Science.gov

Sample records for caga epiya tyrosine

  1. Simple method for determination of the number of Helicobacter pylori CagA variable-region EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs by PCR.

    PubMed

    Argent, Richard H; Zhang, Youli; Atherton, John C

    2005-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains possessing the cag pathogenicity island are associated with the development of gastric cancer. The CagA protein is translocated into epithelial cells and becomes phosphorylated on tyrosine residues within EPIYA motifs, which may be repeated within the variable region of the protein. Strains possessing CagA with greater numbers of these repeats have been more closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis. Phosphorylated CagA leads to epithelial cell elongation, which is dependent on the number of variable-region EPIYA motifs. Thus, determination of the degree of CagA phosphorylation and the number of EPIYA motifs appears to be more important than detection of cagA alone. Determination of the number of EPIYA motifs by nucleotide sequencing, however, is a laborious and expensive process. We describe here a novel and rapid PCR method for determination of the pattern of repeats containing the EPIYA motif. This will aid in the identification of those strains that may be more likely to cause disease.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis, based on EPIYA repeats in the cagA gene of Indian Helicobacter pylori, and the implications of sequence variation in tyrosine phosphorylation motifs on determining the clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Santosh K; Sharma, Vishwas; Sharma, Varun Kumar; Gopi, Manoj; Saikant, R; Nandan, Amrita; Bardia, Avinash; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Katikala, Prasanth; Habeeb, Md Aejaz; Khan, Aleem A; Habibullah, C M

    2011-04-01

    The population of India harbors one of the world's most highly diverse gene pools, owing to the influx of successive waves of immigrants over regular periods in time. Several phylogenetic studies involving mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomal variation have demonstrated Europeans to have been the first settlers in India. Nevertheless, certain controversy exists, due to the support given to the thesis that colonization was by the Austro-Asiatic group, prior to the Europeans. Thus, the aim was to investigate pre-historic colonization of India by anatomically modern humans, using conserved stretches of five amino acid (EPIYA) sequences in the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori. Simultaneously, the existence of a pathogenic relationship of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs), in 32 H. pylori strains isolated from subjects with several forms of gastric diseases, was also explored. High resolution sequence analysis of the above described genes was performed. The nucleotide sequences obtained were translated into amino acids using MEGA (version 4.0) software for EPIYA. An MJ-Network was constructed for obtaining TPM haplotypes by using NETWORK (version 4.5) software. The findings of the study suggest that Indian H. pylori strains share a common ancestry with Europeans. No specific association of haplotypes with the outcome of disease was revealed through additional network analysis of TPMs.

  3. Prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs in Helicobacter pylori among dyspeptic patients in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chomvarin, Chariya; Phusri, Karnchanawadee; Sawadpanich, Kookwan; Mairiang, Pisaln; Namwat, Wises; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Hahnvajanawong, Chariya

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of cagA type in Helicobacter pylori isolated from dyspeptic patients in northeastern Thailand and to determine whether the pattern of cagA EPIYA motifs were associated with clinical outcomes. One hundred and forty-seven H. pylori-infected dyspeptic patients were enrolled, of whom 68 had non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), 57 peptic ulcer disease (PUD), 18 gastric cancer (GCA), and 4 other gastroduodenal diseases. PCR and DNA sequence analysis were used to determine the cagA genotype and the pattern of EPIYA motifs. cagA-positive H. pylori were identified in 138 (94%) of H. pylori-infected dyspeptic patients of whom 75 (54%) were of the Western-type, 44 (32%) the East Asian type and 19 (14%) of the other types. The Western type is significantly found in PUD patients (p = 0.0175). The majority of cagA EPIYA was EPIYA-ABC (43%) and EPIYA-ABD (28%). There is no significant correlation between the increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and clinical outcomes. Thus, the most frequent cagA type found among northeastern Thai dyspeptic patients was the Western cagA type, which is significantly associated with PUD indicating a possible predictive parameter for clinical outcome.

  4. A specific A/T polymorphism in Western tyrosine phosphorylation B-motifs regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA epithelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Traube, Leah; Jindal, Shawn; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Sticht, Heinrich; Backert, Steffen; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA. Database searching revealed strong non-random distribution of the B-motifs (including EPIYA and EPIYT) in Western H. pylori isolates. In silico analysis of Western H. pylori CagA sequences provided evidence that the EPIYT B-TPMs are significantly less associated with gastric cancer than the EPIYA B-TPMs. By generating and using a phosphorylated CagA B-TPM-specific antibody, we demonstrated the phosphorylated state of the CagA B-TPM EPIYT during H. pylori co-culture with host cells. We also showed that within host cells, CagA interaction with phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) was B-TPM tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent, and the recombinant CagA with EPIYT B-TPM had higher affinity to PI3-kinase and enhanced induction of AKT than the isogenic CagA with EPIYA B-TPM. Structural modeling of the CagA B-TPM motif bound to PI3-kinase indicated that the threonine residue at the pY+1 position forms a side-chain hydrogen bond to N-417 of PI3-kinase, which cannot be formed by alanine. During co-culture with AGS cells, an H. pylori strain with a CagA EPIYT B-TPM had significantly attenuated induction of interleukin-8 and hummingbird phenotype, compared to the isogenic strain with B-TPM EPIYA. These results suggest that the A/T polymorphisms could regulate CagA activity through interfering with host signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis, thus influencing cancer risk.

  5. Effect of treatment failure on the CagA EPIYA motif in Helicobacter pylori strains from Colombian subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier Andres; Matta, Andres Jenuer; Pazos, Alvaro Jairo; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate effect of treatment failure on cagA and vacA genotypes in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolates from Colombia. METHODS One hundred and seventy-six participants infected with H. pylori from Colombia were treated during 14 d with the triple-standard therapy. Six weeks later, eradication was evaluated by 13C-Urea breath test. Patients with treatment failure were subjected to endoscopy control; biopsies obtained were used for histopathology and culture. DNA from H. pylori isolates was amplified using primers specific for cagA and vacA genes. The phylogenetic relationships among isolates obtained before and after treatment were established by conglomerate analysis based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting. RESULTS Treatment effectiveness was at 74.6%. Of the participants with treatment failure, 25 accepted subjected to a second endoscopy. Prevalence of post-treatment infection was 64% (16/25) and 40% (10/25) by histology and culture, respectively. Upon comparing the cagA and vacA genotypes found before and after therapy, multiple cagA genotypes (cagA-positive and cagA-negative) were found before treatment; in contrast, cagA-negative genotypes decreased after treatment. vacA s1m1 genotype was highly prevalent in patients before and after therapy. The 3’cagA region was successfully amplified in 95.5% (21/22) of the isolates obtained before and in 81.8% (18/22) of the isolates obtained after treatment. In the isolates obtained from patients with treatment failure, it was found that 72.7% (16/22) presented alterations in the number of EPIYA motifs, compared to isolates found before treatment. CONCLUSION Unsuccessful treatment limits colonization by low-virulence strains resulting in partial and selective eradication in mixed infections, and acts on the cagA-positive strains inducing genetic rearrangements in cagA variable region that produces a loss or gain of EPIYA repetitions. PMID:28373764

  6. Different distribution of Helicobacter pylori EPIYA- cagA motifs and dupA genes in the upper gastrointestinal diseases and correlation with clinical outcomes in iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Haddadi, Mohammad Hossein; Bazargani, Abdollah; Khashei, Reza; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Moini, Maryam; Rokni Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to determine the EPIYA-cagA Phosphorylation sites and dupA gene in H. pylori isolates among patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases. Background: Pathogenicity of the cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is associated with EPIYA motifs and higher number of EPIYA-C segments is a risk factor of gastric cancer, while duodenal ulcer-promoting gene (dupA) is determined as a protective factor against gastric cancer. Patients and methods: A total of 280 non-repeated gastric biopsies obtained from patients undergoing endoscopy from January 2013 till July 2013. Samples were cultured on selective horse blood agar and incubated in microaerophilic atmosphere. The isolated organisms were identified as H. pylori by Gram staining and positive oxidase, catalase, and urease tests. Various motif types of cagA and the prevalence of dupA were determined by PCR method. Results: Out of 280 specimens, 128 (54.7%) isolated organisms were identified as H. pylori. Of 120 H. pylori isolates, 35.9% were dupA positive and 56.26% were cagA positive, while cagA with ABC and ABCC motifs were 55.5% and 44.5%, respectively. Fifty six percent of the isolates with the ABCC motif have had dupA genes. We also found a significant association between strains with genotypes of dupA-ABC and duodenal ulcer disease (p = 0.007). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori in Shiraz was as high as in western countries and higher numbers of EPIYA-C segments were seen in gastric cancer patients. We may also use dupA as a prognostic and pathogenic marker for duodenal ulcer disease and cagA with the segment C for gastric cancer and gastric ulcer disease in this region. PMID:26171136

  7. Helicobacter pylori VacA, acting through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α, is crucial for CagA phosphorylation in human duodenum carcinoma cell line AZ-521

    PubMed Central

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Yamasaki, Eiki; Kurazono, Hisao; Akada, Junko; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Niidome, Takuro; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Taro; Moss, Joel; Isomoto, Hajime; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, produces vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which seem to be involved in virulence. VacA exhibits pleiotropic actions in gastroduodenal disorders via its specific receptors. Recently, we found that VacA induced the phosphorylation of cellular Src kinase (Src) at Tyr418 in AZ-521 cells. Silencing of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)α, a VacA receptor, reduced VacA-induced Src phosphorylation. Src is responsible for tyrosine phosphorylation of CagA at its Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) variant C (EPIYA-C) motif in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells, resulting in binding of CagA to SHP-2 phosphatase. Challenging AZ-521 cells with wild-type H. pylori induced phosphorylation of CagA, but this did not occur when challenged with a vacA gene-disrupted mutant strain. CagA phosphorylation was observed in cells infected with a vacA gene-disrupted mutant strain after addition of purified VacA, suggesting that VacA is required for H. pylori-induced CagA phosphorylation. Following siRNA-mediated RPTPα knockdown in AZ-521 cells, infection with wild-type H. pylori and treatment with VacA did not induce CagA phosphorylation. Taken together, these results support our conclusion that VacA mediates CagA phosphorylation through RPTPα in AZ-521 cells. These data indicate the possibility that Src phosphorylation induced by VacA is mediated through RPTPα, resulting in activation of Src, leading to CagA phosphorylation at Tyr972 in AZ-521 cells. PMID:27935824

  8. Five-year monitoring of considerable changes in tyrosine phosphorylation motifs of the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene in Iran.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Mohammad; Ghorbani-Dalini, Sadegh; Doosti, Abbas; Najafi, Akram

    2014-08-01

    CagA is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori involved in host cell modulation. The C-terminal part of CagA containing the EPIYA motifs is highly variable and is important for the biological activity of the protein. The aim of this study was consideration of the changes in cagA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) of H. pylori. A set of 302 H. pylori DNA samples from the Iranian population from 2006 to 2011 was selected for the proposed study. The cagA gene and its TPMs were assessed by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and specific primers. The prevalence of the cagA gene in our study ranged from 91.43% to 97.06% (with an average of 95.03%). Out of the cagA-positive samples, the prevalence of TPMs A and B increased from 12.5% and 23.44% to 71.2% and 63.63%, respectively. Also, the prevalence of samples infected with Western and East Asian types of H. pylori ranged from 64.06% to 5.73% for the Western type and 17.19% to 51.59% for the East Asian type. Overall, our results showed a high prevalence of the cagA gene. Also, it seems that cagA TPMs of H. pylori is undergoing a change from the Western type to the East Asian type in Iran.

  9. CagA and VacA Polymorphisms Do Not Correlate with Severity of Histopathological Lesions in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Greek Children▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Panayotopoulou, Effrosini G.; Papadakos, Konstantinos; Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Roumbani, Aikaterini; Panayiotou, Joanna; vanVliet-Constantinidou, Cathy; Mentis, Andreas F.; Roma-Giannikou, Eleftheria

    2009-01-01

    The presence of various numbers of EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs in the CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to contribute to pathogenesis in adults. In this prospective study, we characterized H. pylori isolates from symptomatic children, with reference to the diversity of functional EPIYA motifs in the CagA protein and vacA isotypes, and assessed the potential correlation with the histopathological manifestations of the infection. We analyzed 105 H. pylori isolates from 98 children and determined the diversity of EPIYA motifs in CagA by amplification and sequencing of the 3′ variable region of the cagA gene as well as vacA isotypes for the signal, middle, and intermediate regions. CagA phosphorylation and levels of secreted IL-8 were determined following in vitro infection of AGS gastric epithelial cells. Histopathological evaluation of H. pylori colonization, activity, and severity of the associated gastritis was performed according to the updated Sydney criteria. EPIYA A (GLKN[ST]EPIYAKVNKKK), EPIYA B (Q[V/A]ASPEPIY[A/T]QVAKKVNAKI), and EPIYA C (RS[V/A]SPEPIYATIDDLG) motifs were detected in the ABC (46.6%) and ABCC (17.1%) combinations. No isolates harboring more than two EPIYA C motifs in CagA were found. The presence of isogenic strains with variable numbers of CagA EPIYA C motifs within the same patient was detected in seven cases. Occurrence of increasing numbers of EPIYA C motifs correlated strongly with presence of a high-vacuolation (s1 or s2/i1/m1) phenotype and age. A weak positive correlation was observed between vacuolating vacA genotypes and presence of nodular gastritis. However, CagA- and VacA-dependent pathogenicities were not found to contribute to severity of histopathology manifestations in H. pylori-infected children. PMID:19535517

  10. Activation of Helicobacter pylori CagA by tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for dephosphorylation of host cell proteins in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Püls, Jurgen; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2002-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori type I strains harbour the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI), a 37 kb sequence,which encodes the components of a type IV secretion system. CagA, the first identified effector protein of the cag-PAI, is translocated into eukaryotic cells and tyrosine phosphorylated (CagAP-tyr) by a host cell tyrosine kinase. Translocation of CagA induces the dephosphorylation of a set of phosphorylated host cell proteins of unknown identity. CagA proteins of independent H. pylori strains vary in sequence and thus in the number and composition of putative tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs). The CagA protein of H. pylori strain J99 (CagAJ99) does not carry any of three putative tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPM-A, TPM-B or TPM-C) predicted by the MOTIF algorithm in CagA proteins. CagA,n is not tyrosine phosphorylated and is inactive in the dephosphorylation of host cell proteins. By site-specific mutagenesis,we introduced a TPM-C into CagA,. by replacing a single lysine with a tyrosine. This slight modification resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of CagAJ99 and host cell protein dephosphorylation. In contrast, the removal of the indigenous TPM-C from CagAP12 did not abolish its tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that further phosphorylated sites are present in CagAP12. By generation of hybrid CagA proteins, a phosphorylation of the most N-terminal TPM-A could be excluded. Our data suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation at TPM-C is sufficient, but not exclusive,to activate translocated CagA. Activated CagAPtr might either convert into a phosphatase itself or activate a cellular phosphatase to dephosphorylate cellular phosphoproteins and modulate cellular signalling cascades of the host.

  11. Computational approaches for evaluating the effect of sequence variations and the intrinsically disordered C-terminal region of the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein on the interaction with tyrosine kinase Src.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Paula; Peñaranda, Natalia; Zamora, María Antonia; del Pilar Delgado, María; Bohorquez, Eliana; Castro, Harold; Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    The Helicobacter pylori CagA protein was the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified as important in the development of human malignancies such as gastric cancer. It is not clear how it is able to deregulate a set of cell control mechanisms to induce carcinogenesis following translocation into human gastric epithelial cells. It is likely, however, that structural variations in the CagA sequence alter its affinity with the host proteins inducing differences in the pathogenicity of different H. pylori strains. Using the recently elucidated N-terminal 3D structure of H. pylori CagA, information on the full cagA gene sequence, and intrinsically disordered protein structure predictions methods we evaluated the interaction of different CagA variants with the kinase Src. An automated docking followed by molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore CagA interaction modes with Src, one of its cellular partners. The computational approach let us establish that even in the presence of the same number and type of EPIYA motifs, CagA protein can reveal different spatial distributions. Based on the lowest affinity energy and higher number of interactions it was established that the principal forces governing the CagA-Src interaction are electrostatic. Results showed that EPIYA-D models presents higher affinity with some host proteins than EPIYA-C. Thus, we highlight the importance and advantage of the use of computational tools in combining chemical and biological data with bioinformatics for modeling and prediction purposes in some cases where experimental techniques present limitations.

  12. Differences in Helicobacter pylori CagA tyrosine phosphorylation motif patterns between western and East Asian strains, and influences on interleukin-8 secretion.

    PubMed

    Argent, Richard H; Hale, James L; El-Omar, Emad M; Atherton, John C

    2008-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains from East Asia have an 'East Asian' type of CagA that is more active and predominantly comprises a single type. Strains from other countries have a 'western' type of CagA, which is less active and comprises many different types generated by intragenomic recombination. Co-culture of AGS gastric epithelial cells with isolates of western strains that displayed microevolution in CagA showed that isolates with additional copies of the C motif induced significantly more interleukin (IL)-8 secretion. Co-culture of AGS cells with western and East Asian strains, each expressing CagA with a single copy of the C or D motif, showed that East Asian strains induced significantly more IL-8 secretion. Analysis of the different CagA types from data deposited in GenBank and from the literature showed that western CagA is significantly more likely to undergo duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation motif C than East Asian CagA is of the corresponding D motif. Taken together, the data suggest that the already highly active East Asian CagA with one D motif has no requirement to increase its virulence, whereas the less active western CagA displays flexibility in its capacity to increase its number of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs to become more virulent.

  13. Type IV Secretion and Signal Transduction of Helicobacter pylori CagA through Interactions with Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Backert, Steffen; Tegtmeyer, Nicole

    2017-03-24

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful human bacterium, which is exceptionally equipped to persistently inhabit the human stomach. Colonization by this pathogen is associated with gastric disorders ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to cancer. Highly virulent H. pylori strains express the well-established adhesins BabA/B, SabA, AlpA/B, OipA, and HopQ, and a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The adhesins ascertain intimate bacterial contact to gastric epithelial cells, while the T4SS represents an extracellular pilus-like structure for the translocation of the effector protein CagA. Numerous T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY, and CagA have been shown to target the integrin-β₁ receptor followed by translocation of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine and CagA-containing outer membrane vesicles may also play a role in the delivery process. Translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation in C-terminal EPIYA-repeat motifs by oncogenic Src and Abl kinases. CagA then interacts with an array of host signaling proteins followed by their activation or inactivation in phosphorylation-dependent and phosphorylation-independent fashions. We now count about 25 host cell binding partners of intracellular CagA, which represent the highest quantity of all currently known virulence-associated effector proteins in the microbial world. Here we review the research progress in characterizing interactions of CagA with multiple host cell receptors in the gastric epithelium, including integrin-β₁, EGFR, c-Met, CD44, E-cadherin, and gp130. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization, signal transduction, and gastric pathogenesis is discussed.

  14. Helicobacter pylori CagA induced interleukin-8 secretion in gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Zeinab; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Azimirad, Masoumeh; Yadegar, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Since, contradictory data have been reported about the effect of diverse variants of H. pylori virulence factors on IL-8 induction, we aimed to analyze the effect of this diversity on levels of IL-8 secretion in AGS cell line. Background: Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and induces the activation of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, in the gastric mucosa. This induction promotes neutrophil and monocyte recruitment that causes gastric tissue damage. Methods: To determine whether different strains of H. pylori and their CagA variants have possible roles on IL-8 induction, polarized AGS cell line was infected with CagA+ H. pylori strains carrying different EPIYA motifs (ABCCC and ABC) and CagA- strain for 24 hours. Difference in stimulation of IL-8 was measured by ELISA. Results: IL-8 secretion was elevated in the treated cells with CagA encoding strains compared with the negative one. Furthermore, a noticeably increased level of IL-8 induction was measured by the CagA-EPIYA type ABCCC encoding strain in compare to that carried EPIYA type ABC Conclusion: Results of this study provide new evidence about different effects of H. pylori strains and possible roles of their CagA variants on IL-8 induction. It seems that not only carriage of cagA and its expression, but also diversity in EPIYA motif be involved in IL-8 induction in the gastric epithelial cells. PMID:28224027

  15. In vitro effect of amoxicillin and clarithromycin on the 3’ region of cagA gene in Helicobacter pylori isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier Andrés; Matta, Andrés Januer; Pazos, Alvaro; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the in vitro effect of amoxicillin and clarithromycin on the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI). METHODS: One hundred and forty-nine clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) cultured from gastric biopsies from 206 Colombian patients with dyspeptic symptoms from a high-risk area for gastric cancer were included as study material. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the agar dilution method. Resistant isolates at baseline and in amoxicillin and clarithromycin serial dilutions were subjected to genotyping (cagA, vacA alleles s and m), Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) polymerase chain reaction and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Images of the RAPD amplicons were analyzed by Gel-Pro Analyzer 4.5 program. Cluster analyses was done using SPSS 15.0 statistical package, where each of the fingerprint bands were denoted as variables. Dendrograms were designed by following Ward’s clustering method and the estimation of distances between each pair of H. pylori isolates was calculated with the squared Euclidean distance. RESULTS: Resistance rates were 4% for amoxicillin and 2.7% for clarithromycin with 2% double resistances. Genotyping evidenced a high prevalence of the genotype cagA-positive/vacA s1m1. The 3’ region of cagA gene was successfully amplified in 92.3% (12/13) of the baseline resistant isolates and in 60% (36/60) of the resistant isolates growing in antibiotic dilutions. Upon observing the distribution of the number of EPIYA repetitions in each dilution with respect to baseline isolates, it was found that in 61.5% (8/13) of the baseline isolates, a change in the number of EPIYA repetitions lowered antibiotic pressure. The gain and loss of EPIYA motifs resulted in a diversity of H. pylori subclones after bacterial adjustment to changing conditions product of antibiotic pressure. RAPD PCR evidenced the close clonal relationship between baseline isolates and isolates growing in antibiotic dilutions. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic

  16. Effector prediction in host-pathogen interaction based on a Markov model of a ubiquitous EPIYA motif

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effector secretion is a common strategy of pathogen in mediating host-pathogen interaction. Eight EPIYA-motif containing effectors have recently been discovered in six pathogens. Once these effectors enter host cells through type III/IV secretion systems (T3SS/T4SS), tyrosine in the EPIYA motif is phosphorylated, which triggers effectors binding other proteins to manipulate host-cell functions. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the distribution pattern of EPIYA motif in broad biological species, to predict potential effectors with EPIYA motif, and to suggest roles and biological functions of potential effectors in host-pathogen interactions. Results A hidden Markov model (HMM) of five amino acids was built for the EPIYA-motif based on the eight known effectors. Using this HMM to search the non-redundant protein database containing 9,216,047 sequences, we obtained 107,231 sequences with at least one EPIYA motif occurrence and 3115 sequences with multiple repeats of the EPIYA motif. Although the EPIYA motif exists among broad species, it is significantly over-represented in some particular groups of species. For those proteins containing at least four copies of EPIYA motif, most of them are from intracellular bacteria, extracellular bacteria with T3SS or T4SS or intracellular protozoan parasites. By combining the EPIYA motif and the adjacent SH2 binding motifs (KK, R4, Tarp and Tir), we built HMMs of nine amino acids and predicted many potential effectors in bacteria and protista by the HMMs. Some potential effectors for pathogens (such as Lawsonia intracellularis, Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania major) are suggested. Conclusions Our study indicates that the EPIYA motif may be a ubiquitous functional site for effectors that play an important pathogenicity role in mediating host-pathogen interactions. We suggest that some intracellular protozoan parasites could secrete EPIYA-motif containing effectors through secretion systems similar to the

  17. Study of the oipA genetic diversity and EPIYA motif patterns in cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strains from Venezuelan patients with chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Keila; Valderrama, Elvis; Sayegh, Marjorie; Ramírez, José Luis; Chiurillo, Miguel Angel

    2014-11-01

    CagA and OipA are involved, among other virulence factors, in the ability of Helicobacter pylori to colonize the gastric mucosa and to modulate the host environment during the establishment of chronic infection. The number and type of EPIYA phosphorylation motifs and the presence and functional status of oipA have been involved in the induction of cellular transformations playing an important role in the development of H. pylori associated gastric diseases. This work determined the prevalence of the oipA virulence factor and EPIYA motif patterns in cagA-positive H. pylori gastric biopsies from chronic gastritis patients from the Central-Western region of Venezuela. DNA was extracted directly from gastric biopsies collected by upper endoscopy from 113 patients. The EPIYA motif genotyping and oipA gene functional status was determined by PCR and sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis with the 3' variable region of cagA sequences was performed. Only Western-type EPIYA variants were detected: ABC (68.14%), ABCC (29.20%) and ABCCC (2.66%). High prevalence of strains with the oipA gene (93.8%) and its functional status "ON" (83%) was observed. No significant association between EPIYA motif patterns or oipA functional status with the histological changes in the gastric mucosa was found. Our study demonstrated the absolute predominance of the Western-type cagA gene in a Venezuelan admixed population. This is the first report showing oipA status of H. pylori strains in Venezuela. Further studies with a larger number of samples and including other pathologies are necessary to continue evaluating the role of the H. pylori virulence factors in the prevalence of gastric diseases in our country.

  18. Infection with CagA-Positive Helicobacter Pylori Strain Containing Three EPIYA C Phosphorylation Sites is Associated with More Severe Gastric Lesions in Experimentally Infected Mongolian Gerbils (Meriones Unguiculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Junior, M. Ferreira; Batista, S.A.; Vidigal, P.V.T; Cordeiro, A.A.C.; Oliveira, F.M.S.; Prata, L.O.; Diniz, A.E.T.; Barral, C.M.; Barbuto, R.C.; Comes, A.D.; Araujo, I.D.; Queiroz, D.M.M.; Caliari, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains containing high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites in the CagA is associated with significant gastritis and increased risk of developing pre-malignant gastric lesions and gastric carcinoma. However, these findings have not been reproduced in animal models yet. Therefore, we investigated the effect on the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains exhibiting one or three EPIYA-C phosphorilation sites. Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with H. pylori clonal isolates containing one or three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. Control group was composed by uninfected animals challenged with Brucella broth alone. Gastric fragments were evaluated by the modified Sydney System and digital morphometry. Clonal relatedness between the isolates was considered by the identical RAPD-PCR profiles and sequencing of five housekeeping genes, vacA i/d region and of oipA. The other virulence markers were present in both isolates (vacA s1i1d1m1, iceA2, and intact dupA). CagA of both isolates was translocated and phosphorylated in AGS cells. After 45 days of infection, there was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells and in the area of the lamina propria in the infected animals, notably in those infected by the CagA-positive strain with three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. After six months of infection, a high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites was associated with progressive increase in the intensity of gastritis and in the area of the lamina propria. Atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia were also observed more frequently in animals infected with the CagA-positive isolate with three EPIYA-C sites. We conclude that infection with H. pylori strain carrying a high number of CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in an animal model of H. pylori infection. PMID:26150158

  19. Translocation of Helicobacter pylori CagA into Gastric Epithelial Cells by Type IV Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbreit, Stefan; Püls, Jürgen; Sedlmaier, Bettina; Gerland, Elke; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2000-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. Strains producing the CagA antigen (cagA+) induce strong gastric inflammation and are strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. We show here that such strains translocate the bacterial protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system, encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. CagA is tyrosine-phosphorylated and induces changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation state of distinct cellular proteins. Modulation of host cells by bacterial protein translocation adds a new dimension to the chronic Helicobacter infection with yet unknown consequences.

  20. Fragmentation of CagA Reduces Hummingbird Phenotype Induction by Helicobactor pylori.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chi; Kuo, Wein-Shung; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Perng, Chin-Lin; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been linked to various gastro-intestinal diseases; nevertheless it remains to be clarified why only a minority of infected individuals develop illness. Studies from the West have indicated that the cagA gene and the associated EPIYA genotype of H. pylori is closely linked to the development of severe gastritis and gastric carcinoma; however, as yet no consistent correlation has been found among the bacteria from East Asia. In addition to genotype variation, the CagA protein undergoes fragmentation; however, the functional significance of fragmentation with respect to H. pylori infection remains unknown. In this study, we isolated 594 H. pylori colonies from 99 patients and examined the fragmentation patterns of CagA protein using immunoblotting. By analyzing the ability of the isolates to induce the host cell morphological transition to the highly invasive hummingbird phenotype, we demonstrated that H. pylori colonies with substantial CagA fragmentation are less potent in terms of causing this morphological transition. Our results uncovered a functional role for CagA fragmentation with respect to H. pylori-induced hummingbird phenotype formation and these findings suggest the possibility that the post-translational processing of CagA may be involved in H. pylori infection pathogenesis.

  1. Identification of cagA tyrosine phosphorylation DNA motifs in Helicobacter pylori isolates from peptic ulcer patients by novel PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and real-time fluorescence PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Owen, Robert J; Sharp, Sally I; Chisholm, Stephanie A; Rijpkema, Sjoerd

    2003-07-01

    Cag pathogenicity island-containing Helicobacter pylori (type I) induces signal transduction pathways resulting in tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins adjacent to the site of bacterial adhesion on host gastric epithelial cells. Conventional block PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and real-time LightCycler (LC) PCR hybridization assays, validated by direct sequencing, were designed to test for the presence of three nucleotide sequences corresponding to tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) A, B, and C in 84 isolates of H. pylori type I from patients in England. Overall, the PCR assays demonstrated that one or more TPMs were present in 62 strains (75%). Motif A was common (71% of strains), whereas motifs B and C were rarer (8% of strains). Strains lacking a TPM were typically vacuolating cytotoxin genotype vacA m2. Motif A was widely distributed in relation to disease severity and was more commonly (but not significantly [P = 0.071]) associated with gastric ulcer than with duodenal ulcer (86 versus 56%). The LC hybridization assay provided a rapid means of detecting all three motifs, but RFLP analysis was more specific for TPM-A. TPMs provide novel additional strain markers for defining cagA variation, including identification of RFLP types within TPM-A. The presence of a particular TPM was not of direct diagnostic value, either singly or in combination, but the higher proportion of TPM-A strains in gastric ulcer patients merits further investigation.

  2. Attenuation of Helicobacter pylori CagA x SHP-2 signaling by interaction between CagA and C-terminal Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Ryouhei; Higashi, Hideaki; Higuchi, Megumi; Okada, Masato; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2003-02-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a causative agent of gastric diseases ranging from gastritis to cancer. The CagA protein is the product of the cagA gene carried among virulent H. pylori strains and is associated with severe disease outcomes, most notably gastric carcinoma. CagA is injected from the attached H. pylori into gastric epithelial cells and undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation. The phosphorylated CagA binds and activates SHP-2 phosphatase and thereby induces a growth factor-like morphological change termed the "hummingbird phenotype." In this work, we demonstrate that CagA is also capable of interacting with C-terminal Src kinase (Csk). As is the case with SHP-2, Csk selectively binds tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA via its SH2 domain. Upon complex formation, CagA stimulates Csk, which in turn inactivates the Src family of protein-tyrosine kinases. Because Src family kinases are responsible for CagA phosphorylation, an essential prerequisite of CagA.SHP-2 complex formation and subsequent induction of the hummingbird phenotype, our results indicate that CagA-Csk interaction down-regulates CagA.SHP-2 signaling by both competitively inhibiting CagA.SHP-2 complex formation and reducing levels of CagA phosphorylation. We further demonstrate that CagA.SHP-2 signaling eventually induces apoptosis in AGS cells. Our results thus indicate that CagA-Csk interaction prevents excess cell damage caused by deregulated activation of SHP-2. Attenuation of CagA activity by Csk may enable cagA-positive H. pylori to persistently infect the human stomach for decades while avoiding excess CagA toxicity to the host.

  3. Novel effects of Helicobacter pylori CagA on key genes of gastric cancer signal transduction: a comparative transfection study.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Farzam; Peerayeh, Shahin N; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Maghsoudi, Nader; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Siadat, Seyed D; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is now recognized as a worldwide problem. Helicobacter pylori CagA is the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified in relation to human cancer. Helicobacter pylori CagA is noted for structural diversity in its C-terminal region (contains EPIYA motifs), with which CagA interacts with numerous host cell proteins. Deregulation of host signaling by translocated bacterial proteins provides a new aspect of microbial-host cell interaction. The aim of this study is to compare the cellular effects of two different CagA EPIYA motifs on identified signaling pathways involve in gastric carcinogenesis. To investigate the effects of CagA protein carboxyl region variations on the transcription of genes involved in gastric epithelial carcinogenesis pathways, the eukaryotic vector carrying the cagA gene (ABC and ABCCC types) was transfected into gastric cancer cell line. The 42 identified key genes of signal transduction involved in gastric cancer were analyzed at the transcription level by real-time PCR. The results of real-time PCR provide us important clue that the ABCCC oncoprotein variant can change the fate of the cell completely different from ABC type. In fact, these result proposed that the ABCCC type can induce the intestinal metaplasia, IL-8, perturbation of Crk adaptor proteins, anti-apoptotic effect and carcinogenic effect more significantly than ABC type. These data support our hypothesis of a complex interaction of host cell and these two different H. pylori effector variants that determines host cellular fate.

  4. Helicobacter pylori CagA: analysis of sequence diversity in relation to phosphorylation motifs and implications for the role of CagA as a virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Evans, D J; Evans, D G

    2001-09-01

    CagA is transported into host target cells and subsequently phosphorylated. Clearly this is a mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori could take control of one or more host cell signal transduction pathways. Presumably the end result of this interaction favors survival of H. pylori, irrespective of eventual damage to the host cell. CagA is noted for its amino acid (AA) sequence diversity, both within and outside the variable region of the molecule. The primary purpose of this review is to examine how variation in the type and number of CagA phosphorylation sites might determine the outcome of infection by different strains of H. pylori. The answer to this question could help to explain the widely disparate results obtained when H. pylori CagA status has been compared to type and severity of disease outcome in different populations, that is in different countries. Analysis of all available CagA sequences revealed that CagA contains both tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) and cyclic-AMP-dependent phosphorylation motifs (CPMs). There are two potential CPMs near the N-terminus of CagA and at least two in the repeat region; these are not all equally well conserved. We also defined a 48-residue AA sequence, which includes the N-terminal TPM at tyrosine (Y)-122, which distinguishes between Eastern (Hong Kong-Taiwan-Japan-Thailand) H. pylori isolates and those from the West (Europe-Africa-the Americas-Australia). All 28 of the Eastern type CagA proteins have a functional N-terminal TPM whereas 11 of 47 (23.4%) of the Western type contain an inactive motif, with threonine (T) replacing the critical aspartic acid (D) residue. Only 13 of 24 (54%) known CagA sequences have an active TPM in the repeat region and only one has two TPMs in this region. The potential TPM near the C-terminus of CagA is not likely to be important since only 3 of 24 (12.5%) sequences were found to be intact. Protein database searches revealed that the AA sequence immediately following the TPM at Y

  5. Analysis of the intactness of Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island in Iranian strains by a new PCR-based strategy and its relationship with virulence genotypes and EPIYA motifs.

    PubMed

    Yadegar, Abbas; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Variants of the Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) and certain virulence genotypes have been proposed to be associated with different gastric disorders. In the present study, we designed a new PCR-based strategy to investigate the intactness of cagPAI in Iranian patients using highly specific primer sets spanning the cagPAI region. The possible relationship between the cagPAI status of the strains and clinical outcomes was also determined. We also characterized virulence genotypes (cagL, cagA, vacA, babA2 and sabA) and variants of CagA EPIYA motifs in these strains. H. pylori was detected in 61 out of 126 patients with various gastroduodenal diseases. The cagL, cagA, vacA s1m1, vacA s1m2, vacA s2m2, babA2, and sabA genotypes were detected in 96.7%, 85.2%, 29.5%, 45.9%, 24.6%, 96.7%, and 83.6% of the strains, respectively. Among the 52 cagA-positive strains, EPIYA motifs ABC, ABCC, ABCCC, and mixed types were orderly detected in the 39, 7, 1, and 5 strains. The cagPAI positivity included both intact and partially deleted, with the overall frequencies of 70.5% and 26.2%, respectively. The majority of the strains from patients with PUD (87.5%), gastric erosion (83.3%) and cancer (80%) presented an intact cagPAI, while a lower frequency of cagPAI intactness was detected in gastritis patients (61.1%). However, no significant relationship was found between the possession of intact cagPAI and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we found that cagA and vacA s1m1 genotypes were significantly correlated with intact cagPAI (P=0.015 and P=0.012). A significant correlation was also found between EPIYA-ABC and intact cagPAI (P=0.010). The proposed PCR-based scheme was found to be useful for determining the intactness of cagPAI. Our findings also indicate that the cagPAI appears to be intact and rather conserved in majority of Iranian strains. Finally, our study proposed that H. pylori strains with partially deleted cagPAI were less likely to cause severe diseases

  6. Phosphorylation of Helicobacter pylori CagA by c-Abl leads to cell motility.

    PubMed

    Poppe, M; Feller, S M; Römer, G; Wessler, S

    2007-05-24

    Helicobacter pylori induces a strong motogenic response in infected gastric epithelial host cells, which is enhanced by translocation of the pathogenic factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) into host cells via a specialized type IV secretion system. Once injected into the cytosol CagA is rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated by Src family kinases followed by Src inactivation. Hence, it remained unknown why CagA is constantly phosphorylated in sustained H. pylori infections to induce cell migration, whereas other substrates of Src kinases are dephosphorylated. Here, we identify the non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl as a crucial mediator of H. pylori-induced migration and novel CagA kinase in epithelial cells. Upon H. pylori infection c-Abl directly interacts with CagA and localizes in focal adhesion complexes and membrane ruffles, which are highly dynamic cytoskeletal structures necessary for cell motility. Selective inhibition of c-Abl kinase activity by STI571 or shRNA abrogates sustained CagA phosphorylation and epithelial cell migration, indicating a pivotal role of c-Abl in H. pylori infection and pathogenicity. These results implicate c-Abl as a novel molecular target for therapeutic intervention in H. pylori-related gastric diseases.

  7. Regulation of Helicobacter pylori cagA expression in response to salt.

    PubMed

    Loh, John T; Torres, Victor J; Cover, Timothy L

    2007-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection and a high dietary salt intake are risk factors for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high salt concentrations might alter gene expression in H. pylori. Transcriptional profiling experiments indicated that the expression of multiple H. pylori genes, including cagA, was regulated in response to the concentrations of sodium chloride present in the bacterial culture medium. Increased expression of cagA in response to high salt conditions was confirmed by the use of transcriptional reporter strains and by immunoblotting. H. pylori CagA is translocated into gastric epithelial cells via a type IV secretion pathway, and on entry into target cells, CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation and causes multiple cellular alterations. Coculture of gastric epithelial cells with H. pylori grown under high salt conditions resulted in increased tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA and increased secretion of interleukin-8 by the epithelial cells compared with coculture of the cells with H. pylori grown under low salt conditions. Up-regulation of H. pylori cagA expression in response to high salt concentrations may be a factor that contributes to the development of gastric adenocarcinoma.

  8. Novel CagA ELISA exhibits enhanced sensitivity of Helicobacter pylori CagA antibody

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yuichi; Kido, Yasutoshi; Akada, Junko; Shiota, Seiji; Binh, Tran Thanh; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Dung, Ho D Q; Tung, Pham Huu; Tri, Tran Dinh; Thuan, Ngo P Minh; Tam, Le Quang; Nam, Bui Chi; Khien, Vu Van; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    AIM To develop a novel Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suitable for detecting serum anti-CagA antibodies with high sensitivity. METHODS Recombinant East Asian-type CagA protein was purified and immobilized for ELISA. Serum samples from 217 Vietnamese individuals (110 H. pylori-infected and 107 uninfected individuals) were applied. Conventional ELISA from Western-type CagA and our East Asian-type CagA ELISA were evaluated by comparing 38 subjects with the Western-type genotype and 72 subjects with the East Asian-type cagA genotype. Histological scores of the gastric mucosa were determined using the updated Sydney System to examine the relationship with anti-CagA antibody titers. RESULTS Recombinant 70-100 kDa fragments were immobilized on the ELISA plate. In ROC analysis, the area under the curve of our East Asian-type CagA ELISA was comparable to that of conventional CagA ELISA. The sensitivity of the two ELISAs differed depending on the cagA genotype. The sensitivity of East Asian-type CagA ELISA was higher for subjects infected with East Asian-type cagA H. pylori (P < 0.001), and the sensitivity of the conventional CagA ELISA tended to be higher for subjects infected with Western cagA H. pylori (P = 0.056). The titer of anti-CagA antibody tended to correlate with monocyte infiltration scores (r = 0.25, P = 0.058) and was inversely correlated with H. pylori density (r = -0.26, P = 0.043). CONCLUSION The novel ELISA is useful to detect anti-CagA antibodies in East Asian countries, and the titer may be a marker for predicting chronic gastritis. PMID:28104980

  9. Helicobacter pylori cagA Promoter Region Sequences Influence CagA Expression and Interleukin 8 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Wen, Xiaogang; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-02-15

    Heterogeneity at the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene promoter region has been linked to variation in CagA expression and gastric histopathology. Here, we characterized the cagA promoter and expression in 46 H. pylori strains from Portugal. Our results confirm the relationship between cagA promoter region variation and protein expression originally observed in strains from Colombia. We observed that individuals with intestinal metaplasia were all infected with H. pylori strains containing a specific cagA motif. Additionally, we provided novel functional evidence that strain-specific sequences in the cagA promoter region and CagA expression levels influence interleukin 8 secretion by the host gastric epithelial cells.

  10. Risk for gastric cancer in people with CagA positive or CagA negative Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed Central

    Parsonnet, J; Friedman, G D; Orentreich, N; Vogelman, H

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: It is not known why some people with Helicobacter pylori infection develop gastric cancer whereas others do not. Whether the CagA phenotype of H pylori infection affected risk for cancer independently of other posited risk factors was evaluated. SUBJECTS: 242 persons who participated in a previous nested case-control study of gastric cancer. 179 (90 cases and 89 controls) were infected with H pylori as determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum and 63 (13 cases and 50 controls) were uninfected. METHODS: Serum samples from cases and controls, obtained a mean of 14.2 years before diagnosis of cancer in the cases, were tested by ELISA for IgG antibodies against the CagA gene product of H pylori. They had previously been tested for pepsinogen I. Using logistic regression analysis, risk for cancer was compared among infected persons with CagA antibodies, infected persons without CagA antibodies, and uninfected persons. RESULTS: Subjects infected with H pylori who had CagA antibodies were 5.8-fold more likely than uninfected subjects to develop gastric cancer (95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 2.6-13.0). This was true for both intestinal (odds ratio (OR) 5.1, 95% CI = 2.1-12.2) and diffuse type (OR 10.1, 95% CI = 2.2-47.4) cancers. By contrast, H pylori infected subjects without CagA antibodies were only slightly, and not significantly, at increased risk for cancer (OR 2.2, 95% CI = 0.9-5.4) and any possible association was restricted to diffuse type carcinoma (OR 9.0, 95% CI = 1.2-65.8). Pepsinogen 1 < 50 ng/ml significantly increased risk for both cancer types in H pylori infected persons and lessened the magnitude of association between CagA and cancer. Educational attainment, cigarette smoking, and ABO blood group were not associated with malignancy. CONCLUSIONS: When compared with uninfected subjects, persons infected with CagA positive H pylori are at considerably increased risk of gastric cancer. CagA negative H pylori

  11. Helicobacter pylori bab Paralog Distribution and Association with cagA, vacA, and homA/B Genotypes in American and South Korean Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aeryun; Servetas, Stephanie L; Kang, Jieun; Kim, Jinmoon; Jang, Sungil; Cha, Ho Jin; Lee, Wan Jin; Kim, June; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Merrell, D Scott; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori genetic variation is a crucial component of colonization and persistence within the inhospitable niche of the gastric mucosa. As such, numerous H. pylori genes have been shown to vary in terms of presence and genomic location within this pathogen. Among the variable factors, the Bab family of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been shown to differ within subsets of strains. To better understand genetic variation among the bab genes and to determine whether this variation differed among isolates obtained from different geographic locations, we characterized the distribution of the Bab family members in 80 American H. pylori clinical isolates (AH) and 80 South Korean H. pylori clinical isolates (KH). Overall, we identified 23 different bab genotypes (19 in AH and 11 in KH), but only 5 occurred in greater than 5 isolates. Regardless of strain origin, a strain in which locus A and locus B were both occupied by a bab gene was the most common (85%); locus C was only occupied in those isolates that carried bab paralog at locus A and B. While the babA/babB/- genotype predominated in the KH (78.8%), no single genotype could account for greater than 40% in the AH collection. In addition to basic genotyping, we also identified associations between bab genotype and well known virulence factors cagA and vacA. Specifically, significant associations between babA at locus A and the cagA EPIYA-ABD motif (P<0.0001) and the vacA s1/i1/m1 allele (P<0.0001) were identified. Log-linear modeling further revealed a three-way association between bab carried at locus A, vacA, and number of OMPs from the HOM family (P<0.002). En masse this study provides a detailed characterization of the bab genotypes from two distinct populations. Our analysis suggests greater variability in the AH, perhaps due to adaptation to a more diverse host population. Furthermore, when considering the presence or absence of both the bab and homA/B paralogs at their given loci and the vac

  12. Dynamic Expansion and Contraction of cagA Copy Number in Helicobacter pylori Impact Development of Gastric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hanfu; Blum, Faith C.; Bae, Sarang; Choi, Yun Hui; Kim, Aeryun; Hong, Youngmin A.; Kim, Jinmoon; Kim, Ji-Hye; Gunawardhana, Niluka; Jeon, Yeong-Eui; Yoo, Yun-Jung; Merrell, D. Scott

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for development of gastric disease, including gastric cancer. Patients infected with H. pylori strains that express CagA are at even greater risk of gastric carcinoma. Given the importance of CagA, this report describes a new molecular mechanism by which the cagA copy number dynamically expands and contracts in H. pylori. Analysis of strain PMSS1 revealed a heterogeneous population in terms of numbers of cagA copies; strains carried from zero to four copies of cagA that were arranged as direct repeats within the chromosome. Each of the multiple copies of cagA was expressed and encoded functional CagA; strains with more cagA repeats exhibited higher levels of CagA expression and increased levels of delivery and phosphorylation of CagA within host cells. This concomitantly resulted in more virulent phenotypes as measured by cell elongation and interleukin-8 (IL-8) induction. Sequence analysis of the repeat region revealed three cagA homologous areas (CHAs) within the cagA repeats. Of these, CHA-ud flanked each of the cagA copies and is likely important for the dynamic variation of cagA copy numbers. Analysis of a large panel of clinical isolates showed that 7.5% of H. pylori strains isolated in the United States harbored multiple cagA repeats, while none of the tested Korean isolates carried more than one copy of cagA. Finally, H. pylori strains carrying multiple cagA copies were differentially associated with gastric disease. Thus, the dynamic expansion and contraction of cagA copy numbers may serve as a novel mechanism by which H. pylori modulates gastric disease development. PMID:28223454

  13. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  14. Functional association between the Helicobacter pylori virulence factors VacA and CagA.

    PubMed

    Argent, Richard H; Thomas, Rachael J; Letley, Darren P; Rittig, Michael G; Hardie, Kim R; Atherton, John C

    2008-02-01

    The Helicobacter pylori virulence factors CagA and VacA are implicated in the development of gastroduodenal diseases. Most strains possessing CagA also possess the more virulent vacuolating form of VacA. This study assessed the significance of possession of both virulence factors in terms of their effect on gastric epithelial cells, using a set of minimally passaged, isogenic VacA, CagA and CagE mutants in H. pylori strains 60190 and 84-183. The cagA and cagE mutants were found to significantly increase VacA-induced vacuolation of epithelial cells, and the vacA mutants significantly increased CagA-induced cellular elongations, compared with wild-type strains, indicating that CagA reduces vacuolation and VacA reduces hummingbird formation. Although epithelial cells incubated with the wild-type H. pylori strains may display both vacuolation and hummingbird formation, it was found that (i) hummingbird length was significantly reduced in vacuolated cells compared with those without vacuolation; (ii) the number of vacuoles was significantly reduced in vacuolated cells with hummingbird formation compared with those without hummingbirds; and (iii) cells displaying extensive vacuolation did not subsequently form hummingbirds and vice versa. VacA did not affect the phosphorylation of CagA. These data show that VacA and CagA downregulate each other's effects on epithelial cells, potentially allowing H. pylori interaction with cells whilst avoiding excessive cellular damage.

  15. Exosomes as nanocarriers for systemic delivery of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factor CagA

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Asako; Ueda, Koji; Nishiumi, Shin; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Azuma, Takeshi; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    CagA, encoded by cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA), is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gastric pathogen involved in the development of upper gastrointestinal diseases. Infection with cagA-positive H. pylori may also be associated with diseases outside the stomach, although the mechanisms through which H. pylori infection promotes extragastric diseases remain unknown. Here, we report that CagA is present in serum-derived extracellular vesicles, known as exosomes, in patients infected with cagA-positive H. pylori (n = 4). We also found that gastric epithelial cells inducibly expressing CagA secrete exosomes containing CagA. Addition of purified CagA-containing exosomes to gastric epithelial cells induced an elongated cell shape, indicating that the exosomes deliver functional CagA into cells. These findings indicated that exosomes secreted from CagA-expressing gastric epithelial cells may enter into circulation, delivering CagA to distant organs and tissues. Thus, CagA-containing exosomes may be involved in the development of extragastric disorders associated with cagA-positive H. pylori infection. PMID:26739388

  16. CagA antibodies in Japanese children with nodular gastritis or peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Kato, S; Sugiyama, T; Kudo, M; Ohnuma, K; Ozawa, K; Iinuma, K; Asaka, M; Blaser, M J

    2000-01-01

    cagA(+) Helicobacter pylori strains have been linked to more severe gastric inflammation, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer in adults, but there have been few studies of cagA in children. We examined the relationship between H. pylori cagA status and clinical status in Japanese children. Forty H. pylori-positive children were studied: 15 with nodular gastritis, 5 with gastric ulcers, and 20 with duodenal ulcers. H. pylori status was confirmed by biopsy-based tests and serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. As controls, 77 asymptomatic children with sera positive for anti-H. pylori IgG were enrolled. Levels of IgG antibodies to CagA in serum were measured by an antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In 16 patients with successful H. pylori eradication, posttreatment levels of CagA and H. pylori IgG antibodies also were studied. The CagA antibody seropositivities of asymptomatic controls (81.8%) and patients with nodular gastritis, gastric ulcers, and duodenal ulcers (80.0 to 95.0%) were not significantly different. Compared with pretreatment levels of CagA antibodies, posttreatment levels decreased progressively and significantly. We conclude that, as in Japanese adults, a high prevalence of cagA(+) H. pylori strains was found in Japanese children, and that there was no association with nodular gastritis or peptic ulcer disease. In the assessment of eradicative therapies, monitoring of serum anti-CagA antibodies does not appear to offer any direct benefit over monitoring of anti-H. pylori antibodies.

  17. Diversity of the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori strains from patients with gastroduodenal diseases in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Maria Celeste C; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Casingal, Cristine R; Fajardo, Lindsay Sydney N; Juan, Ma Luisa G; De Guzman, Blanquita B; Bondoc, Edgardo M; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Natividad, Filipinas F; Azuma, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori CagA protein is considered a major virulence factor associated with gastric cancer. There are two major types of CagA proteins: the Western and East Asian CagA. The East Asian CagA-positive H. pylori infection is more closely associated with gastric cancer. The prevalence of gastric cancer is quite low in the Philippines, although Philippine populations are considered to originate from an East Asia source. This study investigates the characteristics of the cagA gene and CagA protein in Philippine H. pylori strains and compares them with previously characterized reference strains worldwide. The full-length cagA gene was sequenced from 19 Philippine isolates and phylogenetic relationships between the Philippine and 40 reference strains were analyzed. All Philippine strains examined were cagA positive, and 73.7% (14/19) strains were Western CagA-positive. The phylogenetic tree based on the deduced amino acid sequence of CagA indicated that the Philippine strains were classified into the two major groups of CagA protein: the Western and the East Asian group. These findings suggest that the modern Western influence may have resulted in more Western type H. pylori strains in the Philippines. Therefore, H. pylori-infected Filipinos can be considered to be at a low risk of developing gastric cancer.

  18. Association of Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer in Saudi Patients.

    PubMed

    Saber, Taisir; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Yousef, Amany R; Khalifa, Amany; Al Qurashi, Hesham; Shaqhan, Mohammad; Samaha, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between occurrence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer, and the presence of H. pylori cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG, and to estimate the value of these antibodies in detecting infection by cagA gene-positive H. pylori strains in Saudi patients. The study included 180 patients who were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Taif province and Western region of Saudi Arabia (60 gastric cancer, 60 peptic ulcer, and 60 with non-ulcer dyspepsia). Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained and tested for H. pylori infection by rapid urease test and culture. PCR was performed on the isolated strains and biopsy specimens for detection of the cagA gene. Blood samples were collected and tested for CagA IgG by ELISA. H. pylori infection was detected among 72.8% of patients. The cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG were found in 63.4% and 61.8% of H. pylori-infected patients, respectively. They were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in patients with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer compared with those with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Detection of the CagA IgG was 91.6% sensitive, 89.6% specific, and 90.8% accurate compared with detection of the cagA gene. Its positive and negative predictive values were 93.8% and 86%, respectively. The study showed a significant association between the presence of the cagA gene and gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease, and between anti-CagA IgG and the cagA gene in Saudi patients. However, a further larger study is required to confirm this finding.

  19. Geographic differences and the role of cagA gene in gastroduodenal diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Valmaseda Pérez, T; Gisbert, J P; Pajares García, J M

    2001-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major causal agent of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Several bacterium genes seem to be involved in the pathogenicity mechanism. One of them, the cagA gene, has been extensively studied and characterized. In this article we have carried out a study of characteristics and genetic variability of cagA gene in different geographic areas of the world. At the same time, we have summarized several studies that evaluate possible relation of cagA with gastroduodenal diseases associated by H. pylori infection. In our study we found that the presence of the cagA gene has been confirmed in more than 60% H. pylori strains distributed throughout the world. The prevalence of cagA genotype is of 65.4% in gastritis patients, 84.2% in patients with peptic ulcer and 86.5% in those with gastric cancer. It shows a high genetic variability of cagA associated with gastroduodenal diseases that could serve as a virulence marker in H. pylori infected subjects. However, the high prevalence of H. pylori cagA positive strains in some geographic areas does not confirm the strong association between cagA and virulence of strains as described in other countries. Nowadays, cagA gene is considered as a marker for the presence of cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) in H. pylori genoma. This region contains several genes that has been involved with the production of cytokines that results in an increased inflammation of host gastric mucosa, but its function is unknown. Probably, others bacterium factors, such as susceptibility host and environmental cofactors could influence in the risk of developing different gastroduodenal diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  20. Consensus and Variable Region PCR Analysis of Helicobacter pylori 3′ Region of cagA Gene in Isolates from Individuals with or without Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Cláudia Augustin; Pereira-Lima, Júlio C.; Blaya, Carolina; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2001-01-01

    The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. To investigate the cagA status of H. pylori-infected patients and the relationship between cagA and peptic ulcer disease, gastric biopsy specimens from 103 Caucasian patients in Brazil were analyzed by PCR. Since allelic variation in cagA exists and distinct H. pylori subgenotypes may circulate in different regions, PCR using primers for a variable 3′ region of the cagA gene according to a Japanese methodology and for a consensus cagA 3′ region used in Western methods was used for cagA detection. cagA was present in 53 (71%) of 75 H. pylori-positive cases when analyzed by the consensus region method and was associated with duodenal ulcer disease (P = 0.02), but not with gastric ulcer (P = 0.26), when compared to patients with duodenitis or gastritis. The variable region PCR method was able to detect 43 (57%) cagA-positive cases within the same group of H. pylori-positive patients and showed three subtypes of cagA (A, B/D, and C) that were not associated with clinical outcome. However, in 8 (18%) of the cases, more than one subtype was present, and an association between patients with multiple subtypes and disease outcome was observed when compared to patients with isolated subtypes (P = 0.048). cagA was a marker of H. pylori strains for duodenal ulcer disease in our population, and in spite of the differences in the 3′ region of the cagA gene, the Japanese methodology was able to detect the cagA status in most cases. The presence of multiple subgenotypes of cagA was associated with gastric ulcer. PMID:11158115

  1. Helicobacter pylori cagA 12-bp insertion can be a marker for duodenal ulcer in Okinawa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yuichi; Shiota, Seiji; Matsunari, Osamu; Suzuki, Rumiko; Watada, Masahide; Binh, Tran Thanh; Kinjo, Nagisa; Kinjo, Fukunori; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds Helicobacter pylori cagA can be classified into mainly two types (East-Asian-type and Western-type cagA) according to the repeat regions located in the 3′ region. Recent studies showed that the Western-type cagA in strains from Okinawa, Japan formed a different cluster (J-Western-type cagA subtype). We also reported that J-Western-type cagA possess a 12-bp insertion located in the 5′ region of cagA sequence. Methods The prevalence of 12-bp insertion in cagA in Okinawa and the United States (U.S.) was examined by DNA sequencing. We then designed the primer pair which can detect the 12-bp insertion only by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The prevalence of strains with 12-bp insertion was examined in 336 strains isolated from Okinawa by PCR. Results In case of Western-type cagA/vacA s1m2 strains, the prevalence of 12-bp insertion was significantly higher in strains isolated from Okinawa than that from the U.S. (P = 0.002). Phylogenetic tree showed that strains with 12-bp insertion formed two individual clusters within J-Western-type cagA subtype; one is from Okinawa and another is from the U.S. Our designed primer set showed high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (90.8%) in Okinawa. The 12-bp insertion was found in 23.7%, 14.3%, 4.2%, and 4.0% of strains with duodenal ulcer (DU), gastritis, gastric cancer (GC), and gastric ulcer (GU), respectively (P < 0.001 for DU vs. GU) in Okinawa. Conclusions Although the mechanisms are unknown, the presence of 12-bp insertion was associated with the presence of DU and might have a suppressive action on GU and GC. PMID:23190390

  2. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Man; Li, Fu-gang; Xie, Xi-sheng; Wang, Shao-qing; Fan, Jun-ming

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  3. Fucosyltransferase-4 and Oligosaccharide Lewis Y Antigen as potentially Correlative Biomarkers of Helicobacter pylori CagA Associated Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Faisal; Gao, Wei; Yan, Qiu

    2017-01-01

    H. pylori cytotoxin associated antigen A (CagA) plays a significant role in the progression of gastric cancer but their effect on fucosylation to develop gastric cancer is unknown. Fucosyltransferase IV (FUT4) is the key enzyme for synthesis of LewisY (LeY) carried by glycoproteins and glycolipids on the cell membrane. Herein, we compare the expression of CagA, p-EGFR, FUT4 and LeY in gastritis (n = 128, 176), gastric ulcer (n = 174, 213), and gastric cancer (n = 323, 261) tissue and serum samples, respectively by IHC and ELISA. Moreover, we investigated the potential correlation of CagA with FUT4 and LeY overexpression through EGFR activation. IHC and ELISA results showed higher positive cases of H. pylori CagA (83, 86 %), p-EGFR (81, 72 %), FUT4 (91, 97 %) and LeY (93, 92 %) in gastric cancer, compared to gastritis and gastric ulcer, H. pylori CagA (58, 67 & 59, 73 %), p-EGFR (52, 63 & 35, 47 %), FUT4 (68, 78 & 67, 82 %) and LeY (62,76 & 65, 85 %), respectively. We found a significant high expression (H-Value) of CagA (1.79, 1.66), p-EGFR (1.53, 1.58), FUT4 (2.14, 1.66) and LeY (1.69, 1.61) in gastric cancer tissues and serum, respectively as compared to chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers, CagA (0.64,1.14), p-EGFR (0.856, 0.678), FUT4 (0.949,1.197) and LeY (0.68,1.008) (P < 0.0001), respectively. Furthermore, H. pylori CagA showed significant correlation with p-EGFR (R-0.62, -0.74), FUT4 (R-0.81, -0.76) and LeY (R-0.82, -0.70) in gastric tissues and serum (P < 0.0001). H. pylori CagA plays key role in the development of gastric cancer with overexpression of FUT4/LeY, serve as potentially correlative biomarkers of H. pylori CagA associated gastric cancer.

  4. What exists beyond cagA and vacA? Helicobacter pylori genes in gastric diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Débora Menezes; Pereira, Eliane dos Santos; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in more than half the world’s population and has been associated with several gastric disorders, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The clinical outcome of this infection depends on host and bacterial factors where H. pylori virulence genes seem to play a relevant role. Studies of cagA and vacA genes established that they were determining factors in gastric pathogenesis. However, there are gastric cancer cases that are cagA-negative. Several other virulence genes have been searched for, but these genes remain less well known that cagA and vacA. Thus, this review aimed to establish which genes have been suggested as potentially relevant virulence factors for H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal diseases. We focused on the cag-pathogenicity island, genes with adherence and motility functions, and iceA based on the relevance shown in several studies in the literature. PMID:26457016

  5. [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Membrane receptors with tyrosine kinase activity and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases have emerged as important potential targets in oncology. Starting from basic structures such as anilino-quinazoline, numerous compounds have been synthesised, with the help of tyrosine kinase crystallography, which has allowed to optimise protein-ligand interactions. The catalytic domains of all kinases present similar three-dimensional structures, which explains that it may be difficult to identify molecules having a high specificity for a given tyrosine kinase. Some tyrosine kinase inhibitors are relatively specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as géfitinib and erlotinib; other are mainly active against platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the receptor KIT, such as imatinib or nilotinib, and other against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors involved in angiogenesis, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. The oral formulation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors is well accepted by the patients but may generate sometimes compliance problems requiring pharmacokinetic monitoring. This chemical family is in full expansion and several dozens of compounds have entered clinical trials.

  6. Helicobacter pylori induced interleukin-8 expression in gastric epithelial cells is associated with CagA positive phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, J E; Covacci, A; Farmery, S M; Xiang, Z; Tompkins, D S; Perry, S; Lindley, I J; Rappuoli, R

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To use a range of natural phenotypically variant strains of Helicobacter pylori with disparate CagA and VacA (vacuolating cytotoxin) expression to determine which bacterial factors are more closely associated with epithelial interleukin-8 (IL-8) induction. METHODS--Gastric epithelial cells (AGS and KATO-3) were co-cultured with five H pylori strains which were variously shown to express the cagA gene/CagA protein, VacA and/or to exhibit biological cytotoxicity. Secreted IL-8 was assayed by enzyme leaked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IL-8 messenger RNA (mRNA) was assayed using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction based technique (RT-PCR). RESULTS--Strains expressing CagA, including a variant strain (D931) which is non-cytotoxic and does not express the VacA protein, were found to upregulate epithelial IL-8 secretion and gene expression. In contrast, strains with no CagA expression, even in the presence of VacA and/or biological cytotoxicity, (G104, BA142), failed to induce IL-8 protein or mRNA above control values. CONCLUSIONS--These results strongly support a role for H pylori CagA or coexpressed factors other than the cytotoxin in upregulation of gastric epithelial IL-8. Increased epithelial IL-8 secretion and concomitant neutrophil chemotaxis and activation in addition to direct cytotoxicity may be an important factor in tissue damage and ulceration. Images PMID:7706517

  7. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion. PMID:26557697

  8. Development of a lateral flow immunoassay strip for rapid detection of CagA antigen of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Karakus, Cebrail

    2015-01-01

    About half of the world populations are known to be infected with Helicobacter pylori. The CagA antigen secreting strains provoke severe mucosal damages and act as a risk factor for the development of peptic ulceration and gastric cancer. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strip was developed based on sandwich format for rapid detection of CagA antigen of H. pylori using gold conjugated monoclonal antibody. This LFIA strip will provide a good aid in the diagnosis of CagA-secreting H. pylori within 10 min instead of time consuming, expensive and laborious invasive approaches.

  9. The Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin CagA is essential for suppressing host heat shock protein expression.

    PubMed

    J Lang, Ben; J Gorrell, Rebecca; Tafreshi, Mona; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Kwok, Terry; T Price, John

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections typically elicit a strong Heat Shock Response (HSR) in host cells. However, the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has the unique ability to repress this response, the mechanism of which has yet to be elucidated. This study sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms by which H. pylori down-modulates host HSP expression upon infection. Examination of isogenic mutant strains of H. pylori defective in components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS), identified the secretion substrate, CagA, to be essential for down-modulation of the HSPs HSPH1 (HSP105), HSPA1A (HSP72), and HSPD1 (HSP60) upon infection of the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Ectopic expression of CagA by transient transfection was insufficient to repress HSP expression in AGS or HEK293T cells, suggesting that additional H. pylori factors are required for HSP repression. RT-qPCR analysis of HSP gene expression in AGS cells infected with wild-type H. pylori or isogenic cagA-deletion mutant found no significant change to account for reduced HSP levels. In summary, this study identified CagA to be an essential bacterial factor for H. pylori-mediated suppression of host HSP expression. The novel finding that HSPH1 is down-modulated by H. pylori further highlights the unique ability of H. pylori to repress the HSR within host cells. Elucidation of the mechanism by which H. pylori achieves HSP repression may prove to be beneficial in the identification of novel mechanisms to inhibit the HSR pathway and provide further insight into the interactions between H. pylori and the host gastric epithelium.

  10. Helicobacter pylori CagA and IL-1β Promote the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered the most important risk factor, mainly by the activity of its virulence factor CagA. H. pylori/CagA-induced chronic inflammation triggers a series of gastric lesions of increased severity, starting with gastritis and ending with cancer. IL-1β has been associated with tumor development and invasiveness in different types of cancer, including gastric cancer. Currently, it is not clear if there is an association between CagA and IL-1β at a cellular level. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IL-1β and CagA on MCF-10A nontransformed cells. We found evidence that both CagA and IL-1β trigger the initiation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition characterized by β-catenin nuclear translocation, increased expression of Snail1 and ZEB1, downregulation of CDH1, and morphological changes during MCF-10A acini formation. However, only CagA induced MMP9 activity and cell invasion. Our data support that IL-1β and CagA target the β-catenin pathway, with CagA leading to acquisition of a stage related to aggressive tumors. PMID:27525003

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Waters, B; Vujaklija, D; Gold, M R; Davies, J

    1994-07-01

    Using phosphotyrosine-specific antibodies, we demonstrate that in several Streptomyces spp. a variety of proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Tyrosine phosphorylation was found in a number of Streptomyces species including Streptomyces lividans, Streptomyces hygroscopicus and Streptomyces lavendulae. Each species exhibited a unique pattern of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Moreover, the patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation varied during the growth phase and were also influenced by culture conditions. We suggest that metabolic shifts during the complex growth cycle of these filamentous bacteria, and possibly secondary metabolic pathways, may be controlled by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, as has been demonstrated in signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic organisms.

  12. CEACAM6 is upregulated by Helicobacter pylori CagA and is a biomarker for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Supriya; Samanta, Animesh; Sharma, Neel; Tan, Kar Tong; Yang, Henry; Voon, Dominic C.; Pang, Brendan; Teh, Ming; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Chang, Young-Tae; Yong, Wei Peng; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ho, Khek Yu; Tan, Patrick; Soong, Richie; Koeffler, Phillip H.; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Jeyasekharan, Anand D.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of gastric cancers saves lives, but remains a diagnostic challenge. In this study, we aimed to identify cell-surface biomarkers of early gastric cancer. We hypothesized that a subset of plasma membrane proteins induced by the Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA will be retained in early gastric cancers through non-oncogene addiction. An inducible system for expression of CagA was used to identify differentially upregulated membrane protein transcripts in vitro. The top hits were then analyzed in gene expression datasets comparing transcriptome of gastric cancer with normal tissue, to focus on markers retained in cancer. Among the transcripts enriched upon CagA induction in vitro, a significant elevation of CEACAM6 was noted in gene expression datasets of gastric cancer. We used quantitative digital immunohistochemistry to measure CEACAM6 protein levels in tissue microarrays of gastric cancer. We demonstrate an increase in CEACAM6 in early gastric cancers, when compared to matched normal tissue, with an AUC of 0.83 for diagnostic validity. Finally, we show that a fluorescently conjugated CEACAM6 antibody binds avidly to freshly resected gastric cancer xenograft samples and can be detected by endoscopy in real time. Together, these results suggest that CEACAM6 upregulation is a cell surface response to H. pylori CagA, and is retained in early gastric cancers. They highlight a novel link between CEACAM6 expression and CagA in gastric cancer, and suggest CEACAM6 to be a promising biomarker to aid with the fluorescent endoscopic diagnosis of early neoplastic lesions in the stomach. PMID:27421133

  13. Roles of the tyrosine isomers meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine in oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ipson, Brett R; Fisher, Alfred L

    2016-05-01

    The damage to cellular components by reactive oxygen species, termed oxidative stress, both increases with age and likely contributes to age-related diseases including Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cataract formation. In the setting of oxidative stress, hydroxyl radicals can oxidize the benzyl ring of the amino acid phenylalanine, which then produces the abnormal tyrosine isomers meta-tyrosine or ortho-tyrosine. While elevations in m-tyrosine and o-tyrosine concentrations have been used as a biological marker of oxidative stress, there is emerging evidence from bacterial, plant, and mammalian studies demonstrating that these isomers, particularly m-tyrosine, directly produce adverse effects to cells and tissues. These new findings suggest that the abnormal tyrosine isomers could in fact represent mediators of the effects of oxidative stress. Consequently the accumulation of m- and o-tyrosine may disrupt cellular homeostasis and contribute to disease pathogenesis, and as result, effective defenses against oxidative stress can encompass not only the elimination of reactive oxygen species but also the metabolism and ultimately the removal of the abnormal tyrosine isomers from the cellular amino acid pool. Future research in this area is needed to clarify the biologic mechanisms by which the tyrosine isomers damage cells and disrupt the function of tissues and organs and to identify the metabolic pathways involved in removing the accumulated isomers after exposure to oxidative stress.

  14. Proteomic Characterization of Helicobacter pylori CagA Antigen Recognized by Child Serum Antibodies and Its Epitope Mapping by Peptide Array

    PubMed Central

    Akada, Junko; Okuda, Masumi; Hiramoto, Narumi; Kitagawa, Takao; Zhang, Xiulian; Kamei, Shuichi; Ito, Akane; Nakamura, Mikiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiwatani, Tomoko; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Teruko; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Serum antibodies against pathogenic bacteria play immunologically protective roles, and can be utilized as diagnostic markers of infection. This study focused on Japanese child serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori, a chronically-infected gastric bacterium which causes gastric cancer in adults. Serological diagnosis for H. pylori infection is well established for adults, but it needs to be improved for children. Serum samples from 24 children, 22 H. pylori (Hp)-positive and 2 Hp-negative children, were used to catalogue antigenic proteins of a Japanese strain CPY2052 by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblot and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total, 24 proteins were identified as candidate antigen proteins. Among these, the major virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA) was the most reactive antigen recognized by all the Hp-positive sera even from children under the age of 3 years. The major antigenic part of CagA was identified in the middle region, and two peptides containing CagA epitopes were identified using a newly developed peptide/protein-combined array chip method, modified from our previous protein chip method. Each of the epitopes was found to contain amino acid residue(s) unique to East Asian CagA. Epitope analysis of CagA indicated importance of the regional CagA antigens for serodiagnosis of H. pylori infection in children. PMID:25141238

  15. Interaction with CagF Is Required for Translocation of CagA into the Host via the Helicobacter pylori Type IV Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Marc Roger; Tasca, Elizabetta; Montecucco, Cesare; Stein, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Development of severe gastric diseases is strongly associated with those strains of Helicobacter pylori that contain the cag pathogenicity island (PAI) inserted into the chromosome. The cag PAI encodes a type IV secretion system that translocates the major disease-associated virulence protein, CagA, into the host epithelial cell. CagA then affects host signaling pathways, leading to cell elongations and inflammation. Since the precise mechanism by which the CagA toxin is translocated by the type IV secretion system remained elusive, we used fusion proteins and immunoprecipitation studies to identify CagA-interacting secretion components. Here we demonstrate that CagA, in addition to other yet-unidentified proteins, interacts with CagF, presumably at the inner bacterial membrane. This interaction is required for CagA translocation, since an isogenic nonpolar cagF mutant was translocation deficient. Our results suggest that CagF may be a protein with unique chaperone-like function that is involved in the early steps of CagA recognition and delivery into the type IV secretion channel. PMID:16368981

  16. Clinical relevance of Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rui M; Machado, José C; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major etiological factor of gastric carcinoma. This disease is the result of a long, multistep, and multifactorial process, which occurs only in a small proportion of patients infected with H. pylori. Gastric carcinoma development is influenced by host genetic susceptibility factors, environmental factors, and H. pylori virulence. H. pylori is genetically highly variable, and variability that affects H. pylori virulence factors may be useful to identify strains with different degrees of pathogenicity. This review will focus on VacA and CagA that have polymorphic regions that impact their functional properties. The characterization of H. pylori vacA and cagA-associated could be useful for identifying patients at highest risk of disease, who could be offered H. pylori eradication therapy and who could be included in programs of more intensive surveillance in an attempt to reduce gastric carcinoma incidence.

  17. High Diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori Genotypes in Patients with and without Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    López-Vidal, Yolanda; Ponce-de-León, Sergio; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Barreto-Zúñiga, Rafael; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008), and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003). A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036). A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003). Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. Conclusion/Significance High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work. PMID:19050763

  18. Hydrogen Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori Plays a Role in Gastric Carcinogenesis through Facilitating CagA Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that augments gastric cancer risk is the CagA cytotoxin. A carcinogenic derivative strain, 7.13, that has a greater ability to translocate CagA exhibits much higher hydrogenase activity than its parent noncarcinogenic strain, B128. A Δhyd mutant strain with deletion of hydrogenase genes was ineffective in CagA translocation into human gastric epithelial AGS cells, while no significant attenuation of cell adhesion was observed. The quinone reductase inhibitor 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) was used to specifically inhibit the H2-utilizing respiratory chain of outer membrane-permeabilized bacterial cells; that level of inhibitor also greatly attenuated CagA translocation into AGS cells, indicating the H2-generated transmembrane potential is a contributor to toxin translocation. The Δhyd strain showed a decreased frequency of DNA transformation, suggesting that H. pylori hydrogenase is also involved in energizing the DNA uptake apparatus. In a gerbil model of infection, the ability of the Δhyd strain to induce inflammation was significantly attenuated (at 12 weeks postinoculation), while all of the gerbils infected with the parent strain (7.13) exhibited a high level of inflammation. Gastric cancer developed in 50% of gerbils infected with the wild-type strain 7.13 but in none of the animals infected with the Δhyd strain. By examining the hydrogenase activities from well-defined clinical H. pylori isolates, we observed that strains isolated from cancer patients (n = 6) have a significantly higher hydrogenase (H2/O2) activity than the strains isolated from gastritis patients (n = 6), further supporting an association between H. pylori hydrogenase activity and gastric carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:27531909

  19. Spermine oxidase, a polyamine catabolic enzyme that links Helicobacter pylori CagA and gastric cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; de Sablet, Thibaut; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently reported that Helicobacter pylori strains expressing the virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) stimulate increased levels of spermine oxidase (SMO) in gastric epithelial cells, while cagA– strains did not. SMO catabolizes the polyamine spermine and produces H2O2 that results in both apoptosis and DNA damage. Exogenous overexpression of CagA confirmed these findings, and knockdown or inhibition of SMO blocked CagA-mediated apoptosis and DNA damage. The strong association of SMO, apoptosis, and DNA damage was also demonstrated in humans infected with cagA+, but not cagA– strains. In infected gerbils and mice, DNA damage was CagA-dependent and only present in epithelial cells that expressed SMO. We also discovered SMOhigh gastric epithelial cells from infected animals with dysplasia that are resistant to apoptosis despite high levels of DNA damage. Inhibition of polyamine synthesis or SMO could abrogate the development of this cell population that may represent precursors for neoplastic transformation. PMID:22555547

  20. MicroRNAs up-regulated by CagA of Helicobacter pylori induce intestinal metaplasia of gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongliang; Jiang, Qiaoli; Lou, Xiaojun; Ji, Xiaowei; Wen, Zhenzhen; Wu, Jia; Tao, Haiying; Jiang, Tingting; He, Wei; Wang, Caihua; Du, Qin; Zheng, Shu; Mao, Jianshan; Huang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    CagA of Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium-derived oncogenic protein closely associated with the development of gastric cancers. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of widespread non-coding RNAs, many of which are involved in cell growth, cell differentiation and tumorigenesis. The relationship between CagA protein and miRNAs is unclear. Using mammalian miRNA profile microarrays, we found that miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 expression was up-regulated in CagA-transformed cells, miRNA-1290 was up-regulated in an Erk1/2-dependent manner, and miRNA-584 was activated by NF-κB. miRNA-584 sustained Erk1/2 activities through inhibition of PPP2a activities, and miRNA-1290 activated NF-κB by knockdown of NKRF. Foxa1 was revealed to be an important target of miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290. Knockdown of Foxa1 promoted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition significantly. Overexpression of miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 induced intestinal metaplasia of gastric epithelial cells in knock-in mice. These results indicate that miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 interfere with cell differentiation and remodel the tissues. Thus, the miRNA pathway is a new pathogenic mechanism of CagA.

  1. Risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects is influenced by ABO blood group and cagA status.

    PubMed

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Kato, Ikuko; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Stein, Angelika; Jan van Doorn, Leen; Franceschi, Silvia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-07-15

    A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For our study, we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2,077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed six single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene, and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios (ORs) for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia (IM) and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of IM or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared to subjects carrying cagA negative strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95% CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (p=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status.

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  3. Risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects is influenced by ABO blood group and cagA status

    PubMed Central

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Kato, Ikuko; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Stein, Angelika; van Doorn, Leen Jan; Franceschi, Silvia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-01-01

    A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For this study we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared with subjects carrying cagA− strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95%CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (P=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status. PMID:23319424

  4. Tyrosine - Effects on catecholamine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acworth, Ian N.; During, Matthew J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine administration elevates striatal levels of dopamine metabolites in animals given treatments that accelerate nigrostriatal firing, but not in untreated rats. We examined the possibility that the amino acid might actually enhance dopamine release in untreated animals, but that the technique of measuring striatal dopamine metabolism was too insensitive to demonstrate such an effect. Dopamine release was assessed directly, using brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid. Tyrosine administration (50-200 mg/kg IP) did indeed cause a dose related increase in extracellular fluid dopamine levels with minor elevations in levels of DOPAC and HVA, its major metabolites, which were not dose-related. The rise in dopamine was short-lived, suggesting that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms responded to the increased dopamine release by diminishing neuronal firing or sensitivity to tyrosine. These observations indicate that measurement of changes in striatal DOPAC and HVA, if negative, need not rule out increases in nigrostriatal dopamine release.

  5. Second harmonic generation from tyrosine containing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M. N.; Bergmann, E.; Benichou, E.; Russier-Antoine, I.; Lascoux, N.; Jonin, Ch.; Besson, F.; Brevet, P. F.

    2013-10-01

    The Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) response from Tyrosine-containing peptides at the air-water interface is presented. First, the quadratic hyperpolarizability of the aromatic amino acid Tyrosine obtained by Hyper Rayleigh Scattering is reported, demonstrating its potentiality as an endogenous molecular probe for SHG studies. Then, the single Tyrosine antimicrobial peptide Mycosubtilin is monitored at the air-water interface and compared to another peptide, Surfactin, lacking a Tyrosine residue. Adsorption kinetics and polarization analysis of the SHG intensity for the peptide monolayers clearly demonstrate that the SHG response from Mycosubtilin arises from Tyrosine. Besides, it confirms that indeed Tyrosine can be targeted as an endogenous molecular probe.

  6. Association among H. pylori virulence markers dupA, cagA and vacA in Brazilian patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Only a few Helicobacter pylori-infected individuals develop severe gastric diseases and virulence factors of H. pylori appear to be involved in such clinical outcomes. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene A (dupA) is a novel virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that is associated with duodenal ulcer development and reduced risk for gastric carcinoma in some populations. The aims of the present study were to determine the presence of dupA gene and evaluate the association among dupA and other virulence factors including cagA and vacA in Brazilian patients. Gastric biopsies were obtained from 205 dyspeptic patients (100 children and 105 adults). DNA was extracted and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori and its virulence factors using the polymerase chain reaction method. Results Patients with gastritis tested positive for H. pylori more frequently. The dupA gene was detected in 41.5% of them (85/205); cagA gene was found in 98 isolates (47.8%) and vacA genotype s1/m1 in 50.2%, s1/m2 in 8.3%, s2/m2 in 36.6%, s2/m1 in 0.5% and s1/s2/m1/m2 in 4.4%. We also verified a significant association between cagA and dupA genes [p = 0.0003, relative risk (RR) 1.73 and confidence interval [CI] = 1.3–2.3]. The genotypes s1/m1 were also associated with dupA gene (p = 0.0001, RR: 1.72 and CI: 1.3–2.2). The same associations were found when analyzing pediatric and adult groups of patients individually. Conclusion Ours results suggest that dupA is highly frequent in Brazilian patients and is associated with cagA gene and vacA s1/m1 genotype, and it may be considered an important virulence factor in the development of gastric diseases in adults or children. PMID:24456629

  7. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-06-30

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson's group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src-transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src-associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month.

  8. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  9. Tyrosine supplementation in chronic experimental uremia.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, C L; Mandel, S; Mrozinska, K; Wapnir, R A

    1983-08-01

    The occurrence of low tyrosine tissue levels in uremic subjects, possibly due to impaired phenylalanine hydroxylation, suggests that tyrosine may be an essential amino acid in uremia. Additional dietary tyrosine may thus re-dress the deficiency. This study examined growth and tyrosine/phenylalanine metabolism in uremic rats during tyrosine supplementation. Rats made uremic (U) by 7/8 nephrectomy were compared to pair-fed (CP) and ad libitum-fed (CA), sham-operated controls. Two sets of each group of rats were studied after 21 days on the respective diets: I = Purina Lab Chow; II = same + 3.5% tyrosine. Plasma tyrosine was below normal in U and CP-fed diet I. With diet II, the tyrosine:phenylalanine ratio in U was lower than both CA and CP. In rats fed diet II, the tyrosine:phenylalanine ratio became indistinguishable among the three groups. Growth parameters in U and CP were similar, regardless of the diet. Body weight gain, tibial length, muscle mass, and tissue protein did not improve in uremic animals supplemented with tyrosine. The specific activity of liver phenylalanine hydroxylase in U was not different from CA or CP. However, loss of cortical renal mass appeared to be the major determinant of decreased kidney phenylalanine hydroxylation in experimental uremia. This alteration is likely to be the greatest contributory factor to the alteration of plasma levels of tyrosine and phenylalanine. The data presented do not support a proposed essentiality of tyrosine in uremia.

  10. Characterization of virulence genes cagA and vacA in Helicobacter Pylori and their prevalence in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Neves, Daniel Locatelli; do Nascimento, Aguinaldo José; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori infection was determined using cultures of gastric biopsy samples of patients attended at the academic hospital of the Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. Molecular methods were used to characterize the cagA and vacA genes from bacterial isolates associated with different diseases presented by patients. Out of a total of 81, forty-two gastric biopsy samples tested were positive for H. pylori, with a prevalence of 51.9%. No significant difference was found with regard to the gender (p=0.793) and age (p=0.183) of the patients. Genotype s1m1 vacA gene was found in 67% of the cases of peptic ulcer investigated (p=1.0), despite the limited number of patients with this disease (n=3). A correlation between the presence of less virulent strains (s2m2) and reflux esophagitis was found in the majority of the cases (45%), but without statistical significance. An association between the prevalence of cagA gene, found in 92% of isolates, and peptic ulcer was not observed (p=1.0), suggesting that this gene cannot be considered a specific marker of severity in our environment. The results reinforce the importance of conducting regional studies and the need to characterize H. pylori virulence genes associated with different diseases. PMID:24031754

  11. Presumptive mechanisms of peptic ulceration by Helicobacter pylori VacA involving mucoprotease and CagA.

    PubMed

    Choi, K M; Lim, W J; Park, J K; Hwang, S Y

    2001-06-30

    Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) appears to be unusually stable, not only against extreme pH conditions or high temperatures, but also against common organic solvents or detergents. Under acidic conditions, its activity was markedly increased in the manner of temperature-independent, suggesting a spontaneous activation. A similar finding was also observed under alkaline conditions, however, it should have an appropriate temperature. From these observations, the mechanisms of VacA activation were suggested to be so redundant that either the case of acidic or basic amino acid residues could be involved in the VacA activation. Separately, we also found that the VacA production by H. pylori was pH-dependent: Its production was increased at a low pH region with a broad range (1.0-5.0), and at a high pH region with a narrow range (8.0-9.0). Astonishingly, a highly immunogenic CagA did not appear to be expressed under the acidic conditions. Its expression, however, was shown to be enhanced when the surrounding pH of this bacterium was raised. In contrast, mucoproteolytic activity in the H. pylori membrane was found to be increased at acidic conditions. Considering these observations, together with the stomach and duodenal pH of humans, two presumptive mechanisms of H. pylori VacA-associated ulceration may be deduced; namely, an acid- and an alkali-dependent type, involving mucoprotease and CagA, respectively.

  12. Structural basis of tubulin tyrosination by tubulin tyrosine ligase

    PubMed Central

    Prota, Andrea E.; Magiera, Maria M.; Kuijpers, Marijn; Bargsten, Katja; Frey, Daniel; Wieser, Mara; Jaussi, Rolf; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Janke, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) catalyzes the post-translational retyrosination of detyrosinated α-tubulin. Despite the indispensable role of TTL in cell and organism development, its molecular mechanism of action is poorly understood. By solving crystal structures of TTL in complex with tubulin, we here demonstrate that TTL binds to the α and β subunits of tubulin and recognizes the curved conformation of the dimer. Biochemical and cellular assays revealed that specific tubulin dimer recognition controls the activity of the enzyme, and as a consequence, neuronal development. The TTL–tubulin structure further illustrates how the enzyme binds the functionally crucial C-terminal tail sequence of α-tubulin and how this interaction catalyzes the tyrosination reaction. It also reveals how TTL discriminates between α- and β-tubulin, and between different post-translationally modified forms of α-tubulin. Together, our data suggest that TTL has specifically evolved to recognize and modify tubulin, thus highlighting a fundamental role of the evolutionary conserved tubulin tyrosination cycle in regulating the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:23358242

  13. Tyrosine kinases in inflammatory dermatologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Ricardo T.; Fiorentino, David; Chung, Lorinda; Robinson, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases are enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on protein substrates. They are key components of signaling pathways that drive an array of cellular responses including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Specific tyrosine kinases have recently been identified as critical to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinases are emerging as a novel class of therapy that may provide benefit in certain patient subsets. In this review, we highlight tyrosine kinase signaling implicated in inflammatory dermatologic diseases, evaluate strategies aimed at inhibiting these aberrant signaling pathways, and discuss prospects for future drug development. PMID:20584561

  14. Prevalence of cagA and vacA among Helicobacter pylori-infected patients in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Kiani, Faezeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Soroush, Setareh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Delpisheh, Ali; Emaneini, Mohammad; Bogdanović, Lidija; Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-07-30

    The varieties of infections caused by Helicobacter pylori may be due to differences in bacterial genotypes and virulence factors as well as environmental and host-related factors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients in Iran and analyze their relevance to the disease status between two clinical groups via a meta-analysis method. Different databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus, SID, Magiran, Science Direct, and Medlib were investigated, and 23 relevant articles from the period between 2001 and 2012 were finally analyzed. The relevant data obtained from these papers were analyzed by a random-effects model. Data were analyzed using R software and STATA. The prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients was 70% (95% CI, 64-75) and 41% (95% CI, 24.3-57.7), respectively. The prevalence of duodenal ulcers, peptic ulcers, and gastritis among cagA+ individuals was 53% (95% CI, 20-86), 65% (95% CI, 34-97), and 71% (95% CI, 59-84), respectively. Odds ratio (OR) between cagA-positive compared with cagA-negative patients showed a 1.89 (95% CI, 1.38-2.57) risk of ulcers. In conclusion, the frequency of cagA gene among H. pylori strains is elevated in Iran and it seems to be more frequently associated with gastritis. Therefore, any information about cagA and vacA prevalence among different H. pylori-infected clinical groups in the country can help public health authorities to plan preventive policies to reduce the prevalence of diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  15. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  16. XAFS of human tyrosine hydroxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, W.; Haavik, J.; Winkler, H.; Trautwein, A. X.; Nolting, H.-F.

    1995-02-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyses the rate-limiting step (hydroxylation of tyrosine to form dihydroxyphenylalanine) in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the catecholamines dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline. The human enzyme (hTH) is present in four isoforms, generated by splicing of pre-mRNA. The purified apoenzyme (metal free) binds stoichiometric amounts of iron. The incorporation of Fe(II) results in a rapid and up to 40-fold increase of activity [1]. Besides the coordination of the metal centers in native enzyme we studied the purported inhibition of TH by its immediate products. So we analysed Fe-hTH isoform 1 native as well as oxidized with dopamine and Co-hTH isoform 2.

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphatase: enzymatic assays.

    PubMed

    Montalibet, Jacqueline; Skorey, Kathryn I; Kennedy, Brian P

    2005-01-01

    Activity assays for tyrosine phosphatases are based on the hydrolysis of a arylphosphate moiety from a synthetic substrate yielding a spectroscopically active product. Many different substrates can be used for these assays with p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), fluorescein diphosphate (FDP), and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbellyferyl phosphate (DiFMUP) being the most efficient and versatile. Equally, larger molecules such as phosphotyrosyl peptides can also be used to mimic more natural substrates. Activity assays include the determinations of the rate of dephosphorylation and calculations of kinetic constants such as k(cat) and K(M). These assays are useful to identify and characterize tyrosine phosphatases and are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of inhibitors.

  18. Tyrosine Recombinase Retrotransposons and Transposons.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Russell T M; Butler, Margi I

    2015-04-01

    Retrotransposons carrying tyrosine recombinases (YR) are widespread in eukaryotes. The first described tyrosine recombinase mobile element, DIRS1, is a retroelement from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The YR elements are bordered by terminal repeats related to their replication via free circular dsDNA intermediates. Site-specific recombination is believed to integrate the circle without creating duplications of the target sites. Recently a large number of YR retrotransposons have been described, including elements from fungi (mucorales and basidiomycetes), plants (green algae) and a wide range of animals including nematodes, insects, sea urchins, fish, amphibia and reptiles. YR retrotransposons can be divided into three major groups: the DIRS elements, PAT-like and the Ngaro elements. The three groups form distinct clades on phylogenetic trees based on alignments of reverse transcriptase/ribonuclease H (RT/RH) and YR sequences, and also having some structural distinctions. A group of eukaryote DNA transposons, cryptons, also carry tyrosine recombinases. These DNA transposons do not encode a reverse transcriptase. They have been detected in several pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Sequence comparisons suggest that the crypton YRs are related to those of the YR retrotransposons. We suggest that the YR retrotransposons arose from the combination of a crypton-like YR DNA transposon and the RT/RH encoding sequence of a retrotransposon. This acquisition must have occurred at a very early point in the evolution of eukaryotes.

  19. Tyrosine Metabolism in Patients with Liver Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert J.; Conn, Harold O.

    1967-01-01

    Plasma levels of tyrosine were assayed in the fasting state and after oral administration of either tyrosine (tyrosine tolerance test) or phenylalanine (phenlyalanine conversion test) in normal subjects and in patients with hepatitis, biliary obstruction, or cirrhosis. Fasting tyrosine levels tended to be slightly increased in patients with hepatitis and biliary obstruction and markedly increased in patients with cirrhosis. Tyrosine tolerance tests in patients with cirrhosis were characterized by larger than normal increments in tyrosine levels and by delayed returns toward fasting levels. The results of phenylalanine conversion tests were abnormal in approximately one-half of patients with either hepatitis or biliary obstruction and four-fifths of patients with cirrhosis. Abnormalities were characterized by elevated fasting plasma tyrosine levels, or small and delayed increments in tyrosine levels, or both. Abnormal phenylalanine conversion test results in patients with cirrhosis did not correlate closely with any clinical feature of cirrhosis or with the results of any standard liver function test; there was positive correlation only with abnormal ammonia tolerance, a test of portalsystemic shunting. Tests of tyrosine metabolism do not appear to be useful for routine clinical assessment of liver function. Tyrosine tolerance tests and phenylalanine conversion tests done for purposes of diagnosis of other diseases may yield misleading results in patients with liver disease. PMID:6074004

  20. Evaluation of immobilized metal affinity chromatography kits for the purification of histidine-tagged recombinant CagA protein.

    PubMed

    Karakus, Cebrail; Uslu, Merve; Yazici, Duygu; Salih, Barik A

    2016-05-15

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) technique is used for fast and reliable purification of histidine(His)-tagged recombinant proteins. The technique provides purification under native and denaturing conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate three commercially available IMAC kits (Thermo Scientific, GE Healthcare and Qiagen) for the purification of a 6xHis-tagged recombinant CagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein from IPTG-induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) culture. The kits were tested according to the manufacturer instructions and the protein was purified with only GE Healthcare and Qiagen kits under denaturing conditions. 1% (w/v) SDS was used as denaturing agent in PBS instead of extraction reagent of Thermo Scientific kit to lyse bacterial cells from 100ml culture. The 6xHis-tagged recombinant protein was purified by the three kits equally.

  1. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS ‘Driver mutations’ are essential for carcinogenesis as well as tumor progression as they confer a selective growth advantage to cancer cells. Identification of driver mutations in growth related protein kinases, especially tyrosine kinases have led to clinical development of an array of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in various malignancies, including lung cancer. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinases have proven to be of meaningful clinical benefit, while inhibition of several other tyrosine kinases have been of limited clinical benefit, thus far. An improved understanding of tyrosine kinase biology has also led to faster drug development, identification of resistance mechanisms and ways to overcome resistance. In this review, we discuss the clinical data supporting the use and practical aspects of management of patients on epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22520981

  2. An essential tyrosine residue of Aspergillus polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Stratilová, E; Dzúrová, M; Markovic, O; Jörnvall, H

    1996-03-11

    Based on strict conservation of a tyrosine residue in 24 polygalacturonases, tyrosine modification was assessed in two different forms of the Aspergillus enzyme. The second subform was unknown in structure but submitted to sequence analysis and was found also to have the conserved tyrosine residue. Results of chemical modifications are consistent in showing inactivation of the proteins with all tyrosine-reactive agents tested, acetic anhydride, N-acetyl imidazole, and tetranitromethane. Furthermore, after acetylation, regeneration of enzyme activity was possible with hydroxylamine. Spectrophotometric pH titration showed that one accessible tyrosine residue is ionized at pH 9.3-9.5, whereas the remaining, masked residues are all ionized at pH 10.5. It is concluded that one tyrosine residue is catalytically important, in agreement with the inactivation and reactivation data, that this residue is accessible, and that it is likely to correspond to the strictly conserved residue observed in all forms.

  3. Zur Biosynthese von Phenylalanin und Tyrosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingens, F.; Keller, E.

    1983-03-01

    With the discovery of arogenic acid two new pathways for the biosynthesis of phenylalanine and tyrosine have been revealed. The occurrence of two, three, or four pathways for the biosynthesis of phenylalanine and tyrosine in microorganisms and plants may be a useful tool for taxonomic classifications. Investigations on enterobacteriaceae, pseudomonads, flavobacteria, streptomycetes, archaebacteria, and on Sphaerotilus, Trichococcus and Leptothrix species from bulking sludge are described. The possible role of arogenate in the evolution of the pathways for tyrosine and phenylalanine biosynthesis is discussed.

  4. The rotational spectrum of tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cristóbal; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2015-04-23

    In this work neutral tyrosine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples, and its most abundant conformers characterized through their rotational spectra. Their identification has been made by comparison between the experimental and ab initio values of the rotational and quadrupole coupling constants. Both conformers are stabilized by an O-H•••N hydrogen bond established within the amino acid skeleton chain and an additional weak N-H•••π hydrogen bond. The observed conformers differ in the orientation of the phenolic -OH group.

  5. Helicobacter pylori CagL Y58/E59 Mutation Turns-Off Type IV Secretion-Dependent Delivery of CagA into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Lind, Judith; Schmid, Benedikt; Backert, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    The type IV secretion system (T4SS) is a major virulence determinant of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. The CagL protein is a specialized adhesin of the corresponding T4SS pilus, which establishes initial contact with the integrin β1 receptor on host target cells. Recent studies proposed that Y58 and E59 amino acid polymorphisms in CagL increase the virulence of H. pylori strains by enhanced translocation and phosphorylation of the CagA effector protein. These polymorphisms were therefore correlated with an increased risk of gastric cancer development. Here we show that the Y58/E59 motif, which is located in a loop connecting two α-helices, and corresponding polymorphisms could influence the function of CagL. However, expression of isogenic CagL Y58/E59 variants in H. pylori strain 26695 significantly blocked the translocation and phosphorylation of CagA as compared to complemented wild-type CagL. These results suggest that the function of the T4SS for delivery of CagA is turned-off by the Y58/E59 mutation in CagL. This activity appears to be similar to the one recently described for another T4SS pilus protein, CagY, which is also sufficient to cause gain or loss of T4SS function. These data support the hypothesis that certain mutations in CagL or recombination events in CagY may serve as a sort of molecular switch or perhaps rheostat in the T4SS, which could alter the function of the pilus and "tunes" injection of CagA and host pro-inflammatory responses, respectively. PMID:24893039

  6. A CCD-based reader combined with CdS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow strips for ultrasensitive quantitative detection of CagA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Chen; Wang, Kan; Li, Chao; Dai, Xuan; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-02-01

    Immunochromatographic assays are widely used to detect many analytes. CagA is proved to be associated closely with initiation of gastric carcinoma. Here, we reported that a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based test strip reader combined with CdS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow strips for quantitative detection of CagA was developed, which used 365-nm ultraviolet LED as the excitation light source, and captured the test strip images through an acquisition module. Then, the captured image was transferred to the computer and was processed by a software system. A revised weighted threshold histogram equalization (WTHE) image processing algorithm was applied to analyze the result. CdS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow strips for detection of CagA were prepared. One hundred sera samples from clinical patients with gastric cancer and healthy people were prepared for detection, which demonstrated that the device could realize rapid, stable, and point-of-care detection, with a sensitivity of 20 pg/mL.

  7. Molecular mimicry by Helicobacter pylori CagA protein may be involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Shinohara, Kenji; Inoue, Yusuke; Sato, Yutaka; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Okubo, Masashi; Zaitsu, Yuzuru; Ariyoshi, Koichi; Nakamura, Yukinori; Nawata, Ryouhei; Oka, Yoshitomo; Shirai, Mutsunori; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    The eradication of Helicobacter pylori often leads to platelet recovery in patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (cITP). Although this clinical observation suggests the involvement of H. pylori, little is known about the pathogenesis of cITP. We initially examined the effect of H. pylori eradication on platelet counts in 20 adult Japanese cITP patients. Then, using platelet eluates as the probe in immunoblot analyses, we examined the role of molecular mimicry in the pathogenesis of cITP. Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 75% (15 of 20) of cITP patients. Eradication was achieved in 13 (87%) of the H. pylori-positive patients, seven (54%) of which showed increased platelet counts within the 4 months following treatment. Completely responsive patients also showed significant declines in platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (PAIgG) levels. Platelet eluates from 12 (nine H. pylori-positive and three H. pylori-negative) patients recognized H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) protein, and in three completely responsive patients, levels of anti-CagA antibody in platelet eluates declined after eradication therapy. Cross-reactivity between PAIgG and H. pylori CagA protein suggests that molecular mimicry by CagA plays a key role in the pathogenesis of a subset of cITP patients.

  8. Theoretical study of silver-ion-mediated base pairs: the case of C-Ag-C and C-Ag-A systems.

    PubMed

    Fortino, Mariagrazia; Marino, Tiziana; Russo, Nino

    2015-05-28

    Silver-mediated base pairs applied to DNA represent a new biomacromolecular nanomaterial useful for generating nanodevices as ion sensors. Reported herein is a full quantum chemical study devoted to give further knowledge on the electronic and energetic properties of C-Ag-C and mixed C-Ag-A mismatched base pairs. The B3LYP functional in conjunction with the dispersion effects (D3) has been applied. Single-point calculations have been also performed by using the M06-L functional. The investigation of their behavior has been extended to the duplex DNA modeled by the (dC-Ag-dC)2 and (dC-Ag-dA)2 more complex systems. The solvent effect has been taken into account by the conductor-like screening model, COSMO. In the case of mixed C-Ag-A and (dC-Ag-dA)2 systems, both the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen arrangements have been taken into account. Results show that for (dC-Ag-dA)2 systems, the binding energies are almost double that of the corresponding values of C-Ag-A ones.

  9. Polyclonal antibody to soman-tyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Duysen, Ellen G.; Froment, Marie-Thérèse; Masson, Patrick; Nachon, Florian; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Klassen, Lynell W.; Cashman, John; Williams, Gareth R.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Soman forms a stable, covalent bond with tyrosine 411 of human albumin, with tyrosines 257 and 593 in human transferrin, and with tyrosine in many other proteins. The pinacolyl group of soman is retained, suggesting that pinacolyl methylphosphonate bound to tyrosine could generate specific antibodies. Tyrosine in the pentapeptide RYGRK was covalently modified with soman simply by adding soman to the peptide. The phosphonylated-peptide was linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and the conjugate was injected into rabbits. The polyclonal antiserum recognized soman-labeled human albumin, soman-mouse albumin, and soman human transferrin, but not non-phosphonylated control proteins. The soman-labeled tyrosines in these proteins are surrounded by different amino acid sequences, suggesting that the polyclonal recognizes soman-tyrosine independent of the amino acid sequence. Antiserum obtained after 4 antigen injections over a period of 18 weeks was tested in a competition ELISA where it had an IC50 of 10−11 M. The limit of detection on Western blots was 0.01 μg (15 picomoles) of soman-labeled albumin. In conclusion, a high-affinity, polyclonal antibody that specifically recognizes soman adducts on tyrosine in a variety of proteins has been produced. Such an antibody could be useful for identifying secondary targets of soman toxicity. PMID:23469927

  10. Pre-Treatment with Tyrosine Reverses Hypothermia Induced Behavioral Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    accelerated firing activates the enzyme tyrosine- hydroxylase , making it more tyrosine sensitive. The reduction of brain NA is accompanied by a behavioral...regions of the brain. The accelerated firing activates the enzyme tyrosine- hydroxylase , making it more tyrosine sensitive. The reduction of brain NA...depletion. The accelerated firing activates the enzyme tyrosine- hydroxylase (7), making it more tyrosine sensitive. It has been reported that

  11. Receptor tyrosine kinases in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface glycoproteins with enzymatic activity involved in the regulation of various important functions. In all-important physiological functions including differentiation, cell-cell interactions, survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration and signaling these receptors are the key players of regulation. Additionally, mutations of RTKs or their overexpression have been described in many human cancers and are being explored as a novel avenue for a new therapeutic approach. Some of the deregulated RTKs observed to be significantly affected in cancers included vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor, RTK-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. These deregulated RTKs offer attractive possibilities for the new anticancer therapeutic approach involving specific targeting by monoclonal antibodies as well as kinase. The present review aimed to highlight recent perspectives of RTK ROR1 in cancer.

  12. Association between cagA, vacAi, and dupA genes of Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal pathologies in Chilean patients.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Osses, Esteban; Sáez, Katia; Sanhueza, Enrique; Hebel, Sonja; González, Carlos; Briceño, Carlos; García Cancino, Apolinaria

    2017-03-11

    In addition to the already known cagA gene, novel genetic markers have been associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) virulence: the dupA and vacAi genes. These genes might play an important role as specific markers to determine the clinical outcome of the disease, especially the vacAi gene, which has been expected to be a good marker of severe pathologies like gastric adenocarcinoma. In the present study, the association of cagA, dupA, and vacAi genes with gastroduodenal pathologies in Chilean patients was studied. One hundred and thirty-two patients positive for H. pylori were divided into two groups-non-severe and severe gastric pathologies-and investigated for the presence of cagA, dupA, and vacAi H. pylori virulence genes by PCR. The cagA gene was detected in 20/132 patients (15.2%), the vacAi1 gene was detected in 54/132 patients (40.9%), the vacAi2 gene was detected in 26/132 patients (19.7%), and the dupA gene was detected in 50/132 (37.9%) patients. Logistic regression model analysis showed that the vacAi1 isoform gene in the infected strains and the severity of the diseases outcome were highly associated, causing severe gastric damage that may lead to gastric cancer (p < 0.0001; OR = 8.75; 95% CI 3.54-21.64). Conversely, cagA (p = 0.3507; OR = 1.62; 95% CI 0.59-4.45) and vacAi2 (p = 0.0114; OR = 3.09; 95% CI 1.26-7.60) genes were not associated with damage, while the dupA gene was associated significantly with non-severe clinical outcome (p = 0.0032; OR = 0.25; 95% CI 0.09-0.65). In addition, dupA gene exerts protection against severe gastric pathologies induced by vacAi1 by delaying the outcome of the disease by approximately 20 years.

  13. Chronotypic induction of tyrosine aminotransferase by. cap alpha. -methyl-p-tyrosine. [Rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, A.L.; Ferguson, S.M.; Ehret, C.F.

    1981-04-06

    ..cap alpha..Methyl-p-tyrosine induced hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase activity to different extents depending upon the time of day of administration of the drug. Maximal induction occurred when ..cap alpha..-methyl-p-tyrosine (100 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally during the first several hours of the light phase of the daily cycle, but the magnitude of the induction depended on the nutritional state of the animal. Induction was 4- to 5-fold greater in fasting rats. The effect of ..cap alpha..-methyl-ptyrosine on hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase is believed to be mediated by decreases in hypothalamic norepinephrine. This hypothesis was supported by the demonstration that decreasing levels of hypothalamic norepinephrine at times of day when hypothalamic turnover of norepinephrine was greatest resulted in the greatest induction of tyrosine aminotransferase, while lowering hypothalamic norepinephrine at times when turnover was minimal resulted in minimal induction of tyrosine aminotransferase.

  14. Syntheses of L-tyrosine-related amino acids by tyrosine phenol-lyase of Citrobacter intermedius.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, T; Utagawa, T; Goto, J; Kim, C J; Tani, Y; Kumagai, H; Yamada, H

    1981-06-01

    Degradation of tyrosine to phenol, pyruvate and ammonia by tyrosine phenol-lyase from Citrobacter intermedius (formerly named Escherichia intermedia) is readily reversible at high concentrations of pyruvate and ammonia. Spectrophotometric studies indicate that ammonia is the first substrate which interacts with bound pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Kinetic results show that pyruvate is the second substrate bound, hence phenol must be the third. When an appropriate phenol derivative is substituted for phenol, the corresponding tyrosine analogue can be synthesized. 3-Fluoro-, 2-fluoro-, 3-chloro-, 2-chloro-, 3-bromo-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 3-methyl-, 2-methyl- and 2-methoxy-L-tyrosines have been synthesized by this reaction. By using various phenol derivatives or tyrosine analogues as substrates, the substrate specificity of tyrosine phenol-lyase is investigated and the situation of its active site is discussed.

  15. Different pathways of tyrosine oxidation by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Verweij, H.; Christianse, K.; van Steveninck, J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of OH. scavengers on DOPA and 0,0'-dityrosine generation during ozone-treatment of tyrosine and phenylalanine was studied. The results of these studies are presented in this communication.

  16. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  17. The Tyrosine Aminomutase TAM1 Is Required for β-Tyrosine Biosynthesis in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Aboshi, Takako; Teraishi, Masayoshi; Strickler, Susan R.; Spindel, Jennifer E.; Tung, Chih-Wei; Takata, Ryo; Matsumoto, Fuka; Maesaka, Yoshihiro; McCouch, Susan R.; Okumoto, Yutaka; Mori, Naoki; Jander, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Non-protein amino acids, often isomers of the standard 20 protein amino acids, have defense-related functions in many plant species. A targeted search for jasmonate-induced metabolites in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) identified (R)-β-tyrosine, an isomer of the common amino acid (S)-α-tyrosine in the seeds, leaves, roots, and root exudates of the Nipponbare cultivar. Assays with 119 diverse cultivars showed a distinct presence/absence polymorphism, with β-tyrosine being most prevalent in temperate japonica cultivars. Genetic mapping identified a candidate gene on chromosome 12, which was confirmed to encode a tyrosine aminomutase (TAM1) by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and in vitro enzyme assays. A point mutation in TAM1 eliminated β-tyrosine production in Nipponbare. Rice cultivars that do not produce β-tyrosine have a chromosome 12 deletion that encompasses TAM1. Although β-tyrosine accumulation was induced by the plant defense signaling molecule jasmonic acid, bioassays with hemipteran and lepidopteran herbivores showed no negative effects at physiologically relevant β-tyrosine concentrations. In contrast, root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and other tested dicot plants was inhibited by concentrations as low as 1 μM. As β-tyrosine is exuded into hydroponic medium at higher concentrations, it may contribute to the allelopathic potential of rice. PMID:25901084

  18. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The specialized plasma membrane structures termed caveolae and the caveolar-coat protein caveolin are highly expressed in insulin- sensitive cells such as adipocytes and muscle. Stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with insulin significantly increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin and a 29-kD caveolin-associated protein in caveolin-enriched Triton-insoluble complexes. Maximal phosphorylation occurred within 5 min, and the levels of phosphorylation remained elevated for at least 30 min. The insulin-dose responses for the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin and the 29-kD caveolin-associated protein paralleled those for the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. The stimulation of caveolin tyrosine phosphorylation was specific for insulin and was not observed with PDGF or EGF, although PDGF stimulated the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 29-kD caveolin- associated protein. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin, its associated 29-kD protein, and a 60-kD protein was observed in an in vitro kinase assay after incubation of the caveolin-enriched Triton- insoluble complexes with Mg-ATP, suggesting the presence of an intrinsic tyrosine kinase in these complexes. These fractions contain only trace amounts of the activated insulin receptor. In addition, these complexes contain a 60-kD kinase detected in an in situ gel kinase assay and an approximately 60 kD protein that cross-reacts with an antibody against the Src-family kinase p59Fyn. Thus, the insulin- dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin represents a novel, insulin-specific signal transduction pathway that may involve activation of a tyrosine kinase downstream of the insulin receptor. PMID:7540611

  19. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    He, Rong-jun; Yu, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Ruo-yu; Zhang, Zhong-yin

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs. PMID:25220640

  20. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  1. Horseradish-Peroxidase-Catalyzed Tyrosine Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-02

    The efficiency of protein chemical modification on tyrosine residues with N-methylluminol derivatives was drastically improved by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the previous method, based on the use of hemin and H2 O2 , oxidative side reactions such as cysteine oxidation were problematic for functionalization of proteins selectively on tyrosine residues. Oxidative activation of N-methylluminol derivatives with a minimum amount of H2 O2 prevented the occurrence of oxidative side reactions under HRP-catalyzed conditions. As probes for HRP-catalyzed protein modification, N-methylluminol derivatives showed much higher efficiency than tyramide without inducing oligomerization of probe molecules. Tyrosine modification also proceeded in the presence of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, H2 O2 -free conditions).

  2. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M L; Koty, P P

    1999-01-01

    Due to the limited efficacy of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced malignancy and its excessive toxicity precluding its use in chemoprevention, new therapeutic and preventive strategies have been sought. One of the most interesting of these new approaches is the manipulation of signal transduction pathways. Among the approaches being considered to eventuate such a strategy is the inhibition of autophosphorylation, a critical first step in the signal transduction pathways of many cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases, as well as of non-receptor tyrosine kinases. This article is intended to review those tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently in preclinical development, for which there are data to support consideration for their use in chemoprevention or cancer treatment. We will focus upon those agents that have received attention in the past several years.

  3. Total leukocyte counts and neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratios among Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with peptic ulcers: independent of bacterial CagA status.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, A; Akbarpoor, V; Nabizadeh, M; Nemati, M; Rezayati, M T

    2013-01-01

    Elevated leukocyte counts can be a marker of inflammation and infection. The aim of this study was to determine the total leukocyte count and neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR) among Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with peptic ulcer disease (PU) and among asymptomatic subjects (AS) and to evaluate if there is an association between these lab values and the presence of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA). Sixty H. pylori-infected PU patients, 63 AS carriers and 32 healthy H. pylori-negative subjects (controls) were included in the study. The total white blood cell (WBC) counts and differentials were determined using standard hematological methods. The mean total WBC count, mean neutrophil count and NLCR were significantly higher among PU patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Similarly, the mean WBC count, mean neutrophil count and NLCR were significantly higher among AS patients than in controls (p < 0.005, p < 0.001 and p < 0.02, respectively). The differences of mean WBC counts mean neutrophil counts and NLCR were also significantly different (p < 0.005, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively) between the PU and AS patients. There were no differences in the PU and AS patients in regard to anti-CagA positivity. These results show the CagA factor was not associated with the presence or absence of symptoms in H. pylori infected patients.

  4. Capsaicin consumption, Helicobacter pylori CagA status and IL1B-31C>T genotypes: a host and environment interaction in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Camargo, M Constanza; Schneider, Barbara G; Sicinschi, Liviu A; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Correa, Pelayo; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2012-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has been associated with a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to most countries, available information on GC mortality trends showed a gradual increase in Mexico. Our aim was to explore potential interactions among dietary (chili pepper consumption), infectious (Helicobacter pylori) and genetic factors (IL1B-31 genotypes) on GC risk. The study was performed in three areas of Mexico, with different GC mortality rates. We included 158 GC patients and 317 clinical controls. Consumption of capsaicin (Cap), the pungent active substance of chili peppers, was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. H. pylori CagA status was assessed by ELISA, and IL1B-31 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays and Pyrosequencing in DNA samples. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate potential interactions. Moderate to high Cap consumption synergistically increased GC risk in genetically susceptible individuals (IL1B-31C allele carriers) infected with the more virulent H. pylori (CagA+) strains. The combined presence of these factors might explain the absence of a decreasing trend for GC in Mexico. However, further research on gene-environment interactions is required to fully understand the factors determining GC patterns in susceptible populations, with the aim of recommending preventive measures for high risk individuals.

  5. Haemophilus ducreyi LspA proteins are tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophage-encoded protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaiping; Mock, Jason R; Greenberg, Steven; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Hansen, Eric J

    2008-10-01

    The LspA proteins (LspA1 and LspA2) of Haemophilus ducreyi are necessary for this pathogen to inhibit the phagocytic activity of macrophage cell lines, an event that can be correlated with a reduction in the level of active Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in these eukaryotic cells. During studies investigating this inhibitory mechanism, it was discovered that the LspA proteins themselves were tyrosine phosphorylated after wild-type H. ducreyi cells were incubated with macrophages. LspA proteins in cell-free concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid could also be tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophages. This ability to tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins was not limited to immune cell lineages but could be accomplished by both HeLa and COS-7 cells. Kinase inhibitor studies with macrophages demonstrated that the Src family PTKs were required for this tyrosine phosphorylation activity. In silico methods and site-directed mutagenesis were used to identify EPIYG and EPVYA motifs in LspA1 that contained tyrosines that were targets for phosphorylation. A total of four tyrosines could be phosphorylated in LspA1, with LspA2 containing eight predicted tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. Purified LspA1 fusion proteins containing either the EPIYG or EPVYA motifs were shown to be phosphorylated by purified Src PTK in vitro. Macrophage lysates could also tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins and an LspA1 fusion protein via a mechanism that was dependent on the presence of both divalent cations and ATP. Several motifs known to interact with or otherwise affect eukaryotic kinases were identified in the LspA proteins.

  6. Haemophilus ducreyi LspA Proteins Are Tyrosine Phosphorylated by Macrophage-Encoded Protein Tyrosine Kinases▿

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kaiping; Mock, Jason R.; Greenberg, Steven; van Oers, Nicolai S. C.; Hansen, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    The LspA proteins (LspA1 and LspA2) of Haemophilus ducreyi are necessary for this pathogen to inhibit the phagocytic activity of macrophage cell lines, an event that can be correlated with a reduction in the level of active Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in these eukaryotic cells. During studies investigating this inhibitory mechanism, it was discovered that the LspA proteins themselves were tyrosine phosphorylated after wild-type H. ducreyi cells were incubated with macrophages. LspA proteins in cell-free concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid could also be tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophages. This ability to tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins was not limited to immune cell lineages but could be accomplished by both HeLa and COS-7 cells. Kinase inhibitor studies with macrophages demonstrated that the Src family PTKs were required for this tyrosine phosphorylation activity. In silico methods and site-directed mutagenesis were used to identify EPIYG and EPVYA motifs in LspA1 that contained tyrosines that were targets for phosphorylation. A total of four tyrosines could be phosphorylated in LspA1, with LspA2 containing eight predicted tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. Purified LspA1 fusion proteins containing either the EPIYG or EPVYA motifs were shown to be phosphorylated by purified Src PTK in vitro. Macrophage lysates could also tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins and an LspA1 fusion protein via a mechanism that was dependent on the presence of both divalent cations and ATP. Several motifs known to interact with or otherwise affect eukaryotic kinases were identified in the LspA proteins. PMID:18678665

  7. RTKdb: database of receptor tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Grassot, Julien; Mouchiroud, Guy; Perrière, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK) are transmembrane receptors specifically found in metazoans. They represent an excellent model for studying evolution of cellular processes in metazoans because they encompass large families of modular proteins and belong to a major family of contingency generating molecules in eukaryotic cells: the protein kinases. Because tyrosine kinases have been under close scrutiny for many years in various species, they are associated with a wealth of information, mainly in mammals. Presently, most categories of RTK were identified in mammals, but in a near future other model species will be sequenced, and will bring us RTKs from other metazoan clades. Thus, collecting RTK sequences would provide a good starting point as a new model for comparative and evolutionary studies applying to multigene families. In this context, we are developing the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase database (RTKdb), which is the only database on tyrosine kinase receptors presently available. In this database, protein sequences from eight model metazoan species are organized under the format previously used for the HOVERGEN, HOBACGEN and NUREBASE systems. RTKdb can be accessed through the PBIL (Pôle Bioinformatique Lyonnais) World Wide Web server at http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/RTKdb/, or through the FamFetch graphical user interface available at the same address. PMID:12520021

  8. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  9. Brain catechol synthesis - Control by brain tyrosine concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.; Larin, F.; Mostafapour, S.; Fernstrom, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Brain catechol synthesis was estimated by measuring the rate at which brain dopa levels rose following decarboxylase inhibition. Dopa accumulation was accelerated by tyrosine administration, and decreased by treatments that lowered brain tyrosine concentrations (for example, intraperitoneal tryptophan, leucine, or parachlorophenylalanine). A low dose of phenylalanine elevated brain tyrosine without accelerating dopa synthesis. Our findings raise the possibility that nutritional and endocrine factors might influence brain catecholamine synthesis by controlling the availability of tyrosine.

  10. A novel proteomic approach for specific identification of tyrosine kinase substrates using [13C]tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Ibarrola, Nieves; Molina, Henrik; Iwahori, Akiko; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2004-04-16

    Proteomic studies to find substrates of tyrosine kinases generally rely on identification of protein bands that are "pulled down" by antiphosphotyrosine antibodies from ligand-stimulated samples. One can obtain erroneous results from such experiments because of two major reasons. First, some proteins might be basally phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in the absence of ligand stimulation. Second, proteins can bind non-specifically to the antibodies or the affinity matrix. Induction of phosphorylation of proteins by ligand must therefore be confirmed by a different approach, which is not always feasible. We have developed a novel proteomic approach to identify substrates of tyrosine kinases in signaling pathways studies based on in vivo labeling of proteins with "light" (12C-labeled) or "heavy" (13C-labeled) tyrosine. This stable isotope labeling in cell culture method enables the unequivocal identification of tyrosine kinase substrates, as peptides derived from true substrates give rise to a unique signature in a mass spectrometry experiment. By using this approach, from a single experiment, we have successfully identified several known substrates of insulin signaling pathway and a novel substrate, polymerase I and transcript release factor, a protein that is implicated in the control of RNA metabolism and regulation of type I collagen promoters. This approach is amenable to high throughput global studies as it simplifies the specific identification of substrates of tyrosine kinases as well as serine/threonine kinases using mass spectrometry.

  11. The Mechanism of the Tyrosine Transporter TyrP Supports a Proton Motive Tyrosine Decarboxylation Pathway in Lactobacillus brevis

    PubMed Central

    Wolken, Wout A. M.; Lucas, Patrick M.; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2006-01-01

    The tyrosine decarboxylase operon of Lactobacillus brevis IOEB9809 contains, adjacent to the tyrosine decarboxylase gene, a gene for TyrP, a putative tyrosine transporter. The two genes potentially form a proton motive tyrosine decarboxylation pathway. The putative tyrosine transporter gene of L. brevis was expressed in Lactococcus lactis and functionally characterized using right-side-out membranes. The transporter very efficiently catalyzes homologous tyrosine-tyrosine exchange and heterologous exchange between tyrosine and its decarboxylation product tyramine. Tyrosine-tyramine exchange was shown to be electrogenic. In addition to the exchange mode, the transporter catalyzes tyrosine uniport but at a much lower rate. Analysis of the substrate specificity of the transporter by use of a set of 19 different tyrosine substrate analogues showed that the main interactions between the protein and the substrates involve the amino group and the phenyl ring with the para hydroxyl group. The carboxylate group that is removed in the decarboxylation reaction does not seem to contribute to the affinity of the protein for the substrates significantly. The properties of the TyrP protein are those typical for precursor-product exchangers that operate in proton motive decarboxylation pathways. It is proposed that tyrosine decarboxylation in L. brevis results in proton motive force generation by an indirect proton pumping mechanism. PMID:16513749

  12. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer L.; Kuntz, Steven G.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Ror proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes, including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement, and cell polarity. While Ror (receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor) proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species now establish that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either activate or repress transcription of Wnt target genes and can modulate Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnt ligands. New evidence implicates Ror proteins in planar cell polarity (PCP), an alternative Wnt pathway. Here, we review the progress made in understanding these mysterious proteins and in particular we focus on their function as Wnt receptors. PMID:18848778

  13. Tyrosine Kinase Display of Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    transdifferentiation . The fact that some prostate cancer cell lines, such as LNCaP, can undergo NE differentiation suggests that at least a subset of NE cells is...Katz, C. A. Olsson, and R. Buttyan. 1997. Transdifferentiation of cultured human prostate cells to a neuroendocrine cell phenotype in a hormone...in the above-mentioned cases 3), and some of these cells can be induced to transdifferentiate are tyrosine kinases, which are known initiators of

  14. Behavioral Effects of Tyrosine during Sustained Wakefulness,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Hefti, & Melamed, 1981). Tryptophan , a sleep promoter (Braverman, 1987), is a precursor of serotonin, which in turn is a precursor of melatonin...Melatonin also has known sleep-inducing effects (see Kelly et al., 1989, for a review). Tyrosine ingestion may reduce the levels of available tryptophan ...catecholamines, its possible role in decreasing brain levels of tryptophan , and its relative safety make it worthy of further study as a countermeasure to

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta/Smads signaling induces transcription of the cell type-restricted ankyrin repeat protein CARP gene through CAGA motif in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kanai, H; Tanaka, T; Aihara, Y; Takeda, S; Kawabata, M; Miyazono, K; Nagai, R; Kurabayashi, M

    2001-01-19

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta plays a major role in the development of vascular diseases. Despite the pleiotropic effects of TGF-ss on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), only a few genes have been characterized as direct targets of TGF-beta in VSMCs. Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) has been thought to be expressed exclusively in the heart. In the present study, we showed that CARP is expressed in the vasculature after balloon injury and in cultured VSMCs in response to TGF-beta. Analysis of a half-life of the cytoplasmic CARP mRNA levels and the transient transfection of the CARP promoter/luciferase gene indicates that the regulation of CARP expression is increased by TGF-beta at the transcriptional level. Transfection of expression vectors encoding Smads significantly activated the CARP promoter/luciferase activity. Deletion analysis and site-specific mutagenesis of the CARP promoter indicate that TGF-beta response element is localized to CAGA motif at -108 bp relative to the transcription start site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the binding activity to the CAGA motif was increased in nuclear extracts of cultured VSMCs by TGF-beta. Cells transfected with adenovirus vector expressing CARP showed a significant decrease in DNA synthesis. Overexpression of CARP enhanced the TGF-beta-mediated inhibition of the DNA synthesis. These data indicate that CARP is a downstream target of TGF-beta/Smad signaling in VSMCs and suggest a role of CARP in mediation of the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta on the proliferation of VSMCs.

  16. Helicobacter pylori genotyping from American indigenous groups shows novel Amerindian vacA and cagA alleles and Asian, African and European admixture.

    PubMed

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America.

  17. Helicobacter pylori Genotyping from American Indigenous Groups Shows Novel Amerindian vacA and cagA Alleles and Asian, African and European Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E.; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America. PMID:22073291

  18. Association of plasma ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine ratio with responsiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in dialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Kun, Szilárd; Mikolás, Esztella; Molnár, Gergo A; Sélley, Eszter; Laczy, Boglárka; Csiky, Botond; Kovács, Tibor; Wittmann, István

    2014-09-01

    Objectives Patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are often ESA-hyporesponsive associated with free radical production. Hydroxyl free radical converts phenylalanine into ortho-tyrosine, while physiological isomer para-tyrosine is formed enzymatically, mainly in the kidney. Production of 'para-tyrosine' is decreased in ESRF and it can be replaced by ortho-tyrosine in proteins. Our aim was to study the role of tyrosines in ESA-responsiveness. Methods Four groups of volunteers were involved in our cross-sectional study: healthy volunteers (CONTR; n = 16), patients on hemodialysis without ESA-treatment (non-ESA-HD; n = 8), hemodialyzed patients with ESA-treatment (ESA-HD; n = 40), and patients on continuous peritoneal dialysis (CAPD; n = 21). Plasma ortho-, para-tyrosine, and phenylalanine levels were detected using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-method. ESA-demand was expressed by ESA-dose, ESA-dose/body weight, and erythropoietin resistance index1 (ERI1, weekly ESA-dose/body weight/hemoglobin). Results We found significantly lower para-tyrosine levels in all groups of dialyzed patients when compared with control subjects, while in contrast ortho-tyrosine levels and ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine ratio were comparatively significantly higher in dialyzed patients. Among groups of dialyzed patients the ortho-tyrosine level and ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine ratio were significantly higher in ESA-HD than in the non-ESA-HD and CAPD groups. There was a correlation between weekly ESA-dose/body weight, ERI1, and ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine ratio (r = 0.441, P = 0.001; r = 0.434, P = 0.001, respectively). Our most important finding was that the ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine ratio proved to be an independent predictor of ERI1 (β = 0.330, P = 0.016). In these multivariate regression models most of the known predictors of ESA-hyporesponsiveness were included. Discussion Our findings may

  19. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. PMID:23566956

  20. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  1. Spectroscopy of jet-cooled tyrosine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Chin Khuan; Sulkes, Mark

    1991-05-01

    Using fluorescence-based techniques (excitation and emission spectra lifetimes), we have studied the jet-cooled tyrosine derivatives tyramine and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid (HPA). For solvent addition resulting in small, mainly one adduct complexes, there is a high degree of analogy with the results for the corresponding analogs of the amino acid tryptophan. In particular, for tyramine, as had been the case with its tryptophan analog tryptamine, addition of one -OH bearing solvent molecule at the α-amine apparently results in a complex in a single conformation.

  2. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for melanin, should possess more enzymes to control tyrosine metabolism. Therefore, the question of why insects actually possess more tyrosine metabolic enzymes is quite interesting. It has long been known that insects rely heavily on tyrosine metabolism for cuticle hardening and for innate immune responses, and these evolutionary constraints are likely the key answers to this question. In terms of melanogenesis, mammals also possess a high level of regulation; yet mammalian systems possess more mechanisms for detoxification whereas insects accelerate pathways like melanogenesis and therefore must bear increased oxidative pressure. Our research group has had the opportunity to characterize the structure and function of many key proteins involved in tyrosine metabolism from both insects and mammals. In this mini review we will give a brief overview of our research on tyrosine metabolic enzymes in the scope of an evolutionary perspective of mammals in comparison to insects.

  3. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  4. Euglena mitochondria and chloroplasts form tyrosine-O-sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Saidha, T.; Hanfstingl, U.; Schiff, J.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Mitochondria from light-grown wild-type Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris Cori or dark-grown mutant W{sub 10}BSmL incubated with {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and ATP, or with {sup 14}C-tyrosine, non-radioactive sulfate and ATP accumulate a labeled compound in the medium. Since this compound shows exact coelectrophoresis with tyrosine-O-sulfate (TOS) at pH 2.0, 5.8 or 8.0., yields sulfate and tyrosine on acid hydrolysis, and treatment with aryl sulfatase from Aerobacter aerogenes yields sulfate and tyrosine but no tyrosine methyl ester, it is identified as TOS. No TOS is found outside purified developing chloroplasts incubated with {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and ATP, but both chloroplasts and mitochondria form to {sup 35}S externally when incubated with adenosine 3{prime} phosphate 5{prime}phospho({sup 35}S) sulfate (PAP{sup 35}S). Since no tyrosine need be added, tyrosine is provided from endogenous sources. Although TOS is found in the free pool of Euglena cells it cannot be detected in proteins of cells or mucus ruling our sulfation of tyrosine of protein or incorporation of TOS into proteins. The system forming TOS is membrane-bound and may be involved in tyrosine transport.

  5. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition: An Approach to Drug Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitzki, Alexander; Gazit, Aviv

    1995-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and signaling processes in the cells of the immune system. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflammatory responses and to diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and psoriasis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases and the signaling pathways they activate may provide a useful basis for drug development. This article summarizes recent progress in the development of PTK inhibitors and demonstrates their potential use in the treatment of disease.

  6. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  7. Abnormal tyrosine metabolism in chronic cluster headache.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Giovanni; Leone, Massimo; Bussone, Gennaro; Fiore, Paola Di; Bolner, Andrea; Aguggia, Marco; Saracco, Maria Gabriella; Perini, Francesco; Giordano, Giuseppe; Gucciardi, Antonina; Leon, Alberta

    2017-02-01

    Objective Episodic cluster headache is characterized by abnormalities in tyrosine metabolism (i.e. elevated levels of dopamine, tyramine, octopamine and synephrine and low levels of noradrenalin in plasma and platelets.) It is unknown, however, if such biochemical anomalies are present and/or constitute a predisposing factor in chronic cluster headache. To test this hypothesis, we measured the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline together with those of elusive amines, such as tyramine, octopamine and synephrine, in plasma of chronic cluster patients and control individuals. Methods Plasma levels of dopamine, noradrenaline and trace amines, including tyramine, octopamine and synephrine, were measured in a group of 23 chronic cluster headache patients (10 chronic cluster ab initio and 13 transformed from episodic cluster), and 16 control participants. Results The plasma levels of dopamine, noradrenaline and tyramine were several times higher in chronic cluster headache patients compared with controls. The levels of octopamine and synephrine were significantly lower in plasma of these patients with respect to control individuals. Conclusions These results suggest that anomalies in tyrosine metabolism play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache and constitute a predisposing factor for the transformation of the episodic into a chronic form of this primary headache.

  8. VacA and CagA Status as Biomarker of Two Opposite End Outcomes of Helicobacter pylori Infection (Gastric Cancer and Duodenal Ulcer) in a Moroccan Population

    PubMed Central

    El Khadir, Mounia; Alaoui Boukhris, Samia; Benajah, Dafr-Allah; El Rhazi, Karima; Ibrahimi, Sidi Adil; El Abkari, Mohamed; Harmouch, Taoufiq; Nejjari, Chakib; Mahmoud, Mustapha; Benlemlih, Mohamed; Bennani, Bahia

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces inflammation of the gastric mucosa, which may progress to precancerous lesions leading to gastric cancer. Pathological determinism is associated to some virulence genes of the bacterium, notably the vacA and cagA genes. The present study aimed to determine the H. pylori genotypes distribution and their association with sex, age and gastric diseases in a Moroccan population. Gastric biopsy was taken from 1079 consenting patients. The specimens were processed by PCR to identify H. pylori and to determine the genotypic profile by PCR characterizing vacA s, vacA m and vacA i regions directly from biopsies H. pylori positives. VacA genotyping revealed the predominance of vacA m2 (53.2%), vacA s2 (52.9%) and vacA i2 (52%). The most virulent vacA alleles (s1, i1 and m1) are more predominant in men (47.3%, 41.9% and 46.1% respectively) than in women (38.3%, 33.3% and 37% respectively). However, the association between vacA genotypes and age did not reach a statistical significant value. Logistic regression analysis results show that vacA i1m1 and vacA i1m2 genotypes were strongly associated with the risk of GC, the Odds Ratio (95% confidence interval) was 29.73 [5.08–173.73] and 9.17 [2.06–40.82] respectively, while vacAs1/cagA+ seems to be a risk factor for DU since it is inversely associated with GC (OR was 0.13 [0.02–0.75]. The results of this study suggest that vacA i1 genotype independently to vacAm status may be of a clinical usefulness and will help to identify patients at a high risk of GC development. PMID:28125638

  9. Toxicological disruption of signaling homeostasis: Tyrosine phosphatses as targets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) comprised a diverse group of enzymes whose activity opposes that of the tyrosine kinases. As such, the PTP have critical roles in maintaining signaling quiescence in resting cells and in restoring homeostasis by effecting signal termination...

  10. Asymmetrical phosphorylation and function of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif tyrosines in B cell antigen receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Pao, L I; Famiglietti, S J; Cambier, J C

    1998-04-01

    CD79a and CD79b function as transducers of B cell antigen receptor signals via a cytoplasmic sequence, termed the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). ITAMs contain two conserved tyrosines that may become phosphorylated upon receptor aggregation and bind distinct effectors by virtue of the distinct preference of phosphotyrosyl-containing sequences for SH2 domains. To explore the function of CD79a and CD79b ITAM tyrosines, we created membrane molecules composed of MHC class II I-Ak extracellular and transmembrane domains, and CD79a or CD79b cytoplasmic domains in which one or both of the ITAM tyrosines were mutated to phenylalanine. Functional analysis revealed that both ITAM tyrosines are required for ligand-induced Syk phosphorylation. However CD79a-ITAM and CD79b-ITAM tyrosine phosphorylations were asymmetrical, with >80% of phosphorylation occurring on the N-terminal tyrosine (Y-E-G-L). Thus, these findings suggest that following receptor ligation, only a minor proportion of phosphorylated ITAMs are doubly phosphorylated and thus can engage Syk. Only the N-terminal ITAM tyrosine of CD79a was required for ligand-mediated phosphorylation of the receptor and a subset of downstream substrates, including p62, p110, and Shc, and for Ca2+ mobilization. However, responses mediated through CD79b exhibited a greater dependence on the presence of both tyrosines. Neither tyrosine in CD79a or CD79b appeared absolutely essential for Src family kinase phosphorylation. These results indicate that phosphorylations of the tyrosines in CD79a and CD79b occur with very different stoichiometry, and the respective tyrosyl residues have distinct functions.

  11. Importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in receptor kinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-05-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that is known to regulate receptor kinase (RK)-mediated signaling in animals. Plant RKs are annotated as serine/threonine kinases, but recent work has revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation is also crucial for the activation of RK-mediated signaling in plants. These initial observations have paved the way for subsequent detailed studies on the mechanism of activation of plant RKs and the biological relevance of tyrosine phosphorylation for plant growth and immunity. In this Opinion article we review recent reports on the contribution of RK tyrosine phosphorylation in plant growth and immunity; we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a major regulatory role in the initiation and transduction of RK-mediated signaling in plants.

  12. Food for creativity: tyrosine promotes deep thinking.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; de Haan, Annelies M; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that creative people sometimes use food to overcome mental blocks and lack of inspiration, but empirical support for this possibility is still lacking. In this study, we investigated whether creativity in convergent- and divergent-thinking tasks is promoted by the food supplement L-Tyrosine (TYR)-a biochemical precursor of dopamine, which is assumed to drive cognitive control and creativity. We found no evidence for an impact of TYR on divergent thinking ("brainstorming") but it did promote convergent ("deep") thinking. As convergent thinking arguably requires more cognitive top-down control, this finding suggests that TYR can facilitate control-hungry creative operations. Hence, the food we eat may affect the way we think.

  13. Cre Recombinase and Other Tyrosine Recombinases.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Gretchen; Bohm, Andrew; Hauber, Joachim; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Buchholz, Frank

    2016-10-26

    Tyrosine-type site-specific recombinases (T-SSRs) have opened new avenues for the predictable modification of genomes as they enable precise genome editing in heterologous hosts. These enzymes are ubiquitous in eubacteria, prevalent in archaea and temperate phages, present in certain yeast strains, but barely found in higher eukaryotes. As tools they find increasing use for the generation and systematic modification of genomes in a plethora of organisms. If applied in host organisms, they enable precise DNA cleavage and ligation without the gain or loss of nucleotides. Criteria directing the choice of the most appropriate T-SSR system for genetic engineering include that, whenever possible, the recombinase should act independent of cofactors and that the target sequences should be long enough to be unique in a given genome. This review is focused on recent advancements in our mechanistic understanding of simple T-SSRs and their application in developmental and synthetic biology, as well as in biomedical research.

  14. R3 receptor tyrosine phosphatases: conserved regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and tubular organ development.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mili; Zinn, Kai

    2015-01-01

    R3 receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are characterized by extracellular domains composed solely of long chains of fibronectin type III repeats, and by the presence of a single phosphatase domain. There are five proteins in mammals with this structure, two in Drosophila and one in Caenorhabditis elegans. R3 RPTPs are selective regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, and a number of different RTKs have been shown to be direct targets for their phosphatase activities. Genetic studies in both invertebrate model systems and in mammals have shown that R3 RPTPs are essential for tubular organ development. They also have important functions during nervous system development. R3 RPTPs are likely to be tumor suppressors in a number of types of cancer.

  15. R3 receptor tyrosine phosphatases: conserved regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and tubular organ development

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mili; Zinn, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Summary R3 receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are characterized by extracellular domains composed solely of long chains of fibronectin type III repeats, and by the presence of a single phosphatase domain. There are five proteins in mammals with this structure, two in Drosophila, and one in Caenorhabditis elegans. R3 RPTPs are selective regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, and a number of different RTKs have been shown to be direct targets for their phosphatase activities. Genetic studies in both invertebrate model systems and in mammals have shown that R3 RPTPs are essential for tubular organ development. They also have important functions during nervous system development. R3 RPTPs are likely to be tumor suppressors in a number of types of cancer. PMID:25242281

  16. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Expression in Canine Liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Avallone, G; Pellegrino, V; Roccabianca, P; Lepri, E; Crippa, L; Beha, G; De Tolla, L; Sarli, G

    2017-03-01

    The expression of tyrosine kinase receptors is attracting major interest in human and veterinary oncological pathology because of their role as targets for adjuvant therapies. Little is known about tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression in canine liposarcoma (LP), a soft tissue sarcoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of the TKRs fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ); their ligands, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB); and c-kit in canine LP. Immunohistochemical labeling was categorized as high or low expression and compared with the mitotic count and MIB-1-based proliferation index. Fifty canine LPs were examined, classified, and graded. Fourteen cases were classified as well differentiated, 7 as myxoid, 25 as pleomorphic, and 4 as dedifferentiated. Seventeen cases were grade 1, 26 were grade 2, and 7 were grade 3. A high expression of FGF2, FGFR1, PDGFB, and PDGFRβ was identified in 62% (31/50), 68% (34/50), 81.6% (40/49), and 70.8% (34/48) of the cases, respectively. c-kit was expressed in 12.5% (6/48) of the cases. Mitotic count negatively correlated with FGF2 ( R = -0.41; P < .01), being lower in cases with high FGF2 expression, and positively correlated with PDGFRβ ( R = 0.33; P < .01), being higher in cases with high PDGFRβ expression. No other statistically significant correlations were identified. These results suggest that the PDGFRβ-mediated pathway may have a role in the progression of canine LP and may thus represent a promising target for adjuvant cancer therapies.

  17. OH cleavage from tyrosine: debunking a myth

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Charles S.; Carmichael, Ian; Garman, Elspeth F

    2017-01-01

    During macromolecular X-ray crystallography experiments, protein crystals held at 100 K have been widely reported to exhibit reproducible bond scission events at doses on the order of several MGy. With the objective to mitigate the impact of radiation damage events on valid structure determination, it is essential to correctly understand the radiation chemistry mechanisms at play. OH-cleavage from tyrosine residues is regularly cited as amongst the most available damage pathways in protein crystals at 100 K, despite a lack of widespread reports of this phenomenon in protein crystal radiation damage studies. Furthermore, no clear mechanism for phenolic C—O bond cleavage in tyrosine has been reported, with the tyrosyl radical known to be relatively robust and long-lived in both aqueous solutions and the solid state. Here, the initial findings of Tyr –OH group damage in a myrosinase protein crystal have been reviewed. Consistent with that study, at increasing doses, clear electron density loss was detectable local to Tyr –OH groups. A systematic investigation performed on a range of protein crystal damage series deposited in the Protein Data Bank has established that Tyr –OH electron density loss is not generally a dominant damage pathway in protein crystals at 100 K. Full Tyr aromatic ring displacement is here proposed to account for instances of observable Tyr –OH electron density loss, with the original myrosinase data shown to be consistent with such a damage model. Systematic analysis of the effects of other environmental factors, including solvent accessibility and proximity to di­sulfide bonds or hydrogen bond interactions, is also presented. Residues in known active sites showed enhanced sensitivity to radiation-induced disordering, as has previously been reported. PMID:28009542

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors by non-receptor tyrosine kinases: roles in depression-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q.

    2016-01-01

    Several key members of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase (nRTK) family are abundantly present within excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. These neuron-enriched nRTKs interact with glutamate receptors and phosphorylate the receptors at tyrosine sites. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor is a direct substrate of nRTKs and has been extensively investigated in its phosphorylation responses to nRTKs. The α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor is the other glutamate receptor subtype that is subject to nRTK-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation. Recently, group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/5) were found to be sensitive to nRTKs. Robust tyrosine phosphorylation may occur in C-terminal tails of mGluR5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors is either constitutive or induced activity-dependently by changing cellular and/or synaptic input. Through inducing tyrosine phosphorylation, nRTKs regulate trafficking, subcellular distribution, and function of modified receptors. Available data show that nRTK-glutamate receptor interactions and tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptors undergo drastic adaptations in mood disorders such as major depressive disorder. The remodeling of the nRTK-glutamate receptor interplay contributes to the long-lasting pathophysiology and symptomology of depression. This review summarizes the recent progress in tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of nRTKs in regulating glutamate receptors and depression-like behavior. PMID:26942227

  19. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  20. Facile and Stabile Linkages through Tyrosine: Bioconjugation Strategies with the Tyrosine-Click Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Hitoshi; Nagano, Masanobu; Gavrilyuk, Julia; Hakamata, Wataru; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    The scope, chemoselectivity, and utility of the click-like tyrosine labeling reaction with 4-phenyl-3H-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5(4H)-diones (PTADs) is reported. To study the utility and chemoselectivity of PTAD derivatives in peptide and protein chemistry, we synthesized PTAD derivatives possessing azide, alkyne, and ketone groups and studied their reactions with amino acid derivatives and peptides of increasing complexity. With proteins we studied the compatibility of the tyrosine click reaction with cysteine and lysine-targeted labeling approaches and demonstrate that chemoselective tri-functionalization of proteins is readily achieved. In particular cases, we noted PTAD decomposition resulted in formation of a putative isocyanate by-product that was promiscuous in labeling. This side reaction product, however, was readily scavenged by the addition of a small amount of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol (Tris) to the reaction medium. To study the potential of the tyrosine click reaction to introduce poly(ethylene) glycol chains onto proteins (PEGylation), we demonstrate that this novel reagent provides for the selective PEGylation of chymotrypsinogen whereas traditional succinimide-based PEGylation targeting lysine residues provided a more diverse range of PEGylated products. Finally, we applied the tyrosine click reaction to create a novel antibody drug conjugate. For this purpose, we synthesized a PTAD derivative linked to the HIV entry inhibitor aplaviroc. Labeling of the antibody trastuzumab with this reagent provided a labeled antibody conjugate that demonstrated potent HIV-1 neutralization activity demonstrating the potential of this reaction in creating protein conjugates with small molecules. The tyrosine click linkage demonstrated stability to extremes of pH, temperature and exposure to human blood plasma indicating that this linkage is significantly more robust than maleimide-type linkages that are commonly employed in bioconjugations. These studies

  1. Facile and stabile linkages through tyrosine: bioconjugation strategies with the tyrosine-click reaction.

    PubMed

    Ban, Hitoshi; Nagano, Masanobu; Gavrilyuk, Julia; Hakamata, Wataru; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-04-17

    The scope, chemoselectivity, and utility of the click-like tyrosine labeling reaction with 4-phenyl-3H-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5(4H)-diones (PTADs) is reported. To study the utility and chemoselectivity of PTAD derivatives in peptide and protein chemistry, we synthesized PTAD derivatives possessing azide, alkyne, and ketone groups and studied their reactions with amino acid derivatives and peptides of increasing complexity. With proteins we studied the compatibility of the tyrosine click reaction with cysteine and lysine-targeted labeling approaches and demonstrate that chemoselective trifunctionalization of proteins is readily achieved. In particular cases, we noted that PTAD decomposition resulted in formation of a putative isocyanate byproduct that was promiscuous in labeling. This side reaction product, however, was readily scavenged by the addition of a small amount of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol (Tris) to the reaction medium. To study the potential of the tyrosine click reaction to introduce poly(ethylene glycol) chains onto proteins (PEGylation), we demonstrate that this novel reagent provides for the selective PEGylation of chymotrypsinogen, whereas traditional succinimide-based PEGylation targeting lysine residues provided a more diverse range of PEGylated products. Finally, we applied the tyrosine click reaction to create a novel antibody-drug conjugate. For this purpose, we synthesized a PTAD derivative linked to the HIV entry inhibitor aplaviroc. Labeling of the antibody trastuzumab with this reagent provided a labeled antibody conjugate that demonstrated potent HIV-1 neutralization activity demonstrating the potential of this reaction in creating protein conjugates with small molecules. The tyrosine click linkage demonstrated stability to extremes of pH, temperature, and exposure to human blood plasma indicating that this linkage is significantly more robust than maleimide-type linkages that are commonly employed in bioconjugations. These

  2. Dopamine release in rat striatum - Physiological coupling to tyrosine supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    During, Matthew J.; Acworth, Ian N.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor dopamine release in rat striatal extracellular fluid following the intraperitoneal administration of dopamine's precursor amino acid, L-tyrosine. Dopamine concentrations in dialysates increased transiently after tyrosine (50-100 mg/kg) administration. Pretreatment with haloperidol or the partial lesioning of nigrostriatal neurons enhanced the effect of tyrosine on dopamine release, and haloperidol also prolonged this effect. These data suggest that nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are responsive to changes in precursor availability under basal conditions, but that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms limit the magnitude and duration of this effect.

  3. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori vacA, cagA, cagE, oipA, iceA, babA2 and babB genotypes in Iranian dyspeptic patients.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Hossein; Jafari, Fereshteh; Baghaei, Kaveh; Shokrzadeh, Leila; Abdi, Saeed; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Mohammadzadeh, Alireza

    2017-04-01

    There is diversity in clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection in different regions. Microbial, host and environmental factors seem to be reason of such variation. Considering microbial factors, we studied H. pylori genotypes and their association with clinical feature of the infection. Overall 160 H. pylori-positive patients were enrolled in this study. Clinical information and biopsy were collected from each patient. The presence of the major virulence genes were determined by PCR. Regardless to clinical outcomes, vacA, cagA, cagE, oipA, iceA1, babA2 and babB genes was positive in 100%, 69%, 51%, 55%, 26%,78% and 28% of 160 strains respectively. The s1m2 was more common vacA allels and s1a and m1a were predominant s and m regions. In patient with gastric cancer (GC), the oipA was less frequent while the iceA1 was the most common. The babA2 was common in all patient groups. The babB was significantly observed in strains isolated from patients with GC. There were significant association among cagA status with presence of vacAs1, vacAm2, cagE, oipA, iceA1 and babA2. Presence of the babB and oipA was connected with higher and lower risk for GC respectively. There was no association between the cagA, vacA, cagE or iceA status and clinical outcome in patients in Iran. We showed that presence of the babB and iceA1 were significantly connected with higher risk for gastric cancer development in Iranian dyspeptic patients while H. pylori isolates with positive oipA had little threat for leading patients to cancer.

  4. Therapeutic drug monitoring and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Herviou, Pauline; Thivat, Emilie; Richard, Damien; Roche, Lucie; Dohou, Joyce; Pouget, Mélanie; Eschalier, Alain; Durando, Xavier; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic activity of drugs can be optimized by establishing an individualized dosage, based on the measurement of the drug concentration in the serum, particularly if the drugs are characterized by an inter-individual variation in pharmacokinetics that results in an under- or overexposure to treatment. In recent years, several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to block intracellular signaling pathways in tumor cells. These oral drugs are candidates for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) due to their high inter-individual variability for therapeutic and toxic effects. Following a literature search on PubMed, studies on TKIs and their pharmacokinetic characteristics, plasma quantification and inter-individual variability was studied. TDM is commonly used in various medical fields, including cardiology and psychiatry, but is not often applied in oncology. Plasma concentration monitoring has been thoroughly studied for imatinib, in order to evaluate the usefulness of TDM. The measurement of plasma concentration can be performed by various analytical techniques, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry being the reference method. This method is currently used to monitor the efficacy and tolerability of imatinib treatments. Although TDM is already being used for imatinib, additional studies are required in order to improve this practice with the inclusion of other TKIs. PMID:27446421

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Lydia; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne; Szedlacsek, Stefan E

    2008-03-01

    Structural analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) has expanded considerably in the last several years, producing more than 200 structures in this class of enzymes (from 35 different proteins and their complexes with ligands). The small-medium size of the catalytic domain of approximately 280 residues plus a very compact fold makes it amenable to cloning and overexpression in bacterial systems thus facilitating crystallographic analysis. The low molecular weight PTPs being even smaller, approximately 150 residues, are also perfect targets for NMR analysis. The availability of different structures and complexes of PTPs with substrates and inhibitors has provided a wealth of information with profound effects in the way we understand their biological functions. Developments in mammalian expression technology recently led to the first crystal structure of a receptor-like PTP extracellular region. Altogether, the PTP structural work significantly advanced our knowledge regarding the architecture, regulation and substrate specificity of these enzymes. In this review, we compile the most prominent structural traits that characterize PTPs and their complexes with ligands. We discuss how the data can be used to design further functional experiments and as a basis for drug design given that many PTPs are now considered strategic therapeutic targets for human diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  6. Tetrahydrobiopterin shows chaperone activity for tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Thöny, Beat; Calvo, Ana C; Scherer, Tanja; Svebak, Randi M; Haavik, Jan; Blau, Nenad; Martinez, Aurora

    2008-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. Primary inherited defects in TH have been associated with l-DOPA responsive and non-responsive dystonia and infantile parkinsonism. In this study, we show that both the cofactor (6R)-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the feedback inhibitor and catecholamine product dopamine increase the kinetic stability of human TH isoform 1 in vitro. Activity measurements and synthesis of the enzyme by in vitro transcription-translation revealed a complex regulation by the cofactor including both enzyme inactivation and conformational stabilization. Oral BH(4) supplementation to mice increased TH activity and protein levels in brain extracts, while the Th-mRNA level was not affected. All together our results indicate that the molecular mechanisms for the stabilization are a primary folding-aid effect of BH(4) and a secondary effect by increased synthesis and binding of catecholamine ligands. Our results also establish that orally administered BH(4) crosses the blood-brain barrier and therapeutic regimes based on BH(4) supplementation should thus consider the effect on TH. Furthermore, BH(4) supplementation arises as a putative therapeutic agent in the treatment of brain disorders associated with TH misfolding, such as for the human TH isoform 1 mutation L205P.

  7. Evaluation of a tyrosine kinase peptide microarray for tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy selection in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labots, Mariette; Gotink, Kristy J; Dekker, Henk; Azijli, Kaamar; van der Mijn, Johannes C; Huijts, Charlotte M; Piersma, Sander R; Jiménez, Connie R; Verheul, Henk M W

    2016-01-01

    Personalized cancer medicine aims to accurately predict the response of individual patients to targeted therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Clinical implementation of this concept requires a robust selection tool. Here, using both cancer cell lines and tumor tissue from patients, we evaluated a high-throughput tyrosine kinase peptide substrate array to determine its readiness as a selection tool for TKI therapy. We found linearly increasing phosphorylation signal intensities of peptides representing kinase activity along the kinetic curve of the assay with 7.5–10 μg of lysate protein and up to 400 μM adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Basal kinase activity profiles were reproducible with intra- and inter-experiment coefficients of variation of <15% and <20%, respectively. Evaluation of 14 tumor cell lines and tissues showed similar consistently high phosphorylated peptides in their basal profiles. Incubation of four patient-derived tumor lysates with the TKIs dasatinib, sunitinib, sorafenib and erlotinib primarily caused inhibition of substrates that were highly phosphorylated in the basal profile analyses. Using recombinant Src and Axl kinase, relative substrate specificity was demonstrated for a subset of peptides, as their phosphorylation was reverted by co-incubation with a specific inhibitor. In conclusion, we demonstrated robust technical specifications of this high-throughput tyrosine kinase peptide microarray. These features required as little as 5–7 μg of protein per sample, facilitating clinical implementation as a TKI selection tool. However, currently available peptide substrates can benefit from an enhancement of the differential potential for complex samples such as tumor lysates. We propose that mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics may provide such an enhancement by identifying more discriminative peptides. PMID:27980342

  8. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a haemorrhagic fever with high mortality in human. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process.

  9. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis tarp is phosphorylated by src family tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Travis J; Dooley, Cheryl A; Mead, David J; Hackstadt, Ted

    2008-06-27

    The translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp) is injected into the cytosol shortly after Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to a target cell and subsequently phosphorylated by an unidentified tyrosine kinase. A role for Tarp phosphorylation in bacterial entry is unknown. In this study, recombinant C. trachomatis Tarp was employed to identify the host cell kinase(s) required for phosphorylation. Each tyrosine rich repeat of L2 Tarp harbors a sequence similar to a Src and Abl kinase consensus target. Furthermore, purified p60-src, Yes, Fyn, and Abl kinases were able to phosphorylate Tarp. Mutagenesis of potential tyrosines within a single tyrosine rich repeat peptide indicated that both Src and Abl kinases phosphorylate the same residues suggesting that C. trachomatis Tarp may serve as a substrate for multiple host cell kinases. Surprisingly, chemical inhibition of Src and Abl kinases prevented Tarp phosphorylation in culture and had no measurable effect on bacterial entry into host cells.

  11. Skin problems and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kozuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is a good target for the treatment of lung, colon, pancreatic and head and neck cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor was first approved for the treatment of advanced lung cancer in 2002. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor plays an essential role in the treatment of cancer, especially for patients harbouring epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutation. Hence, skin toxicity is the most concerning issue for the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Skin toxicity is bothersome and sometimes affects the quality of life and treatment compliance. Thus, it is important for physicians to understand the background and how to manage epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated skin toxicity. Here, the author reviewed the mechanism and upfront preventive and reactive treatments for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-associated skin toxicities. PMID:26826719

  12. Skin problems and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kozuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is a good target for the treatment of lung, colon, pancreatic and head and neck cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor was first approved for the treatment of advanced lung cancer in 2002. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor plays an essential role in the treatment of cancer, especially for patients harbouring epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutation. Hence, skin toxicity is the most concerning issue for the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Skin toxicity is bothersome and sometimes affects the quality of life and treatment compliance. Thus, it is important for physicians to understand the background and how to manage epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated skin toxicity. Here, the author reviewed the mechanism and upfront preventive and reactive treatments for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-associated skin toxicities.

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 by Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaosi; Zhang, Jiaming; Chen, Lingqiu; Chen, Yongjun; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2017-03-20

    The small molecular weight GTPase Rab7 is a key regulator for late endosomal/lysosomal membrane trafficking, it was known that Rab7 is phosphorylated, but the corresponding kinase and the functional regulation of Rab7 phosphorylation remain unclear. We provide evidence here that Rab7 is a substrate of Src kinase, and is tyrosine-phosphorylated by Src, withY183 residue of Rab7 being the optimal phosphorylation site for Src. Further investigations demonstrated that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 depends on the guanine nucleotide binding activity of Rab7 and the activity of Src kinase. The tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 is physiologically induced by EGF, and impairs the interaction of Rab7 with RILP, consequently inhibiting EGFR degradation and sustaining Akt signaling. These results suggest that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 may be involved in coordinating membrane trafficking and cell signaling.

  14. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan

    PubMed Central

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P.; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in man. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process. PMID:23279385

  15. Prevalence of CagA and VacA antibodies in children with Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer compared to prevalence in pediatric patients with active or nonactive chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, T; Martínez, M J; Urruzuno, P; Cilleruelo, M L; Madruga, D; Sebastian, M; Domingo, D; Sanz, J C; López-Brea, M

    2000-09-01

    VacA and CagA serological responses were detected in pediatric patients: 44 and 56%, respectively, in peptic ulcer (PU) patients, 33.3 and 44.4% in active chronic gastritis (ACG) patients, and 23.2 and 39.2% in non-ACG patients. Higher seroprevalence to CagA+VacA and to CagA+VacA+35-kDa antigen was found among PU patients. However, a low level of sensitivity and specificity was found for indirect detection of PU patients.

  16. Method of making L-dopa from L-tyrosine

    DOEpatents

    Xun, Luying; Lee, Jang Young

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a method of making a L-dopa from L-tyrosine in the presence of an enzyme catalyst and oxygen. By starting with L-tyrosine, no variant of the L-dopa is produced and the L-dopa is stable in the presence of the enzyme catalyst. In other words, the reaction favors the L-dopa and is not reversible.

  17. Use of Tyrosine or Foods to Amplify Catecholamine Release.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-02

    valine; phenylalanine ; tryptophan) are unaffected (see Figure 2). These observations suggest a second mechanism for the precursor- dependence of...involves the activation by phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase that occurs when the neurons fire frequently. This activation changes the enzyme’s... phenylalanine , as well as their plasma "ratios" no changes were noted in the plasma tryptophan nor tyrosine ratios. The metabolic alterations induced by marathon

  18. Method of making L-dopa from L-tyrosine

    DOEpatents

    Xun, L.; Lee, J.Y.

    1998-11-17

    The invention is a method of making a L-dopa from L-tyrosine in the presence of an enzyme catalyst and oxygen. By starting with L-tyrosine, no variant of the L-dopa is produced and the L-dopa is stable in the presence of the enzyme catalyst. In other words, the reaction favors the L-dopa and is not reversible. 3 figs.

  19. Tyrosine Pretreatment Reverses Hypothermia-Induced Behavioral Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    behavioral depression induced by forced swimming in 21- Tyrosine significantly decreased immobility in the swim test 25C water, in a restricted space...Figure 2 shows the effect of tyrosine on immobility in the swim observed that tle behavioral inactivity and the reduction of brain test . A post hoc...Gibson. C. J.; Wurtman, R. J. Physiological control of brain Immobility induced by forced swimming ,n rats: Effects of agents norepinephrine synthesis by

  20. Channel modulation by tyrosine phosphorylation in an identified leech neuron.

    PubMed Central

    Aniksztejn, L; Catarsi, S; Drapeau, P

    1997-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of tyrosine phosphorylation on a spontaneously active cation channel that also participates in the modulation of pressure-sensitive (P) neurons in the leech. Cation channel activity in cell-attached or isolated, inside-out membrane patches from P cells in culture was monitored before and after treatments that altered the level of tyrosine phosphorylation. 2. In cell-attached recordings from intact P cells, bath application of genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, resulted in a 6.6 +/- 2.6-fold increase in channel activity with no change in the mean open time or amplitude. Daidzein, an inactive form of genistein, was without effect. Addition of pervanadate, a membrane-permeant inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, had no effect on its own and blocked the effect of subsequent addition of genistein. 3. In inside-out P cell membrane patch recordings, exposure to a catalytically active fragment of a tyrosine phosphatase resulted in a 10.3 +/- 3.6-fold increase in channel activity with no change in the mean open time or amplitude. Orthovanadate had no effect on channel activity and, when added with the phosphatase, prevented the increase in activity. 4. Our results demonstrate that the basal activity of cation channels is increased by tyrosine dephosphorylation, suggesting a constitutive modulation of channel activity under resting conditions. PMID:9023773

  1. Intricate regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kumer, S C; Vrana, K E

    1996-08-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the catecholamines dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Therefore, the regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme number and intrinsic enzyme activity represents the central means for controlling the synthesis of these important biogenic amines. An intricate scheme has evolved whereby tyrosine hydroxylase activity is modulated by nearly every documented form of regulation. Beginning with the genomic DNA, evidence exists for the transcriptional regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels, alternative RNA processing, and the regulation of RNA stability. There is also experimental support for the role of both translational control and enzyme stability in establishing steady-state levels of active tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Finally, mechanisms have been proposed for feedback inhibition of the enzyme by catecholamine products, allosteric modulation of enzyme activity, and phosphorylation-dependent activation of the enzyme by various different kinase systems. Given the growing literature suggesting that different tissues regulate tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels and activity in different ways, regulatory mechanisms provide not only redundancy but also diversity in the control of catecholamine biosynthesis.

  2. Statins Attenuate Helicobacter pylori CagA Translocation and Reduce Incidence of Gastric Cancer: In Vitro and Population-Based Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Liao, Wei-Chih; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Yu-An; Feng, Chun-Lung; Chen, Chih-Jung; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lai, Chih-Ho; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The correlation of Helicobacter pylori and the etiology of gastric cancer was substantially certain. Cholesterol-rich microdomains (also called lipid rafts), which provide platforms for signaling, are associated with H. pylori-induced pathogenesis leading to gastric cancer. Patients who have been prescribed statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, have exhibited a reduced risk of several types of cancer. However, no studies have addressed the effect of statins on H. pylori-associated gastric cancer from the antineoplastic perspective. In this study, we showed that treatment of gastric epithelial cells with simvastatin reduced the level of cellular cholesterol and led to attenuation of translocation and phosphorylation of H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which is recognized as a major determinant of gastric cancer development. Additionally, a nationwide case-control study based on data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) was conducted. A population-based case-control study revealed that patients who used simvastatin exhibited a significantly reduced risk of gastric cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.70-0.83). In patients exhibiting H. pylori infection who were prescribed simvastatin, the adjusted OR for gastric cancer was 0.25 (95% CI = 0.12-0.50). Our results combined an in vitro study with a nationwide population analysis reveal that statin use might be a feasible approach to prevent H. pylori-associated gastric cancer.

  3. Association Between Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2 Virulence Factors and Gastric Mucosal Interleukin-33 mRNA Expression and Clinical Outcomes in Dyspeptic Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Bahreini, Rasol; Bagheri, Nader; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been reported in more than half of the world human population. It is associated with gastric inflammation and noticeable infiltration of the immune cells to the stomach mucosa by several cytokines secretion. IL-1β, IL-18 have been shown to contribute to H. pylori induced gastritis, but the details of inflammation and association of virulence factors remain unclear. IL-1 cytokine family has a new additional cytokine, Interleukin-33 (IL-33), which is contemplated to have an important role for host defense against microorganisms. H. pylori virulence factors important in gastritis risk are the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) and babA. This study evaluated IL-33 mucosal mRNA expression levels in infected and uninfected patients and its relationship with bacterial virulence factors cagA, babA2 and type of gastritis. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 79 H. pylori-infected patients and 51 H. pylori-negative patients. Mucosal IL-33 mRNA expression levels in gastric biopsies were assessed using real-time PCR. Existence of virulence factors were detected by PCR. IL-33 mRNA expression was significantly higher in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients (P<0.0001). Also there was a direct relationship between virulence factor bab-A2 and enhancement in IL-33 mRNA expression. Furthermore, IL-33 mRNA expression level was significantly lower in chronic gastritis patients compared with patients with active gastritis (P<0.001). IL-33 may play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and induction of the chronic gastritis and severity of inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa.

  4. Association Between Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2 Virulence Factors and Gastric Mucosal Interleukin-33 mRNA Expression and Clinical Outcomes in Dyspeptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Bahreini, Rasol; Bagheri, Nader; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been reported in more than half of the world human population. It is associated with gastric inflammation and noticeable infiltration of the immune cells to the stomach mucosa by several cytokines secretion. IL-1β, IL-18 have been shown to contribute to H. pylori induced gastritis, but the details of inflammation and association of virulence factors remain unclear. IL-1 cytokine family has a new additional cytokine, Interleukin-33 (IL-33), which is contemplated to have an important role for host defense against microorganisms. H. pylori virulence factors important in gastritis risk are the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) and babA. This study evaluated IL-33 mucosal mRNA expression levels in infected and uninfected patients and its relationship with bacterial virulence factors cagA, babA2 and type of gastritis. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 79 H. pylori-infected patients and 51 H. pylori-negative patients. Mucosal IL-33 mRNA expression levels in gastric biopsies were assessed using real-time PCR. Existence of virulence factors were detected by PCR. IL-33 mRNA expression was significantly higher in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients (P<0.0001). Also there was a direct relationship between virulence factor bab-A2 and enhancement in IL-33 mRNA expression. Furthermore, IL-33 mRNA expression level was significantly lower in chronic gastritis patients compared with patients with active gastritis (P<0.001). IL-33 may play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and induction of the chronic gastritis and severity of inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. PMID:27014647

  5. Are striatal tyrosine hydroxylase interneurons dopaminergic?

    PubMed

    Xenias, Harry S; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M

    2015-04-22

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH-Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein unilaterally into the unlesioned midbrain or bilaterally into the striatum. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices revealed that both optical and electrical stimulation readily elicited DA release in control striata but not from contralateral striata when nigrostriatal neurons were transduced. In contrast, neither optical nor electrical stimulation could elicit striatal DA release in either the control or lesioned striata when the virus was injected directly into the striatum transducing only striatal TH interneurons. This demonstrates that striatal TH interneurons do not release DA. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-TH mice revealed colocalization of DA, l-amino acid decarboxylase, the DA transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 with EGFP in midbrain dopaminergic neurons but not in any of the striatal EGFP-TH interneurons. Optogenetic activation of striatal EGFP-TH interneurons produced strong GABAergic inhibition in all spiny neurons tested. These results indicate that striatal TH interneurons are not dopaminergic but rather are a type of GABAergic interneuron that expresses TH but none of the other enzymes or transporters necessary to operate as dopaminergic neurons and exert widespread GABAergic inhibition onto direct and indirect spiny neurons.

  6. Cyclin B targets p34cdc2 for tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, L; Azzi, L; Wang, J Y

    1991-06-01

    A universal intracellular factor, the 'M phase-promoting factor' (MPF), triggers the G2/M transition of the cell cycle in all organisms. In late G2, it is present as an inactive complex of tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2 and unphosphorylated cyclin Bcdc13. In M phase, its activation as an active MPF displaying histone H1 kinase (H1K) originates from the concomitant tyrosine dephosphorylation of the p34cdc2 subunit and the phosphorylation of the cylin Bcdc13 subunit. We have investigated the role of cyclin in the formation of this complex and the tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2, using highly synchronous mitotic sea urchin eggs as a model. As cells leave the S phase and enter the G2 phase, a massive tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2 occurs. This large p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation burst does not arise from a massive increase in p34cdc2 concentration. It even appears to affect only a fraction (non-immunoprecipitable by anti-PSTAIR antibodies) of the total p34cdc2 present in the cell. Several observations point to an extremely close association between accumulation of unphosphorylated cyclin and p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation: (i) both events coincide perfectly during the G2 phase; (ii) both tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2 and cyclin are not immunoprecipitated by anti-PSTAIR antibodies; (iii) accumulation of unphosphorylated cyclin by aphidicolin treatment of the cells, triggers a dramatic accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2; and (iv) inhibition of cyclin synthesis by emetine inhibits p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation without affecting the p34cdc2 concentration. These results show that, as it is synthesized, cyclin B binds and recruits p34cdc2 for tyrosine phosphorylation; this inactive complex then requires the completion of DNA replication before it can be turned into fully active MPF. These results fully confirm recent data obtained in vitro with exogenous cyclin added to cycloheximide-treated Xenopus egg extracts.

  7. A redox-regulated tyrosine phosphorylation cascade in rat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B; Aitken, R J

    2001-01-01

    Rat spermatozoa from both the caput and cauda epididymidis were shown to generate superoxide anion (O2-.) both spontaneously and following stimulation with NAD(P)H. Caput spermatozoa gave a significantly greater O2- response to NADPH stimulation than caudal cells, whereas in both cell types the responses to exogenous NADPH and NADH were approximately equivalent. Analysis of H2O2 production revealed that this oxidant was generated only by caudal epididymal cells and only in these cells did the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production with NADPH lead to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. Stimulation of ROS production with NADPH increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in both caput and caudal epididymal cells, but only in caudal cells did cAMP stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation, in keeping with the NADPH results. On the basis of these findings we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation in rat spermatozoa is driven by ROS acting via 2 different but complementary mechanisms; O2-. stimulates tyrosine kinase activity indirectly through the elevation of intracellular cAMP while H2O2 acts directly on the kinase/phosphatase system, stimulating the former and inhibiting the latter. Zinc was examined as a potential regulator of this signal transduction cascade and was shown to suppress tyrosine phosphorylation in caput cells but to promote this activity in caudal spermatozoa, possibly through an inhibitory effect on tyrosine phosphatase activity. These results reveal the maturation of a redox-regulated, cAMP-mediated, signal transduction cascade during epididymal transit in the rat that is sensitive to zinc and plays a key role in the control of tyrosine phosphorylation events associated with capacitation.

  8. Dietary tyrosine benefits cognitive and psychomotor performance during body cooling.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Catherine; Mahoney, Caroline; Tharion, William J; Sils, Ingrid V; Castellani, John W

    2007-02-28

    Supplemental tyrosine is effective at limiting cold-induced decreases in working memory, presumably by augmenting brain catecholamine levels, since tyrosine is a precursor for catecholamine synthesis. The effectiveness of tyrosine for preventing cold-induced decreases in physical performance has not been examined. This study evaluated the effect of tyrosine supplementation on cognitive, psychomotor, and physical performance following a cold water immersion protocol that lowered body core temperature. Fifteen subjects completed a control trial (CON) in warm (35 degrees C) water and two cold water trials, each spaced a week apart. Subjects ingested an energy bar during each trial; on one cold trial (TYR) the bar contained tyrosine (300 mg/kg body weight), and on the other cold trial (PLB) and on CON the bar contained no tyrosine. Following each water immersion, subjects completed a battery of performance tasks in a cold air (10 degrees C) chamber. Core temperature was lower (p=0.0001) on PLB and TYR (both 35.5+/-0.6 degrees C) than CON (37.1+/-0.3 degrees C). On PLB, performance on a Match-to-Sample task decreased 18% (p=0.02) and marksmanship performance decreased 14% (p=0.002), compared to CON, but there was no difference between TYR and CON. Step test performance decreased by 11% (p=0.0001) on both cold trials, compared to CON. These data support previous findings that dietary tyrosine supplementation is effective for mitigating cold-induced cognitive performance such as working memory, even with reduced core temperature, and extends those findings to include the psychomotor task of marksmanship.

  9. Role of Tyrosine Isomers in Acute and Chronic Diseases Leading to Oxidative Stress - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Gergő A.; Kun, Szilárd; Sélley, Eszter; Kertész, Melinda; Szélig, Lívia; Csontos, Csaba; Böddi, Katalin; Bogár, Lajos; Miseta, Attila; Wittmann, István

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of a variety of acute and chronic diseases. Measurement of the oxidative stress-related end products may be performed, e.g. that of structural isomers of the physiological para-tyrosine, namely meta- and ortho-tyrosine, that are oxidized derivatives of phenylalanine. Recent data suggest that in sepsis, serum level of meta-tyrosine increases, which peaks on the 2nd and 3rd days (p<0.05 vs. controls), and the kinetics follows the intensity of the systemic inflammation correlating with serum procalcitonin levels. In a similar study subset, urinary meta-tyrosine excretion correlated with both need of daily insulin dose and the insulin-glucose product in non-diabetic septic cases (p<0.01 for both). Using linear regression model, meta-tyrosine excretion, urinary meta-tyrosine/para-tyrosine, urinary ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine and urinary (meta- + ortho-tyrosine)/para-tyrosine proved to be markers of carbohydrate homeostasis. In a chronic rodent model, we tried to compensate the abnormal tyrosine isomers using para-tyrosine, the physiological amino acid. Rats were fed a standard high cholesterol-diet, and were given para-tyrosine or vehicle orally. High-cholesterol feeding lead to a significant increase in aortic wall meta-tyrosine content and a decreased vasorelaxation of the aorta to insulin and the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, that both could be prevented by administration of para-tyrosine. Concluding, these data suggest that meta- and ortho-tyrosine are potential markers of oxidative stress in acute diseases related to oxidative stress, and may also interfere with insulin action in septic humans. Competition of meta- and ortho-tyrosine by supplementation of para-tyrosine may exert a protective role in oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:26785996

  10. Tubulin tyrosine nitration regulates microtubule organization in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Yaroslav B.; Krasylenko, Yuliya A.; Demchuk, Oleh M.; Yemets, Alla I.

    2013-01-01

    During last years, selective tyrosine nitration of plant proteins gains importance as well-recognized pathway of direct nitric oxide (NO) signal transduction. Plant microtubules are one of the intracellular signaling targets for NO, however, the molecular mechanisms of NO signal transduction with the involvement of cytoskeletal proteins remain to be elucidated. Since biochemical evidence of plant α-tubulin tyrosine nitration has been obtained recently, potential role of this posttranslational modification in regulation of microtubules organization in plant cell is estimated in current paper. It was shown that 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NO2-Tyr) induced partially reversible Arabidopsis primary root growth inhibition, alterations of root hairs morphology and organization of microtubules in root cells. It was also revealed that 3-NO2-Tyr intensively decorates such highly dynamic microtubular arrays as preprophase bands, mitotic spindles and phragmoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells under physiological conditions. Moreover, 3D models of the mitotic kinesin-8 complexes with the tail of detyrosinated, tyrosinated and tyrosine nitrated α-tubulin (on C-terminal Tyr 450 residue) from Arabidopsis were reconstructed in silico to investigate the potential influence of tubulin nitrotyrosination on the molecular dynamics of α-tubulin and kinesin-8 interaction. Generally, presented data suggest that plant α-tubulin tyrosine nitration can be considered as its common posttranslational modification, the direct mechanism of NO signal transduction with the participation of microtubules under physiological conditions and one of the hallmarks of the increased microtubule dynamics. PMID:24421781

  11. The structural role of receptor tyrosine sulfation in chemokine recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ludeman, Justin P; Stone, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification of secreted and transmembrane proteins, including many GPCRs such as chemokine receptors. Most chemokine receptors contain several potentially sulfated tyrosine residues in their extracellular N-terminal regions, the initial binding site for chemokine ligands. Sulfation of these receptors increases chemokine binding affinity and potency. Although receptor sulfation is heterogeneous, insights into the molecular basis of sulfotyrosine (sTyr) recognition have been obtained using purified, homogeneous sulfopeptides corresponding to the N-termini of chemokine receptors. Receptor sTyr residues bind to a shallow cleft defined by the N-loop and β3-strand elements of cognate chemokines. Tyrosine sulfation enhances the affinity of receptor peptides for cognate chemokines in a manner dependent on the position of sulfation. Moreover, tyrosine sulfation can alter the selectivity of receptor peptides among several cognate chemokines for the same receptor. Finally, binding to receptor sulfopeptides can modulate the oligomerization state of chemokines, thereby influencing the ability of a chemokine to activate its receptor. These results increase the motivation to investigate the structural basis by which tyrosine sulfation modulates chemokine receptor activity and the biological consequences of this functional modulation. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24116930

  12. Queuine mediated inhibition in phosphorylation of tyrosine phosphoproteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chandramani; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Vinayak, Manjula

    2008-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation or dephosphorylation is the most important regulatory switch of signal transduction contributing to control of cell proliferation. The reversibility of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is due to the activities of kinases and phosphatase, which determine protein phosphorylation level of cell under different physiological and pathological conditions. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) mediated cellular signaling is precisely coordinated and tightly controlled in normal cells which ensures regulated mitosis. Deregulation of RTK signaling resulting in aberrant activation in RTKs leads to malignant transformation. Queuine is one of the modified base of tRNA which participates in down regulation of tyrosine kinase activity. The guanine analogue queuine is a nutrient factor to eukaryotes and occurs as free base or modified nucleoside queuosine into the first anticodon position of specific tRNAs. The tRNAs are often queuine deficient in cancer and fast proliferating tissues. The present study is aimed to investigate queuine mediated inhibition in phosphorylation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in lymphoma bearing mouse. The result shows high level of cytosolic and membrane associated tyrosine phosphoprotein in DLAT cancerous mouse liver compared to normal. Queuine treatments down regulate the level of tyrosine phosphoproteins, which suggests that queuine is involved in regulation of mitotic signaling pathways.

  13. Biphasic Affinity Chromatographic Approach for Deep Tyrosine Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenzhen; Dong, Mingming; Wang, Yan; Dong, Jing; Li, Shawn S-C; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang

    2017-02-21

    Tyrosine phosphorylation (pTyr) is important for normal physiology and implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. Identification of pTyr sites is critical to dissecting signaling pathways and understanding disease pathologies. However, compared with serine/threonine phosphorylation (pSer/pThr), the analysis of pTyr at the proteome level is more challenging due to its low abundance. Here, we developed a biphasic affinity chromatographic approach where Src SH2 superbinder was coupled with NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, for tyrosine phosphoproteome analysis. With the use of competitive elution agent biotin-pYEEI, this strategy can distinguish high-affinity phosphotyrosyl peptides from low-affinity ones, while the excess competitive agent is readily removed by using NeutrAvidin agarose resin in an integrated tip system. The excellent performance of this system was demonstrated by analyzing tyrosine phosphoproteome of Jurkat cells from which 3,480 unique pTyr sites were identified. The biphasic affinity chromatography method for deep Tyr phosphoproteome analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective. It is widely applicable to the global analysis of the tyrosine phosphoproteome associated with tyrosine kinase signal transduction.

  14. Heterologous production of caffeic acid from tyrosine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J L; Araújo, R G; Prather, K L J; Kluskens, L D; Rodrigues, L R

    2015-04-01

    Caffeic acid is a plant secondary metabolite and its biological synthesis has attracted increased attention due to its beneficial effects on human health. In this study, Escherichia coli was engineered for the production of caffeic acid using tyrosine as the initial precursor of the pathway. The pathway design included tyrosine ammonia lyase (TAL) from Rhodotorula glutinis to convert tyrosine to p-coumaric acid and 4-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) from Saccharothrix espanaensis or cytochrome P450 CYP199A2 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris to convert p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. The genes were codon-optimized and different combinations of plasmids were used to improve the titer of caffeic acid. TAL was able to efficiently convert 3mM of tyrosine to p-coumaric acid with the highest production obtained being 2.62mM (472mg/L). CYP199A2 exhibited higher catalytic activity towards p-coumaric acid than C3H. The highest caffeic acid production obtained using TAL and CYP199A2 and TAL and C3H was 1.56mM (280mg/L) and 1mM (180mg/L), respectively. This is the first study that shows caffeic acid production using CYP199A2 and tyrosine as the initial precursor. This study suggests the possibility of further producing more complex plant secondary metabolites like flavonoids and curcuminoids.

  15. Mechanisms of peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, K N

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms of tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate were investigated with the CBS-QB3 method. Either the protonation of peroxynitrite or a reaction with carbon dioxide gives a reactive peroxide intermediate. Peroxynitrous acid-mediated nitration of phenol occurs via unimolecular decomposition to give nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Nitrosoperoxycarbonate also undergoes unimolecular decomposition to give carbonate and nitrogen dioxide radicals. The reactions of tyrosine with the hydroxyl or carbonate radicals give a phenoxy radical intermediate. The reaction of the nitrogen dioxide with this radical intermediate followed by tautomerization gives nitrated tyrosine in both cases. According to CBS-QB3 calculations, the rate-limiting step for the nitration of phenol is the decomposition of peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate.

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation of clathrin heavy chain under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Yasuoka, Chie; Kageyama, Kan; Wada, Yoshinao; Kondo, Takahito

    2002-09-20

    In mouse pancreatic insulin-producing betaTC cells, oxidative stress due to H(2)O(2) causes tyrosine phosphorylation in various proteins. To identify proteins bearing phosphotyrosine under stress, the proteins were affinity purified using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody-conjugated agarose column. A protein of 180kDa was identified as clathrin heavy chain (CHC) by electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitated CHC showed tyrosine phosphorylation upon H(2)O(2) treatment and the phosphorylation was suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2. The phosphorylation status of CHC affected the intracellular localization of CHC and the clathrin-dependent endocytosis of transferrin under oxidative stress. In conclusion, CHC is a protein that is phosphorylated at tyrosine by H(2)O(2) and this phosphorylation status is implicated in the intracellular localization and functions of CHC under oxidative stress. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress affects intracellular vesicular trafficking via the alteration of clathrin-dependent vesicular trafficking.

  17. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Diabetes: A Novel Treatment Paradigm?

    PubMed

    Fountas, Athanasios; Diamantopoulos, Leonidas-Nikolaos; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2015-11-01

    Deregulation of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity is implicated in various proliferative conditions. Multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are increasingly used for the treatment of different malignancies. Recently, several clinical cases of the reversal of both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM) during TKI administration have been reported. Experimental in vivo and in vitro studies have elucidated some of the mechanisms behind this effect. For example, inhibition of Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) results in β cell survival and enhanced insulin secretion, while platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition leads to improvement in insulin sensitivity. In addition, inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) reduces the degree of islet cell inflammation (insulitis). Therefore, targeting several PTKs may provide a novel approach for correcting the pathophysiologic disturbances of diabetes.

  18. Spectroscopic analysis of tyrosine derivatives: on the role of the tyrosine-histidine covalent linkage in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Voicescu, Mariana; El Khoury, Youssef; Martel, David; Heinrich, Martine; Hellwig, Petra

    2009-10-08

    2'-(1-Imidazolyl)-4-methylphenol (C-N bonding in the ortho' position at the phenyl group), a model compound for a tyrosine-histidine covalent linkage, was studied with a combined electrochemical and UV-vis/IR spectroscopic approach. Electrochemical analysis of the 2'-(1-imidazolyl)-4-methylphenol model compound by the means of cyclic voltammetry yielded a potential of 0.48 vs ferrocene (1.15 V vs NHE) for the oxidation of the deprotonated form, the reaction being kinetically irreversible. A tentative assignment of the electrochemically induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference infrared spectra is presented that indicates the deprotonation of the tyrosine before oxidation and importantly the strong influence of the solvent on the spectral properties and on the mechanism of radical formation. Fluorescence lifetimes and pre-exponential factors of the tyrosine-histidine model compounds are presented and discussed in comparison to tyrosine. The tyrosine-histidine fluorescence lifetime is found to be solvent dependent. The influence of the solvent on the reaction mechanism is proposed with regard to the mechanism of electron coupled proton transfer in proteins that include covalently linked amino acid side chains, like the cytochrome c oxidase.

  19. Tryptophan prenyltransferases showing higher catalytic activities for Friedel-Crafts alkylation of o- and m-tyrosines than tyrosine prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aili; Xie, Xiulan; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-07-21

    Tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2, 5-DMATS, 6-DMATSSv and 7-DMATS catalyse regiospecific C-prenylations on the indole ring, while tyrosine prenyltransferases SirD and TyrPT catalyse the O-prenylation of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In this study, we report the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of L-o-tyrosine by these enzymes. Surprisingly, no conversion was detected with SirD and three tryptophan prenyltransferases showed significantly higher activity than another tyrosine prenyltransferase TyrPT. C5-prenylated L-o-tyrosine was identified as a unique product of these enzymes. Using L-m-tyrosine as the prenylation substrate, product formation was only observed with the tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS. C4- and C6-prenylated derivatives were identified in the reaction mixture of FgaPT2. These results provided additional evidence for the similarities and differences between these two subgroups within the DMATS superfamily in their catalytic behaviours.

  20. Evaluation of Brachypodium distachyon L-Tyrosine Decarboxylase Using L-Tyrosine Over-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Noda, Shuhei; Shirai, Tomokazu; Mochida, Keiichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Oyama, Sachiko; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that herbaceous biomass is a versatile gene resource, we focused on the model plant Brachypodium distachyon, and screened the B. distachyon for homologs of tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC), which is involved in the modification of aromatic compounds. A total of 5 candidate genes were identified in cDNA libraries of B. distachyon and were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate TDC expression and tyramine production. It is suggested that two TDCs encoded in the transcripts Bradi2g51120.1 and Bradi2g51170.1 have L-tyrosine decarboxylation activity. Bradi2g51170.1 was introduced into the L-tyrosine over-producing strain of S. cerevisiae that was constructed by the introduction of mutant genes that promote deregulated feedback inhibition. The amount of tyramine produced by the resulting transformant was 6.6-fold higher (approximately 200 mg/L) than the control strain, indicating that B. distachyon TDC effectively converts L-tyrosine to tyramine. Our results suggest that B. distachyon possesses enzymes that are capable of modifying aromatic residues, and that S. cerevisiae is a suitable host for the production of L-tyrosine derivatives.

  1. Phosphorylated tyrosine in the flagellum filament protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K.; Anderson, T.; Montie, T.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Purified flagella from two strains of {sup 32}P-labeled Pseudomonas aeruginosa were shown to be phosphorylated. This was confirmed by autoradiography of flagellin protein in polyacrylamide gels. Thin-layer electrophoresis and autoradiography of flagellin partial hydrolysates indicated that phosphotyrosine was the major phosphorylated amino acid. High-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis confirmed the presence of phosphotyrosine in flagellum filament protein. Preliminary data indicated that less than one tyrosine per subunit was phosphorylated. No evidence was found for phosphorylation of serine or threonine. A function related to tyrosine phosphorylation has not been determined.

  2. Proteasomal inhibition causes loss of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase neurons.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V; Cleeter, Michael W J; Muddle, John R; Workman, Jane M; Cooper, J Mark; King, Rosalind H M

    2006-08-01

    Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The systemic administration of UPS inhibitors has been reported to induce nigrostriatal cell death and model Parkinson's disease pathology in rodents. We administered a synthetic, specific UPS inhibitor (PSI) subcutaneously to rats and quantified substantia nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic neurons by stereology. PSI caused a 15% decrease in UPS activity at 2 weeks and a 42% reduction in substantia nigra pars compacta tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons at 8 weeks. Systemic inhibition of the UPS warrants further evaluation as a means to model Parkinson's disease.

  3. Targeting Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases for Anticancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya. M.; Lawrence, Harshani. R.; Sebti, Saïd. M.; Lawrence, Nicholas. J.; Wu, Jie.

    2010-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a diverse family of enzymes encoded by 107 genes in the human genome. Together with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), PTPs regulate various cellular activities essential for the initiation and maintenance of malignant phenotypes. While PTK inhibitors are now used routinely for cancer treatment, the PTP inhibitor development field is still in the discovery phase. In this article, the suitability of targeting PTPs for novel anticancer drug discovery is discussed. Examples are presented for PTPs that have been targeted for anticancer drug discovery as well as potential new PTP targets for novel anticancer drug discovery. PMID:20337577

  4. 21 CFR 862.1730 - Free tyrosine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Free tyrosine test system. 862.1730 Section 862.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... phenylketonuria (a disease that can cause brain damage). (b) Classification. Class I....

  5. 21 CFR 862.1730 - Free tyrosine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Free tyrosine test system. 862.1730 Section 862.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... phenylketonuria (a disease that can cause brain damage). (b) Classification. Class I....

  6. 21 CFR 862.1730 - Free tyrosine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Free tyrosine test system. 862.1730 Section 862.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... phenylketonuria (a disease that can cause brain damage). (b) Classification. Class I....

  7. 21 CFR 862.1730 - Free tyrosine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Free tyrosine test system. 862.1730 Section 862.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... phenylketonuria (a disease that can cause brain damage). (b) Classification. Class I....

  8. Tyrosine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis: soluble expression and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Ni, Ye

    2014-02-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, EC 4.1.1.25) is an enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-tyrosine to produce tyramine and CO2. In this study, a 1881-bp tdc gene from Lactobacillus brevis was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Glucose was discovered to play an important role in the soluble expression of rLbTDC. After optimization, recombinant TDC (rLbTDC) was achieved in excellent solubility and a yield of 224mg rLbTDC/L broth. The C-terminal His-Tagged rLbTDC was one-step purified with 90% recovery. Based on SDS-PAGE and gel filtration analysis, rLbTDC is a dimer composed of two identical subunits of approximately 70kDa. Using l-tyrosine as substrate, the specific activity of rLbTDC was determined to be 133.5U/mg in the presence of 0.2mM pyridoxal-5'-phosphate at 40°C and pH 5.0. The Km and Vmax values of rLbTDC were 0.59mM and 147.1μmolmin(-1)mg(-1), respectively. In addition to l-tyrosine, rLbTDC also exhibited decarboxylase activity towards l-DOPA. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, the soluble expression of tdc gene from L. brevis in heterologous host.

  9. Old Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Newcomers in Gastrointestinal Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Erika; Zoratto, Federica; Strudel, Martina; Papa, Anselmo; Rossi, Luigi; Minozzi, Marina; Caruso, Davide; Zaccarelli, Eleonora; Verrico, Monica; Tomao, Silverio

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer treatment is based more on molecular biology that has provided increasing knowledge about cancer pathogenesis on which targeted therapy is being developed. Precisely, targeted therapy is defined as a "type of treatment that uses drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to identify and attack specific cancer cells". Nowadays, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved many targeted therapies for gastrointestinal cancer treatment, as many are in various phases of development as well. In a previous review we discussed the main monoclonal antibodies used and studied in gastrointestinal cancer. In addition to monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent another class of targeted therapy and following the approval of imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been approved for gastrointestinal cancers treatment such as sunitinib, regoragenib, sorafenib and erlotinib. Moving forward, the purpose of this review is to focus on the efficacy data of main tyrosine kinase inhibitors commonly used in the personalized treatment of each gastrointestinal tumour and to provide a comprehensive overview about experimental targeted therapies ongoing in this setting.

  10. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias in tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pons, Roser; Syrengelas, Dimitris; Youroukos, Sotiris; Orfanou, Irene; Dinopoulos, Arqirios; Cormand, Bru; Ormazabal, Aida; Garzía-Cazorla, Angels; Serrano, Mercedes; Artuch, Rafael

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize levodopa (l-dopa)-induced dyskinesias in patients with tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency. Clinical observation was carried out on 6 patients who were diagnosed with tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency and were treated with escalating doses of l-dopa. All 6 patients showed l-dopa-induced dyskinesias of variable intensity early in the course of treatment and regardless of the age of initiation. l-Dopa-induced dyskinesias were precipitated by increases in the dose of l-dopa and also by febrile illnesses and stress. They caused dysfunction and distress in 2 patients. The dyskinesias were improved by decreasing the l-dopa dose or by slowing its titration upward. Increasing the dose frequency was helpful in 2 patients, and introducing amantadine was helpful in another 2 patients. l-Dopa-induced dyskinesias are a common phenomenon in tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency. The current observations show that l-dopa-induced dyskinesias are frequent in a dopamine-deficient state in the absence of nigrostriatal degeneration. Although l-dopa-induced dyskinesias in tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency are phenomenologically similar to those that occur in Parkinson's disease, they are different in a number of other respects, suggesting intrinsic differences in the pathophysiologic basis of l-dopa-induced dyskinesias in the 2 conditions. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1730 - Free tyrosine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... measure free tyrosine (an amono acid) in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as congenital tyrosinemia (a disease that can cause liver... phenylketonuria (a disease that can cause brain damage). (b) Classification. Class I....

  12. ZDHHC3 Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulates Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Cesca, Fabrizia; Gorinski, Natalya; Galil, Dalia Abdel; Cherkas, Volodimir; Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Gaestel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. It is broadly expressed in the nervous system and regulates neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Previous in vitro studies revealed that palmitoylation of NCAM is required for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-stimulated neurite outgrowth and identified the zinc finger DHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys)-containing proteins ZDHHC3 and ZDHHC7 as specific NCAM-palmitoylating enzymes. Here, we verified that FGF2 controlled NCAM palmitoylation in vivo and investigated molecular mechanisms regulating NCAM palmitoylation by ZDHHC3. Experiments with overexpression and pharmacological inhibition of FGF receptor (FGFR) and Src revealed that these kinases control tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 and that ZDHHC3 is phosphorylated by endogenously expressed FGFR and Src proteins. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that Tyr18 is an FGFR1-specific ZDHHC3 phosphorylation site, while Tyr295 and Tyr297 are specifically phosphorylated by Src kinase in cell-based and cell-free assays. Abrogation of tyrosine phosphorylation increased ZDHHC3 autopalmitoylation, enhanced interaction with NCAM, and upregulated NCAM palmitoylation. Expression of ZDHHC3 with tyrosine mutated in cultured hippocampal neurons promoted neurite outgrowth. Our findings for the first time highlight that FGFR- and Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 modulates ZDHHC3 enzymatic activity and plays a role in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:27247265

  13. In vitro enzymatic assays of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Lubben, T; Clampit, J; Stashko, M; Trevillyan, J; Jirousek, M R

    2001-08-01

    Many hormone or growth factor receptors signal via the activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Alteration of the phosphorylation state of tyrosine residues in certain proteins can directly regulate enzyme activity or cause formation of protein complexes necessary for transducing intracellular signals. Genetic and biochemical evidence also implicates protein-tyrosine phosphatases in several disease processes, including negative regulation of insulin receptor signaling at the level of the insulin receptor and perhaps in signaling at the IRS-1 level. The expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is elevated in muscle and adipose tissue in insulin-resistant states both in man and rodents suggesting that PTP1B may play a role in the insulin-resistant state associated with diabetes and obesity. As described in this unit, PTP1B activity can be determined with the small molecule substrate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), in which the cleavage of the phosphate results in production of p-nitrophenol (pNP) and an increase in absorbance at 405 nm. Alternatively, PTP1B activity can be measured as described using model phosphotyrosyl-containing peptide substrates in which the release of free phosphate from the peptide is determined using a malachite green colorimetric assay.

  14. Protein tyrosine nitration in pea roots during development and senescence

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that is associated with nitro-oxidative damage. No information about this process is available in relation to higher plants during development and senescence. Using pea plants at different developmental stages (ranging from 8 to 71 days), tyrosine nitration in the main organs (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits) was analysed using immunological and proteomic approaches. In the roots of 71-day-old senescent plants, nitroproteome analysis enabled the identification a total of 16 nitrotyrosine-immunopositive proteins. Among the proteins identified, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), an enzyme involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolism, redox regulation, and responses to oxidative stress, was selected to evaluate the effect of nitration. NADP-ICDH activity fell by 75% during senescence. Analysis showed that peroxynitrite inhibits recombinant cytosolic NADP-ICDH activity through a process of nitration. Of the 12 tyrosines present in this enzyme, mass spectrometric analysis of nitrated recombinant cytosolic NADP-ICDH enabled this study to identify the Tyr392 as exclusively nitrated by peroxynitrite. The data as a whole reveal that protein tyrosine nitration is a nitric oxide-derived PTM prevalent throughout root development and intensifies during senescence. PMID:23362300

  15. Receptor for bombesin with associated tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, D M; Gaudino, G; Naldini, L; Comoglio, P M

    1986-01-01

    The neuropeptide bombesin is known for its potent mitogenic activity on murine 3T3 fibroblasts and other cells. Recently it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of small cell lung carcinoma, in which it acts through an autocrine loop of growth stimulation. Phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) antibodies have been successfully used to recognize the autophosphorylated receptors for known growth factors. In Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, phosphotyrosine antibodies identified a 115,000-Mr cell surface protein (p115) that became phosphorylated on tyrosine as a specific response to bombesin stimulation of quiescent cells. The extent of phosphorylation was dose dependent and correlated with the mitogenic effect induced by bombesin, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p115 was detectable minutes after the addition of bombesin, and its time course paralleled that described for the binding of bombesin to its receptor. Immunocomplexes of phosphorylated p115 and phosphotyrosine antibodies bound 125I-labeled [Tyr4]bombesin in a specific and saturable manner and displayed an associated tyrosine kinase activity enhanced by bombesin. Furthermore, the 125I-labeled bombesin analog gastrin-releasing peptide, bound to intact live cells, was coprecipitated with p115. These data strongly suggest that p115 participates in the structure and function of the surface receptor for bombesin, a new member of the family of growth factor receptors with associated tyrosine kinase activity. Images PMID:2432404

  16. Teaching resources. Growth factor and receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Stuart

    2005-02-22

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a graduate-level class on ligand regulation of signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases and receptors involved in the Wnt canonical pathway. It is part of a series of lectures that constitute the Cell Signaling Systems course. A description of the lecture, along with a set of slides used to present this information, is provided.

  17. Motogenic and morphogenic activity of epithelial receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases play essential roles in morphogenesis and differentiation of epithelia. Here we examined various tyrosine kinase receptors, which are preferentially expressed in epithelia (c-met, c- ros, c-neu, and the keratin growth factor [KGF] receptor), for their capacity to induce cell motility and branching morphogenesis of epithelial cells. We exchanged the ligand-binding domain of these receptors by the ectodomain of trkA and could thus control signaling by the new ligand, NGF. We demonstrate here that the tyrosine kinases of c- met, c-ros, c-neu, the KGF receptor, and trkA, but not the insulin receptor, induced scattering and increased motility of kidney epithelial cells in tissue culture. Mutational analysis suggests that SHC binding is essential for scattering and increased cell motility induced by trkA. The induction of motility in epithelial cells is thus an important feature of various receptor tyrosine kinases, which in vivo play a role in embryogenesis and metastasis. In contrast, only the c-met receptor promoted branching morphogenesis of kidney epithelial cells in three-dimensional matrices, which resemble the formation of tubular epithelia in development. Interestingly, the ability of c-met to induce morphogenesis could be transferred to trkA, when in a novel receptor hybrid COOH-terminal sequences of c-met (including Y14 to Y16) were fused to the trkA kinase domain. These data demonstrate that tubulogenesis of epithelia is a restricted activity of tyrosine kinases, as yet only demonstrated for the c-met receptor. We predict the existence of specific substrates that mediate this morphogenesis signal. PMID:8655582

  18. Biochemistry of primary headaches: role of tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, G; Cevoli, S; Colavito, D; Leon, A

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of migraine as well as cluster headache (CH) is yet a debated question. In this review, we discuss the possible role of the of tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism in the pathogenesis of these primary headaches. These include the abnormalities in the synthesis of neurotransmitters: high level of DA, low level of NE and very elevated levels of octopamine and synephrine (neuromodulators) in plasma of episodic migraine without aura and CH patients. We hypothesize that the imbalance between the levels of neurotransmitters and elusive amines synthesis is due to a metabolic shift directing tyrosine toward an increased decarboxylase and reduced hydroxylase enzyme activities. The metabolic shift of the tyrosine is favored by a state of neuronal hyperexcitability and a reduced mitochondrial activity present in migraine. In addition we present biochemical studies performed in chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache patients to verify if the same anomalies of the tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism are present in these primary headaches and, if so, their possible role in the chronicity process of CM and CTTH. The results show that important abnormalities of tyrosine metabolism are present only in CM patients (very high plasma levels of DA, NE and tryptamine). Tryptamine plasma levels were found significantly lower in both CM and CTTH patients. In view of this, we propose that migraine and, possibly, CH attacks derive from neurotransmitter and neuromodulator metabolic abnormalities in a hyperexcitable and hypoenergetic brain that spread from the frontal lobe, downstream, resulting in abnormally activated nuclei of the pain matrix. The low tryptamine plasma levels found in CM and CTTH patients suggest that these two primary chronic headaches are characterized by a common insufficient serotoninergic control of the pain threshold.

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation on spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is differentially regulated in human and murine platelets by protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Bhavanasi, Dheeraj; Dangelmaier, Carol; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Borgognone, Alessandra; Tsygankov, Alexander Y; McKenzie, Steven E; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2013-10-04

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms differentially regulate platelet functional responses downstream of glycoprotein VI (GPVI) signaling, but the role of PKCs regulating upstream effectors such as Syk is not known. We investigated the role of PKC on Syk tyrosine phosphorylation using the pan-PKC inhibitor GF109203X (GFX). GPVI-mediated phosphorylation on Syk Tyr-323, Tyr-352, and Tyr-525/526 was rapidly dephosphorylated, but GFX treatment inhibited this dephosphorylation on Tyr-525/526 in human platelets but not in wild type murine platelets. GFX treatment did not affect tyrosine phosphorylation on FcRγ chain or Src family kinases. Phosphorylation of Lat Tyr-191 and PLCγ2 Tyr-759 was also increased upon treatment with GFX. We evaluated whether secreted ADP is required for such dephosphorylation. Exogenous addition of ADP to GFX-treated platelets did not affect tyrosine phosphorylation on Syk. FcγRIIA- or CLEC-2-mediated Syk tyrosine phosphorylation was also potentiated with GFX in human platelets. Because potentiation of Syk phosphorylation is not observed in murine platelets, PKC-deficient mice cannot be used to identify the PKC isoform regulating Syk phosphorylation. We therefore used selective inhibitors of PKC isoforms. Only PKCβ inhibition resulted in Syk hyperphosphorylation similar to that in platelets treated with GFX. This result indicates that PKCβ is the isoform responsible for Syk negative regulation in human platelets. In conclusion, we have elucidated a novel pathway of Syk regulation by PKCβ in human platelets.

  20. Helicobacter pylori isolated from Iranian drinking water: vacA, cagA, iceA, oipA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Khamesipour, Faham; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2016-05-01

    Despite the clinical importance of Helicobacter pylori in human gastric disorders, its exact route of transmission is still uncertain. Based on the contentious hypothesis and findings of previous investigations, water may play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. This study was carried out to investigate the vacA, cagA, oipA, iceA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties of H. pylori strains isolated from the drinking water samples of four major provinces in Iran. A total of 400 drinking water samples were cultured and tested. H. pylori-positive strains were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes and antimicrobial resistance. Twelve of 400 (3%) water samples were positive for H. pylori. Samples from Isfahan province had the highest, while those from Shiraz had the lowest prevalence of H. pylori. The seasonal distribution was also determined, with the highest prevalence of bacteria in the summer season (7.36%). H. pylori strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (100%), erythromycin (75%), clarithromycin (75%), and trimethoprim (58.3%). The most commonly detected genotypes were vacAs1a (83.3%), vacAm1a (66.6%), vacAs2 (50%) and cagA (50%). The presence of similar genotypes in the H. pylori strains of drinking water and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated water maybe the sources of bacteria. Spiramycin and furazolidone are suggested for the treatment of cases of H. pylori infection.

  1. Identification of Tyrosine O Sulfated Proteins in Cow Retina and the 661W Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Kanan, Yogita; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R

    2016-01-01

    Lack of tyrosine O Sulfation compromises both rod and cone electroretinographic responses emphasizing the importance of this post-translational modification for vision. To identify tyrosine sulfated proteins in retina, cow retinal lysates were subjected to immunoaffinity purification using an anti-sulfotyrosine antibody. The tyrosine sulfated proteins were eluted from the column using a sulfotyrosine pentapeptide and identified using mass spectrometry. Similarly, tyrosine sulfated proteins secreted by the 661W cell line were identified. Proteins identified were vitronectin, fibronectin, fibulin 2, nidogen, collagen V alpha 2, complement component 3 and C4 and fibrinogen beta. All proteins were subjected to analysis by 'Sulfinator' to determine potential sulfated tyrosines.

  2. Regulation and function of syk tyrosine kinase in mast cell signaling and beyond.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Rodrigo Orlandini

    2011-01-01

    The protein tyrosine kinase Syk plays a critical role in FcεRI signaling in mast cells. Binding of Syk to phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (p-ITAM) of the receptor subunits results in conformational changes and tyrosine phosphorylation at multiple sites that leads to activation of Syk. The phosphorylated tyrosines throughout the molecule play an important role in the regulation of Syk-mediated signaling. Reconstitution of receptor-mediated signaling in Syk(-/-) cells by wild-type Syk or mutants which have substitution of these tyrosines with phenylalanine together with in vitro assays has been useful strategies to understand the regulation and function of Syk.

  3. Behavioral and cognitive effects of tyrosine intake in healthy human adults.

    PubMed

    Hase, Adrian; Jung, Sophie E; aan het Rot, Marije

    2015-06-01

    The amino acid tyrosine is the precursor to the catecholamine neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. Increasing tyrosine uptake may positively influence catecholamine-related psychological functioning. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effects of tyrosine on behavior and cognition. Fifteen studies were reviewed. All studies except one involved tyrosine loading during a single test session. In most behavioral studies, there were no significant effects of tyrosine on exercise performance. In contrast, cognitive studies employing neuropsychological measures found that tyrosine loading acutely counteracts decrements in working memory and information processing that are induced by demanding situational conditions such as extreme weather or cognitive load. The buffering effects of tyrosine on cognition may be explained by tyrosine's ability to neutralize depleted brain catecholamine levels. There is evidence that tyrosine may benefit healthy individuals exposed to demanding situational conditions. For future research we recommend moving from studying the acute effects of a single tyrosine load in small samples to studying the behavioral and cognitive effects of tyrosine in larger groups over multiple weeks.

  4. meta-Tyrosine in Festuca rubra ssp. commutata (Chewings fescue) is synthesized by hydroxylation of phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tengfang; Rehak, Ludmila; Jander, Georg

    2012-03-01

    m-Tyrosine is a non-protein amino acid that is structurally similar to the common protein amino acids p-tyrosine and phenylalanine. Copious amounts of m-tyrosine can be found in root exudates of the fine fescue cultivar, Festuca rubra L. ssp. commutata (Chewings fescue). The phytotoxicity of m-tyrosine may contribute to the allelopathic potential of F. rubra. m-Tyrosine in Euphorbia myrsinites (donkey-tail spurge), was previously shown to be synthesized via transamination of m-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. Here we show that m-tyrosine biosynthesis in F. rubra occurs through direct hydroxylation of phenylalanine in the root tips, perhaps through the activity of a cytochrome P450 enzyme. Hence, E. myrsinites and F. rubra, the only two plant species known to produce m-tyrosine, use distinct biosynthetic pathways that likely arose independently in evolutionary history.

  5. Electromagnetic field-induced stimulation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Kristupaitis, D; Dibirdik, I; Vassilev, A; Mahajan, S; Kurosaki, T; Chu, A; Tuel-Ahlgren, L; Tuong, D; Pond, D; Luben, R; Uckun, F M

    1998-05-15

    Here we present evidence that exposure of DT40 lymphoma B-cells to low energy electromagnetic fields (EMF) results in activation of phospholipase C-gamma 2 (PLC-gamma2), leading to increased inositol phospholipid turnover. PLC-gamma2 activation in EMF-stimulated cells is mediated by stimulation of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the Src-related TEC family of protein tyrosine kinases, which acts downstream of LYN kinase and upstream of PLC-gamma2. B-cells rendered BTK-deficient by targeted disruption of the btk gene did not show enhanced PLC-gamma2 activation in response to EMF exposure. Introduction of the wild-type (but not a kinase domain mutant) human btk gene into BTK-deficient B-cells restored their EMF responsiveness. Thus, BTK exerts a pivotal and mandatory function in initiation of EMF-induced signaling cascades in B-cells.

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling: a view from quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2009-10-01

    Growth factor receptor signaling via receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is one of the basic cellular communication principals found in all metazoans. Extracellular signals are transferred via membrane spanning receptors into the cytoplasm, reversible tyrosine phosphorylation being the hallmark of all RTKs. In recent years proteomic approaches have yielded detailed descriptions of cellular signaling events. Quantitative proteomics is able to characterize the exact position and strength of post-translational modifications (PTMs) providing essential information for understanding the molecular basis of signal transduction. Numerous new post-translational modification sites have been identified by quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In addition, plentiful new players in signal transduction have been identified underlining the complexity and the modular architecture of most signaling networks. In this review, we outline the principles of signal transduction via RTKs and highlight some of the new insights obtained from proteomic approaches such as protein microarrays and quantitative mass spectrometry.

  7. Establishing the role of tyrosine kinase 2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Übel, Caroline; Mousset, Stephanie; Trufa, Denis; Sirbu, Horia; Finotto, Susetta

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) is a member of the Janus family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases involved in cytokine signaling. TYK2 deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to mycobacterial and viral infections, hyper IgE syndrome as well as with allergic asthma. However the precise role of TYK2 in oncogenesis and tumor progression is not clear yet. Tyk2-deficient mice are prone to develop tumors because they lack efficient cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell antitumor responses as a result of deficient Type I interferon signaling. However, as TYK2 functions downstream of growth factor receptors that are often hyperactivated in cancer, inhibiting TYK2 might also have beneficial effects for cancer treatment. PMID:23482926

  8. Establishing the role of tyrosine kinase 2 in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ubel, Caroline; Mousset, Stephanie; Trufa, Denis; Sirbu, Horia; Finotto, Susetta

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) is a member of the Janus family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases involved in cytokine signaling. TYK2 deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to mycobacterial and viral infections, hyper IgE syndrome as well as with allergic asthma. However the precise role of TYK2 in oncogenesis and tumor progression is not clear yet. Tyk2-deficient mice are prone to develop tumors because they lack efficient cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell antitumor responses as a result of deficient Type I interferon signaling. However, as TYK2 functions downstream of growth factor receptors that are often hyperactivated in cancer, inhibiting TYK2 might also have beneficial effects for cancer treatment.

  9. Resistance to HER2-directed antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Joan T

    2011-01-01

    The antibody trastuzumab and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib are approved by the FDA for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. These anti-HER2 drugs are changing the natural history of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. However, therapeutic resistance to trastuzumab or lapatinib, as either single-agents or in combination with chemotherapy in the metastatic setting, typically occurs within months of starting therapy. Several mechanisms of trastuzumab-resistance have been reported that include signaling from other HER receptors, signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) outside of the HER (ErbB) family, increased phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling, and the presence of truncated forms of HER2. Mechanisms of resistance to lapatinib also point to increased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling as well as derepression/activation of compensatory survival pathways. In this review, we discuss how these models and mechanisms enhance our understanding of the clinical resistance to HER2-directed therapies. PMID:21307659

  10. Current status of tyrosine hydroxylase in management of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Feve, Annaik Petithomme

    2012-06-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate limiting enzyme responsible for converting tyrosine to L-DOPA in the dopamine synthesis pathway. The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is largely due to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system, with a decrease in TH activity, TH synthesis and TH mRNA in the striatum of PD and animal experimental models. TH is thus one of the main targets for gene therapy in PD. TH activity variations during L-DOPA and new antiparkinsonian treatments have been extensively studied. Pharmacological trials with neuroprotective treatments could modify these variations, suggesting a direct involvement of TH cells in the neurodegenerative process. α- Synuclein, the main component of Lewy bodies regulates the production of dopamine through its interaction with TH. Over-expression of α-synuclein reduces the levels of TH mRNA and protein in the brain and in this way links the histological description of PD and its pathological biochemistry.

  11. Bone sialoprotein II synthesized by cultured osteoblasts contains tyrosine sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Ecarot-Charrier, B.; Bouchard, F.; Delloye, C. )

    1989-11-25

    Isolated mouse osteoblasts that retain their osteogenic activity in culture were incubated with (35S) sulfate. Two radiolabeled proteins, in addition to proteoglycans, were extracted from the calcified matrix of osteoblast cultures. All the sulfate label in both proteins was in the form of tyrosine sulfate as assessed by amino acid analysis and thin layer chromatography following alkaline hydrolysis. The elution behavior on DEAE-Sephacel of the major sulfated protein and the apparent Mr on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels were characteristic of bone sialoprotein II extracted from rat. This protein was shown to cross-react with an antiserum raised against bovine bone sialoprotein II, indicating that bone sialoprotein II synthesized by cultured mouse osteoblasts is a tyrosine-sulfated protein. The minor sulfated protein was tentatively identified as bone sialoprotein I or osteopontin based on its elution properties on DEAE-Sephacel and anomalous behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels similar to those reported for rat bone sialoprotein I.

  12. Targeting Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Sheetal Mehta; Nimeiri, Halla S; Benson, Al B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly diagnosed throughout the world, and treatment options have greatly expanded over the last 2 decades. Targeting angiogenesis has been a major focus of study in a variety of malignancy types. Targeting angiogenesis has been achieved by several mechanisms in colorectal cancer, including use of antiangiogenic small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There have been many attempts and failures to prove efficacy of TKIs in the treatment of colorectal cancer including sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib, and tivozanib. Regorafenib was the first TKI to demonstrate efficacy and is an orally active inhibitor of angiogenic (including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3), stromal, and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases. There are ongoing investigations of both regorafenib and ninetanib; however, there remains a critical need to better understand novel combinations with TKIs that could prove more efficacious than available options.

  13. Purification and characterization of tyrosine phenol lyase from Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Meenakshi; Azmi, Wamik

    2013-12-01

    The purification and characterization of intracellular tyrosine phenol lyase from Citrobacter freundii has been carried out. The enzyme was purified 35-fold to homogeneity by ammonium sulphate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Its subunit molecular weight was found to be 52 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified tyrosine phenol lyase showed maximum activity in borate buffer (0.05 M at pH 8.5) at 45 °C after 20 min of incubation. The Km and Vmax values of purified enzyme were found to be 0.446 mm and 0.342 mM/min/mg. This enzyme exhibits t1/2 of 10, 52 and 130 min at 55, 45 and 35 °C, respectively. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined as MET-ASN-TYR-PRO-ALA-GLU-PRO-PHE-ARG-ILETRP- TRP-VAL-GLY.

  14. Bone sialoprotein II synthesized by cultured osteoblasts contains tyrosine sulfate.

    PubMed

    Ecarot-Charrier, B; Bouchard, F; Delloye, C

    1989-11-25

    Isolated mouse osteoblasts that retain their osteogenic activity in culture were incubated with [35S] sulfate. Two radiolabeled proteins, in addition to proteoglycans, were extracted from the calcified matrix of osteoblast cultures. All the sulfate label in both proteins was in the form of tyrosine sulfate as assessed by amino acid analysis and thin layer chromatography following alkaline hydrolysis. The elution behavior on DEAE-Sephacel of the major sulfated protein and the apparent Mr on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels were characteristic of bone sialoprotein II extracted from rat. This protein was shown to cross-react with an antiserum raised against bovine bone sialoprotein II, indicating that bone sialoprotein II synthesized by cultured mouse osteoblasts is a tyrosine-sulfated protein. The minor sulfated protein was tentatively identified as bone sialoprotein I or osteopontin based on its elution properties on DEAE-Sephacel and anomalous behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels similar to those reported for rat bone sialoprotein I.

  15. Assessment of tumor response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Amanda; Han, Zhaozhong

    2015-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent developments in the use of non-invasive imaging to assess tumor response to TKI therapy. Receptor tyrosine kinases play important roles in cancer development. A new class of drugs, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) can induce rapid and dramatic tumor suppression when administered to carefully selected patient groups. Identifying these patients with responding tumors prior to or shortly after the initiation of therapy remains challenging. The gold standard of response assessment has been by invasive biopsies used in biological and biochemical procedures. Advances in non-invasive imaging at the anatomical, functional and molecular level have enabled the early detection of tumor response; sometimes within days of beginning treatment. The growing area of molecular imaging has spurred the discovery of novel targeting peptides to bind TKI responding tumors. The emergence of targeted, quick responding imaging probes advances the field of cancer management towards the goal of personalized medicine. PMID:21622159

  16. The Effects of Tyrosine on Cognitive Functions During Sustained Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    Differences in the Adaptability to Irregular Rest-Work Rhythms/Status of the Use of Drugs in Sleep -Wakefulness Management [les Differences entre individus...depression in animals𔃺’ the cognitive performance decrement that was due to the 11. In humans, clonidine -induced inhibition of NE release impact of stress...as therefore, strongly suggests that supplementation with resource management, sleep and work/rest management, tyrosine may serve to reduce the

  17. Hypervalent Organochalcogenanes as Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Piovan, Leandro; Wu, Li; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Andrade, Leandro H.

    2011-01-01

    A series of organochalcogenanes was synthesized and evaluated as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) inhibitors. The results indicate that organochalcogenanes inactivate the PTPs in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, most likely through covalent modification of the active site sulfur-moiety by the chalcogen atom. Consequently, organochalcogenanes represent a new class of mechanism-based probes to modulate the PTP-mediated cellular processes. PMID:21240419

  18. Tyrosine Supplementation Attenuates Cognitive and Psychomotor Deficits in Cold Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited In rats, dietary supplementation with the amino acid tyrosine (TYR) prevented depletion of central...that cold exposure degrades cognitive performance and supplementation with TYR alleviates working memory decrements, even with a reduced core

  19. Perspective: Dynamics of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Bruce J

    2012-08-14

    Textbook descriptions of signal transduction complexes provide a static snapshot view of highly dynamic events. Despite enormous strides in identifying the key components of signaling complexes and the underlying mechanisms of signal transduction, our understanding of the dynamic behavior of these complexes has lagged behind. Using the example of receptor tyrosine kinases, this perspective takes a fresh look at the dynamics of the system and their potential impact on signal processing.

  20. Targeting the Reversibly Oxidized Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Benoit; Yang, Ming; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled production of reactive oxygen species leads to reversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and has emerged as an important tier of regulation over phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction. We present a modified cysteinyl-labeling assay that detects reversible oxidation of members of each of the different PTP subclasses. Here, we describe the methods for enriching reversibly oxidized PTPs from complex protein extracts, illustrating the procedure in IMR90 fibroblasts. PMID:20807953

  1. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced NSCLC: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alves, Ana Ferreira; Liebermann, Marco

    2008-10-01

    Erlotinib is a molecule that selectively inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase activity. The authors present a case that exemplifies the use of erlotinib as second line therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This case is about a 76 years old woman, non-smoker, with advanced lung adenocarcinoma (stage IIIB) previously treated with two cycles of standard chemotherapy, which were interrupted by serious adverse reactions. Rev Port Pneumol 2008; XIV (Supl 3): S23-S28.

  2. Temporal patterns of tyrosine nitration in embryo heart development

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Liliana; Radmilovich, Milka; Vargas, Marcelo R.; Dennys, Cassandra N.; Wilson, Landon; Barnes, Stephen; Franco, Maria Clara; Beckman, Joseph S.; Estévez, Alvaro G.

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine nitration is a biomarker for the production of peroxynitrite and other reactive nitrogen species. Nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity is present in many pathological conditions including several cardiac diseases. Because the events observed during heart failure may recapitulate some aspects of development, we tested whether nitrotyrosine is present during normal development of the rat embryo heart and its potential relationship in cardiac remodeling through apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) production is highly dynamic during development, but whether peroxynitrite and nitrotyrosine are formed during normal embryonic development has received little attention. Rat embryo hearts exhibited strong nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in endocardial and myocardial cells of the atria and ventricles from E12 to E18. After E18, nitrotyrosine staining faded and disappeared entirely by birth. Tyrosine nitration in the myocardial tissue coincided with elevated protein expression of nitric oxide synthases (eNOS and iNOS). The immunoreactivity for these NOS isoforms remained elevated even after nitrotyrosine had disappeared. Tyrosine nitration did not correlate with cell death or proliferation of cardiac cells. Analysis of tryptic peptides by MALDI-TOF shows that nitration occurs in actin, myosin, and the mitochondrial ATP synthase alpha chain. These results suggest that reactive nitrogen species are not restricted to pathological conditions but may play a role during normal embryonic development. PMID:23195686

  3. Inhibition of a protein tyrosine phosphatase using mesoporous oxides.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, S; Girish, T S; Mandal, S S; Gopal, B; Bhattacharyya, A J

    2010-03-11

    The feasibility of utilizing mesoporous matrices of alumina and silica for the inhibition of enzymatic activity is presented here. These studies were performed on a protein tyrosine phosphatase by the name chick retinal tyrosine phosphotase-2 (CRYP-2), a protein that is identical in sequence to the human glomerular epithelial protein-1 and involved in hepatic carcinoma. The inhibition of CRYP-2 is of tremendous therapeutic importance. Inhibition of catalytic activity was examined using the sustained delivery of p-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS) from bare and amine functionalized mesoporous silica (MCM-48) and mesoporous alumina (Al(2)O(3)). Among the various mesoporous matrices employed, amine functionalized MCM-48 exhibited the best release of pNCS and also inhibition of CRYP-2. The maximum speed of reaction v(max) (=160 +/- 10 micromol/mnt/mg) and inhibition constant K(i) (=85.0 +/- 5.0 micromol) estimated using a competitive inhibition model were found to be very similar to inhibition activities of protein tyrosine phosphatases using other methods.

  4. Tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan in gastroesophageal malignancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Tom; Kumar, Sacheen; Markar, Sheraz R; Antonowicz, Stefan; Hanna, George B

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal cancer has a rapidly increasing incidence worldwide and reliable biomarkers are urgently required to facilitate earlier diagnosis and improve survival. The aromatic amino acids tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan represent potential biomarkers and their relation to gastroesophageal cancer will be evaluated in this review. An electronic literature search was performed to identify all published research relating to the measurement of tyrosine, phenylalanine, or tryptophan in the biofluids or tissues of patients with gastroesophageal cancer. Sixteen studies were included in this systematic review. Six studies investigated serum concentrations, which all found decreased concentrations of these aromatic amino acids, except one study that found increased phenylalanine. Five studies reported increased concentrations within gastric content of these patients and two reported increased urinary concentrations. Tissue concentrations of these aromatic amino acids were increased in three studies. Tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan represent potential biomarkers of gastroesophageal cancer, and further research is necessary to definitively establish the mechanism responsible for altered concentrations of these compounds in patients with gastroesophageal cancer.

  5. Eph-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of citron kinase controls abscission

    PubMed Central

    Jungas, Thomas; Perchey, Renaud T.; Fawal, Mohamad; Callot, Caroline; Froment, Carine; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Besson, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the last step of cell division, culminating in the physical separation of daughter cells at the end of mitosis. Cytokinesis is a tightly regulated process that until recently was mostly viewed as a cell-autonomous event. Here, we investigated the role of Ephrin/Eph signaling, a well-known local cell-to-cell communication pathway, in cell division. We show that activation of Eph signaling in vitro leads to multinucleation and polyploidy, and we demonstrate that this is caused by alteration of the ultimate step of cytokinesis, abscission. Control of abscission requires Eph kinase activity, and Src and citron kinase (CitK) are downstream effectors in the Eph-induced signal transduction cascade. CitK is phosphorylated on tyrosines in neural progenitors in vivo, and Src kinase directly phosphorylates CitK. We have identified the specific tyrosine residues of CitK that are phosphorylated and show that tyrosine phosphorylation of CitK impairs cytokinesis. Finally, we show that, similar to CitK, Ephrin/Eph signaling controls neuronal ploidy in the developing neocortex. Our study indicates that CitK integrates intracellular and extracellular signals provided by the local environment to coordinate completion of cytokinesis. PMID:27551053

  6. cap alpha. -Methyl-p-tyrosine shifts circadian temperature rhythms

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, A.L.; Ehret, C.F.

    1982-09-01

    ..cap alpha..-Methyl-p-tyrosine shifts the acrophase (time of highest temperature) of the circadian temperature rhythm of the rat to earlier or later times of day depending on the phase of the cicadian cycle at which the drug is administered. When ..cap alpha..-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester HCl is injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 100 mg/kg late in the projected 8-h light phase, the acrophase of the intraperitoneal temperature rhythm is delayed by up to 3 h.However, when the same dose of drug is given 9-10 h into the projected 16-h dark phase of the daily cycle, the acrophase of the temperature rhythm occurs about 2 h earlier than expected. The times of ..cap alpha..-methyl-p-tyrosine administration leading to maximal phase delays or advances are correlated with the times of minimal and maximal turnover of norepinephrine in the hypothalamus. These results suggest that changing rates of norepinephrine turnover in the hypothalamus may regulate the circadian temperature rhythm in rats. The results also emphasize the fact that the effects of drugs may vary as a function of the time of administration. This fact must be taken into account in pharmacologic testing.

  7. Activation of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase ALK by zinc.

    PubMed

    Bennasroune, Aline; Mazot, Pierre; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Vigny, Marc

    2010-08-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development of the central and peripheral nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in Vertebrates is still a matter of debate. During synaptic transmission the release of ionic zinc found in vesicles of certain glutamatergic and gabaergic terminals may act as a neuromodulator by binding to pre- or post-synaptic receptors. Recently, zinc has been shown to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, independently of neurotrophins. This activation occurs via increasing the Src family kinase activity. In the present study, we investigated whether the ALK activity could be modulated by extracellular zinc. We first showed that zinc alone rapidly activates ALK. This activation is dependent of ALK tyrosine kinase activity and dimerization of the receptor but is independent of Src family kinase activity. In contrast, addition of sodium pyrithione, a zinc ionophore, led to a further activation of ALK. This stronger activation is dependent of Src family kinase but independent of ALK activity and dimerization. In conclusion, zinc could constitute an endogenous ligand of ALK in vertebrates.

  8. Src tyrosine kinase regulates adhesion and chemotaxis in Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Hai T.; Azab, Abdel Kareem; Farag, Mena; Jia, Xiaoying; Melhem, Molly M.; Runnels, Judith; Roccaro, Aldo M.; Azab, Feda; Sacco, Antonio; Leleu, Xavier; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Ghobrial, Irene M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma characterized by widespread involvement of the bone marrow. Despite different options of therapy, WM is still incurable. Src tyrosine kinase was shown to play a central role in the regulation of a variety of biological processes such as cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and survival, in solid tumors. We sought to determine whether the protein tyrosine kinase Src regulates adhesion, migration and survival in WM. Experimental Design We have tested the expression of Src tyrosine kinase in WM and normal cells, and tested the effect of its specific inhibitor AZD-530 on adhesion, migration, cell cycle and survival of WM cell line and patient samples. Moreover, we tested its effect on sytockeletal and cell cycle signaling in WM. Results We demonstrated that Src is over expressed in WM cells compared to control B cells. And that the use of the Src inhibitor AZD0530 led to significant inhibition of adhesion, migration and cytosekletal signaling induced by SDF1. Moreover, inhibition of Src activity induced G1 cell cycle arrest; however, it had minimal effect on survival of WM cells, and no significant effect on survival of normal cells. Conclusions Taken together, these studies delineate the role of Src kinase activity in WM and provide the framework for future clinical trials using Src inhibitors in combination with other drugs to improve the outcome of patients with WM. PMID:19755386

  9. Paxillin-kinase-linker tyrosine phosphorylation regulates directional cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2009-11-01

    Directed cell migration requires the coordination of growth factor and cell adhesion signaling and is of fundamental importance during embryonic development, wound repair, and pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate that the ArfGAP, paxillin-kinase-linker (PKL/GIT2), is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, in an adhesion dependent manner and is necessary for directed cell migration. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout cells and kinase mutants, FAK, and Src family kinases were shown to mediate PDGF-dependent PKL tyrosine phosphorylation. In fibroblasts, expression of a PKL mutant lacking the principal tyrosine phosphorylation sites resulted in loss of wound-induced cell polarization as well as directional migration. PKL phosphorylation was necessary for PDGF-stimulated PKL binding to the focal adhesion protein paxillin and expression of paxillin or PKL mutants defective in their respective binding motifs recapitulated the polarization defects. RNA interference or expression of phosphorylation mutants of PKL resulted in disregulation of PDGF-stimulated Rac1 and PAK activities, reduction of Cdc42 and Erk signaling, as well as mislocalization of betaPIX. Together these studies position PKL as an integral component of growth factor and cell adhesion cross-talk signaling, controlling the development of front-rear cell polarity and directional cell migration.

  10. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during meiotic divisions of starfish oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peaucellier, G.; Andersen, A.C.; Kinsey, W.H. )

    1990-04-01

    We have used an antibody specific for phosphotyrosine to investigate protein phosphorylation on tyrosine during hormone-induced maturation of starfish oocytes. Analysis of immunoprecipitates from cortices of in vivo labeled Marthasterias glacialis oocytes revealed the presence of labeled phosphotyrosine-containing proteins only after hormone addition. Six major phosphoproteins of 195, 155, 100, 85, 45, and 35 kDa were detected. Total activity in immunoprecipitates increased until first polar body emission and was greatly reduced upon completion of meiosis but some proteins exhibited different kinetics. The labeling of the 155-kDa protein reached a maximum at germinal vesicle breakdown, while the 35-kDa appeared later and disappeared after polar body emission. Similar results were obtained with Asterias rubens oocytes. In vitro phosphorylation of cortices showed that tyrosine kinase activity is a major protein kinase activity in this fraction, the main endogenous substrate being a 68-kDa protein. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro were almost similar in extracts from oocytes treated or not with the hormone.

  11. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  12. Differential dephosphorylation of the FcRgamma immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif tyrosines with dissimilar potential for activating Syk.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Ryo; Backlund, Peter S; Yamashita, Yumi; Yergey, Alfred L; Rivera, Juan

    2008-10-17

    The cell surface-expressed gamma chain of the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI) can be phosphorylated on two tyrosine residues of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), leading to recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a kinase that is essential for mast cell signaling and allergic responses. However, it is not known whether preferential phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of the two individual FcRgamma tyrosines (the N-terminal Tyr47 and C-terminal Tyr58) could regulate Syk activation. Herein we report that phosphorylation of only Tyr58 was able to elicit Syk phosphorylation and a weak rise in intracellular calcium, suggesting that Tyr58 phosphorylation may be distinctively important for Syk activation. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that both Tyr47 and Tyr58 could be similarly phosphorylated. However, mass spectrometric analysis of the phosphorylated FcepsilonRgamma from bone marrow-derived mast cells showed that phosphorylation at Tyr47 was at least 2-fold greater than at Tyr58. This suggested that, once phosphorylated, Tyr58 is preferentially dephosphorylated. In vitro studies demonstrated more efficient dephosphorylation of Tyr58 (by the receptor-associated phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2) than of Tyr47. Analysis of Syk binding to wild type and mutant phosphorylated FcepsilonRI revealed that mutation at Tyr58 almost completely ablated Syk binding, whereas mutation at Tyr47 moderately reduced Syk binding. The findings argue for a novel regulatory mechanism, where dephosphorylation of phospho-Tyr58 is likely to promote the down-regulation of Syk activation and suppression of mast cell responses.

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation of protein kinase CK2 by Src-related tyrosine kinases correlates with increased catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Donella-Deana, Arianna; Cesaro, Luca; Sarno, Stefania; Ruzzene, Maria; Brunati, Anna Maria; Marin, Oriano; Vilk, Greg; Doherty-Kirby, Amanda; Lajoie, Gilles; Litchfield, David W; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2003-01-01

    Casein kinase-2 (CK2) is a pleiotropic and constitutively active serine/threonine protein kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory beta-subunits, whose regulation is still not well understood. In the present study, we show that the catalytic subunits of human CK2, but not the regulatory beta-subunits, are readily phosphorylated by the Src family protein tyrosine kinases Lyn and c-Fgr to a stoichiometry approaching 2 mol phosphotyrosine/mol CK2alpha with a concomitant 3-fold increase in catalytic activity. We also show that endogenous CK2alpha becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in pervanadate-treated Jurkat cells. Both tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of activity are suppressed by the specific Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4- d ]pyrimidine. By comparison, mutations giving rise to inactive forms of CK2alpha do not abrogate and, in some cases, stimulate Lyn and c-Fgr-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of CK2. Several radiolabelled phosphopeptides could be resolved by HPLC, following tryptic digestion of CK2alpha that had been phosphoradiolabelled by incubation with [(32)P]ATP and c-Fgr. The most prominent phosphopeptide co-migrates with a synthetic peptide encompassing the 248-268 sequence, phosphorylated previously by c-Fgr at Tyr(255) in vitro. The identification of Tyr(255) as a phosphorylated residue was also supported by MS sequencing of both the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated 248-268 tryptic fragments from CK2alpha and by on-target phosphatase treatment. A CK2alpha mutant in which Tyr(255) was replaced by phenylalanine proved less susceptible to phosphorylation and refractory to stimulation by c-Fgr. PMID:12628006

  14. Tyrosine phosphatases as key regulators of StAR induction and cholesterol transport: SHP2 as a potential tyrosine phosphatase involved in steroid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Mariana; Mele, Pablo; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Poderoso, Cecilia; Orlando, Ulises; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-04-10

    The phospho-dephosphorylation of intermediate proteins is a key event in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. In this regard, it is well accepted that steroidogenic hormones act through the activation of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein kinases. Although many cellular processes can be regulated by a crosstalk between different kinases and phosphatases, the relationship of Ser/Thr phosphorylation and tyrosine (Tyr)-dephosphorylation is a recently explored field in the regulation of steroid synthesis. Indeed in steroidogenic cells, one of the targets of hormone-induced Ser/Thr phosphorylation is a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Whereas protein tyrosine phosphatases were initially regarded as household enzymes with constitutive activity, dephosphorylating all the substrates they encountered, evidence is now accumulating that protein tyrosine phosphatases are tightly regulated by various mechanisms. Here, we will describe the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis, relating them to steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, arachidonic acid metabolism and mitochondrial rearrangement.

  15. Tyrosine Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation in Burkholderia cenocepacia Affect Biofilm Formation, Growth under Nutritional Deprivation, and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Angel; Tavares-Carreón, Faviola; Khodai-Kalaki, Maryam; Valvano, Miguel A

    2015-11-20

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, a member of the B. cepacia complex (Bcc), is an opportunistic pathogen causing serious chronic infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Tyrosine phosphorylation has emerged as an important posttranslational modification modulating the physiology and pathogenicity of Bcc bacteria. Here, we investigated the predicted bacterial tyrosine kinases BCAM1331 and BceF and the low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases BCAM0208, BceD, and BCAL2200 of B. cenocepacia K56-2. We show that BCAM1331, BceF, BCAM0208, and BceD contribute to biofilm formation, while BCAL2200 is required for growth under nutrient-limited conditions. Multiple deletions of either tyrosine kinase or low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase genes resulted in the attenuation of B. cenocepacia intramacrophage survival and reduced pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella larval infection model. Experimental evidence indicates that BCAM1331 displays reduced tyrosine autophosphorylation activity compared to that of BceF. With the artificial substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the phosphatase activities of the three low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases demonstrated similar kinetic parameters. However, only BCAM0208 and BceD could dephosphorylate BceF. Further, BCAL2200 became tyrosine phosphorylated in vivo and catalyzed its autodephosphorylation. Together, our data suggest that despite having similar biochemical activities, low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases and tyrosine kinases have both overlapping and specific roles in the physiology of B. cenocepacia.

  16. Tyrosine Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation in Burkholderia cenocepacia Affect Biofilm Formation, Growth under Nutritional Deprivation, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Angel; Tavares-Carreón, Faviola; Khodai-Kalaki, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, a member of the B. cepacia complex (Bcc), is an opportunistic pathogen causing serious chronic infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Tyrosine phosphorylation has emerged as an important posttranslational modification modulating the physiology and pathogenicity of Bcc bacteria. Here, we investigated the predicted bacterial tyrosine kinases BCAM1331 and BceF and the low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases BCAM0208, BceD, and BCAL2200 of B. cenocepacia K56-2. We show that BCAM1331, BceF, BCAM0208, and BceD contribute to biofilm formation, while BCAL2200 is required for growth under nutrient-limited conditions. Multiple deletions of either tyrosine kinase or low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase genes resulted in the attenuation of B. cenocepacia intramacrophage survival and reduced pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella larval infection model. Experimental evidence indicates that BCAM1331 displays reduced tyrosine autophosphorylation activity compared to that of BceF. With the artificial substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the phosphatase activities of the three low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases demonstrated similar kinetic parameters. However, only BCAM0208 and BceD could dephosphorylate BceF. Further, BCAL2200 became tyrosine phosphorylated in vivo and catalyzed its autodephosphorylation. Together, our data suggest that despite having similar biochemical activities, low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases and tyrosine kinases have both overlapping and specific roles in the physiology of B. cenocepacia. PMID:26590274

  17. Effects of hemorrhagic hypotension on tyrosine concentrations in rat spinal cord and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Roberts, C. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine is the precursor for catecholamine neurotransmitters. When catecholamine-containing neurons are physiologically active (as sympathoadrenal cells are in hypotension), tyrosine administration increases catecholamine synthesis and release. Since hypotension can alter plasma amino acid composition, the effects of an acute hypotensive insult on tyrosine concentrations in plasma and spinal cord were examined. Rats were cannulated and bled until the systolic blood pressure was 50 mmHg, or were kept normotensive for 1 h. Tyrosine and other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) known to compete with tyrosine for brain uptake were assayed in plasma and spinal cord. The rate at which intra-arterial (H-3)tyrosine disappeared from the plasma was also estimated in hemorrhaged and control rats. In plasma of hemorrhaged animals, both the tyrosine concentration and the tyrosine/LNAA ratio was elevated; moreover, the disappearance of (H-3)tyrosine was slowed. Tyrosine concentrations also increased in spinal cords of hemorrhaged-hypotensive rats when compared to normotensive controls. Changes in plasma amino acid patterns may thus influence spinal cord concentrations of amino acid precursors for neurotransmitters during the stress of hemorrhagic shock.

  18. Essential Functions of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Ptp2 and Ptp3 and Rim11 Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meiosis and Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xiao-Li; Hong, Yulong; Zhu, Tianqing; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Deschenes, Robert J.; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2000-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a central role in eukaryotic signal transduction. In yeast, MAP kinase pathways are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, and it has been speculated that other biochemical processes may also be regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. Previous genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) negatively regulate yeast MAP kinases. Here we report that deletion of PTP2 and PTP3 results in a sporulation defect, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation is involved in regulation of meiosis and sporulation. Deletion of PTP2 and PTP3 blocks cells at an early stage of sporulation before premeiotic DNA synthesis and induction of meiotic-specific genes. We observed that tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including 52-, 43-, and 42-kDa proteins, was changed in ptp2Δptp3Δ homozygous deletion cells under sporulation conditions. The 42-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein was identified as Mck1, which is a member of the GSK3 family of protein kinases and previously known to be phosphorylated on tyrosine. Mutation of MCK1 decreases sporulation efficiency, whereas mutation of RIM11, another GSK3 member, specifically abolishes sporulation; therefore, we investigated regulation of Rim11 by Tyr phosphorylation during sporulation. We demonstrated that Rim11 is phosphorylated on Tyr-199, and the Tyr phosphorylation is essential for its in vivo function, although Rim11 appears not to be directly regulated by Ptp2 and Ptp3. Biochemical characterizations indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation of Rim11 is essential for the activity of Rim11 to phosphorylate substrates. Our data demonstrate important roles of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in meiosis and sporulation PMID:10679022

  19. The Usp8 deubiquitination enzyme is post-translationally modified by tyrosine and serine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Inez M J; Kerperien, JoAnn; Sotoca, Ana M; van Zoelen, Everardus J J; van Leeuwen, Jeroen E M

    2013-04-01

    The ERBB1-ERBB4 receptors belong to a family of receptor tyrosine kinases that trigger a network of signaling pathways after ligand binding, thereby regulating cellular growth, differentiation and development. Ligand-induced signaling through ERBB1, also known as EGFR, is attenuated by the clathrin-dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis and RING E3-ligase Cbl-mediated receptor ubiquitination, which is followed by incorporation into multi-vesicular bodies (MVBs) and subsequent degradation in lysosomes. Before incorporation into MVBs, the EGFR is deubiquitinated by Usp8. We previously demonstrated that Usp8 is tyrosine phosphorylated in an EGFR- and SRC-kinase dependent manner. In the present study we show that overexpression of constitutively active SRC enhances constitutive and ligand-induced Usp8 tyrosine phosphorylation. We also show that enhanced endosomal recycling of the EGFR induced by TGFα stimulation is associated with decreased Usp8 tyrosine phosphorylation. We therefore hypothesize that tyrosine phosphorylation of Usp8 could regulate the function of Usp8. To identify Usp8 tyrosine phosphorylation site(s), we used Usp8 deletion constructs, site-directed mutagenesis of nine individual Usp8 tyrosine residues and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Our results demonstrate that the MIT-domain is necessary for ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Usp8 1-504. However, mutation of three MIT domain tyrosine residues did not abolish Usp8 tyrosine phosphorylation. Similar results were obtained upon mutation of six exposed tyrosine residues in the Rhod domain and linker region. Repeated MS analysis of both Usp8 WT and C748A mutants readily detected serine phosphorylation, including the S680 14-3-3 binding site, but did not reveal any phospho-tyrosine residues. Notably, mutation of the tyrosine residue in the Usp8 14-3-3 binding motif (Y679) did not abolish phosphoserine-dependent binding of 14-3-3 to Usp8. Our findings are most consistent with the model that MIT

  20. Tyrosine phosphorylation is an early and specific event involved in primary keratinocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Filvaroff, E; Stern, D F; Dotto, G P

    1990-01-01

    Very little is known about early molecular events triggering epithelial cell differentiation. We have examined the possible role of tyrosine phosphorylation in this process, as observed in cultures of primary mouse keratinocytes after exposure to calcium or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Immunoblotting with phosphotyrosine-specific antibodies as well as direct phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that induction of tyrosine phosphorylation occurs as a very early and specific event in keratinocyte differentiation. Very little or no induction of tyrosine phosphorylation was observed in a keratinocyte cell line resistant to the differentiating effects of calcium. Treatment of cells with tyrosine kinase inhibitors prevented induction of tyrosine phosphorylation by calcium and TPA and interfered with the differentiative effects of these agents. These results suggest that specific activation of tyrosine kinase(s) may play an important regulatory role in keratinocyte differentiation. Images PMID:1689456

  1. Tyrosine fluorescence probing of the surfactant-induced conformational changes of albumin.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Nadezda G; Shirshin, Evgeny A; Maksimov, Eugene G; Panchishin, Ivan M; Saletsky, Alexander M; Fadeev, Victor V

    2015-05-01

    Tyrosine fluorescence in native proteins is known to be effectively quenched, whereas its emission increases upon proteins' unfolding. This suggests that tyrosine fluorescence could be exploited for probing structural rearrangements of proteins in addition to the extensively used tryptophan emission. We studied the possibility of using tyrosine fluorescence as an indicator of surfactant-induced conformational changes in albumins. It was shown that fluorescence of tyrosine residues, which are uniformly distributed all over the protein molecules, allows the detection of subtle structural rearrangements of proteins upon surfactant binding, which do not influence the properties of a single tryptophan residue buried in the inner hydrophobic region of human serum albumin. Tyrosine fluorescence properties, including its fluorescence lifetime, revealed the multistage character of surfactant binding to albumin, consistent with the data provided by other methods. The obtained results demonstrate the possibility of probing conformational changes in proteins using tyrosine photophysical parameters as indicators.

  2. Mitochondrial tyrosine phosphoproteome: new insights from an up-to-date analysis.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Luca; Salvi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is a newcomer in the mitochondrial signaling and is currently emerging as an important mechanism for regulating mitochondrial processes. But to what extent? By analyzing an updated draft of the mitochondrial tyrosine phosphoproteome, the following observations can be drawn: more than a hundred mitochondrial proteins undergo tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphotyrosine proteins are distributed in each of the submitochondrial compartments, and mitochondrial tyrosine phosphorylated proteins are involved in a variety of functions as metabolism (electron transport chain, Krebs cycle, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism), solute and protein transport, mitochondrial translation machinery, quality protein assessment, oxidative stress, apoptosis, fission, and other. This large and varied collection suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation could be a widespread mechanism in modulating mitochondrial functions. Moreover the in silico model is here used to explore potential effects of tyrosine phosphorylation on selected mitochondrial proteins pointing out some future perspectives in this field.

  3. A reduced graphene oxide based electrochemical biosensor for tyrosine detection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Junhua; Qiu, Jingjing; Li, Li; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Xianwen; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Wang, Shiren

    2012-08-24

    In this paper, a 'green' and safe hydrothermal method has been used to reduce graphene oxide and produce hemin modified graphene nanosheet (HGN) based electrochemical biosensors for the determination of l-tyrosine levels. The as-fabricated HGN biosensors were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experimental results indicated that hemin was successfully immobilized on the reduced graphene oxide nanosheet (rGO) through π-π interaction. TEM images and EDX results further confirmed the attachment of hemin on the rGO nanosheet. Cyclic voltammetry tests were carried out for the bare glass carbon electrode (GCE), the rGO electrode (rGO/GCE), and the hemin-rGO electrode (HGN/GCE). The HGN/GCE based biosensor exhibits a tyrosine detection linear range from 5 × 10(-7) M to 2 × 10(-5) M with a detection limitation of 7.5 × 10(-8) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The sensitivity of this biosensor is 133 times higher than that of the bare GCE. In comparison with other works, electroactive biosensors are easily fabricated, easily controlled and cost-effective. Moreover, the hemin-rGO based biosensors demonstrate higher stability, a broader detection linear range and better detection sensitivity. Study of the oxidation scheme reveals that the rGO enhances the electron transfer between the electrode and the hemin, and the existence of hemin groups effectively electrocatalyzes the oxidation of tyrosine. This study contributes to a widespread clinical application of nanomaterial based biosensor devices with a broader detection linear range, improved stability, enhanced sensitivity and reduced costs.

  4. A reduced graphene oxide based electrochemical biosensor for tyrosine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Junhua; Qiu, Jingjing; Li, Li; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Xianwen; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Wang, Shiren

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a ‘green’ and safe hydrothermal method has been used to reduce graphene oxide and produce hemin modified graphene nanosheet (HGN) based electrochemical biosensors for the determination of l-tyrosine levels. The as-fabricated HGN biosensors were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experimental results indicated that hemin was successfully immobilized on the reduced graphene oxide nanosheet (rGO) through π-π interaction. TEM images and EDX results further confirmed the attachment of hemin on the rGO nanosheet. Cyclic voltammetry tests were carried out for the bare glass carbon electrode (GCE), the rGO electrode (rGO/GCE), and the hemin-rGO electrode (HGN/GCE). The HGN/GCE based biosensor exhibits a tyrosine detection linear range from 5 × 10-7 M to 2 × 10-5 M with a detection limitation of 7.5 × 10-8 M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The sensitivity of this biosensor is 133 times higher than that of the bare GCE. In comparison with other works, electroactive biosensors are easily fabricated, easily controlled and cost-effective. Moreover, the hemin-rGO based biosensors demonstrate higher stability, a broader detection linear range and better detection sensitivity. Study of the oxidation scheme reveals that the rGO enhances the electron transfer between the electrode and the hemin, and the existence of hemin groups effectively electrocatalyzes the oxidation of tyrosine. This study contributes to a widespread clinical application of nanomaterial based biosensor devices with a broader detection linear range, improved stability, enhanced sensitivity and reduced costs.

  5. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  6. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  7. Genomic organization of Bruton`s tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, J.; Conley, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (Btk), is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that has been identified as the defective gene in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). XLA patients have profound hypogammaglobulinemia and markedly reduced numbers of B cells while their T cell and phagocyte numbers remain normal. To determine the genomic organization of Btk, intron/exon borders were identified by sequencing cosmid DNA using cDNA primers. Nineteen exons spanning 37 kb of genomic DNA were identified. All the intron/exon splice junctions followed the GT/AG rule. The translational ATG start codon was in exon 2 which was 6 kb downstream of exon 1. Exon 19, 519 bp in length and 3.8 kb distal to exon 18, was the largest exon and included the 450 bp of the 3{prime} untranslated region. Exons 6 through 18 formed the largest cluster of exons with no intron being longer than 1550 bp. There was no apparent correlation between the exon boundaries of Btk and the functional domains of the protein or the exon boundaries of src, the nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase prototype. The region 500 bp upstream of the presumed transcriptional start site was sequenced and found to have a G+C content of 52%. No TATA-type promoter elements in the -20 bp to -30 bp region were identified. However, at position -48 bp, a TGTGAA motif was found that bears some similarity to the TATA box. This sequence was preceded by a perfect inverted CCAAT box at position -90 bp. Three retinoic acid binding sites were also identified at positions -50 bp, -83 bp and -197 bp. Defining the genomic structure of Btk will permit us to identify regulatory elements in this gene and to identify mutations in genomic DNA of patients with XLA.

  8. Effects of systemic L-tyrosine on dopamine release from rat corpus striatum and nucleus accumbens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    During, Matthew J.; Acworth, Ian N.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Intracerebral dialysis was used to monitor extracellular fluid from rat striatum and nucleus accumbens following the intraperitoneal administration of tyrosine. Dopamine concentrations in dialysates from both the striatum and the nucleus accumbens increased significantly in response to the tyrosine. The magnitude of the tyrosine effect was greater in the nucleus accumbens than in the striatum. Hence, mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons may be especially responsive to precursor availability.

  9. Evaluation of toxicity on epithelial and tumor cells of biaryl dipeptide tyrosines.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Stanley N S; Drewes, Carine C; de Vinci Kanda Kupa, Leonard; Farsky, Sandra H P; Stefani, Hélio A

    2016-05-23

    We report a method to obtain biaryl dipeptide tyrosine via Suzuki-Miyaura and alkynyl dipeptide tyrosine by Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions. Analysis of the biological action of biaryl dipeptide tyrosine 4d compound showed its ability to impair the metabolism and proliferation of SK-Mel-28 human melanoma lineage cells, independently of mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, 4d compound did not cause toxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), suggesting its toxic specificity to cancer cells.

  10. Key role of succinate dehydrogenase in insulin-induced inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Pomytkin, I A; Kolesova, O E

    2002-06-01

    We studied the role of mitochondria in insulin-induced inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the liver. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an insulin-sensitive source of H(2)O(2)that acts as a physiological inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Succinate dehydrogenase plays a key role in insulin-stimulated generation of H(2)O(2)and inactivation of liver protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  11. Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Clement, Christian A; Satir, Peter; Pedersen, Lotte B

    2012-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that coordinate signalling pathways in cell-cycle control, migration, differentiation and other cellular processes critical during development and for tissue homeostasis. Accordingly, defects in assembly or function of primary cilia lead to a plethora of developmental disorders and pathological conditions now known as ciliopathies. In this review, we summarize the current status of the role of primary cilia in coordinating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling pathways. Further, we present potential mechanisms of signalling crosstalk and networking in the primary cilium and discuss how defects in ciliary RTK signalling are linked to human diseases and disorders.

  12. Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Søren T; Clement, Christian A; Satir, Peter; Pedersen, Lotte B

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that coordinate signalling pathways in cell-cycle control, migration, differentiation and other cellular processes critical during development and for tissue homeostasis. Accordingly, defects in assembly or function of primary cilia lead to a plethora of developmental disorders and pathological conditions now known as ciliopathies. In this review, we summarize the current status of the role of primary cilia in coordinating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling pathways. Further, we present potential mechanisms of signalling crosstalk and networking in the primary cilium and discuss how defects in ciliary RTK signalling are linked to human diseases and disorders. PMID:21956154

  13. Second-generation inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingjing; Liu, Christina; Tsui, Stella T; Liu, Delong

    2016-09-02

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a critical effector molecule for B cell development and plays a major role in lymphoma genesis. Ibrutinib is the first-generation BTK inhibitor. Ibrutinib has off-target effects on EGFR, ITK, and Tec family kinases, which explains the untoward effects of ibrutinib. Resistance to ibrutinib was also reported. The C481S mutation in the BTK kinase domain was reported to be a major mechanism of resistance to ibrutinib. This review summarizes the clinical development of novel BTK inhibitors, ACP-196 (acalabrutinib), ONO/GS-4059, and BGB-3111.

  14. EphB4 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Hassanieh  L,   Ley  EJ,  Scehnet  J,  Kumar  NG,   Hawes  D,  Press  MF,  Weaver  FA,  Gill  PS.  Receptor  tyrosine...J. Pathol. 174 (2009) 1492. [33] T.D. Bartley, R.W. Hunt, A.A. Welcher, W.J. Boyle , V.P. Parker, R.A. Lindberg, H.S. Lu, A.M. Colombero, R.L

  15. Reduced expression of CD45 Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Pr

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-08

    complex ( MHC ) I (28-14-8), MHC II (M5/114.15.2), CD44 (IM7), and Ly6G (1A8). Cells (1 106) were resuspended in Fc block (anti CD16/CD32 antibody diluted...enzyme (supplemental Fig. 3). Themajority of the phosphatases tested in this panel belong to the class of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (SHP-1, SHP- 2 ...and Sina Bavari‡ 2 From the ‡United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland 21702-5011, §Target Structure

  16. Genetic Variations of Tyrosine Hydroxylase in the Pathogenesis of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Ho; Kim, Yang Gyun; Moon, Ju-Young; Kim, Jin Sug; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2016-01-01

    One of the major pathophysiological features of primary hypertension is an inappropriate activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which is mediated by excessive synthesis and secretion of catecholamine into the blood. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine, has been highlighted because genetic variations of TH could alter the activity of the sympathetic nervous system activity and subsequently contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension. Here, we discuss the role of TH as a regulator of sympathetic activity and review several studies that investigated the relationship between genetic variations of TH and hypertension. PMID:28275384

  17. Actin Polymerization: An Event Regulated by Tyrosine Phosphorylation During Buffalo Sperm Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Naresh, S; Atreja, S K

    2015-12-01

    In the female reproductive tract, the spermatozoa undergo a series of physiological and biochemical changes, prior to gaining the ability to fertilize, that result to capacitation. However, the actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation are the two necessary steps for capacitation. In this study, we have demonstrated the actin polymerization and established the correlation between protein tyrosine phosphorylation and actin reorganization during in vitro capacitation in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) spermatozoa. Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot techniques were used to detect actin polymerization and tyrosine phosphorylation. The time-dependent fluorimetric studies revealed that the actin polymerization starts from the tail region and progressed towards the head region of spermatozoa during capacitation. The lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC)-induced acrosome reaction (AR) stimulated quick actin depolymerization. The inhibitor cytochalasin D (CD) blocked the in vitro capacitation by inhibiting the actin polymerization. In addition, we also performed different inhibitor (Genistein, H-89, PD9809 and GF-109) and enhancer (dbcAMP, H(2)O(2) and vanadate) studies on actin tyrosine phosphorylation and actin polymerization. The inhibitors of tyrosine phosphorylation inhibit actin tyrosine phosphorylation and polymerization, whereas enhancers of tyrosine phosphorylation stimulate F-actin formation and tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest that the tyrosine phosphorylation regulates the actin polymerization, and both are coupled processes during capacitation of buffalo spermatozoa.

  18. Distinct tyrosine autophosphorylation sites negatively and positively modulate neu-mediated transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Dankort, D L; Wang, Z; Blackmore, V; Moran, M F; Muller, W J

    1997-01-01

    A number of cytoplasmic signaling molecules are thought to mediate mitogenic signaling from the activated Neu receptor tyrosine kinase through binding specific phosphotyrosine residues located within the intracellular portion of Neu/c-ErbB-2. An activated neu oncogene containing tyrosine-to-phenylalanine substitutions at each of the known autophosphorylation sites was generated and assessed for its specific transforming potential in Rat1 and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Mutation of these sites resulted in a dramatic impairment of the transforming potential of neu. To assess the role of these tyrosine phosphorylation sites in cellular transformation, the transforming potential of a series of mutants in which individual tyrosine residues were restored to this transformation-debilitated neu mutant was evaluated. Reversion of any one of four mutated sites to tyrosine residues restored wild-type transforming activity. While each of these transforming mutants displayed Ras-dependent signaling, the transforming activity of two of these mutants was correlated with their ability to bind either the GRB2 or SHC adapter molecules that couple receptor tyrosine kinases to the Ras signaling pathway. By contrast, restoration of a tyrosine residue located at position 1028 completely suppressed the basal transforming activity of this mutated neu molecule or other transforming neu molecules which possessed single tyrosine residues. These data argue that the transforming potential of activated neu is mediated both by positive and negative regulatory tyrosine phosphorylation sites. PMID:9271418

  19. Inhibition of L-tyrosine-induced micronuclei production by phenylthiourea in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Poma, A; Bianchini, S; Miranda, M

    1999-12-13

    It was previously found that L-tyrosine oxidation product(s) are cytotoxic, genotoxic and increase the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels in human melanoma cells. In this work, the micronucleus assay has been performed on human melanotic and amelanotic melanoma cell lines (Carl-1 MEL and AMEL) in the presence of 1.0, 0.5 and 0.1 mM L-tyrosine concentrations to investigate if melanin synthesis intermediate(s) increase micronuclei production. L-Tyrosine oxidation product(s) increased the frequency of micronuclei in melanoma cells; 0.1 mM phenylthiourea (PTU), an inhibitor of L-tyrosine oxidation by tyrosinase, lowered the micronucleus production to the control levels. The culture of melanoma cells with high L-tyrosine in the culture medium resulted in a positive response to an ELISA-based apoptotic test. For comparison the effect of L-tyrosine on micronuclei production in human amelanotic melanoma cells was also investigated; the micronucleus production in the presence of 1 mM L-tyrosine in the culture medium was lower than that found with melanotic melanoma cells of the same cell line. The data suggest that melanin synthesis intermediates arising from L-tyrosine oxidation may cause micronuclei production in Carl-1 human melanoma cells; the addition of PTU in the presence of L-tyrosine decreased the frequency of micronuclei to about the control values thus the inhibition of melanogenesis may have some clinical implication in melanotic melanoma.

  20. A semisynthetic Eph receptor tyrosine kinase provides insight into ligand-induced kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Nikhil; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Himanen, Juha P.; Muir, Tom W.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed a methodology for generating milligram amounts of functional Eph tyrosine kinase receptor using the protein engineering approach of expressed protein ligation. Stimulation with ligand induces efficient autophosphorylation of the semisynthetic Eph construct. The in vitro phosphorylation of key Eph tyrosine residues upon ligand-induced activation was monitored via time-resolved, quantitative phosphoproteomics, suggesting a precise and unique order of phosphorylation of the Eph tyrosines in the kinase activation process. To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported semisynthesis of a receptor tyrosine kinase and provides a potentially general method for producing single-pass membrane proteins for structural and biochemical characterization. PMID:21439481

  1. Spectral analysis of interaction between carotenoid and tyrosine in ethanol-water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liping; Liu, Guiling; Ni, Xiaowu; Luo, Xiaosen

    2015-03-01

    In this study we have applied UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, steady state fluorescence, Raman spectra to investigate the effects of tyrosine on the aggregates of lutein and β-carotene. Absorption spectra analysis revealed that hydroxyl and amino groups of tyrosine can affect the aggregate of lutein to a certain extent. In Raman spectra the effect of tyrosine on the length of conjugation was observed in the case of lutein molecule. In addition tyrosine also had a great effect on the excited electronic state of carotenoids, and internal energy transferring among aggregates.

  2. Receptor tyrosine kinases and schistosome reproduction: new targets for chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Hahnel, Steffen; Grevelding, Christoph G.; Dissous, Colette

    2014-01-01

    Schistosome parasites still represent a serious public health concern and a major economic problem in developing countries. Pathology of schistosomiasis is mainly due to massive egg production by these parasites and to inflammatory responses raised against the eggs which are trapped in host tissues. Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are key molecules that control cell differentiation and proliferation and they already represent important targets in cancer therapy. During recent years, it has been shown that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) signaling was active in reproductive organs and that it could regulate sexual maturation of schistosomes and egg production. This opens interesting perspectives for the control of transmission and pathogenesis of schistosomiasis based on new therapies targeting schistosome RTKs. This review relates the numerous data showing the major roles of kinase signaling in schistosome reproduction. It describes the conserved and particular features of schistosome RTKs, their implication in gametogenesis and reproduction processes and summarizes recent works indicating that RTKs and their signaling partners are interesting chemotherapeutical targets in new programs of control. PMID:25101117

  3. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Shougang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis can be induced in different renal diseases, but ultimately progresses to end stage renal disease. Although the pathophysiologic process of renal fibrosis have not been fully elucidated, it is characterized by glomerulosclerosis and/or tubular interstitial fibrosis, and is believed to be caused by the proliferation of renal inherent cells, including glomerular epithelial cells, mesangial cells, and endothelial cells, along with defective kidney repair, renal interstitial fibroblasts activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate a variety of cell physiological processes, including metabolism, growth, differentiation, and survival. Many studies from in vitro and animal models have provided evidence that RTKs play important roles in the pathogenic process of renal fibrosis. It is also showed that tyrosine kinases inhibitors (TKIs) have anti-fibrotic effects in basic research and clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the evidence for involvement of specific RTKs in renal fibrosis process and the employment of TKIs as a therapeutic approach for renal fibrosis. PMID:27331812

  4. Phospho-tyrosine dependent protein–protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Arndt; Benlasfer, Nouhad; Birth, Petra; Hegele, Anna; Wachsmuth, Franziska; Apelt, Luise; Stelzl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications, such as tyrosine phosphorylation, regulate protein–protein interactions (PPIs) critical for signal processing and cellular phenotypes. We extended an established yeast two-hybrid system employing human protein kinases for the analyses of phospho-tyrosine (pY)-dependent PPIs in a direct experimental, large-scale approach. We identified 292 mostly novel pY-dependent PPIs which showed high specificity with respect to kinases and interacting proteins and validated a large fraction in co-immunoprecipitation experiments from mammalian cells. About one-sixth of the interactions are mediated by known linear sequence binding motifs while the majority of pY-PPIs are mediated by other linear epitopes or governed by alternative recognition modes. Network analysis revealed that pY-mediated recognition events are tied to a highly connected protein module dedicated to signaling and cell growth pathways related to cancer. Using binding assays, protein complementation and phenotypic readouts to characterize the pY-dependent interactions of TSPAN2 (tetraspanin 2) and GRB2 or PIK3R3 (p55γ), we exemplarily provide evidence that the two pY-dependent PPIs dictate cellular cancer phenotypes. PMID:25814554

  5. Negative regulation of ErbB family receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, C; Carraway, K L

    2004-01-26

    Receptors of the EGF receptor or ErbB family of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases are frequently overexpressed in a variety of solid tumours, and the aberrant activation of their tyrosine kinase activities is thought to contribute to tumour growth and progression. Much effort has been put into developing inhibitors of ErbB receptors, and both antibody and small-molecule approaches have exhibited clinical success. Recently, a number of endogenous negative regulatory proteins have been identified that suppress the signalling activity of ErbB receptors in cells. These include intracellular RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligases such as cbl and Nrdp1 that mediate ErbB receptor degradation, and may include a wide variety of secreted and transmembrane proteins that suppress receptor activation by growth factor ligands. It will be of interest to determine the extent to which tumour cells suppress these pathways to promote their progression, and whether restoration of endogenous receptor-negative regulatory pathways may be exploited for therapeutic benefit.

  6. Tyrosine kinase FYN negatively regulates NOX4 in cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Shouji; Kuroda, Junya; Zhai, Peiyong; Liu, Tong; Ikeda, Shohei; Nagarajan, Narayani; Yokota, Takashi; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Hsu, Chiao-Po; Li, Hong; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (Noxes) produce ROS that regulate cell growth and death. NOX4 expression in cardiomyocytes (CMs) plays an important role in cardiac remodeling and injury, but the posttranslational mechanisms that modulate this enzyme are poorly understood. Here, we determined that FYN, a Src family tyrosine kinase, interacts with the C-terminal domain of NOX4. FYN and NOX4 colocalized in perinuclear mitochondria, ER, and nuclear fractions in CMs, and FYN expression negatively regulated NOX4-induced O2– production and apoptosis in CMs. Mechanistically, we found that direct phosphorylation of tyrosine 566 on NOX4 was critical for this FYN-mediated negative regulation. Transverse aortic constriction activated FYN in the left ventricle (LV), and FYN-deficient mice displayed exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction and increased ROS production and apoptosis. Deletion of Nox4 rescued the exaggerated LV remodeling in FYN-deficient mice. Furthermore, FYN expression was markedly decreased in failing human hearts, corroborating its role as a regulator of cardiac cell death and ROS production. In conclusion, FYN is activated by oxidative stress and serves as a negative feedback regulator of NOX4 in CMs during cardiac remodeling. PMID:27525436

  7. Cloning and expression of human tyrosine aminotransferase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Séralini, G E; Luu-Thé, V; Labrie, F

    1995-01-02

    Complementary DNA clones encoding human tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) were isolated by screening a normal adult woman liver lambda gt11 library with rat TAT cDNA. The largest isolated cDNA is 2051 bp long (EMBL accession number X55675). This cDNA was subcloned downstream of the cytomegalovirus promoter in the pCMV vector for transfection into human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Expression of the TAT cDNA resulted in the synthesis of a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa, as assessed by Western analysis, a value which is in close agreement with the predicted molecular weight of 50,399, for a deduced sequence of 454 amino acids. The expressed protein catalyzed specifically the conversion of L-[14C]tyrosine into p-[14C]hydroxyphenylpyruvate. The availability of a functional TAT cDNA provides a useful tool for detailed study of the structure-function relationship of the enzyme and its mutated derivatives.

  8. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24709904

  9. Mutagenesis of a specificity-determining residue in tyrosine hydroxylase establishes that the enzyme is a robust phenylalanine hydroxylase but a fragile tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Daubner, S Colette; Avila, Audrey; Bailey, Johnathan O; Barrera, Dimitrios; Bermudez, Jaclyn Y; Giles, David H; Khan, Crystal A; Shaheen, Noel; Thompson, Janie Womac; Vasquez, Jessica; Oxley, Susan P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-02-26

    The aromatic amino acid hydroxylases tyrosine hydroxylase (TyrH) and phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) have essentially identical active sites; however, PheH is nearly incapable of hydroxylating tyrosine, while TyrH can readily hydroxylate both tyrosine and phenylalanine. Previous studies have indicated that Asp425 of TyrH is important in determining the substrate specificity of that enzyme [Daubner, S. C., Melendez, J., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 9652-9661]. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of amino acids 423-427, a mobile loop containing Asp425, shows that only mutagenesis of Asp425 alters the activity of the enzyme significantly. Saturation mutagenesis of Asp425 results in large (up to 10(4)) decreases in the V(max) and V(max)/K(tyr) values for tyrosine hydroxylation, but only small decreases or even increases in the V(max) and V(max)/K(phe) values for phenylalanine hydroxylation. The decrease in the tyrosine hydroxylation activity of the mutant proteins is due to an uncoupling of tetrahydropterin oxidation from amino acid hydroxylation with tyrosine as the amino acid substrate. In contrast, with the exception of the D425W mutant, the extent of coupling of tetrahydropterin oxidation and amino acid hydroxylation is unaffected or increases with phenylalanine as the amino acid substrate. The decrease in the V(max) value with tyrosine as the substrate shows a negative correlation with the hydrophobicity of the amino acid residue at position 425. The results are consistent with a critical role of Asp425 being to prevent a hydrophobic interaction that results in a restricted active site in which hydroxylation of tyrosine does not occur.

  10. Treatment with Tyrosine a Neurotransmitter Precursor Reduces Environmental Stress in Humans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    brain norepinephrine and dopamine. catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. In animals, administration of tyrosine, a food constituent and precursor of the...Profile of Mood States. Stanford Sleepiness Scale) ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS that have been employed to evaluate a variety of psychoactive drugs foods ... tyramine . However. Plasma tyrosine levels were significantly elevated during behav- this amine is not detectable in the plasma of animals after they

  11. FAK and Src kinases are required for netrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of UNC5.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiquan; Aurandt, Jennifer; Jürgensen, Claudia; Jürgense, Claudia; Rao, Yi; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2006-01-01

    During neuronal development, netrin and its receptors UNC5 and DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer) guide axonal growth cones in navigating to their targets. Netrin also plays important roles in the regulation of cell migration, tissue morphogenesis and tumor growth. Here, we show that netrin induces UNC5 tyrosine phosphorylation and that this effect of netrin is dependent on its co-receptor DCC. UNC5 tyrosine phosphorylation is known to be important for netrin to induce cell migration and axonal repulsion. Src tyrosine kinase activity is required for netrin to stimulate UNC5 tyrosine phosphorylation in neurons and transfected cells. The SH2 domain of Src kinase directly interacts with the cytosolic domain of UNC5 in a tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, the tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is also involved in netrin-induced UNC5 tyrosine phosphorylation. Both Src and FAK can phosphorylate UNC5. Our data suggest a model in which netrin stimulates UNC5 tyrosine phosphorylation and signaling in a manner dependent on the co-receptor DCC, through the recruitment of Src and FAK kinases.

  12. Engineering tyrosine-based electron flow pathways in proteins: the case of aplysia myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Brandon J; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Cooper, Chris E; Wilson, Michael T

    2012-05-09

    Tyrosine residues can act as redox cofactors that provide an electron transfer ("hole-hopping") route that enhances the rate of ferryl heme iron reduction by externally added reductants, for example, ascorbate. Aplysia fasciata myoglobin, having no naturally occurring tyrosines but 15 phenylalanines that can be selectively mutated to tyrosine residues, provides an ideal protein with which to study such through-protein electron transfer pathways and ways to manipulate them. Two surface exposed phenylalanines that are close to the heme have been mutated to tyrosines (F42Y, F98Y). In both of these, the rate of ferryl heme reduction increased by up to 3 orders of magnitude. This result cannot be explained in terms of distance or redox potential change between donor and acceptor but indicates that tyrosines, by virtue of their ability to form radicals, act as redox cofactors in a new pathway. The mechanism is discussed in terms of the Marcus theory and the specific protonation/deprotonation states of the oxoferryl iron and tyrosine. Tyrosine radicals have been observed and quantified by EPR spectroscopy in both mutants, consistent with the proposed mechanism. The location of each radical is unambiguous and allows us to validate theoretical methods that assign radical location on the basis of EPR hyperfine structure. Mutation to tyrosine decreases the lipid peroxidase activity of this myoglobin in the presence of low concentrations of reductant, and the possibility of decreasing the intrinsic toxicity of hemoglobin by introduction of these pathways is discussed.

  13. Kinetic Characterization of O-Phospho-L-Tyrosine Phosphohydrolase Activity of Two Fungal Phytases.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal phytases belonging to 'Histidine Acid Phosphatase' or HAP class of phosphomonoesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phytic acid could also hydrolyze O-phospho-tyrosine. Two phytases from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus awamori with pH optima 2.5 were tested for phospho-tyrosine hydrola...

  14. Inhibition of Tyrosine Kinase Signaling After Trauma-Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jarrar, Doraid; Wang, Ping; Song, Grace Y.; Cioffi, William G.; Bland, Kirby I.; Chaudry, Irshad H.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine whether administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor after trauma-hemorrhage has any beneficial effects on cardiovascular parameters and hepatocellular function and on survival rate after subsequent sepsis. Background Increased inflammatory cytokine release and concomitant activation of intracellular signaling pathways contributes to multiple organ dysfunction and increased susceptibility to subsequent sepsis after severe hemorrhagic shock. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a midline laparotomy (i.e., soft-tissue trauma induced) and were then bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until 40% of the maximal shed blood volume was returned in the form of Ringer’s lactate. The rats were then resuscitated with four times the shed blood volume in the form of Ringer’s lactate during a 60-minute period. A tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG 556 (7.5 mg/kg), or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally at the middle of resuscitation. At 24 hours after resuscitation, various in vivo parameters such as heart performance, cardiac index, and hepatocellular function (i.e., the maximum velocity and the overall efficiency of indocyanine green clearance) were determined. Phosphorylation state of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p44/42 and p38 in the liver was assessed by Western blot analysis. In additional groups of rats, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture at 20 hours after hemorrhage. The necrotic cecum was excised 10 hours thereafter, and the survival rate was monitored for a period of 10 days. Results AG 556 treatment restored the depressed cardiovascular and hepatocellular functions after trauma-hemorrhage and resuscitation, which was associated with reduced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases p44/42 and p38. Moreover, treatment with AG 556 significantly increased the survival rate of rats after trauma-hemorrhage and induction of subsequent sepsis compared with vehicle-treated rats

  15. Canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma tyrosine kinase receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluated tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression and activation in canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (cpAC) biospecimens. As histological similarities exist between human and cpAC, we hypothesized that cpACs will have increased TKR mRNA and protein expression as well as TKR phosphorylation. The molecular profile of cpAC has not been well characterized making the selection of therapeutic targets that would potentially have relevant biological activity impossible. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to define TKR expression and their phosphorylation state in cpAC as well as to evaluate the tumors for the presence of potential epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase activating mutations in exons 18–21. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for TKR expression was performed using a tissue microarray (TMA) constructed from twelve canine tumors and companion normal lung samples. Staining intensities of the IHC were quantified by a veterinary pathologist as well as by two different digitalized algorithm image analyses software programs. An antibody array was used to evaluate TKR phosphorylation of the tumor relative to the TKR phosphorylation of normal tissues with the resulting spot intensities quantified using array analysis software. Each EGFR exon PCR product from all of the tumors and non-affected lung tissues were sequenced using sequencing chemistry and the sequencing reactions were run on automated sequencer. Sequence alignments were made to the National Center for Biotechnology Information canine EGFR reference sequence. Results The pro-angiogenic growth factor receptor, PDGFRα, had increased cpAC tumor mRNA, protein expression and phosphorylation when compared to the normal lung tissue biospecimens. Similar to human pulmonary adenocarcinoma, significant increases in cpAC tumor mRNA expression and receptor phosphorylation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine receptor were present when compared to the

  16. [Studies on the oxidation of tyrosine induced by hydroxyl radical with fluorescence spectroscopic method].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-hui; Wang, Wei-long; Wu, Lin-sheng; Jia, Xiao-li

    2011-07-01

    Dityrosine is a marker of tyrosine oxidation. To study effecting factors of hydroxyl radical on tyrosine oxidation, synchronous fluorescence spectra with two dimensional correlation was used. The results showed that the peak position and intensity of dityrosine changed while pH value varied. In the system of tyrosine oxidation, with the increment of tyrosine concentration, the concentration of dityrosine decreased. With the increment of hydrogen peroxide concentration, the concentration of dityrosine increased. The oxidation reaction was prone to taking place in acid conditions while difficult to develop in basic conditions. With the development of oxidation reaction, the fluorescence intensity of dityrosine increased and then decreased. Two dimentional correlation synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that the variation in the intensity at 292 nm preceded that of 281, 300 and 374 nm. Thus, fluorescence spectroscopy was simple and easy for studying tyrosine oxidation induced by hydroxyl radical.

  17. Regulatory Phosphorylation of Ikaros by Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Ishkhanian, Rita; Uckun, Fatih M.

    2013-01-01

    Diminished Ikaros function has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. Therefore, a stringent regulation of Ikaros is of paramount importance for normal lymphocyte ontogeny. Here we provide genetic and biochemical evidence for a previously unknown function of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) as a partner and posttranslational regulator of Ikaros, a zinc finger-containing DNA-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in immune homeostasis. We demonstrate that BTK phosphorylates Ikaros at unique phosphorylation sites S214 and S215 in the close vicinity of its zinc finger 4 (ZF4) within the DNA binding domain, thereby augmenting its nuclear localization and sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Our results further demonstrate that BTK-induced activating phosphorylation is critical for the optimal transcription factor function of Ikaros. PMID:23977012

  18. Design and Synthesis of Novel Macrocyclic Mer Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Weihe; Stashko, Michael A; Nichols, James; Miley, Michael J; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Chen, Zhilong; Machius, Mischa; DeRyckere, Deborah; Wood, Edgar; Graham, Douglas K; Earp, H Shelton; Kireev, Dmitri; Frye, Stephen V

    2016-12-08

    Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) is aberrantly elevated in various tumor cells and has a normal anti-inflammatory role in the innate immune system. Inhibition of MerTK may provide dual effects against these MerTK-expressing tumors through reducing cancer cell survival and redirecting the innate immune response. Recently, we have designed novel and potent macrocyclic pyrrolopyrimidines as MerTK inhibitors using a structure-based approach. The most active macrocycles had an EC50 below 40 nM in a cell-based MerTK phosphor-protein ELISA assay. The X-ray structure of macrocyclic analogue 3 complexed with MerTK was also resolved and demonstrated macrocycles binding in the ATP binding pocket of the MerTK protein as anticipated. In addition, the lead compound 16 (UNC3133) had a 1.6 h half-life and 16% oral bioavailability in a mouse PK study.

  19. Identification of phenylalanine 3-hydroxylase for meta-tyrosine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Ames, Brian D; Walsh, Christopher T

    2011-06-21

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) is an iron(II)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of aromatic amino acid l-phenylalanine (L-Phe) to l-tyrosine (L-Tyr). The enzymatic modification has been demonstrated to be highly regiospecific, forming proteinogenic para-Tyr (p-Tyr) exclusively. Here we biochemically characterized the first example of a phenylalanine 3-hydroxylase (Phe3H) that catalyzes the synthesis of meta-Tyr (m-Tyr) from Phe. Subsequent mutagenesis studies revealed that two residues in the active site of Phe3H (Cys187 and Thr202) contribute to C-3 rather than C-4 hydroxylation of the phenyl ring. This work sets the stage for the mechanistic and structural study of regiospecific control of the substrate hydroxylation by PheH.

  20. DIRS-1 and the other tyrosine recombinase retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Poulter, R T M; Goodwin, T J D

    2005-01-01

    DIRS-1 is a retroelement from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Until recently only two related retrotransposons had been described: PAT from the nematode Panagrellus redivivus and Prt1 from the zygomycete fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus. Analyses of the reverse transcriptase sequences encoded by these three elements suggested that they were closely related to each other and more distantly related to the Ty3/gypsy Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) retroelements. They have several unusual structural features that distinguish them from typical LTR elements. For instance, they each encode a tyrosine recombinase (YR), but not a DDE-type integrase or an aspartic protease. Although the DIRS-1-related elements are bordered by terminal repeats these differ from typical LTRs in a number of ways. In DIRS-1, for example, the terminal repeats are inverted (complementary), non-identical in sequence, and the outer edges of the terminal sequences are repeated (adjacent to each other) in the internal region. PAT has so-called "split" direct repeats in which the unrelated terminal sequences appear as direct repeats adjacent to each other in the internal region. The only repetition displayed by Prt1 is the presence of short inverted terminal repeats, but the sequenced copy of this element is believed to be a truncated version of an element with a structure resembling DIRS-1. The unusual structure of the terminal repeats of the DIRS1-like elements appears to be related to their replication via free circular intermediates. Site-specific recombination is believed to integrate the circle without creating duplications of the target sites. In recognition of these important distinctions it is proposed that the retrotransposons that encode tyrosine recombinases be called the tyrosine recombinase (or YR) retrotransposons. Recently a large number of additional YR retrotransposons have been described, including elements from fungi (zygomycetes and basidiomycetes), plants (green algae) and a

  1. Exploring Missense Mutations in Tyrosine Kinases Implicated with Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Sami, Neha; Kumar, Vijay; Islam, Asimul; Ali, Sher; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Imtaiyaz

    2016-08-20

    Protein kinases are one of the largest families of evolutionarily related proteins and the third most common protein class of human genome. All the protein kinases share the same structural organization. They are made up of an extracellular domain, transmembrane domain and an intra cellular kinase domain. Missense mutations in these kinases have been studied extensively and correlated with various neurological disorders. Individual mutations in the kinase domain affect the functions of protein. The enhanced or reduced expression of protein leads to hyperactivation or inactivation of the signalling pathways, resulting in neurodegeneration. Here, we present extensive analyses of missense mutations in the tyrosine kinase focussing on the neurodegenerative diseases encompassing structure function relationship. This is envisaged to enhance our understanding about the neurodegeneration and possible therapeutic measures.

  2. Mechanisms of resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lihua; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is driven by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs, e.g., gefitinib and elrotinib) have been effectively used for clinical treatment. However, patients eventually develop drug resistance. Resistance to EGFR-TKIs is inevitable due to various mechanisms, such as the secondary mutation (T790M), activation of alternative pathways (c-Met, HGF, AXL), aberrance of the downstream pathways (K-RAS mutations, loss of PTEN), impairment of the EGFR-TKIs-mediated apoptosis pathway (BCL2-like 11/BIM deletion polymorphism), histologic transformation, ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter effusion, etc. Here we review and summarize the known resistant mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs and provide potential targets for development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26579470

  3. Getting Syk: Spleen Tyrosine Kinase as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Geahlen, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Syk is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase well known for its ability to couple immune cell receptors to intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cellular responses to extracellular antigens and antigen-immunoglobulin complexes of particular importance to the initiation of inflammatory responses. Thus, Syk is an attractive target for therapeutic kinase inhibitors designed to ameliorate symptoms and consequences of acute and chronic inflammation. Its more recently recognized role as a promoter of cell survival in numerous cancer cell types ranging from leukemia to retinoblastoma has attracted considerable interest as a target for a new generation of anticancer drugs. This review discusses the biological processes in which Syk participates that have made this kinase such a compelling drug target. PMID:24975478

  4. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Kundi, Sarina; Ahmed, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration. PMID:22848811

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor–Resistant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kadoaki; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Michor, Franziska; Pao, William

    2013-01-01

    Purpose EGFR-mutant lung cancer was first described as a new clinical entity in 2004. Here, we present an update on new controversies and conclusions regarding the disease. Methods This article reviews the clinical implications of EGFR mutations in lung cancer with a focus on epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance. Results The discovery of EGFR mutations has altered the ways in which we consider and treat non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients whose metastatic tumors harbor EGFR mutations are expected to live longer than 2 years, more than double the previous survival rates for lung cancer. Conclusion The information presented in this review can guide practitioners and help them inform their patients about EGFR mutations and their impact on the treatment of NSCLC. Efforts should now concentrate on making EGFR-mutant lung cancer a chronic rather than fatal disease. PMID:23401451

  6. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Landscape in Lung Cancer: Therapeutical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Quintanal-Villalonga, A.; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease responsible for the most cases of cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients are clinically diagnosed at advanced stages, with a poor survival rate. For this reason, the identification of oncodrivers and novel biomarkers is decisive for the future clinical management of this pathology. The rise of high throughput technologies popularly referred to as “omics” has accelerated the discovery of new biomarkers and drivers for this pathology. Within them, tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) have proven to be of importance as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tools and, due to their molecular nature, as therapeutic targets. Along this review, the role of TKRs in the different lung cancer histologies, research on improvement of anti-TKR therapy, and the current approaches to manage anti-TKR resistance will be discussed. PMID:27528792

  7. The Receptor Tyrosine Kinase AXL in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Erinn B.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2016-01-01

    The AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL) has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Recent studies have revealed a central role of AXL signaling in tumor proliferation, survival, stem cell phenotype, metastasis, and resistance to cancer therapy. Moreover, AXL is expressed within cellular components of the tumor microenvironment where AXL signaling contributes to the immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotypes. A variety of AXL inhibitors have been developed and are efficacious in preclinical studies. These agents offer new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in the prevention and treatment of advanced disease. Here we review the literature that has illuminated the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which AXL signaling promotes tumor progression and we will discuss the therapeutic potential of AXL inhibition for cancer therapy. PMID:27834845

  8. Tyrosine Autofluorescence as a Measure of Bovine Insulin Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bekard, Innocent B.; Dunstan, Dave E.

    2009-01-01

    The traditional approach to investigating the partial unfolding and fibrillation of insulin, and proteins at large, has involved use of the dyes 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid (ANS) and Thioflavin T (ThT), respectively. We compare the kinetic profiles of ThT, ANS, light scattering, and intrinsic Tyr fluorescence during insulin fibrillation. The data reveal that the sequence of structural changes (dimers → monomers → partially unfolded monomers → oligomeric aggregates → fibrils) accompanying insulin fibrillation can be detected directly using intrinsic Tyr fluorescence. The results indicate that at least two distinguishable structural intermediates precede fibril development. There is no evidence of tyrosinate or dityrosine during insulin aggregation. Obtaining such critical information from the protein itself is complementary to existing aggregation probes and affords the advantage of directly examining structural changes that occur at the molecular level, providing concrete details of the early events preceding fibrillation. PMID:19883595

  9. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Regulate OPG through Inhibition of PDGFRβ

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Mei Lin; Lin, Jian-Ming; Bava, Usha; Callon, Karen; Cornish, Jillian; Naot, Dorit; Grey, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Nilotinib and imatinib are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) used in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). In vitro, imatinib and nilotinib inhibit osteoclastogenesis, and in patients they reduce levels of bone resorption. One of the mechanisms that might underlie these effects is an increase in the production of osteoprotegerin (OPG). In the current work we report that platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling regulates OPG production in vitro. In addition, we have shown that TKIs have effects on RANKL signaling through inhibition of the PDGFRβ and other target receptors. These findings have implications for our understanding of the mechanisms by which TKIs affect osteoclastogenesis, and the role of PDGFRβ signaling in regulating osteoclastogenesis. Further studies are indicated to confirm the clinical effects of PDGFRβ-inhibitors and to elaborate the intracellular pathways that underpin these effects. PMID:27737004

  10. The Antidepressant Effect of L-Tyrosine-Loaded Nanoparticles: Behavioral Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Alabsi, Abdelrahman; Khoudary, Adel Charbel; Abdelwahed, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression has been linked to disruption in the cerebral levels of specific neurotransmitters. L-tyrosine is a precursor of more than one of the neurotransmitters affected by depression. Even though setbacks of monoamines precursors include high doses and low efficiency, many studies have suggested using L-tyrosine as antidepressant. Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore the possible antidepressant effect of L-tyrosine loaded in a nanoparticle-designed formula, using behavioral tests in acute and chronic mild stress (CMS) models of depression in rats. Methods Animals from both models received L-tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles (5 or 10 mg/kg), L-tyrosine solution (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or placebo daily for 21 days. Rats from the acute stress model of depression were subjected to open field and forced swim tests (FSTs). For the CMS model, sucrose preference test was carried out. Additionally, 3 profiles of the nanoparticles formula were tested in vitro. High dissolution rate and entrapment efficiency were obtained from the in vitro tests. Moreover, L-tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles 10 mg/kg and fluoxetine 10 mg/kg significantly decreased the immobility time in the FST, concomitant with restoration of the basal levels of locomotor activity, distance travelled and rearing counts. Also, an increase of the sucrose consumption was recorded in the sucrose preference test after treatment with L-tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles 10 mg/kg and fluoxetine 10 mg/kg. Results The positive results after treatment with L-tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles, through behavioral tests, are probably attributed to restorating the basal levels of the cerebral noradrenaline. Conclusion The effects of L-tyrosine administration on the cerebral levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and corticotropin-releasing factor should be further investigated. PMID:27647959

  11. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity by hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan-Guo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an important signaling event triggered by the activation of various cell surface receptors. Major targets of H(2)O(2) include protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Oxidation of the active site Cys by H(2)O(2) abrogates PTP catalytic activity, thereby potentially furnishing a mechanism to ensure optimal tyrosine phosphorylation in response to a variety of physiological stimuli. Unfortunately, H(2)O(2) is poorly reactive in chemical terms and the second order rate constants for the H(2)O(2)-mediated PTP inactivation are ~10M(-1)s(-1), which is too slow to be compatible with the transient signaling events occurring at the physiological concentrations of H(2)O(2). We find that hydroxyl radical is produced from H(2)O(2) solutions in the absence of metal chelating agent by the Fenton reaction. We show that the hydroxyl radical is capable of inactivating the PTPs and the inactivation is active site directed, through oxidation of the catalytic Cys to sulfenic acid, which can be reduced by low molecular weight thiols. We also show that hydroxyl radical is a kinetically more efficient oxidant than H(2)O(2) for inactivating the PTPs. The second-order rate constants for the hydroxyl radical-mediated PTP inactivation are at least 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those mediated by H(2)O(2) under the same conditions. Thus, hydroxyl radical generated in vivo may serve as a more physiologically relevant oxidizing agent for PTP inactivation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chemistry and mechanism of phosphatases, diesterases and triesterases.

  12. Characterization of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Tapia, Ana Lilia; Baylón-Pacheco, Lidia; Espíritu-Gordillo, Patricia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) is a group of phosphatases that has not been broadly studied in protozoan parasites. In humans, PRLs are involved in metastatic cancer, the promotion of cell migration and invasion. PTPs have been increasingly recognized as important effectors of host-pathogen interactions. We characterized the only putative protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (PTP EhPRL) in the eukaryotic human intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Here, we reported that the EhPRL protein possessed the classical HCX5R catalytic motif of PTPs and the CAAX box characteristic of the PRL family and exhibited 31-32% homology with the three human PRL isoforms. In amebae, the protein was expressed at low but detectable levels. The recombinant protein (rEhPRL) had enzymatic activity with the 3-o-methyl fluorescein phosphate (OMFP) substrate; this enzymatic activity was inhibited by the PTP inhibitor o-vanadate. Using immunofluorescence we showed that native EhPRL was localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. When the trophozoites interacted with collagen, EhPRL relocalized over time to vesicle-like structures. Interaction with fibronectin increased the presence of the enzyme in the cytoplasm. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that EhPRL mRNA expression was upregulated when the trophozoites interacted with collagen but not with fibronectin. Trophozoites recovered from amoebic liver abscesses showed higher EhPRL mRNA expression levels than normal trophozoites. These results strongly suggest that EhPRL may play an important role in the biology and adaptive response of the parasite to the host environment during amoebic liver abscess development, thereby participating in the pathogenic mechanism.

  13. Peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosine hydroxylase: identification of tyrosines 423, 428, and 432 as sites of modification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tyrosine-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Sadidi, Mahdieh; Liu, Xiuli; Kreipke, Christian; Geddes, Timothy; Borges, Chad; Watson, J Throck

    2002-04-19

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine, is inactivated by peroxynitrite. The sites of peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine nitration in TH have been identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tyrosine-scanning mutagenesis. V8 proteolytic fragments of nitrated TH were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A peptide of 3135.4 daltons, corresponding to residues V410-E436 of TH, showed peroxynitrite-induced mass shifts of +45, +90, and +135 daltons, reflecting nitration of one, two, or three tyrosines, respectively. These modifications were not evident in untreated TH. The tyrosine residues (positions 423, 428, and 432) within this peptide were mutated to phenylalanine to confirm the site(s) of nitration and assess the effects of mutation on TH activity. Single mutants expressed wild-type levels of TH catalytic activity and were inactivated by peroxynitrite while showing reduced (30-60%) levels of nitration. The double mutants Y423F,Y428F, Y423F,Y432F, and Y428F,Y432F showed trace amounts of tyrosine nitration (7-30% of control) after exposure to peroxynitrite, and the triple mutant Y423F,Y428F,Y432F was not a substrate for nitration, yet peroxynitrite significantly reduced the activity of each. When all tyrosine mutants were probed with PEO-maleimide activated biotin, a thiol-reactive reagent that specifically labels reduced cysteine residues in proteins, it was evident that peroxynitrite resulted in cysteine oxidation. These studies identify residues Tyr(423), Tyr(428), and Tyr(432) as the sites of peroxynitrite-induced nitration in TH. No single tyrosine residue appears to be critical for TH catalytic function, and tyrosine nitration is neither necessary nor sufficient for peroxynitrite-induced inactivation. The loss of TH catalytic activity caused by peroxynitrite is associated instead with oxidation of cysteine

  14. Tyrosine Pretreatment Alleviates Suppression of Schedule-Controlled Responding Produced by Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    specific interaction with tyrosine hydroxylase . Thus, (3,13,14). alleviation of CRF with tyrosine may result from an affect of The 200 mg/kg dose of tyrosine...G., Dana, R.; Risch, S. C.; Koob, G. F. Activating aspartame, phenylalanine , and tyrosine. Fund. Appl. Toxicol. 16: and anxiogenic effects of...Onali, P. Corticotropin-releasing factor activates ty- Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. 32:967-970: 1989. rosine hydroxylase in rat and mouse striatal

  15. The protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 associates with the phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of Fc gamma RIIa to modulate signaling events in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Latha P; Fang, Huiqing; Marsh, Clay B; Tridandapani, Susheela

    2003-09-12

    Fc gamma RIIa is a low affinity IgG receptor uniquely expressed in human cells that promotes phagocytosis of immune complexes and induces inflammatory cytokine gene transcription. Recent studies have revealed that phagocytosis initiated by Fc gamma RIIa is tightly controlled by the inositol phosphatase SHIP-1, and the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Whereas the molecular nature of SHIP-1 involvement with Fc gamma RIIa has been well studied, it is not clear how SHP-1 is activated by Fc gamma RIIa to mediate its regulatory effect. Here we report that Fc gamma RIIa clustering induces SHP-1 phosphatase activity in THP-1 cells. Using synthetic phosphopeptides, and stable transfectants expressing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) tyrosine mutants of Fc gamma RIIa, we demonstrate that SHP-1 associates with the phosphorylated amino-terminal ITAM tyrosine of Fc gamma RIIa, whereas the tyrosine kinase Syk associates with the carboxyl-terminal ITAM tyrosine. Association of SHP-1 with Fc gamma RIIa ITAM appears to suppress total cellular tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, Fc gamma RIIa clustering results in the association of SHP-1 with key signaling molecules such as Syk, p85 subunit of PtdIns 3-kinase, and p62dok, suggesting that these molecules may be substrates of SHP-1 in this system. Finally, overexpression of wild-type SHP-1 but not catalytically deficient SHP-1 led to a down-regulation of NF kappa B-dependent gene transcription in THP-1 cells activated by clustering Fc gamma RIIa.

  16. Loss of Tyrosine Phosphatase Dependent Inhibition Promotes Activation of Tyrosine Kinase c-Src in Detached Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sarah F.; Isley, Beth A.; Baker, Cheryl H.; Gallick, Gary E.; Summy, Justin M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite an intense focus on novel therapeutic strategies, pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest human malignancies. The frequent and rapid mortality associated with pancreatic cancer may be attributed to several factors, including late diagnosis, rapid tumor invasion into surrounding tissues, and formation of distant metastases. Both local invasion and metastasis require disruption of tumor cell contacts with the extracellular matrix. Detachment of normal cells from the extracellular matrix leads to a form of programmed cell death termed anoikis. Pancreatic cancer cells avert anoikis by activation of signaling pathways that allow for adhesion-independent survival. In the present studies, cellular signaling pathways activated in detached pancreatic cancer cells were examined. We demonstrate a rapid and robust activation of Src kinase in detached pancreatic cancer cells, relative to adherent. Src autophosphorylation rapidly returned to baseline levels upon reattachment to tissue culture plastic, in the presence or absence of specific extracellular matrix proteins. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors increased steady-state Src autophosphorylation in adherent cells and abrogated the detachment-induced increase in Src autophosphorylation. Src was found to co-immunoprecipitate with the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting that SHP-2 may participate in regulation of Src autophosphorylation in adherent cells. Src family kinase (SFK) dependent increases in Akt and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation were observed in detached cells, indicating the potential for Src-dependent activation of survival and stress pathways in pancreatic cancer cells that have detached from the extracellular matrix. PMID:20945416

  17. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mili; Scott, Matthew P; Zinn, Kai

    2012-06-15

    The respiratory (tracheal) system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) tyrosine kinase (TK). Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways.

  18. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mili; Scott, Matthew P.; Zinn, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Summary The respiratory (tracheal) system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) tyrosine kinase (TK). Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways. PMID:23213447

  19. Tyrosine-Specific Chemical Modification with in Situ Hemin-Activated Luminol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-20

    Tyrosine-specific chemical modification was achieved using in situ hemin-activated luminol derivatives. Tyrosine residues in peptide and protein were modified effectively with N-methylated luminol derivatives under oxidative conditions in the presence of hemin and H2O2. Both single and double modifications of the tyrosine residue occurred in the reaction of angiotensin II with N-methylated luminol derivative 9. Tyrosine-specific chemical modification of the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) revealed that the surface-exposed tyrosine residues were selectively modified with 9. We succeeded in the functionalization of several proteins using azide-conjugated compound 18 using alkyne-conjugated probes by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) or dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-mediated copper-free click chemistry. This tyrosine-specific modification was orthogonal to conventional lysine modification by N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester, and dual functionalization by fluorescence modification of tyrosine residues and PEG modification of lysine residues was achieved without affecting the modification efficiency.

  20. Production of tyrosine through phenylalanine hydroxylation bypasses the intrinsic feedback inhibition in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Lin, Yuheng; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2015-04-01

    Tyrosine is a proteinogenic aromatic amino acid that is often used as a supplement of food and animal feed, as well as a (bio-)synthetic precursor to various pharmaceutically or industrially important molecules. Extensive metabolic engineering efforts have been made towards the efficient and cost-effective microbial production of tyrosine. Conventional strategies usually focus on eliminating intrinsic feedback inhibition and redirecting carbon flux into the shikimate pathway. In this study, we found that continuous conversion of phenylalanine into tyrosine by the action of tetrahydromonapterin (MH4)-utilizing phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase (P4H) can bypass the feedback inhibition in Escherichia coli, leading to tyrosine accumulation in the cultures. First, expression of the P4H from Xanthomonas campestris in combination with an MH4 recycling system in wild-type E. coli allowed the strain to accumulate tyrosine at 262 mg/L. On this basis, enhanced expression of the key enzymes associated with the shikimate pathway and the MH4 biosynthetic pathway resulted in the elevation of tyrosine production up to 401 mg/L in shake flasks. This work demonstrated a novel approach to tyrosine production and verified the possibility to alleviate feedback inhibition by creating a phenylalanine sink.

  1. Partial purification and characterization of an enzyme from pea nuclei with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y L; Roux, S J

    1995-01-01

    A pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclear enzyme with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity has been partially purified and characterized. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 90 kD as judged by molecular sieve column chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Like animal protein tyrosine phosphatases it can be inhibited by low concentrations of molybdate and vanadate. It is also inhibited by heparin and spermine but not by either the acid phosphatase inhibitors citrate and tartrate or the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. The enzyme does not require Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ for its activity but is stimulated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate and by ethyleneglycolbis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. It dephosphorylates phosphotyrosine residues on the four different 32P-tyrosine-labeled peptides tested but not the phosphoserine/threonine residues on casein and histone. Like some animal protein tyrosine phosphatases, it has a variable pH optimum depending on the substrate used: the optimum is 5.5 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled lysozyme, but it is 7.0 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled poly(glutamic acid, tyrosine). It has a Km of 4 microM when the lysozyme protein is used as a substrate. PMID:11536662

  2. Testing whether metazoan tyrosine loss was driven by selection against promiscuous phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Siddharth; Struck, Travis J; Mannakee, Brian K; Paniscus, Mary; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory modification in metazoans, and the corresponding kinase enzymes have diversified dramatically. This diversification is correlated with a genome-wide reduction in protein tyrosine content, and it was recently suggested that this reduction was driven by selection to avoid promiscuous phosphorylation that might be deleterious. We tested three predictions of this intriguing hypothesis. 1) Selection should be stronger on residues that are more likely to be phosphorylated due to local solvent accessibility or structural disorder. 2) Selection should be stronger on proteins that are more likely to be promiscuously phosphorylated because they are abundant. We tested these predictions by comparing distributions of tyrosine within and among human and yeast orthologous proteins. 3) Selection should be stronger against mutations that create tyrosine versus remove tyrosine. We tested this prediction using human population genomic variation data. We found that all three predicted effects are modest for tyrosine when compared with the other amino acids, suggesting that selection against deleterious phosphorylation was not dominant in driving metazoan tyrosine loss.

  3. Grass roots chemistry: meta-Tyrosine, an herbicidal nonprotein amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Cécile; Weston, Leslie A.; Huang, Tengfang; Jander, Georg; Owens, Thomas; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2007-01-01

    Fine fescue grasses displace neighboring plants by depositing large quantities of an aqueous phytotoxic root exudate in the soil rhizosphere. Via activity-guided fractionation, we have isolated and identified the nonprotein amino acid m-tyrosine as the major active component. m-Tyrosine is significantly more phytotoxic than its structural isomers o- and p-tyrosine. We show that m-tyrosine exposure results in growth inhibition for a wide range of plant species and propose that the release of this nonprotein amino acid interferes with root development of competing plants. Acid hydrolysis of total root protein from Arabidopsis thaliana showed incorporation of m-tyrosine, suggesting this as a possible mechanism of phytotoxicity. m-Tyrosine inhibition of A. thaliana root growth is counteracted by exogenous addition of protein amino acids, with phenylalanine having the most significant effect. The discovery of m-tyrosine, as well as a further understanding of its mode(s) of action, could lead to the development of biorational approaches to weed control. PMID:17940026

  4. ROLE OF TYROSINE-SULFATED PROTEINS IN RETINAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Y.; Al-Ubaidi, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a significant role in cellular and retinal health. The study of retinal tyrosine-sulfated proteins is an important first step toward understanding the role of ECM in retinal health and diseases. These secreted proteins are members of the retinal ECM. Tyrosine sulfation was shown to be necessary for the development of proper retinal structure and function. The importance of tyrosine sulfation is further demonstrated by the evolutionary presence of tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases, enzymes that catalyze proteins’ tyrosine sulfation, and the compensatory abilities of these enzymes. Research has identified four tyrosine-sulfated retinal proteins: fibulin 2, vitronectin, complement factor H (CFH), and opticin. Vitronectin and CFH regulate the activation of the complement system and are involved in the etiology of some cases of age-related macular degeneration. Analysis of the role of tyrosine sulfation in fibulin function showed that sulfation influences the protein's ability to regulate growth and migration. Although opticin was recently shown to exhibit anti-angiogenic properties, it is not yet determined what role sulfation plays in that function. Future studies focusing on identifying all of the tyrosine-sulfated retinal proteins would be instrumental in determining the impact of sulfation on retinal protein function in retinal homeostasis and diseases. PMID:25819460

  5. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  6. Rates and energetics of tyrosine ring flips in yeast iso-2-cytochrome c

    SciTech Connect

    Nall, B.T.; Zuniga, E.H. )

    1990-08-21

    Isotope-edited nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to monitor ring flip motion of the five tyrosine side chains in the oxidized and reduced forms of yeast iso-2-cytochrome c. With specifically labeled protein purified from yeast grown on media containing (3,5-{sup 13}C)tyrosine, isotope-edited one-dimensional proton spectra have been collected over a 5-55{degree}C temperature range. The spectra allow selective observation of the 10 3,5 tyrosine ring proton resonances and, using a two-site exchange model, allow estimation of the temperature dependence of ring flip rates from motion-induced changes in proton line shapes. For the reduced protein, tyrosines II and IV are in fast exchange throughout the temperature range investigated, or lack resolvable differences in static chemical shifts for the 3,5 ring protons. Tyrosines I, III, and V are in sloe exchange at low temperatures and in fast exchange at high temperatures. Spectral simulations give flip rates for individual tyrosines in a range of one flip per second at low temperatures to thousands of flips per second at high temperatures. Eyring plots show that two of the tyrosines (I and III) have essentially the same activation parameters. Tentative sequence-specific assignments for the tyrosines in reduced iso-2 are suggested by comparison to horse cytochrome c. For oxidized iso-2, five resonances are observed at high temperatures, suggesting flip rates for all five tyrosines sufficient to average static chemical shift differences. At lower temperatures, there is evidence of intermediate and slow flipping for some of the rings.

  7. Interplay of Anionic Charge, Poly(ethylene glycol), and Iodinated Tyrosine Incorporation within Tyrosine-derived Polycarbonates: Effects on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Patrick A.; Luk, Arnold; Demtchouk, Aleksey; Patel, Hiral; Sung, Hak-Joon; Treiser, Matthew D.; Gordonov, Simon; Sheihet, Larisa; Bolikal, Das; Kohn, Joachim; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of smooth muscle cell adhesion, proliferation, and motility on biomaterials is critical to the performance of blood-contacting implants and vascular tissue engineering scaffolds. The goal of this study was to examine the underlying substrate-smooth muscle cell response relations, using a selection of polymers representative of an expansive library of multifunctional, tyrosine-derived polycarbonates. Three chemical components within the polymer structure were selectively varied through copolymerization: 1) the content of iodinated tyrosine to achieve X-ray visibility; 2) the content of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to decrease protein adsorption and cell adhesivity; and 3) the content of desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine (DT) which regulates the rate of polymer degradation. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, we quantified differential serum protein adsorption behavior due to the chemical components DT, iodinated tyrosine, and PEG: increased PEG content within the polymer structure progressively decreased protein adsorption but the simultaneous presence of both DT and iodinated tyrosine reversed the effects of PEG. The complex interplay of these components was next tested on the adhesion, proliferation, and motility behavior cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells. The incorporation of PEG into the polymer reduced cell attachment, which was reversed in the presence of iodinated tyrosine. Further, we found that as little as 10% DT content was sufficient to negate the PEG effect in polymers containing iodinated tyrosine while in non-iodinated polymers the PEG effect on cell attachment was reversed. Cross-functional analysis of motility and proliferation revealed divergent substrate chemistry related cell response regimes. For instance, within the series of polymers containing both iodinated tyrosine and 10% of DT, increasing PEG levels lowered smooth muscle cell motility without a change in the rate of cell proliferation. In contrast, for non

  8. The use of the tyrosine phosphatase antagonist orthovanadate in the study of a cell proliferation inhibitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enebo, D. J.; Hanek, G.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Incubation of murine fibroblasts with orthovanadate, a global tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, was shown to confer a "pseudo-transformed" phenotype with regard to cell morphology and growth characteristics. This alteration was manifested by both an increasing refractile appearance of the cells, consistent with many transformed cell lines, as well as an increase in maximum cell density was attained. Despite the abrogation of cellular tyrosine phosphatase activity, orthovanadate-treated cells remained sensitive to the biological activity of a naturally occurring sialoglycopeptide (SGP) cell surface proliferation inhibitor. The results indicated that tyrosine phosphatase activity, inhibited by orthovanadate, was not involved in the signal transduction pathway of the SGP.

  9. Isolation and purification of tyrosine hydroxylase from callus cultures of Portulaca grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto Ki; Kobayashi, N; Yoshitama, K; Teramoto, S; Komamine, A

    2001-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was separated from polyphenol oxidase activity and was highly purified from betacyanin producing callus cultures of Portulaca grandiflora. The purified enzyme catalyzed the formation of DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) from tyrosine and required the pterin compounds (6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin; 6,7-dimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin) as coenzyme. The K(m) values for tyrosine and 6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin were 0.5 mM and 0.15 mM, respectively. This enzyme was activated by Fe(2+) and Mn(2+), and inhibited by metal chelating agents.

  10. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  11. Deprotonation of tyrosines in bacteriorhodopsin as studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with deuterium and nitrate labeling.

    PubMed

    Lin, S L; Ormos, P; Eisenstein, L; Govindjee, R; Konno, K; Nakanishi, K

    1987-12-15

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectra are presented for bacteriorhodopsin (BR) at low temperature. Previous FTIR measurements have identified several tyrosine residues that change their absorption characteristics between light-adapted BR and dark-adapted BR, or between intermediates K and M [Dollinger, G., Eisenstein, L., Lin, S.-L., Nakanishi, K., Odashima, K., & Termini, J. (1986) Methods Enzymol. 127, 649-662]. These changes were explained by protonation/deprotonation of tyrosine moieties and perturbation of the protein environment surrounding tyrosines. A tyrosine deprotonation was observed to occur between intermediates K and M. The present studies confine the deprotonation to being between intermediates L and M and show that no tyrosines undergo changes between the K and the L states. Evidence is presented that none of the tyrosines undergoing changes at low temperature can be assigned to tyrosine-64. The environmental changes of these tyrosines are discussed in relation to the proton pumping mechanism. Their spatial relation to the chromophore is also discussed. At least two tyrosines are suggested to reside close to the retinal binding site. The reactive groups of the nitrated tyrosine-64 are speculated to be remote from the Schiff base and the active tyrosines but can possibly interact sterically with the ionone ring of the retinal.

  12. Signal transduction in podocytes—spotlight on receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Jochen; Sever, Sanja; Faul, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian kidney filtration barrier is a complex multicellular, multicomponent structure that maintains homeostasis by regulating electrolytes, acid–base balance, and blood pressure (via maintenance of salt and water balance). To perform these multiple functions, podocytes—an important component of the filtration apparatus—must process a series of intercellular signals. Integrating these signals with diverse cellular responses enables a coordinated response to various conditions. Although mature podocytes are terminally differentiated and cannot proliferate, they are able to respond to growth factors. It is possible that the initial response of podocytes to growth factors is beneficial and protective, and might include the induction of hypertrophic cell growth. However, extended and/or uncontrolled growth factor signalling might be maladaptive and could result in the induction of apoptosis and podocyte loss. Growth factors signal via the activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) on their target cells and around a quarter of the 58 RTK family members that are encoded in the human genome have been identified in podocytes. Pharmacological inhibitors of many RTKs exist and are currently used in experimental and clinical cancer therapy. The identification of pathological RTK-mediated signal transduction pathways in podocytes could provide a starting point for the development of novel therapies for glomerular disorders. PMID:24394191

  13. Electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry of tyrosine nitrated peptides.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew W; Mikhailov, Victor A; Iniesta, Jesus; Cooper, Helen J

    2010-02-01

    In vivo protein nitration is associated with many disease conditions that involve oxidative stress and inflammatory response. The modification involves addition of a nitro group at the position ortho to the phenol group of tyrosine to give 3-nitrotyrosine. To understand the mechanisms and consequences of protein nitration, it is necessary to develop methods for identification of nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and localization of the sites of modification. Here, we have investigated the electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) behavior of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing peptides. The presence of nitration did not affect the CID behavior of the peptides. For the doubly-charged peptides, addition of nitration severely inhibited the production of ECD sequence fragments. However, ECD of the triply-charged nitrated peptides resulted in some singly-charged sequence fragments. ECD of the nitrated peptides is characterized by multiple losses of small neutral species including hydroxyl radicals, water and ammonia. The origin of the neutral losses has been investigated by use of activated ion (AI) ECD. Loss of ammonia appears to be the result of non-covalent interactions between the nitro group and protonated lysine side-chains.

  14. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  15. Redundant Regulation of Cdk1 Tyrosine Dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Erin K; Dysart, Michael; Lianga, Noel; Williams, Elizabeth C; Pilon, Sophie; Doré, Carole; Deneault, Jean-Sebastien; Rudner, Adam D

    2016-03-01

    Cdk1 activity drives both mitotic entry and the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in all eukaryotes. The kinase Wee1 and the phosphatase Cdc25 regulate the mitotic activity of Cdk1 by the reversible phosphorylation of a conserved tyrosine residue. Mutation of cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe blocks Cdk1 dephosphorylation and causes cell cycle arrest. In contrast, deletion of MIH1, the cdc25 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is viable. Although Cdk1-Y19 phosphorylation is elevated during mitosis in mih1∆ cells, Cdk1 is dephosphorylated as cells progress into G1, suggesting that additional phosphatases regulate Cdk1 dephosphorylation. Here we show that the phosphatase Ptp1 also regulates Cdk1 dephosphorylation in vivo and can directly dephosphorylate Cdk1 in vitro. Using a novel in vivo phosphatase assay, we also show that PP2A bound to Rts1, the budding yeast B56-regulatory subunit, regulates dephosphorylation of Cdk1 independently of a function regulating Swe1, Mih1, or Ptp1, suggesting that PP2A(Rts1) either directly dephosphorylates Cdk1-Y19 or regulates an unidentified phosphatase.

  16. Redundant Regulation of Cdk1 Tyrosine Dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Erin K.; Dysart, Michael; Lianga, Noel; Williams, Elizabeth C.; Pilon, Sophie; Doré, Carole; Deneault, Jean-Sebastien; Rudner, Adam D.

    2016-01-01

    Cdk1 activity drives both mitotic entry and the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in all eukaryotes. The kinase Wee1 and the phosphatase Cdc25 regulate the mitotic activity of Cdk1 by the reversible phosphorylation of a conserved tyrosine residue. Mutation of cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe blocks Cdk1 dephosphorylation and causes cell cycle arrest. In contrast, deletion of MIH1, the cdc25 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is viable. Although Cdk1-Y19 phosphorylation is elevated during mitosis in mih1∆ cells, Cdk1 is dephosphorylated as cells progress into G1, suggesting that additional phosphatases regulate Cdk1 dephosphorylation. Here we show that the phosphatase Ptp1 also regulates Cdk1 dephosphorylation in vivo and can directly dephosphorylate Cdk1 in vitro. Using a novel in vivo phosphatase assay, we also show that PP2A bound to Rts1, the budding yeast B56-regulatory subunit, regulates dephosphorylation of Cdk1 independently of a function regulating Swe1, Mih1, or Ptp1, suggesting that PP2ARts1 either directly dephosphorylates Cdk1-Y19 or regulates an unidentified phosphatase. PMID:26715668

  17. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling – A Proteomic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Biarc, Jordane; Chalkley, Robert J.; Burlingame, A. L.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    The stimulation of various cellular processes through extracellular signals is of paramount importance in biological systems and is a central focus in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease. The information transfer is accomplished in a variety of ways by the interaction of soluble, matrix-associated and cell bound ligands that either bind specifically to plasma membrane-associated proteins that act as receptors, or penetrate to the cytoplasmic/nuclear compartments to bind and activate receptors located there. The former class of entities generates intracellular signals that are transmitted and amplified by chemical modifications that are manifested as protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). These are both reversible and irreversible and range from phosphorylation of tyrosine, threonine and serine residues to endoproteolytic cleavages. Although the PTMs alter the activity and functions of many of the proteins in these cascades, the major outcomes of most of the signaling pathways are the activation/deactivation of transcriptional regulators with the concomitant changes in gene expression that generally underlie biological responses. PMID:21056590

  18. The evolution of tyrosine-recombinase elements in Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Szitenberg, Amir; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Blaxter, Mark L; Lunt, David H

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements can be categorised into DNA and RNA elements based on their mechanism of transposition. Tyrosine recombinase elements (YREs) are relatively rare and poorly understood, despite sharing characteristics with both DNA and RNA elements. Previously, the Nematoda have been reported to have a substantially different diversity of YREs compared to other animal phyla: the Dirs1-like YRE retrotransposon was encountered in most animal phyla but not in Nematoda, and a unique Pat1-like YRE retrotransposon has only been recorded from Nematoda. We explored the diversity of YREs in Nematoda by sampling broadly across the phylum and including 34 genomes representing the three classes within Nematoda. We developed a method to isolate and classify YREs based on both feature organization and phylogenetic relationships in an open and reproducible workflow. We also ensured that our phylogenetic approach to YRE classification identified truncated and degenerate elements, informatively increasing the number of elements sampled. We identified Dirs1-like elements (thought to be absent from Nematoda) in the nematode classes Enoplia and Dorylaimia indicating that nematode model species do not adequately represent the diversity of transposable elements in the phylum. Nematode Pat1-like elements were found to be a derived form of another Pat1-like element that is present more widely in animals. Several sequence features used widely for the classification of YREs were found to be homoplasious, highlighting the need for a phylogenetically-based classification scheme. Nematode model species do not represent the diversity of transposable elements in the phylum.

  19. Regulation of Endothelial Adherens Junctions by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells form a semipermeable, regulated barrier that limits the passage of fluid, small molecules, and leukocytes between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. The adherens junction, a major mechanism of intercellular adhesion, is comprised of transmembrane cadherins forming homotypic interactions between adjacent cells and associated cytoplasmic catenins linking the cadherins to the cytoskeleton. Inflammatory conditions promote the disassembly of the adherens junction and a loss of intercellular adhesion, creating openings or gaps in the endothelium through which small molecules diffuse and leukocytes transmigrate. Tyrosine kinase signaling has emerged as a central regulator of the inflammatory response, partly through direct phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the adherens junction components. This review discusses the findings that support and those that argue against a direct effect of cadherin and catenin phosphorylation in the disassembly of the adherens junction. Recent findings indicate a complex interaction between kinases, phosphatases, and the adherens junction components that allow a fine regulation of the endothelial permeability to small molecules, leukocyte migration, and barrier resealing. PMID:26556953

  20. Regulation of tyrosine phosphatases in the adventitia during vascular remodelling

    SciTech Connect

    Micke, Patrick; Hackbusch, Daniel; Mercan, Sibel; Stawowy, Philipp; Ostman, Arne; Kappert, Kai

    2009-05-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are regulators of growth factor signalling in vascular remodelling. The aim of this study was to evaluate PTP expression in the context of PDGF-signalling in the adventitia after angioplasty. Utilising a rat carotid artery model, the adventitial layers of injured and non-injured vessels were laser microdissected. The mRNA expression of the PDGF {beta}-receptor, the ligands PDGF-A/B/C/D and the receptor-antagonising PTPs (DEP-1, TC-PTP, SHP-2, PTP1B) were determined and correlated to vascular morphometrics, proliferation markers and PDGF {beta}-receptor phosphorylation. The levels of the PDGF {beta}-receptor, PDGF-C and PDGF-D were upregulated concurrently with the antagonising PTPs DEP-1 and TC-PTP at day 8, and normalised at day 14 after vessel injury. Although the proliferation parameters were time-dependently altered in the adventitial layer, the phosphorylation of the PDGF {beta}-receptor remained unchanged. The expression dynamics of specific PTPs indicate a regulatory role of PDGF-signalling also in the adventitia during vascular remodelling.

  1. Have adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitors lost their shine?

    PubMed Central

    Sabari, Joshua K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite broad advances in molecularly targeted therapies, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the United States. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur in approximately 17% of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the US population. The remarkable efficacy of small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in this unique subset of patients has revolutionized the therapeutic approach to lung cancer. The success of these agents in the metastatic setting leads to the logical question of what role these drugs may have in the adjuvant setting for patients with earlier stage disease. RADIANT, an international randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled phase III study in patients with completely resected stage IB to IIIA NSLC whose tumors expressed EGFR by IHC and EGFR amplification by FISH, attempted to answer the question of whether erlotinib would improve disease free survival and overall survival in the adjuvant setting. While RADIANT does not conclude for or against adjuvant use of EGFR-TKIs, all data points towards benefit in a selected population. As clinicians, we must continue to enroll to potentially practice changing therapeutic neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy studies internationally. PMID:27568486

  2. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders.

  3. New functional aspects of the atypical protein tyrosine phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Hengge, Alvan C

    2013-11-12

    LDP3 (VHZ) is the smallest classical protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) known to date and was originally misclassified as an atypical dual-specificity phosphatase. Kinetic isotope effects with steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of VHZ and mutants with p-nitrophenol phosphate have revealed several unusual properties. VHZ is significantly more active than previously reported but remains one of the least active PTPs. Highly unusual for a PTP, VHZ possesses two acidic residues (E134 and D65) in the active site. D65 occupies the position corresponding to the typical general acid in the PTP family. However, VHZ primarily utilizes E134 as the general acid, with D65 taking over this role when E134 is mutated. This unusual behavior is facilitated by two coexisting, but unequally populated, substrate binding modes. Unlike most classical PTPs, VHZ exhibits phosphotransferase activity. Despite the presence of the Q-loop that normally prevents alcoholysis of the phosphoenzyme intermediate in other classical PTPs, VHZ readily phosphorylates ethylene glycol. Although mutations of Q-loop residues affect this phosphotransferase activity, mutations on the IPD loop that contains the general acid exert more control over this process. A single P68V substitution on this loop completely abolishes phosphotransferase activity. The ability of native VHZ to catalyze transphosphorylation may lead to an imbalance of intracellular phosphorylation, which could explain the correlation of its overexpression with several types of cancer.

  4. Exploiting receptor tyrosine kinase co-activation for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Aik-Choon; Vyse, Simon; Huang, Paul H

    2017-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have shown that Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK) co-activation is prevalent in many cancer types. Compelling data demonstrates that cancers are likely to have evolved RTK co-activation as a generic means for driving tumour growth and providing a buffering system to limit the lethal effects of microenvironmental insults including therapy. In this review, we summarise the general principles of RTK co-activation gleaned from key studies over the last decade. We discuss direct and indirect approaches to exploit RTK co-activation for cancer therapy and describe recent developments in computational approaches to predict kinase co-dependencies by integrating drug screening data and kinase inhibitor selectivity profiles. We offer a perspective on the outstanding questions in the field focusing on the implications of RTK co-activation on tumour heterogeneity and cancer evolution and conclude by surveying emerging computational and experimental approaches that will provide further insights into the biology of RTK co-activation and deliver new developments in effective cancer therapies. PMID:27452454

  5. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications.

  6. Signal processing by protein tyrosine phosphorylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification controlling many biological processes. Most phosphorylation occurs on serine and threonine, and to a less extend on tyrosine (Tyr). In animals, Tyr phosphorylation is crucial for the regulation of many responses such as growth or differentiation. Only recently with the development of mass spectrometry, it has been reported that Tyr phosphorylation is as important in plants as in animals. The genes encoding protein Tyr kinases and protein Tyr phosphatases have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Putative substrates of these enzymes, and thus Tyr-phosphorylated proteins have been reported by proteomic studies based on accurate mass spectrometry analysis of the phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins. Biochemical approaches, pharmacology and genetic manipulations have indicated that responses to stress and developmental processes involve changes in protein Tyr phosphorylation. The aim of this review is to present an update on Tyr phosphorylation in plants in order to better assess the role of this post-translational modification in plant physiology. PMID:21628997

  7. Tyrosine aminotransferase from Leishmania infantum: A new drug target candidate

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Miguel Angel; Alonso, Ana; Alcolea, Pedro Jose; Abramov, Ariel; de Lacoba, Mario García; Abendroth, Jan; Zhang, Sunny; Edwards, Thomas; Lorimer, Don; Myler, Peter John; Larraga, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean basin. The disease is fatal without treatment, which has been based on antimonial pentavalents for more than 60 years. Due to resistances, relapses and toxicity to current treatment, the development of new drugs is required. The structure of the L. infantum tyrosine aminotransferase (LiTAT) has been recently solved showing important differences with the mammalian orthologue. The characterization of LiTAT is reported herein. This enzyme is cytoplasmic and is over-expressed in the more infective stages and nitric oxide resistant parasites. Unlike the mammalian TAT, LiTAT is able to use ketomethiobutyrate as co-substrate. The pharmacophore model of LiTAT with this specific co-substrate is described herein. This may allow the identification of new inhibitors present in the databases. All the data obtained support that LiTAT is a good target candidate for the development of new anti-leishmanial drugs. PMID:25516846

  8. Regulation of therapeutic resistance in cancers by receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-01-01

    In response to DNA damage lesions due to cellular stress, DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are activated to promote cell survival and genetic stability or unrepaired lesion-induced cell death. Current cancer treatments predominantly utilize DNA damaging agents, such as irradiation and chemotherapy drugs, to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce cell death through the activation of DDR. However, a portion of cancer patients is reported to develop therapeutic resistance to these DDR-inducing agents. One significant resistance mechanism in cancer cells is oncogenic kinase overexpression, which promotes cell survival by enhancing DNA damage repair pathways and evading cell cycle arrest. Among the oncogenic kinases, overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is reported in many of solid tumors, and numerous clinical trials targeting RTKs are currently in progress. As the emerging trend in cancer treatment combines DNA damaging agents and RTK inhibitors, it is important to understand the substrates of RTKs relative to the DDR pathways. In addition, alteration of RTK expression and their phosphorylated substrates can serve as biomarkers to stratify patients for combination therapies. In this review, we summarize the deleterious effects of RTKs on the DDR pathways and the emerging biomarkers for personalized therapy. PMID:27186434

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors isolated from Artemisia roxburghiana.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Raza; Ishtiaq; Hizbullah, Syed Muhammad; Habtemariam, Solomon; Zarrelli, Armando; Muhammad, Akhtar; Collina, Simona; Khan, Inamulllah

    2016-08-01

    Artemisia roxburghiana is used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases including diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of active constituents by using protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a validated target for management of diabetes. Various compounds were isolated as active principles from the crude methanolic extract of aerial parts of A. roxburghiana. All compounds were screened for PTP1B inhibitory activity. Molecular docking simulations were performed to investigate the mechanism behind PTP1B inhibition of the isolated compound and positive control, ursolic acid. Betulinic acid, betulin and taraxeryl acetate were the active PTP1B principles with IC50 values 3.49 ± 0.02, 4.17 ± 0.03 and 87.52 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. Molecular docking studies showed significant molecular interactions of the triterpene inhibitors with Gly220, Cys215, Gly218 and Asp48 inside the active site of PTP1B. The antidiabetic activity of A. roxburghiana could be attributed due to PTP1B inhibition by its triterpene constituents, betulin, betulinic acid and taraxeryl acetate. Computational insights of this study revealed that the C-3 and C-17 positions of the compounds needs extensive optimization for the development of new lead compounds.

  10. Function of redox-active tyrosine in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2006-06-01

    Water oxidation at photosystem II Mn-cluster is mediated by the redox-active tyrosine Y(Z). We calculated the redox potential (E(m)) of Y(Z) and its symmetrical counterpart Y(D), by solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The calculated E(m)(Y( )/Y(-)) were +926 mV/+694 mV for Y(Z)/Y(D) with the Mn-cluster in S2 state. Together with the asymmetric position of the Mn-cluster relative to Y(Z/D), differences in H-bond network between Y(Z) (Y(Z)/D1-His(190)/D1-Asn(298)) and Y(D) (Y(D)/D2-His(189)/D2-Arg(294)/CP47-Glu(364)) are crucial for E(m)(Y(Z/D)). When D1-His(190) is protonated, corresponding to a thermally activated state, the calculated E(m)(Y(Z)) was +1216 mV, which is as high as the E(m) for P(D1/D2). We observed deprotonation at CP43-Arg(357) upon S-state transition, which may suggest its involvement in the proton exit pathway. E(m)(Y(D)) was affected by formation of P(D2)(+) (but not P(D1)(+)) and sensitive to the protonation state of D2-Arg(180). This points to an electrostatic link between Y(D) and P(D2).

  11. The Evolution of Tyrosine-Recombinase Elements in Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    Szitenberg, Amir; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Blaxter, Mark L.; Lunt, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements can be categorised into DNA and RNA elements based on their mechanism of transposition. Tyrosine recombinase elements (YREs) are relatively rare and poorly understood, despite sharing characteristics with both DNA and RNA elements. Previously, the Nematoda have been reported to have a substantially different diversity of YREs compared to other animal phyla: the Dirs1-like YRE retrotransposon was encountered in most animal phyla but not in Nematoda, and a unique Pat1-like YRE retrotransposon has only been recorded from Nematoda. We explored the diversity of YREs in Nematoda by sampling broadly across the phylum and including 34 genomes representing the three classes within Nematoda. We developed a method to isolate and classify YREs based on both feature organization and phylogenetic relationships in an open and reproducible workflow. We also ensured that our phylogenetic approach to YRE classification identified truncated and degenerate elements, informatively increasing the number of elements sampled. We identified Dirs1-like elements (thought to be absent from Nematoda) in the nematode classes Enoplia and Dorylaimia indicating that nematode model species do not adequately represent the diversity of transposable elements in the phylum. Nematode Pat1-like elements were found to be a derived form of another Pat1-like element that is present more widely in animals. Several sequence features used widely for the classification of YREs were found to be homoplasious, highlighting the need for a phylogenetically-based classification scheme. Nematode model species do not represent the diversity of transposable elements in the phylum. PMID:25197791

  12. Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Massarotti, Alberto; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key enzymes in cellular regulation. The 107 human PTPs are regulated by redox signalling, phosphorylation, dimerisation, and proteolysis. Recent findings of very strong inhibition of some PTPs by zinc ions at concentrations relevant in a cellular environment suggest yet another mechanism of regulation. One of the most extensively investigated PTPs is PTP1B (PTPN1). It regulates the insulin and leptin signalling pathway and is implicated in cancer and obesity/diabetes. The development of novel assay conditions to investigate zinc inhibition of PTP1B provides estimates of about 5.6 nM affinity for inhibitory zinc(II) ions. Analysis of three PTP1B 3D structures (PDB id: 2CM2, 3I80 and 1A5Y) identified putative zinc binding sites and supports the kinetic studies in suggesting an inhibitory zinc only in the closed and cysteinyl-phosphate intermediate forms of the enzyme. These observations gain significance with regard to recent findings of regulatory roles of zinc ions released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Combined genotoxicity of chlorinated products from tyrosine and benzophenone-4.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yangyang; Bai, Yaohui; Ji, Qinghua; Huo, Yang; Liu, Huijuan; Crittenden, John C; Qu, Jiuhui

    2017-01-15

    The toxicity of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from a single precursor was studied intensively. Here we examined the genotoxicity when two precursors (tyrosine (Tyr) and benzophenone-4 (BP-4)) were chlorinated together and separately. We sought to examine whether the genotoxicity of the mixture (GCM) could be estimated from the sum of the genotoxicities of the individual precursors (GCI), which were chlorinated separately. We determined the genotoxicity using the SOS/umu test. The results revealed that GCM was not identical to GCI. The difference in genotoxicity between GCM and GCI (GΔ) was observed to decrease with increasing pH. GCM was higher than GCI (GΔ>0) at pH 5.0-6.1, and lower than GCI (GΔ<0) at pH 6.3-8.0. We found that nitrogen-containing DBPs played a dominant role in determining GCM and GCI. We propose that the total organic nitrogen (TON) ratio, TON(chlorinatedmixture)/TON(thesumofchlorinatedindividuals), is useful to estimate GΔ.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Regulating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Jaehong; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Seungeun; Park, Hana; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulatory factors in inflammatory signaling pathways. Although PTPs have been extensively studied, little is known about their role in neuroinflammation. In the present study, we examined the expression of 6 different PTPs (PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, MEG2, LYP, and RPTPβ) and their role in glial activation and neuroinflammation. All PTPs were expressed in brain and glia. The expression of PTP1B, SHP2, and LYP was enhanced in the inflamed brain. The expression of PTP1B, TC-PTP, and LYP was increased after treating microglia cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To examine the role of PTPs in microglial activation and neuroinflammation, we used specific pharmacological inhibitors of PTPs. Inhibition of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, LYP, and RPTPβ suppressed nitric oxide production in LPS-treated microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, and RPTPβ inhibitors downregulated microglial activation in an LPS-induced neuroinflammation model. Our results indicate that multiple PTPs are involved in regulating microglial activation and neuroinflammation, with different expression patterns and specific functions. Thus, PTP inhibitors can be exploited for therapeutic modulation of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27790059

  15. Leukocyte tyrosine kinase functions in pigment cell development.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Susana S; Yang, Xueyan; Müller, Jeanette; Carney, Thomas J; McAdow, Anthony R; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Jacoby, Arie S; Hurst, Laurence D; Delfino-Machín, Mariana; Haffter, Pascal; Geisler, Robert; Johnson, Stephen L; Ward, Andrew; Kelsh, Robert N

    2008-03-07

    A fundamental problem in developmental biology concerns how multipotent precursors choose specific fates. Neural crest cells (NCCs) are multipotent, yet the mechanisms driving specific fate choices remain incompletely understood. Sox10 is required for specification of neural cells and melanocytes from NCCs. Like sox10 mutants, zebrafish shady mutants lack iridophores; we have proposed that sox10 and shady are required for iridophore specification from NCCs. We show using diverse approaches that shady encodes zebrafish leukocyte tyrosine kinase (Ltk). Cell transplantation studies show that Ltk acts cell-autonomously within the iridophore lineage. Consistent with this, ltk is expressed in a subset of NCCs, before becoming restricted to the iridophore lineage. Marker analysis reveals a primary defect in iridophore specification in ltk mutants. We saw no evidence for a fate-shift of neural crest cells into other pigment cell fates and some NCCs were subsequently lost by apoptosis. These features are also characteristic of the neural crest cell phenotype in sox10 mutants, leading us to examine iridophores in sox10 mutants. As expected, sox10 mutants largely lacked iridophore markers at late stages. In addition, sox10 mutants unexpectedly showed more ltk-expressing cells than wild-type siblings. These cells remained in a premigratory position and expressed sox10 but not the earliest neural crest markers and may represent multipotent, but partially-restricted, progenitors. In summary, we have discovered a novel signalling pathway in NCC development and demonstrate fate specification of iridophores as the first identified role for Ltk.

  16. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jan A

    2014-03-01

    BTK is a cytoplasmic, non-receptor tyrosine kinase that transmits signals from a variety of cell-surface molecules, including the B-cell receptor (BCR) and tissue homing receptors. Genetic BTK deletion causes B-cell immunodeficiency in humans and mice, making this kinase an attractive therapeutic target for B-cell disorders. The BTK inhibitor ibrutinib (PCI-32765, brand name: Imbruvica) demonstrated high clinical activity in B-cell malignancies, especially in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM). Therefore, ibrutinib was granted a 'breakthrough therapy' designation for these indications and was recently approved for the treatment of relapsed MCL by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Other BTK inhibitors in earlier clinical development include CC-292 (AVL-292), and ONO-4059. In CLL and MCL, ibrutinib characteristically induces redistribution of malignant B cells from tissue sites into the peripheral blood, along with rapid resolution of enlarged lymph nodes and a surge in lymphocytosis. With continuous ibrutinib therapy, growth- and survival-inhibitory activities of ibrutinib result in the normalization of lymphocyte counts and remissions in a majority of patients. This review discusses the clinical advances with BTK inhibitor therapy, as well as its pathophysiological basis, and outlines perspectives for future use of BTK inhibitors.

  17. The EGFR Family: Not So Prototypical Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was among the first receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for which ligand binding was studied and for which the importance of ligand-induced dimerization was established. As a result, EGFR and its relatives have frequently been termed “prototypical” RTKs. Many years of mechanistic studies, however, have revealed that—far from being prototypical—the EGFR family is quite unique. As we discuss in this review, the EGFR family uses a distinctive “receptor-mediated” dimerization mechanism, with ligand binding inducing a dramatic conformational change that exposes a dimerization arm. Intracellular kinase domain regulation in this family is also unique, being driven by allosteric changes induced by asymmetric dimer formation rather than the more typical activation-loop phosphorylation. EGFR family members also distinguish themselves from other RTKs in having an intracellular juxtamembrane (JM) domain that activates (rather than autoinhibits) the receptor and a very large carboxy-terminal tail that contains autophosphorylation sites and serves an autoregulatory function. We discuss recent advances in mechanistic aspects of all of these components of EGFR family members, attempting to integrate them into a view of how RTKs in this important class are regulated at the cell surface. PMID:24691965

  18. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-mediated inhibitory signaling is regulated by sequential phosphorylation mediated by distinct nonreceptor tyrosine kinases: a case study involving PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Tourdot, Benjamin E; Brenner, Michelle K; Keough, Kathleen C; Holyst, Trudy; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2013-04-16

    The activation state of many blood and vascular cells is tightly controlled by a delicate balance between receptors that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) and those that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). Precisely how the timing of cellular activation by ITAM-coupled receptors is regulated by ITIM-containing receptors is, however, poorly understood. Using platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) as a prototypical ITIM-bearing receptor, we demonstrate that initiation of inhibitory signaling occurs via a novel, sequential process in which Src family kinases phosphorylate the C-terminal ITIM, thereby enabling phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of PECAM-1 by other Src homology 2 domain-containing nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). NRTKs capable of mediating the second phosphorylation event include C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Btk and Csk function downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation during ITAM-dependent platelet activation. In ITAM-activated platelets that were treated with a PI3K inhibitor, PECAM-1 was phosphorylated but did not bind the tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, indicating that it was not phosphorylated on its N-terminal ITIM. Csk bound to and phosphorylated PECAM-1 more efficiently than did Btk and required its SH2 domain to perform these functions. Additionally, the phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of Siglec-9 by Csk is enhanced by the prior phosphorylation of its C-terminal ITIM, providing evidence that the ITIMs of other dual ITIM-containing receptors are also sequentially phosphorylated. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sequential ITIM phosphorylation provides a general mechanism for precise temporal control over the recruitment and activation of tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases that dampen ITAM-dependent signals.

  19. Emerging issues in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase function: lifting fog or simply shifting?

    PubMed

    Petrone, A; Sap, J

    2000-07-01

    Transmembrane (receptor) tyrosine phosphatases are intimately involved in responses to cell-cell and cell-matrix contact. Several important issues regarding the targets and regulation of this protein family are now emerging. For example, these phosphatases exhibit complex interactions with signaling pathways involving SRC family kinases, which result from their ability to control phosphorylation of both activating and inhibitory sites in these kinases and possibly also their substrates. Similarly, integrin signaling illustrates how phosphorylation of a single protein, or the activity of a pathway, can be controlled by multiple tyrosine phosphatases, attesting to the intricate integration of these enzymes in cellular regulation. Lastly, we are starting to appreciate the roles of intracellular topology, tyrosine phosphorylation and oligomerization among the many mechanisms regulating tyrosine phosphatase activity.

  20. Determination of Phenylalanine and Tyrosine by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphenylalaninemia/phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most common inborn errors of amino acid metabolism affecting about 1:15,000 infants in the United States. PKU is an autosomal recessive disorder that if untreated results in mental retardation. The most common cause of PKU is deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase that converts phenylalanine to tyrosine. Tyrosine deficiency results in impaired synthesis of catecholamines and thyroxine. Less commonly, it can result from defects in the synthesis or regeneration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor for the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. Increased phenylalanine and decreased tyrosine in blood are used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with PKU. LC/MS/MS method is described for the quantification of phenylalanine and tyrosine.

  1. Synaptic Clustering of PSD-95 Is Regulated by c-Abl through Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    de Arce, Karen Perez; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Farias, Olivia; Cifuentes, Alejandra; Bull, Paulina; Couch, Brian A.; Koleske, Anthony J.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Alvarez, Alejandra R.

    2010-01-01

    The c-Abl tyrosine kinase is present in mouse brain synapses, but its precise synaptic function is unknown. We found that c-Abl levels in the rat hippocampus increase postnatally, with expression peaking at the first postnatal week. In 14 d in vitro hippocampal neuron cultures, c-Abl localizes primarily to the postsynaptic compartment, in which it colocalizes with the postsynaptic scaffold protein postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) in apposition to presynaptic markers. c-Abl associates with PSD-95, and chemical or genetic inhibition of c-Abl kinase activity reduces PSD-95 tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to reduced PSD-95 clustering and reduced synapses in treated neurons. c-Abl can phosphorylate PSD-95 on tyrosine 533, and mutation of this residue reduces the ability of PSD-95 to cluster at postsynaptic sites. Our results indicate that c-Abl regulates synapse formation by mediating tyrosine phosphorylation and clustering of PSD-95. PMID:20220006

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of maspin in normal mammary epithelia and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Odero-Marah, Valerie A; Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila; Schneider, Galen B; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Seftor, Richard E B; Koland, John G; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2002-07-26

    Maspin is a 42kDa tumor suppressor protein that belongs to the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) family. It inhibits cell motility and invasion in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice; however, maspin's molecular mechanism of action has remained elusive. Maspin contains several tyrosine residues and we hypothesized that phosphorylation of maspin could play a role in its biological function. Our study reveals that maspin is phosphorylated on tyrosine moiety(ies) in normal mammary epithelial cells endogenously expressing maspin. In addition, transfection of the maspin gene, using either a stable or inducible system into maspin-deficient breast cancer cell lines, yields a protein product that is phosphorylated on tyrosine residue(s). Furthermore, recombinant maspin protein can be tyrosine-phosphorylated by the kinase domain from the epidermal growth factor receptor in vitro. These novel observations suggest that maspin, which deviates from the classical serpin, may be an important signal transduction molecule in its phosphorylated form.

  3. Crystal structure of SP-PTP, a low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bonsu; Keum, Chae Won; Lee, Hye Seon; Yun, Hye-Yeoung; Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Bo Yeon; Kim, Seung Jun

    2016-09-23

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogenic bacterium that causes a variety of infectious diseases. The GAS genome encodes one protein tyrosine phosphatase, SP-PTP, which plays an essential role in the replication and virulence maintenance of GAS. Herein, we present the crystal structure of SP-PTP at 1.9 Å resolution. Although SP-PTP has been reported to have dual phosphatase specificity for both phosphorylated tyrosine and serine/threonine, three-dimensional structural analysis showed that SP-PTP shares high similarity with typical low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMWPTPs), which are specific for phosphotyrosine, but not with dual-specificity phosphatases, in overall folding and active site composition. In the dephosphorylation activity test, SP-PTP consistently acted on phosphotyrosine substrates, but not or only minimally on phosphoserine/phosphothreonine substrates. Collectively, our structural and biochemical analyses verified SP-PTP as a canonical tyrosine-specific LMWPTP.

  4. Synthesis of Hydroxylated Bicyclic Amino Acids from l-Tyrosine: Octahydro-1H-indole Carboxylates

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Joshua G.; Kasi, Dhanalakshmi; Fushimi, Makoto; Cuzzupe, Anthony; Wipf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A stereoselective approach to polyhydroxylated l-Choi derivatives has been developed. The oxidative cyclization of l-tyrosine was optimized to avoid partial racemization and to allow a more efficient scale-up. PMID:18767800

  5. Administration of supplemental L-tyrosine with phenelzine: a clinical literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; Ryan, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this literature review is the alleged relationship between L-tyrosine, phenelzine, and hypertensive crisis. Phenelzine (Nardil®) prescribing information notes: “The potentiation of sympathomimetic substances and related compounds by MAO inhibitors may result in hypertensive crises (see WARNINGS). Therefore, patients being treated with NARDIL should not take […] L-tyrosine […]”. Interest in the scientific foundation of this claim was generated during routine patient care. A comprehensive literature search of Google Scholar and PubMed revealed no reported cases of hypertensive crisis associated with concomitant administration of L-tyrosine and phenelzine. Review of current US Food and Drug Administration nutritional guidelines relating to ongoing phenelzine studies reveals no mention and requires no consideration of L-tyrosine ingestion in combination with phenelzine. This paper is intended to provide an objective review of the science to then allow the reader to formulate the final opinion. PMID:25092999

  6. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  7. Free tyrosine and tyrosine-rich peptide-dependent superoxide generation catalyzed by a copper-binding, threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide derived from prion protein.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Goto, Kaishi; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    Previously, generation of superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)) catalyzed by Cu-binding peptides derived from human prion protein (model sequence for helical Cu-binding motif VNITKQHTVTTTT was most active) in the presence of catecholamines and related aromatic monoamines such as phenylethylamine and tyramine, has been reported [Kawano, T., Int J Biol Sci 2007; 3: 57-63]. The peptide sequence (corresponding to helix 2) tested here is known as threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide. In the present article, the redox behaviors of aromatic monoamines, 20 amino acids and prion-derived tyrosine-rich peptide sequences were compared as putative targets of the oxidative reactions mediated with the threonine-rich prion-peptide. For detection of O(2)(*-), an O(2)(*-)-specific chemiluminescence probe, Cypridina luciferin analog was used. We found that an aromatic amino acid, tyrosine (structurally similar to tyramine) behaves as one of the best substrates for the O(2)(*-) generating reaction (conversion from hydrogen peroxide) catalyzed by Cu-bound prion helical peptide. Data suggested that phenolic moiety is required to be an active substrate while the presence of neither carboxyl group nor amino group was necessarily required. In addition to the action of free tyrosine, effect of two tyrosine-rich peptide sequences YYR and DYEDRYYRENMHR found in human prion corresponding to the tyrosine-rich region was tested as putative substrates for the threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide. YYR motif (found twice in the Y-rich region) showed 2- to 3-fold higher activity compared to free tyrosine. Comparison of Y-rich sequence consisted of 13 amino acids and its Y-to-F substitution mutant sequence revealed that the tyrosine-residues on Y-rich peptide derived from prion may contribute to the higher production of O(2)(*-). These data suggest that the tyrosine residues on prion molecules could be additional targets of the prion-mediated reactions through intra- or inter-molecular interactions. Lastly, possible

  8. Tyrosine Ameliorates a Cold-Induced Delayed Matching-to-Sample Performance Decrement in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    were controlled and creased firing rate of CNS neurons and the continued recorded by a computer system. release of catecholamines, tyrosine hydroxylase ... hydroxylase . In: Lipton MA, DiMascio ducing a working memory deficit under field conditions A, Killam KF (eds) Psychopharmacology: a generation of pro...of rats after acute oral doses of aspar- References tame, phenylalanine , and tyrosine. Fundam Appi Toxicol 16:495-505 Ahlers ST, Thomas JR, Berkey DL

  9. Adhesion-Linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0496 TITLE: Adhesion-linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL...Adhesion-linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, DAMD17-03-1-0496 Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression 6. AUTHOR(S) Valerie M. Weaver, Ph.D. 7...we identified the Band 4.1 PTPs MEG1 and D1 as two candidate PTP metastasis suppressors. Our studies show that during MEC differentiation PTP MEG1

  10. Identification and Targeting of Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Initiation, Progression, and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Initiation, Progression, and Metastasis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Justin Drake CONTRACTING...PROJECT NUMBER Justin Drake and Owen Witte 5e. TASK NUMBER Email: jdrake@mednet.ucla.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...of tyrosine kinase networks during prostate cancer progression Justin M. Drakea, Nicholas A. Grahamb,c, Tanya Stoyanovaa, Amir Sedghia, Andrew S

  11. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  12. Altered localization and cytoplasmic domain-binding properties of tyrosine-phosphorylated beta 1 integrin

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to study tyrosine-phosphorylated (PY) integrins in cells transformed by virally encoded tyrosine kinases. We have synthesized a peptide (PY beta 1 peptide) that represents a portion of the cytoplasmic domain of the beta 1 integrin subunit and is phosphorylated on the tyrosine residue known to be the target of oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Antibodies prepared against the PY beta 1 peptide, after removal of cross-reacting antibodies by absorption and affinity purification, recognized the PY beta 1 peptide and the tyrosine-phosphorylated form of the intact beta 1 subunit, but did not bind the nonphosphorylated beta 1 peptide, the nonphosphorylated beta 1 subunit or other unrelated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. The anti- PY beta 1 antibodies labeled the podosomes of Rous sarcoma virus- transformed fibroblasts, but did not detectably stain nontransformed fibroblasts. The localization of the tyrosine phosphorylated beta 1 subunits appeared distinct from that of the beta 1 subunit. Adhesion plaques were stained by the anti-beta 1 subunit antibodies in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed fibroblasts plated on fibronectin, whereas neither podosomes nor adhesion plaques were labeled on vitronectin or on uncoated plates. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies labeled podosomes, adhesion plaques and cell-cell boundaries regardless of the substratum. One of the SH2 domains of the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3- kinase bound to the PY beta 1 peptide, but not to the non- phosphorylated beta 1 cytoplasmic peptide. Other SH2 domains did not bind to the PY beta 1 peptide. These results show that the phosphorylated form of the beta 1 integrin subunit is detected in a different subcellular localization than the nonphosphorylated form and suggest that the phosphorylation on tyrosine of the beta 1 subunit cytoplasmic domain may affect cellular signaling pathways. PMID:7520449

  13. Effects of tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sheremet, Ya A; Yemets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J P; Blume, Ya B

    2012-01-01

    To test whether reversible tubulin phosphorylation plays any role in the process of plant mitosis the effects of inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, herbimycin A, genistein and tyrphostin AG 18, and of an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, sodium orthovanadate, on microtubule organization and mitosis progression in a synchronized BY-2 culture has been investigated. It was found that treatment with inhibitors of tyrosine kinases of BY-2 cells at the G2/M transition did not lead to visible disturbances of mitotic microtubule structures, while it did reduce the frequency of their appearance. We assume that a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation level could alter the microtubule dynamic instability parameters during interphase/prophase transition. All types of tyrosine kinase inhibitors used caused a prophase delay: herbimycin A and genistein for 2 h, and tyrphostin AG18 for 1 h. Thereafter the peak of mitosis was displaced for 1 h by herbimycin A or genistein exposure, but after tyrphostin AG18 treatment the timing of the mitosis-peak was comparable to that in control cells. Enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation induced by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor resulted in the opposite effect on BY-2 mitosis transition. Culture treatment with sodium orthovanadate during 1 h resulted in an accelerated start of the prophase and did not lead to the alteration in time of the mitotic index peak formation, as compared to control cells. We suppose that the reversible tyrosine phosphorylation can be involved in the regulation of interphase to M phase transition possibly through regulation of microtubule dynamics in plant cells.

  14. [Transport of phenylalanine and tyrosine in Brevibacterium linens: specificity and incorporation into proteins].

    PubMed

    Boyaval, P; Moreira, E; Desmazeaud, M J

    1984-04-01

    The specificity of phenylalanine and tyrosine carriers was investigated using actively metabolizing cells of Brevibacterium linens. The cellular protein synthesis of resting cells was very weakly inhibited, even with high concentrations of chloramphenicol or tetracycline. The nonaromatic amino acids were weak inhibitors for these carriers, while fluorinate analogues of phenylalanine and tyrosine were very potent competitive inhibitors. In practice these analogues cannot be used to replace amino acids to evaluate transport without incorporation because they are incorporated in cellular proteins.

  15. Pyomelanin production in Penicillium chrysogenum is stimulated by L-tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Vasanthakumar, Archana; DeAraujo, Alice; Mazurek, Joy; Schilling, Michael; Mitchell, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    From a tomb in Upper Egypt we isolated a strain of Penicillium chrysogenum that was capable of producing brown pigment in vitro when grown in a minimal salts medium containing tyrosine. We present evidence that this pigment is a pyomelanin, a compound that is known to assist in the survival of some micro-organisms in adverse environments. We tested type strains of Pe. chrysogenum, which were also able to produce this pigment under similar conditions. Inhibitors of the DHN and DOPA melanin pathways were unable to inhibit the formation of the pigment. Fourier transform IR analysis indicated that this brown pigment is similar to pyomelanin. Pyrolysis-GC/MS revealed the presence of phenolic compounds. Using LC/MS, homogentisic acid, the monomeric precursor of pyomelanin, was detected in supernatants of Pe. chrysogenum cultures growing in tyrosine medium but not in cultures lacking tyrosine. Partial regions of the genes encoding two enzymes in the homogentisic acid pathway of tyrosine degradation were amplified. Data from reverse-transcription PCR demonstrated that hmgA transcription was increased in cultures grown in tyrosine medium, suggesting that tyrosine induced the transcription.

  16. Verbascoside promotes the regeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian-qing; Wang, Li; He, Jian-cheng; Hua, Xian-dong

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase is a key enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis. Change in tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the nigrostriatal system is closely related to the occurrence and development of Parkinson's disease. Verbascoside, an extract from Radix Rehmanniae Praeparata has been shown to be clinically effective in treating Parkinson's disease. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. It is hypothesized that the effects of verbascoside on Parkinson's disease are related to tyrosine hydroxylase expression change in the nigrostriatal system. Rat models of Parkinson's disease were established and verbascoside (60 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally once a day. After 6 weeks of verbascoside treatment, rat rotational behavior was alleviated; tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein expression and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the rat right substantia nigra were significantly higher than the Parkinson's model group. These findings suggest that the mechanism by which verbascoside treats Parkinson's disease is related to the regeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra. PMID:26981096

  17. Phosphorylation of phosphatase inhibitor-2 (i-2) by a bovine thymus tyrosine protein kinase, p40

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli-Roach, A.A.; Votaw, P.; Zioncheck, T.F.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Phosphatase inhibitor-2, a heat stable protein of Mr 22,800, is a regulatory component of the ATP-Mg-dependent phosphatase. It has been shown that in the cell tyrosine kinase activation can result in altered phosphorylation at serine and/or threonine residues, but the mechanism involved is unknown. The authors have found that i-2 is a substrate for a tyrosine specific protein kinase, p40, purified from bovine thymus. The purified enzyme is a monomer of Mr 40,000 that is autophosphorylated at tyrosine residue(s). The stoichiometry of phosphorylation of i-2 by this tyrosine protein kinase is up to 1 mol of phosphate per mol of i-2. Phosphoaminoacid analysis revealed that all the phosphate introduced was associated with tyrosine residues. Mapping of TSP-tryptic peptides by TLE and isoelectric focusing showed one major labeled fragment. Using the ATP-Mg-dependent phosphatase, a lesser extent of phosphorylation of i-2 by p40 was obtained although partial activation of the phosphatase was observed. The effect on the activity was not due to FA/GSK-3 contamination. These results could provide an important link between tyrosine protein kinase activity and modulation of phosphorylation at serine and/or threonine residues.

  18. Tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin inhibits tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Teraoka, K.; Azuma, M.; Oka, M.; Hamano, S. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of the tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin on both the secretion of endogenous catecholamines and the formation of 14C-catecholamines from (14C)tyrosine were examined using cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Palytoxin was shown to cause the stimulation of catecholamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. However, this toxin caused the reduction rather than the stimulation of 14C-catecholamine formation at the same concentrations. Palytoxin failed to cause any alteration in the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. Furthermore, the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells was shown to be inhibited by this toxin under the conditions in which the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation was observed, and this inhibitory action on tyrosine uptake was closely correlated with that on catecholamine formation. The inhibitory action of palytoxin on tyrosine uptake into the cells was observed to be noncompetitive, and this effect was not altered by the removal of Na+ from the incubation mixture. These results suggest that palytoxin may be able to inhibit the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells, resulting in the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation, probably through its direct action on the plasma membranes of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

  19. TrkA receptor ectodomain cleavage generates a tyrosine-phosphorylated cell-associated fragment

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The extracellular domain of several membrane-anchored proteins can be released as a soluble fragment by the action of a cell surface endoproteolytic system. This cleavage results in the generation of a soluble and a cell-bound fragment. In the case of proteins with signaling capability, such as tyrosine kinase receptors, the cleavage process may have an effect on the kinase activity of the cell-bound receptor fragment. By using several cell lines that express the TrkA neurotrophin receptor, we show that this receptor tyrosine kinase is cleaved by a proteolytic system that mimics the one that acts at the cell surface. TrkA cleavage is regulated by protein kinase C and several receptor agonists (including the TrkA ligand NGF), occurs at the ectodomain in a membrane-proximal region, and is independent of lysosomal function. TrkA cleavage results in the generation of a cell- associated fragment that is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Tyrosine phosphorylation of this fragment is not detected in TrkA mutants devoid of kinase activity, suggesting that phosphorylation requires an intact TrkA kinase domain, and is not due to activation of an intermediate intracellular tyrosine kinase. The increased phosphotyrosine content of the cell-bound fragment may thus reflect higher catalytic activity of the truncated fragment. We postulate that cleavage of receptor tyrosine kinases by this naturally occurring cellular mechanism may represent an additional mean for the regulation of receptor activity. PMID:8636219

  20. Site selectivity for protein tyrosine nitration: insights from features of structure and topological network.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shangli; Lian, Baofeng; Liang, Juan; Shi, Ting; Xie, Lu; Zhao, Yi-Lei

    2013-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration is a covalent post-translational modification, which regulates protein functions such as hindering tyrosine phosphorylation and affecting essential signal transductions in cells. Based on up-to-date proteomics data, tyrosine nitration appears to be a highly selective process since not all tyrosine residues in proteins or all proteins are nitrated in vivo. Quite a few investigations included the protein structural information from the RCSB PDB database, where near 100,000 high-quality three-dimensional structures are available. In this work, we analyzed the local protein structures and amino acid topological networks of the nitrated and non-nitrated tyrosine sites in nitrated proteins, including neighboring atomic distribution, amino acid pair (AAP) and amino acid triangle (AAT). It has been found that aromatic and aliphatic residues, particularly with large volume, aromatic, aliphatic, or acidic side chains, are disfavored for the nitration. After integrating these structural features and topological network features with traditional sequence features, the predictive model achieves a sensitivity of 63.30% and a specificity of 92.24%, resulting in a much better accuracy compared to the previous models with only protein sequence information. Our investigation implies that the site selectivity may stem from a more open, hydrophilic and high-pH chemical environment around the tyrosine residue.

  1. Drug-drug interactions with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Roelof W F; van Gelder, Teun; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Jansman, Frank G A

    2014-07-01

    In the past decade, many tyrosine-kinase inhibitors have been introduced in oncology and haemato-oncology. Because this new class of drugs is extensively used, serious drug-drug interactions are an increasing risk. In this Review, we give a comprehensive overview of known or suspected drug-drug interactions between tyrosine-kinase inhibitors and other drugs. We discuss all haemato-oncological and oncological tyrosine-kinase inhibitors that had been approved by Aug 1, 2013, by the US Food and Drug Administration or the European Medicines Agency. Various clinically relevant drug interactions with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors have been identified. Most interactions concern altered bioavailability due to altered stomach pH, metabolism by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, and prolongation of the QTc interval. To guarantee the safe use of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, a drugs review for each patient is needed. This Review provides specific recommendations to guide haemato-oncologists, oncologists, and clinical pharmacists, through the process of managing drug-drug interactions during treatment with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in daily clinical practice.

  2. Effects of excess dietary tyrosine or certain xenobiotics on the cholesterogenesis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, S.; Masaki, H.; Aoyama, Y.; Yoshida, A.

    1986-05-01

    Comparison of the effects of excess dietary tyrosine, DDT, chlorobutanol (Chloretone) or butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) on serum cholesterol, hepatic activities of the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis,3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and in vivo rates of the hepatic cholesterol synthesis measured by /sup 3/H/sub 2/O incorporation were investigated in rats. Serum cholesterol concentration was significantly higher in rats fed the DDT, chlorobutanol, BHA or excess tyrosine diets than in rats fed the control diet for 7 days. Serum cholesterol concentration remained higher compared to control rats when excess tyrosine was fed for 21 d. When rats were fed a basal diet after feeding a tyrosine excess diet for 2 wk, liver weight and serum cholesterol level returned to normal within 7 d. The incorporation of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O into liver cholesterol and the activity of liver 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase were greater in rats fed excess tyrosine or certain xenobiotics than in control rats. Present results suggested that the increase in serum cholesterol concentration due to excess dietary tyrosine or certain xenobiotics is mainly attributable to the stimulation of liver cholesterol synthesis.

  3. Src Tyrosine Kinase Alters Gating of Hyperpolarization-Activated HCN4 Pacemaker Channel through Tyr531

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S. Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2009-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance the HCN4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, PP2, on HCN4 and its mutant channels ex pressed in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole-cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr531 and Tyr554. Substituting HCN4-Tyr531 with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr554 by phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation, but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole-cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr531. PMID:17977941

  4. Tyrosine phosphatase activity in mitochondria: presence of Shp-2 phosphatase in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Stringaro, A; Brunati, A M; Agostinelli, E; Arancia, G; Clari, G; Toninello, A

    2004-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation by unidentified enzymes has been observed in mitochondria, with recent evidence indicating that non-receptorial tyrosine kinases belonging to the Src family, which represent key players in several transduction pathways, are constitutively present in mitochondria. The extent of protein phosphorylation reflects a coordination balance between the activities of specific kinases and phophatases. The present study demonstrates that purified rat brain mitochondria possess endogenous tyrosine phosphatase activity. Mitochondrial phosphatases were found to be capable of dephosphorylating different exogenous substrates, including paranitrophenylphosphate, (32)P-poly(Glu-Tyr)(4:1) and (32)P-angiotensin. These activities are strongly inhibited by peroxovanadate, a well-known inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by inhibitors of alkali or Ser/Thr phosphatases, and mainly take place in the intermembrane space and outer mitochondrial membrane. Using a combination of approaches, we identified the tyrosine phosphatase Shp-2 in mitochondria. Shp-2 plays a crucial role in a number of intracellular signalling cascades and is probably involved in several human diseases. It thus represents the first tyrosine phosphatase shown to be present in mitochondria.

  5. Effect of tyrosine administration on duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, T.; Szabo, S.

    1987-03-01

    Duodenal ulcers were produced by administering cysteamine to rats. Pretreatment with the catecholamine precursor, L-tyrosine (40 mg/100 g i.p. for 5 days), decreased the intensity of duodenal ulcers induced by cysteamine. Equimolar doses of tyrosine methyl ester (51.2 mg/100 g i.p. or s.c.) were equally effective in reducing ulcer intensity. Other amino acids (i.e., alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, leucine, lysine, tryptophan and valine) did not prevent experimental duodenal ulcers. Coadministration of other large neutral amino acids (e.g., leucine and valine) that compete with tyrosine for uptake into the brain did not inhibit the effect of tyrosine on duodenal ulcers induced by cysteamine. Gastric, duodenal and brain dopamine concentrations were increased 1 hr after the injection of tyrosine methyl ester (25.6 mg/100 g s.c.). These results suggest that the effect of tyrosine on duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine may be mediated by changes in gastrointestinal dopamine metabolism.

  6. PTB domain-directed substrate targeting in a tyrosine kinase from the unicellular choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Echagüe, Victoria; Chan, Perry M; Craddock, Barbara P; Manser, Edward; Miller, W Todd

    2011-04-26

    Choanoflagellates are considered to be the closest living unicellular relatives of metazoans. The genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis contains a surprisingly high number and diversity of tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphatases, and phosphotyrosine-binding domains. Many of the tyrosine kinases possess combinations of domains that have not been observed in any multicellular organism. The role of these protein interaction domains in M. brevicollis kinase signaling is not clear. Here, we have carried out a biochemical characterization of Monosiga HMTK1, a protein containing a putative PTB domain linked to a tyrosine kinase catalytic domain. We cloned, expressed, and purified HMTK1, and we demonstrated that it possesses tyrosine kinase activity. We used immobilized peptide arrays to define a preferred ligand for the third PTB domain of HMTK1. Peptide sequences containing this ligand sequence are phosphorylated efficiently by recombinant HMTK1, suggesting that the PTB domain of HMTK1 has a role in substrate recognition analogous to the SH2 and SH3 domains of mammalian Src family kinases. We suggest that the substrate recruitment function of the noncatalytic domains of tyrosine kinases arose before their roles in autoinhibition.

  7. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Tim; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel is activated by PKA phosphorylation of a regulatory domain that interacts dynamically with multiple CFTR domains and with other proteins. The large number of consensus sequences for phosphorylation by PKA has naturally focused most attention on regulation by this kinase. We report here that human CFTR is also phosphorylated by the tyrosine kinases p60c-Src (proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase) and the proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and they can also cause robust activation of quiescent CFTR channels. In excised patch-clamp experiments, CFTR activity during exposure to Src or Pyk2 reached ∼80% of that stimulated by PKA. Exposure to PKA after Src or Pyk2 caused a further increase to the level induced by PKA alone, implying a common limiting step. Channels became spontaneously active when v-Src or the catalytic domain of Pyk2 was coexpressed with CFTR and were further stimulated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor dephostatin. Exogenous Src also activated 15SA-CFTR, a variant that lacks 15 potential PKA sites and has little response to PKA. PKA-independent activation by tyrosine phosphorylation has implications for the mechanism of regulation by the R domain and for the physiologic functions of CFTR.—Billet, A., Jia, Y., Jensen, T., Riordan, J. R., Hanrahan, J. W. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:26062600

  8. The insulin receptor juxtamembrane region contains two independent tyrosine/beta-turn internalization signals

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the role of tyrosine residues in the insulin receptor cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region (Tyr953 and Tyr960) during endocytosis. Analysis of the secondary structure of the juxtamembrane region by the Chou-Fasman algorithms predicts that both the sequences GPLY953 and NPEY960 form tyrosine-containing beta-turns. Similarly, analysis of model peptides by 1-D and 2-D NMR show that these sequences form beta-turns in solution, whereas replacement of the tyrosine residues with alanine destabilizes the beta-turn. CHO cell lines were prepared expressing mutant receptors in which each tyrosine was mutated to phenylalanine or alanine, and an additional mutant contained alanine at both positions. These mutations had no effect on insulin binding or receptor autophosphorylation. Replacements with phenylalanine had no effect on the rate of [125I]insulin endocytosis, whereas single substitutions with alanine reduced [125I]insulin endocytosis by 40-50%. Replacement of both tyrosines with alanine reduced internalization by 70%. These data suggest that the insulin receptor contains two tyrosine/beta-turns which contribute independently and additively to insulin-stimulated endocytosis. PMID:1500426

  9. An experimental and computational investigation into the gas-phase acidities of tyrosine and phenylalanine: three structures for deprotonated tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Bokatzian, Samantha S; Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2014-11-06

    Using mass spectrometry and correlated molecular orbital theory, three deprotonated structures were revealed for the amino acid tyrosine. The structures were distinguished experimentally by ion/molecule reactions involving proton transfer and trimethylsilyl azide. Gas-phase acidities from proton transfer reactions and from G3(MP2) calculations generally agree well. The lowest energy structure, which was only observed experimentally using electrospray ionization from aprotic solvents, is deprotonated at the carboxylic acid group and is predicted to be highly folded. A second unfolded carboxylate structure is several kcal/mol higher in energy and primarily forms from protic solvents. Protic solvents also yield a structure deprotonated at the phenolic side chain, which experiments find to be intermediate in energy to the two carboxylate forms. G3(MP2) calculations indicate that the three structures differ in energy by only 2.5 kcal/mol, yet they are readily distinguished experimentally. Structural abundance ratios are dependent upon experimental conditions, including the solvent and accumulation time of ions in a hexapole. Under some conditions, carboxylate ions may convert to phenolate ions. For phenylalanine, which lacks a phenolic group, only one deprotonated structure was observed experimentally when electrosprayed from protic solvent. This agrees with G3(MP2) calculations that find the folded and unfolded carboxylate forms to differ by 0.3 kcal/mol.

  10. An Experimental and Computational Investigation into the Gas-Phase Acidities of Tyrosine and Phenylalanine: Three Structures for Deprotonated Tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Bokatzian, Samantha S.; Stover, Michele L.; Plummer, Chelsea E.; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-06

    Using mass spectrometry and correlated molecular orbital theory, three deprotonated structures were revealed for the amino acid tyrosine. The structures were distinguished experimentally by ion/molecule reactions involving proton transfer and trimethylsilyl azide. Gas-phase acidities from proton transfer reactions and from G3(MP2) calculations generally agree well. The lowest energy structure, which was only observed experimentally using electrospray ionization from aprotic solvents, is deprotonated at the carboxylic acid group and is predicted to be highly folded. A second unfolded carboxylate structure is several kcal/mol higher in energy and primarily forms from protic solvents. Protic solvents also yield a structure deprotonated at the phenolic side chain, which experiments find to be intermediate in energy to the two carboxylate forms. G3(MP2) calculations indicate that the three structures differ in energy by only 2.5 kcal/mol, yet they are readily distinguished experimentally. Structural abundance ratios are dependent upon experimental conditions, including the solvent and accumulation time of ions in a hexapole. Under some conditions, carboxylate ions may convert to phenolate ions. For phenylalanine, which lacks a phenolic group, only one deprotonated structure was observed experimentally when electrosprayed from protic solvent. This agrees with G3(MP2) calculations that find the folded and unfolded carboxylate forms to differ by 0.3 kcal/mol.

  11. Effective L-Tyrosine Hydroxylation by Native and Immobilized Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Lewańczuk, Marcin; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Liesiene, Jolanta; Bryjak, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) by immobilized tyrosinase in the presence of ascorbic acid (AH2), which reduces DOPA-quinone to L-DOPA, is characterized by low reaction yields that are mainly caused by the suicide inactivation of tyrosinase by L-DOPA and AH2. The main aim of this work was to compare processes with native and immobilized tyrosinase to identify the conditions that limit suicide inactivation and produce substrate conversions to L-DOPA of above 50% using HPLC analysis. It was shown that immobilized tyrosinase does not suffer from partitioning and diffusion effects, allowing a direct comparison of the reactions performed with both forms of the enzyme. In typical processes, additional aeration was applied and boron ions to produce the L-DOPA and AH2 complex and hydroxylamine to close the cycle of enzyme active center transformations. It was shown that the commonly used pH 9 buffer increased enzyme stability, with concomitant reduced reactivity of 76%, and that under these conditions, the maximal substrate conversion was approximately 25 (native) to 30% (immobilized enzyme). To increase reaction yield, the pH of the reaction mixture was reduced to 8 and 7, producing L-DOPA yields of approximately 95% (native enzyme) and 70% (immobilized). A three-fold increase in the bound enzyme load achieved 95% conversion in two successive runs, but in the third one, tyrosinase lost its activity due to strong suicide inactivation caused by L-DOPA processing. In this case, the cost of the immobilized enzyme preparation is not overcome by its reuse over time, and native tyrosinase may be more economically feasible for a single use in L-DOPA production. The practical importance of the obtained results is that highly efficient hydroxylation of monophenols by tyrosinase can be obtained by selecting the proper reaction pH and is a compromise between complexation and enzyme reactivity. PMID:27711193

  12. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  13. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  14. Laser Desorption Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy of Hydrated Tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Hikari; Shimozono, Yoko; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Carcabal, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    The structure of tyrosine (tyr) consists of amino-acid chain and phenol, and it has roughly two possible binding sites for water, amino-acid site and phenolic OH site. Investigating how water molecule binds to tyr will give fundamental information for hydrations of peptide and protein. Resonance enhanced multi photon ionization (REMPI) spectrum of tyr-water 1:1 cluster has already been reported by de Vries and co-workers, however, no analysis on the hydrated structures has been reported. In the REMPI spectrum, two clusters of bands are observed; one appears at ˜35600 cm^{-1} energy region which is the almost same with 0-0 transitions of tyr monomer, and another is observed at ˜300 cm^{-1} lower than the former. Based on the electronic transition energy of phenylalanine and the hydrated clusters, the former is expected to be derived from a structure that water binds to amino acid site. On the other hand, it is plausibly predicted that the latter originates from a structure that water binds to phenolic OH group, because the electronic transition of mono hydrated phenol is ˜300 cm^{-1} red-shifted from the monomer. We applied IR dip spectroscopy which can measure conformer selective IR spectra to the tyr-(H_{2}O)_{1} clusters by using laser desorption supersonic jet technique to confirm the assignments. Especially in the phenolic OH bound isomer, it was found that the intra molecular hydrogen bond within amino-acid chain, which is far from the water molecule and cannot interact directly with each other, is strengthened by the hydration. A. Abio-Riziq et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6077 (2011). Y. Shimozono, et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., (2013) DOI: 10.1039/c3cp43573c. T. Ebata et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 4783 (2006). T. Watanabe et al., J. Chem. Phys., 105, 408 (1996).

  15. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Type II Cochlear Afferents in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pankhuri; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; Zimmerman, Amanda; Fuchs, Paul; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase. The present study was designed to determine whether TH-driven Cre recombinase (TH-2A-CreER) provides a selective and reliable tool for identification and genetic manipulation of type II rather than type I cochlear afferents. The "TH-2A-CreER neurons" radiated from the spiral lamina, crossed the tunnel of Corti, turned towards the base of the cochlea, and traveled beneath the rows of outer hair cells. Neither the processes nor the somata of TH-2A-CreER neurons were labeled by antibodies that specifically labeled type I afferents and medial efferents. TH-2A-CreER-positive processes partially co-labeled with antibodies to peripherin, a known marker of type II afferents. Individual TH-2A-CreER neurons gave off short branches contacting 7-25 outer hair cells (OHCs). Only a fraction of TH-2A-CreER boutons were associated with CtBP2-immunopositive ribbons. These results show that TH-2A-CreER provides a selective marker for type II versus type I afferents and can be used to describe the morphology and arborization pattern of type II cochlear afferents in the mouse cochlea.

  16. Cardiotoxicity Associated with the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tammy F.; Rupnick, Maria A.; Kerkela, Risto; Dallabrida, Susan M.; Zurakowski, David; Nguyen, Lisa; Woulfe, Kathleen; Pravda, Elke; Cassiola, Flavia; Desai, Jayesh; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Harris, David; Ismail, Nesreen S.; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Schoen, Frederick J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have advanced cancer treatment. Sunitinib, a recently-approved, multi-targeted TKI, prolongs survival for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), but concerns about cardiac safety have arisen with this agent. Methods To determine the cardiovascular risk associated with sunitinib, we reviewed all cardiovascular events in patients with imatinib-resistant, metastatic GIST at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute enrolled in a Phase I/II protocol evaluating the efficacy of the drug (n=75). Sunitinib’s effects on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and blood pressure (BP) were also examined. Studies in isolated cardiomyocytes and mice investigated potential mechanisms of sunitinib-associated cardiac effects. Findings Eleven percent (8/75) of subjects suffered a cardiovascular event with congestive heart failure (CHF) occurring in 8% (6/75) of the population. Twenty-eight percent (10/36) of patients treated at the FDA-approved dose had LVEF declines of ≥ 10 EF%, and nineteen percent (7/36) experienced LVEF declines of ≥ 15 EF%. Sunitinib induced significant increases in mean systolic and diastolic BP in patients, and 47% (35/75) of individuals developed hypertension (HTN) (>150/100 mmHg). CHF and LV dysfunction generally responded to withholding drug and instituting medical management. In mice and cultured cardiomyocytes, sunitinib caused mitochondrial injury and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Interpretation Sunitinib treatment can lead to HTN, LVEF decline, and/or CHF. Experimental studies suggest that this is due, at least in part, to direct cardiomyocyte toxicity which may be exacerbated by HTN. Patients treated with sunitinib should receive close monitoring and prompt treatment for HTN and/or LVEF decline. PMID:18083403

  17. Tyrosine aminotransferase contributes to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Facchini, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TyrAT) catalyzes the transamination of L-Tyr and α-ketoglutarate, yielding 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid and L-glutamate. The decarboxylation product of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, is a precursor to a large and diverse group of natural products known collectively as benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). We have isolated and characterized a TyrAT cDNA from opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), which remains the only commercial source for several pharmaceutical BIAs, including codeine, morphine, and noscapine. TyrAT belongs to group I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes wherein Schiff base formation occurs between PLP and a specific Lys residue. The amino acid sequence of TyrAT showed considerable homology to other putative plant TyrATs, although few of these have been functionally characterized. Purified, recombinant TyrAT displayed a molecular mass of approximately 46 kD and a substrate preference for L-Tyr and α-ketoglutarate, with apparent K(m) values of 1.82 and 0.35 mm, respectively. No specific requirement for PLP was detected in vitro. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirmed the conversion of L-Tyr to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. TyrAT gene transcripts were most abundant in roots and stems of mature opium poppy plants. Virus-induced gene silencing was used to evaluate the contribution of TyrAT to BIA metabolism in opium poppy. TyrAT transcript levels were reduced by at least 80% in silenced plants compared with controls and showed a moderate reduction in total alkaloid content. The modest correlation between transcript levels and BIA accumulation in opium poppy supports a role for TyrAT in the generation of alkaloid precursors, but it also suggests the occurrence of other sources for 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde.

  18. Mefloquine neurotoxicity is mediated by non-receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Milatovic, Dejan; Jenkins, Jerry W; Hood, Jonathan E; Yu, Yingchun; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Among several available antimalarial drugs, mefloquine has proven to be effective against drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and remains the drug of choice for both therapy and chemoprophylaxis. However, mefloquine is known to cause adverse neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms, which offset its therapeutic advantage. The exact mechanisms leading to the adverse neurological effects of mefloquine are poorly defined. Alterations in neurotransmitter release and calcium homeostasis, the inhibition of cholinesterases and the interaction with adenosine A(2A) receptors have been hypothesized to play prominent roles in mediating the deleterious effects of this drug. Our recent data have established that mefloquine can also trigger oxidative damage and subsequent neurodegeneration in rat cortical primary neurons. Furthermore, we have utilized a system biology-centered approach and have constructed a pathway model of cellular responses to mefloquine, identifying non-receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) as a critical target in mediating mefloquine neurotoxicity. In this study, we sought to establish an experimental validation of Pyk2 using gene-silencing techniques (siRNA). We have examined whether the downregulation of Pyk2 in primary rat cortical neurons alters mefloquine neurotoxicity by evaluating cell viability, apoptosis and oxidative stress. Results from our study have confirmed that mefloquine neurotoxicity is associated with apoptotic response and oxidative injury, and we have demonstrated that mefloquine affects primary rat cortical neurons, at least in part, via Pyk2. The implication of these findings may prove beneficial in suppressing the neurological side effects of mefloquine and developing effective therapeutic modalities to offset its adverse effects.

  19. DISCOIDIN DOMAIN RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES: NEW PLAYERS IN CANCER PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Valiathan, Rajeshwari R.; Marco, Marta; Leitinger, Birgit; Kleer, Celina G.; Fridman, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Almost all human cancers display dysregulated expression and/or function of one or more receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). The strong causative association between altered RTK function and cancer progression has translated into novel therapeutic strategies that target these cell surface receptors in the treatment of cancer. Yet, the full spectrum of RTKs that may alter the oncogenic process is not completely understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that a unique set of RTKs known as the Discoidin Domain Receptors (DDRs) play a role in cancer progression by regulating the interactions of tumor cells with their surrounding collagen matrix. The DDRs are the only RTKs that specifically bind to, and are activated by collagen. Hence, the DDRs are part of the signaling networks that translate information from the extracellular matrix thereby acting as key regulators of cell-matrix interactions. Under physiological conditions, DDRs control cell and tissue homeostasis by acting as collagen sensors, transducing signals that regulate cell polarity, tissue morphogenesis, and cell differentiation. In cancer, DDRs are hijacked by tumor cells to disrupt normal cell-matrix communication and initiate pro-migratory and pro-invasive programs. Importantly, several cancer types exhibit DDR mutations, which are thought to alter receptor function and contribute to cancer progression. Other evidence suggests that the actions of DDRs in cancer are complex, either promoting or suppressing tumor cell behavior in a DDR type/isoform specific and context dependent manner. Thus, there is still a considerable gap in our knowledge of DDR actions in cancer tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on DDR expression and function in cancer and discusses the potential implications of DDRs in cancer biology. It is hoped that this effort will encourage more research into these poorly understood but unique RTKs, which have the potential of becoming novel therapeutics targets in cancer. PMID

  20. Association of the tyrosine phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor with a 55-kD tyrosine phosphorylated protein at the cell surface and in endosomes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    After the intraportal injection of EGF, the EGF receptor (EGFR) is rapidly internalized into hepatic endosomes where it remains largely receptor bound (Lai et al., 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2751-2760). In the present study, we evaluated the phosphotyrosine content of EGFRs at the cell surface and in endosomes in order to assess the consequences of internalization. Quantitative estimates of specific radioactivity of the EGFR in these two compartments revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR was observed at the cell surface within 30 s of ligand administration. However, the EGFR was also highly phosphorylated in endosomes reaching levels of tyrosine phosphorylation significantly higher than those of the cell surface receptor at 5 and 15 min after EGF injection. A 55-kD tyrosine phosphorylated polypeptide (pyp55) was observed in association with the EGFR at the cell surface within 30 s of EGF injection. The protein was also found in association with the EGFR in endosomes as evidenced by coprecipitation studies using a mAb to the EGFR as well as by coelution with the EGR in gel permeation chromatography. Limited proteolysis of isolated endosomes indicated that the tyrosine phosphorylated domains of the EGFR and associated pyp55 were cytosolically oriented while internalized EGF was intraluminal. The identification of pyp55 in association with EGFR in both hepatic plasma membranes and endosomes may be relevant to EGFR function and/or trafficking of the EGFR. PMID:1370492

  1. Human glioblastoma ADF cells express tyrosinase, L-tyrosine hydroxylase and melanosomes and are sensitive to L-tyrosine and phenylthiourea.

    PubMed

    Bonfigli, Antonella; Zarivi, Osvaldo; Colafarina, Sabrina; Cimini, Anna Maria; Ragnelli, Anna Maria; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Cerù, Maria Paola; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Miranda, Michele

    2006-06-01

    Melanocytes and neuroblasts share the property of transforming L-tyrosine through two distinct metabolic pathways leading to melanogenesis and catecholamine synthesis, respectively. While tyrosinase (TYR) activity has been shown to be expressed by neuroblastoma it remains to be established as to whether also glioblastomas cells are endowed with this property. We have addressed this issue using the human continuous glioblastoma cell line ADF. We demonstrated that these cells possess tyrosinase as well as L-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and synthesize melanosomes. Because the two pathways are potentially cyto-genotoxic due to production of quinones, semiquinones, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), we have also investigated the expression of the peroxisomal proliferators activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and nuclear factor-kB (NFkB) transcription factor as well the effect of L-tyrosine concentration on cell survival. We report that L-tyrosine down-regulates PPARalpha expression in ADF cells but not neuroblastoma and that this aminoacid and phenylthiourea (PTU) induces apoptosis in glioblastoma and neuroblastoma.

  2. Substrate recognition by the Lyn protein-tyrosine kinase. NMR structure of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling region of the B cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Gaul, B S; Harrison, M L; Geahlen, R L; Burton, R A; Post, C B

    2000-05-26

    The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) plays a central role in transmembrane signal transduction in hematopoietic cells by mediating responses leading to proliferation and differentiation. An initial signaling event following activation of the B cell antigen receptor is phosphorylation of the CD79a (Ig-alpha) ITAM by Lyn, a Src family protein-tyrosine kinase. To elucidate the structural basis for recognition between the ITAM substrate and activated Lyn kinase, the structure of an ITAM-derived peptide bound to Lyn was determined using exchange-transferred nuclear Overhauser NMR spectroscopy. The bound substrate structure has an irregular helix-like character. Docking based on the NMR data into the active site of the closely related Lck kinase strongly favors ITAM binding in an orientation similar to binding of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase rather than that of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. The model of the complex provides a rationale for conserved ITAM residues, substrate specificity, and suggests that substrate binds only the active conformation of the Src family tyrosine kinase, unlike the ATP cofactor, which can bind the inactive form.

  3. State-by-state investigation of destructive interference in resonance Raman spectra of neutral tyrosine and the tyrosinate anion with the simplified sum-over-states approach.

    PubMed

    Cabalo, Jerry B; Saikin, Semion K; Emmons, Erik D; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-16

    UV resonance Raman scattering is uniquely sensitive to the molecular electronic structure as well as intermolecular interactions. To better understand the relationship between electronic structure and resonance Raman cross section, we carried out combined experimental and theoretical studies of neutral tyrosine and the tyrosinate anion. We studied the Raman cross sections of four vibrational modes as a function of excitation wavelength, and we analyzed them in terms of the contributions of the individual electronic states as well as of the Albrecht A and B terms. Our model, which is based on time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), reproduced the experimental resonance Raman spectra and Raman excitation profiles for both studied molecules with good agreement. We found that for the studied modes, the contributions of Albrecht's B terms in the Raman cross sections were important across the frequency range spanning the L(a,b) and B(a,b) electronic excitations in tyrosine and the tyrosinate anion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interference with high-energy states had a significant impact and could not be neglected even when in resonance with a lower-energy state. The symmetry of the vibrational modes served as an indicator of the dominance of the A or B mechanisms. Excitation profiles calculated with a damping constant estimated from line widths of the electronic absorption bands had the best consistency with experimental results.

  4. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatases and dual-specificity phosphatases in mammalian spermatozoa and their role in sperm motility and protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Macias-Garcia, B; Salido, G M; Peña, F J; Tapia, J A

    2009-06-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases have important roles in spermatozoa; however, little is known about the presence and regulation in these cells of their counterparts in signaling, namely, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs). The objectives of the present study were to identify PTPs and DSPs in boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa; to characterize their subcellular distribution; and to investigate the roles of tyrosine phosphatases in maintenance of protein tyrosine phosphorylation level and in sperm motility. Using Western blotting with specific antibodies in boar and stallion sperm lysates, we unequivocally identified two PTPs (PTPRB and PTPN11) and two DSPs (DUSP3 and DUSP4). In dog sperm lysates, only PTPN11, DUSP3, and DUSP4 were detected. In all these species, we did not detect the specific signal with anti-PTPRC (CD45), CDKN3, DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP6, DUSP9, PTPN1, PTPN3, PTPN6, PTPN7, PTPN13, PTPRA, PTPRG, PTPRJ, PTPRK, or PTPRZ antibodies. Positive matches were further investigated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results showed that PTPRB was associated with the plasma membrane in the head and tail of boar and stallion spermatozoa. In agreement with Western blotting results, PTPRB antibodies did not show immunoreactivity in dog sperm analyzed by immunofluorescence. In the three species, DUSP4 was mainly found in the tail of spermatozoa, with little or no immunoreactivity in the head. PTPN11 was mainly located in the postacrosomal region in the head, whereas DUSP3 immunoreactivity was extended within the acrosome. PTPN11 and DUSP3 showed immunoreactivity in the tail that was restricted to the midpiece. Finally, we incubated boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa with pervanadate and sodium orthovanadate, two PTP inhibitors, and analyzed overall protein tyrosine phosphorylation and assessed sperm motility. Sodium orthovanadate and pervanadate showed concentration-dependent inhibition of sperm motility that was

  5. Activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor by gintonin inhibits Kv1.2 channel activity: involvement of tyrosine kinase and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Rhee, Jeehae; Chung, Chihye; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2013-08-26

    Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand. The primary action of gintonin is to elicit a transient increase in [Ca(2+)]i via activation of LPA receptor subtypes. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels play important roles in synaptic transmission in nervous systems. The previous reports have shown that Kv channels can be regulated by Gαq/11 protein-coupled receptor ligands. In the present study, we examined the effects of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity expressed in Xenopus oocytes after injection of RNA encoding the human Kv1.2 α subunit. Gintonin treatment inhibited Kv1.2 channel activity in reversible and concentration-dependent manners. The inhibitory effect of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity was blocked by active phospholipase C inhibitor, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor antagonist, and intracellular Ca(2+) chelator. The co-expression of active receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α (RPTPα) with Kv1.2 channel greatly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity, but attenuation was not observed with catalytically inactive RPTPα. Furthermore, neither genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nor site-directed mutation of a tyrosine residue (Y132 to Y132F), which is phosphorylated by tyrosine kinase of the N-terminal of the Kv1.2 channel α subunit, significantly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity. These results indicate that the gintonin-mediated Kv1.2 channel regulation involves the dual coordination of both tyrosine kinase and RPTPα coupled to this receptor. Finally, gintonin-mediated regulation of Kv1.2 channel activity might explain one of the modulations of gintonin-mediated neuronal activities in nervous systems.

  6. Threonine-124 and phenylalanine-448 in Citrobacter freundii tyrosine phenol-lyase are necessary for activity with L-tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Demidkina, Tatyana V; Barbolina, Maria V; Faleev, Nicolai G; Sundararaju, Bakthavatsalam; Gollnick, Paul D; Phillips, Robert S

    2002-05-01

    Thr-124 and Phe-448 are located in the active site of Citrobacter freundii tyrosine phenol-lyase (TPL) near the phenol ring of a bound substrate analogue, 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid [Sundararaju, Antson, Phillips, Demidkina, Barbolina, Gollnick, Dodson and Wilson (1997) Biochemistry 36, 6502-6510]. Thr-124 is replaced by Asp and Phe-448 is replaced by His in the crystal structure of a structurally similar enzyme, Proteus vulgaris tryptophan indole-lyase, which has 50% identical residues. Hence, Thr-124 and Phe-448 in TPL were mutated to Ala or Asp, and His, respectively, in order to probe the role of these residues in the reaction specificity for L-Tyr. These mutant enzymes have little or no beta-elimination activity with L-Tyr or 3-fluoro-L-Tyr as a substrate, but retain significant elimination activity with S-(o-nitrophenyl)-L-cysteine, S-alkyl-L-cysteines and beta-chloroalanine. Furthermore, the binding of L-Tyr and other non-substrate amino acids is not significantly affected by the mutations. The mutant TPLs form intermediates in rapid-scanning stopped-flow experiments with L-Phe, L-Tyr and L-Trp, similar to those seen with wild-type TPL. These results demonstrate that Thr-124 and Phe-448 are necessary for the reaction specificity of TPL for L-Tyr, and probably play a role in the elimination stage of the reaction mechanism. Thr-124 is within hydrogen-bonding distance of the phenolic group of the bound substrate, and may help to orientate the ring for beta-elimination to occur. Phe-448 may be important to allow the formation of the closed conformation during the reaction.

  7. Tannic acid, a potent inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Er Bin; Wei, Liu; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Yu Zong; Chen, Wei Ning

    2006-03-01

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that tannic acid, a plant polyphenol, exerts anticarcinogenic activity in chemically induced cancers. In the present study, tannic acid was found to strongly inhibit tyrosine kinase activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) in vitro (IC50 = 323 nM). In contrast, the inhibition by tannic acid of p60(c-src) tyrosine kinase (IC50 = 14 microM) and insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IC50 = 5 microM) was much weaker. The inhibition of EGFr tyrosine kinase by tannic acid was competitive with respect to ATP and non-competitive with respect to peptide substrate. In cultured cells, growth factor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of growth factor receptors, including EGFr, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and basic fibroblast growth factor receptor, was inhibited by tannic acid. No inhibition of insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin-receptor substrate-1 was observed. EGF-stimulated growth of HepG2 cells was inhibited in the presence of tannic acid. The inhibition of serine/threonine-specific protein kinases, including cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase, by tannic acid was only detected at relatively high concentration, IC50 being 3, 325 and 142 microM respectively. The molecular modeling study suggested that tannic acid could be docked into the ATP binding pockets of either EGFr or insulin receptor. These results demonstrate that tannic acid is an in vitro potent inhibitor of EGFr tyrosine kinase.

  8. Hyaluronan and the hyaluronan receptor RHAMM promote focal adhesion turnover and transient tyrosine kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms whereby hyaluronan (HA) stimulates cell motility was investigated in a C-H-ras transformed 10T 1/2 fibroblast cell line (C3). A significant (p < 0.001) stimulation of C3 cell motility with HA (10 ng/ml) was accompanied by an increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation as detected by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies using immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins was found to be both rapid and transient with phosphorylation occurring within 1 min of HA addition and dissipating below control levels 10-15 min later. These responses were also elicited by an antibody generated against a peptide sequence within the HA receptor RHAMM. Treatment of cells with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein, 10 micrograms/ml or herbimycin A, 0.5 micrograms/ml) or microinjection of anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies inhibited the transient protein tyrosine phosphorylation in response to HA as well as prevented HA stimulation of cell motility. To determine a link between HA-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation and the resulting cell locomotion, cytoskeletal reorganization was examined in C3 cells plated on fibronectin and treated with HA or anti-RHAMM antibody. These agents caused a rapid assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions as revealed by immunofluorescent localization of vinculin. The time course with which HA and antibody induced focal adhesion turnover exactly paralleled the induction of transient protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, phosphotyrosine staining colocalized with vinculin within structures in the lamellapodia of these cells. Notably, the focal adhesion kinase, pp125FAK, was rapidly phosphorylated and dephosphorylated after HA stimulation. These results suggest that HA stimulates locomotion via a rapid and transient protein tyrosine kinase signaling event mediated by RHAMM. They also provide a possible molecular basis for focal adhesion turnover, a process that is

  9. Unfolding of Ubiquitin Studied by Picosecond Time-Resolved Fluorescence of the Tyrosine Residue

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Melinda; Lima, João C.; Bastos, Margarida; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L.

    2004-01-01

    The photophysics of the single tyrosine in bovine ubiquitin (UBQ) was studied by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of pH and along thermal and chemical unfolding, with the following results: First, at room temperature (25°C) and below pH 1.5, native UBQ shows single-exponential decays. From pH 2 to 7, triple-exponential decays were observed and the three decay times were attributed to the presence of tyrosine, a tyrosine-carboxylate hydrogen-bonded complex, and excited-state tyrosinate. Second, at pH 1.5, the water-exposed tyrosine of either thermally or chemically unfolded UBQ decays as a sum of two exponentials. The double-exponential decays were interpreted and analyzed in terms of excited-state intramolecular electron transfer from the phenol to the amide moiety, occurring in one of the three rotamers of tyrosine in UBQ. The values of the rate constants indicate the presence of different unfolded states and an increase in the mobility of the tyrosine residue during unfolding. Finally, from the pre-exponential coefficients of the fluorescence decays, the unfolding equilibrium constants (KU) were calculated, as a function of temperature or denaturant concentration. Despite the presence of different unfolded states, both thermal and chemical unfolding data of UBQ could be fitted to a two-state model. The thermodynamic parameters Tm = 54.6°C, ΔHTm = 56.5 kcal/mol, and ΔCp = 890 cal/mol//K, were determined from the unfolding equilibrium constants calculated accordingly, and compared to values obtained by differential scanning calorimetry also under the assumption of a two-state transition, Tm = 57.0°C, ΔHm= 51.4 kcal/mol, and ΔCp = 730 cal/mol//K. PMID:15454455

  10. Elevated prevalence of Helicobacter species and virulence factors in opisthorchiasis and associated hepatobiliary disease

    PubMed Central

    Deenonpoe, Raksawan; Mairiang, Eimorn; Mairiang, Pisaln; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Chamgramol, Yaovalux; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J.; Sripa, Banchob

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that Opisthorchis viverrini serves as a reservoir of Helicobacter and implicate Helicobacter in pathogenesis of opisthorchiasis-associated cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Here, 553 age-sex matched cases and controls, 293 and 260 positive and negative for liver fluke O. viverrini eggs, of residents in Northeastern Thailand were investigated for associations among infection with liver fluke, Helicobacter and hepatobiliary fibrosis. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in O. viverrini-infected than uninfected participants. H. pylori bacterial load correlated positively with intensity of O. viverrini infection, and participants with opisthorchiasis exhibited higher frequency of virulent cagA-positive H. pylori than those free of fluke infection. Genotyping of cagA from feces of both infected and uninfected participants revealed that the AB genotype accounted for 78% and Western type 22%. Participants infected with O. viverrini exhibited higher prevalence of typical Western type (EPIYA ABC) and variant AB’C type (EPIYT B) CagA. Multivariate analyses among H. pylori virulence genes and severity of hepatobiliary disease revealed positive correlations between biliary periductal fibrosis during opisthorchiasis and CagA and CagA with CagA multimerization (CM) sequence-positive H. pylori. These findings support the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic opisthorchiasis and specifically to opisthorchiasis-associated CCA. PMID:28198451

  11. Novel bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, William C; Metcalf, Chester A; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Keenan, Terence; Weigele, Manfred; Bohacek, Regine S; Dalgarno, David C; Sawyer, Tomi K

    2003-09-01

    Bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase (STK) inhibitors have recently been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer-related bone diseases. The concept of bone targeting derives from bisphosphonates, and from the evolution of such molecules in terms of therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of bone disorders. Interestingly, some of the earliest bisphosphonates were recognized for their ability to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation (scaling) by virtue of their affinity to chelate calcium. This chelating property was subsequently exploited in the development of bisphosphonate analogs as inhibitors of the bone-resorbing cells known as osteoclasts, giving rise to breakthrough medicines, such as Fosamax (for the treatment of osteoporosis) and Zometa (for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastases). Relative to these milestone achievements, there is a tremendous opportunity to explore beyond the limited chemical space (functional group diversity) of such bisphosphonates to design novel bone-targeting moieties, which may be used to develop other classes of promising small-molecule drugs affecting different biological pathways. Here, we review studies focused on bone-targeted inhibitors of STK, a key enzyme in osteoclast-dependent bone resorption. Two strategies are described relative to bone-targeted STK inhibitor drug discovery: (i) the development of novel Src homology (SH)-2 inhibitors incorporating non-hydrolyzable phosphotyrosine mimics and exhibiting molecular recognition and bone-targeting properties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-22408; and (ii) the development of novel ATP-based Src kinase inhibitors incorporating bone-targeting moieties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-23236. In summary, AP-22408 and AP-23236, which differ mechanistically by virtue of blocking Src-dependent non-catalytic or catalytic activities in osteoclasts, exemplify ARIAD Pharmaceuticals' structure-based design of novel bone

  12. Differential Receptor Tyrosine Kinase PET Imaging for Therapeutic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Wehrenberg-Klee, Eric; Turker, N. Selcan; Heidari, Pedram; Larimer, Benjamin; Juric, Dejan; Baselga, José; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway hold promise for the treatment of breast cancer, but resistance to these treatments can arise via feedback loops that increase surface expression of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), leading to persistent growth pathway signaling. We developed PET probes that provide a method of imaging this response in vivo, determining which tumors may use this escape pathway while avoiding the need for repeated biopsies. Methods: Anti-EGFR-F(ab′)2 and anti-HER3-F(ab′)2 were generated from monoclonal antibodies by enzymatic digestion, conjugated to DOTA, and labeled with 64Cu. A panel of breast cancer cell lines was treated with increasing concentrations of the AKT inhibitor GDC-0068 or the PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941. Pre- and posttreatment expression of EGFR and HER3 was compared using Western blot and correlated to probe accumulation with binding studies. Nude mice xenografts of HCC-70 or MDA-MB-468 were treated with either AKT inhibitor or PI3K inhibitor and imaged with either EGFR or HER3 PET probe. Results: Changes in HER3 and EGFR PET probe accumulation correlate to RTK expression change as assessed by Western blot (R2 of 0.85–0.98). EGFR PET probe PET/CT imaging of HCC70 tumors shows an SUV of 0.32 ± 0.03 for vehicle-, 0.50 ± 0.01 for GDC-0941–, and 0.62 ± 0.01 for GDC-0068–treated tumors, respectively (P < 0.01 for both comparisons to vehicle). HER3 PET probe PET/CT imaging of MDAMB468 tumors shows an SUV of 0.35 ± 0.02 for vehicle- and 0.73 ± 0.05 for GDC-0068–treated tumors (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Our imaging studies, using PET probes specific to EGFR and HER3, show that changes in RTK expression indicative of resistance to PI3K and AKT inhibitors can be seen within days of therapy initiation and are of sufficient magnitude as to allow reliable

  13. The nature of heme/iron-induced protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Ka; Gao, Zhonghong; Weisbrodt, Norman; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Recently, substantial evidence has emerged that revealed a very close association between the formation of nitrotyrosine and the presence of activated granulocytes containing peroxidases, such as myeloperoxidase. Peroxidases share heme-containing homology and can use H2O2 to oxidize substrates. Heme is a complex of iron with protoporphyrin IX, and the iron-containing structure of heme has been shown to be an oxidant in several model systems where the prooxidant effects of free iron, heme, and hemoproteins may be attributed to the formation of hypervalent states of the heme iron. In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that free heme and iron play a crucial role in NO2-Tyr formation. The data from our study indicate that: (i) heme/iron catalyzes nitration of tyrosine residues by using hydrogen peroxide and nitrite, a reaction that revealed the mechanism underlying the protein nitration by peroxidase, H2O2, and NO\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{2}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}; (ii) H2O2 plays a key role in the protein oxidation that forms the basis for the protein nitration, whereas nitrite is an essential element that facilitates nitration by the heme(Fe), H2O2, and the NO\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{2}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} system; (iii) the formation of a Fe(IV) hypervalent compound may be essential for heme(Fe)-catalyzed nitration, whereas O\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage

  14. A bacterial tyrosine aminomutase proceeds through retention or inversion of stereochemistry to catalyze its isomerization reaction.

    PubMed

    Wanninayake, Udayanga; Walker, Kevin D

    2013-07-31

    β-Amino acids are biologically active compounds of interest in medicinal chemistry. A class I lyase-like family of aminomutases isomerizes (S)-α-arylalanines to the corresponding β-amino acids by exchange of the NH2/H pair. This family uses a 3,5-dihydro-5-methylidene-4H-imidazol-4-one (MIO) group within the active site to initiate the reaction. The absolute stereochemistry of the product is known for an MIO-dependent tyrosine aminomutase from Chondromyces crocatus (CcTAM) that isomerizes (S)-α-tyrosine to (R)-β-tyrosine. To evaluate the cryptic stereochemistry of the CcTAM mechanism, (2S,3S)-[2,3-(2)H2]- and (2S,3R)-[3-(2)H]-α-tyrosine were stereoselectively synthesized from unlabeled (or [(2)H]-labeled) (4'-hydroxyphenyl)acrylic acids by reduction with D2 (or H2) gas and a chiral Rh-Prophos catalyst. GC/EIMS analysis of the [(2)H]-β-tyrosine biosynthesized by CcTAM revealed that the α-amino group was transferred to Cβ of the phenylpropanoid skeleton with retention of configuration. These labeled substrates also showed that the pro-(3S) proton exchanges with protons from the bulk media during its migration to Cα during catalysis. (1)H- and (2)H NMR analyses of the [(2)H]-β-tyrosine derived from (2S)-[3,3-(2)H2]-α-tyrosine by CcTAM catalysis showed that the migratory proton attached to Cα of the product also with retention of configuration. CcTAM is stereoselective for (R)-β-tyrosine (85%) yet also forms the (S)-β-tyrosine enantiomer (15%) through inversion of configuration at both migration termini, as described herein. The proportion of the (S)-β-isomer made by CcTAM during steady state interestingly increased with solvent pH, and this effect on the proposed reaction mechanism is also discussed.

  15. Pathway optimization by re-design of untranslated regions for L-tyrosine production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cheol Kim, Seong; Eun Min, Byung; Gyu Hwang, Hyun; Woo Seo, Sang; Yeol Jung, Gyoo

    2015-01-01

    L-tyrosine is a commercially important compound in the food, pharmaceutical, chemical, and cosmetic industries. Although several attempts have been made to improve L-tyrosine production, translation-level expression control and carbon flux rebalancing around phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) node still remain to be achieved for optimizing the pathway. Here, we demonstrate pathway optimization by altering gene expression levels for L-tyrosine production in Escherichia coli. To optimize the L-tyrosine biosynthetic pathway, a synthetic constitutive promoter and a synthetic 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) were introduced for each gene of interest to allow for control at both transcription and translation levels. Carbon flux rebalancing was achieved by controlling the expression level of PEP synthetase using UTR Designer. The L-tyrosine productivity of the engineered E. coli strain was increased through pathway optimization resulting in 3.0 g/L of L-tyrosine titer, 0.0354 g L-tyrosine/h/g DCW of productivity, and 0.102 g L-tyrosine/g glucose yield. Thus, this work demonstrates that pathway optimization by 5′-UTR redesign is an effective strategy for the development of efficient L-tyrosine-producing bacteria. PMID:26346938

  16. Tyrosine Deprotonation Yields Abundant and Selective Backbone Cleavage in Peptide Anions upon Negative Electron transfer Dissociation and Ultraviolet Photodissociation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jared B.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Zhang, Xing; Julian, Ryan R.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine deprotonation in peptides yields preferential electron detachment upon NETD or UVPD, resulting in prominent N – Cα bond cleavage N-terminal to the tyrosine residue. UVPD of iodo-tyrosine modified peptides was used to generate localized radicals on neutral tyrosine side chains by homolytic cleavage of the C – I bond. Subsequent collisional activation of the radical species yielded the same preferential cleavage of the adjacent N-terminal N – Cα bond. LC-MS/MS analysis of a tryptic digest of BSA demonstrated that these cleavages are regularly observed for peptides when using high pH mobile phases. PMID:22970927

  17. Tyrosine deprotonation yields abundant and selective backbone cleavage in peptide anions upon negative electron transfer dissociation and ultraviolet photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jared B; Ledvina, Aaron R; Zhang, Xing; Julian, Ryan R; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2012-09-26

    Tyrosine deprotonation in peptides yields preferential electron detachment upon NETD or UVPD, resulting in prominent N-Cα bond cleavage N-terminal to the tyrosine residue. UVPD of iodo-tyrosine-modified peptides was used to generate localized radicals on neutral tyrosine side chains by homolytic cleavage of the C-I bond. Subsequent collisional activation of the radical species yielded the same preferential cleavage of the adjacent N-terminal N-Cα bond. LC-MS/MS analysis of a tryptic digest of BSA demonstrated that these cleavages are regularly observed for peptides when using high-pH mobile phases.

  18. Distinct tyrosine residues within the interleukin-2 receptor beta chain drive signal transduction specificity, redundancy, and diversity.

    PubMed

    Gaffen, S L; Lai, S Y; Ha, M; Liu, X; Hennighausen, L; Greene, W C; Goldsmith, M A

    1996-08-30

    To explore the basis for interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling specificity, the roles of tyrosine-based sequences located within the cytoplasmic tails of the beta and gammac chains were examined in the murine helper T cell line HT-2. Activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, cellular proliferation, and the induction of various genes were monitored. All four of the cytoplasmic tyrosine residues as well as the distal portion of the gammac proved dispensable for the entire spectrum of IL-2R signaling responses studied. Conversely, select tyrosine residues within the beta chain were essential and differentially required for various signaling events. Specifically, activation of c-fos gene expression was found to occur exclusively through the most membrane proximal tyrosine, Tyr-338, whereas proliferation and the activation of STAT-5 were induced either through Tyr-338 or through the two C-terminal tyrosine residues, Tyr-392 and Tyr-510. These tyrosine residues mediated the induction of two different STAT-5 isoforms, which were found to form heterodimers upon receptor activation. In contrast to the tyrosine dependence of c-fos and STAT-5 induction, bcl-2 gene induction proceeded independently of all IL-2Rbeta tyrosine residues. Thus, the tyrosine-based modules present within the IL-2Rbeta cytoplasmic tail play a critical role in IL-2R signaling, mediating specificity, redundancy, and multifunctionality.

  19. PhpA, a tyrosine phosphatase of Myxococcus xanthus, is involved in the production of exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yumi; Maeda, Miri; Takegawa, Kaoru; Kimura, Yoshio

    2012-10-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in multiple cellular functions in bacteria. Bacterial tyrosine phosphatases catalyse the dephosphorylation of tyrosyl-phosphorylated proteins. Myxococcus xanthus PhpA shares homology with DNA polymerase and histidinol phosphatase family members. Recombinant His-tagged PhpA requires Mn(2+) or Co(2+) for phosphatase activity, and shows strict specificity for phosphorylated tyrosine residues. The k(m) values of PhpA for p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) and phosphotyrosine peptide, RRLIEDAEpYAARG, were 803 and 139 µM, respectively. The phosphatase activity of PhpA was inhibited by sodium orthovanadate with a k(i) of 33 µM. phpA gene expression was observed under both vegetative and developmental conditions, but peaked during late fruiting body formation. A phpA mutant exhibited an elevated level of tyrosine phosphorylation of a 79 kDa protein and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, BtkA. In M. xanthus, exopolysaccharide (EPS) is essential for cell-cell adhesion and fruiting body formation. phpA mutant cells exhibited enhanced capacity for cell-cell agglutination in agglutination buffer. Under starvation conditions, phpA mutation caused early aggregation and sporulation. The EPS production assay showed that the phpA mutant produced an increased amount of EPS in comparison with the wild-type. These results indicate that PhpA may negatively regulate the production of EPS in M. xanthus.

  20. Biochemical evaluation of a parsley tyrosine decarboxylase results in a novel 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde synthase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Gillaspy, Glenda; Zhao, Bingyu; Harich, Kim; White, Robert H; Li, Jianyong

    2012-02-10

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) are effectively indistinguishable from plant aromatic acetaldehyde syntheses (AASs) through primary sequence comparison. Spectroscopic analyses of several characterized AASs and AAADs were performed to look for absorbance spectral identifiers. Although this limited survey proved inconclusive, the resulting work enabled the reevaluation of several characterized plant AAS and AAAD enzymes. Upon completion, a previously reported parsley AAAD protein was demonstrated to have AAS activity. Substrate specificity tests demonstrate that this novel AAS enzyme has a unique substrate specificity towards tyrosine (km 0.46mM) and dopa (km 1.40mM). Metabolite analysis established the abundance of tyrosine and absence of dopa in parsley extracts. Such analysis indicates that tyrosine is likely to be the sole physiological substrate. The resulting information suggests that this gene is responsible for the in vivo production of 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (4-HPAA). This is the first reported case of an AAS enzyme utilizing tyrosine as a primary substrate and the first report of a single enzyme capable of producing 4-HPAA from tyrosine.

  1. Protein kinase Calpha activation by RET: evidence for a negative feedback mechanism controlling RET tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Francesco; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Carlomagno, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Miele, Claudia; Fiory, Francesca; Santopietro, Stefania; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Beguinot, Francesco; Santoro, Massimo; Formisano, Pietro

    2003-05-15

    We have studied the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in signaling of the RET tyrosine kinase receptor. By using a chimeric receptor (E/R) in which RET kinase can be tightly controlled by the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF), we have found that RET triggering induces a strong increase of PKCalpha, PKCdelta and PKCzeta activity and that PKCalpha, not PKCdelta and PKCzeta, forms a ligand-dependent protein complex with E/R. We have identified tyrosine 1062 in the RET carboxyl-terminal tail as the docking site for PKCalpha. Block of PKC activity by bisindolylmaleimide or chronic phorbol esters treatment decreased EGF-induced serine/threonine phosphorylation of E/R, while it caused a similarly sized increase of EGF-induced E/R tyrosine kinase activity and mitogenic signaling. Conversely, acute phorbol esters treatment, which promotes PKC activity, increased the levels of E/R serine/threonine phosphorylation and significantly decreased its phosphotyrosine content. A threefold reduction of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of the constitutively active RET/MEN2A oncoprotein was observed upon coexpression with PKCalpha. We conclude that RET binds to and activates PKCalpha. PKCalpha, in turn, causes RET phosphorylation and downregulates RET tyrosine kinase and downstream signaling, thus functioning as a negative feedback loop to modulate RET activity.

  2. A Multifeatures Fusion and Discrete Firefly Optimization Method for Prediction of Protein Tyrosine Sulfation Residues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunhua; Zhou, Peng; Li, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is one of the ubiquitous protein posttranslational modifications, where some sulfate groups are added to the tyrosine residues. It plays significant roles in various physiological processes in eukaryotic cells. To explore the molecular mechanism of tyrosine sulfation, one of the prerequisites is to correctly identify possible protein tyrosine sulfation residues. In this paper, a novel method was presented to predict protein tyrosine sulfation residues from primary sequences. By means of informative feature construction and elaborate feature selection and parameter optimization scheme, the proposed predictor achieved promising results and outperformed many other state-of-the-art predictors. Using the optimal features subset, the proposed method achieved mean MCC of 94.41% on the benchmark dataset, and a MCC of 90.09% on the independent dataset. The experimental performance indicated that our new proposed method could be effective in identifying the important protein posttranslational modifications and the feature selection scheme would be powerful in protein functional residues prediction research fields. PMID:27034949

  3. Meta-tyrosine. A powerful anti-metastatic factor with undetectable toxic-side effects.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Damián; Chiarella, Paula; Montagna, Daniela; Dran, Graciela; Meiss, Roberto P; Ruggiero, Raúl A

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant tumor resistance (CR) is a phenomenon in which a tumor-bearing host is resistant to the growth of secondary tumor implants and metastasis. While former studies have indicated that T-cell dependent processes mediate CR in hosts bearing immunogenic small tumors, the most universal manifestation of CR induced by immunogenic and non-immunogenic large tumors had been associated with an antitumor serum factor that remained an enigma for many years. In a recent paper, we identified that elusive factor(s) as an equi-molar mixture of meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine, two isomers of tyrosine that are not present in normal proteins and that proved to be responsible for 90% and 10%, respectively, of the total serum anti-tumor activity. In this work, we have extended our previous findings demonstrating that a periodic intravenous administration of meta-tyrosine induced a dramatic reduction of lung and hepatic metastases generated in mice bearing two different metastatic murine tumors and decreased the rate of death from 100% up to 25% in tumor-excised mice that already exhibited established metastases at the time of surgery. These anti-metastatic effects were achieved even at very low concentrations and without displaying any detectable toxic-side effects, suggesting that the use of meta-tyrosine may help to develop new and less harmful means of managing malignant diseases, especially those aimed to control the growth of metastases that is the most serious problem in cancer pathology.

  4. Reduction of electron deficient guanine radical species in plasmid DNA by tyrosine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Mandi; Do, Trinh T; Tang, Vicky J; Aguilera, Joseph A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2010-06-07

    Guanine bases are the most easily oxidized sites in DNA and therefore electron deficient guanine radical species are major intermediates in the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself) on DNA as a consequence of hole migration to guanine. As a model for this process we have used gamma-irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions to generate single electron oxidized guanine radicals in a plasmid target in aqueous solution. The stable species formed from these radicals can be detected and quantified by the formation of strand breaks in the plasmid after a post-irradiation incubation using a suitable enzyme. If a tyrosine derivative is also present during irradiation, the production of guanine oxidation products is decreased by electron transfer from tyrosine to the intermediate guanyl radical species. By using cationic tyrosine containing ligands we are able to observe this process when the tyrosine is electrostatically bound to the plasmid. The driving force dependence of this reaction was determined by comparing the reactivity of tyrosine with its 3-nitro analog. The results imply that the electron transfer reaction is coupled to a proton transfer. The experimental conditions used in this model system provide a reasonable approximation to those involved in the radioprotection of DNA by tightly bound proteins in chromatin.

  5. Src drives the Warburg effect and therapy resistance by inactivating pyruvate dehydrogenase through tyrosine-289 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Anitha K.; Lim, Sangbin; Zhang, Ying; Charles, Steve; Tarrash, Miriam; Fu, Xueqi; Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Trevino, Jose G.; Tan, Ming; Lu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect, which reflects cancer cells' preference for aerobic glycolysis over glucose oxidation, contributes to tumor growth, progression and therapy resistance. The restraint on pyruvate flux into mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in cancer cells is in part attributed to the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Src is a prominent oncogenic non-receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes cancer cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis and resistance to conventional and targeted therapies. However, the potential role of Src in tumor metabolism remained unclear. Here we report that activation of Src attenuated PDH activity and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conversely, Src inhibitors activated PDH and increased cellular ROS levels. Src inactivated PDH through direct phosphorylation of tyrosine-289 of PDH E1α subunit (PDHA1). Indeed, Src was the main kinase responsible for PDHA1 tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells. Expression of a tyrosine-289 non-phosphorable PDHA1 mutant in Src-hyperactivated cancer cells restored PDH activity, increased mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress, decreased experimental metastasis, and sensitized cancer cells to pro-oxidant treatment. The results suggest that Src contributes to the Warburg phenotype by inactivating PDH through tyrosine phosphorylation, and the metabolic effect of Src is essential for Src-driven malignancy and therapy resistance. Combination therapies consisting of both Src inhibitors and pro-oxidants may improve anticancer efficacy. PMID:26848621

  6. The Role of Bacterial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Regulation of the Biosynthesis of Secreted Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Morona, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Tyrosine phosphorylation and associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are gaining prominence as critical mechanisms in the regulation of fundamental processes in a wide variety of bacteria. In particular, these phosphatases have been associated with the control of the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides, critically important virulence factors for bacteria. Recent Advances: Deletion and overexpression of the phosphatases result in altered polysaccharide biosynthesis in a range of bacteria. The recent structures of associated auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinases have suggested that the phosphatases may be critical for the cycling of the kinases between monomers and higher order oligomers. Critical Issues: Additional substrates of the phosphatases apart from cognate kinases are currently being identified. These are likely to be critical to our understanding of the mechanism by which polysaccharide biosynthesis is regulated. Future Directions: Ultimately, these protein tyrosine phosphatases are an attractive target for the development of novel antimicrobials. This is particularly the case for the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase family, which is predominantly found in bacteria. Furthermore, the determination of bacterial tyrosine phosphoproteomes will likely help to uncover the fundamental roles, mechanism, and critical importance of these phosphatases in a wide range of bacteria. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2274–2289. PMID:24295407

  7. An Extensive Survey of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Revealing New Sites in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heibeck, Tyler H.; Ding, Shi-Jian; Opresko, Lee K.; Zhao, Rui; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. Steven; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation represents a central regulatory mechanism in cell signaling. Here we present an extensive survey of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in a normal-derived human mammary epithelial cell line by applying anti-phosphotyrosine peptide immunoaffinity purification coupled with high sensitivity capillary liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 481 tyrosine phosphorylation sites (covered by 716 unique peptides) from 285 proteins were confidently identified in HMEC following the analysis of both the basal condition and acute stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF). The estimated false discovery rate was 1.0% as determined by searching against a scrambled database. Comparison of these data with existing literature showed significant agreement for previously reported sites. However, we observed 281 sites that were not previously reported for HMEC cultures and 29 of which have not been reported for any human cell or tissue system. The analysis showed that the majority of highly phosphorylated proteins were relatively low-abundance. Large differences in phosphorylation stoichiometry for sites within the same protein were also observed, raising the possibility of more important functional roles for such highly phosphorylated pTyr sites. By mapping to major signaling networks, such as the EGF receptor and insulin growth factor-1 receptor signaling pathways, many known proteins involved in these pathways were revealed to be tyrosine phosphorylated, which provides interesting targets for future hypothesis-driven and targeted quantitative studies involving tyrosine phosphorylation in HMEC or other human systems. PMID:19534553

  8. Effects of Protonation State on a Tyrosine-Histidine Bioinspired Redox Mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Gary F.; Hambourger, Michael; Kodis, Gerdenis; Michl, Weston; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.

    2010-11-18

    The conversion of tyrosine to the corresponding tyrosyl radical in photosytem II (PSII) is an example of proton-coupled electron transfer. Although the tyrosine moiety (TyrZ) is known to function as a redox mediator between the photo-oxidized primary donor (P680 •+) and the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex, the protonation states involved in the course of the reaction remain an active area of investigation. Herein, we report on the optical, structural, and electrochemical properties of tyrosine-histidine constructs, which model the function of their naturally occurring counterparts in PSII. Electrochemical studies show that the phenoxyl/phenol couple of the model is chemically reversible and thermodynamically capable of water oxidation. Studies under acidic and basic conditions provide clear evidence that an ionizable proton controls the electrochemical potential of the tyrosine-histidine mimic and that an exogenous base or acid can be used to generate a low-potential or high-potential mediator, respectively. The phenoxyl/phenoxide couple associated with the low-potential mediator is thermodynamically incapable of water oxidation, whereas the relay associated with the high-potential mediator is thermodynamically incapable of reducing an attached photoexcited porphyrin. These studies provide insight regarding the mechanistic role of the tyrosine-histidine complex in water oxidation and strategies for making use of hydrogen bonds to affect the coupling between proton and electron transfer in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  9. Central neural regulation by adrenergic nerves of the daily rhythm in hepatic tyrosine transaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Black, Ira B.; Reis, Donald J.

    1971-01-01

    1. In adrenalectomized fasted rats transection of the spinal cord at C7-C8 or placement of bilateral electrolytic lesions in the lateral hypothalamus when performed in the morning interrupted the daily rhythm of hepatic tyrosine transaminase by elevating low (AM) enzyme activities to high (PM) levels; lesions placed in PM did not affect the late afternoon rise in enzyme activity. 2. Bilateral thalamic lesions had no affect on enzyme activity. 3. The activity of hepatic catechol-O-methyl transferase was unaffected by hypothalamic lesions. 4. The lesion-evoked rise of tyrosine transaminase activity was abolished by exogenously administered norepinephrine. 5. Cycloheximide blocked the rise of tyrosine transaminase activity caused by hypothalamic lesions. 6. The results suggest that rhythmic activity of sympathetic nerves governed by lateral hypothalamus contribute to regulation of the daily rhythm in tyrosine transaminase by regulating the release of norepinephrine peripherally; norepinephrine may block the daily rise of enzyme by interfering with protein synthesis, possibly of new enzyme, by competing with pyridoxal co-factor. 7. It is proposed that alternating activity of sympathetic-adrenergic and vagal-cholinergic nerves to liver, controlled by the C.N.S., contribute to rhythmic activity of hepatic tyrosine transaminase. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4400586

  10. Chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.I.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1982-04-01

    The chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum has been examined relative to enzymatic activity and reactivity of these groups in the native protein. 4,4'-Dipyridyl disulfide, dansylaziridine, and fluorescein mercuric acetate all reacted with just one of six sulfhydryls per enzyme subunit, resulting in activities of 100, 95 and 70%, respectively. The K/sub m/ values for MgATP, formate, and tetrahydrofolate were unaltered in the modified enzymes. ATP did produce a 2.5-fold reduction in the rate of reaction between the enzyme and 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide. Tetranitromethane reacted most rapidly with a single sulfhydryl group per subunit to produce a 20 to 30% loss in activity. Subsequent additions of tetranitromethane modified 2.2 tyrosines per subunit which was proportional to the loss of the remaining enzymatic activity. Folic acid, a competitive inhibitor, protected against modification of the tyrosines and the associated activity losses; however, the oxidation of the single sulfhydryl group and the initial 20 to 30% activity loss were unaffected. In the presence of folic acid, higher concentrations of tetranitromethane produced a loss of the remaining activity proportional to the modification of 1.2 tyrosines per subunit. It is proposed that at least 1 tyrosine critical for enzymatic activity is located at or near the folic acid/tetrahydrofolate binding site.

  11. Selective Sensing of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Peptides Using Terbium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sumaoka, Jun; Akiba, Hiroki; Komiyama, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins, as well as their dephosphorylation, is closely related to various diseases. However, this phosphorylation is usually accompanied by more abundant phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues in the proteins and covers only 0.05% of the total phosphorylation. Accordingly, highly selective detection of phosphorylated tyrosine in proteins is an urgent subject. In this review, recent developments in this field are described. Monomeric and binuclear TbIII complexes, which emit notable luminescence only in the presence of phosphotyrosine (pTyr), have been developed. There, the benzene ring of pTyr functions as an antenna and transfers its photoexcitation energy to the TbIII ion as the emission center. Even in the coexistence of phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), pTyr can be efficintly detected with high selectivity. Simply by adding these TbIII complexes to the solutions, phosphorylation of tyrosine in peptides by protein tyrosine kinases and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases can be successfully visualized in a real-time fashion. Furthermore, the activities of various inhibitors on these enzymes are quantitatively evaluated, indicating a strong potential of the method for efficient screening of eminent inhibitors from a number of candidates. PMID:27375742

  12. Activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) at fertilization in Rhinella arenarum eggs.

    PubMed

    Mouguelar, Valeria S; Coux, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have provided evidence for the involvement of a cytosolic tyrosine-phosphorylatable 70 kDa oocyte protein in Rhinella arenarum (Anura: Bufonidae) fertilization. The aim of the present work was to characterize its phosphorylation, determine the identity of this protein and establish its biological role during the fertilization process. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the 70 kDa protein was not observed in eggs activated with the calcium ionophore A23187. Pretreatment of oocytes with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein effectively blocked the fertilization-dependent phosphorylation of the 70 kDa protein. In order to identify this protein, we examined the presence in amphibian oocytes of non-receptor 70 kDa tyrosine kinase members of the Syk/Zap70 and Tec families by RT-PCR using degenerate primers. We found that R. arenarum oocytes contain the transcripts coding for Syk and Tec kinases. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of Syk protein in unfertilized oocytes and eggs. Studies using phospho-Syk specific antibodies showed that fertilization rapidly (less than 10 minutes) induces phosphorylation on Syk tyrosine residues (352 and 525/526) that are necessary for the activation of the enzyme. Finally, specific inhibition of Syk with the R406 compound provoked a diminished fertilization score, thereby confirming a functional role of the Syk protein during R. arenarum fertilization. To our knowledge this is the first time that Syk is described as a player in the signaling cascade activated after fertilization.

  13. Novel Regulation of Parkin Function Through c-Abl-Mediated Tyrosine Phosphorylation: Implications for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Syed Z.; Zhou, Qing; Yamamoto, Ayako; Valente, Anthony J.; Ali, Syed F.; Bains, Mona; Roberts, James L.; Kahle, Philipp J.; Clark, Robert A.; Li, Senlin

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are most common cause of autosomal-recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we show that the stress-signaling non-receptor tyrosine-kinase c-Abl links parkin to sporadic forms of PD via tyrosine phosphorylation. Under oxidative and dopaminergic stress, c-Abl was activated in cultured neuronal cells and in striatum of adult C57 mice. Activated c-Abl was found in the striatum of PD patients. Concomitantly, parkin was tyrosine-phosphorylated, causing loss ofit's ubiquitin ligase and cytoprotective activities, and the accumulation of parkin substrates, AIMP2 (p38/JTV-1) and FBP-1. STI-571, a selective c-Abl inhibitor, prevented tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin and restored its E3 ligase activity and cytoprotective function both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin by c-Abl is a major post-translational modification that leads to loss of parkin function and disease progression in sporadic PD. Moreover, inhibition of c-Abl offers new therapeutic opportunities for blocking PD progression. PMID:21209200

  14. The Crystal Structure of Aquifex aeolicus Prephenate Dehydrogenase Reveals the Mode of Tyrosine Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Warren; Shahinas, Dea; Bonvin, Julie; Hou, Wenjuan; Kimber, Matthew S.; Turnbull, Joanne; Christendat, Dinesh

    2009-08-14

    TyrA proteins belong to a family of dehydrogenases that are dedicated to l-tyrosine biosynthesis. The three TyrA subclasses are distinguished by their substrate specificities, namely the prephenate dehydrogenases, the arogenate dehydrogenases, and the cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenases, which utilize prephenate, l-arogenate, or both substrates, respectively. The molecular mechanism responsible for TyrA substrate selectivity and regulation is unknown. To further our understanding of TyrA-catalyzed reactions, we have determined the crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus prephenate dehydrogenase bound with NAD(+) plus either 4-hydroxyphenylpyuvate, 4-hydroxyphenylpropionate, or l-tyrosine and have used these structures as guides to target active site residues for site-directed mutagenesis. From a combination of mutational and structural analyses, we have demonstrated that His-147 and Arg-250 are key catalytic and binding groups, respectively, and Ser-126 participates in both catalysis and substrate binding through the ligand 4-hydroxyl group. The crystal structure revealed that tyrosine, a known inhibitor, binds directly to the active site of the enzyme and not to an allosteric site. The most interesting finding though, is that mutating His-217 relieved the inhibitory effect of tyrosine on A. aeolicus prephenate dehydrogenase. The identification of a tyrosine-insensitive mutant provides a novel avenue for designing an unregulated enzyme for application in metabolic engineering.

  15. Induction of tyrosine phosphorylation during ICAM-3 and LFA-1-mediated intercellular adhesion, and its regulation by the CD45 tyrosine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-3, a recently described counter- receptor for the lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 integrin, appears to play an important role in the initial phase of immune response. We have previously described the involvement of ICAM-3 in the regulation of LFA-1/ICAM-1-dependent cell-cell interaction of T lymphoblasts. In this study, we further investigated the functional role of ICAM-3 in other leukocyte cell-cell interactions as well as the molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. We have found that ICAM-3 is also able to mediate LFA-1/ICAM-1-independent cell aggregation of the leukemic JM T cell line and the LFA-1/CD18-deficient HAFSA B cell line. The ICAM-3-induced cell aggregation of JM and HAFSA cells was not affected by the addition of blocking mAb specific for a number of cell adhesion molecules such as CD1 1a/CD18, ICAM-1 (CD54), CD2, LFA-3 (CD58), very late antigen alpha 4 (CD49d), and very late antigen beta 1 (CD29). Interestingly, some mAb against the leukocyte tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were able to inhibit this interaction. Moreover, they also prevented the aggregation induced on JM T cells by the proaggregatory anti-LFA-1 alpha NKI-L16 mAb. In addition, inhibitors of tyrosine kinase activity also abolished ICAM-3 and LFA-1- mediated cell aggregation. The induction of tyrosine phosphorylation through ICAM-3 and LFA-1 antigens was studied by immunofluorescence, and it was found that tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins were preferentially located at intercellular boundaries upon the induction of cell aggregation by either anti-ICAM-3 or anti-LFA-1 alpha mAb. Western blot analysis revealed that the engagement of ICAM-3 or LFA-1 with activating mAb enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of polypeptides of 125, 70, and 38 kD on JM cells. This phenomenon was inhibited by preincubation of JM cells with those anti-CD45 mAb that prevented cell aggregation. Altogether these results indicate that CD45 tyrosine phosphatase

  16. Lichen planopilaris-like eruption during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib*

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Juliana Ribeiro; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai; Kakizaki, Priscila; Veronez, Isis Suga; Pires, Mario Cezar

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective as a target therapy for malignant neoplasms. Imatinib was the first tyrosine kinase inhibitor used. After its introduction, several other drugs have appeared with a similar mechanism of action, but less prone to causing resistance. Even though these drugs are selective, their toxicity does not exclusively target cancer cells, and skin toxicity is the most common non-hematologic adverse effect. We report an eruption similar to lichen planopilaris that developed during therapy with nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia resistant to imatinib. In a literature review, we found only one report of non-scarring alopecia due to the use of nilotinib.

  17. Inhibition of an Erythrocyte Tyrosine Kinase with Imatinib Prevents Plasmodium falciparum Egress and Terminates Parasitemia

    PubMed Central

    Kesely, Kristina R.; Pantaleo, Antonella; Turrini, Francesco M.; Olupot-Olupot, Peter

    2016-01-01

    With half of the world’s population at risk for malaria infection and with drug resistance on the rise, the search for mutation-resistant therapies has intensified. We report here a therapy for Plasmodium falciparum malaria that acts by inhibiting the phosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane band 3 by an erythrocyte tyrosine kinase. Because tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 causes a destabilization of the erythrocyte membrane required for parasite egress, inhibition of the erythrocyte tyrosine kinase leads to parasite entrapment and termination of the infection. Moreover, because one of the kinase inhibitors to demonstrate antimalarial activity is imatinib, i.e. an FDA-approved drug authorized for use in children, translation of the therapy into the clinic will be facilitated. At a time when drug resistant strains of P. falciparum are emerging, a strategy that targets a host enzyme that cannot be mutated by the parasite should constitute a therapeutic mechanism that will retard evolution of resistance. PMID:27768734

  18. DNA‐Catalyzed Introduction of Azide at Tyrosine for Peptide Modification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Puzhou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We show that DNA enzymes (deoxyribozymes) can introduce azide functional groups at tyrosine residues in peptide substrates. Using in vitro selection, we identified deoxyribozymes that transfer the 2′‐azido‐2′‐deoxyadenosine 5′‐monophosphoryl group (2′‐Az‐dAMP) from the analogous 5′‐triphosphate (2′‐Az‐dATP) onto the tyrosine hydroxyl group of a peptide, which is either tethered to a DNA anchor or free. Some of the new deoxyribozymes are general with regard to the amino acid residues surrounding the tyrosine, while other DNA enzymes are sequence‐selective. We use one of the new deoxyribozymes to modify free peptide substrates by attaching PEG moieties and fluorescent labels. PMID:27391404

  19. Tyrosine- and tryptophan-coated gold nanoparticles inhibit amyloid aggregation of insulin.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Kriti; Anand, Bibin G; Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh; Navya, P N; Daima, Hemant Kumar; Kar, Karunakar

    2015-12-01

    Here, we have strategically synthesized stable gold (AuNPs(Tyr), AuNPs(Trp)) and silver (AgNPs(Tyr)) nanoparticles which are surface functionalized with either tyrosine or tryptophan residues and have examined their potential to inhibit amyloid aggregation of insulin. Inhibition of both spontaneous and seed-induced aggregation of insulin was observed in the presence of AuNPs(Tyr), AgNPs(Tyr), and AuNPs(Trp) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles also triggered the disassembly of insulin amyloid fibrils. Surface functionalization of amino acids appears to be important for the inhibition effect since isolated tryptophan and tyrosine molecules did not prevent insulin aggregation. Bioinformatics analysis predicts involvement of tyrosine in H-bonding interactions mediated by its C=O, -NH2, and aromatic moiety. These results offer significant opportunities for developing nanoparticle-based therapeutics against diseases related to protein aggregation.

  20. Antioxidant promotion of tyrosine nitration in the presence of copper(II).

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2013-06-01

    Copper(II) is known to catalyze the generation of reactive nitrogen species in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, nitrite or nitric oxide, leading to tyrosine nitration, a biomarker for free radical species associated diseases. Here, we find that biological antioxidants such as ascorbic acid can promote tyrosine nitration in the presence of copper(II) and nitrite under aerobic and weak acidic conditions. Tyrosine nitration is demonstrated on both the β-amyloid peptide and angiotensin I. These studies show that (i) ascorbic acid works as a pro-oxidant in the presence of copper(II) to induce oxidation and nitration on peptides, (ii) both free and coordinated copper(II) can catalyze peptide oxidation and nitration, (iii) nitration occurs under mild acidic conditions (pH = 6.0-6.5).

  1. Imatinib-sensitive tyrosine kinases regulate mycobacterial pathogenesis and represent therapeutic targets against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Napier, Ruth J; Rafi, Wasiulla; Cheruvu, Mani; Powell, Kimberly R; Zaunbrecher, M Analise; Bornmann, William; Salgame, Padmini; Shinnick, Thomas M; Kalman, Daniel

    2011-11-17

    The lengthy course of treatment with currently used antimycobacterial drugs and the resulting emergence of drug-resistant strains have intensified the need for alternative therapies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. We show that Mtb and Mycobacterium marinum use ABL and related tyrosine kinases for entry and intracellular survival in macrophages. In mice, the ABL family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec), when administered prophylactically or therapeutically, reduced both the number of granulomatous lesions and bacterial load in infected organs and was also effective against a rifampicin-resistant strain. Further, when coadministered with current first-line drugs, rifampicin or rifabutin, imatinib acted synergistically. These data implicate host tyrosine kinases in entry and intracellular survival of mycobacteria and suggest that imatinib may have therapeutic efficacy against Mtb. Because imatinib targets host, it is less likely to engender resistance compared to conventional antibiotics and may decrease the development of resistance against coadministered drugs.

  2. Phosphylated tyrosine in albumin as a biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nichola H; Harrison, John M; Read, Robert W; Black, Robin M

    2007-09-01

    The organophosphorus nerve agents sarin, soman, cyclosarin and tabun phosphylate a tyrosine residue on albumin in human blood. These adducts may offer relatively long-lived biological markers of nerve agent exposure that do not 'age' rapidly, and which are not degraded by therapy with oximes. Sensitive methods for the detection of these adducts have been developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Adducts of all four nerve agents were detected in the blood of exposed guinea pigs being used in studies to improve medical countermeasures. The tyrosine adducts with soman and tabun were detected in guinea pigs receiving therapy 7 days following subcutaneous administration of five times the LD(50) dose of the respective nerve agent. VX also forms a tyrosine adduct in human blood in vitro but only at high concentrations.

  3. Keratinocyte-derived Laminin-332 Protein Promotes Melanin Synthesis via Regulation of Tyrosine Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heesung; Jung, Hyejung; Lee, Jung-hyun; Oh, Hye Yun; Kim, Ok Bin; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes, which produce the pigment melanin, are known to be closely regulated by neighboring keratinocytes. However, how keratinocytes regulate melanin production is unclear. Here we report that melanin production in melanoma cells (B16F10 and MNT-1) was increased markedly on a keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix compared with a melanoma cell-derived extracellular matrix. siRNA-mediated reduction of keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 expression decreased melanin synthesis in melanoma cells, and laminin-332, but not fibronectin, enhanced melanin content and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-regulated melanin production in melanoma cells. Similar effects were observed in human melanocytes. Interestingly, however, laminin-332 did not affect the expression or activity of tyrosinase. Instead, laminin-332 promoted the uptake of extracellular tyrosine and, subsequently, increased intracellular levels of tyrosine in both melanocytes and melanoma cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 contributes to melanin production by regulating tyrosine uptake. PMID:24951591

  4. Radiobrominated m-tyrosine analog as potential CNS L-dopa PET tracer

    SciTech Connect

    De Jesus, O.T.; Mukherjee, J.

    1988-02-15

    Radiobrominated 6-bromo-m-tyrosine (6-BMT) was prepared and the time course of its localization in selected cerebral and peripheral organs in the mouse was determined. Since m-tyrosine is known to have L-dopa-like properties in vivo, our goal was to assess the utility of a radiolabeled analog as a tracer for cerebral L-dopa. Our preliminary results showed that substantial amounts of 6-BMT is extracted by the mouse brain and that the regional distribution and time course of the radiotracer is consistent with uptake in regions rich in dopamine neurons. Although a more thorough biochemical characterization of 6-BMT is necessary, this or other positron emitting analogs of m-tyrosine, such as an /sup 18/F labelled analog, may be useful PET tracers for the non-invasive study of dopamine turnover in humans.

  5. Structural Basis of the Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Catalysis of a Papaver somniferum Tyrosine Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huai; Song, Shuaibao; Robinson, Howard; Liang, Jing; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong; Han, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC), a type II pyridoxal 5'-phosphate decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of tyrosine. Due to a generally high sequence identity to other aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs), primary sequence information is not enough to understand substrate specificities with structural information. In this study, we selected a typical TyDC from Papaver somniferum as a model to study the structural basis of AAAD substrate specificities. Analysis of the native P. somniferum TyDC crystal structure and subsequent molecular docking and dynamics simulation provide some structural bases that explain substrate specificity for tyrosine. The result confirmed the previous proposed mechanism for the enzyme selectivity of indolic and phenolic substrates. Additionally, this study yields the first crystal structure for a plant type II pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decarboxylase.

  6. Keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 protein promotes melanin synthesis via regulation of tyrosine uptake.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heesung; Jung, Hyejung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Hye Yun; Kim, Ok Bin; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-08-01

    Melanocytes, which produce the pigment melanin, are known to be closely regulated by neighboring keratinocytes. However, how keratinocytes regulate melanin production is unclear. Here we report that melanin production in melanoma cells (B16F10 and MNT-1) was increased markedly on a keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix compared with a melanoma cell-derived extracellular matrix. siRNA-mediated reduction of keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 expression decreased melanin synthesis in melanoma cells, and laminin-332, but not fibronectin, enhanced melanin content and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-regulated melanin production in melanoma cells. Similar effects were observed in human melanocytes. Interestingly, however, laminin-332 did not affect the expression or activity of tyrosinase. Instead, laminin-332 promoted the uptake of extracellular tyrosine and, subsequently, increased intracellular levels of tyrosine in both melanocytes and melanoma cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 contributes to melanin production by regulating tyrosine uptake.

  7. Inhibition of an Erythrocyte Tyrosine Kinase with Imatinib Prevents Plasmodium falciparum Egress and Terminates Parasitemia.

    PubMed

    Kesely, Kristina R; Pantaleo, Antonella; Turrini, Francesco M; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Low, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    With half of the world's population at risk for malaria infection and with drug resistance on the rise, the search for mutation-resistant therapies has intensified. We report here a therapy for Plasmodium falciparum malaria that acts by inhibiting the phosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane band 3 by an erythrocyte tyrosine kinase. Because tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 causes a destabilization of the erythrocyte membrane required for parasite egress, inhibition of the erythrocyte tyrosine kinase leads to parasite entrapment and termination of the infection. Moreover, because one of the kinase inhibitors to demonstrate antimalarial activity is imatinib, i.e. an FDA-approved drug authorized for use in children, translation of the therapy into the clinic will be facilitated. At a time when drug resistant strains of P. falciparum are emerging, a strategy that targets a host enzyme that cannot be mutated by the parasite should constitute a therapeutic mechanism that will retard evolution of resistance.

  8. Structural Basis of the Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Catalysis of a Papaver somniferum Tyrosine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Huai; Song, Shuaibao; Robinson, Howard; Liang, Jing; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong; Han, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC), a type II pyridoxal 5′-phosphate decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of tyrosine. Due to a generally high sequence identity to other aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs), primary sequence information is not enough to understand substrate specificities with structural information. In this study, we selected a typical TyDC from Papaver somniferum as a model to study the structural basis of AAAD substrate specificities. Analysis of the native P. somniferum TyDC crystal structure and subsequent molecular docking and dynamics simulation provide some structural bases that explain substrate specificity for tyrosine. The result confirmed the previous proposed mechanism for the enzyme selectivity of indolic and phenolic substrates. Additionally, this study yields the first crystal structure for a plant type II pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decarboxylase. PMID:28232911

  9. The VIPER elements of trypanosomes constitute a novel group of tyrosine recombinase-enconding retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Hernan A; Robledo, German; Levin, Mariano J

    2006-02-01

    VIPER was initially characterized as a 2326bp LTR-like retroelement associated to SIRE, a short interspersed repetitive element specific of Trypanosoma cruzi. It carried a single ORF that coded for a putative reverse transcriptase-RNAse H protein, suggesting that it could be a truncated copy of a longer retroelement. Herein we report the identification and characterization of a complete 4480bp long VIPER in the T. cruzi genome. The complete VIPER harbored three non-overlapped domains encoding for a GAG-like, a tyrosine recombinase and a reverse transcriptase-RNAse H proteins. VIPER elements were also found in the genomes of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma vivax, but not in Leishmania sp. On the basis of its reverse transcriptase phylogeny, VIPER was classified as an LTR retroelement. However, VIPER was structurally related to the tyrosine recombinase encoding retroelements, DIRS and Ngaro. Phylogenetic analysis showed that VIPER's tyrosine recombinase grouped with the transposases RCI1 of Escherichia coli and Ye24 and Ye72 of Haemophilus influenzae within a major branch of prokaryotic recombinases. Taken together, VIPER's structure, the nature of its tyrosine recombinase, the unique features of its reverse transcriptase catalytic consensus motif and the fact that it was found in Trypanosomes, an early branching eukaryote, suggest that VIPER may be the closest relative of the founder element of the tyrosine recombinase encoding retrotransposons known up to date. Our analysis revealed that tyrosine recombinase-encoding retroelements were originated as early in evolution as non-LTR retroelements and suggests that VIPER, Ngaro and DIRS elements may constitute a third group of retrotransposons, distinct from both LTR and non-LTR retroelements.

  10. Utilization of tyrosine- and histidine-containing dipeptides to enhance productivity and culture viability.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sohye; Mullen, Johanna; Miranda, Les P; Deshpande, Rohini

    2012-09-01

    Adequate supply of nutrients, especially providing a sufficient level of specific amino acids, is essential for cell survival and production. Complex raw materials such as soy hydrolysates or yeast extracts are the source for both free amino acids and peptides. However, typical chemically defined (CD) media provide amino acids only in free form. While most amino acids are highly soluble in media and can be provided at fairly high concentrations, certain amino acids such as tyrosine have poor solubility and thus, only a limited amount can be added as a media component. The limited solubility of amino acids in media can raise the risk of media precipitation and instability, and could contribute to suboptimal culture performance due to insufficient nutrient levels to meet cellular demands. In this study, we examine the use of chemically synthesized dipeptides as an alternative method for delivering amino acids to various monoclonal antibody producing cell lines. In particular, we focus on tyrosine-containing dipeptides. Due to their substantially higher solubility (up to 250-fold as compared with free tyrosine), tyrosine-containing dipeptides can efficiently provide large amounts of tyrosine to cultured cells. When tested in fed-batch processes, these supplemental dipeptides exerted positive effects, including enhanced culture viability and titer. Moreover, dipeptide-supplemented cultures displayed improved metabolic profiles including lower lactate and NH 4(+) production, and better pH maintenance. In bioreactor studies using two-sided pH control, a lactate spike occurring on Day 10 and the concomitant high levels of base addition could be prevented with dipeptide supplementation. These beneficial effects could be obtained by one-time addition of dipeptides during inoculation, and did not require further feeds during the entire 11-15-day process. Non-tyrosine-containing dipeptides, such as His-Gly, also showed improved productivity and viability over control cultures.

  11. Src tyrosine kinase alters gating of hyperpolarization-activated HCN4 pacemaker channel through Tyr531.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) 4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2), on HCN4 and its mutant channels expressed in HEK 293 cells by using a whole cell patch-clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr(531) and Tyr(554). Substituting HCN4-Tyr(531) with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr(554) with phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src's actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr(531).

  12. Receptor tyrosine kinase amplification is predictive of distant metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Yu; Morita, Kei-Ichi; Kayamori, Kou; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Sakamoto, Kei; Katoh, Hiroto; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Inazawa, Johji; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to clarify the genomic factors associated with the diagnosis and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma via next-generation sequencing. We evaluated data from 220 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Genomic DNA was eluted using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, and targeted resequencing of 50 cancer-related genes was performed. In total, 311 somatic mutations were detected in 220 patients, consisting of 68 synonymous mutations and 243 non-synonymous mutations. Genes carrying mutations included TP53, CDKN2A, and PIK3CA in 79 (35.9%), 35 (15.9%), and 19 patients (8.6%), respectively. Copy number analysis detected amplification of PIK3CA and AKT1 in 38 (17.3%) and 11 patients (5.0%), respectively. Amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases was found in 37 patients (16.8%). Distant metastasis was noted in nine of 37 patients (24%) with receptor tyrosine kinase amplification, accounting for 43% of the 21 cases of distant metastasis. The cumulative 5-year survival rate was 64.6% in the receptor tyrosine kinase amplification group vs 85.2% in the no receptor tyrosine kinase amplification group. Moreover, we identified significantly poorer prognosis in the TP53 mutation/receptor tyrosine kinase amplification group, for which the cumulative 5-year survival rate was 41.6%. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrated that receptor tyrosine kinase amplification is a prognostic factor for distant metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma, indicating the necessity of using next-generation sequencing in clinical sequencing.

  13. Infarction-induced cytokines cause local depletion of tyrosine hydroxylase in cardiac sympathetic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Diana C.; Alston, Eric N.; Rohrer, Hermann; Nkadi, Paul; Woodward, William R.; Schütz, Günther; Habecker, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial infarction causes heterogeneity of noradrenergic transmission that contributes to the development of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Ischemia-induced alterations in sympathetic transmission include regional variations in cardiac norepinephrine (NE) and in tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in NE synthesis. Inflammatory cytokines that act through gp130 are elevated in the heart after myocardial infarction. These cytokines decrease expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in sympathetic neurons, and indirect evidence suggests they contribute to the local depletion of tyrosine hydroxylase in the damaged left ventricle. However, gp130 cytokines are also important for the survival of cardiac myocytes following damage to the heart. To examine the effect of cytokines on tyrosine hydroxylase and NE content in cardiac nerves we used gp130DBH-Cre/lox mice, which have a deletion of the gp130 receptor in neurons expressing dopamine beta hydroxylase. The absence of neuronal gp130 prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase in cardiac sympathetic nerves innervating the left ventricle one week after ischemia-reperfusion. Surprisingly, restoring tyrosine hydroxylase in the damaged ventricle did not return neuronal NE content to normal levels. NE uptake into cardiac nerves was significantly lower in gp130 KO mice, contributing to the lack of neuronal NE stores. There were no significant differences in left ventricular peak systolic pressure, dP/dtMAX, or dP/dtMIN between the two genotypes after myocardial infarction, but ganglionic blockade revealed differences in autonomic tone between the genotypes. Stimulating the heart with dobutamine or releasing endogenous NE with tyramine generated similar responses in both genotypes. Thus, the removal of gp130 from sympathetic neurons prevents the post-infarct depletion of TH in the left ventricle, but does not alter NE content or cardiac function. PMID:19880537

  14. ACK1/TNK2 Tyrosine Kinase: Molecular Signaling and Evolving Role in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Kiran; Mahajan, Nupam P.

    2014-01-01

    Deregulated tyrosine kinase signaling alters cellular homeostasis to drive cancer progression. The emergence of a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, ACK1 as an oncogenic kinase, has uncovered novel mechanisms by which tyrosine kinase signaling promotes cancer progression. While early studies focused on ACK1 (also known as activated Cdc42-associated kinase 1 or TNK2) as a cytosolic effecter of activated transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), wherein it shuttles between the cytosol and the nucleus to rapidly transduce extracellular signals from the RTKs to the intracellular effectors, recent data unfold a new aspect of its functionality as an epigenetic regulator. ACK1 interacts with the Estrogen Receptor (ER)/histone demethylase KDM3A (JHDM2a) complex, modifies KDM3A by tyrosine phosphorylation to regulate transcriptional outcome at HOXA1 locus to promote the growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. It is also well established that ACK1 regulates the activity of Androgen Receptor (AR) by tyrosine phosphorylation to fuel the growth of hormone-refractory prostate cancers. Further, recent explosion in genomic sequencing has revealed recurrent ACK1 gene amplification and somatic mutations in a variety of human malignancies, providing a molecular basis for its role in neoplastic transformation. In this review, we will discuss the various facets of ACK1 signaling, including its newly uncovered epigenetic regulator function, which enables cells to bypass the blockade to major survival pathways to promote resistance to standard cancer treatments. Not surprisingly, cancer cells appear to acquire an `addiction’ to ACK1 mediated survival, particularly under stress conditions, such as growth factor deprivation or genotoxic insults or hormone deprivation. With the accelerated development of potent and selective ACK1 inhibitors, targeted treatment for cancers harboring aberrant ACK1 activity may soon become a clinical reality. PMID:25347744

  15. Enhancement of cytosolic tyrosine kinase activity by propylthiouracil-induced hyperplasia in the rat thyroid.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R; Fantus, I G

    1989-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thyroid gland induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) is a well established model of rapid cell proliferation in vivo. Recent evidence indicates that tyrosine kinase activity is associated with growth factor receptors and oncogene protein products and may have an important regulatory action in the control of cell growth. Thus, we examined tyrosine kinase activity in rat thyroid membrane and cytosol preparations at rest and during PTU-induced hyperplasia. Although kinase activity was present in a crude microsomal membrane preparation, no change was observed during thyroid growth. In contrast, tyrosine kinase activity assayed with the artificial substrate poly(Glu,Na:Tyr) 4:1 was present in normal rat thyroid cytosol and increased 2- to 6-fold during the rapid phase of hyperplasia in the first 5-10 days of PTU treatment. It declined to control values by day 15, when the size and DNA content of the thyroid reached a plateau. Preincubation of the cytosolic preparations with several peptides known to bind to and activate growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases failed to enhance the activity, suggesting, along with the cytosolic localization, that the activity was distinct from these receptors. By gel filtration chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, tyrosine kinase activity was associated with a 55 kDa protein. Partial purification over a poly(Glu,Na:Tyr)4:1-Sepharose column, yielded a protein that appeared capable of autophosphorylation. It is suggested that this tyrosine kinase plays a role in mediating the growth-promoting effects of this model of thyroid cell hyperplasia.

  16. Radiation induced modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in flavocytochrome b 2 in dilute aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D.; Saha, A.; Mandal, P. C.

    2000-07-01

    Steady state gamma irradiation of an aqueous solution of flavocytochrome b 2 under different conditions led to modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. These aromatic amino acid residues were more susceptible to the attack by OH radicals than H atoms. Unchanged quantum yield values for tryptophan and tyrosine residues and unchanged tryptophan excited state lifetime in the irradiated enzyme suggests that irradiation results in breakage of some non-covalent bonds disrupting the peptide framework partially. It is justified by the circular dichroic studies for the irradiated enzyme which shows a reduced helicity but no evolution towards any other structures.

  17. Stimulatory actions of bioflavenoids on tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Hamano, S.; Oka, M.; Teraoka, K. )

    1990-09-28

    The effects of flavenoids on L-({sup 14}C)tyrosine uptake into cultured adrenal chromaffin cells were examined. Flavone markedly stimulated tyrosine uptake into these cells in a manner dependent on its concentration. Apigenin also caused a moderate stimulatory action, but quercetin had no significant effect on the uptake. Flavone also stimulated the uptake of histidine, but did not affect the uptake of serine, lysine, or glutamic acid. These results are considered to propose the possibility that flavonoids may be able to stimulate the precursor uptake into the cells, resulting in an enhancement of the biogenic amine production.

  18. Using ovality to predict nonmutagenic, orally efficacious pyridazine amides as cell specific spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Matthew C; Bhagirath, Niala; Chiao, Eric; Goldstein, David M; Hermann, Johannes C; Hsu, Pei-Yuan; Kirchner, Stephan; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Lukacs, Christine; Menke, John; Niu, Linghao; Padilla, Fernando; Peng, Ying; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Railkar, Aruna; Slade, Michelle; Soth, Michael; Xu, Daigen; Yadava, Preeti; Yee, Calvin; Zhou, Mingyan; Liao, Cheng

    2014-03-27

    Inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase has attracted much attention as a mechanism for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. We report the structure-guided optimization of pyridazine amide spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early representatives of this scaffold were highly potent and selective but mutagenic in an Ames assay. An approach that led to the successful identification of nonmutagenic examples, as well as further optimization to compounds with reduced cardiovascular liabilities is described. Select pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy data are presented.

  19. Phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) serine-511 by the combined action of tyrosine kinases and CK2: the implication of tyrosine-512 and phenylalanine-508.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Luca; Marin, Oriano; Venerando, Andrea; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2013-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) harbors, close to Phe-508, whose deletion is the commonest cause of cystic fibrosis, a conserved potential CK2 phospho-acceptor site (Ser511), which however is not susceptible to phosphorylation by CK2. To shed light on this apparent paradox, a series of systematically substituted peptides encompassing Ser511 were assayed for their ability to be phosphorylated. The main outcomes of our study are the following: (a) Tyr512 plays a prominent role as a negative determinant as its replacement by Ala restores Ser511 phosphorylation by CK2; (b) an even more pronounced phosphorylation of Ser511 is promoted if Tyr512 is replaced by phospho-tyrosine instead of alanine; (c) Tyr512 and, to a lesser extent, Tyr515 are readily phosphorylated by Lyn, a protein tyrosine kinase of the Src family, in a manner which is enhanced by the concomitant Phe508 deletion. Collectively taken, our data, in conjunction with the notion that Tyr515 is phosphorylated in vivo, disclose the possibility that CFTR Ser511 can be phosphorylated by the combined action of tyrosine kinases and CK2 and disclose a new mechanism of hierarchical phosphorylation where the role of the priming kinase is that of removing negative determinant(s).

  20. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ubiquitylation Involves the Dynamic Regulation of Cbl-Spry2 by Intersectin 1 and the Shp2 Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Okur, Mustafa Nazir; Russo, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitylation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulates their trafficking and lysosomal degradation. The multidomain scaffolding protein intersectin 1 (ITSN1) is an important regulator of this process. ITSN1 stimulates ubiquitylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through enhancing the activity of the Cbl E3 ubiquitin ligase. However, the precise mechanism through which ITSN1 enhances Cbl activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ITSN1 interacts with and recruits the Shp2 tyrosine phosphatase to Spry2 to enhance its dephosphorylation, thereby disrupting the inhibitory effect of Spry2 on Cbl and enhancing EGFR ubiquitylation. In contrast, expression of a catalytically inactive Shp2 mutant reversed the effect of ITSN1 on Spry2 dephosphorylation and decreased Cbl-mediated EGFR ubiquitylation. In addition, disruption of ITSN1 binding to Spry2 through point mutation of the Pro-rich ITSN1 binding site in Spry2 resulted in decreased Shp2-Spry2 interaction and enhanced Spry2 tyrosine phosphorylation. This study demonstrates that ITSN1 enhances Cbl activity, in part, by modulating the interaction of Cbl with Spry2 through recruitment of Shp2 phosphatase to the Cbl-Spry2 complex. These findings reveal a new level of complexity in the regulation of RTKs by Cbl through ITSN1 binding with Shp2 and Spry2. PMID:24216759

  1. Tyrosine kinase activation in breast carcinoma with correlation to HER-2/neu gene amplification and receptor overexpression.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, R; Naeem, R; Marconi, S; Luszcz, J; Garb, J; Gasparini, R; Otis, C N

    2001-12-01

    The HER-2/neu oncogene encodes a transmembrane receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. A pilot study was performed to investigate downstream effects of HER-2/neu (or related growth factor receptor) activation by identifying phosphorylated tyrosine. Fifty-four breast carcinomas were evaluated for HER-2/neu overexpression by the HercepTest (Dako, Carpinteria, CA) and the monoclonal CB11 antibody (Ventana, Tucson, AZ). Phosphotyrosine (an indication of tyrosine kinase activity) was detected by an antiphosphotyrosine mouse monoclonal antibody (Upstate Biotechnology, Lake Placid, NY). The gene amplification status was evaluated in 50 of the 54 cases by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Ventana gene probe. The HER-2/neu oncogene amplification was detected in 28% (14 of 50) of cases. Of the 14 cases showing oncogene amplification, tyrosine kinase activity was detected in 9 (64.2%) cases. There was moderate agreement between HER-2/neu gene amplification and tyrosine kinase activity (kappa = 0.43). Immunohistochemical staining of 3+ (with both HercepTest and CB11) showed better agreement with HER-2/neu oncogene amplification and increased tyrosine kinase activity than 2+ immunohistochemical staining. Overall, oncogene amplification and overexpression correlated with increased tyrosine kinase activity, supporting the mechanism of tyrosine kinase activation by HER-2/neu amplification and overexpression. However, 7 cases showing increased tyrosine kinase activity did not show gene amplification or 3+ receptor expression (by either HercepTest or CB11), raising the possibility of other growth factor receptors operating via the tyrosine kinase pathway. There was no apparent correlation between tyrosine kinase activity and hormone receptor status (estrogen or progesterone). Increased tyrosine kinase activity is more commonly associated with higher-grade tumors and thus may correlate with aggressive biologic behavior in breast carcinoma. The results of

  2. Tyramine biosynthesis in Enterococcus durans is transcriptionally regulated by the extracellular pH and tyrosine concentration.

    PubMed

    Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, María; Martín, M Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2009-11-01

    The microbial decarboxylation of some amino acids leads to the undesirable presence of biogenic amines in foods. One of the most abundant and frequent biogenic amines found in fermented foods is tyramine, which is produced by the decarboxylation of tyrosine. In the present work, transcriptional analysis of tyramine biosynthesis in Enterococcus durans IPLA655, a strain isolated from cheese, was studied. The gene coding for the tyrosine decarboxylase (tdcA) and that coding for the tyrosine-tyramine antiporter (tyrP) form an operon transcribed from the promoter P(tdcA), the expression of which is regulated by the extracellular pH and tyrosine concentration. Quantification of gene expression during the log phase of growth showed high concentrations of tyrosine and acidic pH conditions to induce tdcA-tyrP polycistronic messenger transcription.

  3. SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation as a potential bio-marker for myeloproliferative neoplasms associated with mutant JAK2 kinases

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Joanne; Suessmuth, Yvonne; Scott, Linda M.; Nahlik, Krystyna; McMullin, Mary Frances; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Green, Anthony R.; Johnston, James A.

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 V617F, identified in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, tyrosine phosphorylates SOCS3 and escapes its inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that the JAK2 exon 12 mutants described in a subset of V617F-negative MPN cases, also stabilize tyrosine phosphorylated SOCS3. SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation was also observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and granulocytes isolated from patients with JAK2 H538QK539L or JAK2 F537-K539delinsL mutations. JAK kinase inhibitors, which effectively inhibited the proliferation of cells expressing V617F or K539L, also caused a dose-dependent reduction in both mutant JAK2 and SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation. We propose, therefore, that SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation may be a novel bio-marker of myeloproliferative neoplasms resulting from a JAK2 mutation and a potential reporter of effective JAK2 inhibitor therapy currently in clinical development. PMID:19229050

  4. Role of the Yes and Csk tyrosine kinases in the development of a pathological state in the human retina.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Lyudmila; Emelyanova, Valentina; Volotovski, Igor

    2010-07-01

    Amplification and a cloning of fragments of genes of human retina tyrosine kinases, the nucleotide sequences of which feature a high homology to the gene families of the Yes and Csk tyrosine kinases, and a cloning of the complete coding sequence of the cDNA of the Csk tyrosine kinase gene of the human lymphocytes have been carried out. It has been established that this sequence contains 1,624 bp and encodes a protein that, with a 99% homology, corresponds to the human tyrosine kinase. A comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the full-size cDNA of the Csk tyrosine kinase of the lymphocytes of healthy donors and of patients with an eye choroidal melanoma has shown that a risk of development of an eye choroidal melanoma can be estimated by the frequency of occurrence of a mutant allele in the 10th exon.

  5. Brain catecholamine depletion and motor impairment in a Th knock-in mouse with type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Korner, Germaine; Noain, Daniela; Ying, Ming; Hole, Magnus; Flydal, Marte I; Scherer, Tanja; Allegri, Gabriella; Rassi, Anahita; Fingerhut, Ralph; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia; Pillai, Samyuktha; Wueest, Stephan; Konrad, Daniel; Lauber-Biason, Anna; Baumann, Christian R; Bindoff, Laurence A; Martinez, Aurora; Thöny, Beat

    2015-10-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase catalyses the hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to l-DOPA, the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of catecholamines. Mutations in the TH gene encoding tyrosine hydroxylase are associated with the autosomal recessive disorder tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency, which manifests phenotypes varying from infantile parkinsonism and DOPA-responsive dystonia, also termed type A, to complex encephalopathy with perinatal onset, termed type B. We generated homozygous Th knock-in mice with the mutation Th-p.R203H, equivalent to the most recurrent human mutation associated with type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency (TH-p.R233H), often unresponsive to l-DOPA treatment. The Th knock-in mice showed normal survival and food intake, but hypotension, hypokinesia, reduced motor coordination, wide-based gate and catalepsy. This phenotype was associated with a gradual loss of central catecholamines and the serious manifestations of motor impairment presented diurnal fluctuation but did not improve with standard l-DOPA treatment. The mutant tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme was unstable and exhibited deficient stabilization by catecholamines, leading to decline of brain tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity in the Th knock-in mice. In fact the substantia nigra presented an almost normal level of mutant tyrosine hydroxylase protein but distinct absence of the enzyme was observed in the striatum, indicating a mutation-associated mislocalization of tyrosine hydroxylase in the nigrostriatal pathway. This hypomorphic mouse model thus provides understanding on pathomechanisms in type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency and a platform for the evaluation of novel therapeutics for movement disorders with loss of dopaminergic input to the striatum.

  6. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  7. Evaluation of RET Tyrosine Kinase as a Novel Driver of Prostatic Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC) accounts for only 1% of diagnosed prostate cancers prior to aggressive therapy. However, after administration of... aggressive therapy, tumor resistance is inevitable resulting in the acquisition of SCNC tumors in well over 20% of patients. SCNC tumors are highly... aggressive , metastasize readily, and often lead to death of the patient within months after diagnosis. Tyrosine kinases represent an untapped area for

  8. Mutant torsinA interacts with Tyrosine Hydroxylase in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, Casey A.; Martin, Kirstee; Hutton, Michael; Delatycki, Martin B.; Cookson, Mark R.; Lockhart, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    A specific mutation (ΔE302/303) in the torsinA gene underlies most cases of dominantly inherited early-onset torsion dystonia. This mutation causes the protein to aggregate and form intracellular inclusion bodies in cultured cells and animal models. Co-expression of the wildtype and mutant proteins resulted in the redistribution of the wildtype protein from the endoplasmic reticulum to inclusion bodies in cultured HEK293 cells, and this was associated with increased interaction between the two proteins. Expression of ΔE302/303 but not wildtype torsinA in primary postnatal midbrain neurons resulted in the formation of intracellular inclusion bodies, predominantly in dopaminergic neurons. Tyrosine hydroxylase was sequestered in these inclusions and this process was mediated by increased protein-protein interaction between mutant torsinA and tyrosine hydroxylase. Analysis in an inducible neuroblastoma cell culture model demonstrated altered tyrosine hydroxylase activity in the presence of the mutant but not wildtype torsinA protein. Our results suggest that the interaction of tyrosine hydroxylase and mutant torsinA may contribute to the phenotype and reported dopaminergic dysfunction in torsinA-mediated dystonia. PMID:19761814

  9. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated syndrome of inappropriate secretion of anti-diuretic hormone.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jordan; Shields, Jenna; Passero, Vida

    2016-10-01

    Hyponatremia is a common complication among cancer patients. Certain antineoplastic agents have been associated with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of anti-diuretic hormone-induced hyponatremia. The most common agents associated with secretion of anti-diuretic hormone are vinca alkaloids, platinum compounds, and alkylating agents. We report a case of secretion of anti-diuretic hormone associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  10. Angiopoietin-1 Regulates Brain Endothelial Permeability through PTPN-2 Mediated Tyrosine Dephosphorylation of Occludin

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Rizwan; Mayanil, Chandra S.; Kim, Kwang Sik; Tomita, Tadanori

    2015-01-01

    Objective Blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and increased endothelial permeability is a hallmark of neuro-vascular inflammation. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), a Tie-2 receptor agonist ligand, is known to modulate barrier function of endothelial cells; however the molecular mechanisms related to Ang-1 mediated repair of Tight Junctions (TJs) in brain endothelium still remain elusive. In this study, we investigated a novel role of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase N-2 (PTPN-2) in Ang-1 mediated stabilization of tight junction proteins. Method and Result To study the barrier protective mechanism of Ang-1, we challenged human brain microvascular endothelial cells in-vitro, with a potent inflammatory mediator thrombin. By using confocal microscopy and transwell permeability assay, we show that pretreatment of brain endothelial cells with Ang-1 diminish thrombin mediated disruption of TJs and increase in endothelial permeability. We also found that Ang-1 inhibits thrombin induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Occludin and promote Occludin interaction with Zona Occludens-1 (ZO-1) to stabilize TJs. Interestingly, our study revealed that depletion of PTPN-2 by siRNAs abolishes Ang-1 ability to promote tyrosine dephosphorylation of Occludin, resulting Occludin disassociation from ZO-1 and endothelial hyperpermeability. Summary Collectively, our findings suggest that in brain endothelial cells blocking PTPN-2 mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Occludin is a novel mechanism to maintain BBB function, and may offer a key therapeutic strategy for neuro-inflammatory disorders associated with BBB disruption. PMID:26090670

  11. Effect of chain elongation on biological properties of the toxin paralysin β-alanyl-tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Macurkova, Anna; Neubauerova, Tereza; Poncova, Kristyna; Jezek, Rudolf; Lovecka, Petra; Spiwok, Vojtech; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2014-04-01

    In hemolymph of insect species, compounds with remarkable properties for pharmaceutical industry are present. At the first line, there were found compounds of low molecular mass, less than 1 kDa. One of such compounds, β-alanyl-tyrosine (252 Da), was isolated from larval hemolymph of some species of holometabolous insects (e.g. Neobellieria bullata). Its paralytic activity and antimicrobial properties were described until now. In this study, we present the effect of elongation of β-alanyl-tyrosine by repeating of this motive on the biological and physical properties of prepared analogues. For assessment of antimicrobial properties of these new compounds strains of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were used, we also followed the haemolytic activity and toxic effect on human cell culture HepG2. On the base of ECD spectroscopy measurement, subsequent molecular modelling and known secondary structure of original β-alanyl-tyrosine dipeptide, the secondary structures of repeating sequences of β-AY were specified. The repeating structures of β-alanyl-tyrosine show increase in antimicrobial activity; for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, minimal inhibitory concentration was decreased from 30 to 15 mM for 2xβ-AY, 0.4 mM for 4xβ-AY and 0.25 mM for 6xβ-AY.

  12. IN VITRO CARDIOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: ROLE OF BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CARDIOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: ROLE OF BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION.

    T. L. Knuckles1 R. Jaskot2, J. Richards2, and K.Dreher2.
    1Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicin...

  13. Deciphering the Role of Tyrosine Sulfation in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Using Shotgun Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Jee; Park, Chang-Jin; Bae, Nahee; Han, Sang-Wook

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial tyrosine sulfotransferase, RaxST, is required for activation of rice XA21-mediated immunity, and it catalyzes sulfation of tyrosine residues of Omp1X and RaxX in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, a causal agent of bacterial blight in rice. Although RaxST is biochemically well-characterized, biological functions of tyrosine sulfation have not been fully elucidated. We compared protein expression patterns between the wildtype and a raxST knockout mutant using shotgun proteomic analysis. Forty nine proteins displayed a more than 1.5-fold difference in their expression between the wildtype and the mutant strains. Clusters of orthologous groups analysis revealed that proteins involved in cell motility were most abundant, and phenotypic observation also showed that the twitching motility of the mutant was dramatically changed. These results indicate that tyrosine sulfation by RaxST is essential for Xoo movement, and they provide new insights into the biological roles of RaxST in cellular processes. PMID:27298602

  14. Tyrosine decarboxylase activity of Lactobacillus brevis IOEB 9809 isolated from wine and L. brevis ATCC 367.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arribas, V; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    1999-11-01

    Tyramine, a frequent amine in wines, is produced from tyrosine by the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) activity of bacteria. The tyramine-producing strain Lactobacillus brevis IOEB 9809 isolated from wine and the reference strain L. brevis ATCC 367 were studied. At the optimum pH, 5.0, K(m) values of IOEB 9809 and ATCC 367 crude extracts for L-tyrosine were 0.58 mM and 0.67 mM, and V(max) was higher for the wine strain (115 U) than the ATCC 367 (66 U). TDC exhibited a preference for L-tyrosine over L-DOPA as substrate. Enzyme activity was pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent and it was stabilized by the substrate and coenzyme. In contrast, glycerol and beta-mercaptoethanol strongly inhibited TDC. Tyramine competitively inhibited TDC for both strains. Citric acid, lactic acid and ethanol had an inhibitory effect on cells and crude extracts, but none could inhibit TDC at the usual concentrations in wines.

  15. Role of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Indolent and Other Mature B-Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kutsch, Nadine; Marks, Reinhard; Ratei, Richard; Held, Thomas K; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tyrosine kinases represents a highly specific treatment approach for different malignancies. This also includes non-Hodgkin lymphoma since it is well known that these enzymes are frequently involved in the lymphomagenesis. Hereby, tyrosine kinases might either be dysregulated intrinsically or be activated within signal transduction pathways leading to tumor survival and growth. Among others, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is of particular interest as a potential therapeutic target. Btk is stimulated by B-cell receptor signaling and activates different transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB. The Btk inhibitor ibrutinib has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma recently. Numerous clinical trials evaluating this agent in different combinations (eg, with rituximab or classical chemotherapeutic agents) as a treatment option for aggressive and indolent lymphoma are under way. Here, we summarize the role of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of indolent and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas (eg, mantle-cell lymphoma). PMID:26327780

  16. Role of the Non-Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ACK2 in EGF Receptor Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13 . ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words...SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Tyrosine kinase, EGF receptor; ErbB-2/Neu, signaling, small 13 molecules 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...12 References ...................................................................................... 13 Appendices

  17. Activation of oncogenic tyrosine kinase signaling promotes insulin receptor-mediated cone photoreceptor survival

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Ammaji; Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, daylight vision is primarily mediated by cone photoreceptors. These cells die in age-related retinal degenerations. Prolonging the life of cones for even one decade would have an enormous beneficial effect on usable vision in an aging population. Photoreceptors are postmitotic, but shed 10% of their outer segments daily, and must synthesize the membrane and protein equivalent of a proliferating cell each day. Although activation of oncogenic tyrosine kinase and inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase signaling is known to be essential for tumor progression, the cellular regulation of this signaling in postmitotic photoreceptor cells has not been studied. In the present study, we report that a novel G-protein coupled receptor–mediated insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway is regulated by non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src through the inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase IB (PTP1B). We demonstrated the functional significance of this pathway through conditional deletion of IR and PTP1B in cones, in addition to delaying the death of cones in a mouse model of cone degeneration by activating the Src. This is the first study demonstrating the molecular mechanism of a novel signaling pathway in photoreceptor cells, which provides a window of opportunity to save the dying cones in retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27391439

  18. A novel mutation leading to a deletion in the SH3 domain of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Mesci, Lütfiye; Ozdag, Hilal; Turul, Tuba; Ersoy, Fügen; Tezcan, Ilhan; Sanal, Ozden

    2006-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary B cell immunodeficiency disorder, caused by a defect in the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. Here, we describe a novel four base pair mutation (838delGAGT) in intron 9 of the BTK gene leading to the skipping of exon 9 in a 2.5-year-old boy with this disorder.

  19. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  20. Effects of modification of the tyrosine residues of bacteriorhodopsin with tetranitromethane.

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Cavieres, M; Moore, T A; Perham, R N

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium with tetranitromethane led to modification of tyrosine residues. Modification of more than 3-4 tyrosine residues per bacteriorhodopsin monomer caused a decrease in the light-induced proton-pumping ability of purple membrane in synthetic lipid vesicles, loss of the sharp X-ray-diffraction patterns characteristic of the crystal lattice, loss of the absorbance maximum at 560 nm, and change in the buoyant density of the membrane. No modification of lipid was detected. These changes were interpreted as a gradual denaturation of the protein component such that when 8-9 tyrosine residues are modified, no proton pumping is observed. Modification of less than 3-4 tyrosine residues with tetranitromethane caused an increse in light-induced proton pumping. It was possible to generate partly modified purple membrane which had completely lost the property of diffracting X-rays into the sharp pattern observed with native purple membrane, but which still retained the ability to pump protons in a vectorial manner. Retention of crystal lattice is not essential for proton pumping. Images Fig. 3. PMID:475758

  1. Insect cell-expressed p180erbB3 possesses an impaired tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, P M; Platko, J V; Cantley, L C; Cerione, R A; Carraway, K L

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinases share a number of highly conserved or invariant amino acid residues in their catalytic domains, suggesting that these residues are necessary for kinase activity. In p180erbB3, a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor subfamily, three of these residues are altered, suggesting that this protein might have an impaired protein tyrosine kinase activity. To test this hypothesis, we have expressed human EGF receptor and bovine p180erbB3 in insect cells via baculovirus infection and have compared their autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation activities. We have found that, while the EGF receptor readily undergoes EGF-stimulated autophosphorylation and catalyzes the incorporation of phosphate into the model substrates (E4Y1)n (random 4:1 copolymer of glutamic acid and tyrosine) and GST-p85 (glutathione S-transferase fusion protein with the 85-kDa subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase), p180erbB3 autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation are at least 2 orders of magnitude less efficient. However, p180erbB3 is capable of binding the ATP analog 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine, indicating that the lack of observed kinase activity is probably not due to nonfunctional or denatured receptors expressed by the insect cells. On the basis of these results, we propose that p180erbB3 possesses an impaired intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Images PMID:8058768

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Fate Is Controlled by Hrs Tyrosine Phosphorylation Sites That Regulate Hrs Degradation▿

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Kathryn A.; Visser Smit, Gina D.; Place, Trenton L.; Winistorfer, Stanley; Piper, Robert C.; Lill, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is an endosomal protein essential for the efficient sorting of activated growth factor receptors into the lysosomal degradation pathway. Hrs undergoes ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation on residues Y329 and Y334 downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. It has been difficult to investigate the functional roles of phosphoHrs, as only a small proportion of the cellular Hrs pool is detectably phosphorylated. Using an HEK 293 model system, we found that ectopic expression of the protein Cbl enhances Hrs ubiquitination and increases Hrs phosphorylation following cell stimulation with EGF. We exploited Cbl's expansion of the phosphoHrs pool to determine whether Hrs tyrosine phosphorylation controls EGFR fate. In structure-function studies of Cbl and EGFR mutants, the level of Hrs phosphorylation and rapidity of apparent Hrs dephosphorylation correlated directly with EGFR degradation. Differential expression of wild-type versus Y329,334F mutant Hrs in Hrs-depleted cells revealed that one or both tyrosines regulate ligand-dependent Hrs degradation, as well as EGFR degradation. By modulating Hrs ubiquitination, phosphorylation, and protein levels, Cbl may control the composition of the endosomal sorting machinery and its ability to target EGFR for lysosomal degradation. PMID:17101784

  3. Dephosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinases as target of regulation by radiation, oxidants or alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Knebel, A; Rahmsdorf, H J; Ullrich, A; Herrlich, P

    1996-01-01

    Several non-physiologic agents such as radiation, oxidants and alkylating agents induce ligand-independent activation of numerous receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and of protein tyrosine kinases at the inner side of the plasma membrane (e.g. Dévary et al., 1992; Sachsenmaier et al., 1994; Schieven et al., 1994; Coffer et al., 1995). Here we show additional evidence for the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and we show activation of v-ErbB, ErbB2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. As a common principle of action the inducing agents such as UVC, UVB, UVA, hydrogen peroxide and iodoacetamide inhibit receptor tyrosine dephosphorylation in a thiol-sensitive and, with the exception of the SH-alkylating agent, reversible manner. EGFR dephosphorylation can also be modulated by these non-physiologic agents in isolated plasma membranes in the presence of Triton X-100. Further, substrate (EGFR) and phosphatase have been separated: a membrane preparation of cells that have been treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and whose dephosphorylating enzymes have been permanently destroyed by iodoacetamide can be mixed with a membrane preparation from untreated cells which re-establishes EGFR dephosphorylation. This dephosphorylation can be modulated in vitro by UV and thiol agents. We conclude that RTKs exhibit significant spontaneous protein kinase activity; several adverse agents target (an) essential SH-group(s) carried by (a) membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase(s). Images PMID:8895576

  4. Protein tyrosine kinases in bacterial pathogens are associated with virulence and production of exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, O; Bloch, Y; Frankel, G; Ullrich, H; Geider, K; Rosenshine, I

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryotes, tyrosine protein phosphorylation has been studied extensively, while in bacteria, it is considered rare and is poorly defined. We demonstrate that Escherichia coli possesses a gene, etk, encoding an inner membrane protein that catalyses tyrosine autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of a synthetic co-polymer poly(Glu:Tyr). This protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was termed Ep85 or Etk. All the E.coli strains examined possessed etk; however, only a subset of pathogenic strains expressed it. Etk is homologous to several bacterial proteins including the Ptk protein of Acinetobacter johnsonii, which is the only other known prokaryotic PTK. Other Etk homologues are AmsA of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora and Orf6 of the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. These proteins are involved in the production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) required for virulence. We demonstrated that like Etk, AmsA and probably also Orf6 are PTKs. Taken together, these findings suggest that tyrosine protein phosphorylation in prokaryotes is more common than was appreciated previously, and that Etk and its homologues define a distinct protein family of prokaryotic membrane-associated PTKs involved in EPS production and virulence. These prokaryotic PTKs may serve as a new target for the development of new antibiotics. PMID:10369665

  5. Earliest events in α-synuclein fibrillation probed with the fluorescence of intrinsic tyrosines.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Marco A; Jorge, Carla D; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence of the four tyrosines of α-synuclein (Syn) was used for probing the earliest events preceding the fibrillation of Syn, during the onset of the so-called lag-time of fibrillation. Steady-state fluorescence experiments revealed an increase in the fluorescence intensity (FI) for Syn solutions at pH values 3 and 2, in comparison with pH7, and fluorescence decays indicated that the FI increase did not result from suppression of excited-state proton transfer from the tyrosines to aspartates and glutamates, exposure of tyrosines to more hydrophobic environments, or reduction of homo-energy transfer. Instead, the FI increase was due to changes in the population of the tyrosine rotamers at low pH values. Stopped-flow experiments (pH-jumps) showed that the FI enhancement involves two processes: a fast (sub-7 ms) intramolecular (concentration-independent) process, which we assign to the protein collapse at low pH, and a slower intermolecular (concentration-dependent) process of protein dimerization/oligomerization, starting at 4-10s after acidification. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work on the experimental detection of these earliest processes in the fibrillation of Syn.

  6. Inhibition of formation of filopodia after axotomy by inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D J; Wu, D Y

    1995-08-01

    The activity of motile protrusions of the growth cone--filopodia, veils, and lamellipodia--is essential for directed growth of a neuronal process. The regulation of the formation of these protrusions is not well understood. Numerous filopodia and veils or lamellipodia form within minutes of transection of an Aplysia axon in culture, as the initial components of growth cones of regenerating neurites. Axotomy, therefore, provides a robust and reliable protocol for analyzing the formation of these protrusions. We evaluated the involvement of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of protrusive activity. Of the inhibitors of protein kinases assayed, only the inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases--genistein, lavendustin A, herbimycin A, and erbstatin analogue--suppressed the formation of protrusions, as assessed by high magnification video microscopy. These drugs did not work by preventing resealing of the axon, as evident from visual inspection and by the unimpaired effectiveness of genistein or lavendustin in preventing formation of filopodia when applied after resealing. Inhibition of protein tyrosine kinases not only prevented the formation of actin-based protrusions, but also caused deterioration of the actin network underlying the protrusive area of preexisting growth cones. Consistent with an involvement of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the generation of protrusive structures, immunocytochemistry revealed that aggregates of phosphotyrosine appeared at the margins of the axon, from which protrusions emerge shortly after axotomy. These results suggest a role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the formation and maintenance of actin-based protrusive structures.

  7. A comparison of tyrosine against placebo, phentermine, caffeine, and D-amphetamine during sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Waters, William F; Magill, Richard A; Bray, George A; Volaufova, Julia; Smith, Steven R; Lieberman, Harris R; Rood, Jennifer; Hurry, Mark; Anderson, Tai; Ryan, Donna H

    2003-08-01

    Sleep deprivation can impair alertness and cognitive and motor performance. We hypothesized that the amino acid tyrosine might reduce deleterious effects of sleep deprivation. Seventy-six healthy males, age 18-35 years, participated in a four-day protocol that included a habituation night, a baseline night, a 40.5 h period without sleep, and a recovery night. Tyrosine 150 mg/kg, caffeine 300 mg/70 kg, phentermine 37.5 mg, D-amphetamine 20 mg and placebo were administered in a double-blind, randomized fashion to compare their effects on the time it took to fall asleep, on endocrine responses during sleep deprivation, and on sleep quantity, quality and architecture as measured by polysomnography during recovery sleep. When given after 36 h without sleep, tyrosine had no significant effect on any parameter of sleep. D-amphetamine produced marked decrease in sleep drive but caused deleterious effects on many aspects of recovery sleep. Still, D-amphetamine was associated with increased alertness on the first recovery day. Phentermine and caffeine both decreased sleep drive during sleep deprivation, but phentermine impaired rapid-eye-movement (REM) recovery sleep. Tyrosine (when compared to placebo) had no effect on any sleep related measure, but it did stimulate prolactin release.

  8. Standard enthalpies of formation for glycyl-tyrosine and products of its dissociation in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochergina, L. A.; Badelin, V. G.; Krutova, O. N.; Volkov, A. V.; Damrina, K. V.

    2015-07-01

    The enthalpies of solution of crystalline glycyl-tyrosine in water and potassium hydroxide aqueous solutions are determined at 298.15 K by means of direct calorimetry. Standard enthalpies of formation for dipeptide and its products of dissociation in an aqueous solution are calculated.

  9. A novel bacterial tyrosine kinase essential for cell division and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianguo; Ohta, Noriko; Zhao, Ji-Liang; Newton, Austin

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in the regulation of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell growth, division, and differentiation. The Caulobacter crescentus divL gene encodes a novel bacterial tyrosine kinase essential for cell viability and division. Although the DivL protein is homologous to the ubiquitous bacterial histidine protein kinases (HPKs), it differs from previously studied members of this protein kinase family in that it contains a tyrosine residue (Tyr-550) in the conserved H-box instead of a histidine residue, which is the expected site of autophosphorylation. DivL is autophosphorylated on Tyr-550 in vitro, and this tyrosine residue is essential for cell viability and regulation of the cell division cycle. Purified DivL also catalyzes phosphorylation of CtrA and activates transcription in vitro of the cell cycle-regulated fliF promoter. Suppressor mutations in ctrA bypass the conditional cell division phenotype of cold-sensitive divL mutants, providing genetic evidence that DivL function in cell cycle and developmental regulation is mediated, at least in part, by the global response regulator CtrA. DivL is the only reported HPK homologue whose function has been shown to require autophosphorylation on a tyrosine, and, thus, it represents a new class of kinases within this superfamily of protein kinases. PMID:10557274

  10. Activation of the Lck tyrosine protein kinase by hydrogen peroxide requires the phosphorylation of Tyr-394.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J S; Sefton, B M

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of cells to H2O2 mimics many of the effects of treatment of cells with extracellular ligands. Among these is the stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation. In this study, we show that exposure of cells to H2O2 increases the catalytic activity of the lymphocyte-specific tyrosine protein kinase p56lck (Lck) and induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-394, the autophosphorylation site. Using mutant forms of Lck, we found that Tyr-394 is required for H2O2-induced activation of Lck, suggesting that phosphorylation of this site may activate Lck. In addition, H2O2 treatment induced phosphorylation at Tyr-394 in a catalytically inactive mutant of Lck in cells that do not express endogenous Lck. This demonstrates that a kinase other than Lck itself is capable of phosphorylating Lck at the so-called autophosphorylation site and raises the possibility that this as yet unidentified tyrosine protein kinase functions as an activator of Lck. Such an activating enzyme could play an important role in signal transduction in T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7538674

  11. Elucidation of a four-site allosteric network in fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaibin; Marsiglia, William M; Cho, Min-Kyu; Huang, Zhifeng; Deng, Jingjing; Blais, Steven P; Gai, Weiming; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Neubert, Thomas A; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2017-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is tightly regulated by protein allostery within the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains. Yet the molecular determinants of allosteric connectivity in tyrosine kinase domain are incompletely understood. By means of structural (X-ray and NMR) and functional characterization of pathogenic gain-of-function mutations affecting the FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase domain, we elucidated a long-distance allosteric network composed of four interconnected sites termed the ‘molecular brake’, ‘DFG latch’, ‘A-loop plug’, and ‘αC tether’. The first three sites repress the kinase from adopting an active conformation, whereas the αC tether promotes the active conformation. The skewed design of this four-site allosteric network imposes tight autoinhibition and accounts for the incomplete mimicry of the activated conformation by pathogenic mutations targeting a single site. Based on the structural similarity shared among RTKs, we propose that this allosteric model for FGFR kinases is applicable to other RTKs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21137.001 PMID:28166054

  12. Engagement of CD81 induces ezrin tyrosine phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with filamentous actin

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Greg P.; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Liu, Raymond; Sharpe, Orr; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Wald Krauss, Sharon; Sagi, Yael; Davis, R. Eric; Staudt, Louis M.; Sharman, Jeff P.; Robinson, William H.; Levy, Shoshana

    2009-06-09

    CD81 is a tetraspanin family member involved in diverse cellular interactions in the immune and nervous systems and in cell fusion events. However, the mechanism of action of CD81 and of other tetraspanins has not been defined. We reasoned that identifying signaling molecules downstream of CD81 would provide mechanistic clues. We engaged CD81 on the surface of Blymphocytes and identified the induced tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the most prominent tyrosine phosphorylated protein was ezrin, an actin binding protein and a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family. We also found that CD81 engagement induces spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that Syk was involved in tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin. Ezrin colocalized with CD81 and F-actin upon stimulation and this association was disrupted when Syk activation was blocked. Taken together, these studies suggest a model in which CD81 interfaces between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton by activating Syk, mobilizing ezrin, and recruiting F-actin to facilitate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell signaling. This may be a mechanism explaining the pleiotropic effects induced in response to stimulating cells by anti-CD81 antibodies or by the hepatitis C virus, which uses this molecule as its key receptor.

  13. Tyrosine requirement during the rapid catch-up growth phase of recovery from severe childhood undernutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The requirement for aromatic amino acids, during the rapid catch-up in weight phase of recovery from severe childhood under nutrition (SCU) is not clearly established. As a first step, the present study aimed to estimate the tyrosine requirement of children with SCU during the catch-up growth phase ...

  14. Ecology Drives the Distribution of Specialized Tyrosine Metabolism Modules in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Greene, George H.; McGary, Kriston L.; Rokas, Antonis; Slot, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene clusters encoding accessory or environmentally specialized metabolic pathways likely play a significant role in the evolution of fungal genomes. Two such gene clusters encoding enzymes associated with the tyrosine metabolism pathway (KEGG #00350) have been identified in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. The l-tyrosine degradation (TD) gene cluster encodes a functional module that facilitates breakdown of the phenolic amino acid, l-tyrosine through a homogentisate intermediate, but is also involved in the production of pyomelanin, a fungal pathogenicity factor. The gentisate catabolism (GC) gene cluster encodes a functional module likely involved in phenolic compound degradation, which may enable metabolism of biphenolic stilbenes in multiple lineages. Our investigation of the evolution of the TD and GC gene clusters in 214 fungal genomes revealed spotty distributions partially shaped by gene cluster loss and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Specifically, a TD gene cluster shows evidence of HGT between the extremophilic, melanized fungi Exophiala dermatitidis and Baudoinia compniacensis, and a GC gene cluster shows evidence of HGT between Sordariomycete and Dothideomycete grass pathogens. These results suggest that the distribution of specialized tyrosine metabolism modules is influenced by both the ecology and phylogeny of fungal species. PMID:24391152

  15. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling and vascular integrity.

    PubMed

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Hess, Paul R; Kahn, Mark L; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2014-03-28

    Platelets are well-known for their critical role in hemostasis, that is, the prevention of blood loss at sites of mechanical vessel injury. Inappropriate platelet activation and adhesion, however, can lead to thrombotic complications, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. To fulfill its role in hemostasis, the platelet is equipped with various G protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to soluble agonists such as thrombin, ADP, and thromboxane A2. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, platelets express 3 glycoproteins that belong to the family of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors: Fc receptor γ chain, which is noncovalently associated with the glycoprotein VI collagen receptor, C-type lectin 2, the receptor for podoplanin, and Fc receptor γII A, a low-affinity receptor for immune complexes. Although both genetic and chemical approaches have documented a critical role for platelet G protein-coupled receptors in hemostasis, the contribution of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors to this process is less defined. Studies performed during the past decade, however, have identified new roles for platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in vascular integrity in utero and at sites of inflammation. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on how platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling controls vascular integrity, both in the presence and absence of mechanical injury.

  16. Determination of L-tyrosine by β-cyclodextrin sensitized fluorescence quenching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiashi; Xu, Suqin

    2010-10-01

    A novel β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) sensitized fluorescence quenching method for the determination of L-tyrosine ( L-Tyr) with Mo(VI)-phenyl-fluorone (PF) as a fluorescence probe has been developed. The fluorescence intensity of Mo(VI)-PF-β-CD was diminished as the L-tyrosine was added, the fluorescence quenching value Δ F = Fβ-CD-Mo-PF - Fβ-CD-Mo-PF- L-Tyr was enhanced in β-CD and there was a linear relationship between the Δ F and the concentration of L-Tyr. Under the optimal conditions, the linear range of calibration curve for the determination of L-tyrosine was 0.3-20.0 μg mL -1; the detection limit was 0.094 μg mL -1. NaOH (10%, w/v) is the best reagent of hydrolysis in sample preparation. The sensitized mechanism of β-cyclodextrin was discussed. The method has been applied to the determination of L-tyrosine in spirulina and food samples with satisfactory results.

  17. Modulation of protein tyrosine nitration and inflammatory mediators by isoprenylhydroquinone glucoside.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Ana; Giner, Rosa-María; Recio, María-Carmen; Ríos, José-Luis; Máñez, Salvador

    2007-03-01

    The nitration of tyrosine caused by peroxynitrite and other reactive nitrogen species is clearly detrimental for some physiological processes; however, its signalling role is still open to controversy. Among the natural phenolics known for their ability to oppose free tyrosine nitration, isoprenylhydroquinone glucoside is investigated due to its unusual structure, which contains a simple hydroxybenzene alkylated by a hemiterpenoid moiety. This hydroquinone was shown to be an effective inhibitor of peroxynitrite-induced protein tyrosine nitration in 3T3 fibroblasts. When tested on bovine seroalbumin nitration, however, the potency was reduced by half and the effect was almost abolished in the presence of bicarbonate. In contrast, addition of this anion had no effect on the nitrite/hydrogen peroxide/hemin system. Isoprenylhydroquinone glucoside was also active in the microM range on intra- and extracellular protein-bound tyrosine nitration by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. The effects on nitric oxide synthase expression, interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were quite moderate. Thus, isoprenylhydroquinone glucoside is an inhibitor of protein nitration in situ, but lacks effect on the generation of either nitric oxide or inflammatory cytokines.

  18. Effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitor on the motility and ATP concentrations of fowl spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, K; Higashio, M; Tsuzuki, Y

    1998-02-01

    The possible role of tyrosine kinase in the regulation of fowl sperm motility was investigated by using a stable analogue of erbstatin, methyl 2,5-dihydroxycinnamate (2,5-MeC), a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinase. This inhibited the motility of intact spermatozoa at 30 degrees C in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the motility of demembranated spermatozoa was not inhibited by the same concentrations of 2,5-MeC. At 40 degrees C, both intact and demembranated spermatozoa were almost immotile with or without 2,5-MeC. Additionally, intact spermatozoa, stimulated by the addition of Ca2+ or calyculin A, a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatases, lost their motility with the subsequent addition of 2,5-MeC at 40 degrees C. However, unlike the motility, the ATP concentrations of spermatozoa were maintained in about 30-35 nmol ATP/10(9) cells during these incubation periods. The activity of tyrosine kinase of spermatozoa at 30 degrees C, estimated by measuring the phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide substrate, RR-SRC, was 0.17 pmol/min per milligram of protein. This activity was lower than that of fowl testes or chick brain but higher than that of chick liver. These results suggest that tyrosine kinase activity, which is not retained in the axoneme and/or accessory cytoskeletal components, may be involved in the maintenance of flagellar movement of fowl spermatozoa at 30 degrees C.

  19. Tyrosine Kinase Ligand-Receptor Pair Prediction by Using Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Yarimizu, Masayuki; Wei, Cao; Komiyama, Yusuke; Ueki, Kokoro; Nakamura, Shugo; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases are essential proteins involved in cellular differentiation and proliferation in vivo and are heavily involved in allergic diseases, diabetes, and onset/proliferation of cancerous cells. Identifying the interacting partner of this protein, a growth factor ligand, will provide a deeper understanding of cellular proliferation/differentiation and other cell processes. In this study, we developed a method for predicting tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from their amino acid sequences. We collected tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP) and UniProtKB, filtered them by removing sequence redundancy, and used them as a dataset for machine learning and assessment of predictive performance. Our prediction method is based on support vector machines (SVMs), and we evaluated several input features suitable for tyrosine kinase for machine learning and compared and analyzed the results. Using sequence pattern information and domain information extracted from sequences as input features, we obtained 0.996 of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. This accuracy is higher than that obtained from general protein-protein interaction pair predictions. PMID:26347773

  20. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  1. Hierarchical Disabled-1 Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Src family Kinase Activation and Neurite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Zhihua; Monckton, Elizabeth; Glubrecht, Darryl; Godbout, Roseline

    2013-01-01

    There are two developmentally regulated alternatively spliced forms of Disabled-1 (Dab1) in the chick retina: an early form (Dab1-E) expressed in retinal precursor cells and a late form (Dab1-L) expressed in neuronal cells. The main difference between these two isoforms is the absence of two Src family kinase (SFK) recognition sites in Dab1-E. Both forms retain two Abl/Crk/Nck recognition sites implicated in the recruitment of SH2 domain-containing signaling proteins. One of the Dab1-L-specific SFK recognition sites, at tyrosine(Y)-198, has been shown to be phosphorylated in Reelin-stimulated neurons. Here, we use Reelin-expressing primary retinal cultures to investigate the role of the four Dab1 tyrosine phosphorylation sites on overall tyrosine phosphorylation, Dab1 phosphorylation, SFK activation and neurite formation. We show that Y198 is essential but not sufficient for maximal Dab1 phosphorylation, SFK activation and neurite formation, with Y232 and Y220 playing particularly important roles in SFK activation and neuritogenesis, and Y185 having modifying effects secondary to Y232 and Y220. Our data support a role for all four Dab1 tyrosine phosphorylation sites in mediating the spectrum of activities associated with Reelin-Dab1 signaling in neurons. PMID:17350651

  2. Endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase activity is essential for myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Tanja; Räsänen, Markus; Anisimov, Andrey; Tuomainen, Tomi; Zheng, Wei; Tvorogov, Denis; Hulmi, Juha J.; Andersson, Leif C.; Cenni, Bruno; Tavi, Pasi; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of heart disease, including ischemic disease, hypertension, heart failure, and valvular disease, and it is a strong predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Deletion of bone marrow kinase in chromosome X (Bmx), an arterial nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy in mice. This finding raised the possibility of therapeutic use of Bmx tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which we have addressed here by analyzing cardiac hypertrophy in gene-targeted mice deficient in Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. We found that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy is significantly reduced in mice deficient in Bmx and in mice with inactivated Bmx tyrosine kinase compared with WT mice. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling showed that Bmx inactivation suppresses myocardial expression of genes related to Ang II-induced inflammatory and extracellular matrix responses whereas expression of RNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins after Ang II administration was maintained in Bmx-inactivated hearts. Very little or no Bmx mRNA was expressed in human cardiomyocytes whereas human cardiac endothelial cells expressed abundant amounts. Ang II stimulation of endothelial cells increased Bmx phosphorylation, and Bmx gene silencing inhibited downstream STAT3 signaling, which has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway by Ang II treatment was decreased in the Bmx-deficient hearts. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the cross-talk between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes by Bmx inactivation suppresses Ang II-induced signals for cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase could provide a target to attenuate the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26430242

  3. Multifaceted Modulation of K+ Channels by Protein-tyro