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Sample records for calcite crystal growth

  1. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  2. An assessment of calcite crystal growth mechanisms based on crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth experiments were undertaken to test a recently proposed model that relates crystal growth mechanisms to the shapes of crystal size distributions (CSDs). According to this approach, CSDs for minerals have three basic shapes: (1) asymptotic, which is related to a crystal growth mechanism having constant-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; (2) lognormal, which results from decaying-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; and (3) a theoretical, universal, steady-state curve attributed to Ostwald ripening. In addition, there is a fourth crystal growth mechanism that does not have a specific CSD shape, but which preserves the relative shapes of previously formed CSDs. This mechanism is attributed to supply-controlled growth. All three shapes were produced experimentally in the calcite growth experiments by modifying nucleation conditions and solution concentrations. The asymptotic CSD formed when additional reactants were added stepwise to the surface of solutions that were supersaturated with respect to calcite (initial Ω = 20, where Ω = 1 represents saturation), thereby leading to the continuous nucleation and growth of calcite crystals. Lognormal CSDs resulted when reactants were added continuously below the solution surface, via a submerged tube, to similarly supersaturated solutions (initial Ω = 22 to 41), thereby leading to a single nucleation event followed by surface-controlled growth. The Ostwald CSD resulted when concentrated reactants were rapidly mixed, leading initially to high levels of supersaturation (Ω >100), and to the formation and subsequent dissolution of very small nuclei, thereby yielding CSDs having small crystal size variances. The three CSD shapes likely were produced early in the crystallization process, in the nanometer crystal size range, and preserved during subsequent growth. Preservation of the relative shapes of the CSDs indicates that a supply-controlled growth mechanism

  3. Investigating calcite growth rates using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bo; Stack, Andrew G.; Steefel, Carl I.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Lammers, Laura N.; Hu, Yandi

    2018-02-01

    Calcite precipitation plays a significant role in processes such as geological carbon sequestration and toxic metal sequestration and, yet, the rates and mechanisms of calcite growth under close to equilibrium conditions are far from well understood. In this study, a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used for the first time to measure macroscopic calcite growth rates. Calcite seed crystals were first nucleated and grown on sensors, then growth rates of calcite seed crystals were measured in real-time under close to equilibrium conditions (saturation index, SI = log ({Ca2+}/{CO32-}/Ksp) = 0.01-0.7, where {i} represent ion activities and Ksp = 10-8.48 is the calcite thermodynamic solubility constant). At the end of the experiments, total masses of calcite crystals on sensors measured by QCM-D and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were consistent, validating the QCM-D measurements. Calcite growth rates measured by QCM-D were compared with reported macroscopic growth rates measured with auto-titration, ICP-MS, and microbalance. Calcite growth rates measured by QCM-D were also compared with microscopic growth rates measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and with rates predicted by two process-based crystal growth models. The discrepancies in growth rates among AFM measurements and model predictions appear to mainly arise from differences in step densities, and the step velocities were consistent among the AFM measurements as well as with both model predictions. Using the predicted steady-state step velocity and the measured step densities, both models predict well the growth rates measured using QCM-D and AFM. This study provides valuable insights into the effects of reactive site densities on calcite growth rate, which may help design future growth models to predict transient-state step densities.

  4. The Effect of Additives on the Early Stages of Growth of Calcite Single Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Colin L.; Gong, Xiuqing; Levenstein, Mark A.; Wang, Yunwei; Kulak, Alexander; Anduix‐Canto, Clara; Lee, Phillip A.; Li, Shunbo; Chen, Li; Christenson, Hugo K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract As crystallization processes are often rapid, it can be difficult to monitor their growth mechanisms. In this study, we made use of the fact that crystallization proceeds more slowly in small volumes than in bulk solution to investigate the effects of the soluble additives Mg2+ and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) on the early stages of growth of calcite crystals. Using a “Crystal Hotel” microfluidic device to provide well‐defined, nanoliter volumes, we observed that calcite crystals form via an amorphous precursor phase. Surprisingly, the first calcite crystals formed are perfect rhombohedra, and the soluble additives have no influence on the morphology until the crystals reach sizes of 0.1–0.5 μm for Mg2+ and 1–2 μm for PSS. The crystals then continue to grow to develop morphologies characteristic of these additives. These results can be rationalized by considering additive binding to kink sites, which is consistent with crystal growth by a classical mechanism. PMID:28767197

  5. Crystal growth of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solutions at constant PCO2 and 25°C: a test of a calcite dissolution model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, E.

    1981-01-01

    A highly reproducible seeded growth technique was used to study calcite crystallization from calcium bicarbonate solutions at 25°C and fixed carbon dioxide partial pressures between 0.03 and 0.3 atm. The results are not consistent with empirical crystallization models that have successfully described calcite growth at low PCO2 (< 10−3 atm). Good agreement was found between observed crystallization rates and those calculated from the calcite dissolution rate law and mechanism proposed by Plummer et al. (1978).

  6. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Review of aragonite and calcite crystal morphogenesis in thermal spring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Aragonite and calcite crystals are the fundamental building blocks of calcareous thermal spring deposits. The diverse array of crystal morphologies found in these deposits, which includes monocrystals, mesocrystals, skeletal crystals, dendrites, and spherulites, are commonly precipitated under far-from-equilibrium conditions. Such crystals form through both abiotic and biotic processes. Many crystals develop through non-classical crystal growth models that involve the arrangement of nanocrystals in a precisely controlled crystallographic register. Calcite crystal morphogenesis has commonly been linked to a ;driving force;, which is a conceptual measure of the distance of the growth conditions from equilibrium conditions. Essentially, this scheme indicates that increasing levels of supersaturation and various other parameters that produce a progressive change from monocrystals and mesocrystals to skeletal crystals to crystallographic and non-crystallographic dendrites, to dumbbells, to spherulites. Despite the vast amount of information available from laboratory experiments and natural spring systems, the precise factors that control the driving force are open to debate. The fact that calcite crystal morphogenesis is still poorly understood is largely a reflection of the complexity of the factors that influence aragonite and calcite precipitation. Available information indicates that variations in calcite crystal morphogenesis can be attributed to physical and chemical parameters of the parent water, the presence of impurities, the addition of organic or inorganic additives to the water, the rate of crystal growth, and/or the presence of microbes and their associated biofilms. The problems in trying to relate crystal morphogenesis to specific environmental parameters arise because it is generally impossible to disentangle the controlling factor(s) from the vast array of potential parameters that may act alone or in unison with each other.

  8. Production Engineering for Growth of Synthetic Calcite Polarizer Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    AD-A008 043 PRODUCTION ENGINEERING FOR GROWTH OF SYNTHETIC CALCITE POLARIZER MATERIAL Roger F. Belt, et al Litton Systems...Production Bngin««ring for Growth of Synthetic Calcit « Polarizer Material I. RCCIPItNT’tCATALOO NUMMN i. T.vpc or ncpoMT • rtmoo covtnto Final Report...VOKOt (CanlliMit en »xift •id« II ntffrt Kid Idtnlllr br block iwmbmr) Crystal Growth Hydrothermal Growth Calcite Polarizers 30. AtSTHACT

  9. REE Incorporation into Calcite Individual Crystals as One Time Spike Addition

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gabitov, Rinat; Sadekov, Aleksey; Migdisov, Artas

    Experiments on the incorporation of trace elements into calcite were performed, and rare earth elements (REE) were used to mark the growth zones of individual crystals. Experiments were conducted at different pH (7.7 to 8.8) and temperatures (2 °C to 24.6 °C) in NH 4Cl + CaCl 2 solutions, where REE were rapidly consumed by growing calcite. LA-ICP-MS line-scans yielded the distribution of (REE/Ca) calcite within individual crystals in a manner consistent with the addition of REE into fluid. A sharp decrease of (REE/Ca) calcite toward the crystal edge suggests the fast depletion of (REE/Ca) fluid due to strong REEmore » consumption by growing calcite. An attempt was made to estimate the lower limit of the partition coefficients between calcite and fluid using selected REE/Ca data within individual calcite crystals and the amount of REE added into fluid.« less

  10. REE Incorporation into Calcite Individual Crystals as One Time Spike Addition

    DOE PAGES

    Gabitov, Rinat; Sadekov, Aleksey; Migdisov, Artas

    2017-10-26

    Experiments on the incorporation of trace elements into calcite were performed, and rare earth elements (REE) were used to mark the growth zones of individual crystals. Experiments were conducted at different pH (7.7 to 8.8) and temperatures (2 °C to 24.6 °C) in NH 4Cl + CaCl 2 solutions, where REE were rapidly consumed by growing calcite. LA-ICP-MS line-scans yielded the distribution of (REE/Ca) calcite within individual crystals in a manner consistent with the addition of REE into fluid. A sharp decrease of (REE/Ca) calcite toward the crystal edge suggests the fast depletion of (REE/Ca) fluid due to strong REEmore » consumption by growing calcite. An attempt was made to estimate the lower limit of the partition coefficients between calcite and fluid using selected REE/Ca data within individual calcite crystals and the amount of REE added into fluid.« less

  11. Regulation of calcite crystal morphology by intracrystalline acidic proteins and glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Albeck, S; Addadi, I; Weiner, S

    1996-01-01

    Many biologically formed calcite crystals contain intracrystalline macromolecules. The ways in which they interact with growing calcite crystals were evaluated by monitoring changes in the morphology of calcite crystals grown in vitro in their presence. Macromolecules were extracted from within isolated prisms from the prismatic layer of the shell of the mollusk Atrina rigida and from spines of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Two modes of interaction were identified; the interaction of highly acidic proteins with calcite planes perpendicular to the c crystallographic axis and the interaction of glycoproteins with planes roughly parallel to the c axis. By different preparative procedures we demonstrated that the polysaccharide moieties of the sea urchin spine glycoproteins are directly involved in the latter mode of interactions. We suggest that organisms utilize the abilities of these macromolecules to interact in different ways with calcite crystals, and in so doing fine-tune aspects of the control of crystal growth in vivo.

  12. In-situ growth of calcite at Devils Hole, Nevada: Comparison of field and laboratory rates to a 500,000 year record of near-equilibrium calcite growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, E.; Riggs, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite grew continuously for 500,000 years on the submerged walls of an open fault plane (Devils Hole) in southern Nevada, U.S.A. at rates of 0.3 to 1.3 mm/ka, but ceased growing approximately 60,000 years ago, even though the fault plane remained open and was continuously submerged. The maximum initial in-situ growth rate on pre-weighed crystals of Iceland spar placed in Devils Hole (calcite saturation index, SI, is 0.16 to 0.21 at 33.7??C) for growth periods of 0.75 to 4.5 years was 0.22 mm/ka. Calcite growth on seed crystals slowed or ceased following initial contact with Devils Hole groundwater. Growth rates measured in synthetic Ca-HCO3 solutions at 34??C, CO2 partial pressures of 0.101, 0.0156 (similar to Devils Hole groundwater) and 0.00102 atm, and SI values of 0.2 to 1.9 were nearly independent of P(CO)(2), decreased with decreasing saturation state, and extrapolated through the historical Devils Hole rate. The results show that calcite growth rate is highly sensitive to saturation state near equilibrium. A calcite crystal retrieved from Devils Hole, and used without further treatment of its surface, grew in synthetic Devils Hole groundwater when the saturation index was raised nearly 10-fold that of Devils Hole water, but the rate was only 1/4 that of fresh laboratory crystals that had not contacted Devils Hole water. Apparently, inhibiting processes that halted calcite growth in Devils Hole 60,000 years ago continue today.

  13. In-situ growth of calcite at Devils Hole, Nevada--Comparison of field and laboratory rates to a 500,000 year record of near-equilibrium calcite growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Riggs, Alan C.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite grew continuously for 500,000 years on the submerged walls of an open fault plane (Devils Hole) in southern Nevada, U.S.A. at rates of 0.3 to 1.3 mm/ka, but ceased growing approximately 60,000 years ago, even though the fault plane remained open and was continuously submerged. The maximum initial in-situ growth rate on pre-weighed crystals of Iceland spar placed in Devils Hole (calcite saturation index, SI, is 0.16 to 0.21 at 33.7 °C) for growth periods of 0.75 to 4.5 years was 0.22 mm/ka. Calcite growth on seed crystals slowed or ceased following initial contact with Devils Hole groundwater. Growth rates measured in synthetic Ca-HCO3 solutions at 34 °C, CO2 partial pressures of 0.101, 0.0156 (similar to Devils Hole groundwater) and 0.00102 atm, and SI values of 0.2 to 1.9 were nearly independent of PCO2, decreased with decreasing saturation state, and extrapolated through the historical Devils Hole rate. The results show that calcite growth rate is highly sensitive to saturation state near equilibrium. A calcite crystal retrieved from Devils Hole, and used without further treatment of its surface, grew in synthetic Devils Hole groundwater when the saturation index was raised nearly 10-fold that of Devils Hole water, but the rate was only 1/4 that of fresh laboratory crystals that had not contacted Devils Hole water. Apparently, inhibiting processes that halted calcite growth in Devils Hole 60,000 years ago continue today.

  14. In vitro effects of recombinant otoconin 90 upon calcite crystal growth. Significance of tertiary structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenfu; Zhou, Dan; Freeman, John J; Thalmann, Isolde; Ornitz, David M; Thalmann, Ruediger

    2010-09-01

    Otoconia are biomineral particles of microscopic size essential for perception of gravity and maintenance of balance. Millions of older Americans are affected in their mobility, quality of life and in their health by progressive demineralization of otoconia. Currently, no effective means to prevent or counteract this process are available. Because of prohibitive anatomical and biological constraints, otoconial research is lagging far behind other systems such as bone and teeth. We have overcome these obstacles by generating otoconial matrix proteins by recombinant techniques. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of recombinant Otoconin 90 (OC90), the principal soluble matrix protein upon calcite crystal growth patterns in vitro. Our findings highlight multiple effects, including facilitation of nucleation, and inhibition of crystal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, OC90 induces morphologic changes characteristic of native otoconia. OC90 is considerably less acidic than the prototypical invertebrate CaCO(3) -associated protein, but is nevertheless an effective modulator of calcite crystal growth. Based on homology modeling of the sPLA2-like domains of OC90, we propose that the lower density of acidic residues of the primary sequence is compensated by formation of major anionic surface clusters upon folding into tertiary conformation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biotic Control of Skeletal Growth by Scleractinian Corals in Aragonite–Calcite Seas

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Yuyama, Ikuko; Harii, Saki; Agostini, Sylvain; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2014-01-01

    Modern scleractinian coral skeletons are commonly composed of aragonite, the orthorhombic form of CaCO3. Under certain conditions, modern corals produce calcite as a secondary precipitate to fill pore space. However, coral construction of primary skeletons from calcite has yet to be demonstrated. We report a calcitic primary skeleton produced by the modern scleractinian coral Acropora tenuis. When uncalcified juveniles were incubated from the larval stage in seawater with low mMg/Ca levels, the juveniles constructed calcitic crystals in parts of the primary skeleton such as the septa; the deposits were observable under Raman microscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed different crystal morphologies of aragonite and calcite in a single juvenile skeleton. Quantitative analysis using X-ray diffraction showed that the majority of the skeleton was composed of aragonite even though we had exposed the juveniles to manipulated seawater before their initial crystal nucleation and growth processes. Our results indicate that the modern scleractinian coral Acropora mainly produces aragonite skeletons in both aragonite and calcite seas, but also has the ability to use calcite for part of its skeletal growth when incubated in calcite seas. PMID:24609012

  16. Direct observation of the transition from calcite to aragonite growth as induced by abalone shell proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J B; Paloczi, G T; Kindt, J H; Michenfelder, M; Smith, B L; Stucky, G; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    2000-01-01

    The mixture of EDTA-soluble proteins found in abalone nacre are known to cause the nucleation and growth of aragonite on calcite seed crystals in supersaturated solutions of calcium carbonate. Past atomic force microscope studies of the interaction of these proteins with calcite crystals did not observe this transition because no information about the crystal polymorph on the surface was obtained. Here we have used the atomic force microscope to directly observe changes in the atomic lattice on a calcite seed crystal after the introduction of abalone shell proteins. The observed changes are consistent with a transition to (001) aragonite growth on a (1014) calcite surface. PMID:11106633

  17. Experimental Study of Sr Partitioning into Calcite at Various Linear Growth Rates and Temperatures: Preliminary Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabitov, R. I.; Watson, B. E.

    2004-05-01

    The surface of a crystal in equilibrium with surrounding fluid can have a composition that differs from the bulk crystal. If growth rate of the crystal exceeds a minimum value at which partitioning-equilibrium can be maintained, then the crystal surface composition may be "captured" by the newly-formed lattice. The degree of this entrapment increases with increasing crystal growth rate. Non-equlibrium partitioning of Sr into calcite probably occurs by this entrapment mechanism. Sr and calcite are geochemically significant in understanding the thermal history of the ocean because the substitution of Sr for Ca in calcite is temperature dependent. To improve our understanding of the partitioning of Sr into calcite, we conducted two different types of experiment: 1) calcite growth from Sr-bearing solution with analysis of the crystal cross-section by electron microprobe (bulk crystal-liquid runs); and 2) treatment of calcite cleavage surfaces with Sr-bearing solutions and examination of the top few nm surface layer by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (surface-liquid runs). In the series of bulk-liquid experiments crystals were grown by three different procedures: 1) precipitation on glass slide (pre-coated with calcite), where a steady flow of CaCl2 - SrCl2 and Na2CO3 solutions were mixed just before passage through a tube and allowed to drip onto a slide ("cave"-type experiments, ionic strength I=0.01); 2) growth from a CaCl2 - NH4Cl - SrCl2 solution by diffusion of CO2 from an ammonium carbonate source ("drift" experiments, I=0.52); 3) coarsening of small calcite crystals in the CaCO3-SrCO3-NaCl-H2O system at 800-950° C and 0.5-1 kb in a cold seal apparatus. The growth rate of individual crystals was determined by periodic monitoring of crystal size with time or roughly by comparison of final size with duration of the experiment. Surface-liquid experiments were performed by treatment of cleavage surfaces of natural calcite fragments in a Sr(ClO4)2 solution for 1

  18. Sand-calcite crystals from Garfield County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, Kenneth A.; Zeller, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    Sand-calcite crystals are found in the Morrison Formation of Jurassic age in south-central Garfield County, Utah. The outcrop area is less than 1 acre, yet the locality contains many fine specimens of single, double, and complex crystals in good hexagonal form. This is the first known occurrence of sand-calcite crystals in rocks of Jurassic age and is the first reported occurrence in Utah.

  19. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    DOE PAGES

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; ...

    2016-06-15

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. In this study, we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO 3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generatedmore » in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. In conclusion, this work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates.« less

  20. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Kulak, Alexander N.; Comyn, Timothy P.; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Robinson, Ian K.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. Here we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. This work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates. PMID:27302863

  1. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  2. Manganese-calcium intermixing facilitates heteroepitaxial growth at the (1014) calcite-water interface

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Man; Riechers, Shawn L.; Ilton, Eugene S.; ...

    2017-09-05

    For this research, in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were performed to probe surface precipitates that formed on the (10more » $$\\bar{1}$$4) surface of calcite (CaCO 3) single crystals following reaction with Mn2 +-bearing aqueous solutions. Three-dimensional epitaxial islands were observed to precipitate and grow on the surfaces. In situ time-sequenced measurements demonstrated that the growth rates were commensurate with those obtained for epitaxial islands formed on calcite crystals reacted with Cd2 +-bearing aqueous solutions of the same range in supersaturation with respect to the pure metal carbonate phase. This finding was unexpected as rhodochrosite (MnCO 3) and calcite display a 10% lattice mismatch, based on the area of their (10$$\\bar{1}$$4) surface unit cells, whereas the lattice mismatch is only 4% for otavite (CdCO 3) and calcite. Coatings of varying thicknesses were therefore synthesized by reacting calcite single crystals in calcite-equilibrated aqueous solutions with up to 250 μM MnCl 2. Ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and AFM measurements of the reacted crystals demonstrated the formation of an epitaxial (Mn,Ca)CO 3 solid solution. The epitaxial solid solution had a spatially complex composition, whereby the first few nanometers were rich in Ca and the Mn content increased with distance from the original calcite surface, culminating in a topmost region of almost pure MnCO 3 for the thickest coatings. The effective lattice mismatch was therefore much smaller than the nominal mismatch thus explaining the measured growth rates. Lastly, these findings highlight the strong influence played by the substrate on the composition of surface precipitates in aqueous conditions.« less

  3. The effect of sulfated polysaccharides on the crystallization of calcite superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Ruth; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2012-01-01

    Calcite with unique morphology and uniform size has been successfully synthesized in the presence of classes of polysaccharides based on carrageenans. In the crystallization of calcite, the choice of different carrageenans, (iota, lambda and kappa), as additives concedes systematic study of the influence of different chemical structures and particularly molecular charge on the formation of CaCO 3 crystals. The uniform calcite superstructures are formed by assemblies and aggregation of calcite crystals. The mechanism for the formation of calcite superstructures was studied by a variety of techniques, SEM, TEM, XRD, time-resolved conductivity and light scattering measurements, focusing on the early stages of crystals' nucleation and aggregation.

  4. Crystallographic orientation inhomogeneity and crystal splitting in biogenic calcite

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio G.; Bonarski, Jan T.; Willinger, Marc G.; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Kania, Bogusz; González-Segura, Alicia; Pina, Carlos M.; Pospiech, Jan; Morawiec, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The calcitic prismatic units forming the outer shell of the bivalve Pinctada margaritifera have been analysed using scanning electron microscopy–electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In the initial stages of growth, the individual prismatic units are single crystals. Their crystalline orientation is not consistent but rather changes gradually during growth. The gradients in crystallographic orientation occur mainly in a direction parallel to the long axis of the prism, i.e. perpendicular to the shell surface and do not show preferential tilting along any of the calcite lattice axes. At a certain growth stage, gradients begin to spread and diverge, implying that the prismatic units split into several crystalline domains. In this way, a branched crystal, in which the ends of the branches are independent crystalline domains, is formed. At the nanometre scale, the material is composed of slightly misoriented domains, which are separated by planes approximately perpendicular to the c-axis. Orientational gradients and splitting processes are described in biocrystals for the first time and are undoubtedly related to the high content of intracrystalline organic molecules, although the way in which these act to induce the observed crystalline patterns is a matter of future research. PMID:23804442

  5. Crystallization of ikaite and its pseudomorphic transformation into calcite: Raman spectroscopy evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Pastor, N.; Oehlerich, Markus; Astilleros, José Manuel; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Mayr, Christoph C.; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2016-02-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) is a metastable phase that crystallizes in nature from alkaline waters with high phosphate concentrations at temperatures close to 0 °C. This mineral transforms into anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorphs when temperatures rise or when exposed to atmospheric conditions. During the transformation in some cases the shape of the original ikaite crystal is preserved as a pseudomorph. Pseudomorphs after ikaite are considered as a valuable paleoclimatic indicator. In this work we conducted ikaite crystal growth experiments at near-freezing temperatures using the single diffusion silica gel technique, prepared with a natural aqueous solution from the polymictic lake Laguna Potrok Aike (51°57‧S, 70°23‧W) in Patagonia, Argentina. The ikaite crystals were recovered from the gels and the transformation reactions were monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy at two different temperatures. The first spectra collected showed the characteristic features of ikaite. In successive spectra new bands at 1072, 1081 and 1086 cm-1 and changes in the intensity of bands corresponding to the OH modes were observed. These changes in the Raman spectra were interpreted as corresponding to intermediate stages of the transformation of ikaite into calcite and/or vaterite. After a few hours, the characteristics of the Raman spectrum were consistent with those of calcite. While ikaite directly transforms into calcite at 10 °C in contact with air, at 20 °C this transformation involves the formation of intermediate, metastable vaterite. During the whole process the external shape of ikaite crystals was preserved. Therefore, this transformation showed the typical characteristics of a pseudomorphic mineral replacement, involving the generation of a large amount of porosity to account for the large difference in molar volumes between ikaite and calcite. A mechanism involving the coupled dissolution of ikaite and crystallization of calcite/vaterite is proposed for this

  6. Initial formation of calcite crystals in the thin prismatic layer with the periostracum of Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Nakayama, Seiji; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2013-02-01

    Although the formation mechanism of calcite crystals in the prismatic layer has been studied well in many previous works, the initial state of calcite formation has not been observed in detail using electron microscopes. In this study, we report that the soft prismatic layer with transparent color (the thin prismatic layer) in the tip of the fresh shell of Pinctada fucata was picked up to observe the early calcification phase. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) image showed that the growth tip of the thin prismatic layer was covered by the periostracum, which was also where the initial formation of calcite crystals began. A cross-section containing the thin calcite crystals in the thin prismatic layer with the periostracum was made using a focused ion beam (FIB) system. In a transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, the thin calcite crystal (thickness is about 1μm) on the periostracum was found to be a single crystal with the c-axis oriented perpendicular to the shell surface. On the other hand, many aggregated small particles consisting of bassanite crystals were observed in the periostracum suggesting the possibility that not only organic sulfate but also inorganic sulfates exist in the prismatic layer. These discoveries in the early calcification phase of the thin prismatic layer may help to clarify the mechanism of regulating the nucleation and orientation of the calcite crystal in the shell. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-08-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10-4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10-4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  8. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  9. Manganese-calcium intermixing facilitates heteroepitaxial growth at the 10 1 ¯ 4 calcite-water interface

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Xu, Man; Riechers, Shawn L.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2017-10-01

    In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were performed to probe surface precipitates that formed on the (10-14) surface of calcite (CaCO3) single crystals following reaction with Mn2+-bearing aqueous solutions with a range of initial concentrations. Three-dimensional epitaxial islands were observed to precipitate and grow on the surfaces and in situ time-sequenced measurements demonstrated that their growth rates were commensurate with those obtained for epitaxial islands formed on calcite crystals reacted with Cd2+-bearing aqueous solutions of the same range in supersaturation with respect to the pure metal carbonate phase. This finding was unexpected as rhodochrosite (MnCO3) and calcite display amore » 10% lattice mismatch, based on the area of their (10-14) surface unit cells, whereas the lattice mismatch is only 4% for otavite (CdCO3) and calcite. Coatings of varying thicknesses were therefore synthesized by reacting calcite single crystals with calcite-equilibrated aqueous solutions with concentrations of up to 250 µM MnCl2 and analyzed to determine the composition of the surface precipitates. Ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and AFM measurements of the reacted crystals demonstrated the formation of an epitaxial (Mn,Ca)CO3 solid solution with a spatially complex composition atop the calcite surface, whereby the first few nanometers were rich in Ca and the Mn content increased with distance from the original calcite surface, culminating in a topmost region of almost pure MnCO3 for the thickest coatings. These findings explain the measured growth rates (the effective lattice mismatch was much smaller than nominal mismatch) and highlight the strong influence played by the substrate on the composition of surface precipitates in aqueous conditions.« less

  10. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Long; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Deyoreo, James J.

    2014-09-01

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, with hydrophobic interactions playing the dominant role. While either strong electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions inhibit growth and reduces expression of the {104} faces, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate electrostatic interactions allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate hydrophobic interactions cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of the {104} faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.

  11. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chen, Chunlong; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui

    2014-09-05

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic interactions (EI) and hydrophobic interactions (HI), with HI playing the dominant role. While either strong EI or HI inhibit growth and suppress (104) face expression, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energiesmore » and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate EI allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate HI cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of (104) faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.« less

  12. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Long; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; DeYoreo, James J.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, with hydrophobic interactions playing the dominant role. While either strong electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions inhibit growth and reduces expression of the {104} faces, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate electrostatic interactions allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate hydrophobic interactions cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of the {104} faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications. PMID:25189418

  13. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29.

  14. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-12-01

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites.

  15. The crystal structure of calcite III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Joseph R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    The crystal structure of calcite III has been deduced from existing high pressure powder X-ray diffraction patterns, based on the assumption that it is a displacive modification of the calcite I structure. The structure is monoclinic with space group C2 and a Z of 6. There are two Ca and two C positions, and five O positions, and atom coordinates have been refined by distance-least-squares methods to give reasonable octahedral coordination for Ca and parallel, planar CO3 groups. Unit cell parameters refined from a published powder diffraction pattern at 4.1 GPa are: a = 8.746(8)Å b = 4.685(5)Å c = 8.275(8)Å and β= 94.4°. The structure has a calculated density of 2.949 Mg/m³ at 4.1 GPa which is less than that of aragonite at this pressure and consistent with early piston cylinder studies. This implies that calcite III is indeed a metastable intermediary between calcite I and aragonite.

  16. Pb 2+–Calcite Interactions under Far-from-Equilibrium Conditions: Formation of Micropyramids and Pseudomorphic Growth of Cerussite

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Ke; De Andrade, Vincent; Feng, Zhange; ...

    2018-01-04

    The presence of impurity ions is known to significantly influence mineral surface morphology during crystal growth from aqueous solution, but knowledge on impurity ion-mineral interactions during dissolution under far-from equilibrium conditions remains limited. Here we show that calcite (CaCO 3) exhibits a rich array of dissolution features in the presence of Pb. During the initial stage, calcite exhibits non-classical surface features characterized as micro pyramids developed spontaneously in acidic Pb-bearing solutions. Subsequent pseudomorphic growth of cerussite (PbCO 3) was observed, where nucleation occurred entirely within a pore space created by dissolution at the calcite/substrate interface. Uneven growth rates yielded amore » cerussite shell made of lath- or dendritic-shaped crystals. The cerussite phase was separated from the calcite by pores of less than 200 nm under transmission X-ray microscopy, consistent with the interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism. These results show that impurity metal ions exert significant control over the microscale dissolution features found on mineral surfaces and provide new insights into interpreting and designing micro structures observed in naturally-occurring and synthetic carbonate minerals by dissolution. In addition, heterogeneous micro-environments created in transport limited reactions under pore spaces may lead to unusual growth forms during crystal nucleation and precipitation.« less

  17. Nucleation, growth and evolution of calcium phosphate films on calcite.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Sonia; Scherer, George W

    2014-12-01

    Marble, a stone composed of the mineral calcite, is subject to chemically induced weathering in nature due to its relatively high dissolution rate in acid rain. To protect monuments and sculpture from corrosion, we are investigating the application of thin layers of hydroxyapatite (HAP) onto marble. The motivation for using HAP is its low dissolution rate and crystal and lattice compatibility with calcite. A mild, wet chemical synthesis route, in which diammonium hydrogen phosphate salt was reacted with marble, alone and with cationic and anionic precursors under different reaction conditions, was used to produce inorganic HAP layers on marble. Nucleation and growth on the calcite substrate was studied, as well as metastable phase evolution, using scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Film nucleation was enhanced by surface roughness. The rate of nucleation and the growth rate of the film increased with cationic (calcium) and anionic (carbonate) precursor additions. Calcium additions also influenced phase formation, introducing a metastable phase (octacalcium phosphate) and a different phase evolution sequence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monoclinic deformation of calcite crystals at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeniosło, R.; Fabrykiewicz, P.; Sosnowska, I.

    2016-09-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation powder diffraction shows that the average crystal structure of calcite at ambient conditions is described with the trigonal space group R 3 bar c but there is a systematic hkl-dependent Bragg peak broadening. A modelling of this anisotropic peak broadening with the microstrain model from Stephens (1999) [15] is presented. The observed lattice parameters' correlations can be described by assuming a monoclinic-type deformation of calcite crystallites. A quantitative model of this monoclinic deformation observed at ambient conditions is described with the space group C 2 / c . The monoclinic unit cell suggested at ambient conditions is related with the monoclinic unit cell reported in calcite at high pressure (Merrill and Bassett (1975) [10]).

  19. Effect of coccolith polysaccharides isolated from the coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi, on calcite crystal formation in in vitro CaCO3 crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kayano, Keisuke; Saruwatari, Kazuko; Kogure, Toshihiro; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2011-02-01

    Marine coccolithophorids (Haptophyceae) produce calcified scales "coccoliths" which are composed of CaCO(3) and coccolith polysaccharides (CP) in the coccolith vesicles. CP was previously reported to be composed of uronic acids and sulfated residues, etc. attached to the polymannose main chain. Although anionic polymers are generally known to play key roles in biomineralization process, there is no experimental data how CP contributes to calcite crystal formation in the coccolithophorids. CP used was isolated from the most abundant coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi. CaCO(3) crystallization experiment was performed on agar template layered onto a plastic plate that was dipped in the CaCO(3) crystallization solution. The typical rhombohedral calcite crystals were formed in the absence of CP. CaCO(3) crystals formed on the naked plastic plate were obviously changed to stick-like shapes when CP was present in the solution. EBSD analysis proved that the crystal is calcite of which c-axis was elongated. CP in the solution stimulated the formation of tabular crystals with flat edge in the agarose gel. SEM and FIB-TEM observations showed that the calcite crystals were formed in the gel. The formation of crystals without flat edge was stimulated when CP was preliminarily added in the gel. These observations suggest that CP has two functions: namely, one is to elongate the calcite crystal along c-axis and another is to induce tabular calcite crystal formation in the agarose gel. Thus, CP may function for the formation of highly elaborate species-specific structures of coccoliths in coccolithophorids.

  20. On the origin of size-dependent and size-independent crystal growth: Influence of advection and diffusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments were conducted using potassium alum and calcite crystals in aqueous solution under both non-stirred and stirred conditions to elucidate the mechanism for size-dependent (proportionate) and size-independent (constant) crystal growth. Growth by these two laws can be distinguished from each other because the relative size difference among crystals is maintained during proportionate growth, leading to a constant crystal size variance (??2) for a crystal size distribution (CSD) as the mean size increases. The absolute size difference among crystals is maintained during constant growth, resulting in a decrease in size variance. Results of these experiments show that for centimeter-sized alum crystals, proportionate growth occurs in stirred systems, whereas constant growth occurs in non-stirred systems. Accordingly, the mechanism for proportionate growth is hypothesized to be related to the supply of reactants to the crystal surface by advection, whereas constant growth is related to supply by diffusion. Paradoxically, micrometer-sized calcite crystals showed proportionate growth both in stirred and in non-stirred systems. Such growth presumably results from the effects of convection and Brownian motion, which promote an advective environment and hence proportionate growth for minute crystals in non-stirred systems, thereby indicating the importance of solution velocity relative to crystal size. Calcite crystals grown in gels, where fluid motion was minimized, showed evidence for constant, diffusion-controlled growth. Additional investigations of CSDs of naturally occurring crystals indicate that proportionate growth is by far the most common growth law, thereby suggesting that advection, rather than diffusion, is the dominant process for supplying reactants to crystal surfaces.

  1. Anisotropic Growth of Otavite on Calcite: Implications for Heteroepitaxial Growth Mechanisms

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Riechers, Shawn L.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    Elucidating how cation intermixing can affect the mechanisms of heteroepitaxial growth in aqueous media has remained a challenging endeavor. Toward this goal, in situ atomic force microscopy was employed to image the heteroepitaxial growth of otavite (CdCO3) at the (10-14) surface of calcite (CaCO3) single crystals in static aqueous conditions. Heteroepitaxial growth proceeded via spreading of three-dimensional (3D) islands and two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers at low and high initial saturation levels, respectively. Experiments were carried out as a function of applied force and imaging mode thus enabling determination of growth mechanisms unaltered by imaging artifacts. This approach revealed the significantmore » anisotropic nature of heteroepitaxial growth on calcite in both growth modes and its dependence on supersaturation, intermixing, and substrate topography. The 3D islands not only grew preferentially along the [42-1] direction relative to the [010] direction, resulting in rod-like surface precipitates, but also showed clear preference for growth from the island end rich in obtuse/obtuse kink sites. Pinning to step edges was observed to often reverse this tendency. In the 2D growth mode, the relative velocities of acute and obtuse steps were observed to switch between the first and second atomic layers. This phenomenon stemmed from the significant Cd-Ca intermixing in the first layer, despite bulk thermodynamics predicting the formation of almost pure otavite. Composition effects were also responsible for the inability of 3D islands to grow on 2D layers in cases where both modes were observed to occur simultaneously. Overall, the AFM images highlighted the effects of intermixing on heteroepitaxial growth, particularly how it can induce thickness-dependent growth mechanisms at the nanoscale.« less

  2. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03 Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  3. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Xray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the cmore » axis (by 0.03Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.« less

  4. Nanobacteria-like calcite single crystals at the surface of the Tataouine meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Benzerara, Karim; Menguy, Nicolas; Guyot, François; Dominici, Christian; Gillet, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Nanobacteria-like objects evidenced at the surface of the orthopyroxenes of the Tataouine meteorite in South Tunisia have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. A method of micromanipulation has been developed to ensure that exactly the same objects were studied by both methods. We have shown that the nanobacteria-like objects are spatially correlated with filaments of microorganisms that colonized the surface of the meteoritic pyroxene during its 70 years of residence in the aridic Tataouine soil. Depressions of a few micrometers in depth are observed in the pyroxene below the carbonates, indicating preferential dissolution of the pyroxene and calcite precipitation at these locations. The nanobacteria-like small rods that constitute calcium carbonate rosettes are well crystallized calcite single crystals surrounded by a thin amorphous layer of carbonate composition that smoothes the crystal edges and induces rounded shapes. Those morphologies are unusual for calcite single crystals observed in natural samples. A survey of recent literature suggests that the intervention of organic compounds derived from biological activity is likely in their formation. PMID:12792020

  5. Nanobacteria-like calcite single crystals at the surface of the Tataouine meteorite.

    PubMed

    Benzerara, Karim; Menguy, Nicolas; Guyot, Francois; Dominici, Christian; Gillet, Philippe

    2003-06-24

    Nanobacteria-like objects evidenced at the surface of the orthopyroxenes of the Tataouine meteorite in South Tunisia have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. A method of micromanipulation has been developed to ensure that exactly the same objects were studied by both methods. We have shown that the nanobacteria-like objects are spatially correlated with filaments of microorganisms that colonized the surface of the meteoritic pyroxene during its 70 years of residence in the aridic Tataouine soil. Depressions of a few micrometers in depth are observed in the pyroxene below the carbonates, indicating preferential dissolution of the pyroxene and calcite precipitation at these locations. The nanobacteria-like small rods that constitute calcium carbonate rosettes are well crystallized calcite single crystals surrounded by a thin amorphous layer of carbonate composition that smoothes the crystal edges and induces rounded shapes. Those morphologies are unusual for calcite single crystals observed in natural samples. A survey of recent literature suggests that the intervention of organic compounds derived from biological activity is likely in their formation.

  6. Quantitative single molecule measurements on the interaction forces of poly(L-glutamic acid) with calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Lars; Luo, Yufei; Schlaad, Helmut; Seitz, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut; Gaub, Hermann E

    2007-12-12

    The interaction between poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLE) and calcite crystals was studied with AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy. Block copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and PLE were synthesized and covalently attached to the tip of an AFM cantilever. In desorption measurements the molecules were allowed to adsorb on the calcite crystal faces and afterward successively desorbed. The corresponding desorption forces were detected with high precision, showing for example a force transition between the two blocks. Because of its importance in the crystallization process in biominerals, the PLE-calcite interaction was investigated as a function of the pH as well as the calcium concentration of the aqueous solution. The sensitivity of the technique was underlined by resolving different interaction forces for calcite (104) and calcite (100).

  7. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Amino Acid-Assisted Incorporation of Dye Molecules within Calcite Crystals.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Bartosz; Green, David C; Holden, Mark A; Coté, Alexander S; Ihli, Johannes; Khalid, Saba; Kulak, Alexander; Walker, Daniel; Tang, Chiu; Duffy, Dorothy M; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2018-05-23

    Biomineralisation processes invariably occur in the presence of multiple organic additives, which act in combination to give exceptional control over structures and properties. However, few synthetic studies have investigated the cooperative effects of soluble additives. This work addresses this challenge and focuses on the combined effects of amino acids and coloured dye molecules. The experiments demonstrate that strongly coloured calcite crystals only form in the presence of Brilliant Blue R (BBR) and four of the seventeen soluble amino acids, as compared with almost colourless crystals using the dye alone. The active amino acids are identified as those which themselves effectively occlude in calcite, suggesting a mechanism where they can act as chaperones for individual molecules or even aggregates of dyes molecules. These results provide new insight into crystal-additive interactions and suggest a novel strategy for generating materials with target properties. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Calcite precipitates in Slovenian bottled waters.

    PubMed

    Stanič, Tamara Ferjan; Miler, Miloš; Brenčič, Mihael; Gosar, Mateja

    2017-06-01

    Storage of bottled waters in varying ambient conditions affects its characteristics. Different storage conditions cause changes in the initial chemical composition of bottled water which lead to the occurrence of precipitates with various morphologies. In order to assess the relationship between water composition, storage conditions and precipitate morphology, a study of four brands of Slovenian bottled water stored in PET bottles was carried out. Chemical analyses of the main ions and measurements of the physical properties of water samples were performed before and after storage of water samples at different ambient conditions. SEM/EDS analysis of precipitates was performed after elapsed storage time. The results show that the presence of Mg 2+ , SO 4 2- , SiO 2 , Al, Mn and other impurities such as K + , Na + , Ba and Sr in the water controlled precipitate morphology by inhibiting crystal growth and leading to elongated rhombohedral calcite crystal forms which exhibit furrowed surfaces and calcite rosettes. Different storage conditions, however, affected the number of crystallization nuclei and size of calcite crystals. Hollow calcite spheres composed of cleavage rhombohedrons formed in the water with variable storage conditions by a combination of evaporation and precipitation of water droplets during high temperatures or by the bubble templating method.

  10. Hydrothermal Growth of Polyscale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Kullaiah

    In this chapter, the importance of the hydrothermal technique for growth of polyscale crystals is discussed with reference to its efficiency in synthesizing high-quality crystals of various sizes for modern technological applications. The historical development of the hydrothermal technique is briefly discussed, to show its evolution over time. Also some of the important types of apparatus used in routine hydrothermal research, including the continuous production of nanosize crystals, are discussed. The latest trends in the hydrothermal growth of crystals, such as thermodynamic modeling and understanding of the solution chemistry, are elucidated with appropriate examples. The growth of some selected bulk, fine, and nanosized crystals of current technological significance, such as quartz, aluminum and gallium berlinites, calcite, gemstones, rare-earth vanadates, electroceramic titanates, and carbon polymorphs, is discussed in detail. Future trends in the hydrothermal technique, required to meet the challenges of fast-growing demand for materials in various technological fields, are described. At the end of this chapter, an Appendix 18.A containing a more or less complete list of the characteristic families of crystals synthesized by the hydrothermal technique is given with the solvent and pressure-temperature (PT) conditions used in their synthesis.

  11. Unusual calcite cementing of quartz grains on Chandeleur Island Beach, offshore Louisiana

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mitchell-Tapping, H.J.

    1983-09-01

    A very unusual calcite cement was found in some beachchips from an unconsolidated beach surface of Chandeleur Island offshore approximately 35 nmi (65 km) south of Mississippi in the Gulf of Mexico. The beachchips are irregularly shaped and are well cemented by this unusual calcite. This calcite crystal structure has not been reported previously as existing in a marine environment. A similar cement has been found in freshwater lake beachrock and in some travertine samples. The calcite crystals are elongate parallel to the c-optic axis, and are composed of bunches of crystallite blades. The crystallite blades of each crystal bunchmore » are pointed and are more bladed than freshwater cement crystals. The intercrystallite pore space contains no fine calcite silt as was observed in the lake samples. Fresh water provided by rainfall may be held in the pore spaces and bounded to the quartz-grain surfaces by ionic attraction. Marine spray above and saline water concentrated underneath from a sandwich effect at the micropore level, allowing rapid growth and precipitation of these very unusual calcite crystals in a single-phase low-salinity fluid.« less

  12. Site-specific incorporation of uranyl carbonate species at the calcite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, Richard J.; Elzinga, Evert J.; Tait, C. Drew; Rector, K. D.; Donohoe, Robert J.; Morris, David E.

    2004-12-01

    Spatially resolved luminescence spectra from U(VI) co-precipitated at the (101¯4) growth surface of synthetic calcite single crystals confirm heterogeneous incorporation corresponding to the distribution of structurally non-equivalent steps composing the vicinal surfaces of spiral growth hillocks. Spectral structure from U(VI) luminescence at the "-" vicinal regions and featureless, weak luminescence at the "+" vicinal regions are consistent with previously reported observations of enrichment at the former sites during calcite growth. Luminescence spectra differ between the non-equivalent regions of the crystal, with the spectral features from the "-" vicinal region corresponding to those observed in bulk calcite samples. Subtle spectral shifts are observed from U(VI) co-precipitated with microcrystalline calcite synthesized by a different method, and all of the U(VI)-calcite sample spectra differ significantly from that of U(VI) co-precipitated with aragonite. The step-selective incorporation of U(VI) can be explained by a proposed model in which the allowed orientation for adsorption of the dominant calcium uranyl triscarbonate species is controlled by the atomic arrangement at step edges. Differences in the tilt angles of carbonate groups between non-equivalent growth steps favor adsorption of the calcium uranyl triscarbonate species at "-" steps, as observed in experiments.

  13. Replacement of Calcite (CaCO 3) by Cerussite (PbCO 3)

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Ke; Lee, Sang Soo; De Andrade, Vincent; ...

    2016-10-21

    The mobility of toxic elements, such as lead (Pb) can be attenuated by adsorption, incorporation, and precipitation on carbonate minerals in subsurface environments. Here in this paper, we report a study of the bulk transformation of single-crystal calcite (CaCO 3) into polycrystalline cerussite (PbCO 3) through reaction with acidic Pb-bearing solutions. This reaction began with the growth of a cerussite shell on top of calcite surfaces followed by the replacement of the remaining calcite core. The external shape of the original calcite was preserved by a balance between calcite dissolution and cerussite growth controlled by adjusting the Pb 2+ concentration and pH. The relation between the rounded calcite core and the surrounding lath-shaped cerussite aggregates was imaged by transmission X-ray microscopy, which revealed preferentially elongated cerussite crystals parallel to the surface and edge directions of calcite. The replacement reaction involved concurrent development ~100 nm wide pores parallel to calcite c-glide or (1more » $$\\overline{20}$$) planes, which may have provided permeability for chemical exchange during the reaction. X-ray reflectivity measurements showed no clear epitaxial relation of cerussite to the calcite (104) surface. These results demonstrate Pb sequestration through mineral replacement reactions and the critical role of nanoporosity (3% by volume) on the solid phase transformation through a dissolution-recrystallization mechanism.« less

  14. Seasonal variations in modern speleothem calcite growth in Central Texas, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banner, J.L.; Guilfoyle, A.; James, E.W.; Stern, L.A.; Musgrove, M.

    2007-01-01

    Variations in growth rates of speleothem calcite have been hypothesized to reflect changes in a range of paleoenvironmental variables, including atmospheric temperature and precipitation, drip-water composition, and the rate of soil CO2 delivery to the subsurface. To test these hypotheses, we quantified growth rates of modern speleothem calcite on artificial substrates and monitored concurrent environmental conditions in three caves across the Edwards Plateau in central Texas. Within each of two caves, different drip sites exhibit similar annual cycles in calcite growth rates, even though there are large differences between the mean growth rates at the sites. The growth-rate cycles inversely correlate to seasonal changes in regional air temperature outside the caves, with near-zero growth rates during the warmest summer months, and peak growth rates in fall through spring. Drip sites from caves 130 km apart exhibit similar temporal patterns in calcite growth rate, indicating a controlling mechanism on at least this distance. The seasonal variations in calcite growth rate can be accounted for by a primary control by regional temperature effects on ventilation of cave-air CO2 concentrations and/or drip-water CO2 contents. In contrast, site-to-site differences in the magnitude of calcite growth rates within an individual cave appear to be controlled principally by differences in drip rate. A secondary control by drip rate on the growth rate temporal variations is suggested by interannual variations. No calcite growth was observed in the third cave, which has relatively high values of and small seasonal changes in cave-air CO2. These results indicate that growth-rate variations in ancient speleothems may serve as a paleoenvironmental proxy with seasonal resolution. By applying this approach of monitoring the modern system, speleothem growth rate and geochemical proxies for paleoenviromnental change may be evaluated and calibrated. Copyright ?? 2007, SEPM (Society for

  15. Effect of otoconial proteins fetuin A, osteopontin, and otoconin 90 on the nucleation and growth of calcite

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Mina; Moreland, K. Trent; Chen, Jiajun; ...

    2014-10-30

    Here, we investigated the roles of three proteins associated with the formation of otoconia including fetuin A, osteopontin (OPN), and otoconin 90 (OC90). In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the effects of these proteins on the growth of atomic steps on calcite surfaces were performed to obtain insight into their effects on the growth kinetics. We also used scanning electron microscopy to examine the effects of these proteins on crystal morphology. All three proteins were found to be potent inhibitors of calcite growth, although fetuin A promoted growth at concentrations below about 40 nM and only became anmore » inhibitor at higher concentrations. We then used in situ optical microscopy to observe calcite nucleation on films of these proteins adsorbed onto mica surfaces. By measuring the calcite nucleation rate as a function of supersaturation, the value of the interfacial energy that controls the free energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation was determined for each protein. OPN and OC90 films led to significantly reduced interfacial energies as compared to the value for homogeneous calcite nucleation in bulk solution. The value for fetuin A was equal to that for bulk solution within experimental error. Zeta potential measurements showed all of the proteins possessed negative surface charge and varied in magnitude according to sequence fetuin A > OC90 > OPN. In addition, the interfacial energies exhibited an inverse scaling with the zeta potential. In analogy to previous measurements on polysaccharide films, this scaling indicates the differences between the proteins arise from the effect of protein surface charge on the solution–substrate interfacial energy.« less

  16. High surface area calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. N.; Andersson, M. P.; Dalby, K. N.; Müter, D.; Okhrimenko, D. V.; Fordsmand, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2013-05-01

    Calcite (CaCO3) is important in many fields—in nature, because it is a component of aquifers, oil reservoirs and prospective CO2 storage sites, and in industry, where it is used in products as diverse as paper, toothpaste, paint, plastic and aspirin. It is difficult to obtain high purity calcite with a high surface area but such material is necessary for industrial applications and for fundamental calcite research. Commercial powder is nearly always contaminated with growth inhibitors such as sugars, citrate or pectin and most laboratory synthesis methods deliver large precipitates, often containing vaterite or aragonite. To address this problem, we (i) adapted the method of carbonating a Ca(OH)2 slurry with CO2 gas to develop the first simple, cheap, safe and reproducible procedure using common laboratory equipment, to obtain calcite that reproducibly had a surface area of 14-17 m2/g and (ii) conducted a thorough characterization of the product. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed nanometer scale, rhombohedral crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed highly crystalline, pure calcite that more closely resembles the dimensions of the biogenic calcite produced by algae in coccoliths than other methods for synthesizing calcite. We suggest that this calcite is useful when purity and high surface area are important.

  17. The influence of impurities on the growth rate of calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H. J.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of 34 different additives on the growth rate of calcite were investigated. An initial growth rate of about one crystal monolayer (3 × 10 -8 cm) per minute was adjusted at a constant supersaturation which was maintained by a control circuit. Then the impurity was added step by step and the reduction of the growth rate was measured. The impurity concentration necessary to reduce the initial growth rate by a certain percentage increased in the order Fe 2+, ATP, P 3O 5-10, P 2O 4-7, (PO 3) 6-6, Zn 2+, ADP, Ce 3+, Pb 2+, carbamyl phosphate, Fe 3+, PO 3-4, Co 2+, Mn 2+, Be 2+, β-glycerophosphate, Ni 2+, Cd 2+, "Tris", phenylphosphate, chondroitine sulphate, Ba 2+, citrate, AMP, Sr 2+, tricarballylate, taurine, SO 2-4, Mg 2+ by 4 orders of magnitude. The most effective additives halved the initial growth rate in concentrations of 2 × 10 -8 mol/1. For Fe 2+ the halving concentration was nearly proportional to the initial rate. The mechanism of inhibition by adsorption of the impurities at growth sites (kinks) is discussed.

  18. On the origin of fiber calcite crystals in moonmilk deposits.

    PubMed

    Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Cuezva, Soledad; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Lario, Javier; Laiz, Leonila; Gonzalez, Juan Miguel; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we show that moonmilk subaerial speleothems in Altamira Cave (Spain) consist of a network of fiber calcite crystals and active microbial structures. In Altamira moonmilks, the study of the typology and distribution of fiber crystals, extracellular polymeric substances, and microorganisms allowed us to define the initial stages of fiber crystal formation in recent samples as well as the variations in the microstructural arrangement in more evolved stages. Thus, we have been able to show the existence of a relationship among the different types of fiber crystals and their origins. This allowed us to outline a model that illustrates the different stages of formation of the moonmilk, developed on different substrata, concluding that microbes influence physicochemical precipitation, resulting in a variety of fiber crystal morphologies and sizes.

  19. Heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate at dolomite and calcite surfaces: Mechanisms and rates

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Callagon, Erika Blanca R.; Lee, Sang Soo; Eng, Peter J.

    Here, the systematic variation of rates and the mechanism of cadmium uptake on the (104) surface of dolomite (CaMg(CO 3) 2) were investigated using in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), ex situ specular X-ray reflectivity (XR), and ex situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Selected experiments were performed on the calcite (CaCO 3) (104) surface for comparison. Aqueous solutions of CdCl 2, CaCl 2, and NaHCO 3, undersaturated with respect to calcite and supersaturated with respect to otavite (CdCO 3) and the (Cd xCa 1-x)CO 3 solid solution, were reacted with dolomite surfaces for minutes to days. Calcite substratesmore » were reacted with solutions containing 1-50 μM CdCl 2, and with no added Ca or CO 3. Thin carbonate films following the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode were observed on both substrates. Specular XR and XRF revealed the formation of nm-thick Cd-rich carbonate films that were structurally ordered with respect to the dolomite (104) plane. Epitaxial films adopted the calcite crystal structure with a d 104- spacing (3.00 Å) larger than those of pure dolomite (2.88 Å) and otavite (2.95 Å) indicating either a solid solution with x approximate to 0.5, or a strained Cd-rich carbonate with a composition near that of otavite. The growth rate r of this phase increases with the initial supersaturation of the solution with respect to the solid solution, beta max, and follows the empirical relationship, as determined from XRF measurements, given by: r = 10 -4.88 ± 0.42 (β 2.29 ± 0.24 max - 1), (in units of atoms of Cd/Å 2/h).The morphology of the overgrowth also varied with β max, as exemplified by AFM observations. Growth at step edges occurred over the entire β max range considered, and additional growth features including 3 Å high monolayer islands and ~ 25 Å high tall islands were observed when log β max > 1. On calcite, in situ XR indicated that this phase is similar to the Cd-rich overgrowth formed on dolomite and images obtained from X

  20. Heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate at dolomite and calcite surfaces: Mechanisms and rates

    DOE PAGES

    Callagon, Erika Blanca R.; Lee, Sang Soo; Eng, Peter J.; ...

    2016-12-10

    Here, the systematic variation of rates and the mechanism of cadmium uptake on the (104) surface of dolomite (CaMg(CO 3) 2) were investigated using in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), ex situ specular X-ray reflectivity (XR), and ex situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Selected experiments were performed on the calcite (CaCO 3) (104) surface for comparison. Aqueous solutions of CdCl 2, CaCl 2, and NaHCO 3, undersaturated with respect to calcite and supersaturated with respect to otavite (CdCO 3) and the (Cd xCa 1-x)CO 3 solid solution, were reacted with dolomite surfaces for minutes to days. Calcite substratesmore » were reacted with solutions containing 1-50 μM CdCl 2, and with no added Ca or CO 3. Thin carbonate films following the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode were observed on both substrates. Specular XR and XRF revealed the formation of nm-thick Cd-rich carbonate films that were structurally ordered with respect to the dolomite (104) plane. Epitaxial films adopted the calcite crystal structure with a d 104- spacing (3.00 Å) larger than those of pure dolomite (2.88 Å) and otavite (2.95 Å) indicating either a solid solution with x approximate to 0.5, or a strained Cd-rich carbonate with a composition near that of otavite. The growth rate r of this phase increases with the initial supersaturation of the solution with respect to the solid solution, beta max, and follows the empirical relationship, as determined from XRF measurements, given by: r = 10 -4.88 ± 0.42 (β 2.29 ± 0.24 max - 1), (in units of atoms of Cd/Å 2/h).The morphology of the overgrowth also varied with β max, as exemplified by AFM observations. Growth at step edges occurred over the entire β max range considered, and additional growth features including 3 Å high monolayer islands and ~ 25 Å high tall islands were observed when log β max > 1. On calcite, in situ XR indicated that this phase is similar to the Cd-rich overgrowth formed on dolomite and images obtained from X

  1. On geological interpretations of crystal size distributions: Constant vs. proportionate growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Kile, D.E.; Drits, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    Geological interpretations of crystal size distributions (CSDs) depend on understanding the crystal growth laws that generated the distributions. Most descriptions of crystal growth, including a population-balance modeling equation that is widely used in petrology, assume that crystal growth rates at any particular time are identical for all crystals, and, therefore, independent of crystal size. This type of growth under constant conditions can be modeled by adding a constant length to the diameter of each crystal for each time step. This growth equation is unlikely to be correct for most mineral systems because it neither generates nor maintains the shapes of lognormal CSDs, which are among the most common types of CSDs observed in rocks. In an alternative approach, size-dependent (proportionate) growth is modeled approximately by multiplying the size of each crystal by a factor, an operation that maintains CSD shape and variance, and which is in accord with calcite growth experiments. The latter growth law can be obtained during supply controlled growth using a modified version of the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), an equation that simulates the reaction path followed by a CSD shape as mean size increases.

  2. Morphology and formation mechanism in precipitation of calcite induced by Curvibacter lanceolatus strain HJ-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chonghong; Li, Fuchun; Lv, Jiejie

    2017-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbobate induced by microbial activities is common occurrence in controlled solution, but the formation mechanism and morphology in precipitation of calcite in solution systems is unclear, and the role of microbes is disputed. Here, culture experiment was performed for 50 days using the Curvibacter lanceolatus strain HJ-1 in a M2 culture medium, and the phase composition and morphology of the precipitates were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. We show that the precipitation processes in our experiment lead to unusual morphologies of crystals corresponding to different growth stages, and the morphologies of the precipitated crystal aggregates ranging from the main rod-, cross-, star-, cauliflower-like morphologies to spherulitic structure. The complex and unusual morphologies of the precipitated calcite by strain HJ-1 may provide a reference point for better understanding the biomineralization mechanism of calcite, moreover, morphological transition of minerals revealed that the multi-ply crystals-aggregation mechanism for calcite growth in crystallisation media.

  3. Specific effects of background electrolytes on the kinetics of step propagation during calcite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; Putnis, Christine V.; Wang, Lijun; Putnis, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms by which background electrolytes modify the kinetics of non-equivalent step propagation during calcite growth were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), at constant driving force and solution stoichiometry. Our results suggest that the acute step spreading rate is controlled by kink-site nucleation and, ultimately, by the dehydration of surface sites, while the velocity of obtuse step advancement is mainly determined by hydration of calcium ions in solution. According to our results, kink nucleation at acute steps could be promoted by carbonate-assisted calcium attachment. The different sensitivity of obtuse and acute step propagation kinetics to cation and surface hydration could be the origin of the reversed geometries of calcite growth hillocks (i.e., rate of obtuse step spreading < rate of acute step spreading) observed in concentrated (ionic strength, IS = 0.1) KCl and CsCl solutions. At low IS (0.02), ion-specific effects seem to be mainly associated with changes in the solvation environment of calcium ions in solution. With increasing electrolyte concentration, the stabilization of surface water by weakly paired salts appears to become increasingly important in determining step spreading rate. At high ionic strength (IS = 0.1), overall calcite growth rates increased with increasing hydration of calcium in solution (i.e., decreasing ion pairing of background electrolytes for sodium-bearing salts) and with decreasing hydration of the carbonate surface site (i.e., increasing ion pairing for chloride-bearing salts). Changes in growth hillock morphology were observed in the presence of Li +, F - and SO42-, and can be interpreted as the result of the stabilization of polar surfaces due to increased ion hydration. These results increase our ability to predict crystal reactivity in natural fluids which contain significant amounts of solutes.

  4. Morphology Controls on Calcite Recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Frank; Paulig, Leonie; Nie, Zhe; Schild, Dieter; Finck, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Environmental scientists and geoscientists working in different fields regard the reactivity of calcite and corresponding changes in its trace elemental- or isotopic composition from diametrically opposed points of view. As one extreme, calcite based environmental remediation strategies rely on the fast recrystallization of calcite and the concurrent uptake and immobilization of pollutants. Paleo-ecological investigations denote the other extreme, and rely on the invariability of calcite composition over geological periods of time. We use long-term radiotracer experiments to quantify recrystallization rates of seven types of calcite powder with diverse morphology and particle size distribution. On the one hand our results demonstrate the long-term metastability of calcite with equilibrated crystal surfaces even at isotopic dis-equilibrium. On the other hand, we document the extremely high reactivity and interfacial free energy of freshly ground, rough calcite. Our results indicate that bulk calcite recrystallization is an interfacial free energy driven Ostwald-ripening process, in which particle roughness effects dominate over the effect of crystal habitus and particle size. We confirm that the dynamic equilibrium exchange of crystal constituents between kink sites involves an activation barrier of about 25 kJ/mol. At room temperature the equilibrium exchange is limited to a near surface region and proceeds at a rate of (3.6 ± 1.4)·10 -13 mol/(m 2 ·s).

  5. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  6. Amorphous calcium carbonate transforms into calcite during sea urchin larval spicule growth

    PubMed Central

    Beniash, E.; Aizenberg, J.; Addadi, L.; Weiner, S.

    1997-01-01

    Sea urchin larvae form an endoskeleton composed of a pair of spicules. For more than a century it has been stated that each spicule comprises a single crystal of the CaCO3 mineral, calcite. We show that an additional mineral phase, amorphous calcium carbonate, is present in the sea urchin larval spicule, and that this inherently unstable mineral transforms into calcite with time. This observation significantly changes our concepts of mineral formation in this well-studied organism.

  7. Predicting crystal growth via a unified kinetic three-dimensional partition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Michael W.; Gebbie-Rayet, James T.; Hill, Adam R.; Farida, Nani; Attfield, Martin P.; Cubillas, Pablo; Blatov, Vladislav A.; Proserpio, Davide M.; Akporiaye, Duncan; Arstad, Bjørnar; Gale, Julian D.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding and predicting crystal growth is fundamental to the control of functionality in modern materials. Despite investigations for more than one hundred years, it is only recently that the molecular intricacies of these processes have been revealed by scanning probe microscopy. To organize and understand this large amount of new information, new rules for crystal growth need to be developed and tested. However, because of the complexity and variety of different crystal systems, attempts to understand crystal growth in detail have so far relied on developing models that are usually applicable to only one system. Such models cannot be used to achieve the wide scope of understanding that is required to create a unified model across crystal types and crystal structures. Here we describe a general approach to understanding and, in theory, predicting the growth of a wide range of crystal types, including the incorporation of defect structures, by simultaneous molecular-scale simulation of crystal habit and surface topology using a unified kinetic three-dimensional partition model. This entails dividing the structure into ‘natural tiles’ or Voronoi polyhedra that are metastable and, consequently, temporally persistent. As such, these units are then suitable for re-construction of the crystal via a Monte Carlo algorithm. We demonstrate our approach by predicting the crystal growth of a diverse set of crystal types, including zeolites, metal-organic frameworks, calcite, urea and L-cystine.

  8. Selective adsorption of L- and D-amino acids on calcite: Implications for biochemical homochirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, R. M.; Filley, T. R.; Goodfriend, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of biochemical homochirality was a key step in the origin of life, yet prebiotic mechanisms for chiral separation are not well constrained. Here we demonstrate a geochemically plausible scenario for chiral separation of amino acids by adsorption on mineral surfaces. Crystals of the common rock-forming mineral calcite (CaCO(3)), when immersed in a racemic aspartic acid solution, display significant adsorption and chiral selectivity of d- and l-enantiomers on pairs of mirror-related crystal-growth surfaces. This selective adsorption is greater on crystals with terraced surface textures, which indicates that d- and l-aspartic acid concentrate along step-like linear growth features. Thus, selective adsorption of linear arrays of d- and l-amino acids on calcite, with subsequent condensation polymerization, represents a plausible geochemical mechanism for the production of homochiral polypeptides on the prebiotic Earth.

  9. Characteristics of biogenic calcite in the prismatic layer of a pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Taiga; Suzuki, Michio; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2010-10-01

    The fine structure of the calcite prism in the outer layer of a pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata, has been investigated using various electron beam techniques, in order to understand its characteristics and growth mechanism including the role of intracrystalline organic substances. As the calcite prismatic layer grows thicker, sinuous boundaries develop to divide the prism into a number of domains. The crystal misorientation between the adjacent domains is several to more than ten degrees. The component of the misorientation is mainly the rotation about the c-axis. There is no continuous organic membrane at the boundaries. Furthermore, the crystal orientation inside the domains changes gradually, as indicated by the electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination revealed that the domain consists of sub-grains of a few hundred nanometers divided by small-angle grain boundaries, which are probably the origin of the gradual change of the crystal orientation inside the domains. Spherular Fresnel contrasts were often observed at the small-angle grain boundaries, in defocused TEM images. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) indicated the spherules are organic macromolecules, suggesting that incorporation of organic macromolecules during the crystal growth forms the sub-grain structure of the calcite prism.

  10. Ab initio study of single-crystalline and polycrystalline elastic properties of Mg-substituted calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L-F; Friák, M; Lymperakis, L; Titrian, H; Aydin, U; Janus, A M; Fabritius, H-O; Ziegler, A; Nikolov, S; Hemzalová, P; Raabe, D; Neugebauer, J

    2013-04-01

    We employ ab initio calculations and investigate the single-crystalline elastic properties of (Ca,Mg)CO3 crystals covering the whole range of concentrations from pure calcite CaCO3 to pure magnesite MgCO3. Studying different distributions of Ca and Mg atoms within 30-atom supercells, our theoretical results show that the energetically most favorable configurations are characterized by elastic constants that nearly monotonously increase with the Mg content. Based on the first principles-derived single-crystalline elastic anisotropy, the integral elastic response of (Ca,Mg)CO3 polycrystals is determined employing a mean-field self-consistent homogenization method. As in case of single-crystalline elastic properties, the computed polycrystalline elastic parameters sensitively depend on the chemical composition and show a significant stiffening impact of Mg atoms on calcite crystals in agreement with the experimental findings. Our analysis also shows that it is not advantageous to use a higher-scale two-phase mix of stoichiometric calcite and magnesite instead of substituting Ca atoms by Mg ones on the atomic scale. Such two-phase composites are not significantly thermodynamically favorable and do not provide any strong additional stiffening effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystalline order of a water/glycine film coadsorbed on the (104) calcite surface.

    PubMed

    Magdans, Uta; Torrelles, Xavier; Angermund, Klaus; Gies, Hermann; Rius, Jordi

    2007-04-24

    For biomineralization processes, the interaction of the surface of calcite crystals with organic molecules is of particular importance. Especially, biologically controlled biomineralization as in exoskeletons of mollusks and echinoderms, e.g., sea urchin with single-crystal-like spines and shells,1-3 requires molecular control of seed formation and growth process. So far, experiments showing the obvious influence of organic molecules on the morphology and habit of calcite crystals have demonstrated the molecular dimension of the interaction.4-7 Details of the kinetics of growth and dissolution of mineral surfaces influenced by additives are available,8,9 but other experimental data about the structure of the organic/inorganic interface on the atomic scale are rare. On the other hand, complicated organic macromolecules which are involved in biomineralization are numerous, with only a small fraction solved in structure and function so far.10-13 Therefore, model systems have to be designed to provide a basic understanding for the interaction process.14 Using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction combined with molecular modeling techniques, we show that glycine molecules order periodically on the calcite (104) face in competition with the solvent water when exposed to an aqueous solution of the most simple amino acid. In contrast to the general concept of the charge-matching fit of organic molecules on mineral surfaces,4,14 glycine is not attached to the calcite surface directly but substitutes for water molecules in the second hydration layer.

  12. Kinetic and thermodynamic factors controlling the distribution of SO32- and Na+ in calcites and selected aragonites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, E.; Plummer, Niel

    1985-01-01

    Significant amounts of SO42-, Na+, and OH- are incorporated in marine biogenic calcites. Biogenic high Mg-calcites average about 1 mole percent SO42-. Aragonites and most biogenic low Mg-calcites contain significant amounts of Na+, but very low concentrations of SO42-. The SO42- content of non-biogenic calcites and aragonites investigated was below 100 ppm. The presence of Na+ and SO42- increases the unit cell size of calcites. The solid-solutions show a solubility minimum at about 0.5 mole percent SO42- beyond which the solubility rapidly increases. The solubility product of calcites containing 3 mole percent SO42- is the same as that of aragonite. Na+ appears to have very little effect on the solubility product of calcites. The amounts of Na+ and SO42- incorporated in calcites vary as a function of the rate of crystal growth. The variation of the distribution coefficient (D) of SO42- in calcite at 25.0??C and 0.50 molal NaCl is described by the equation D = k0 + k1R where k0 and k1 are constants equal to 6.16 ?? 10-6 and 3.941 ?? 10-6, respectively, and R is the rate of crystal growth of calcite in mg??min-1??g-1 of seed. The data on Na+ are consistent with the hypothesis that a significant amount of Na+ occupies interstitial positions in the calcite structure. The distribution of Na+ follows a Freundlich isotherm and not the Berthelot-Nernst distribution law. The numerical value of the Na+ distribution coefficient in calcite is probably dependent on the number of defects in the calcite structure. The Na+ contents of calcites are not very accurate indicators of environmental salinities. ?? 1985.

  13. Inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by organic additives using the constant composition method in conditions of recirculating cooling circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhim, Norinda; Kharbachi, Chams; Neveux, Thibaut; Bouteleux, Céline; Teychené, Sébastien; Biscans, Béatrice

    2017-08-01

    The cooling circuits used in power plants are subject to mineral crystallization which can cause scaling on the surfaces of equipment and construction materials reducing their heat exchange efficiency. Precipitated calcium carbonate is the predominant mineral scale commonly observed in cooling systems. Supersaturation is the key parameter controlling the nucleation and growth of calcite in these systems. The present work focuses on the precipitation of calcite using the constant composition method at constant supersaturation, through controlled addition of reactants to a semi-batch crystallizer, in order to maintain constant solution pH. The determination of the thermodynamic driving force (supersaturation) was based on the relevant chemical equilibria, total alkalinity and calculation of the activity coefficients. Calcite crystallization rates were derived from the experiments performed at supersaturation levels similar to those found in industrial station cooling circuits. Several types of seeds particles were added into the aqueous solution to mimic natural river water conditions in terms of suspended particulate matters content, typically: calcite, silica or illite particles. The effect of citric and copolycarboxylic additive inhibitors added to the aqueous solution was studied. The calcium carbonate growth rate was reduced by 38.6% in the presence of the citric additive and a reduction of 92.7% was observed when the copolycarboxylic additive was used under identical experimental conditions. These results are explained by the location of the adsorbed inhibitor at the crystal surface and by the degree of chemical bonding to the surface.

  14. Adjustment errors of sunstones in the first step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: studies with dichroic cordierite/ tourmaline and birefringent calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Egri, Ádám; Kretzer, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tibor; Jäger, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    According to an old but still unproven theory, Viking navigators analysed the skylight polarization with dichroic cordierite or tourmaline, or birefringent calcite sunstones in cloudy/foggy weather. Combining these sunstones with their sun-dial, they could determine the position of the occluded sun, from which the geographical northern direction could be guessed. In psychophysical laboratory experiments, we studied the accuracy of the first step of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. We measured the adjustment error e of rotatable cordierite, tourmaline and calcite crystals when the task was to determine the direction of polarization of white light as a function of the degree of linear polarization p. From the obtained error functions e(p), the thresholds p* above which the first step can still function (i.e. when the intensity change seen through the rotating analyser can be sensed) were derived. Cordierite is about twice as reliable as tourmaline. Calcite sunstones have smaller adjustment errors if the navigator looks for that orientation of the crystal where the intensity difference between the two spots seen in the crystal is maximal, rather than minimal. For higher p (greater than pcrit) of incident light, the adjustment errors of calcite are larger than those of the dichroic cordierite (pcrit=20%) and tourmaline (pcrit=45%), while for lower p (less than pcrit) calcite usually has lower adjustment errors than dichroic sunstones. We showed that real calcite crystals are not as ideal sunstones as it was believed earlier, because they usually contain scratches, impurities and crystal defects which increase considerably their adjustment errors. Thus, cordierite and tourmaline can also be at least as good sunstones as calcite. Using the psychophysical e(p) functions and the patterns of the degree of skylight polarization measured by full-sky imaging polarimetry, we computed how accurately the northern direction can be determined with the use of the Viking sun

  15. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  16. Metadynamics simulations of calcite crystallization on self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, D.; Rodger, P. M.; Freeman, C. L.; Harding, J. H.; Duffy, D. M.

    2009-09-01

    We show that recent developments in the application of metadynamics methods to direct simulations of crystallization make it possible to predict the orientation of crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers. In contrast to previous studies, the method allows for dynamic treatment of the organic component and the inclusion of explicit surface water without the need for computationally intensive interfacial energy calculations or prior knowledge of the interfacial structure. The method is applied to calcite crystallization on carboxylate terminated alkanethiols arrayed on Au (111). We demonstrate that a dynamic treatment of the monolayer is sufficient to reproduce the experimental results without the need to impose epitaxial constraints on the system. We also observe an odd-even effect in the variation of selectivity with organic chain length, reproducing experimentally observed orientations in both cases. Analysis of the ordering process in our simulations suggests a cycle of mutual control in which both the organic and mineral components induce complementary local order across the interface, leading to the formation of a critical crystalline region. The influence of pH, together with some factors that might affect the range of applicability of our method, is discussed.

  17. Adjustment errors of sunstones in the first step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: studies with dichroic cordierite/ tourmaline and birefringent calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Egri, Ádám; Kretzer, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tibor; Jäger, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    According to an old but still unproven theory, Viking navigators analysed the skylight polarization with dichroic cordierite or tourmaline, or birefringent calcite sunstones in cloudy/foggy weather. Combining these sunstones with their sun-dial, they could determine the position of the occluded sun, from which the geographical northern direction could be guessed. In psychophysical laboratory experiments, we studied the accuracy of the first step of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. We measured the adjustment error e of rotatable cordierite, tourmaline and calcite crystals when the task was to determine the direction of polarization of white light as a function of the degree of linear polarization p. From the obtained error functions e(p), the thresholds p* above which the first step can still function (i.e. when the intensity change seen through the rotating analyser can be sensed) were derived. Cordierite is about twice as reliable as tourmaline. Calcite sunstones have smaller adjustment errors if the navigator looks for that orientation of the crystal where the intensity difference between the two spots seen in the crystal is maximal, rather than minimal. For higher p (greater than p crit) of incident light, the adjustment errors of calcite are larger than those of the dichroic cordierite (p crit=20%) and tourmaline (p crit=45%), while for lower p (less than p crit) calcite usually has lower adjustment errors than dichroic sunstones. We showed that real calcite crystals are not as ideal sunstones as it was believed earlier, because they usually contain scratches, impurities and crystal defects which increase considerably their adjustment errors. Thus, cordierite and tourmaline can also be at least as good sunstones as calcite. Using the psychophysical e(p) functions and the patterns of the degree of skylight polarization measured by full-sky imaging polarimetry, we computed how accurately the northern direction can be determined with the use of the Viking

  18. Perlwapin, an Abalone Nacre Protein with Three Four-Disulfide Core (Whey Acidic Protein) Domains, Inhibits the Growth of Calcium Carbonate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Treccani, Laura; Mann, Karlheinz; Heinemann, Fabian; Fritz, Monika

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a new protein from the nacreous layer of the shell of the sea snail Haliotis laevigata (abalone). Amino acid sequence analysis showed the protein to consist of 134 amino acids and to contain three sequence repeats of ∼40 amino acids which were very similar to the well-known whey acidic protein domains of other proteins. The new protein was therefore named perlwapin. In addition to the major sequence, we identified several minor variants. Atomic force microscopy was used to explore the interaction of perlwapin with calcite crystals. Monomolecular layers of calcite crystals dissolve very slowly in deionized water and recrystallize in supersaturated calcium carbonate solution. When perlwapin was dissolved in the supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, growth of the crystal was inhibited immediately. Perlwapin molecules bound tightly to distinct step edges, preventing the crystal layers from growing. Using lower concentrations of perlwapin in a saturated calcium carbonate solution, we could distinguish native, active perlwapin molecules from denaturated ones. These observations showed that perlwapin can act as a growth inhibitor for calcium carbonate crystals in saturated calcium carbonate solution. The function of perlwapin in nacre growth may be to inhibit the growth of certain crystallographic planes in the mineral phase of the polymer/mineral composite nacre. PMID:16861275

  19. Bio-inspired formation of functional calcite/metal oxide nanoparticle composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S; Walsh, Dominic; Kulak, Alexander N; Cespedes, Oscar; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2014-01-21

    Biominerals are invariably composite materials, where occlusion of organic macromolecules within single crystals can significantly modify their properties. In this article, we take inspiration from this biogenic strategy to generate composite crystals in which magnetite (Fe3O4) and zincite (ZnO) nanoparticles are embedded within a calcite single crystal host, thereby endowing it with new magnetic or optical properties. While growth of crystals in the presence of small molecules, macromolecules and particles can lead to their occlusion within the crystal host, this approach requires particles with specific surface chemistries. Overcoming this limitation, we here precipitate crystals within a nanoparticle-functionalised xyloglucan gel, where gels can also be incorporated within single crystals, according to their rigidity. This method is independent of the nanoparticle surface chemistry and as the gel maintains its overall structure when occluded within the crystal, the nanoparticles are maintained throughout the crystal, preventing, for example, their movement and accumulation at the crystal surface during crystal growth. This methodology is expected to be quite general, and could be used to endow a wide range of crystals with new functionalities.

  20. Calcium carbonate crystals promote calcium oxalate crystallization by heterogeneous or epitaxial nucleation: possible involvement in the control of urinary lithogenesis.

    PubMed

    Geider, S; Dussol, B; Nitsche, S; Veesler, S; Berthézène, P; Dupuy, P; Astier, J P; Boistelle, R; Berland, Y; Dagorn, J C; Verdier, J M

    1996-07-01

    A large proportion of urinary stones have calcium oxalate (CaOx) as the major mineral phase. In these stones, CaOx is generally associated with minor amounts of other calcium salts. Several reports showing the presence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium phosphate in renal stones suggested that crystals of those salts might be present in the early steps of stone formation. Such crystals might therefore promote CaOx crystallization from supersaturated urine by providing an appropriate substrate for heterogeneous nucleation. That possibility was investigated by seeding a metastable solution of 45Ca oxalate with vaterite or calcite crystallites. Accretion of CaOx was monitored by 45Ca incorporation. We showed that (1) seeds of vaterite (the hexagonal polymorph of CaCO3) and calcite (the rhomboedric form) could initiate calcium oxalate crystal growth; (2) in the presence of lithostathine, an inhibitor of CaCO3 crystal growth, such accretion was not observed. In addition, scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that growth occurred by epitaxy onto calcite seeds whereas no special orientation was observed onto vaterite. It was concluded that calcium carbonate crystals promote crystallization of calcium oxalate and that inhibitors controlling calcium carbonate crystal formation in Henle's loop might play an important role in the prevention of calcium oxalate stone formation.

  1. Galacturonomannan and Golgi-derived membrane linked to growth and shaping of biogenic calcite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, M. E.; Ridall, A. L.; Azadi, P.; Duke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    The coccolithophores are valuable models for the design and synthesis of composite materials, because the cellular machinery controlling the nucleation, growth, and patterning of their calcitic scales (coccoliths) can be examined genetically. The coccoliths are formed within the Golgi complex and are the major CaCO(3) component in limestone sediments-particularly those of the Cretaceous period. In this study, we describe mutants lacking a sulfated galacturonomannan and show that this polysaccharide in conjunction with the Golgi-derived membrane is directly linked to the growth and shaping of coccolith calcite but not to the initial orientated nucleation of the mineral phase.

  2. The Crystal Hotel: A Microfluidic Approach to Biomimetic Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Wang, Yun-Wei; Ihli, Johannes; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Li, Shunbo; Walshaw, Richard; Chen, Li; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2015-12-02

    A "crystal hotel" microfluidic device that allows crystal growth in confined volumes to be studied in situ is used to produce large calcite single crystals with predefined crystallographic orientation, microstructure, and shape by control of the detailed physical environment, flow, and surface chemistry. This general approach can be extended to form technologically important, nanopatterned single crystals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Intrinsic versus extrinsic controls on the development of calcite dendrite bushes, Shuzhishi Spring, Rehai geothermal area, Tengchong, Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian; Peng, Xiaotong

    2012-04-01

    In the Rehai geothermal area, located near Tengchong, there is an old succession of crystalline calcite that formed from a spring that is no longer active. The thin-bedded succession, exposed on the south bank of Zaotang River, is formed of three-dimensional dendrite bushes that are up to 6 cm high and 3 cm in diameter with multiple levels of branching. Bedding is defined by color, which ranges from white to gray to almost black and locally accentuated by differential weathering that highlights the branching motif of the dendrites. The succession developed through repeated tripartite growth cycles that involved: Phase I that was characterized by rapid vertical growth of the dendrite bushes with ever-increasing branching; Phase II that developed once growth of the dendrites had almost or totally ceased, and involved an initial phase of etching that was followed by the precipitation of various secondary minerals (sheet calcite, trigonal calcite crystals, hexagonal calcite crystals, hexagonal plates formed of Ca and P, Mn precipitates, Si-Mg reticulate coatings, opal-CT lepispheres) on the branches of the calcite dendrites, and Phase III that involved deposition of detrital quartz, feldspar, clay, and calcite on top of the dendrite bushes. The tripartite growth cycle is attributed primarily to aperiodic cycles in the CO2 content of the spring water that was controlled by subsurface igneous activity rather than climatic controls. High CO2 coupled with rapid CO2 degassing triggered growth of the dendrite bushes. As CO2 levels waned, saturation levels in the spring water decreased and calcite dendrite growth ceased and precipitation of the secondary minerals took place, possibly in the microcosms of microbial mats. Deposition of the detrital sediment was probably related to surface runoff that was triggered by periods of high rainfall. Critically, this study shows that intrinsic factors rather than extrinsic factors (e.g., climate) were the prime control on the

  4. Morphology of calcite crystals in clast coatings from four soils in the Mojave desert region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadwick, Oliver A.; Sowers, Janet M.; Amundson, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Pedogenic calcite-crystal coatings on clasts were examined in four soils along an altitudinal gradient on Kyle Canyon alluvium in southern Nevada. Clast coatings were studied rather than matrix carbonate to avoid the effects of soil matrix on crystallization. Six crystal sizes and shapes were recognized and distinguished. Equant micrite was the dominant crystal form with similar abundance at all elevations. The distributions of five categories of spar and microspar appear to be influenced by altitudinally induced changes in effective moisture. In the drier, lower elevation soils, crystals were equant or parallel prismatic with irregular, interlocking boundaries while in the more moist, higher elevation soils they were randomly oriented, euhedral, prismatic, and fibrous. There was little support for the supposition that Mg(+2) substitution or increased (Mg + Ca)/HCO3 ratios in the precipitating solution produced crystal elongation.

  5. The calcite → aragonite transformation in low-Mg marble: Equilibrium relations, transformations mechanisms, and rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Rubie, David C.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental transformation of a rather pure natural calcite marble to aragonite marble did not proceed via the expected straightforward polymorphic replacement. Instead, the small amount of Mg in the starting material (0.36 wt %) was excluded from the growing aragonite and diffused preferentially into the remaining calcite grains, producing Mg-rich calcite rods that persisted as relicts. Nucleation of aragonite occurred exclusively on grain boundaries, with aragonite [001] oriented subparallel to calcite [0001]. The aragonite crystals preferentially consumed the calcite crystal on which they nucleated, and the reaction fronts developed preferentially along the {010} and {110} planes of aragonite. Each aragonite neoblast that grew was nearly free of Mg (typically <0.1 wt %). The excess Mg was taken up by the calcite grains in between, stabilizing them and causing a few volume percent rodlike relicts of Mg-enriched calcite (up to 10 wt % MgO) to be left behind by the advancing reaction front. The aragonite growth rates are approximately linear and range from ∼3 × 10−11 m s−1 at 600°C to ∼9 × 10−9 m s−1 at 850°C, with an apparent activation enthalpy of 166 ± 91 kJ mol−1. This reaction mechanism and the resultant texture are akin to cellular precipitation reactions in metals. Similar transformation textures have been reported from high-Mg marbles in Japan and China that disproportionated to low-Mg calcite and dolomite.

  6. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. PMID:22940703

  7. High-pressure deformation of calcite marble and its transformation to aragonite under non-hydrostatic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, B.R.; Kirby, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    We conducted deformation experiments on Carrara marble in the aragonite and calcite stability fields to observe the synkinematic transformation of calcite to aragonite, and to identify any relationships between transformation and deformation or sample strength. Deformation-induced microstructures in calcite crystals varied most significantly with temperature, ranging from limited slip and twinning at 400??C, limited recrystallization at 500??C, widespread recrystallization at 600 and 700??C, to grain growth at 800-900??C. Variations in confining pressure from 0.3 to 2.0 GPa have no apparent effect on calcite deformation microstructures. Aragonite grew in 10-6-10-7 s-1strain rate tests conducted for 18-524 h at confining pressures of 1.7-2.0 GPa and temperatures of 500-600??C. As in our previously reported hydrostatic experiments on this same transformation, the aragonite nucleated on calcite grain boundaries. The extent of transformation varied from a few percent conversion near pistons at 400??C, 2.0 GPa and 10-4 s-1 strain rate in a 0.8 h long experiment, to 98% transformation in a 21-day test at a strain rate of 10-7 s-7, a temperature of 600??C and a pressure of 2.0 GPa. At 500??C, porphyroblastic 100-200 ??m aragonite crystals grew at a rate faster than 8 ?? 10-1m s-1. At 600??C, the growth of aragonite neoblasts was slower, ???6 ?? 10-1 m s -1, and formed 'glove-and-finger' cellularprecipitation-like textures identical to those observed in hydrostatic experiments. The transformation to aragonite is not accompanied by a shear instability or anisotropic aragonite growth, consistent with its relatively small volume change and latent heat in comparison with compounds that do display those features. ?? 1993.

  8. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions.

    PubMed

    Hellebrandt, S E; Hofmann, S; Jordan, N; Barkleit, A; Schmidt, M

    2016-09-13

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu(3+) occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na(+). These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site.

  9. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hellebrandt, S. E.; Hofmann, S.; Jordan, N.; Barkleit, A.; Schmidt, M.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu3+ occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na+. These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site. PMID:27618958

  10. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: calcite present early in the aboral plumula.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stuart R; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D; Dorvee, Jason R

    2012-11-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: when and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 3D visualization of additive occlusion and tunable full-spectrum fluorescence in calcite

    PubMed Central

    Green, David C.; Ihli, Johannes; Thornton, Paul D.; Holden, Mark A.; Marzec, Bartosz; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alex N.; Levenstein, Mark A.; Tang, Chiu; Lynch, Christophe; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    From biomineralization to synthesis, organic additives provide an effective means of controlling crystallization processes. There is growing evidence that these additives are often occluded within the crystal lattice. This promises an elegant means of creating nanocomposites and tuning physical properties. Here we use the incorporation of sulfonated fluorescent dyes to gain new understanding of additive occlusion in calcite (CaCO3), and to link morphological changes to occlusion mechanisms. We demonstrate that these additives are incorporated within specific zones, as defined by the growth conditions, and show how occlusion can govern changes in crystal shape. Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime imaging microscopy also show that the dyes experience unique local environments within different zones. Our strategy is then extended to simultaneously incorporate mixtures of dyes, whose fluorescence cascade creates calcite nanoparticles that fluoresce white. This offers a simple strategy for generating biocompatible and stable fluorescent nanoparticles whose output can be tuned as required. PMID:27857076

  12. Chemical Evidence for Episodic Growth of a Fibrous Antitaxial Calcite Vein From Externally Derived Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, S. L.; Cox, S. F.; Eggins, S. M.; Gagan, M. K.

    2005-12-01

    Fibrous, massive and crustiform textured quartz and calcite veins occur within a deformed limestone-shale sequence at Taemas, in the Lachlan Fold Belt, eastern New South Wales, Australia. Stable isotope analyses of veins and host rock indicate that these veins formed from upwardly migrating, externally derived fluids. High spatial resolution (100 μm) analyses reveal per mil scale variations of stable C and O isotope ratios, and radiogenic Sr isotope ratios in a 1.5 cm thick, fibrous, antitaxial-growth calcite vein. LA-ICP-MS analyses (30 μm resolution) demonstrate significant variations in Fe, Mn, Sr, REE and Eu/Eu* parallel to the long axes of fibres. Stable and radiogenic isotopic ratio variations, and trace and REE concentration changes correlate with different cathodoluminesence zones, and slight changes in fibre orientation and thickness. The covariance of calcite textures and chemistry indicate that this fibrous vein grew episodically. Moreover, calcite in this vein was precipitated from externally derived fluid, which underwent variable fluid-rock interaction, and had a fluctuating oxidation state. This fibrous, antitaxial growth vein likely formed from fluid that migrated along fracture-controlled flow pathways.

  13. Catalytic Biomineralization of Fluorescent Calcite by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naoto; Higashimura, Eiji; Saeki, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus bacterium catalyzed the formation of 100-μm hexagonal crystals at 60°C in a hydrogel containing sodium acetate, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate. Under fluorescence microscopy, crystals fluoresced upon excitation at 365 ± 5, 480 ± 20, or 545 ± 15 nm. X-ray diffraction indicated that the crystals were magnesium-calcite in calcite-type calcium carbonate. PMID:20851984

  14. 3D calcite heterostructures for dynamic and deformable mineralized matrices

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yi, Jaeseok; Wang, Yucai; Jiang, Yuanwen

    Scales are rooted in soft tissues, and are regenerated by specialized cells. The realization of dynamic synthetic analogues with inorganic materials has been a significant challenge, because the abiological regeneration sites that could yield deterministic growth behavior are hard to form. Here we overcome this fundamental hurdle by constructing a mutable and deformable array of three-dimensional calcite heterostructures that are partially locked in silicone. Individual calcite crystals exhibit asymmetrical dumbbell shapes and are prepared by a parallel tectonic approach under ambient conditions. Furthermore, the silicone matrix immobilizes the epitaxial nucleation sites through self-templated cavities, which enables symmetry breaking in reactionmore » dynamics and scalable manipulation of the mineral ensembles. With this platform, we devise several mineral-enabled dynamic surfaces and interfaces. For example, we show that the induced growth of minerals yields localized inorganic adhesion for biological tissue and reversible focal encapsulation for sensitive components in flexible electronics.« less

  15. 3D calcite heterostructures for dynamic and deformable mineralized matrices

    DOE PAGES

    Yi, Jaeseok; Wang, Yucai; Jiang, Yuanwen; ...

    2017-09-11

    Scales are rooted in soft tissues, and are regenerated by specialized cells. The realization of dynamic synthetic analogues with inorganic materials has been a significant challenge, because the abiological regeneration sites that could yield deterministic growth behavior are hard to form. Here we overcome this fundamental hurdle by constructing a mutable and deformable array of three-dimensional calcite heterostructures that are partially locked in silicone. Individual calcite crystals exhibit asymmetrical dumbbell shapes and are prepared by a parallel tectonic approach under ambient conditions. Furthermore, the silicone matrix immobilizes the epitaxial nucleation sites through self-templated cavities, which enables symmetry breaking in reactionmore » dynamics and scalable manipulation of the mineral ensembles. With this platform, we devise several mineral-enabled dynamic surfaces and interfaces. For example, we show that the induced growth of minerals yields localized inorganic adhesion for biological tissue and reversible focal encapsulation for sensitive components in flexible electronics.« less

  16. Modelling the evolution of complex conductivity during calcite precipitation on glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Philippe; Li, Shuai; Jougnot, Damien; Revil, André; Wu, Yuxin

    2017-04-01

    When pH and alkalinity increase, calcite frequently precipitates and hence modifies the petrophysical properties of porous media. The complex conductivity method can be used to directly monitor calcite precipitation in porous media because it is sensitive to the evolution of the mineralogy, pore structure and its connectivity. We have developed a mechanistic grain polarization model considering the electrochemical polarization of the Stern and diffuse layers surrounding calcite particles. Our complex conductivity model depends on the surface charge density of the Stern layer and on the electrical potential at the onset of the diffuse layer, which are computed using a basic Stern model of the calcite/water interface. The complex conductivity measurements of Wu et al. on a column packed with glass beads where calcite precipitation occurs are reproduced by our surface complexation and complex conductivity models. The evolution of the size and shape of calcite particles during the calcite precipitation experiment is estimated by our complex conductivity model. At the early stage of the calcite precipitation experiment, modelled particles sizes increase and calcite particles flatten with time because calcite crystals nucleate at the surface of glass beads and grow into larger calcite grains. At the later stage of the calcite precipitation experiment, modelled sizes and cementation exponents of calcite particles decrease with time because large calcite grains aggregate over multiple glass beads and only small calcite crystals polarize.

  17. Ikaite pseudomorphs in the Zaire deep-sea fan: An intermediate between calcite and porous calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, J. H. F.; Woensdregt, C. F.; Kooistra, M. J.; van der Gaast, S. J.

    1987-03-01

    Translucent brown aggregates of calcium-carbonate crystals have been found in cores from the Zaire deep-sea fan (west equatorial Africa). The aggregates are well preserved but very friable. Upon storage they become yellowish white and cloudy and release water. Chemical, mineralogical (XRD), petrographical, crystal-morphological, and stable-isotope data demonstrate that the crystals have passed through three phases: (1) an authigenic carbonate phase, probably calcium carbonate, which is represented by the external habit of the present crystals; (2) a translucent brown ikaite phase (CaCO3·6H2O), unstable at temperatures above 5 °C; and (3) a phase consisting of calcite microcrystals that are poorly cemented and form a porous mass within the crystal form of the morphologically unchanged first phase. The transformation from the first phase into ikaite was probably a kinetic replacement. The transformation from ikaite into the third phase occurred because of storage at room temperature. The presence of ikaite is indicative of a low-temperature, anaerobic, organic-carbon-rich marine environment. Ikaite is probably the precursor of a great number of porous calcite pseudomorphs, and possibly also of many marine authigenic microcrystalline carbonate nodules.

  18. Repulsive hydration forces between calcite surfaces and their effect on the brittle strength of calcite-bearing rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røyne, Anja; Dalby, Kim N.; Hassenkam, Tue

    2015-06-01

    The long-term mechanical strength of calcite-bearing rocks is highly dependent on the presence and nature of pore fluids, and it has been suggested that the observed effects are due to changes in nanometer-scale surface forces near fracture tips and grain contacts. In this letter, we present measurements of forces between two calcite surfaces in air and water-glycol mixtures using the atomic force microscope. We show a time- and load-dependent adhesion at low water concentrations and a strong repulsion in the presence of water, which is most likely due to hydration of the strongly hydrophilic calcite surfaces. We argue that this hydration repulsion can explain the commonly observed water-induced decrease in strength in calcitic rocks and single calcite crystals. Furthermore, this relatively simple experimental setup may serve as a useful tool for analyzing surface forces in other mineral-fluid combinations.

  19. Sulphate partitioning into calcite: Experimental verification of pH control and application to seasonality in speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Peter M.; Fairchild, Ian J.; Borsato, Andrea; Spötl, Christoph; Hartland, Adam; Baker, Andy; Frisia, Silvia; Baldini, James U. L.

    2018-04-01

    Carbonate-associated sulphate (CAS) is a useful carrier of palaeoenvironmental information throughout the geologic record, particularly through its stable isotope composition. However, a paucity of experimental data restricts quantitative understanding of sulphate incorporation into carbonates, and consequently CAS concentrations and their diagenetic modifications are rarely interpreted. However, in the case of calcite speleothems, the remarkably high-resolution CAS records which are obtainable via modern microanalytical techniques represent a potentially invaluable source of palaeoenvironmental information. Here, we describe the results of controlled experiments of sulphate co-precipitation with calcite in freshwater solutions where pH, saturation state, and sulphate concentration were varied independently of each other. Solution pH is confirmed as the principal control on sulphate incorporation into calcite. The relative efficiency of incorporation was calculated as a partition coefficient DSO4 = (mSO4/mCO3)solid/(mSO4/mCO3)solution. High crystal growth rates (driven by either pH or saturation state) encouraged higher values of DSO4 because of an increasing concentration of defect sites on crystal surfaces. At low growth rates, DSO4 was reduced due to an inferred competition between sulphate and bicarbonate at the calcite surface. These experimental results are applied to understand the incorporation of sulphate into speleothem calcite. The experimentally determined pH-dependence suggests that strong seasonal variations in cave air PCO2 could account for annual cycles in sulphate concentration observed in stalagmites. Our new experimentally determined values of DSO4 were compared with DSO4 values calculated from speleothem-drip water monitoring from two caves within the Austrian and Italian Alps. At Obir cave, Austria, DSO4 (×105) varies between 11.1 (winter) and 9.0 (summer) and the corresponding figures for Ernesto cave, Italy, are 15.4 (winter) and 14

  20. (U-Th)/He dating and He diffusion in calcite from veins and breccia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautheron, C.; Cros, A.; Pagel, M.; Berthet, P.; Tassan-Got, L.; Douville, E.; Pinna-Jamme, R.; Sarda, P.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of He retention in crystalline calcite is mandatory to estimate the possibility of (U-Th)/He dating of calcite. To this aim, fault-filling calcite crystals from the Eocene/Oligocene Gondrecourt graben, Paris Basin, Eastern France, have been sampled, based on their relatively old, Eocene-Oligocene, precipitation age and cold thermal history (<40°C since precipitation). The samples were sorted into three main tectonic and morphological groups, including successively (1) micro-fracture calcites, (2) breccia and associated geodic calcites, and (3) vein and associated geodic calcites. (U-Th)/He dating of 63 calcite fragments yields ages dispersed from 0.2×0.02 to 35.8×2.7 Ma, as well as two older dates of 117×10 and 205×28 Ma (1s). These He ages correlate to grain chemistry, such as to Sr and ΣREE concentrations or (La/Yb)N ratios, and these correlations probably reflect the evolution of parent fluid. Only the oldest He ages are in agreement with the He-retentive character of calcite as determined by Copeland et al. (2007), and these ages were obtained for the most recently precipitated crystals. To better understand the large He-age scatter and why calcites precipitated earlier show younger ages, He diffusion experiments have been conducted on 10 Gondrecourt calcite fragments from 3 samples with He ages of 0.2 to 6 Ma. In addition, a crystallographic investigation by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) performed on similar samples reveals that the crystal structure evolves with increasing temperature, showing with micro-cracks and cleavage opening. These XRD results indicate that, in fault-filling calcite, He retention is controlled by multiple diffusion domains (MDD, Lovera et al., 1991) with various sizes, and therefore, evolves through time with strong consequences on (U-Th)/He age. We thus interpret the Gondrecourt calcite (U-Th)/He age scatter of older samples as a consequence of cleavage opening due to a succession of calcite crystallization phases related to

  1. Effect of organic ligands on Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during low-temperature precipitation of calcite in the absence of growth rate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Purgstaller, Bettina; Baldermann, Andre; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Calcite growth rate has been previously shown to be the dominating parameter controlling both Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during calcite growth. In natural calcite precipitation environments - characterized by abundant organic material - the presence of dissolved organic molecules may affect these two parameters. In order to assess the role of organic molecules, steady state calcite growth experiments have been performed at 25 °C, 1 bar pCO2 and constant, within analytical uncertainty growth rate (rp = 10-7.4 mol m-2 s-1) in the presence of aqueous Mg and six organic ligands in the concentration range from 0.01 to 10 mM. The organic ligands used in this study are: (i) acetic acid, (ii) citric acid, (iii) glutamic acid, (iv) salycilic acid, (v) glycine, and (vi) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). These contain one or more carboxyl- and amino-groups that are commonly present in natural organic substances found in lacustrine, fluvial, soil, cave, as well as in marine and earliest diagenetic porewater environments. Results shown here indicate that the presence of these carboxyl- and amino-groups promotes an increase in the partition coefficient of Mg in calcite (DMg = (Mg/Ca)calcite/(Mg/Ca)fluid) that can be attributed to their adsorption onto the calcite surfaces and the subsequent reduction of the active sites of growth. This increase of DMg values as a function of the supersaturation degree of calcite in the fluid phase can be described by the linear equation:

  2. Bioengineering single crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Park, Alexander; Joester, Derk

    2011-02-16

    Biomineralization is a "bottom-up" synthesis process that results in the formation of inorganic/organic nanocomposites with unrivaled control over structure, superior mechanical properties, adaptive response, and the capability of self-repair. While de novo design of such highly optimized materials may still be out of reach, engineering of the biosynthetic machinery may offer an alternative route to design advanced materials. Herein, we present an approach using micro-contact-printed lectins for patterning sea urchin embryo primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) in vitro. We demonstrate not only that PMCs cultured on these substrates show attachment to wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A patterns but, more importantly, that the deposition and elongation of calcite spicules occurs cooperatively by multiple cells and in alignment with the printed pattern. This allows us to control the placement and orientation of smooth, cylindrical calcite single crystals where the crystallographic c-direction is parallel to the cylinder axis and the underlying line pattern.

  3. Photoinduced synthesis of single-digit micrometer-size spheroidal calcite composites in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-06-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), which was based on the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphyenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions of pH 8.4 and 10 was studied for preparation of CaCO3 composite particles in single-digit micrometer-sizes. In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol%) was used as a precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. After the UV irradiation for 50 min, calcite spheroids in single-digit micrometer-sizes were obtained as major products at pH 8.4. The obtained calcite spheroids contained organic components of about 10 wt%. The comparison of the characteristics of the CaCO3 obtained at pH 8.4 and 10 suggests that the nucleation and crystallization of both vaterite and calcite continuously took place in a moderated supersaturation owing to the CO2 hydration equilibrium as long as the photodecarboxylation of KP continued. Consequently, the aggregation-based crystal growth in the presence of PVAPS seemed to enable the formation of the spheroidal composites of calcite in single-digit micrometer-sizes.

  4. Mechanism of calcite co-orientation in the sea urchin tooth.

    PubMed

    Killian, Christopher E; Metzler, Rebecca A; Gong, Y U T; Olson, Ian C; Aizenberg, Joanna; Politi, Yael; Wilt, Fred H; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Doran, Andrew; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Coppersmith, Susan N; Gilbert, P U P A

    2009-12-30

    Sea urchin teeth are remarkable and complex calcite structures, continuously growing at the forming end and self-sharpening at the mature grinding tip. The calcite (CaCO(3)) crystals of tooth components, plates, fibers, and a high-Mg polycrystalline matrix, have highly co-oriented crystallographic axes. This ability to co-orient calcite in a mineralized structure is shared by all echinoderms. However, the physico-chemical mechanism by which calcite crystals become co-oriented in echinoderms remains enigmatic. Here, we show differences in calcite c-axis orientations in the tooth of the purple sea urchin ( Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ), using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and microbeam X-ray diffraction (muXRD). All plates share one crystal orientation, propagated through pillar bridges, while fibers and polycrystalline matrix share another orientation. Furthermore, in the forming end of the tooth, we observe that CaCO(3) is present as amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). We demonstrate that co-orientation of the nanoparticles in the polycrystalline matrix occurs via solid-state secondary nucleation, propagating out from the previously formed fibers and plates, into the amorphous precursor nanoparticles. Because amorphous precursors were observed in diverse biominerals, solid-state secondary nucleation is likely to be a general mechanism for the co-orientation of biomineral components in organisms from different phyla.

  5. Formation and mosaicity of coccolith segment calcite of the marine algae Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaofei; Ziegler, Andreas; Kelm, Klemens; Hoffmann, Ramona; Watermeyer, Philipp; Alexa, Patrick; Villinger, Clarissa; Rupp, Ulrich; Schlüter, Lothar; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Griesshaber, Erika; Walther, Paul; Schmahl, Wolfgang W

    2018-02-01

    Coccolithophores belong to the most abundant calcium carbonate mineralizing organisms. Coccolithophore biomineralization is a complex and highly regulated process, resulting in a product that strongly differs in its intricate morphology from the abiogenically produced mineral equivalent. Moreover, unlike extracellularly formed biological carbonate hard tissues, coccolith calcite is neither a hybrid composite, nor is it distinguished by a hierarchical microstructure. This is remarkable as the key to optimizing crystalline biomaterials for mechanical strength and toughness lies in the composite nature of the biological hard tissue and the utilization of specific microstructures. To obtain insight into the pathway of biomineralization of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths, we examine intracrystalline nanostructural features of the coccolith calcite in combination with cell ultrastructural observations related to the formation of the calcite in the coccolith vesicle within the cell. With TEM diffraction and annular dark-field imaging, we prove the presence of planar imperfections in the calcite crystals such as planar mosaic block boundaries. As only minor misorientations occur, we attribute them to dislocation networks creating small-angle boundaries. Intracrystalline occluded biopolymers are not observed. Hence, in E. huxleyi calcite mosaicity is not caused by occluded biopolymers, as it is the case in extracellularly formed hard tissues of marine invertebrates, but by planar defects and dislocations which are typical for crystals formed by classical ion-by-ion growth mechanisms. Using cryo-preparation techniques for SEM and TEM, we found that the membrane of the coccolith vesicle and the outer membrane of the nuclear envelope are in tight proximity, with a well-controlled constant gap of ~4 nm between them. We describe this conspicuous connection as a not yet described interorganelle junction, the "nuclear envelope junction". The narrow gap of this junction likely

  6. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  7. Thermodynamics of magnesian calcite solid-solutions at 25°C and 1 atm total pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, Niel

    1989-01-01

    protodolomite. Group I and II solid-solutions differ significantly in stability. The rate of crystal growth and the chemical composition of the aqueous solutions from which the solids were formed are the main factors controlling stoichiometric solubility of the magnesian calcites and the density of crystal defects. The literature on the occurrence and behavior of magnesian calcites in sea water and other aqueous solutions is also examined.

  8. Crystal Growth Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Hans J.; Fukuda, Tsuguo

    2004-06-01

    This volume deals with the technologies of crystal fabrication, of crystal machining, and of epilayer production and is the first book on industrial and scientific aspects of crystal and layer production. The major industrial crystals are treated: Si, GaAs, GaP, InP, CdTe, sapphire, oxide and halide scintillator crystals, crystals for optical, piezoelectric and microwave applications and more. Contains 29 contributions from leading crystal technologists covering the following topics:

      General aspects of crystal growth technology Silicon Compound semiconductors Oxides and halides Crystal machining Epitaxy and layer deposition Scientific and technological problems of production and machining of industrial crystals are discussed by top experts, most of them from the major growth industries and crystal growth centers. In addition, it will be useful for the users of crystals, for teachers and graduate students in materials sciences, in electronic and other functional materials, chemical and metallurgical engineering, micro-and optoelectronics including nanotechnology, mechanical engineering and precision-machining, microtechnology, and in solid-state sciences.

    • Uncovering the Atomistic Mechanism for Calcite Step Growth

      DOE PAGES

      De La Pierre, Marco; Raiteri, Paolo; Stack, Andrew G.; ...

      2017-04-13

      Determining a complete atomic-level picture of how minerals grow from aqueous solution remains a challenge as macroscopic rates can be a convolution of many reactions. For the case of calcite (CaCO 3) in water, computer simulations have been used in this paper to map the complex thermodynamic landscape leading to growth of the two distinct steps, acute and obtuse, on the basal surface. The carbonate ion is found to preferentially adsorb at the upper edge of acute steps while Ca 2+ only adsorbs after CO 3 2-. In contrast to the conventional picture, ion pairs prefer to bind at themore » upper edge of the step with only one ion, at most, coordinated to the step and lower terrace. Finally, migration of the first carbonate ion to a growth site is found to be rate-limiting for kink nucleation, with this process having a lower activation energy on the obtuse step.« less

    • Patterns of Expression in the Matrix Proteins Responsible for Nucleation and Growth of Aragonite Crystals in Flat Pearls of Pinctada fucata

      PubMed Central

      Xiang, Liang; Su, Jingtan; Zheng, Guilan; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

      2013-01-01

      The initial growth of the nacreous layer is crucial for comprehending the formation of nacreous aragonite. A flat pearl method in the presence of the inner-shell film was conducted to evaluate the role of matrix proteins in the initial stages of nacre biomineralization in vivo. We examined the crystals deposited on a substrate and the expression patterns of the matrix proteins in the mantle facing the substrate. In this study, the aragonite crystals nucleated on the surface at 5 days in the inner-shell film system. In the film-free system, the calcite crystals nucleated at 5 days, a new organic film covered the calcite, and the aragonite nucleated at 10 days. This meant that the nacre lamellae appeared in the inner-shell film system 5 days earlier than that in the film-free system, timing that was consistent with the maximum level of matrix proteins during the first 20 days. In addition, matrix proteins (Nacrein, MSI60, N19, N16 and Pif80) had similar expression patterns in controlling the sequential morphologies of the nacre growth in the inner-film system, while these proteins in the film-free system also had similar patterns of expression. These results suggest that matrix proteins regulate aragonite nucleation and growth with the inner-shell film in vivo. PMID:23776687

    • Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

      PubMed Central

      Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

      2011-01-01

      Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

    • Face-specific Replacement of Calcite by Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Liesegang, M.; Milke, R.; Neusser, G.; Mizaikoff, B.

      2016-12-01

      Amorphous silica, composed of nanoscale spheres, is an important biomineral, alteration product of silicate rocks on the Earth's surface, and precursor material for stable silicate minerals. Despite constant progress in silica sphere synthesis, fundamental knowledge of natural silica particle interaction and ordering processes leading to colloidal crystals is absent so far. To understand the formation pathways of silica spheres in a geologic environment, we investigated silicified Cretaceous mollusk shell pseudomorphs from Coober Pedy (South Australia) using focused ion beam (FIB)-SEM tomography, petrographic microscopy, µ-XRD, and EMPA. The shells consist of replaced calcite crystals (<2 mm) composed of ordered arrays of uniform, close-packed silica spheres 300 ± 10 nm in size. Concentric layered spheres composed of 40 nm-sized subparticles provide evidence that, at least in the final stage, particle aggregation was the major sphere growth mechanism. Silica sphere arrays in periodically changing orientations perfectly replicate polysynthetic twinning planes of calcite. FIB-SEM tomography shows that cubic closed-packed sphere arrangements preserve the twin lamellae, while the twin plane consists of a submicrometer layer of randomly ordered spheres and vacancies. To transfer crystallographic information from parent to product, the advancement of synchronized dissolution and precipitation fronts along lattice planes is essential. We assume that the volume-preserving replacement process proceeds via a face-specific dissolution-precipitation mechanism with intermediate subparticle aggregation and subsequent layer-by-layer deposition of spheres along a planar surface. Porosity created during the replacement reaction allows permanent fluid access to the propagating reaction interface. Fluid pH and ionic strength remain constant throughout the replacement process, permitting continuous silica nanoparticle formation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation. Our study

    • Physical and stable-isotope evidence for formation of secondary calcite and silica in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      Whelan, J.F.; Paces, J.B.; Peterman, Z.E.

      2002-01-01

      Calcite and silica form coatings on fracture footwalls and cavity floors in the welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain, the potential site of a high-level radioactive waste repository. These secondary mineral deposits are heterogeneously distributed in the unsaturated zone (UZ) with fewer than 10% of possible depositional sites mineralized. The paragenetic sequence, compiled from deposits throughout the UZ, consists of an early-stage assemblage of calcite??fluorite??zeolites that is frequently capped by chalcedony??quartz. Intermediate- and late-stage deposits consist largely of calcite, commonly with opal on buried growth layers or outermost crystal faces of the calcite. Coatings on steep-dipping fractures usually are thin (??? 3 mm) with low-relief outer surfaces whereas shallow-dipping fractures and lithophysal cavities typically contain thicker, more coarsely crystalline deposits characterized by unusual thin, tabular calcite blades up to several cms in length. These blades may be capped with knobby or corniced overgrowths of late-stage calcite intergrown with opal. The observed textures in the fracture and cavity deposits are consistent with deposition from films of water fingering down fracture footwalls or drawn up faces of growing crystals by surface tension and evaporated at the crystal tips. Fluid inclusion studies have shown that most early-stage and some intermediate-stage calcite formed at temperatures of 35 to 85??C. Calcite deposition during the past several million years appears to have been at temperatures < 30??C. The elevated temperatures indicated by the fluid inclusions are consistent with temperatures estimated from calcite ??18O values. Although others have interpreted the elevated temperatures as evidence of hydrothermal activity and flooding of the tuffs of the potential repository, the authors conclude that the temperatures and fluid-inclusion assemblages are consistent with deposition in a UZ environment that experienced prolonged heat input from

    • Microstructural analysis of calcite-filled fractures inherited from basement structures, southern Ontario, Canada: long term instability of the craton?

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Spalding, Jennifer; Schneider, David

      2016-04-01

      Intra-cratonic regions are generally characterized by tectonic stability and low seismicity. In southern Ontario, Canada, moderate levels of seismicity have been recorded over the last few decades reaching magnitudes of 5 MN, indicating that the geosphere is not as stable as predicted. The stratigraphy of the region consists of Ordovician limestone with a thickness of ~200 m that unconformably overlays the Mesoproterozoic crystalline Grenville Province. Subsequent tectonism including repeated Paleozoic orogenies and rifting along the east coast of North America has reactivated Proterozoic structures that have propagated into the overlying carbonate platform forming mesoscopic-scale brittle structures. Exposed along the shores of Lake Ontario are decameter-scale fracture zones, with a fracture spacing of 0.5 to 10 meters. The dominant fracture set trends E-W, and often forms conjugate sets with less prominent NNE-oriented fractures. More locally, an older NW-oriented fracture set is cross cut by the E-W and NNE oriented fractures. Regionally, there have been six directions of maximum horizontal stress in southern Ontario since the Precambrian, with the current orientation of maximum stress oriented ENE as a consequence of far field Atlantic ridge-push forces generated at distant plate boundaries. Calcite mineralization along fractured surfaces locally form sub-horizontal slickenside fabrics which are covered by a layer of euhedral calcite crystals, suggesting that fracture dilation (and fluid flow) occurred after fracture slip to allow the growth of calcite crystals. Due to the proximity of the carbonate units to the crystalline basement, we expect the calcitic veins to be enriched in rare earth elements and are presently conducting geochemical analyses. The calcite veins and surfaces vary from 2.5 cm to 1 mm thicknesses, often with larger calcite crystals in the center of the vein and smaller crystals at the vein boundaries, likely representing nucleation on small

    • Calcite-forming bacteria for compressive strength improvement in mortar.

      PubMed

      Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Yu-Mi; Chun, Woo-Young; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

      2010-04-01

      Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar. However, very few studies have been conducted on the use of calcite-forming bacteria (CFB) to improve compressive strength. In this study, we discovered new bacterial genera that are capable of improving the compressive strength of concrete mortar. We isolated 4 CFB from 7 environmental concrete structures. Using sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes, the CFB could be partially identified as Sporosarcina soli KNUC401, Bacillus massiliensis KNUC402, Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403, and Lysinibacillus fusiformis KNUC404. Crystal aggregates were apparent in the bacterial colonies grown on an agar medium. Stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analyses illustrated both the crystal growth and the crystalline structure of the CaCO3 crystals. We used the isolates to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar cubes and found that KNUC403 offered the best improvement in compressive strength.

    • From Peptides to Proteins: Systematic Control of Net Molecular Charge and Hydrophilicity on the Kinetics of Calcite Growth

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Elhadj, S.; de Yoreo, J. J.; Hoyer, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

      2006-12-01

      The compartment-specific compositions of biologic molecules isolated from biominerals suggest that control of mineral growth may be linked to biochemical features. Here we define a systematic relationship between the ability of biomolecules in solution to promote the growth of calcite (CaCO3) and their net negative molecular charge and hydrophilicity. The degree of enhancement is dependent on peptide composition, but not on peptide sequence. Data analysis shows that this rate enhancement arises from an increase in the kinetic coefficient. We interpret the mechanism of growth enhancement to be a catalytic process whereby biomolecules reduce the magnitude of the diffusive barrier, Ek, by perturbations that displace water molecules- a water shell destruction mechanism. The result is a decrease in the repulsive barrier for attachment of solutes to the solid phase. This previously unrecognized relationship also rationalizes recently reported data showing acceleration of calcite growth rates over rates measured in the pure system by nanomolar levels of abalone nacre proteins. These findings show that the growth-modifying properties of small model peptides may be scaled up to analyze mineralization processes that are mediated by more complex proteins. We suggest that enhancement of calcite growth may now be estimated a priori from the composition of peptide sequences and the calculated values of hydrophilicity and net molecular charge without need for detailed tests for each biomolecule. This insight may contribute to an improved understanding of mineralization in diverse systems of biomineralization.

    • Geochemistry of speleothems affected by aragonite to calcite recrystallization - Potential inheritance from the precursor mineral

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Domínguez-Villar, David; Krklec, Kristina; Pelicon, Primož; Fairchild, Ian J.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, Lawrence R.

      2017-03-01

      Formerly aragonite speleothems recrystallized to calcite result from solutions subsaturated in aragonite and supersaturated in calcite that infiltrate into the speleothem through the interconnected porosity. In most cases, the crystal replacement takes place through a thin solution film. This diagenetic process can occur under open or semi-closed geochemical conditions. Thus, secondary calcite crystals record the composition of the fluid at the time of diagenesis affected by calcite partition coefficients and fractionation factors (open system) or partly inherit the composition of the primary aragonite (semi-closed system). So, whether or not recrystallized aragonite speleothems can record reliable geochemical signals from the time of speleothem primary deposition still is an open debate. We studied a stalagmite from Eagle Cave (Spain) predominantly composed of secondary calcite that replaced aragonite, although a core of primary aragonite extending 45 mm along the growth direction was preserved at the base of the sample. We obtained Mg and Sr compositional maps, paired U-Th dating and δ18O and δ13C profiles across the diagenetic front. Additionally, two parallel isotope records were obtained along the speleothem growth direction in the aragonite and calcite sectors. Our results support that recrystallization of this speleothem took place in open system conditions for δ18O, δ13C, Mg and Sr, but in semi-closed system conditions for U and Th. The recrystallization of this sample took place during one or several events, likely after the Younger Dryas as a result of climate change influencing drip water composition. Based on compositional zoned patterns, we suggest that the advance of diagenetic fronts in this speleothem had an average rate of 50 ± 45 μm/yr. Such recrystallization rate can transform any aragonite speleothem into calcite within a few centuries. We suggest that the volume of water interacting with the speleothem at the time of recrystallization is

    • Experimental diagenesis: insights into aragonite to calcite transformation of Arctica islandica shells by hydrothermal treatment

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Casella, Laura A.; Griesshaber, Erika; Yin, Xiaofei; Ziegler, Andreas; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Müller, Dirk; Ritter, Ann-Christine; Hippler, Dorothee; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Dietzel, Martin; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schöne, Bernd R.; Angiolini, Lucia; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

      2017-03-01

      . Newly formed calcite nucleated at locations which were in contact with the fluid, at the shell surface, in the open pore system, and along growth lines. In the experiments with fluids simulating meteoric water, calcite crystals reached sizes up to 200 µm, while in the experiments with Mg-containing fluids the calcite crystals reached sizes up to 1 mm after 7 days of alteration. Aragonite is metastable at all applied conditions. Only a small bulk thermodynamic driving force exists for the transition to calcite. We attribute the sluggish replacement reaction to the inhibition of calcite nucleation in the temperature window from ca. 50 to ca. 170 °C or, additionally, to the presence of magnesium. Correspondingly, in Mg2+-bearing solutions the newly formed calcite crystals are larger than in Mg2+-free solutions. Overall, the aragonite-calcite transition occurs via an interface-coupled dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism, which preserves morphologies down to the sub-micrometre scale and induces porosity in the newly formed phase. The absence of aragonite replacement by calcite at temperatures lower than 175 °C contributes to explaining why aragonitic or bimineralic shells and skeletons have a good potential of preservation and a complete fossil record.

    • SIMS analyses of minor and trace element distributions in fracture calcite from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Denniston, Rhawn F.; Shearer, Charles K.; Layne, Graham D.; Vaniman, David T.

      1997-05-01

      Fracture-lining calcite samples from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, obtained as part of the extensive vertical sampling in studies of this site as a potential high-level waste repository, have been characterized according to microbeam-scale (25-30 μm) trace and minor element chemistry, and cathodoluminescent zonation patterns. As bulk chemical analyses are limited in spatial resolution and are subject to contamination by intergrown phases, a technique for analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) of minor (Mn, Fe, Sr) and trace (REE) elements in calcite was developed and applied to eighteen calcite samples from four boreholes and one trench. SIMS analyses of REE in calcite and dolomite have been shown to be quantitative to abundances < 1 × chondrite. Although the low secondary ion yields associated with carbonates forced higher counting times than is necessary in most silicates, Mn, Fe, Sr, and REE analyses were obtained with sub-ppm detection limits and 2-15% analytical precision. Bulk chemical signatures noted by Vaniman (1994) allowed correlation of minor and trace element signatures in Yucca Mountain calcite with location of calcite precipitation (saturated vs. unsaturated zone). For example, upper unsaturated zone calcite exhibits pronounced negative Ce and Eu anomalies not observed in calcite collected below in the deep unsaturated zone. These chemical distinctions served as fingerprints which were applied to growth zones in order to examine temporal changes in calcite crystallization histories; analyses of such fine-scale zonal variations are unattainable using bulk analytical techniques. In addition, LREE (particularly Ce) scavenging of calcite-precipitating solutions by manganese oxide phases is discussed as the mechanism for Ce-depletion in unsaturated zone calcite.

    • Elastic constants of calcite

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

      1962-01-01

      The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  1. Synthesis of sub-millimeter calcite from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimi, M. A.; Morrison, J. M.; Burns, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    A novel aqueous synthesis that leads to the formation of calcite (CaCO3) crystals, up to 500μm in diameter, will be used to facilitate the study of contaminant transport in aqueous environmental systems. Existing processes tend to be complicated and often yield nanometer-sized or amorphous CaCO3. The synthesis method presented here, which involves slow mixing of concentrated solutions of CaCl2 ¬and (NH4)2CO3, produces single crystals of rhombohedral calcite in 2 to 4 days. Variations on the experimental method, including changes in pH and solution concentration, were explored to optimize the synthesis. Scanning Electron Microscope images show the differences in size and purity observed when the crystals are grown at pH values ranging from 2 to 6. The crystals grown from solutions of pH 2 were large (up to 500 micrometers in diameter) with minimal polycrystalline calcium carbonate, while crystals grown from solutions with pH values beyond 4 were smaller (up to 100 micrometers in diameter) with significant polycrystalline calcium carbonate. The synthesis method, materials characterization, and use in future actinide contaminant studies will be discussed.

  2. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D.; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G.; Kunitake, Miki E.; Tang, Chiu C.; Duer, Melinda J.; Freeman, Colin L.; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H.; Estroff, Lara A.; Baker, Shefford P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit--mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules--remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules.

  3. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G; Kunitake, Miki E; Tang, Chiu C; Duer, Melinda J; Freeman, Colin L; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H; Estroff, Lara A; Baker, Shefford P; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit-mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules-remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules.

  4. Chemistry and petrography of calcite in the KTB pilot borehole, Bavarian Oberpfalz, Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    The KTB pilot borehole in northeast Bavaria, Germany, penetrates 4000 m of gneiss, amphibolite, and subordinate calc-silicate, lamprophyre and metagabbro. There are three types of calcite in the drilled section: 1) metamorphic calcite in calc-silicate and marble; 2) crack-filling calcite in all lithologies; and 3) replacement calcite in altered minerals. Crack-filling and replacement calcite postdate metamorphic calcite. Multiple calcite generations in individual cracks suggest that different generations of water repeatedly flowed through the same cracks. Crack-filling mineral assemblages that include calcite originally formed at temperatures of 150-350??C. Presently, crack-filling calcite is in chemical and isotopic equilibrium with saline to brackish water in the borehole at temperatures of ???120??C. The saline to brackish water contains a significant proportion of meteoric water. Re-equilibration of crack-filling calcite to lower temperatures means that calcite chemistry tells us little about water-rock interactions in the crystal section of temperatures higher than ~120??C. -from Author

  5. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into an adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  6. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into and adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  7. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  8. Crystal Growth Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Batur, Celal; Bennett, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    We present an innovative design of a vertical transparent multizone furnace which can operate in the temperature range of 25 C to 750 C and deliver thermal gradients of 2 C/cm to 45 C/cm for the commercial applications to crystal growth. The operation of the eight zone furnace is based on a self-tuning temperature control system with a DC power supply for optimal thermal stability. We show that the desired thermal profile over the entire length of the furnace consists of a functional combination of the fundamental thermal profiles for each individual zone obtained by setting the set-point temperature for that zone. The self-tuning system accounts for the zone to zone thermal interactions. The control system operates such that the thermal profile is maintained under thermal load, thus boundary conditions on crystal growth ampoules can be predetermined prior to crystal growth. Temperature profiles for the growth of crystals via directional solidification, vapor transport techniques, and multiple gradient applications are shown to be easily implemented. The unique feature of its transparency and ease of programming thermal profiles make the furnace useful for scientific and commercial applications for the determination of process parameters to optimize crystal growth conditions.

  9. Perlinhibin, a Cysteine-, Histidine-, and Arginine-Rich Miniprotein from Abalone (Haliotis laevigata) Nacre, Inhibits In Vitro Calcium Carbonate Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Karlheinz; Siedler, Frank; Treccani, Laura; Heinemann, Fabian; Fritz, Monika

    2007-01-01

    We have isolated a 4.785 Da protein from the nacreous layer of the sea snail Haliotis laevigata (greenlip abalone) shell after demineralization with acetic acid. The sequence of 41 amino acids was determined by Edman degradation supported by mass spectrometry. The most abundant amino acids were cysteine (19.5%), histidine (17%), and arginine (14.6%). The positively charged amino acids were almost counterbalanced by negatively charged ones resulting in a calculated isoelectric point of 7.86. Atomic-force microscopy studies of the interaction of the protein with calcite surfaces in supersaturated calcium carbonate solution or calcium chloride solution showed that the protein bound specifically to calcite steps, inhibiting further crystal growth at these sites in carbonate solution and preventing crystal dissolution when carbonate was substituted with chloride. Therefore this protein was named perlinhibin. X-ray diffraction investigation of the crystal after atomic-force microscopy growth experiments showed that the formation of aragonite was induced on the calcite substrate around holes caused by perlinhibin crystal-growth inhibition. The strong interaction of the protein with calcium carbonate was also shown by vapor diffusion crystallization. In the presence of the protein, the crystal surfaces were covered with holes due to protein binding and local inhibition of crystal growth. In addition to perlinhibin, we isolated and sequenced a perlinhibin-related protein, indicating that perlinhibin may be a member of a family of closely related proteins. PMID:17496038

  10. The Origin of Fibrous Calcite Veins: Aragonite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elburg, M. A.; Bons, P. D.

    2005-12-01

    Truly fibrous calcite veins occur mainly in carbonaceous shales and are characterised by high length:width ratios of their fibres (>10). Previous studies on their Sr isotopic geochemistry (Elburg et al., 2002: Geol. Soc. London Spec. Publ. 200, 103-118; Hilgers and Sindern, 2005: Geofluids, in press) have shown that some of the material could be derived from the local wall rock. These studies also showed that the veins were always enriched in Sr compared to the calcite in the host rocks. Aragonite can contain significantly more Sr than calcite, while it also tends to have a fibrous crystal habit. It is therefore possible that the fibrous habit of these veins, which now consist of calcite, are a reflection of their initial aragonitic mineralogy, rather than of any special tectonic regime during their formation. This idea was investigated by analysing the major and trace element geochemistry of selected fibrous and non-fibrous calcite veins from Arkaroola (northern Flinders Ranges, Australia). The fibrous vein analysed for major elements contains less than 1% MgCO3, whereas calcite in the host rock, with which it is in Sr isotopic equilibrium, contains 18% MgCO3. Calcite can contain significant Mg, whereas the aragonitic structure cannot accomodate this ion, so this result is consistent with the idea of an original aragonitic mineralogy of the veins. The fibrous veins show an enrichment in the middle rare earth elements (REE) compared to the calcite in the host rock and blocky veins. In a Post-Archean Average Shale normalised diagram, Eu is more strongly enriched compared to its neighbouring elements in the fibrous veins, but not in the host calcite, blocky veins, or in the silicate fraction of the host rock, suggesting more reducing conditions during fibrous vein formation. This data cannot be used as direct evidence for the fibrous veins' aragonitic mineralogy. It does, however, show that significant differences exist between calcite in host rocks, blocky and

  11. Microgravity crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Advanced finite element models are used to study three-dimensional, time-dependent flow and segregation in crystal growth systems. In this image of a prototypical model for melt and crystal growth, pathlines at one instant in time are shown for the flow of heated liquid silicon in a cylindrical container. The container is subjected to g-jitter disturbances along the vertical axis. A transverse magnetic field is applied to control them. Such computations are extremely powerful for understanding melt growth in microgravity where g-jitter drives buoyant flows. The simulation is part of the Theoretical Analysis of 3D, Transient Convection and Segregation in Microgravity Bridgman Crystal Growth investigation by Dr. Jeffrey J. Derby of the University of Mirnesota, Minneapolis.

  12. Correcting for initial Th in speleothems to obtain the age of calcite nucleation after a growth hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, D. A.; Nita, D. C.; Moseley, G. E.; Hoffmann, D. L.; Standish, C. D.; Smart, P. L.; Edwards, R.

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the many U-Th dated speleothem records (δ18O δ13C, trace elements) of past environmental change based on continuous phases of calcite growth, discontinuous records also provide important constraints for a wide range of past states of the Earth system, including sea levels, permafrost extent, regional aridity and local cave flooding. Chronological information about human activity or faunal evolution can also be obtained where calcite can be seen to overlie cave art or mammalian bones, for example. Among the important considerations when determining the U-Th age of calcite that nucleates on an exposed surface are (1) initial 230Th/232Th, which can be elevated and variable in some settings, and (2) growth rate and sub-sample density, where extrapolation is required. By way of example, we present sea level data based on U-Th ages of vadose speleothems (i.e. formed above the water table and distinct from 'phreatic' examples) from caves of the circum-Caribbean , where calcite growth was interrupted by rising sea levels and then reinitiated after regression. These estimates demand large corrections and derived sea level constraints are compared with alternative data from coral reef terraces, phreatic overgrowths on speleothems or indirect, proxy evidence from oxygen isotopes to constrain rates of ice volume growth. Flowstones from the Bahamas provide useful sea level constraints because they present the longest and most continuous records in such settings (a function of preservation potential in addition to hydrological routing) and also earliest growth post-emergence after sea level fall. We revisit estimates for sea level regression at the end of MIS 5 at ~ 80 ka (Richards et al, 1994; Lundberg and Ford, 1994) and make corrections for non-Bulk Earth initial Th contamination (230Th/232Th activity ratio > 10), based on isochron analysis of alternative stalagmites from the same settings and recent high resolution analysis. We also present new U-Th ages for

  13. Hopper Growth of Salt Crystals.

    PubMed

    Desarnaud, Julie; Derluyn, Hannelore; Carmeliet, Jan; Bonn, Daniel; Shahidzadeh, Noushine

    2018-06-07

    The growth of hopper crystals is observed for many substances, but the mechanism of their formation remains ill understood. Here we investigate their growth by performing evaporation experiments on small volumes of salt solutions. We show that sodium chloride crystals that grow very fast from a highly supersaturated solution form a peculiar form of hopper crystal consisting of a series of connected miniature versions of the original cubic crystal. The transition between cubic and such hopper growth happens at a well-defined supersaturation where the growth rate of the cubic crystal reaches a maximum (∼6.5 ± 1.8 μm/s). Above this threshold, the growth rate varies as the third power of supersaturation, showing that a new mechanism, controlled by the maximum speed of surface integration of new molecules, induces the hopper growth of cubic crystals in cascade.

  14. Impact of trace metals on the water structure at the calcite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolthers, Mariette; Di Tommaso, Devis; De Leeuw, Nora

    2014-05-01

    Carbonate minerals play an important role in regulating the chemistry of aquatic environments, including the oceans, aquifers, hydrothermal systems, soils and sediments. Through mineral surface processes such as dissolution, precipitation and sorption, carbonate minerals affect the biogeochemical cycles of not only the constituent elements of carbonates, such as Ca, Mg, Fe and C, but also H, P and trace elements. Surface charging of the calcite mineral-water interface, and its reactivity towards foreign ions can be quantified using a surface structural model that includes, among others, the water structure at the interface (i.e. hydrogen bridging) [1,2] in accordance with the CD-MUSIC formalism [3]. Here we will show the impact of foreign metals such as Mg and Sr on the water structure around different surface sites present in etch pits and on growth terraces at the calcite (10-14) surface. We have performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of metal-doped calcite surfaces, using different interatomic water potentials. Results show that the local environment around the structurally distinct sites differs depending on metal presence, suggesting that metal substitutions in calcite affect its reactivity. The information obtained in this study will help in improving existing macroscopic surface model for the reactivity of calcite [2] and give more general insight in mineral surface reactivity in relation to crystal composition. [1] Wolthers, Charlet, & Van Cappellen (2008). Am. J. Sci., 308, 905-941. [2] Wolthers, Di Tommaso, Du, & de Leeuw (2012). Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 14, 15145-15157. [3] Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996) J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488-508.

  15. Integrated Approach for Understanding Impurity Adsorption on Calcite: Mechanisms for Micro-scale Surface Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, M. D.; Arvidson, R. S.; Luttge, A.

    2004-12-01

    A longstanding goal within the field of environmental geochemistry has been the development of a fundamental understanding of the kinetics that governs the interactions of solution-borne impurities with the calcite mineral surface. Recent dissolution experiments using Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ have shown distinct differences in the interaction of these three impurity ions with the calcite crystal surface. Because the dissolution of carbonate minerals in soils and sediments influences the uptake and migration of groundwater contaminants, a rigorous understanding of the basic processes that occur at the mineral-fluid interface is necessary. We have used vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) coupled with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to examine calcite crystal dissolution in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+, all known dissolution inhibitors and possible groundwater contaminants. We have studied the kinetics of impurity-crystal interactions at a pH 8.8, and in the presence or absence of dissolved inorganic carbon. Our data show that, when individually introduced into undersaturated solutions, Mg2+ and Mn2+ are shown to activate the calcite crystal surface, resulting in enhanced etch pit nucleation rates and step density. Conversely, Sr2+ is shown to cause passivation of the calcite surface. The effect is intensified when solutions are saturated with respect to atmospheric CO2. Results indicate that aqueous CO32- (or HCO3-) may influence how aqueous metal ionic complexes interact with the crystal surface. Furthermore, the influence is differently exhibited, and passivation or activation ultimately depends on the properties of the diffusing metal ion or metal-hydroxide complex. These properties include for example, differences in hydration enthalpy, the effective ionic radius, and electron shell configuration.

  16. Angle-dependent rotation of calcite in elliptically polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herne, Catherine M.; Cartwright, Natalie A.; Cattani, Matthew T.; Tracy, Lucas A.

    2017-08-01

    Calcite crystals trapped in an elliptically polarized laser field exhibit intriguing rotational motion. In this paper, we show measurements of the angle-dependent motion, and discuss how the motion of birefringent calcite can be used to develop a reliable and efficient process for determining the polarization ellipticity and orientation of a laser mode. The crystals experience torque in two ways: from the transfer of spin angular momentum (SAM) from the circular polarization component of the light, and from a torque due to the linear polarization component of the light that acts to align the optic axis of the crystal with the polarization axis of the light. These torques alternatingly compete with and amplify each other, creating an oscillating rotational crystal velocity. We model the behavior as a rigid body in an angle-dependent torque. We experimentally demonstrate the dependence of the rotational velocity on the angular orientation of the crystal by placing the crystals in a sample solution in our trapping region, and observing their behavior under different polarization modes. Measurements are made by acquiring information simultaneously from a quadrant photodiode collecting the driving light after it passes through the sample region, and by imaging the crystal motion onto a camera. We finish by illustrating how to use this model to predict the ellipticity of a laser mode from rotational motion of birefringent crystals.

  17. Growth of single crystals of BaFe12O19 by solid state crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, John G.; Sun, Hengyang; Kook, Young-Geun; Kim, Joon-Seong; Le, Phan Gia

    2016-10-01

    Single crystals of BaFe12O19 are grown for the first time by solid state crystal growth. Seed crystals of BaFe12O19 are buried in BaFe12O19+1 wt% BaCO3 powder, which are then pressed into pellets containing the seed crystals. During sintering, single crystals of BaFe12O19 up to ∼130 μm thick in the c-axis direction grow on the seed crystals by consuming grains from the surrounding polycrystalline matrix. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis shows that the single crystal and the surrounding polycrystalline matrix have the same chemical composition. Micro-Raman scattering shows the single crystal to have the BaFe12O19 structure. The optimum growth temperature is found to be 1200 °C. The single crystal growth behavior is explained using the mixed control theory of grain growth.

  18. Crystal growth and crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Selected topics that may be of interest for both crystal-structure and crystal-growth communities are overviewed. The growth of protein crystals, along with that of some other compounds, is one of the topics, and recent insights into related phenomena are considered as examples of applications of general principles. The relationship between crystal growth shape and structure is reviewed and an attempt to introduce semiquantitative characterization of binding for proteins is made. The concept of kinks for complex structures is briefly discussed. Even at sufficiently low supersaturations, the fluctuation of steps may not be sufficient to implement the Gibbs-Thomson law if the kink density is low enough. Subsurface ordering of liquids and growth of rough interfaces from melts is discussed. Crystals growing in microgravity from solution should be more perfect if they preferentially trap stress-inducing impurities, thus creating an impurity-depleted zone around themselves. Evidently, such a zone is developed only around the crystals growing in the absence of convection. Under terrestrial conditions, the self-purified depleted zone is destroyed by convection, the crystal traps more impurity and grows stressed. The stress relief causes mosaicity. In systems containing stress-inducing but poorly trapped impurities, the crystals grown in the absence of convection should be worse than those of their terrestrial counterparts.

  19. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  20. Protein crystals and their growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results on the associations between protein molecules in crystal lattices, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties, strength, and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed. In addition, some basic approaches to understanding the solubility of proteins are followed by an overview of crystal nucleation and growth. It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source of the variation in the number of crystals ultimately appearing in the sample. The frequency at which new molecules join a crystal lattice is measured by the kinetic coefficient and is related to the observed crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria used to discriminate diffusion- and kinetic-limited growth are discussed on this basis. Finally, the creation of defects is discussed with an emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal perfection.

  1. Time and metamorphic petrology: Calcite to aragonite experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, B.R.; Kirby, S.H.; Bohlen, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    Although the equilibrium phase relations of many mineral systems are generally well established, the rates of transformations, particularly in polycrystalline rocks, are not. The results of experiments on the calcite to aragonite transformation in polycrystalline marble are different from those for earlier experiments on powdered and single-crystal calcite. The transformation in the polycrystalline samples occurs by different mechanisms, with a different temperature dependence, and at a markedly slower rate. This work demonstrates the importance of kinetic studies on fully dense polycrystalline aggregates for understanding mineralogic phase changes in nature. Extrapolation of these results to geological time scales suggests that transformation of calcite to aragonite does not occur in the absence of volatiles at temperatures below 200??C. Kinetic hindrance is likely to extend to higher temperatures in more complex transformations.

  2. Trace concentration - Huge impact: Nitrate in the calcite/Eu(III) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Sascha; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Schmidt, Moritz; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of trivalent lanthanides and actinides with secondary mineral phases such as calcite is of high importance for the safety assessment of deep geological repositories for high level nuclear waste (HLW). Due to similar ionic radii, calcium-bearing mineral phases are suitable host minerals for Ln(III) and An(III) ions. Especially calcite has been proven to retain these metal ions effectively by both surface complexation and bulk incorporation. Since anionic ligands (e.g., nitrate) are omnipresent in the geological environment and due to their coordinating properties, their influence on retentive processes should not be underestimated. Nitrate is a common contaminant in most HLW forms as a result of using nitric acid in fuel reprocessing. It is also formed by microbial activity under aerobic conditions. In this study, atomic force microscopy investigations revealed a major influence of nitrate upon the surface of calcite crystals. NaNO3 causes serious modifications even in trace amounts (<10-7 M) and forms a soft surface layer of low crystallinity on top of the calcite crystal. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Eu(III) showed that, within this layer, Eu(III) ions are incorporated, while losing most of their hydration shell. The results show that solid solution modelling for actinides in calcite must take into account the presence of nitrate in pore and ground waters.

  3. Protein crystal growth tray assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A protein crystal growth tray assembly includes a tray that has a plurality of individual crystal growth chambers. Each chamber has a movable pedestal which carries a protein crystal growth compartment at an upper end. The several pedestals for each tray assembly are ganged together for concurrent movement so that the solutions in the various pedestal growth compartments can be separated from the solutions in the tray's growth chambers until the experiment is to be activated.

  4. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  5. Protein Crystals and their Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results on binding between protein molecules in crystal lattice, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties and strength and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed in the first half of this paper (Sea 2-4). In the second par&, some basic approaches to solubility of proteins are followed by overview on crystal nucleation and growth (Sec 5). It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source for scattering of crystal number ultimately appearing in the batch. Frequency at which new molecules join crystal lattice is measured by kinetic coefficient and related to the observable crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria to discriminate diffusion and kinetic limited growth are discussed on this basis in Sec 7. In Sec 8, creation of defects is discussed with the emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal I;erfection.

  6. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  7. Automated protein crystal growth facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donald, Stacey

    A customer for the protein crystal growth facility fills the specially designed chamber with the correct solutions, fills the syringes with their quenching solutions, and submits the data needed for the proper growth of their crystal. To make sure that the chambers and syringes are filled correctly, a NASA representative may assist the customer. The data needed is the approximate growth time, the growth temperature, and the desired crystal size, but this data can be changed anytime from the ground, if needed. The chambers are gathered and placed into numbered slots in special drawers. Then, data is entered into a computer for each of the chambers. Technicians map out when each chamber's growth should be activated so that all of the chambers have enough time to grow. All of this data is up-linked to the space station when the previous growth session is over. Anti-vibrational containers need to be constructed for the high forces encountered during the lift off and the landing of the space shuttle, and though our team has not designed these containers, we do not feel that there is any reason why a suitable one could not be made. When the shuttle reaches the space station, an astronaut removes a drawer of quenched chambers from the growth facility and inserts a drawer of new chambers. All twelve of the drawers can be replaced in this fashion. The optical disks can also be removed this way. The old drawers are stored for the trip back to earth. Once inside the growth facility, a chamber is removed by the robot and placed in one of 144 active sites at a time previously picked by a technician. Growth begins when the chamber is inserted into an active site. Then, the sensing system starts to determine the size of the protein crystal. All during the crystal's growth, the customer can view the crystal and read all of the crystal's data, such as growth rate and crystal size. When the sensing system determines that the crystal has reached the predetermined size, the robot is

  8. Automated protein crystal growth facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donald, Stacey

    1994-01-01

    A customer for the protein crystal growth facility fills the specially designed chamber with the correct solutions, fills the syringes with their quenching solutions, and submits the data needed for the proper growth of their crystal. To make sure that the chambers and syringes are filled correctly, a NASA representative may assist the customer. The data needed is the approximate growth time, the growth temperature, and the desired crystal size, but this data can be changed anytime from the ground, if needed. The chambers are gathered and placed into numbered slots in special drawers. Then, data is entered into a computer for each of the chambers. Technicians map out when each chamber's growth should be activated so that all of the chambers have enough time to grow. All of this data is up-linked to the space station when the previous growth session is over. Anti-vibrational containers need to be constructed for the high forces encountered during the lift off and the landing of the space shuttle, and though our team has not designed these containers, we do not feel that there is any reason why a suitable one could not be made. When the shuttle reaches the space station, an astronaut removes a drawer of quenched chambers from the growth facility and inserts a drawer of new chambers. All twelve of the drawers can be replaced in this fashion. The optical disks can also be removed this way. The old drawers are stored for the trip back to earth. Once inside the growth facility, a chamber is removed by the robot and placed in one of 144 active sites at a time previously picked by a technician. Growth begins when the chamber is inserted into an active site. Then, the sensing system starts to determine the size of the protein crystal. All during the crystal's growth, the customer can view the crystal and read all of the crystal's data, such as growth rate and crystal size. When the sensing system determines that the crystal has reached the predetermined size, the robot is

  9. Phase-field crystal simulation facet and branch crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Wang, Zhaoyang; Gu, Xinrui; Chen, Yufei; Hao, Limei; de Wit, Jos; Jin, Kexin

    2018-05-01

    Phase-field crystal model with one mode is introduced to describe morphological transition. The relationship between growth morphology and smooth density distribution was investigated. The results indicate that the pattern selection of dendrite growth is caused by the competition between interface energy anisotropy and interface kinetic anisotropy based on the 2D phase diagram. When the calculation time increases, the crystal grows to secondary dendrite at the dimensionless undercooling equal to - 0.4. Moreover, when noise is introduced in the growth progress, the symmetry is broken in the growth mode, and there becomes irregular fractal-like growth morphology. Furthermore, the single crystal shape develops into polycrystalline when the noise amplitude is large enough. When the dimensionless undercooling is less than - 0.3, the noise has a significant effect on the growth shape. In addition, the growth velocity of crystal near to liquid phase line is slow, while the shape far away from the liquid adapts to fast growth. Based on the simulation results, the method was proved to be effective, and it can easily obtain different crystal shapes by choosing the different points in 2D phase diagram.

  10. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite → Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite → calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite → calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation.

  11. Measurable characteristics of lysozyme crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of protein crystal growth is estimated from measurements performed at both the microscopic and molecular levels. In the absence of solutal flow, it was determined that a model that balances the macromolecular flux toward the crystal surface with the flux of the crystal surface well characterizes crystal growth observed using microscopic methods. Namely, it was determined that the model provides accurate estimates for the crystal-growth velocities upon evaluation of crystal-growth measurements obtained in time. Growth velocities thus determined as a function of solution supersaturation were further interpreted using established deterministic models. From analyses of crystal-growth velocities, it was found that the mode of crystal growth varies with respect to increasing solution supersaturation, possibly owing to kinetic roughening. To verify further the hypothesis of kinetic roughening, crystal growth at the molecular level was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the AFM measurements, it was found that the magnitude of surface-height fluctuations, h(x), increases with increasing solution supersaturation. In contrast, the estimated characteristic length, xi, decreases rapidly upon increasing solution supersaturation. It was conjectured that the magnitude of both h(x) and xi could possibly determine the mode of crystal growth. Although the data precede any exact theory, the non-critical divergence of h(x) and xi with respect to increasing solution supersaturation was nevertheless preliminarily established. Moreover, approximate models to account for behavior of both h(x) and xi are also presented.

  12. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of low gravity on the growth of protein crystals and those parameters which will affect growth and crystal quality was studied. The proper design of the flight hardware and experimental protocols are highly dependent on understanding the factors which influence the nucleation and growth of crystals of biological macromolecules. Thus, those factors are investigated and the body of knowledge which has been built up for small molecule crystallization. These data also provide a basis of comparison for the results obtained from low-g experiments. The flows around growing crystals are detailed. The preliminary study of the growth of isocitrate lyase, the crystal morphologies found and the preliminary x ray results are discussed. The design of two apparatus for protein crystal growth by temperature control are presented along with preliminary results.

  13. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  14. Crystal Growth Rate Dispersion: A Predictor of Crystal Quality in Microgravity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kephart, Richard D.; Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.; vanderWoerd, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    In theory macromolecular crystals grow through a process involving at least two transport phenomena of solute to the crystal surface: diffusion and convection. In absence of standard gravitational forces, the ratio of these two phenomena can change and explain why crystal growth in microgravity is different from that on Earth. Experimental evidence clearly shows, however, that crystal growth of various systems is not equally sensitive to reduction in gravitational forces, leading to quality improvement in microgravity for some crystals but not for others. We hypothesize that the differences in final crystal quality are related to crystal growth rate dispersion. If growth rate dispersion exists on Earth, decreases in microgravity, and coincides with crystal quality improvements then this dispersion is a predictor for crystal quality improvement. In order to test this hypothesis, we will measure growth rate dispersion both in microgravity and on Earth and will correlate the data with previously established data on crystal quality differences for the two environments. We present here the first crystal growth rate measurement data for three proteins (lysozyme, xylose isomerase and human recombinant insulin), collected on Earth, using hardware identical to the hardware to be used in microgravity and show how these data correlate with crystal quality improvements established in microgravity.

  15. Optical Diagnostics of Solution Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, T. G.; Lal, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Non-contact optical techniques such as, optical heterodyne, ellipsometry and interferometry, for real time in-situ monitoring of solution crystal growth are demonstrated. Optical heterodyne technique has the capability of measuring the growth rate as small as 1A/sec. In a typical Michelson interferometer set up, the crystal is illuminated by a Zeeman laser with frequency omega(sub 1) and the reference beam with frequency omega(sub 2). As the crystal grows, the phase of the rf signal changes with respect to the reference beam and this phase change is related to the crystal growth rate. This technique is demonstrated with two examples: (1) by measuring the copper tip expansion/shrinkage rate and (2) by measuring the crystal growth rate of L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP). The first test shows that the expansion/shrinkage rate of copper tip was fast in the beginning, and gets slower as the expansion begins to stabilize with time. In crystal growth, the phase change due the crystal growth is measured using a phase meter and a strip chart recorder. Our experimental results indicate a varied growth rate from 69.4 to 92.6A per sec. The ellipsometer is used to study the crystal growth interface. From these measurements and a theoretical modeling of the interface, the various optical parameters can be deduced. Interferometry can also be used to measure the growth rate and concentration gradient in the vicinity of the crystal.

  16. Cave air and hydrological controls on prior calcite precipitation and stalagmite growth rates: Implications for palaeoclimate reconstructions using speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwin, Catherine M.; Baldini, James U. L.

    2011-07-01

    Hourly resolved cave air P and cave drip water hydrochemical data illustrate that calcite deposition on stalagmites can be modulated by prior calcite precipitation (PCP) on extremely short timescales. A very clear second-order covariation between cave air P and drip water Ca 2+ concentrations during the winter months demonstrates the effects of degassing-induced PCP on drip water chemistry. Estimating the strength of the cave air P control on PCP is possible because the PCP signal is so clear; at our drip site a one ppm shift in Ca 2+ concentrations requires a P shift of between 333 and 667 ppm. This value will undoubtedly vary from site to site, depending on drip water flow rate, residence time, drip water-cave air P differential, and availability of low P void spaces in the vadose zone above the cave. High-resolution cave environmental measurements were used to model calcite deposition on one stalagmite in Crag Cave, SW Ireland, and modelled growth over the study period (222 μm over 171 days) is extremely similar to the amount of actual calcite growth (240 μm) over the same time interval, strongly suggesting that equations used to estimate stalagmite growth rates are valid. Although cave air P appears to control drip water hydrochemistry in the winter, drip water dilution caused by rain events may have played a larger role during the summer, as evidenced by a series of sudden drops in Ca 2+ concentrations (dilution) followed by much more gradual increases in drip water Ca 2+ concentrations (slow addition of diffuse water). This research demonstrates that PCP on stalactites, cave ceilings, and void spaces within the karst above the cave partially controls drip water chemistry, and that thorough characterisation of this process at individual caves is necessary to most accurately interpret climate records from those sites.

  17. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noone, M. J.; Spear, K. E.; White, W. B.; Henry, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported on the growth of electronic ceramic single crystals from solution for the future growth of crystals in a microgravity environment. Work included growth from fused or glass solvents and aqueous solutions. Topics discussed include: crystal identification and selection; aqueous solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS); and characterization of TGS.

  18. Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this theoretical research effort was to improve the understanding of the growth of Pb(x)Sn(1-x)Te and especially how crystal quality could be improved utilizing the microgravity environment of space. All theoretical growths are done using the vertical Bridgman method. It is believed that improved single crystal yields can be achieved by systematically identifying and studying system parameters both theoretically and experimentally. A computational model was developed to study and eventually optimize the growth process. The model is primarily concerned with the prediction of the thermal field, although mass transfer in the melt and the state of stress in the crystal were of considerable interest. The evolution is presented of the computer simulation and some of the important results obtained. Diffusion controlled growth was first studied since it represented a relatively simple, but nontheless realistic situation. In fact, results from this analysis prompted a study of the triple junction region where the melt, crystal, and ampoule wall meet. Since microgravity applications were sought because of the low level of fluid movement, the effect of gravitational field strength on the thermal and concentration field was also of interest. A study of the strength of coriolis acceleration on the growth process during space flight was deemed necessary since it would surely produce asymmetries in the flow field if strong enough. Finally, thermosolutal convection in a steady microgravity field for thermally stable conditions and both stable and unstable solutal conditions was simulated.

  19. Puzzling calcite-III dimorphism: crystallography, high-pressure behavior, and pathway of single-crystal transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippinger, T.; Miletich, R.; Merlini, M.; Lotti, P.; Schouwink, P.; Yagi, T.; Crichton, W. A.; Hanfland, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-pressure phase transformations between the polymorphic forms I, II, III, and IIIb of CaCO3 were investigated by analytical in situ high-pressure high-temperature experiments on oriented single-crystal samples. All experiments at non-ambient conditions were carried out by means of Raman scattering, X-ray, and synchrotron diffraction techniques using diamond-anvil cells in the pressure range up to 6.5 GPa. The composite-gasket resistive heating technique was applied for all high-pressure investigations at temperatures up to 550 K. High-pressure Raman spectra reveal distinguishable characteristic spectral differences located in the wave number range of external modes with the occurrence of band splitting and shoulders due to subtle symmetry changes. Constraints from in situ observations suggest a stability field of CaCO3-IIIb at relatively low temperatures adjacent to the calcite-II field. Isothermal compression of calcite provides the sequence from I to II, IIIb, and finally, III, with all transformations showing volume discontinuities. Re-transformation at decreasing pressure from III oversteps the stability field of IIIb and demonstrates the pathway of pressure changes to determine the transition sequence. Clausius-Clapeyron slopes of the phase boundary lines were determined as: Δ P/Δ T = -2.79 ± 0.28 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (I-II); +1.87 ± 0.31 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (II/III); +4.01 ± 0.5 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (II/IIIb); -33.9 ± 0.4 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (IIIb/III). The triple point between phases II, IIIb, and III was determined by intersection and is located at 2.01(7) GPa/338(5) K. The pathway of transition from I over II to IIIb can be interpreted by displacement with small shear involved (by 2.9° on I/II and by 8.2° on II/IIIb). The former triad of calcite-I corresponds to the [20-1] direction in the P21/ c unit cell of phase II and to [101] in the pseudomonoclinic C setting of phase IIIb. Crystal structure investigations of triclinic CaCO3-III at non-ambient pressure

  20. Effects of impurities on crystal growth in fructose crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y. D.; Shiau, L. D.; Berglund, K. A.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of impurities on the crystallization of anhydrous fructose from aqueous solution was studied. The growth kinetics of fructose crystals in the fructose-water-glucose and fructose-water-difructose dianhydrides systems were investigated using photomicroscopic contact nucleation techniques. Glucose is the major impurity likely to be present in fructose syrup formed during corn wet milling, while several difructose dianhydrides are formed in situ under crystallization conditions and have been proposed as a cause in the decrease of overall yields. Both sets of impurities were found to cause inhibition of crystal growth, but the mechanisms responsible in each case are different. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the solubility of fructose in water and thus lowers the supersaturation of the solution. This is probably the main effect responsible for the decrease of crystal growth. Since the molecular structures of difructose dianhydrides are similar to that of fructose, they are probably "tailor-made" impurities. The decrease of crystal growth is probably caused by the incorporation of these impurities into or adsorption to the crystal surface which would accept fructose molecules in the orientation that existed in the difructose dianhydride.

  1. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  2. Static Grain Growth in Contact Metamorphic Calcite: A Cathodoluminescence Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, B.; Heilbronner, R.; Herwegh, M.; Ramseyer, K.

    2009-04-01

    In the Adamello contact aureole, monomineralic mesozoic limestones were investigated in terms of grain size evolution and compared to results on numerical modeling performed by Elle. The sampled area shows no deformation and therefore represents an appropriate natural laboratory for the study of static grain growth (Herwegh & Berger, 2003). For this purpose, samples were collected at different distances to the contact to the pluton, covering a temperature range between 270 to 630°C. In these marbles, the grain sizes increase with temperature from 5 µm to about 1 cm as one approaches the contact (Herwegh & Berger, 2003). In some samples, photomicrographs show domains of variable cathodoluminescence (CL) intensities, which are interpreted to represent growth zonations. Microstructures show grains that contain cores and in some samples even several growth stages. The cores are usually not centered and the zones not concentric. They may be in touch with grain boundaries. These zonation patterns are consistent within a given aggregate but differ among the samples even if they come from the same location. Relative CL intensities depend on the Mn/Fe ratio. We assume that changes in trace amounts of Mn/Fe must have occurred during the grain size evolution, preserving local geochemical trends and their variations with time. Changes in Mn/Fe ratios can either be explained by (a) locally derived fluids (e.g. hydration reactions of sheet silicate rich marbles in the vicinity) or (b) by the infiltration of the calcite aggregates by externally derived (magmatic?) fluids. At the present stage, we prefer a regional change in fluid composition (b) because the growth zonations only occur at distances of 750-1250 m from the pluton contact (350-450°C). Closer to the contact, neither zonations nor cores were found. At larger distances, CL intensities differ from grain to grain, revealing diagenetic CL patterns that were incompletely recrystallized by grain growth. The role of

  3. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Leroy, Philippe; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-04-15

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength ⩽ 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted the corrected zeta potential by assuming that the zeta potential is located at the outer Helmholtz plane, i.e. without considering a stagnant diffuse layer at the calcite-water interface. The surface conductivity of calcite crystals was inferred from electrical conductivity measurements and computed using our basic Stern model. Surface conductivity was also successfully predicted by our surface complexation model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of silk sericin on morphology and structure of calcium carbonate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui-Bo; Han, Hua-Feng; Ding, Shao; Li, Ze-Hao; Kong, Xiang-Dong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, silk sericin was employed to regulate the mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). CaCO3 composite particles were prepared by the precipitation reaction of sodium carbonate with calcium chloride solution in the presence of silk sericin. The as-prepared samples were collected at different reaction time to study the crystallization process of CaCO3 by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that silk sericin significantly affected the morphology and crystallographic polymorph of CaCO3. With increasing the reaction time, the crystal phase of CaCO3 transferred from calcite dominated to vaterite dominated mixtures, while the morphology of CaCO3 changed from disk-like calcite crystal to spherical vaterite crystal. These studies showed the potential of silk sericin used as a template molecule to control the growth of inorganic crystal.

  5. Protein crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystal growth is a major experimental problem and is the bottleneck in widespread applications of protein crystallography. Research efforts now being pursued and sponsored by NASA are making fundamental contributions to the understanding of the science of protein crystal growth. Microgravity environments offer the possibility of performing new types of experiments that may produce a better understanding of protein crystal growth processes and may permit growth environments that are more favorable for obtaining high quality protein crystals. A series of protein crystal growth experiments using the space shuttle was initiated. The first phase of these experiments was focused on the development of micro-methods for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques, using a space version of the hanging drop method. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  6. Transformation mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate into calcite in the sea urchin larval spicule

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Yael; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Abrecht, Mike; Gilbert, Benjamin; Wilt, Fred H.; Sagi, Irit; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Sea urchin larval spicules transform amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite single crystals. The mechanism of transformation is enigmatic: the transforming spicule displays both amorphous and crystalline properties, with no defined crystallization front. Here, we use X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy with probing size of 40–200 nm. We resolve 3 distinct mineral phases: An initial short-lived, presumably hydrated ACC phase, followed by an intermediate transient form of ACC, and finally the biogenic crystalline calcite phase. The amorphous and crystalline phases are juxtaposed, often appearing in adjacent sites at a scale of tens of nanometers. We propose that the amorphous-crystal transformation propagates in a tortuous path through preexisting 40- to 100-nm amorphous units, via a secondary nucleation mechanism. PMID:18987314

  7. Transformation mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate into calcite in the sea urchin larval spicule.

    PubMed

    Politi, Yael; Metzler, Rebecca A; Abrecht, Mike; Gilbert, Benjamin; Wilt, Fred H; Sagi, Irit; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Gilbert, P U P A; Gilbert, Pupa

    2008-11-11

    Sea urchin larval spicules transform amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite single crystals. The mechanism of transformation is enigmatic: the transforming spicule displays both amorphous and crystalline properties, with no defined crystallization front. Here, we use X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy with probing size of 40-200 nm. We resolve 3 distinct mineral phases: An initial short-lived, presumably hydrated ACC phase, followed by an intermediate transient form of ACC, and finally the biogenic crystalline calcite phase. The amorphous and crystalline phases are juxtaposed, often appearing in adjacent sites at a scale of tens of nanometers. We propose that the amorphous-crystal transformation propagates in a tortuous path through preexisting 40- to 100-nm amorphous units, via a secondary nucleation mechanism.

  8. Surface Forces Apparatus Measurements of Interactions between Rough and Reactive Calcite Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dziadkowiec, Joanna; Javadi, Shaghayegh; Bratvold, Jon E; Nilsen, Ola; Røyne, Anja

    2018-06-26

    nm-Range forces acting between calcite surfaces in water affect macroscopic properties of carbonate rocks and calcite-based granular materials and are significantly influenced by calcite surface recrystallization. We suggest that the repulsive mechanical effects related to nm-scale surface recrystallization of calcite in water could be partially responsible for the observed decrease of cohesion in calcitic rocks saturated with water. Using the surface forces apparatus, we simultaneously followed the calcite reactivity and measured the forces in water in two surface configurations: between two rough calcite surfaces (CC) and between rough calcite and a smooth mica surface (CM). We used nm-scale rough, polycrystalline calcite films prepared by atomic layer deposition. We measured only repulsive forces in CC in CaCO 3 -saturated water, which was related to roughness and possibly to repulsive hydration effects. Adhesive or repulsive forces were measured in CM in CaCO 3 -saturated water depending on calcite roughness, and the adhesion was likely enhanced by electrostatic effects. The pull-off adhesive force in CM became stronger with time, and this increase was correlated with a decrease of roughness at contacts, the parameter which could be estimated from the measured force-distance curves. That suggested a progressive increase of real contact areas between the surfaces, caused by gradual pressure-driven deformation of calcite surface asperities during repeated loading-unloading cycles. Reactivity of calcite was affected by mass transport across nm- to μm-thick gaps between the surfaces. Major roughening was observed only for the smoothest calcite films, where gaps between two opposing surfaces were nm-thick over μm-sized areas and led to force of crystallization that could overcome confining pressures of the order of MPa. Any substantial roughening of calcite caused a significant increase of the repulsive mechanical force contribution.

  9. Segregation control in vertical Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Kou, S.

    1996-11-01

    To help the crystal grow at a constant dopant concentration in vertical Bridgman crystal growth, the dopant concentration of the growth melt, i.e. the melt from which the crystal grows, was kept constant. To achieve this, three different methods were used to replenish the growth melt at a controlled rate and suppress dopant diffusion between the growth melt and the replenishing melt. In method one, a replenishing crucible having a long melt passageway was immersed in the growth melt. In method two, a replenishing crucible having an independent feed-rate control mechanism was held above the growth melt. In method three, a submerged diffusion baffle was used to form a long melt passageway between the growth melt and the replenishing melt. NaNO 3 was used as a model material for crystal growth. Single crystals were grown by these three methods with effective segregation control. Method two was applied to InSb and single crystals were also grown with effective segregation control.

  10. Templating Growth of a Pseudomorphic Lepidocrocite Microshell at the Calcite–Water Interface

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Ke; Lee, Sang Soo; Wang, Jun; ...

    2018-01-05

    The growth of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) has been observed through oxidation of Fe(II) on calcite (CaCO 3). Here, we seek to understand the structural relation between lepidocrocite and the calcite substrate and its growth mechanism. The formation of iron oxyhydroxide layers having distinct morphologies was observed during the dissolution of calcite in acidic Fe(II)-rich solutions. A pseudomorphic lepidocrocite shell together with multiple iron oxyhydroxide layers encapsulated within the shell was imaged by optical and transmission X-ray microscopies. The presence of a several-nanometer-thick ordered lepidocrocite film was observed by X-ray reflectivity, with the lepidocrocite (100) plane oriented parallel to the calcite (104)more » surface. Lath-shaped lepidocrocite aggregates formed during the initial precipitation, which eventually grew into clusters of parallel platy crystals. The formation of a nanometer-thick well-ordered lepidocrocite film on a pristine calcite surface appears critical for the subsequent pseudomorphic overgrowth. Detachment of the lepidocrocite film from the dissolving calcite surface yielded a free-standing pseudomorphic iron oxyhydroxide shell, suggesting weak interactions between the shell and the calcite substrate. This growth mechanism yields the potential of using carbonate minerals as templates for pseudomorphic synthesis of iron oxyhydroxides having well-defined size and morphology.« less

  11. Convection effects in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystals for X-ray diffraction study are usually grown resting on the bottom of a hanging drop of a saturated protein solution, with slow evaporation to the air in a small enclosed cell. The evaporation rate is controlled by hanging the drop above a reservoir of water, with its saturation vapor pressure decreased by a low concentration of a passive solute. The drop has a lower solute concentration, and its volume shrinks by evaporation until the molecular concentrations match. Protein crystals can also be grown from a seed crystal suspended or supported in the interior of a supersaturated solution. The main analysis of this report concerns this case because it is less complicated than hanging-drop growth. Convection effects have been suggested as the reason for the apparent cessation of growth at a certain rather small crystal size. It seeems that as the crystal grows, the number of dislocations increases to a point where further growth is hindered. Growth in the microgravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle has been proposed as a method for obtaining larger crystals. Experimental observations of convection effects during the growth of protein crystals have been reported.

  12. Molecular-Scale Structural Controls on Nanoscale Growth Processes: Step-Specific Regulation of Biomineral Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Davis, K. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Orme, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    Deciphering the complex strategies by which organisms produce nanocrystalline materials with exquisite morphologies is central to understanding biomineralizing systems. One control on the morphology of biogenic nanoparticles is the specific interactions of their surfaces with the organic functional groups provided by the organism and the various inorganic species present in the ambient environment. It is now possible to directly probe the microscopic structural controls on crystal morphology by making quantitative measurements of the dynamic processes occurring at the mineral-water interface. These observations can provide crucial information concerning the actual mechanisms of growth that is otherwise unobtainable through macroscopic techniques. Here we use in situ molecular-scale observations of step dynamics and growth hillock morphology to directly resolve roles of principal impurities in regulating calcite surface morphologies. We show that the interactions of certain inorganic as well as organic impurities with the calcite surface are dependent upon the molecular-scale structures of step-edges. These interactions can assume a primary role in directing crystal morphology. In calcite growth experiments containing magnesium, we show that growth hillock structures become modified owing to the preferential inhibition of step motion along directions approximately parallel to the [010]. Compositional analyses have shown that Mg incorporates at different levels into the two types of nonequivalent steps, which meet at the hillock corner parallel to [010]. A simple calculation of the strain caused by this difference indicates that we should expect a significant retardation at this corner, in agreement with the observed development of [010] steps. If the low-energy step-risers produced by these [010] steps is perpendicular to the c-axis as seems likely from crystallographic considerations, this effect provides a plausible mechanism for the elongated calcite crystal

  13. Strontium Incorporation Into Calcite Generated by Bacterial Ureolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Y.; Ingram, J. A.; Cortez, M. M.; Redden, G. D.; Smith, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    Strontium incorporation into calcite generated by bacterial ureolytic activity was investigated as part of a larger effort to evaluate the use of in situ urea hydrolysis for accelerating co-precipitation of trace metals and radionuclides in contaminated aquifers. 90Sr, a uranium fission product with a half-life of 29 years, is a significant subsurface contaminant at several Department of Energy facilities and could be immobilized using this remediation strategy. Experiments were conducted in a medium designed to simulate the groundwater of the Snake River Plain Aquifer in eastern Idaho, amended with strontium. Initially the solution was undersaturated with respect to calcite. As a model ureolytic organism, we used Bacillus pasteurii, a well-characterized bacterium known for high urease activity and previously shown to induce calcite precipitation in urea-amended medium. To gain information on the effect of the bacterial surfaces, we also looked at precipitation in the presence of a bacterial species that did not hydrolyze urea, as well as in the absence of bacteria. In the absence of bacterial ureolysis, carbonate precipitation was induced by addition of ammonium carbonate. All products were identified as calcite by X-ray diffraction. Strontium uptake was observed in all cases, but was greatest in the system including bacterial ureolysis. Sputter depth element profiling by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) confirmed this finding, showing highest Sr:Ca ratios in the bacterially generated calcite throughout the depth (~350 nm) investigated. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) of the solids revealed regular crystals containing the outlines of embedded or entombed bacterial cells, suggesting that calcite precipitated directly on the cell surfaces when present. Analysis by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) indicated that in both the biotically and abiotically generated calcites the Sr was incorporated into the calcite

  14. Coccolith calcite time capsules preserve a molecule-specific record of pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Pearson, A.; Hermoso, M.; Wilkes, E.; Lee, R. B. Y.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-12-01

    Coccolithophores are single-celled phytoplankton that have contributed organic matter and calcite to marine sediments since the Late Triassic. The carbon isotopic compositions of both the calcite, and the organic matter, constitute valuable archives of information about the interaction between these organisms and the environments in which they lived. The isotopic composition of alkenone lipids, a recalcitrant component of coccolithophore organic carbon produced by a single family of coccolithophores, has been widely used to reconstruct pCO2 in the geological past. However, the robustness of this approach has remained controversial, due in part to the difficulties associated with reproducing pCO2 changes across periods of known pCO2 change, and uncertainties in relevant physiological variables such as growth rate and cell size. Meanwhile the calcite, produced in the form of plates called coccoliths, and which has had limited utility in paleoclimate reconstructions due to its large and variable departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, has garnered increasing attention in recent years for the environmental and physiological information it contains. Here we show that polysaccharides preserved within the calcite crystal lattice of near monospecific fractions of fossil coccoliths constitute an ancient pristine source of organic carbon that unlike alkenones is unambiguously associated with the coccolith1. The isotopic composition of these polysaccharides, in tandem with that of the host coccolith calcite, and morphometrics from the same coccoliths2, can be used simultaneously constrain a recently published cellular carbon isotope flux model3, embedded in a more complex nutrient limitation model, in a powerful new approach to simultaneously predict cellular parameters and pCO2. We demonstrate the validity of this approach across a glacial / interglacial cycle. Lee, R. B. Y., et al,, Nat. Commun. 7, 13144 (2016). McClelland, H. L. O. et al. Sci. Rep. 6

  15. Biomineralization processes of calcite induced by bacteria isolated from marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shiping; Cui, Hongpeng; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; He, Hao; Fang, Nianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Biomineralization is a known natural phenomenon associated with a wide range of bacterial species. Bacterial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation by marine isolates was investigated in this study. Three genera of ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina sp., Bacillus sp. and Brevundimonas sp. were observed to precipitate calcium carbonate minerals. Of these species, Sporosarcina sp. dominated the cultured isolates. B. lentus CP28 generated higher urease activity and facilitated more efficient precipitation of calcium carbonate at 3.24 ± 0.25 × 10−4 mg/cell. X-ray diffraction indicated that the dominant calcium carbonate phase was calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that morphologies of the minerals were dominated by cubic, rhombic and polygonal plate-like crystals. The dynamic process of microbial calcium carbonate precipitation revealed that B. lentus CP28 precipitated calcite crystals through the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, and that when ammonium ion concentrations reached 746 mM and the pH reached 9.6, that favored calcite precipitation at a higher level of 96 mg/L. The results of this research provide evidence that a variety of marine bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation, and may influence the marine carbonate cycle in natural environments. PMID:26273260

  16. Origin of cone-in-cone calcite veins during calcitization of dolomites and their subsequent diagenesis: A case study from the Gogolin Formation (Middle Triassic), SW Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal-Linka, Monika

    2010-03-01

    show meteoric-derived waters saturated with respect to calcite as a source of the vein calcite. Dedolomitization and vein precipitation may have taken place from the Norian/Early Jurassic to the Late Jurassic when the study area became eroded land, and the Emilówka Cellular Limestone Member may have acted as a local paleoaquifer conducting the meteoric-derived waters. Solid inclusions in the veins, detached from the host rock and the calcitized nodules, show that the force of calcite crystallization was the main factor responsible for vein widening. Vertical shifts of adjacent cones, remnants of primary fibrous calcite crystals, as well as the burial history justify the application of Tarr's theory in interpreting the origin of the secondary cone-in-cone structure within the fibrous structure veins. The timing and the particular conditions required for the cones to develop are uncertain.

  17. Silicon carbide - Progress in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of two processes for producing large-area high-quality single crystals of SiC is described: (1) a modified Lely process for the growth of the alpha polytypes (e.g., 6H SiC) initially developed by Tairov and Tsvetkov (1978, 1981) and Ziegler et al. (1983), and (2) a process for the epitaxial growth of the beta polytype on single-crystal silicon or other substrates. Growth of large-area cubic SiC on Si is described together with growth of defect-free beta-SiC films on alpha-6H SiC crystals and TiC lattice. Semiconducting qualities of silicon carbide crystals grown by various techniques are discussed.

  18. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    This Final Technical Report for NASA Grant NAG8-774 covers the period from April 27, 1989 through December 31, 1992. It covers five main topics: fluid flow studies, the influence of growth conditions on the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals, control of nucleation, the growth of lysozyme by the temperature gradient method and graphoepitaxy of protein crystals. The section on fluid flow discusses the limits of detectability in the Schlieren imaging of fluid flows around protein crystals. The isocitrate lyase study compares crystals grown terrestrially under a variety of conditions with those grown in space. The controlling factor governing the morphology of the crystals is the supersaturation. The lack of flow in the interface between the drop and the atmosphere in microgravity causes protein precipitation in the boundary layer and a lowering of the supersaturation in the drop. This lowered supersaturation leads to improved crystal morphology. Preliminary experiments with lysozyme indicated that localized temperature gradients could be used to nucleate crystals in a controlled manner. An apparatus (thermonucleator) was designed to study the controlled nucleation of protein crystals. This apparatus has been used to nucleate crystals of materials with both normal (ice-water, Rochelle salt and lysozyme) and retrograde (horse serum albumin and alpha chymotrypsinogen A) solubility. These studies have lead to the design of an new apparatus that small and more compatible with use in microgravity. Lysozyme crystals were grown by transporting nutrient from a source (lysozyme powder) to the crystal in a temperature gradient. The influence of path length and cross section on the growth rate was demonstrated. This technique can be combined with the thermonucleator to control both nucleation and growth. Graphoepitaxy utilizes a patterned substrate to orient growing crystals. In this study, silicon substrates with 10 micron grooves were used to grow crystals of catalase

  19. Impurity effects in crystal growth from solutions: Steady states, transients and step bunch motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Madhav; Weeks, John D.

    2014-05-01

    We analyze a recently formulated model in which adsorbed impurities impede the motion of steps in crystals grown from solutions, while moving steps can remove or deactivate adjacent impurities. In this model, the chemical potential change of an atom on incorporation/desorption to/from a step is calculated for different step configurations and used in the dynamical simulation of step motion. The crucial difference between solution growth and vapor growth is related to the dependence of the driving force for growth of the main component on the size of the terrace in front of the step. This model has features resembling experiments in solution growth, which yields a dead zone with essentially no growth at low supersaturation and the motion of large coherent step bunches at larger supersaturation. The transient behavior shows a regime wherein steps bunch together and move coherently as the bunch size increases. The behavior at large line tension is reminiscent of the kink-poisoning mechanism of impurities observed in calcite growth. Our model unifies different impurity models and gives a picture of nonequilibrium dynamics that includes both steady states and time dependent behavior and shows similarities with models of disordered systems and the pinning/depinning transition.

  20. The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Protein Crystal Growth Archive

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Gary L.; Tung, Michael; Ladner, Jane

    1996-01-01

    The NIST/NASA/CARB Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (BMCD), NIST Standard Reference Database 21, contains crystal data and crystallization conditions for biological macromolecules. The database entries include data abstracted from published crystallographic reports. Each entry consists of information describing the biological macromolecule crystallized and crystal data and the crystallization conditions for each crystal form. The BMCD serves as the NASA Protein Crystal Growth Archive in that it contains protocols and results of crystallization experiments undertaken in microgravity (space). These database entries report the results, whether successful or not, from NASA-sponsored protein crystal growth experiments in microgravity and from microgravity crystallization studies sponsored by other international organizations. The BMCD was designed as a tool to assist x-ray crystallographers in the development of protocols to crystallize biological macromolecules, those that have previously been crystallized, and those that have not been crystallized. PMID:11542472

  1. Catalysis and chemical mechanisms of calcite dissolution in seawater.

    PubMed

    Subhas, Adam V; Adkins, Jess F; Rollins, Nick E; Naviaux, John; Erez, Jonathan; Berelson, William M

    2017-07-18

    Near-equilibrium calcite dissolution in seawater contributes significantly to the regulation of atmospheric [Formula: see text] on 1,000-y timescales. Despite many studies on far-from-equilibrium dissolution, little is known about the detailed mechanisms responsible for calcite dissolution in seawater. In this paper, we dissolve 13 C-labeled calcites in natural seawater. We show that the time-evolving enrichment of [Formula: see text] in solution is a direct measure of both dissolution and precipitation reactions across a large range of saturation states. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer profiles into the 13 C-labeled solids confirm the presence of precipitated material even in undersaturated conditions. The close balance of precipitation and dissolution near equilibrium can alter the chemical composition of calcite deeper than one monolayer into the crystal. This balance of dissolution-precipitation shifts significantly toward a dissolution-dominated mechanism below about [Formula: see text] Finally, we show that the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) increases the dissolution rate across all saturation states, and the effect is most pronounced close to equilibrium. This finding suggests that the rate of hydration of [Formula: see text] is a rate-limiting step for calcite dissolution in seawater. We then interpret our dissolution data in a framework that incorporates both solution chemistry and geometric constraints on the calcite solid. Near equilibrium, this framework demonstrates a lowered free energy barrier at the solid-solution interface in the presence of CA. This framework also indicates a significant change in dissolution mechanism at [Formula: see text], which we interpret as the onset of homogeneous etch pit nucleation.

  2. Protein-crystal growth experiment (planned)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, S.; Asano, K.; Hashitani, T.; Kitakohji, T.; Nemoto, H.; Kitamura, S.

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a microgravity environment on protein crystal growth, a system was developed using 5 cubic feet Get Away Special payload canister. In the experiment, protein (myoglobin) will be simultaneously crystallized from an aqueous solution in 16 crystallization units using three types of crystallization methods, i.e., batch, vapor diffusion, and free interface diffusion. Each unit has two compartments: one for the protein solution and the other for the ammonium sulfate solution. Compartments are separated by thick acrylic or thin stainless steel plates. Crystallization will be started by sliding out the plates, then will be periodically recorded up to 120 hours by a still camera. The temperature will be passively controlled by a phase transition thermal storage component and recorded in IC memory throughout the experiment. Microgravity environment can then be evaluated for protein crystal growth by comparing crystallization in space with that on Earth.

  3. A study of crystal growth by solution technique. [triglycine sulfate single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The advantages and mechanisms of crystal growth from solution are discussed as well as the effects of impurity adsorption on the kinetics of crystal growth. Uncertainities regarding crystal growth in a low gravity environment are examined. Single crystals of triglycine sulfate were grown using a low temperature solution technique. Small components were assembled and fabricated for future space flights. A space processing experiment proposal accepted by NASA for the Spacelab-3 mission is included.

  4. Hydrothermal replacement of calcite by Mg-carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Laura; Mueller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The transport of heat and mass through the Earth's crust is coupled to mineral reactions and the exchange of isotopes and elements between different phases. Carbonate minerals are a major constituent of the Earth's crust and play an important role in different physical, chemical and even biological processes. In this experimental study, the element exchange reaction between calcite (CaCO3) and a Mg-rich fluid phase is investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Single crystals of calcite (2x2x2 mm) react with 1 ml of a 1 M MgCl2 solution at 200° C in a Teflon-lined steel autoclave for different times between one day and four weeks. The reaction leads to the formation of a porous reaction front and the pseudomorphic replacement of calcite by dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] and magnesite (MgCO3). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the reaction rim consists of small Mg-carbonate rhombs closely attached to each other, suggesting that the replacement reaction takes place by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Typically, the observed reaction front can be divided into two different domains. The outer part of the reaction rim, i.e. from the mineral surface in contact to the fluid inwards, consists of magnesite, whereas the inner part of the rim surrounding the unreacted calcite core consists of Ca-rich dolomite. The formation of a porous microstructure that varies in different parts of the reaction rim is a direct result of the large molar volume change induced by the replacement of calcite by magnesite and dolomite. The developing porosity therefore creates fluid pathways that promote the progress of the reaction front towards the unreacted core of the single crystal. Compositional profiles measured perpendicular to the mineral surface across the reactions rims using electron microprobe (EMPA) further revealed a compositional gradient within the reaction rim with regard to the structure-forming elements Mg and Ca. Here, the amount of Mg incorporated in both product

  5. Protein crystal growth (5-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins (enzymes, hormones, immunoglobulins) account for 50 pct. or more of the dry weight of most living systems. A detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. In principle, there are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor is the elimination of density driven convective flow. Other factors that can be controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystals in a gravitational field, and the potential advantage of doing containerless crystal growth. As a result of these theories and facts, one can readily understand why the microgravity environment of an Earth orbiting vehicle seems to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. This perception has led to the establishment of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project. The results of experiments already performed during STS missions have in many cases resulted in large protein crystals which are structurally correct. Thus, the near term objective of the PCG/ME project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of dislocation propagation during crystal growth and dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Anna S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alexander N.; Campbell, James M.; Nisbet, Gareth; Meldrum, Fiona C.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic level defects such as dislocations play key roles in determining the macroscopic properties of crystalline materials 1,2. Their effects range from increased chemical reactivity 3,4 to enhanced mechanical properties 5,6. Dislocations have been widely studied using traditional techniques such as X-ray diffraction and optical imaging. Recent advances have enabled atomic force microscopy to study single dislocations 7 in two-dimensions (2D), while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can now visualise strain fields in three-dimensions (3D) with near atomic resolution 8–10. However, these techniques cannot offer 3D imaging of the formation or movement of dislocations during dynamic processes. Here, we describe how Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging (BCDI) 11,12 can be used to visualize in 3D, the entire network of dislocations present within an individual calcite crystal during repeated growth and dissolution cycles. These investigations demonstrate the potential of BCDI for studying the mechanisms underlying the response of crystalline materials to external stimuli. PMID:26030304

  7. Growth of Solid Solution Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Holland, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The major objective of this program is to determine the conditions under which single crystals of solid solutions can be grown from the melt in a Bridgman configuration with a high degree of chemical homogeneity. The central aim is to assess the role of gravity in the growth process and to explore the possible advantages for growth in the absence of gravity. The alloy system being investigated is the solid solution semiconductor with x-values appropriate for infrared detector applications in Hg sub (1-x) Cd sub x Te the 8 to 14 micro m wavelength region. Both melt and Te-solvent growth are being considered. The study consists of an extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research effort followed by flight experimentation where appropriate. Experimental facilities have been established for the purification, casting, and crystal growth of the alloy system. Facilities have been also established for the metallurgical, compositional, electric and optical characterization of the alloys. Crystals are being grown by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method and are analyzed by various experimental techniques to evaluate the effects of growth conditions on the longitudinal and radial compositional variations and defect densities in the crystals.

  8. Influence of deformation on dolomite rim growth kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helpa, Vanessa; Rybacki, Erik; Grafulha Morales, Luiz Fernando; Dresen, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Using a gas-deformation apparatus stacks of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals were deformed at T = 750° C and P = 400 MPa to examine the influence of stress and strain on magnesio-calcite and dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) growth kinetics. Triaxial compression and torsion tests performed at constant stresses between 7 and 38 MPa and test durations between 4 and 171 hours resulted in bulk strains of 0.03-0.2 and maximum shear strains of 0.8-5.6, respectively. The reaction rims consist of fine-grained (2-7 μm) dolomite with palisade-shaped grains growing into magnesite reactants and equiaxed granular dolomite grains next to calcite. In between dolomite and pure calcite, magnesio-calcite grains evolved with an average grain size of 20-40 μm. Grain boundaries tend to be straighter at high bulk strains and equilibrium angles at grain triple junctions are common within the magnesio-calcite layer. Transmission electron microscopy shows almost dislocation free palisades and increasing dislocation density within granular dolomite towards the magnesio-calcite boundary. Within magnesio-calcite grains, dislocations are concentrated at grain boundaries. Variation of time at fixed stress (˜17 MPa) yields a parabolic time dependence of dolomite rim width, indicating diffusion-controlled growth, similar to isostatic rim growth behavior. In contrast, the magnesio-calcite layer growth is enhanced compared to isostatic conditions. Triaxial compression at given time shows no significant change of dolomite rim thickness (11±2 μm) and width of magnesio-calcite layers (33±5 μm) with increasing stress. In torsion experiments, reaction layer thickness and grain size decrease from the center (low stress/strain) to the edge (high strain/stress) of samples. Chemical analysis shows nearly stoichiometric composition of dolomite palisades, but enhanced Ca content within granular grains, indicating local disequilibrium with magnesio-calcite, in particular for twisted

  9. Crystal growth and annealing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.; Sparrow, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing. An embodiment of the present invention comprises a secondary heater incorporated into a conventional crystal growth and annealing apparatus. The secondary heater supplies heat to minimize the temperature gradients in the crystal during the annealing process. The secondary heater can mount near the bottom of the crucible to effectively maintain appropriate temperature gradients.

  10. Crystal growth of artificial snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Oka, A.; Taki, M.; Kuwano, R.; Ono, H.; Nagura, R.; Narimatsu, Y.; Tanii, J.; Kamimiytat, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Snow crystals were grown onboard the space shuttle during STS-7 and STS-8 to facilitate the investigation of crystal growth under conditions of weightlessness. The experimental design and hardware are described. Space-grown snow crystals were polyhedrons looking like spheres, which were unlike snow crystals produced in experiments on Earth.

  11. Calcite precipitation on glass substrates and active stalagmites in Katerloch Cave (Austria): Constraints from environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakoparnig, Marlene; Boch, Ronny; Wang, Xianfeng; Lin, Ke; Spötl, Christoph; Leis, Albrecht; Gollowitsch, Anna; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Located near Graz at the SE-rim of the Alps Katerloch is well-known for its impressive dripstone decoration, e.g. several metres tall and relatively fast growing (0.2-0.7 mm/yr on average) candle-stick-type stalagmites. In the course of an ongoing multi-annual and partially high-resolution cave monitoring program we study modern (active) sites of carbonate deposition focusing on the site-specific growth dynamics and connection of modern regional and cave environmental conditions with petrographic, chemical and stable isotopic information captured in the speleothems. Fresh calcite precipitates on artificial (glass) substrates underneath active drip sites were collected continuously from 2006 to 2014 (eight years!). The samples (up to 7 mm thick) represent cave sections of different temperature and drip sites of partially different characteristics (e.g. drip rate). We also recovered short drill cores (up to 3 cm length, 1 cm diameter) from the top of active stalagmites probably representing the last decades to centuries of calcite crystallization. Moreover, an actively growing stalagmite (K10) comprising both modern and past calcite deposition was collected. 238U-234U-230Th dating using MC-ICP-MS of K10 (71 cm long) revealed several distinct growth intervals (separated by growth interruptions) starting at 129.1 ±1.2 kyr BP (Last Interglacial) up to now, mostly reflecting warm and humid climate intervals. High-resolution (100 μm) isotope profiles micromilled from the multi-annual modern calcite precipitates on artificial substrates revealed low δ13C values of -12.8 to -8.3 ‰ (VPDB) and relatively high δ18O of -6.9 to -4.9 ‰Ṫhe δ18O curves from all collection sites (different growth rate) record a pronounced decrease during their most recent growth period most likely corresponding to a significant decrease towards lower oxygen isotope values observed in drip waters collected in the year 2014 compared with samples from 2005 to 2007. Drip water δ2H /δ18O

  12. Fluid Physics and Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M.; Snell, E.; Judge, R.; Chayen, N.; Boggon, T.

    2000-01-01

    The molecular structure of biological macromolecules is important in understanding how these molecules work and has direct application to rational drug design for new medicines and for the improvement and development of industrial enzymes. In order to obtain the molecular structure, large, well formed, single macromolecule crystals are required. The growth of macromolecule crystals is a difficult task and is often hampered on the ground by fluid flows that result from the interaction of gravity with the crystal growth process. One such effect is the bulk movement of the crystal through the fluid due to sedimentation. A second is buoyancy driven convection close to the crystal surface. On the ground the crystallization process itself induces both of these flows. Buoyancy driven convection results from density differences between the bulk solution and fluid close to the crystal surface which has been depleted of macromolecules due to crystal growth. Schlieren photograph of a growing lysozyme crystal illustrating a 'growth plume' resulting from buoyancy driven convection. Both sedimentation and buoyancy driven convection have a negative effect on crystal growth and microgravity is seen as a way to both greatly reduce sedimentation and provide greater stability for 'depletion zones' around growing crystals. Some current crystal growth hardware however such as those based on a vapor diffusion techniques, may also be introducing unwanted Marangoni convection which becomes more pronounced in microgravity. Negative effects of g-jitter on crystal growth have also been observed. To study the magnitude of fluid flows around growing crystals we have attached a number of different fluorescent probes to lysozyme molecules. At low concentrations, less than 40% of the total protein, the probes do not appear to effect the crystal growth process. By using these probes we expect to determine not only the effect of induced flows due to crystal growth hardware design but also hope to

  13. Connection between the growth rate distribution and the size dependent crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrović, M. M.; Žekić, A. A.; IIić, Z. Z.

    2002-07-01

    The results of investigations of the connection between the growth rate dispersions and the size dependent crystal growth of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), Rochelle salt (RS) and sodium chlorate (SC) are presented. A possible way out of the existing confusion in the size dependent crystal growth investigations is suggested. It is shown that the size independent growth exists if the crystals belonging to one growth rate distribution maximum are considered separately. The investigations suggest possible reason for the observed distribution maxima widths, and the high data scattering on the growth rate versus the crystal size dependence.

  14. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  15. Modelling the growth of feather crystals

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wood, H.J.; Hunt, J.D.; Evans, P.V.

    1997-02-01

    An existing numerical model of dendritic growth has been adapted to model the growth of twinned columnar dendrites (feather crystals) in a binary aluminium alloy, Examination of the effect of dendrite tip angle on growth has led to an hypothesis regarding the stability of a pointed tip morphology in these crystals.

  16. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study the effect of low gravity on the growth of protein crystals and those parameters which will affect growth and crystal quality. The application of graphoepitaxy (artificial epitaxy) to proteins is detailed. The development of a method for the control of nucleation is discussed. The factor affecting the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals is presented.

  17. Modeling Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2003-01-01

    Tetragonal lysozyme 110 face crystal growth rates, measured over 5 orders of magnitude in range, can be described using a model where growth occurs by 2D nucleation on the crystal surface for solution supersaturations of c/c(sub eq) less than or equal to 7 +/- 2. Based upon the model, the step energy per unit length, beta was estimated to be approx. 5.3 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp -7) erg/mol-cm, which for a step height of 56 A corresponds to barrier of approx. 7 +/- 1 k(sub B)T at 300 K. For supersaturations of c/c(sub eq) > 8, the model emphasizing crystal growth by 2D nucleation not only could not predict, but also consistently overestimated, the highest observable crystal growth rates. Kinetic roughening is hypothesized to occur at a cross-over supersaturation of c/c(sub eq) > 8, where crystal growth is postulated to occur by a different process such as adsorption. Under this assumption, all growth rate data indicated that a kinetic roughening transition and subsequent crystal growth by adsorption for all solution conditions, varying in buffer pH, temperature and precipitant concentration, occurs for c/c(sub eq)(T, pH, NaCl) in the range between 5 and 10, with an energy barrier for adsorption estimated to be approx. 20 k(sub B)T at 300 K. Based upon these and other estimates, we determined the size of the critical surface nucleate, at the crossover supersaturation and higher concentrations, to range from 4 to 10 molecules.

  18. Analytics of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Chang, C. E.; Shlichta, P. J.; Chen, P. S.; Kim, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Two crystal growth processes considered for spacelab experiments were studied to anticipate and understand phenomena not ordinarily encountered on earth. Computer calculations were performed on transport processes in floating zone melting and on growth of a crystal from solution in a spacecraft environment. Experiments intended to simulate solution growth at micro accelerations were performed.

  19. Time-lapse 3D imaging of calcite precipitation in a microporous column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, Jose R. A.; Withers, Philip J.

    2018-02-01

    Time-lapse X-ray computed tomography is used to image the evolution of calcite precipitation during flow through microporous quartz over the course of 400 h. The growth rate decreases by more than seven times, which is linked to the clogging of flow paths that restricts flow to some regions of the column. Fewer precipitates are observed as a function of column depth, which is found to be related to a differential nucleation density along the sample. A higher nucleation density closer to the inlet implies more crystal volume increase per unit of time without affecting the rate if normalized to the surface area of crystals. Our overall growth rates measured in porous media are orders of magnitude slower than growth rates derived from traditional precipitation experiments on free surfaces. Based on our time-lapse results we hypothesize a scenario where the evolving distribution of precipitates within a pore structure during precipitation progressively modifies the local transport through the pores. Within less permeable regions the saturation index may be lower than along the main flow paths. Therefore, the reactive crystal surfaces within those regions grow at a slower rate than that expected from the bulk fluid composition. Since the amount of reactive surface area within these less permeable regions increases over time, the overall growth rate decreases without a necessary significant change of the bulk fluid composition along more permeable flow paths. In conclusion, the overall growth rates in an evolving porous media expected from bulk fluid compositions alone can be overestimated due to the development of stagnant sub-regions where the reactive surface area is bath by a solution with lower saturation index. In this context we highlight the value of time-lapse 3D studies for understanding the dynamics of mineral precipitation in porous media.

  20. Reaction kinetics of dolomite rim growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Abart, R.; Morales, L. F. G.; Rhede, D.; Jeřábek, P.; Dresen, G.

    2014-04-01

    Reaction rims of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) were produced by solid-state reactions at the contacts of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals at 400 MPa pressure, 750-850 °C temperature, and 3-146 h annealing time to determine the reaction kinetics. The dolomite reaction rims show two different microstructural domains. Elongated palisades of dolomite grew perpendicular into the MgCO3 interface with length ranging from about 6 to 41 µm. At the same time, a 5-71 µm wide rim of equiaxed granular dolomite grew at the contact with CaCO3. Platinum markers showed that the original interface is located at the boundary between the granular and palisade-forming dolomite. In addition to dolomite, a 12-80 µm thick magnesio-calcite layer formed between the dolomite reaction rims and the calcite single crystals. All reaction products show at least an axiotactic crystallographic relationship with respect to calcite reactant, while full topotaxy to calcite prevails within the granular dolomite and magnesio-calcite. Dolomite grains frequently exhibit growth twins characterized by a rotation of 180° around one of the equivalent axis. From mass balance considerations, it is inferred that the reaction rim of dolomite grew by counter diffusion of MgO and CaO. Assuming an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, activation energies for diffusion of CaO and MgO are E a (CaO) = 192 ± 54 kJ/mol and E a (MgO) = 198 ± 44 kJ/mol, respectively.

  1. Catalysis and chemical mechanisms of calcite dissolution in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Jess F.; Rollins, Nick E.; Naviaux, John; Erez, Jonathan; Berelson, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Near-equilibrium calcite dissolution in seawater contributes significantly to the regulation of atmospheric CO2 on 1,000-y timescales. Despite many studies on far-from-equilibrium dissolution, little is known about the detailed mechanisms responsible for calcite dissolution in seawater. In this paper, we dissolve 13C-labeled calcites in natural seawater. We show that the time-evolving enrichment of 𝜹13C in solution is a direct measure of both dissolution and precipitation reactions across a large range of saturation states. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer profiles into the 13C-labeled solids confirm the presence of precipitated material even in undersaturated conditions. The close balance of precipitation and dissolution near equilibrium can alter the chemical composition of calcite deeper than one monolayer into the crystal. This balance of dissolution–precipitation shifts significantly toward a dissolution-dominated mechanism below about Ω= 0.7. Finally, we show that the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) increases the dissolution rate across all saturation states, and the effect is most pronounced close to equilibrium. This finding suggests that the rate of hydration of CO2 is a rate-limiting step for calcite dissolution in seawater. We then interpret our dissolution data in a framework that incorporates both solution chemistry and geometric constraints on the calcite solid. Near equilibrium, this framework demonstrates a lowered free energy barrier at the solid–solution interface in the presence of CA. This framework also indicates a significant change in dissolution mechanism at Ω= 0.7, which we interpret as the onset of homogeneous etch pit nucleation. PMID:28720698

  2. DKDP crystal growth controlled by cooling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Qi, Hongji; Shao, Jianda

    2017-08-01

    The performance of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystal directly affects beam quality, energy and conversion efficiency in the Inertial Confinement Fusion(ICF)facility, which is related with the initial saturation temperature of solution and the real-time supersaturation during the crystal growth. However, traditional method to measure the saturation temperature is neither efficient nor accurate enough. Besides, the supersaturation is often controlled by experience, which yields the higher error and leads to the instability during the crystal growth. In this paper, DKDP solution with 78% deuteration concentration is crystallized in different temperatures. We study the relation between solubility and temperature of DKDP and fit a theoretical curve with a parabola model. With the model, the measurement of saturation temperature is simplified and the control precision of the cooling rate is improved during the crystal growth, which is beneficial for optimizing the crystal growth process.

  3. Quartz crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  4. Electrooptic crystal growth and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-02-01

    A new member in the tungsten-bronze family of ferroelectric lead potassium niobate (PKN), with general formula Pb(1-x)K(2x)Nb2O6, has been grown as bulk single crystal. Growth of PKN with charge composition x = 0.23 has been achieved using the Czochralski technique of crystal pulling. Large diameter boules were grown in platinum crucibles at temperatures between 1280 and 1300 C. Crystallographic studies were conducted using x ray diffraction techniques. The samples were characterized for ferroelectric properties between 25 and 600 C and for optical absorption. This paper presents the crystal synthesis and the results of ferroelectric and optical characterization. Bulk single crystals of potassium tantalate niobate, KTa(1-x)Nb(x)O3, ferroelectric with different values of Ta/Nb ratios have been grown by temperature gradient transport technique (TGTT). A second attached paper presents the results of the crystal growth experiments, ferroelectric characterization techniques, and properties of potassium tantalate niobate crystals.

  5. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  6. Growth and development of spring towers at Shiqiang, Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian; Peng, Xiaotong

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the world, high artesian pressures in hydrothermal areas have led to the growth of tall spring towers that have their vents at their summits. The factors that control their development and formative precipitates are poorly understood because these springs, irrespective of location, are mostly inactive. Spring towers found at Shiqiang (Yunnan Province, China), which are up to 4 m high and 3 m in diameter, are formed largely of calcite and aragonite crystal bushes, euhedral calcite crystals and coated grains with alternating Fe-poor and Fe-rich zones, calcite rafts, and cements formed of various combinations of calcite, aragonite, strontianite, Mg-Si reticulate, needle fiber calcite, calcified and non-calcified microbes, diatoms, and insects. Collectively, the limestones that form the towers can be divided into (1) Group A that are friable, porous and form the cores of the towers and have δ18OSMOW values of + 15.7 to + 19.7‰ (average 17.8‰) and δ13CPDB values of + 5.1 to + 6.9‰ (average 5.9‰), and (2) Group B that are hard and well lithified and found largely around the vents and the tower sides, and have δ18OSMOW values of + 13.0 to + 22.0‰ (average 17.6‰) and δ13CPDB values of + 1.4 to + 3.6‰ (average 2.6‰). The precipitates and the isotopic values indicate that these were thermogene springs. Growth of the Shiqiang spring towers involved (1) Phase IA when precipitation of calcite and aragonite bushes formed the core of the tower and Phase IB when calcite, commonly Fe-rich, was precipitated locally, (2) Phase II that involved the precipitation of white cements, formed of calcite, aragonite, strontianite, and Mg-Si reticulate coatings in cavities amid the Phase I precipitates, and (3) Phase III, which formed probably after spring activity ceased, when needle-fiber calcite was precipitated and the mounds were invaded by microbes (some now calcified), diatoms, and insects. At various times during this complex history, pore waters mediated

  7. GROWTH AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SINGLE CRYSTALS OF RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SINGLE CRYSTALS, CRYSTAL GROWTH), (*CRYSTAL GROWTH, SINGLE CRYSTALS), (*RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS, SINGLE CRYSTALS), EPITAXIAL GROWTH, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, CHLORIDES, VAPOR PLATING, ELECTROSTATIC FIELDS, ENERGY, ATOMIC PROPERTIES , BONDING

  8. Growth Kinetics and Morphology of Barite Crystals Derived from Face-Specific Growth Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Godinho, Jose R. A.; Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-03-30

    Here we investigate the growth kinetics and morphology of barite (BaSO 4) crystals by measuring the growth rates of the (001), (210), (010), and (100) surfaces using vertical scanning interferometry. Solutions with saturation indices 1.1, 2.1, and 3.0 without additional electrolyte, in 0.7 M NaCl, or in 1.3 mM SrCl2 are investigated. Face-specific growth rates are inhibited in the SrCl 2 solution relative to a solution without electrolyte, except for (100). Contrarily, growth of all faces is promoted in the NaCl solution. The variation of face-specific rates is solution-specific, which leads to a. change of the crystal morphology and overallmore » growth rate of crystals. The measured face-specific growth rates are used to model the growth of single crystals. Modeled crystals have a morphology and size similar to those grown from solution. Based on the model the time dependence of surface area and growth rates is analyzed. Growth rates change with time due to surface area normalization for small crystals and large growth intervals. By extrapolating rates to crystals with large surfaces areas, time-independent growth rates are 0.783, 2.96, and 0.513 mmol∙m -2∙h -1, for saturation index 2.1 solutions without additional electrolyte, NaCl, and SrCl 2, respectively.« less

  9. Growth Kinetics and Morphology of Barite Crystals Derived from Face-Specific Growth Rates

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Godinho, Jose R. A.; Stack, Andrew G.

    Here we investigate the growth kinetics and morphology of barite (BaSO 4) crystals by measuring the growth rates of the (001), (210), (010), and (100) surfaces using vertical scanning interferometry. Solutions with saturation indices 1.1, 2.1, and 3.0 without additional electrolyte, in 0.7 M NaCl, or in 1.3 mM SrCl2 are investigated. Face-specific growth rates are inhibited in the SrCl 2 solution relative to a solution without electrolyte, except for (100). Contrarily, growth of all faces is promoted in the NaCl solution. The variation of face-specific rates is solution-specific, which leads to a. change of the crystal morphology and overallmore » growth rate of crystals. The measured face-specific growth rates are used to model the growth of single crystals. Modeled crystals have a morphology and size similar to those grown from solution. Based on the model the time dependence of surface area and growth rates is analyzed. Growth rates change with time due to surface area normalization for small crystals and large growth intervals. By extrapolating rates to crystals with large surfaces areas, time-independent growth rates are 0.783, 2.96, and 0.513 mmol∙m -2∙h -1, for saturation index 2.1 solutions without additional electrolyte, NaCl, and SrCl 2, respectively.« less

  10. Advanced protein crystal growth programmatic sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the costs of various APCG (Advanced Protein Crystal Growth) program options and to determine the parameters which, if changed, impact the costs and goals of the programs and to what extent. This was accomplished by developing and evaluating several alternate programmatic scenarios for the microgravity Advanced Protein Crystal Growth program transitioning from the present shuttle activity to the man tended Space Station to the permanently manned Space Station. These scenarios include selected variations in such sensitivity parameters as development and operational costs, schedules, technology issues, and crystal growth methods. This final report provides information that will aid in planning the Advanced Protein Crystal Growth Program.

  11. Protein Crystal Growth With the Aid of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Protein crystallography is one of three well-known methods to obtain the structure of proteins. A major rate limiting step in protein crystallography is protein crystal nucleation and growth, which is still largely a process conducted by trial-and-error methods. Many attempts have been made to improve protein crystal growth by performing growth in microgravity. Although the use of microgravity appears to improve crystal quality in some attempts, this method has been inefficient because several reasons: we lack a fundamental understanding of macromolecular crystal growth in general and of the influence of microgravity in particular, we have to start with crystal growth conditions in microgravity based on conditions on the ground and finally the hardware does not allow for experimental iteration without reloading samples on the ground. To partially accommodate the disadvantages of the current hardware, we have used microfluidic technology (Lab-on-a-Chip devices) to design the concept of a more efficient crystallization device, suitable for use on the International Space Station and in high-throughput applications on the ground. The concept and properties of microfluidics, the application design process, and the advances in protein crystal growth hardware will be discussed in this presentation. Some examples of proteins crystallized in the new hardware will be discussed, including the differences between conventional crystallization versus crystallization in microfluidics.

  12. Calcite and dolomite in intrusive carbonatites. II. Trace-element variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhmouradian, Anton R.; Reguir, Ekaterina P.; Couëslan, Christopher; Yang, Panseok

    2016-04-01

    The composition of calcite and dolomite from several carbonatite complexes (including a large set of petrographically diverse samples from the Aley complex in Canada) was studied by electron-microprobe analysis and laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry to identify the extent of substitution of rare-earth and other trace elements in these minerals and the effects of different igneous and postmagmatic processes on their composition. Analysis of the newly acquired and published data shows that the contents of rare-earth elements (REE) and certain REE ratios in magmatic calcite and dolomite are controlled by crystal fractionation of fluorapatite, monazite and, possibly, other minerals. Enrichment in REE observed in some samples (up to ~2000 ppm in calcite) cannot be accounted for by coupled substitutions involving Na, P or As. At Aley, the REE abundances and chondrite-normalized (La/Yb)cn ratios in carbonates decrease with progressive fractionation. Sequestration of heavy REE from carbonatitic magma by calcic garnet may be responsible for a steeply sloping "exponential" pattern and lowered Ce/Ce* ratios of calcite from Magnet Cove (USA) and other localities. Alternatively, the low levels of Ce and Mn in these samples could result from preferential removal of these elements by Ce4+- and Mn3+-bearing minerals (such as cerianite and spinels) at increasing f(O2) in the magma. The distribution of large-ion lithophile elements (LILE = Sr, Ba and Pb) in rock-forming carbonates also shows trends indicative of crystal fractionation effects (e.g., concomitant depletion in Ba + Pb at Aley, or Sr + Ba at Kerimasi), although the phases responsible for these variations cannot be identified unambiguously at present. Overall, element ratios sensitive to the redox state of the magma and its complexing characteristics (Eu/Eu*, Ce/Ce* and Y/Ho) are least variable and in both primary calcite and dolomite, approach the average chondritic values. In consanguineous

  13. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of macromolecular domain cavities and microstructure of single-crystal calcite tooth plates of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Robach, J S; Stock, S R; Veis, A

    2005-07-01

    The calcite plates and prisms in Lytechinus variegatus teeth form a complex biocomposite and employ a myriad of strengthening and toughening strategies. These crystal elements have macromolecule-containing internal cavities that may act to prevent cleavage. Transmission electron microscopy employing a small objective aperture was used to quantify several characteristics of these cavities. Cavity diameters ranged from 10 to 225 nm, the mean cavity diameter was between 50 and 60 nm, and cavities comprised approximately 20% of the volume of the crystal. Some cavities exhibited faceting and trace analysis identified these planes as being predominately of {1014} type. Through focus series of micrographs show the cavities were homogeneously distributed throughout the foil. The electron beam decomposed a substance within cavities and this suggests that these cavities are filled with a hydrated organic phase.

  14. Ages and Origins of Calcite and Opal in the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2001-01-01

    Deposits of calcite and opal are present as coatings on open fractures and lithophysal cavities in unsaturated-zone tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Outermost layers of calcite and opal have radiocarbon ages of 16,000 to 44,000 years before present and thorium-230/uranium ages of 28,000 to more than 500,000 years before present. These ages are young relative to the 13-million-year age of the host rocks. Multiple subsamples from the same outer layer typically show a range of ages with youngest ages from the thinnest subsamples. Initial uranium-234/uranium-238 activity ratios between 1 and 9.5 show a distinct negative correlation with thorium-230/uranium age and are greater than 4 for all but one sample younger than 100,000 years before present. These data, along with micrometer-scale layering and distinctive crystal morphologies, are interpreted to indicate that deposits formed very slowly from water films migrating through open cavities. Exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor probably took place between downward-migrating liquids and upward-migrating gases at low rates, resulting in oversaturation of mineral constituents at crystal extremities and more or less continuous deposition of very thin layers. Therefore, subsamples represent mixtures of older and younger layers on a scale finer than sampling techniques can resolve. Slow, long-term rates of deposition (less than about 5 millimeters of mineral per million years) are inferred from subsamples of outermost calcite and opal. These growth rates are similar to those calculated assuming that total coating thicknesses of 10 to 40 millimeters accumulated over 12 million years. Calcite has a wide range of delta carbon-13 values from about -8.2 to 8.5 per mil and delta oxygen-18 values from about 10 to 21 per mil. Systematic microsampling across individual mineral coatings indicates basal (older) calcite tends to have the largest delta carbon-13 values

  15. Patterned solid state growth of barium titanate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugorek, Michael Stephen

    An understanding of microstructure evolution in ceramic materials, including single crystal development and abnormal/enhanced grain growth should enable more controlled final ceramic element structures. In this study, two different approaches were used to control single crystal development in a patterned array. These two methods are: (1) patterned solid state growth in BaTiO 3 ceramics, and (2) metal-mediated single crystal growth in BaTiO 3. With the patterned solid state growth technique, optical photolithography was used to pattern dopants as well as [001] and [110] BaTiO3 single crystal template arrays with a 1000 microm line pattern array with 1000 microm spacings. These patterns were subsequently used to control the matrix grain growth evolution and single crystal development in BaTiO3. It was shown that the growth kinetics can be controlled by a small initial grain size, atmosphere conditions, and the introduction of a dopant at selective areas/interfaces. By using a PO2 of 1x10-5 atm during high temperature heat treatment, the matrix coarsening has been limited (to roughly 2 times the initial grain size), while retaining single crystal boundary motion up to 0.5 mm during growth for dwell times up to 9 h at 1300°C. The longitudinal and lateral growth rates were optimized at 10--15 microm/h at 1300°C in a PO2 of 1x10 -5 atm for single crystal growth with limited matrix coarsening. Using these conditions, a patterned microstructure in BaTiO3 was obtained. With the metal-mediated single crystal growth technique, a novel approach for fabricating 2-2 single crystal/polymer composites with a kerf < 5 microns was demonstrated. Surface templated grain growth was used to propagate a single crystal interface into a polycrystalline BaTiO3 or Ba(Zr0.05 Ti0.95)O3 matrix with lamellar nickel layers. The grain growth evolution and texture development were studied using both [001] and [110] BaTiO3 single crystals templates. By using a PO 2 of 1x10-11 atm during high

  16. Quantifying the impact of early calcite cementation on the reservoir quality of carbonate rocks: A 3D process-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosa, Aleksandra; Wood, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    The reservoir properties of carbonate rocks are controlled by both deposition and diagenesis. The latter includes the early precipitation of calcite cements, which can exert a strong control on the evolution of subsequent diagenetic pathways. We quantify the impact of early marine cement growth in grainstones on evolving pore space by examining trends in the relationship between cementation and permeability using a 3D process-based model (Calcite3D). The model assumes varying proportions of polycrystalline and monocrystalline grain types, upon which we grow isopachous and syntaxial calcite cement types, respectively. We model two syntaxial cement shapes, compact and elongated, that approximate the geometries of typical rhombohedral calcite forms. Results demonstrate the effect of cement competition: an increasing proportion of monocrystalline grains creates stronger competition and a reduction in the impact of individual grains on final calcite cement volume and porosity. Isopachous cement is effective in closing pore throats and limiting permeability. We also show that the impact of syntaxial cement on porosity occlusion and therefore flow is highly dependent on monocrystalline grain location and the orientation of crystal axes. This demonstrates the importance of diagenetic overprint in controlling the evolution of rock properties, but also that this process can be essentially random. We also show that diagenesis alone can create notable heterogeneity in the permeability of carbonates. While Calcite3D is successful in modelling realistic changes in cement volumes and pore space morphology, modelled permeabilities (0.01 -30D) are above the range reported in reservoir grainstones due to the very high permeability of the initial synthetic sediment deposit (58.9D). Poroperm data generated by Calcite3D, however, exhibits a linear relationship between the logarithms of porosity and permeability with a high coefficient of determination, as observed in natural media.

  17. Direct flow crystal growth system

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1992-01-01

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperature, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank.

  18. The Nucleation and Growth of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining crystals of suitable size and high quality continues to be a major bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Currently, structural genomics efforts are achieving on average about a 10% success rate in going from purified protein to a deposited crystal structure. Growth of crystals in microgravity was proposed as a means of overcoming size and quality problems, which subsequently led to a major NASA effort in microgravity crystal growth, with the agency also funding research into understanding the process. Studies of the macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth process were carried out in a number of labs in an effort to understand what affected the resultant crystal quality on Earth, and how microgravity improved the process. Based upon experimental evidence, as well as simple starting assumptions, we have proposed that crystal nucleation occurs by a series of discrete self assembly steps, which 'set' the underlying crystal symmetry. This talk will review the model developed, and its origins, in our laboratory for how crystals nucleate and grow, and will then present, along with preliminary data, how we propose to use this model to improve the success rate for obtaining crystals from a given protein.

  19. Crystal growth and annealing for minimized residual stress

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing.

  20. An Apparatus for Growth of Small Crystals From Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrovic, Mico M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for crystal growth that was designed to study growth kinetics of small crystals from solutions and to obtain crystals of various substances. Describes the use of the apparatus in laboratory practical experiments in the field of crystal growth physics within the course "Solid State Physics". (JRH)

  1. Mineralogical, crystallographic, and isotopic constraints on the precipitation of aragonite and calcite at Shiqiang and other hot springs in Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian; Peng, Xiaotong

    2016-11-01

    Two active spring vent pools at Shiqiang (Yunnan Province, China) are characterized by a complex array of precipitates that coat the wall around the pool and the narrow ledges that surround the vent pool. These precipitates include arrays of aragonite crystals, calcite cone-dendrites, red spar calcite, unattached dodecahedral and rhombohedral calcite crystals, and late stage calcite that commonly coats and disguises the earlier formed precipitates. Some of the microbial mats that grow on the ledges around the pools have been partly mineralized by microspheres that are formed of Si and minor amounts of Fe. The calcite and aragonite that are interspersed with each other at all scales are both primary precipitates. Some laminae, for example, change laterally from aragonite to calcite over distances of only a few millimetres. The precipitates at Shiqiang are similar to precipitates found in and around the vent pools of other springs found in Yunnan Province, including those at Gongxiaoshe, Zhuyuan, Eryuan, and Jifei. In all cases, the δDwater and δ18Owater indicate that the spring water is of meteoric origin. These are thermogene springs with the carrier CO2 being derived largely from the mantle and reaction of the waters with bedrock. Variations in the δ13Ctravertine values indicate that the waters in these springs were mixed, to varying degrees, with cold groundwater and its soil-derived CO2. Calcite and aragonite precipitation took place once the spring waters had become supersaturated with respect to CaCO3, probably as a result of rapid CO2 degassing. These precipitates, which were not in isotopic equilibrium with the spring water, are characterized by their unusual crystal morphologies. The precipitation of calcite and aragonite, seemingly together, can probably be attributed to microscale variations in the saturation levels that are, in turn, attributable to microscale variations in the rate of CO2 degassing.

  2. Nano-structured calcite produced by micro-organisms in ancient and modern loess in Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Chen, T.; Lu, H.; Wang, X.

    2005-12-01

    The results from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission gun scanning microscopy (FEG-SEM) investigation show that there are calcite nano-fibers (CNFs) formed during pedogenic process. The CNFs are widely distributed in the loess and red clay samples of Caoxian, Luochuan, Lingtai, Lantian, and Xifeng profiles as well as the samples of modern surface loess soils in Chinese Loess Plateau. Diameters of all the NFCs are about 40 nm, the length of the CNFs ranges from tens nanometer to several micrometers. Elongation direction of NFCs is unusual near parallel (105)* or (115)*. Crystals of NFCs arrange as bird net like and lattice-like frameworks. X-ray EDS spectra show the weak peaks of magnesium, phosphorous, and sulfur. Our investigation indicates that CNFs are in pore space of loess and paleosol and made up most of carbonate except for caliche nodular layers. Concentration of NFCs in the loess layers are significantly higher than those of paleosol layers because of leaching of carbonate in the paleosol forming environment (warn and wet paleoclimate). The "nanobacteria-like CNFs are well crystalline calcite single crystals with smoothes surfaces. The morphologies of CNFs are very unusual and different from the calcite single crystals observed in most geological environments. The CNFs are directly related to microbial activities in both ancient and modern loess. It is proposed that the intervention of organic compounds derived from microbial activities control the formation of the calcite nano-fibers. Both morphology and bulk composition of CNFs indicate that the formation of the CNFs involves bio-organics derived from microorganisms in loess deposit environment. Formation conditions of the calcite nano-fibers may information about paleoclimate, paleo-environment and paleoecology. So, the discovery of CNFs in loess-paloesol sequences can provide a new route for reconstruct paleoclimate by oxygen and carbon isotope from the CNFs.

  3. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The solubility and growth mechanism of canavalin were studied, and the applicability of the Schlieren technique to protein crystal growth was investigated. Canavalin which may be crystallized from a basic solution by the addition of hydrogen (H+) ions was shown to have normal solubility characteristics over the range of temperatures (5 to 25 C) and pH (5 to 7.5) studied. The solubility data combined with growth rate data gathered from the seeded growth of canavalin crystals indicated that the growth mechanism at high supersaturation ratios (>1.28) is screw dislocation like. A Schlieren apparatus was constructed and flow patterns were observed in Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate), lysozyme, and canavalin. The critical parameters were identified as the change in density with concentration (dp/dc) and the change in index of refraction with concentration (dn/dc). Some of these values were measured for the materials listed.

  4. Selective adsorption of benzhydroxamic acid on fluorite rendering selective separation of fluorite/calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Zhiyong; Khoso, Sultan Ahmed; Gao, Jiande; Sun, Wei; Pu, Wei; Hu, Yuehua

    2018-03-01

    Fluorite, a chief source of fluorine in the nature, usually coexists with calcite mineral in ore deposits. Worldwide, flotation techniques with a selective collector and/or a selective depressant are commonly preferred for the separation of fluorite from calcite. In the present study, an attempt was made to use benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) as a collector for the selective separation of fluorite from calcite without using any depressant. Results obtained from the flotation experiments for single mineral and mixed binary minerals revealed that the BHA has a good selective collecting ability for the fluorite when 50 mg/L of BHA was used at pH of 9. The results from the zeta potential and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the BHA easily chemisorbs onto the fluorite as compared to calcite. Crystal chemistry calculations showed the larger Ca density and the higher Ca activity on fluorite surface mainly account for the selective adsorption of BHA on fluorite, leading to the selective separation of fluorite from calcite. Moreover, a stronger hydrogen bonding with BHA and the weaker electrostatic repulsion with BHA- also contribute to the stronger interaction of BHA species with fluorite surface.

  5. Theory of the intermediate stage of crystal growth with applications to insulin crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, D. A.

    2017-07-01

    A theory for the intermediate stage of crystal growth, where two defining equations one for population continuity and another for mass-balance, is used to study the kinetics of the supersaturation decay, the homogeneous nucleation rate, the linear growth rate and the final distribution of crystal sizes for the crystallization of bovine and porcine insulin from solution. The cited experimental reports suggest that the crystal linear growth rate is directly proportional to the square of the insulin concentration in solution for bovine insulin and to the cube of concentration for porcine. In a previous work, it was shown that the above mentioned system could be solved for the case where the growth rate is directly proportional to the normalized supersaturation. Here a more general solution is presented valid for cases where the growth rate is directly proportional to the normalized supersaturation raised to the power of any positive integer. The resulting expressions for the time dependent normalized supersaturation and crystal size distribution are compared with experimental reports for insulin crystallization. An approximation for the maximum crystal size at the end of the intermediate stage is derived. The results suggest that the largest crystal size in the distribution at the end of the intermediate stage is maximized when nucleation is restricted to be only homogeneous. Further, the largest size in the final distribution depends only weakly upon the initial supersaturation.

  6. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The solubility and growth of the protein canavalin, and the application of the schlieren technique to study fluid flow in protein crystal growth systems were investigated. These studies have resulted in the proposal of a model to describe protein crystal growth and the preliminary plans for a long-term space flight experiment. Canavalin, which may be crystallized from a basic solution by the addition of hydrogen (H+) ions, was shown to have normal solubility characteristics over the range of temperatures (5 to 25 C) and pH (5 to 7.5) studies. The solubility data combined with growth rate data gathered from the seeded growth of canavalin crystals indicated that the growth rate limiting step is a screw dislocation mechanism. A schlieren apparatus was constructed and flow patterns were observed in Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate), lysozyme, and canavalin. The critical parameters were identified as the change in density with concentration (dp/dc) and the change in index of refraction with concentration (dn/dc). Some of these values were measured for the materials listed. The data for lyrozyme showed non-linearities in plots of optical properties and density vs. concentration. In conjunction with with W. A. Tiller, a model based on colloid stability theory was proposed to describe protein crystallization. The model was used to explain observations made by ourselves and others. The results of this research has lead to the development for a preliminary design for a long-term, low-g experiment. The proposed apparatus is univeral and capable of operation under microprocessor control.

  7. Hydrothermal crystal growth of oxides for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Colin David

    2007-12-01

    The manipulation of light has proven to be an integral part of today's technology-based society. In particular, there is great interest in obtaining coherent radiation in all regions of the optical spectrum to advance technology in military, medical, industrial, scientific and consumer fields. Exploring new crystal growth techniques as well as the growth of new optical materials is critical in the advancement of solid state optics. Surprisingly, the academic world devotes little attention to the growth of large crystals. This shortcoming has left gaps in the optical spectrum inaccessible by solid state devices. This dissertation explores the hydrothermal crystal growth of materials that could fill two such gaps. The first gap exists in the deep-UV region, particularly below 200 nm. Some materials such as LiB3O5 and beta-BaB2O4 can generate coherent light at wavelengths as low as 205 nm. The growth of these materials was explored to investigate the feasibility of the hydrothermal method as a new technique for growing these crystals. Particular attention was paid to the descriptive chemistry surrounding these systems, and several novel structures were elucidated. The study was also extended to the growth of materials that could be used for the generation of coherent light as low as 155 nm. Novel synthetic schemes for Sr2Be2B2O7 and KBe2BO 3F2 were developed and the growth of large crystals was explored. An extensive study of the structures, properties and crystal growth of related compounds, RbBe2BO3F2 and CsBe2BO 3F2, was also undertaken. Optimization of a number of parameters within this family of compounds led to the hydrothermal growth of large, high quality single crystal at rates suitable for large-scale growth. The second gap in technology is in the area of high average power solid state lasers emitting in the 1 mum and eye-safe (>1.5 mum) regions. A hydrothermal technique was developed to grow high quality crystals of Sc 2O3 and Sc2O3 doped with suitable

  8. Defects in Calcite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-13

    AD-A245 645 A TRIDENT SCHOLAR PROJECT REPORT NO. 181 "DEFECTS IN CALCITE " DTTC %N FEB 5-1912 UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 92-02841...report; no. 181 (1991) "DEFECTS IN CALCITE " A Trident Scholar Project Report by Midshipman Anthony J. Kotarski, Class of 1991 U. S. Naval Academy Annapolis...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 13 May 1991 Final 1990/91 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE s. FUNDING NUMBERS DEFECTS IN CALCITE 6. AUTHOR(S) Anthony J. Kotarski 7

  9. The kinetics of dolomite reaction rim growth under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. G.; Abart, R.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    During burial and exhumation, rocks are simultaneously exposed to metamorphic reactions and tectonic stresses. Therefore, the reaction rate of newly formed minerals may depend on chemical and mechanical driving forces. Here, we investigate the reaction kinetics of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) rim growth by solid-state reactions experiments on oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions. Cylindrical samples of 3-5 mm length and 7 mm diameter were drilled and polished perpendicular to the rhombohedral cleavage planes of natural clear crystals. The tests were performed using a Paterson-type deformation apparatus at P = 400 MPa confining pressure, temperatures, T, between 750 and 850°C, and reaction durations, t, of 2 - 146 h to calculate the kinetic parameters of dolomite rim growth under isostatic stress conditions. For non-isostatic reaction experiments we applied in addition differential stresses, σ, up to 40 MPa perpendicular to the contact interface at T = 750°C for 4 - 171 h duration, initiating minor inelastic deformation of calcite. The thickness of the resulting dolomite reaction rims increases linearly with the square root of time, indicating a diffusion-controlled reaction. The rims consist of two different textural domains. Granular dolomite grains (≈ 2 -5 μm grain size) form next to calcite and elongated palisade-shaped grains (1-6 μm diameter) grow perpendicular to the magnesite interface. Texture measurements with the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicate that the orientations of dolomite grains are mainly influenced by the orientation of the calcite educt crystal, in particular in the granular rim. To some extent, the texture of dolomite palisades is also influenced by the orientation of magnesite. The thickness of the two individual layers increases with temperature. At 400 MPa isostatic pressure, T = 750°C and t = 29 hours, a 5 μm thick granular dolomite layer

  10. Czochralski crystal growth: Modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudukovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Srivastava, R. K.; Dorsey, D.

    1986-01-01

    The modeling study of Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth is reported. The approach was to relate in a quantitative manner, using models based on first priniciples, crystal quality to operating conditions and geometric variables. The finite element method is used for all calculations.

  11. A study of crystal growth by solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of crystal growth by solution technique was studied. A low temperature solution crystal growth setup was developed. Crystals of triglycine sulfate (TGS) were grown using this arrangement. Some additional tasks were performed toward fabrication of experiments for future space flight.

  12. Method of Promoting Single Crystal Growth During Melt Growth of Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The method of the invention promotes single crystal growth during fabrication of melt growth semiconductors. A growth ampoule and its tip have a semiconductor source material placed therein. The growth ampoule is placed in a first thermal environment that raises the temperature of the semiconductor source material to its liquidus temperature. The growth ampoule is then transitioned to a second thermal environment that causes the semiconductor source material in the growth ampoule's tip to attain a temperature that is below the semiconductor source material's solidus temperature. The growth ampoule so-transitioned is then mechanically perturbed to induce single crystal growth at the growth ampoule's tip.

  13. Cretaceous joints in southeastern Canada: dating calcite-filled fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, David; Spalding, Jennifer; Gautheron, Cécile; Sarda, Philippe; Davis, Donald; Petts, Duane

    2017-04-01

    To resolve the timing of brittle tectonism is a challenge since the classical chronometers required for analyses are not often in equilibrium with the surrounding material or simply absent. In this study, we propose to couple LA-ICP-MS U-Pb and (U-Th)/He dating with geochemical proxies in vein calcite to tackle this dilemma. We examined intracratonic Middle Ordovician limestone bedrock that overlies Mesoproterozoic crystalline basement, which are cut by NE-trending fault zones that have historic M4-5 earthquakes along their trace. E-W to NE-SW vertical joint sets, the relatively youngest stress recorded in the bedrock, possess 1-7 mm thick calcite veins that seal fractures or coat fracture surfaces. The veins possess intragranular calcite that are lined with fine-grained calcite along the vein margin and can exhibit µm- to mm-scale offset (e.g. displaced fossil fragments in host rock). Calcite d18O and d13C values are analogous to the bulk composition of Middle to Late Ordovician limestones, and suggest vein formation from a source dominated by connate fluids. The calcite contain trails of fluid inclusions commonly along fractures, and 3He/4He analyses indicate a primitive, deep fluid signature (R/Ra: 0.5-2.7). Trace element geochemistry of the calcite is highly variable, generally following the elevated HREE and lower LREE of continental crust trends but individual crystals from a single vein may vary by three orders of magnitude. LA-ICP-MS geochemical traverse across veins show elevated concentrations along (sub)grain boundaries and the vein-host rock contact. Despite abundant helium concentrations, (U-Th)/He dating was unsuccessful yielding highly dispersed dates likely from excess helium derived from the fluid inclusions. However, LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating on calcite separated from the veins yielded model ages of 110.7 ± 6.8 Ma (MSWD: 0.53; n: 16) to 81.4 ± 8.3 Ma (MSWD: 2.6; n: 17). Since all veins are from the same ENE-trend, we regressed all the calcite dates

  14. Laboratory studies of crystal growth in magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.; Welsch, B. T.; First, E.; Shea, T.

    2012-12-01

    The proportions, compositions, and interrelationships among crystalline phases and glasses in volcanic rocks cryptically record pre-eruptive intensive conditions, the timing of changes in crystallization environment, and the devolatilization history of eruptive ascent. These parameters are recognized as important monitoring tools at active volcanoes and interpreting geologic events at prehistoric and remote eruptions, thus motivating our attempts to understand the information preserved in crystals through an experimental appoach. We are performing laboratory experiments in mafic, felsic, and intermediate composition magmas to study the mechanisms of crystal growth in thermochemical environments relevant to volcanic environments. We target features common to natural crystals in igneous rocks for our experimental studies of rapid crystal growth phenomena: (1) Surface curvature. Do curved interfaces and spongy cores represent evidence of dissolution (i.e., are they corrosion features), or do they record the transition from dendritic to polyhedral morphology? (2) Trapped melt inclusions. Do trapped liquids represent bulk (i.e., far-field) liquids, boundary layer liquids, or something intermediate, depending on individual species diffusivity? What sequence of crystal growth rates leads to preservation of sealed melt inclusions? (3) Subgrain boundaries. Natural phenocrysts commonly exhibit tabular subgrain regions distinguished by small angle lattice misorientations or "dislocation lamellae" and undulatory extinction. Might these crystal defects be produced as dendrites undergo ripening? (4) Clusters. Contacting clusters of polymineralic crystals are the building blocks of cumulates, and are ubiquitous features of mafic volcanic rocks. Are plagioclase and clinopyroxene aligned crystallographically, suggesting an epitaxial (surface energy) relationship? (5) Log-normal size distribution. What synthetic cooling histories produce "natural" distributions of crystal sizes, and

  15. Growth of urea crystals by physical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, R. S.; Route, R. K.; Kao, T.-M.

    1985-01-01

    This work demonstrates that high optical quality crystals of urea can be grown by the physical vapor transport method. The unique features of this method are compared with growth from methanol/water solutions. High growth rates, exceeding 2.5 mm/day, were achieved, and cm-size optical quality single crystals were obtained. Details of the growth technique and the physical properties of the crystals are presented.

  16. Development and melt growth of novel scintillating halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Yokota, Yuui; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Kral, Robert; Kamada, Kei; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Ohashi, Yuji; Arakawa, Mototaka; Chani, Valery I.; Kochurikhin, Vladimir V.; Yamaji, Akihiro; Andrey, Medvedev; Nikl, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Melt growth of scintillating halide crystals is reviewed. The vertical Bridgman growth technique is still considered as very popular method that enables production of relatively large and commercially attractive crystals. On the other hand, the micro-pulling-down method is preferable when fabrication of small samples, sufficient for preliminary characterization of their optical and/or scintillation performance, is required. Moreover, bulk crystal growth is also available using the micro-pulling-down furnace. The examples of growths of various halide crystals by industrially friendly melt growth techniques including Czochralski and edge-defined film-fed growth methods are also discussed. Finally, traveling molten zone growth that in some degree corresponds to horizontal zone melting is briefly overviewed.

  17. Kinetic Roughening Transition and Energetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    Interpretation of lysozyme crystal growth rates using well-established physical theories enabled the discovery of a phenomenon possibly indicative of kinetic roughening. For example, lysozyme crystals grown above a critical supersaturation sigma, (where supersaturation sigma = ln c/c(sub eq), c = the protein concentration and c(sub eq) = the solubility concentration) exhibit microscopically rough surfaces due to the continuous addition of growth units anywhere on the surface of a crystal. The rate of crystal growth, V(sub c), for the continuous growth process is determined by the continuous flux of macromolecules onto a unit area of the crystal surface, a, from a distance, xi, per unit time due to diffusion, and a probability of attachment onto the crystal surface, expressed. Based upon models applied, the energetics of lysozyme crystal growth was determined. The magnitudes of the energy barriers of crystal growth for both the (110) and (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals are compared. Finally, evidence supportive of the kinetic roughening hypothesis is presented.

  18. Shallow melt apparatus for semicontinuous czochralski crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  19. Bridgman growth of large-aperture yttrium calcium oxyborate crystal

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wu, Anhua, E-mail: wuanhua@mail.sic.ac.cn; Jiang, Linwen; Qian, Guoxing

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► YCOB is a novel non-linear optical crystal possessing good thermal, mechanical and nonlinear optical properties. ► Large size crystal growth is key technology question for YCOB crystal. ► YCOB crystals 3 in. in diameter were grown with modified vertical Bridgman method. ► It is a more effective growth method to obtain large size and high quality YCOB crystal. -- Abstract: Large-aperture yttrium calcium oxyborate YCa{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (YCOB) crystals with 3 in. in diameter were grown with modified vertical Bridgman method, and the large crystal plate (63 mm × 68 mm × 20 mm) was harvested formore » high-average power frequency conversion system. The crack, facet growth and spiral growth can be effectively controlled in the as-grown crystal, and Bridgman method displays more effective in obtain large size and high quality YCOB crystal plate than Czochralski technique.« less

  20. Effect of organic ligands on Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during low-temperature precipitation of calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Purgstaller, Bettina; Baldermann, Andre; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Calcite growth experiments have been performed at 25 oC and 1 bar pCO2 in the presence of aqueous Mg and six organic ligands in the concentration range from 10-5 to 10-3 M. These experiments were performed in order to quantify the effect of distinct organic ligands on the Mg partitioning and Mg stable isotope fractionation during its incorporation in calcite at similar growth rates normalized to total surface area. The organic ligands used in this study comprise of (i) acetate acid, (ii) citrate, (iii) glutamate, (iv) salicylate, (v) glycine and (vi) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), containing carboxyl- and amino-groups. These fuctional groups are required for bacterial activity and growth as well as related to biotic and abiotic mineralization processes occurring in sedimentary and earliest diagenetic aquatic environments (e.g. soil, cave, lacustrine, marine). The results obtained in this study indicate that the presence of organic ligands promotes an increase in the partition coefficient of Mg in calcite (DMg = (Mg/Ca)calcite (Mg/Ca)fluid). This behaviour can be explained by the temporal formation of aqueous Mg-ligand complexes that are subsequently adsorbed on the calcite surfaces and thereby reducing the active growth sites of calcite. The increase of DMg values as a function of the supersaturation degree of calcite in the fluid phase can be described by the linear equation LogDMg =0.3694 (±0.0329)×SIcalcite - 1.9066 (±0.0147); R2=0.92 In contrast, the presence of organic ligands, with exception of citrate, does not significantly affect the Mg isotope fractionation factor between calcite and reactive fluid (Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid = -2.5 ±0.1). Citrate likely exhibits larger fractionation between the Mg-ligand complexes and free aqueous Mg2+, compared to the other organic ligands studied in this work, as evidenced by the smaller Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid values. These results indicate that in Earth's surface calcite precipitating environments that are

  1. Nanoparticles Incorporated inside Single-Crystals: Enhanced Fluorescent Properties

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yujing; Zang, Huidong; Wang, Ling; ...

    2016-09-25

    Incorporation of guest materials inside single-crystalline hosts leads to single-crystal composites that have become more and more frequently seen in both biogenic and synthetic crystals. The unique composite structure together with long-range ordering promises special properties that are, however, less often demonstrated. In this study, we examine the fluorescent properties of quantum dots (QDs) and polymer dots (Pdots) encapsulated inside the hosts of calcite single-crystals. Two CdTe QDs and two Pdots are incorporated into growing calcite crystals, as the QDs and Pdots are dispersed in the crystallization media of agarose gels. As a result, enhanced fluorescent properties are obtained frommore » the QDs and Pdots inside calcite single-crystals with greatly improved photostability and significantly prolonged fluorescence lifetime, compared to those in solutions and gels. Particularly, the fluorescence lifetime increases by 0.5-1.6 times after the QDs or Pdots are incorporated. The enhanced fluorescent properties indicate the advantages of encapsulation by single-crystal hosts that provide dense shells to isolate the fluorescent nanoparticles from atmosphere. As such, this work has implications for advancing the research of single-crystal composites toward their functional design.« less

  2. Application of enthalpy model for floating zone silicon crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauze, A.; Bergfelds, K.; Virbulis, J.

    2017-09-01

    A 2D simplified crystal growth model based on the enthalpy method and coupled with a low-frequency harmonic electromagnetic model is developed to simulate the silicon crystal growth near the external triple point (ETP) and crystal melting on the open melting front of a polycrystalline feed rod in FZ crystal growth systems. Simulations of the crystal growth near the ETP show significant influence of the inhomogeneities of the EM power distribution on the crystal growth rate for a 4 in floating zone (FZ) system. The generated growth rate fluctuations are shown to be larger in the system with higher crystal pull rate. Simulations of crystal melting on the open melting front of the polycrystalline rod show the development of melt-filled grooves at the open melting front surface. The distance between the grooves is shown to grow with the increase of the skin-layer depth in the solid material.

  3. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    signals occur with characteristics consistent with phosphate monoesters. The results of this study indicate that trace- to minor concentrations of dissolved organic molecules can be effectively taken up during calcite precipitation and incorporated in the structure, leaving a resilient record of materials present during crystallization.

  4. Method for solid state crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Nolas, George S.; Beekman, Matthew K.

    2013-04-09

    A novel method for high quality crystal growth of intermetallic clathrates is presented. The synthesis of high quality pure phase crystals has been complicated by the simultaneous formation of both clathrate type-I and clathrate type-II structures. It was found that selective, phase pure, single-crystal growth of type-I and type-II clathrates can be achieved by maintaining sufficient partial pressure of a chemical constituent during slow, controlled deprivation of the chemical constituent from the primary reactant. The chemical constituent is slowly removed from the primary reactant by the reaction of the chemical constituent vapor with a secondary reactant, spatially separated from the primary reactant, in a closed volume under uniaxial pressure and heat to form the single phase pure crystals.

  5. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The overall scientific goals and rationale for growing protein crystals in microgravity are discussed. Data on the growth of human serum albumin crystals which were produced during the First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) are presented. Potential scientific advantages of the utilization of Space Station Freedom are discussed.

  6. Optical diagnostics of mercuric iodide crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Arnold; Morgan, Steven H.; Silberman, Enrique; Nason, Donald

    1991-12-01

    Two optical methods were recently developed for in situ monitoring of the growth process of mercuric iodide crystals. The first method uses resonance fluorescence spectroscopy (RFS) for the determination of iodine vapor present in the growth ampule, which is an important parameter in determining the stoichiometry, and therefore the quality of the crystals. The second method, reflectance spectroscopy thermometry (RST) measures the crystal face temperature with a present accuracy of +/- 1.5 degree(s)C.

  7. Structural analysis of the industrial grade calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rajiv P.; Raval, Kamlesh G.

    2017-05-01

    The chemical, optical and structural characterization of the industrial grade Calcite by EDAX, FT-IR and XRD. EDAX is a widely used technique to analyze the chemical components in a material, FT-IR stands for Fourier Transform Infra-Red, the preferred method of infrared spectroscopy. The resultant spectrum represents the molecular absorption and transmission, creating a molecular fingerprint of the sample, The atomic planes of a crystal cause an incident beam of X-rays to interfere with one another as they leave the crystal. The phenomenon is called X ray diffraction.(XRD). Data analysis of EDAX, FT-IR and XRD has been carried out with help of various instruments and software and find out the results of the these industrial grade materials which are mostly used in ceramics industries

  8. Space manufacturing in an automated crystal growth facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Alberta W.; Herrmann, Melody C.; Nelson, Pamela J.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of a Space Station Freedom-based robotic laboratory system for crystal growth experiments; the robot must interface with both the experimental apparatus and such human input as may be required for control and display. The goal of the system is the simultaneous growth of several hundred protein crystals in microgravity. The robot possesses six degrees-of-freedom, allowing it to efficiently manipulate the cultured crystals as well as their respective growth cells; the crystals produced are expected to be of sufficiently high quality for complete structural determination on the basis of XRD.

  9. Illusory spirals and loops in crystal growth

    PubMed Central

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G.; Zhu, Zina; Bhandari, Misha; Song, Pengcheng; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of dislocation-controlled crystal growth identifies a continuous spiral step with an emergent lattice displacement on a crystal surface; a mechanistic corollary is that closely spaced, oppositely winding spirals merge to form concentric loops. In situ atomic force microscopy of step propagation on pathological l-cystine crystals did indeed show spirals and islands with step heights of one lattice displacement. We show by analysis of the rates of growth of smaller steps only one molecule high that the major morphological spirals and loops are actually consequences of the bunching of the smaller steps. The morphology of the bunched steps actually inverts the predictions of the theory: Spirals arise from pairs of dislocations, loops from single dislocations. Only through numerical simulation of the growth is it revealed how normal growth of anisotropic layers of molecules within the highly symmetrical crystals can conspire to create features in apparent violation of the classic theory. PMID:24101507

  10. Modified floating-zone growth of organic single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, S.; Chen, C. P.

    1994-04-01

    For organic materials floating-zone crystal growth is superior to other melt growth processes in two significant respects: (1) the absence of crucible-induced mechanical damage and (2) minimum heating-induced chemical degradation. Due to the rather low surface tension of organic melts, however, floating-zone crystal growth under normal gravity has not been possible so far but microgravity is ideal for such a purpose. With the help of a modified floating-zone technique, organic single crystals of small cross-sections were test grown first under normal gravity. These small crystals were round and rectangular single crystals of benzil and salol, up to about 7 cm long and 6 mm in diameter or 9 mm × 3 mm in cross-section.

  11. Optical diagnostics of mercuric iodide crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, A.; Morgan, S. H.; Silberman, E.; Nason, D.

    Two optical methods were recently developed for in situ monitoring of the growth process of mercuric iodide crystals. The first method uses resonance fluorescence spectroscopy (RFS) for the determination of iodine vapor present in the growth ampule, which is an important parameter in determining the stoichiometry, and therefore the quality of the crystals. The second method, Reflectance Spectroscopy Thermometry (RST) measures the crystal face temperature with a percent accuracy of plus or minus 1.5 C.

  12. Bulk crystal growth of Ga2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramata, Akito; Koshi, Kimiyoshi; Watanabe, Shinya; Yamaoka, Yu; Masui, Takekazu; Yamakoshi, Shigenobu

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes the bulk crystal growth of β-Ga2O3 using edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) process. We first describe the method of the crystal growth and show that large-size crystal with width of up to 6 inch can be grown. Then, we discuss the way to control electrical properties. In the discussion, we give some experimental results of residual impurity measurement, intentional doping using Si and Sn for n-type doping and Fe for insulating doping.

  13. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    During the fifth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) Characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions, these efforts are summarized in Section 2; (2) Crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme, our observation on the dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities has been summarized in a manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; (3) Numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics, for a detailed summary of this work see the manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; and (4) Light scattering studies, this work has been summarized in a manuscript that has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Chemical Physics.

  14. Colloidal crystal growth monitored by Bragg diffraction interference fringes.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Justin J; Tikhonov, Alexander; Asher, Sanford A

    2010-10-15

    We monitored the crystal growth kinetics of crystallization of a shear melted crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The fcc CCA heterogeneously nucleates at the flow cell wall surface. We examined the evolution of the (1 1 1) Bragg diffraction peak, and, for the first time, quantitatively monitored growth by measuring the temporal evolution of the Bragg diffraction interference fringes. Modeling of the evolution of the fringe patterns exposes the time dependence of the increasing crystal thickness. The initial diffusion-driven linear growth is followed by ripening-driven growth. Between 80 and 90 microM NaCl concentrations the fcc crystals first linearly grow at rates between 1.9 and 4.2 microm/s until they contact homogeneously nucleated crystals in the bulk. At lower salt concentrations interference fringes are not visible because the strong electrostatic interactions between particles result in high activation barriers, preventing defect annealing and leading to a lower crystal quality. The fcc crystals melt to a liquid phase at >90 microM NaCl concentrations. Increasing NaCl concentrations slow the fcc CCA growth rate consistent with the expectation of the classical Wilson-Frenkel growth theory. The final thickness of wall-nucleated CCA, that is determined by the competition between growth of heterogeneously and homogenously nucleated CCA, increases with higher NaCl concentrations. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) Flight on USML-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Bac, Nurcan; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Guray, Ipek; Marceau, Michelle; Sacco, Teran L.; Whalen, Leah M.

    1997-01-01

    The extensive use of zeolites and their impact on the world's economy has resulted in many efforts to characterize their structure, and improve the knowledge base for nucleation and growth of these crystals. The zeolite crystal growth (ZCG) experiment on USML-2 aimed to enhance the understanding of nucleation and growth of zeolite crystals, while attempting to provide a means of controlling the defect concentration in microgravity. Zeolites A, X, Beta, and Silicalite were grown during the 16 day - USML-2 mission. The solutions where the nucleation event was controlled yielded larger and more uniform crystals of better morphology and purity than their terrestrial/control counterparts. The external surfaces of zeolite A, X, and Silicalite crystals grown in microgravity were smoother (lower surface roughness) than their terrestrial controls. Catalytic studies with zeolite Beta indicate that crystals grown in space exhibit a lower number of Lewis acid sites located in micropores. This suggests fewer structural defects for crystals grown in microgravity. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM) of zeolite Beta crystals also show that crystals grown in microgravity were free of line defects while terrestrial/controls had substantial defects.

  16. Potential productivity benefits of float-zone versus Czochralski crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, T.

    1985-01-01

    Efficient mass production of single-crystal silicon is necessary for the efficient silicon solar arrays needed in the coming decade. However, it is anticipated that there will be difficulty growing such volumes of crystals using conventional Czochralski (Cz) methods. While the productivity of single crystals might increase with a crystal diameter increase, there are two obstacles to the mass production of large diameter Czochralski crystals, the long production cycle due to slow growth rate and the high heat requirements of the furnaces. Also counterproductive would be the large resistivity gradient along the growth direction of the crystals due to impurity concentration. Comparison between Float zone (FZ) and Cz crystal growth on the basis of a crystal 150 mm in diameter is on an order of two to four times in favor of the FZ method. This advantage results from high growth rates and steady-state growth while maintaining a dislocation-free condition and impurity segregation.

  17. Protein Crystal Growth Dynamics and Impurity Incorporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.; Thomas, Bill

    2000-01-01

    The general concepts and theories of crystal growth are proven to work for biomolecular crystallization. This allowed us to extract basic parameters controlling growth kinetics - free surface energy, alpha, and kinetic coefficient, beta, for steps. Surface energy per molecular site in thermal units, alpha(omega)(sup 2/3)/kT approx. = 1, is close to the one for inorganic crystals in solution (omega is the specific molecular volume, T is the temperature). Entropic restrictions on incorporation of biomolecules into the lattice reduce the incorporation rate, beta, by a factor of 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 3) relative to inorganic crystals. A dehydration barrier of approx. 18kcal/mol may explain approx. 10(exp -6) times difference between frequencies of adding a molecule to the lattice and Brownian attempts to do so. The latter was obtained from AFM measurements of step and kink growth rates on orthorhombic lysozyme. Protein and many inorganic crystals typically do not belong to the Kossel type, thus requiring a theory to account for inequivalent molecular positions within its unit cell. Orthorhombic lysozyme will serve as an example of how to develop such a theory. Factors deteriorating crystal quality - stress and strain, mosaicity, molecular disorder - will be reviewed with emphasis on impurities. Dimers in ferritin and lysozyme and acetylated lysozyme, are microheterogeneous i.e. nearly isomorphic impurities that are shown to be preferentially trapped by tetragonal lysozyme and ferritin crystals, respectively. The distribution coefficient, K defined as a ratio of the (impurity/protein) ratios in crystal and in solution is a measure of trapping. For acetylated lysoyzme, K = 2.15 or, 3.42 for differently acetylated forms, is independent of both the impurity and the crystallizing protein concentration. The reason is that impurity flux to the surface is constant while the growth rate rises with supersaturation. About 3 times lower dimer concentration in space grown ferritin and

  18. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tamain, C., E-mail: christelle.tamain@cea.fr; Arab-Chapelet, B.; Rivenet, M.

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O, Th(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, M{sub 2+x}[Pu{sup IV}{sub 2−x}Pu{sup III}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 5}]·nH{sub 2}O and M{sub 1−x}[Pu{sup III}{sub 1−x}Pu{sup IV}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·H{sub 2}O]·nH{sub 2}O. It is the first timemore » that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV–visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds. - Graphical abstract: Two new single crystal growth methods dedicated to actinide oxalate compounds. - Highlights: • Use of diester as oxalate precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Use of actinide oxide as precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Crystal growth of Pu(III) and Am(III) oxalates. • Crystal growth of mixed Pu(III)/Pu(IV) oxalates.« less

  19. Transformation and crystallization energetics of synthetic and biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Radha, A V; Forbes, Tori Z; Killian, Christopher E; Gilbert, P U P A; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-09-21

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC → less metastable hydrated ACC ⇒ anhydrous ACC ∼ biogenic anhydrous ACC ⇒ vaterite → aragonite → calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO(2) sequestration.

  20. Microbial dissolution of calcite at T = 28 °C and ambient pCO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; Wu, Lingling

    2009-04-01

    This study used batch reactors to quantify the mechanisms and rates of calcite dissolution in the presence and absence of a single heterotrophic bacterial species ( Burkholderia fungorum). Experiments were conducted at T = 28°C and ambient pCO 2 over time periods spanning either 21 or 35 days. Bacteria were supplied with minimal growth media containing either glucose or lactate as a C source, NH 4+ as an N source, and H 2PO 4- as a P source. Combining stoichiometric equations for microbial growth with an equilibrium mass-balance model of the H 2O-CO 2-CaCO 3 system demonstrates that B. fungorum affected calcite dissolution by modifying pH and alkalinity during utilization of ionic N and C species. Uptake of NH 4+ decreased pH and alkalinity, whereas utilization of lactate, a negatively charged organic anion, increased pH and alkalinity. Calcite in biotic glucose-bearing reactors dissolved by simultaneous reaction with H 2CO 3 generated by dissolution of atmospheric CO 2 (H 2CO 3 + CaCO 3 → Ca 2+ + 2HCO 3-) and H + released during NH 4+ uptake (H + + CaCO 3 → Ca 2+ + HCO 3-). Reaction with H 2CO 3 and H + supplied ˜45% and 55% of the total Ca 2+ and ˜60% and 40% of the total HCO 3-, respectively. The net rate of microbial calcite dissolution in the presence of glucose and NH 4+ was ˜2-fold higher than that observed for abiotic control experiments where calcite dissolved only by reaction with H 2CO 3. In lactate bearing reactors, most H + generated by NH 4+ uptake reacted with HCO 3- produced by lactate oxidation to yield CO 2 and H 2O. Hence, calcite in biotic lactate-bearing reactors dissolved by reaction with H 2CO 3 at a net rate equivalent to that calculated for abiotic control experiments. This study suggests that conventional carbonate equilibria models can satisfactorily predict the bulk fluid chemistry resulting from microbe-calcite interactions, provided that the ionic forms and extent of utilization of N and C sources can be constrained. Because

  1. Crystal growth kinetics of triblock Janus colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart, Wesley F.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2018-03-01

    We measure the kinetics of crystal growth from a melt of triblock Janus colloids using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We assess the impact of interaction anisotropy by systematically varying the size of the attractive patches from 40% to 100% coverage, finding substantially different growth behaviors in the two limits. With isotropic particles, the interface velocity is directly proportional to the subcooling, in agreement with previous studies. With highly anisotropic particles, the growth curves are well approximated by using a power law with exponent and prefactor that depend strongly on the particular surface geometry and patch fraction. This nonlinear growth appears correlated to the roughness of the solid-liquid interface, with the strongest growth inhibition occurring for the smoothest crystal faces. We conclude that crystal growth for patchy particles does not conform to the typical collision-limited mechanism, but is instead an activated process in which the rate-limiting step is the collective rotation of particles into the proper orientation. Finally, we show how differences in the growth kinetics could be leveraged to achieve kinetic control over polymorph growth, either enhancing or suppressing metastable phases near solid-solid coexistence lines.

  2. Modeling Czochralski growth of oxide crystals for piezoelectric and optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelian, C.; Duffar, T.

    2018-05-01

    Numerical modeling is applied to investigate the impact of crystal and crucible rotation on the flow pattern and crystal-melt interface shape in Czochralski growth of oxide semi-transparent crystals used for piezoelectric and optical applications. Two cases are simulated in the present work: the growth of piezoelectric langatate (LGT) crystals of 3 cm in diameter in an inductive furnace, and the growth of sapphire crystals of 10 cm in diameter in a resistive configuration. The numerical results indicate that the interface shape depends essentially on the internal radiative heat exchanges in the semi-transparent crystals. Computations performed by applying crystal/crucible rotation show that the interface can be flattened during LGT growth, while flat-interface growth of large diameter sapphire crystals may not be possible.

  3. Distribution of Minor Elements in Calcite From the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. D.; Whelan, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Calcite is sporadically distributed in fractures and cavities in the volcanic rocks that form the 500- to 700-m-thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. Previous work has shown that the calcite precipitated from water moving downward through the unsaturated zone since the volcanic rocks were emplaced approximately 13 Ma. Calcite thus serves as a proxy for the chemistry and amounts of past percolation, two parameters that are important in predictions of the future behavior of the potential radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Latest calcite, which began forming between approximately 5 and 2 Ma, typically displays fine-scale growth zoning defined by distributions of Mn (inferred from cathodoluminescence), Mg, and Sr. Electron microprobe (EPMA) mapping of outermost calcite reveals Mg growth zoning1 and higher overall concentrations of Mg in late calcite than in older calcite. Micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) maps were obtained by slow rastering of the samples over a 100-watt X-ray source collimated through a final aperture of 100 μ m. Although the spatial resolution of the micro-XRF mapping is much less than that of EPMA, this technique reveals distributions of some elements to which EPMA is less sensitive. Micro-XRF maps show that Sr is spatially correlated with Mg; Sr concentrations range to 500 μ g/g at the resolution of the 100-μ m collimator. Because both Mg and Sr have similar calcite-water distribution coefficients much less than one, the Mg/Sr in calcite reflects the Mg/Sr of the water that precipitated the calcite. The distribution coefficient for Mn is greater than one and variations in Mn are not correlated with Mg and Sr. Covariation of Mg and Sr in the percolating water may be explained by reactions that affect the rate of uptake of chemical constituents from the overlying rock and soil, and/or evaporation. Late calcite has lower δ 13C values, probably due to a regional change from wetter to drier climate conditions. The higher Mg and

  4. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-resolution microscopic interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been developed. Growth or dissolution of a crystal can be resolved with a long-term depth resolution of 200 A and a lateral resolution of 2 microns. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the interfacial displacement with high local depth resolution has yielded several novel results. We have found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) depending on the impurity content of the solution, the growth step density is either greater or lower at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na plus and Cl minus ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed, to interpret the large body of data in unified way. The results strongly suggest that (1) the ion to lysozyne ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter electron microscopy results appear to confirm this finding, which could have far-reaching consequences for x-ray diffraction studies. A computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies and our kinetics data for the growth of lysozyme. The results show that even in the small cell employed, protein concentration nonuniformities and gravity-driven solutal convection can be significant. The calculated convection velocities are of the same order to magnitude as those found in earlier experiments. As expected, convective transport, i.e., at Og, lysozyme crystal growth remains kinetically limited. The salt distribution in the crystal is predicted to be non-uniform at both 1g and 0g, as a consequence of protein depletion in the solution. Static and

  5. Purification, crystal growth and characterization of CdSe single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, A.; Henderson, D. O.; Morgan, S. H.; Silberman, E.

    1991-02-01

    CdSe single crystals have been grown from the stoichiometric melt and from Se rich solutions. Here we report the first mid and far infrared spectra of CdSe crystals free of any known impurity bands. Previous studies of the lattice vibrational properties of CdSe crystals have shown the presence of two bands at 538 and 270 cm -1. Modifications in the purification and crystal growth conditions lead us to assign these two bands to a sulfur impurity. Low temperature photoluminescence spectra are also presented and discussed.

  6. Method for the growth of large low-defect single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor); Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Trunek, Andrew J. (Inventor); Spry, David J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method and the benefits resulting from the product thereof are disclosed for the growth of large, low-defect single-crystals of tetrahedrally-bonded crystal materials. The process utilizes a uniquely designed crystal shape whereby the direction of rapid growth is parallel to a preferred crystal direction. By establishing several regions of growth, a large single crystal that is largely defect-free can be grown at high growth rates. This process is particularly suitable for producing products for wide-bandgap semiconductors, such as SiC, GaN, AlN, and diamond. Large low-defect single crystals of these semiconductors enable greatly enhanced performance and reliability for applications involving high power, high voltage, and/or high temperature operating conditions.

  7. Supercritical fluid crystallization of griseofulvin: crystal habit modification with a selective growth inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jarmer, Daniel J; Lengsfeld, Corinne S; Anseth, Kristi S; Randolph, Theodore W

    2005-12-01

    Poly (sebacic anhydride) (PSA) was used as a growth inhibitor to selectively modify habit of griseofulvin crystals formed via the Precipitation with a compressed-fluid antisolvent (PCA) process. PSA and griseofulvin were coprecipitated within a PCA injector, which provided efficient mixing between the solution and compressed antisolvent process streams. Griseofulvin crystal habit was modified from acicular to bipyramidal when the mass ratio of PSA/griseofulvin in the solution feed stream was crystal face of the acicular crystal form, which inhibited growth. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the griseofulvin and PSA particles, and gave results consistent with a selective growth inhibition mechanism. SEM micrographs showed regions on griseofulvin crystals where PSA microparticles had preferentially adsorbed. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of the griseofulvin crystals indicated no changes in the crystalline form after the habit modification. Powder compressibility decreased from 49 +/- 3% to 28 +/- 7% with the modification in crystal habit. No change in the physical stability of the processed powder was observed after being stored at 25 degrees C/60% RH and 40 degrees C/70% RH for 23 days. Despite the change in crystal habit, griseofulvin crystals achieved 100% dissolution within 60 min in a simulated gastric fluid. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Growth of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals by solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.; Kroes, R. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    The growth of crystals from solution is greatly influenced by buoyancy driven convection. In a low-g environment, convection is greatly suppressed and diffusion becomes the predominant mechanism for thermal and mass transport. An experiment to grow TGS crystals by solution technique during the orbital Spacelab III mission has been designed. Crystals are grown by a new and unique technique of extracting heat from the crystal through a sting. The cooling at the sting tip is responsible for the desired supersaturation near the growing crystal. Calculations indicate that the cooled sting technique for solution crystal growth is necessary in low-g to maintain a maximum growth rate of 1 mm/day. Results of groundbased work in support of the flight experiment are discussed.

  9. Influence of Polymers on the Crystal Growth Rate of Felodipine: Correlating Adsorbed Polymer Surface Coverage to Solution Crystal Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schram, Caitlin J; Taylor, Lynne S; Beaudoin, Stephen P

    2015-10-20

    The bioavailability of orally administered drugs that exhibit poor aqueous solubility can be enhanced with the use of supersaturating dosage forms. Stabilization of these forms by preventing or inhibiting crystallization in solution is an important area of study. Polymers can be used to stabilize supersaturated systems; however, the properties that impact their effectiveness as crystal growth rate inhibitors are not yet fully understood. In this study, the impact of various polymers on the crystal growth rate of felodipine and the conformation of these polymers adsorbed to crystalline felodipine was investigated in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of crystal growth inhibition. It was determined that polymer hydrophobicity impacted polymer adsorption as well as adsorbed polymer conformation. Polymer conformation impacts its surface coverage, which was shown to directly correlate to the polymer's effectiveness as a growth rate inhibitor. By modeling this correlation, it is possible to predict polymer effectiveness given the surface coverage of the polymer.

  10. Fluid Physics and Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M.; Snell, E.; Judge, R.; Chayen, N.; Boggon, T.; Helliwell, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The molecular structure of biological macromolecules is important in understanding how these molecules work and has direct application to rational drug design for new medicines and for the improvement and development of industrial enzymes. In order to obtain the molecular structure, large, well formed, single macromolecule crystals are required. The growth of macromolecule crystals is a difficult task and is often hampered on the ground by fluid flows that result from the interaction of gravity with the crystal growth process. One such effect is the bulk movement of the crystal through the fluid due to sedimentation. A second is buoyancy driven convection close to the crystal surface. On the ground the crystallization process itself induces both of these flows.

  11. Comparison of solidification/stabilization effects of calcite between Australian and South Korean cements

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lee, Dongjin; Waite, T. David; Swarbrick, Gareth

    2005-11-15

    The differences in the effect of calcite on the strength and stability of Pb-rich wastes solidified and stabilized using Australian and South Korean ordinary Portland cements are examined in this study. Pb-rich waste stabilized using Australian OPC has been shown to possess both substantially higher unconfined compressive strength and lead immobilization ability than South Korean OPC as a result of its higher C{sub 3}S content and the associated enhanced degree of precipitation of lead on the surfaces of silicate phases present. Calcite addition is observed to have an accelerating effect on the OPC-induced solidification/stabilization of Pb-rich wastes as gauged bymore » the unconfined compressive strength and leachability of the solids formed. This effect is observed to be far more dramatic for South Korean OPC than for Australian OPC. Using scanning electron microscopy, waste stabilized with cement and calcite was observed to develop significantly greater proportions of hydrated crystals than wastes stabilized with cement alone. The results of X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the presence of calcite in South Korean OPC results in greater acceleration in the formation of portlandite than is the case for Australian OPC.« less

  12. Electrochemical liquid-liquid-solid (ec-LLS) crystal growth: a low-temperature strategy for covalent semiconductor crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrug, Eli; Maldonado, Stephen

    2015-07-21

    This Account describes a new electrochemical synthetic strategy for direct growth of crystalline covalent group IV and III-V semiconductor materials at or near ambient temperature conditions. This strategy, which we call "electrochemical liquid-liquid-solid" (ec-LLS) crystal growth, marries the semiconductor solvation properties of liquid metal melts with the utility and simplicity of conventional electrodeposition. A low-temperature liquid metal (i.e., Hg, Ga, or alloy thereof) acts simultaneously as the source of electrons for the heterogeneous reduction of oxidized semiconductor precursors dissolved in an electrolyte as well as the solvent for dissolution of the zero-valent semiconductor. Supersaturation of the semiconductor in the liquid metal triggers eventual crystal nucleation and growth. In this way, the liquid electrolyte-liquid metal-solid crystal phase boundary strongly influences crystal growth. As a synthetic strategy, ec-LLS has several intrinsic features that are attractive for preparing covalent semiconductor crystals. First, ec-LLS does not require high temperatures, toxic precursors, or high-energy-density semiconductor reagents. This largely simplifies equipment complexity and expense. In practice, ec-LLS can be performed with only a beaker filled with electrolyte and an electrical circuit capable of supplying a defined current (e.g., a battery in series with a resistor). By this same token, ec-LLS is compatible with thermally and chemically sensitive substrates (e.g., plastics) that cannot be used as deposition substrates in conventional syntheses of covalent semiconductors. Second, ec-LLS affords control over a host of crystal shapes and sizes through simple changes in common experimental parameters. As described in detail herein, large and small semiconductor crystals can be grown both homogeneously within a liquid metal electrode and heterogeneously at the interface of a liquid metal electrode and a seed substrate, depending on the particular

  13. Vapor crystal growth technology development: Application to cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael; Duval, Walter M. B.

    1991-01-01

    Growth of bulk crystals by physical vapor transport was developed and applied to cadmium telluride. The technology makes use of effusive ampoules, in which part of the vapor contents escapes to a vacuum shroud through defined leaks during the growth process. This approach has the advantage over traditional sealed ampoule techniques that impurity vapors and excess vapor constituents are continuously removed from the vicinity of the growing crystal. Thus, growth rates are obtained routinely at magnitudes that are rather difficult to achieve in closed ampoules. Other advantages of this effusive ampoule physical vapor transport (EAPVT) technique include the predetermination of transport rates based on simple fluid dynamics and engineering considerations, and the growth of the crystal from close to congruent vapors, which largely alleviates the compositional nonuniformities resulting from buoyancy driven convective transport. After concisely reviewing earlier work on improving transport rates, nucleation control, and minimization of crystal wall interactions in vapor crystal growth, a detail account is given of the largely computer controlled EAPVT experimentation.

  14. Interface Shape and Growth Rate Analysis of Se/GaAs Bulk Crystals Grown in the NASA Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bly, J. M.; Kaforey, M. L.; Matthiesen, D. H.; Chait, A.

    1997-01-01

    Selenium-doped gallium arsenide, Se/GaAs, bulk crystals have been grown on earth using NASA's crystal growth furnace (CGF) in preparation for microgravity experimentation on the USML-2 spacelab mission. Peltier cooling pulses of 50 ms duration, 2040 A magnitude, and 0.0033 Hz frequency were used to successfully demark the melt-solid interface at known times during the crystal growth process. Post-growth characterization included interface shape measurement, growth rate calculation, and growth rate transient determinations. It was found that the interface shapes were always slightly concave into the solid. The curvature of the seeding interfaces was typically 1.5 mm for the 15 mm diameter samples. This was in agreement with the predicted interface shapes and positions relative to the furnace determined using a numerical model of the sample/ampoule/cartridge assembly (SACA).

  15. Growth and characterization of struvite-Na crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Chetan K.; Joshi, Mihirkumar J.

    2014-09-01

    Sodium magnesium phosphate heptahydrate [NaMgPO4·7H2O], also known as struvite-Na, is the sodium analog to struvite. Among phosphate containing bio-minerals, struvite has attracted considerable attention, because of its common occurrence in a wide variety of environments. Struvite and family crystals were found as urinary calculi in humans and animals. Struvite-Na crystals were grown by a single diffusion gel growth technique in a silica hydro gel medium. Struvite-Na crystals with different morphologies having transparent to translucent diaphaneity were grown with different growth parameters. The phenomenon of Liesegang rings was also observed with some particular growth parameters. The powder XRD study confirmed the structural similarity of the grown struvite-Na crystals with struvite and found that struvite-Na crystallized in the orthorhombic Pmn21 space group with unit cell parameters such as a= 6.893 Å, b=6.124 Å, c=11.150 Å, and α=β=γ=90°. FT-IR spectra of struvite-Na crystals revealed the presence of functional groups. The TGA, DTA and DSC were carried out simultaneously. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of dehydration/decomposition process were calculated. The variation of dielectric constant with frequency of applied field was studied in the range from 400 Hz to 100 kHz.

  16. Sea urchin spine calcite forms via a transient amorphous calcium carbonate phase.

    PubMed

    Politi, Yael; Arad, Talmon; Klein, Eugenia; Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2004-11-12

    The skeletons of adult echinoderms comprise large single crystals of calcite with smooth convoluted fenestrated morphologies, raising many questions about how they form. By using water etching, infrared spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and environmental scanning electron microscopy, we show that sea urchin spine regeneration proceeds via the initial deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. Because most echinoderms produce the same type of skeletal material, they probably all use this same mechanism. Deposition of transient amorphous phases as a strategy for producing single crystals with complex morphology may have interesting implications for the development of sophisticated materials.

  17. Transformation and crystallization energetics of synthetic and biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Radha, A. V.; Forbes, Tori Z.; Killian, Christopher E.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC → less metastable hydrated ACC⇒anhydrous ACC ∼ biogenic anhydrous ACC⇒vaterite → aragonite → calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO2 sequestration. PMID:20810918

  18. Modeling the Growth Rates of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Meirong; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The measured macroscopic growth rates of the (110) and (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme show an unexpectedly complex dependence on the supersaturation. The growth rates decay asymptotically to zero when the supersaturation is lowered to zero and increase rapidly when the supersaturation is increased. When supersaturations are increased still further the growth rates attain a maximum before starting to decrease. However, growth of these crystals is known to proceed by the classical dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms. This anomaly can be explained if growth is assumed to occur not by monomer units but by lysozyme aggregates. Analysis of the molecular packing of these crystals revealed that they were constructed of strongly bonded 4(sub 3) helices, while weaker bonds were responsible for binding the helices to each other. It follows that during crystal growth the stronger bonds are formed before the weaker ones. Thus, the growth of these crystals could be viewed as a two step process: aggregate growth units corresponding to the 4(sub 3) helix are first formed in the bulk solution by stronger intermolecular bonds and then attached to the crystal face by weaker bonds on dislocation hillocks or 2D islands. This will lead to a distribution of aggregates in the solution with monomers and lower order aggregates being predominant at low supersaturations and higher order aggregates being predominant at high supersaturations. If the crystal grows mostly by higher order aggregates, such as tetramers and octamers, it would explain the anomalous dependence of the growth rates on the supersaturation. Besides the analysis of molecular packing, a comprehensive analysis of the measured (110) and (101) growth rates was also undertaken in this study. The distribution of aggregates in lysozyme nutrient solutions at various solution conditions were determined from reversible aggregation reactions at equilibrium. The supersaturation was defined for each aggregate species

  19. Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This diagram shows a cross sectrion of the fluid volume of an individual cell in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  20. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Horse Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Horse Serum Albumin crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission's Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox Experiment. These crystals were grown using a vapor diffusion technique at 22 degrees C. The crystals were allowed to grow for nine days while in orbit. Crystals of 1.0 mm in length were produced. The most abundant blood serum protein, regulates blood pressure and transports ions, metabolites, and therapeutic drugs. Principal Investigator was Edward Meehan.

  1. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    This research involved (1) using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) in a study on the growth of lysozyme crystals and (2) refinement of the design of the Thermonucleator which controls the supersaturation required for the nucleation and growth of protein crystals separately. AFM studies of the (110) tetragonal face confirmed that lysozyme crystals grow by step propagation. There appears to be very little step pile up in the growth regimes which we studied. The step height was measured at = 54A which was equal to the (110) interpane spacing. The AFM images showed areas of step retardation and the formation of pits. These defects ranged in size from 0.1 to 0.4 mu. The source of these defects was not determined. The redesign of the Thermonucleator produced an instrument based on thermoelectric technology which is both easier to use and more amenable to use in a mu g environment. The use of thermoelectric technology resulted in a considerable size reduction which will allow for the design of a multi-unit growth apparatus. The performance of the new apparatus was demonstrated to be the same as the original design.

  2. In-Situ Crystallization of a Lithium Disilicate Glass--Effect of Pressure on Crystal Growth Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuss, T.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    Crystallization of a Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) glass subjected to a uniform hydrostatic pressure of 4.5 GPa and 6 GPa was investigated up to a temperature of 750 C. The density of the compressed glass is about 2% greater at 4.5 GPa than at 1 atm and, depending upon the processing temperature, up to 10% greater at 6 GPa. Crystal growth rates investigated as a function of temperature and pressure show that lithium disilicate crystal growth is an order of magnitude slower at 4.5 GPa than 1 atm resulting in a shift of +45 C (plus or minus 10 C) in the growth rate curve at high pressure compared to 1 atm condition. At 6 GPa lithium disilicate crystallization is suppressed entirely, while a new high pressure lithium metasilicate crystallizes at temperatures 95 C (plus or minus 10 C) higher than those reported for lithium disilicate crystallization at 1 atm. The decrease in crystal growth rate with increasing pressure for lithium disilicate glass up to 750 C is related to an increase in viscosity with pressure associated with fundamental changes in glass structure accommodating densification.

  3. Corrosion Protection by Calcite-Type Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    CORROSION PROTECTION BY CALCITE -TYPE COATINGS OCTOBER, 1989 Prepared by: OCEAN CITY RESEARCH CORPORATION Tennessee Avenue & Beach Thorofare Ocean...REPORT DATE OCT 1989 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Corrosion Protection by Calcite -Type Coatings 5a. CONTRACT... calcite -type coatings to segregated seawater ballast tanks. If perfected, a calcite coating approach could substantially reduce the cost of corrosion

  4. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term stability of the interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been improved. Growth or dissolution of a crystal on a 100 A scale can now be clearly distinguished from dimensional changes occurring within the optical path of the interferometer. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the local interfacial displacement at several widely-spaced positions on the crystal surface with high local depth resolution, has already yielded novel results. We found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) the mean growth step density is greater at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed to interpret the large body of data in a unified way. The results strongly suggests that (1) the ion to lysozyme ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter on the order of 10 microns. The computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization (see the First Report) has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies. These results show that some elements of a moving boundary problem must be incorporated into the model in order to obtain a more realistic description. Our experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions has been extensively tested. Scattering intensity measurements with a true Rayleigh scatterer produced systematically increased forward scattering, indicating problems with glare. These have been resolved. Preliminary measurements with supersaturated lysozyme solutions revealed that the scatterers grow with time. Work has begun on a computer program

  5. Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Dowling, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for growing protein crystals under microgravity environment includes a plurality of protein growth assemblies stacked one above the other within a canister. Each of the protein growth assemblies includes a tray having a number of spaced apart growth chambers recessed below an upper surface. the growth chambers each having an upstanding pedestal and an annular reservoir about the pedestal for receiving a wick and precipitating agents. A well is recessed below the top of each pedestal to define a protein crystal growth receptacle. A flexible membrane is positioned on the upper surface of each tray and a sealing plate is positioned above each membrane, each sealing plate having a number of bumpers corresponding in number and alignment to the pedestals for forcing the membrane selectively against the upper end of the respective pedestal to seal the reservoir and the receptacle when the sealing plate is forced down.

  6. U-Pb Dating of Calcite to Constrain Basinal Brine Flux Events: An Example from the Upper Midwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasbury, T.; Luczaj, J.

    2017-12-01

    Calcite forms in a variety of settings and can be the product of surface to deep basinal fluids. As such, this mineral can uniquely record details of the fluids responsible for its formation. The forms of calcium carbonates and their stratigraphic relationships from the thin section to the regional scale give important insights on pulses of fluids. A fundamental question is the age of such fluid pulses. While calcite excludes uranium (U) from its crystal structure, some is incorporated and depending on the U/Pb ratio, this provides an opportunity for radiometric dating. Calcite crystals of various sizes and crystal habits are found in Paleozoic carbonate rocks throughout the region from the western Michigan basin to the upper Mississippi valley. These are typically associated with Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) mineralization, including galena, sphalerite, and iron sulfides, but typically post-date the main MVT event. We have analyzed a variety of these calcites and find multiple generations of calcite, separated by tens of millions of years. The initial Pb isotope ratios are similar to the isotope ratios of nearby galena, strongly suggesting a genetic relationship. Our oldest ages are 200 Ma, and we find ages ranging into the Cenozoic. Based on the Paleozoic-hosted galena Pb-isotope isoscapes from the region, the fluids may have been sourced from both the Michigan and Illinois basins. An important and unanswered question is what would cause significant fluid movement out of the basins substantially after Appalachian orogenesis. Noble gas data from brines in the Michigan Basin have a mantle component and have been suggested to be responsible for recognized elevated temperatures across the basin (Ma et al., 2009). Multiple thermal events during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras may have an internal heat source related to reactivation of faults of the Keweenawan Rift system below the Michigan Basin. Perhaps a mantle heat source from below episodically fluxes into the

  7. Nucleation and Convection Effects in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilow, Peter G.

    1998-01-01

    Our work under this grant has significantly contributed to the goals of the NASA supported protein crystallization program. We have achieved the main objectives of the proposed work, as outlined in the original proposal: (1) We have provided important insight into protein nucleation and crystal growth mechanisms to facilitate a rational approach to protein crystallization; (2) We have delineated the factors that currently limit the x-ray diffraction resolution of protein crystals, and their correlation to crystallization conditions; (3) We have developed novel technologies to study and monitor protein crystal nucleation and growth processes, in order to increase the reproducibility and yield of protein crystallization. We have published 17 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and books and made more than 15 invited and 9 contributed presentations of our results at international and national scientific meetings.

  8. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  9. Ice Crystal Growth Rates Under Upper Troposphere Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 m, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  10. Wafer-scale single-crystal perovskite patterned thin films based on geometrically-confined lateral crystal growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lynn; Baek, Jangmi; Park, Kyung Sun; Lee, Yong-EunKoo; Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Sung, Myung M.

    2017-01-01

    We report a facile roll-printing method, geometrically confined lateral crystal growth, for the fabrication of large-scale, single-crystal CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films. Geometrically confined lateral crystal growth is based on transfer of a perovskite ink solution via a patterned rolling mould to a heated substrate, where the solution crystallizes instantly with the immediate evaporation of the solvent. The striking feature of this method is that the instant crystallization of the feeding solution under geometrical confinement leads to the unidirectional lateral growth of single-crystal perovskites. Here, we fabricated single-crystal perovskites in the form of a patterned thin film (3 × 3 inch) with a high carrier mobility of 45.64 cm2 V−1 s−1. We also used these single-crystal perovskite thin films to construct solar cells with a lateral configuration. Their active-area power conversion efficiency shows a highest value of 4.83%, which exceeds the literature efficiency values of lateral perovskite solar cells. PMID:28691697

  11. Crystal growth of intermetallic clathrates: Floating zone process and ultra rapid crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofiev, A.; Yan, X.; Ikeda, M.; Löffler, S.; Paschen, S.

    2014-09-01

    We studied the crystal growth process of type-I transition metal clathrates in two different regimes: a regime of moderate cooling rate, realized with the floating zone technique, and a regime of ultra rapid cooling, realized by the melt spinning technique. In the former regime, bulk Ba8AuxSi46-x and Ba8Cu4.8GaxGe41.2-x single crystals were grown. We investigated segregation effects of the constituting elements by measurements of the composition profiles along the growth direction. The compositional non-uniformity results in a spatial variation of the electrical resistivity which is discussed as well. Structural features of clathrates and their extremely low thermal conductivities imply specifics in growth behavior which manifest themselves most pronouncedly in a rapid crystallization process. Our melt spinning experiments on Ba8Au5Si41 and Ba8Ni3.5Si42.5 (and earlier on some other clathrates) have revealed surprisingly large grains of at least 1 μm. Because of the anomalously high growth rate of the clathrate phase the formation of impurity phases is considerably kinetically suppressed. We present our scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations of melt spun samples and discuss structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the unusual clathrate nucleation and crystallization.

  12. The Growth of Protein Crystals Using McDUCK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Felicia; Wilson, Lori; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Most of the current microgravity crystal growth hardware is optimized to produce crystals within the limited time available on orbit. This often results in the actual nucleation and growth process being rushed or the system not coming to equilibrium within the limited time available. Longer duration hardware exists, but one cannot readily pick out crystals grown early versus those which nucleated and grew more slowly. We have devised a long duration apparatus, the Multi-chamber Dialysis Unit for Crystallization Kinetics, or McDUCK. This apparatus-is a series of protein chambers, stacked upon a precipitant reservoir chamber. All chambers are separated by a dialysis membrane, which serves to pass small molecules while retaining the protein. The volume of the Precipitant chamber is equal to the sum of the volumes of the protein chamber. In operation, the appropriate chambers are filled with precipitant solution or protein solution, and the McDUCK is placed standing upright, with the precipitant chamber on the bottom. The precipitant diffuses upwards over time, with the time to reach equilibration a function of the diffusivity of the precipitant and the overall length of the diffusion pathway. Typical equilibration times are approximately 2-4 months, and one can readily separate rapid from slow nucleation and growth crystals. An advantage on Earth is that the vertical precipitant concentration gradient dominates that of the solute, thus dampening out solute density gradient driven convective flows. However, large Earth-grown crystals have so far tended to be more two dimensional. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of lysozyme crystals grown in McDUCK have indicated that the best, and largest, come from the middle chambers, suggesting that there is an optimal growth rate. Further, the improvements in diffraction resolution have been better signal to noise ratios in the low resolution data, not an increase in resolution overall. Due to the persistently large crystals

  13. Solution Growth and Characterization of Single Crystals on Earth and in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Currie, J. R.; Penn, B. G.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    Crystal growth has been of interest to physicists and engineers for a long time because of their unique properties. Single crystals are utilized in such diverse applications as pharmaceuticals, computers, infrared detectors, frequency measurements, piezoelectric devices, a variety of high-technology devices, and sensors. Solution crystal growth is one of the important techniques to grow a variety of crystals when the material decomposes at the melting point and a suitable solvent is available to make a saturated solution at a desired temperature. In this Technical Memorandum (TM) an attempt is made to give the fundamentals of growing crystals from solution including improved designs of various crystallizers. Since the same solution crystal growth technique could not be used in microgravity, the authors proposed a new cooled-sting technique to grow crystals in space. The authors experience from conducting two Space Shuttle solution crystal growth experiments are also detailed in this TM and the complexity of solution growth experiments to grow crystals in space are also discussed. These happen to be some of the early experiments performed in space, and various lessons learned are described. A brief discussion of protein crystal growth that shares basic principles of the solution growth technique is given, along with some flight hardware information for growth in microgravity.

  14. Advanced crystal growth techniques for thallium bromide semiconductor radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amlan; Becla, Piotr; Guguschev, Christo; Motakef, Shariar

    2018-02-01

    Thallium Bromide (TlBr) is a promising room-temperature radiation detector candidate with excellent charge transport properties. Currently, Travelling Molten Zone (TMZ) technique is widely used for growth of semiconductor-grade TlBr crystals. However, there are several challenges associated with this type of crystal growth process including lower yield, high thermal stress, and low crystal uniformity. To overcome these shortcomings of the current technique, several different crystal growth techniques have been implemented in this study. These include: Vertical Bridgman (VB), Physical Vapor Transport (PVT), Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG), and Czochralski Growth (Cz). Techniques based on melt pulling (EFG and Cz) were demonstrated for the first time for semiconductor grade TlBr material. The viability of each process along with the associated challenges for TlBr growth has been discussed. The purity of the TlBr crystals along with its crystalline and electronic properties were analyzed and correlated with the growth techniques. Uncorrected 662 keV energy resolutions around 2% were obtained from 5 mm x 5 mm x 10 mm TlBr devices with virtual Frisch-grid configuration.

  15. Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetanin, S. N.; Jelínek, M., Jr.; Kubeček, V.; Jelínková, H.

    2015-09-01

    Optimal conditions of low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite (CaCO3) are experimentally investigated under 20 ps laser pulse excitation, in agreement with the theoretical study. The collinear parametric Raman generation of the highest number of Raman components in the short calcite crystals corresponding to the optimal condition of Stokes-anti-Stokes coupling was achieved. At the excitation wavelength of 1064 nm, using the optimum-length crystal resulted in the effective multi-octave frequency Raman comb generation containing up to five anti-Stokes and more than four Stokes components (from 674 nm to 1978 nm). The 532 nm pumping resulted in the frequency Raman comb generation from the 477 nm 2nd anti-Stokes up to the 692 nm 4th Stokes component. Using the crystal with a non-optimal length leads to the Stokes components generation only with higher thresholds because of the cascade-like stimulated Raman scattering with suppressed parametric coupling.

  16. Low-magnesium calcite produced by coralline algae in seawater of Late Cretaceous composition

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Steven M.; Ries, Justin B.; Hardie, Lawrence A.

    2002-01-01

    Shifts in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater driven by changes in midocean ridge spreading rates have produced oscillations in the mineralogy of nonskeletal carbonate precipitates from seawater on time scales of 108 years. Since Cambrian time, skeletal mineralogies of anatomically simple organisms functioning as major reef builders or producers of shallow marine limestones have generally corresponded in mineral composition to nonskeletal precipitates. Here we report on experiments showing that the ambient Mg/Ca ratio actually governs the skeletal mineralogy of some simple organisms. In modern seas, coralline algae produce skeletons of high-Mg calcite (>4 mol % MgCO3). We grew three species of these algae in artificial seawaters having three different Mg/Ca ratios. All of the species incorporated amounts of Mg into their skeletons in proportion to the ambient Mg/Ca ratio, mimicking the pattern for nonskeletal precipitation. Thus, the algae calcified as if they were simply inducing precipitation from seawater through their consumption of CO2 for photosynthesis; presumably organic templates specify the calcite crystal structure of their skeletons. In artificial seawater with the low Mg/Ca ratio of Late Cretaceous seas, the algae in our experiments produced low-Mg calcite (<4 mol % MgCO3), the carbonate mineral formed by nonskeletal precipitation in those ancient seas. Our results suggest that many taxa that produce high-Mg calcite today produced low-Mg calcite in Late Cretaceous seas. PMID:12399549

  17. Control of Protein Crystal Nucleation and Growth Using Stirring Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Ai; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Warizaya, Masaichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2004-11-01

    We have previously developed a protein crystallization technique using a stirring protein solution and revealed that (i) continuous stirring prevents excess spontaneous nucleation and accelerates the growth of protein crystals and (ii) prestirring (solution stirring in advance) promotes the crystal nucleation of hen egg-white lysozyme. In bovine adenosine deaminase (ADA) crystallization, continuous stirring improves the crystal quality but elongates the nucleation time. In this paper, in order to control both the crystal nucleation and growth of ADA using a Micro-Stirring technique, we carried out five different stirring patterns such as (i) no stirring, (ii) continuous stirring, (iii) prestirring, (iv) poststirring (stirring late in the growth period) and (v) restirring (combined pre- and poststirring). The results showed that high-quality well-shaped crystals were obtained under the continuous stirring and restirring conditions and the nucleation time under the prestirring and restirring conditions was shorter than that under the continuous stirring and poststirring conditions. Consequently, high-quality crystals were promptly obtained under the restirring condition. These results suggest that we are able to control both the nucleation and growth of protein crystals with the stirring techniques.

  18. Protein crystal growth and the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLucas, L. J.; Moore, K. M.; Long, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    Protein structural information plays a key role in understanding biological structure-function relationships and in the development of new pharmaceuticals for both chronic and infectious diseases. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) has devoted considerable effort studying the fundamental processes involved in macromolecular crystal growth both in a 1-g and microgravity environment. Results from experiments performed on more than 35 U.S. space shuttle flights have clearly indicated that microgravity can provide a beneficial environment for macromolecular crystal growth. This research has led to the development of a new generation of pharmaceuticals that are currently in preclinical or clinical trials for diseases such as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, AIDS, influenza, stroke and other cardiovascular complications. The International Space Station (ISS) provides an opportunity to have complete crystallographic capability on orbit, which was previously not possible with the space shuttle orbiter. As envisioned, the x-ray Crystallography Facility (XCF) will be a complete facility for growing protein crystals; selecting, harvesting, and mounting sample crystals for x-ray diffraction; cryo-freezing mounted crystals if necessary; performing x-ray diffraction studies; and downlinking the data for use by crystallographers on the ground. Other advantages of such a facility include crystal characterization so that iterations in the crystal growth conditions can be made, thereby optimizing the final crystals produced in a three month interval on the ISS.

  19. Novel protein crystal growth technology: Proof of concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyce, Thomas A.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1989-01-01

    A technology for crystal growth, which overcomes certain shortcomings of other techniques, is developed and its applicability to proteins is examined. There were several unknowns to be determined: the design of the apparatus for suspension of crystals of varying (growing) diameter, control of the temperature and supersaturation, the methods for seeding and/or controlling nucleation, the effect on protein solutions of the temperature oscillations arising from the circulation, and the effect of the fluid shear on the suspended crystals. Extensive effort was put forth to grow lysozyme crystals. Under conditions favorable to the growth of tetragonal lysozyme, spontaneous nucleation could be produced but the number of nuclei could not be controlled. Seed transfer techniques were developed and implemented. When conditions for the orthorhombic form were tried, a single crystal 1.5 x 0.5 x 0.2 mm was grown (after in situ nucleation) and successfully extracted. A mathematical model was developed to predict the flow velocity as a function of the geometry and the operating temperatures. The model can also be used to scaleup the apparatus for growing larger crystals of other materials such as water soluble non-linear optical materials. This crystal suspension technology also shows promise for high quality solution growth of optical materials such as TGS and KDP.

  20. Carbonate “clumped” isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kimball, Justine; Eagle, Robert; Dunbar, Robert

    different calibrations. The offset between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect high-Mg and aragonite crystals attaining nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures due to conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological “vital effect” influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological vital effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO 2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on Δ 47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.« less

  1. Carbonate “clumped” isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    DOE PAGES

    Kimball, Justine; Eagle, Robert; Dunbar, Robert

    2016-12-12

    different calibrations. The offset between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect high-Mg and aragonite crystals attaining nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures due to conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological “vital effect” influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological vital effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO 2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on Δ 47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.« less

  2. A Simple Inexpensive Bridgman-Stockbarger Crystal Growth System for Organic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, J.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Wang, W. S.; Metzl, R.; Bhat, K.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1996-01-01

    Direct observation of solid-liquid interface is important for the directional solidification to determine the desired interface shape by controlling the growth parameters. To grow good quality single crystals of novel organic nonlinear optical materials, a simple inexpensive Bridgman-Stockbarger (BS) crystal growth system has been designed and fabricated. Two immiscible liquids have been utilized to create two zones for this crystal growth system. Bulk single crystals of benzil derivative and n-salicylidene-aniline have been successfully grown in this system. The optimum lowering rate has been found to be 0.1 mm/h for the flat interface. Results on the crystal growth and other parameters of the grown crystals are presented.

  3. Fluid Physics and Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helliwell, John R.; Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Judge, Russell A.; Boggon, Titus J.; Pusey, M. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The first protein crystallization experiment in microgravity was launched in April, 1981 and used Germany's Technologische Experimente unter Schwerelosigkeit (TEXUS 3) sounding rocket. The protein P-galactosidase (molecular weight 465Kda) was chosen as the sample with a liquid-liquid diffusion growth method. A sliding device brought the protein, buffer and salt solution into contact when microgravity was reached. The sounding rocket gave six minutes of microgravity time with a cine camera and schlieren optics used to monitor the experiment, a single growth cell. In microgravity a strictly laminar diffusion process was observed in contrast to the turbulent convection seen on the ground. Several single crystals, approx 100micron in length, were formed in the flight which were of inferior but of comparable visual quality to those grown on the ground over several days. A second experiment using the same protocol but with solutions cooled to -8C (kept liquid with glycerol antifreeze) again showed laminar diffusion. The science of macromolecular structural crystallography involves crystallization of the macromolecule followed by use of the crystal for X-ray diffraction experiments to determine the three dimensional structure of the macromolecule. Neutron protein crystallography is employed for elucidation of H/D exchange and for improved definition of the bound solvent (D20). The structural information enables an understanding of how the molecule functions with important potential for rational drug design, improved efficiency of industrial enzymes and agricultural chemical development. The removal of turbulent convection and sedimentation in microgravity, and the assumption that higher quality crystals will be produced, has given rise to the growing number of crystallization experiments now flown. Many experiments can be flown in a small volume with simple, largely automated, equipment - an ideal combination for a microgravity experiment. The term "protein crystal growth

  4. New simulation model of multicomponent crystal growth and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wathen, Brent; Kuiper, Michael; Walker, Virginia; Jia, Zongchao

    2004-04-02

    We review a novel computational model for the study of crystal structures both on their own and in conjunction with inhibitor molecules. The model advances existing Monte Carlo (MC) simulation techniques by extending them from modeling 3D crystal surface patches to modeling entire 3D crystals, and by including the use of "complex" multicomponent molecules within the simulations. These advances makes it possible to incorporate the 3D shape and non-uniform surface properties of inhibitors into simulations, and to study what effect these inhibitor properties have on the growth of whole crystals containing up to tens of millions of molecules. The application of this extended MC model to the study of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and their effects on ice formation is reported, including the success of the technique in achieving AFP-induced ice-growth inhibition with concurrent changes to ice morphology that mimic experimental results. Simulations of ice-growth inhibition suggest that the degree of inhibition afforded by an AFP is a function of its ice-binding position relative to the underlying anisotropic growth pattern of ice. This extended MC technique is applicable to other crystal and crystal-inhibitor systems, including more complex crystal systems such as clathrates.

  5. Economic analysis of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Chung, A. M.; Yan, C. S.; Mccreight, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Many advanced electronic technologies and devices for the 1980's are based on sophisticated compound single crystals, i.e. ceramic oxides and compound semiconductors. Space processing of these electronic crystals with maximum perfection, purity, and size is suggested. No ecomonic or technical justification was found for the growth of silicon single crystals for solid state electronic devices in space.

  6. Containerless protein crystal growth method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.

    1991-01-01

    A method of growing protein crystals from levitated drops is introduced and unique features of containerless approach in 1-g and micro-G laboratories are discussed. Electrostatic multidrop levitation system which is capable of simultaneous four drop levitation is described. A method of controlling protein saturation level in a programmed way is introduced and discussed. Finally, some of the unique features of containerless approach of protein crystal growth in space are discussed and summarized.

  7. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF have been published elsewhere. Both the crystals of CaCO3, which were large and well shaped, and the much smaller TTF-TCNQ crystals showed unusual morphological behavior. The follow up on these experiments was begun in 1981, when ESA initiated a 'Concept Definition Study' on a large, 150 kg, Solution Growth Facility (SGF) to be included in the payload of EURECA-1, the European Retrievable Carrier. This carrier was a continuation of the European Spacelab and at that time planned for launch in 1987. The long delay of the LDEF retrieval and of subsequent missions brought about reflections both on the concept of crystal growth in space and on the choice of crystallization materials that had been made for the LDEF. Already before the LDEF retrieval, research on TTF-TCNQ had been stopped, and a planned growth experiment with TTF-TCNQ on the SGF/EURECA had been cancelled. The target of the SGF investigation is now more fundamental in nature. None of the crystals to be grown here are, like TTF-TCNQ, in particular demand by science or industry, and the crystals only serve the purpose of model crystals. The real purpose of the investigation is to study the growth behavior. One of the experiments, the Soret Coefficient Measurement experiment is not growing crystals at all, but has it as its sole purpose to obtain accurate information on thermal diffusion, a process of importance in crystal growth from solution.

  8. Post-deformational relocation of mica grains in calcite-dolomite marbles identified by cathodoluminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Rebecca; Duschl, Florian; Leiss, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Hot-cathodoluminescence-microscopy (CL) reveals micas which are rotated or shifted within a calcite fabric from a foliation parallel to a random orientation. This feature has been recognized in calcite-dolomite marble samples from the locations Hammerunterwiesenthal, Erzgebirge, Germany and the Alpi Apuane, Italy. As obtained from petrographic thin section analysis, the micas either moved totally within a single calcite grain or from a grain boundary position, and then the calcite grain growth was dragged with the movement of the mica grain. In the moved-through grain, features like fluid-inclusions, twins or cleavage faces are erased and a new, clear calcite phase developed. This indicates dissolution-precipitation as process which led to the new calcite phase. As former deformation features are erased it can be assumed that the mica relocation is a fluid-driven, post-deformational equilibration process. In CL the new calcite mineral phase shows a zonation indicating a polycyclic process. Calcite CL gradually changes from a very dark purple, exactly as the surrounding grains, to a bright orange CL and supports the idea of fluid-induced deformation relocation. We suppose a specific lattice relationship between mica and calcite as initial driving factor for mica relocation. This recrystallization mechanism is probably supported by fluids - either from an external source or developed during retrograde metamorphosis fluid inclusion studies shall identify formation temperatures and origin of involved fluids and thereby clarify the timing of the post-deformational mica rotation. EBSD analysis of involved calcite and mica grains shall reveal a possible systematic relationship between the orientation of the hosting grains, the orientation of the mica and the final position of the mica. It will be interesting to learn in the future, if this kind of calcite-mica microstructure is a general phenomenon and how it can contribute to the understanding of fabric development.

  9. Imaging System For Measuring Macromolecule Crystal Growth Rates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corder, Eric L.; Briscoe, Jeri

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine how macromolecule crystal quality improvement in microgravity is related to crystal growth characteristics, a team of scientists and engineers at NASA's Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed flight hardware capable of measuring the crystal growth rates of a population of crystals growing under the same conditions. As crystal growth rate is defined as the change or delta in a defined dimension or length (L) of crystal over time, the hardware was named Delta-L. Delta-L consists of three sub assemblies: a fluid unit including a temperature-controlled growth cell, an imaging unit, and a control unit (consisting of a Data Acquisition and Control Unit (DACU), and a thermal control unit). Delta-L will be used in connection with the Glovebox Integrated Microgravity Isolation Technology (g-LIMIT) inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), onboard the International Space Station. This paper will describe the Delta-L imaging system. The Delta-L imaging system was designed to locate, resolve, and capture images of up to 10 individual crystals ranging in size from 10 to 500 microns with a point-to-point accuracy of +/- 2.0 microns within a quartz growth cell observation area of 20 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm. The optical imaging system is comprised of a video microscope camera mounted on computer controlled translation stages. The 3-axis translation stages and control units provide crewmembers the ability to search throughout the growth cell observation area for crystals forming in size of approximately 10 microns. Once the crewmember has selected ten crystals of interest, the growth of these crystals is tracked until the size reaches approximately 500 microns. In order to resolve these crystals an optical system with a magnification of 10X was designed. A black and white NTSC camera was utilized with a 20X microscope objective and a 0.5X custom designed relay lens with an inline light to meet the magnification requirement. The design allows a 500 pm

  10. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, D. A.; Lakshtanov, L. Z.; Carneiro, J. F.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite and chalk and pH ranging from 7.7 to 8.8, explored the influence of initial concentration and the amount and type of sorbent on Ni uptake. Adsorption increases with increased surface area and pH. A surface complexation model describes the data well. Stability constants for the Ni surface complex are log KNi = - 1.12 on calcite and log KNi = - 0.43 and - 0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts of polysaccharides and clay nanoparticles on the chalk surface.

  11. Electromigration process for the purification of molten silicon during crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Lovelace, Alan M. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space; Shlichta, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the purification of molten materials during crystal growth by electromigration of impurities to localized dirty zones. The process has particular applications for silicon crystal growth according to Czochralski techniques and edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) conditions. In the Czochralski crystal growing process, the impurities are electromigrated away from the crystallization interface by applying a direct electrical current to the molten silicon for electromigrating the charged impurities away from the crystal growth interface. In the EFG crystal growth process, a direct electrical current is applied between the two faces which are used in forming the molten silicon into a ribbon. The impurities are thereby migrated to one side only of the crystal ribbon. The impurities may be removed or left in place. If left in place, they will not adversely affect the ribbon when used in solar collectors. The migration of the impurity to one side only of the silicon ribbon is especially suitable for use with asymmetric dies which preferentially crystallize uncharged impurities along one side or face of the ribbon.

  12. Amino Acid Hydrolysis and Analysis System for Investigation of Site Directed Nucleation and Growth of Ceramic Films on Metallic Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    that composed the proteinaceous polymers found at the interface between calcite crystals deposited by oyster cells and the various n1etal substrates...proteinaceous polymers found at the interface between calcite crystals deposited by oyster cells and the various metal substrates. A recently...required for the mechanism of biomineralization and site-specific deposition of ceramic crystals on aluminum alloy substrates. These calcite crystals

  13. Growth Defects in Biomacromolecular Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's ground based program confirmed close similarity between protein and small molecules crystal growth, but also revealed essential differences. No understanding exists as to why and when crystals grown in space are, in approx. 20 percent of cases, of higher quality. More rationale is needed in flight experiments. Ferritin crystals grown in space are 2.5 times cleaner than their terrestrial counterparts. This may occur because of the existence of a zone depleted with respect to impurities around a crystal growing in stagnant solution. This zone should appear since the distribution coefficient for homologous impurities exceeds unity. This impurity depletion zone hypothesis requires verification and development. Thorough purification from homologous impurities brought about resolution improvement from 2.6 to 1.8 angstroms for ferritin and from 2.6 to 2.0 angstroms for canavalin.

  14. Interaction between Convection and Heat Transfer in Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Crystals are integral components in some of our most sophisticated and rapidly developing industries. Single crystals are solids with the most uniform structures that can be obtained on an atomic scale. Because of their structural uniformity, crystals can transmit acoustic and electromagnetic waves and charged particles with essentially no scattering or interferences. This transparency, which can be selectively modified by controlled additions of impurities known as dopants, is the foundation of modern electronic industry. It has brought about widespread application of crystals in transistors, lasers, microwave devices, infrared detectors, magnetic memory devices, and many other magnets and electro-optic components. The performance of a crystal depends strongly on its compositional homogeneity. For instance, in modern microcircuitry, compositional variations of a few percent (down to a submicron length scale) can seriously jeopardize predicted yields. Since crystals are grown by carefully controlled phase transformations, the compositional adjustment in the solid is often made during growth from the nutrient. Hence, a detailed understanding of mass transfer in the nutrient is essential. Moreover, since mass transfer is often the slowest process during growth, it is usually the rate limiting mechanism. Crystal growth processes are usually classified according to the nature of the parent phase. Nevertheless, whether the growth occurs by solidification from a melt (melt growth), nucleation from a solution (solution growth), condensation from a vapor (physical vapor transport) or chemical reaction of gases (chemical vapor deposition), the parent phase is a fluid. As is with most non-equilibrium processes involving fluids, liquid or vapor, fluid motion plays an important role, affecting both the concentration and temperature gradients at the soli-liquid interface.

  15. Control of interface shape during high melting sesquioxide crystal growth by HEM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kaiwei; Zheng, Lili; Zhang, Hui

    2018-02-01

    During crystal growth in heat exchanger method (HEM) system, the shape of the growth interface changes with the proceeding of the growth process, which limits the crystal size and reduces the quality of the crystal. In this paper, a modified HEM system is proposed to control the interface shape for growth of sesquioxide crystals. Numerical simulation is performed to predict heat transfer, melt flow and interface shape during growth of high melting sesquioxide crystals by the heat exchanger method. The results show that a flat or slightly convex interface shape is beneficial to reduce the solute pileup in front of the melt/crystal interface and decrease the radial temperature gradient inside the crystal during growth of sesquioxide crystals. The interface shape can be controlled by adjusting the gap size d and lower resistance heater power during growth. The growth rate and the melt/crystal interface position can be obtained by two measured temperatures.

  16. Phenytoin crystal growth rates in the presence of phosphate and chloride ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipp, G. L.; Rodríguez-Hornedo, N.

    1992-09-01

    Phenytoin crystal growth kinetics have been measured as a function of supersaturation in pH 2.2 phosphoric acid and pH 2.2 hydrochloric acid solutions. Two different methods were used for the kinetic analysis. The first involved a zone-sensing device which provided an analysis of the distribution of crystals in a batch crystallizer. Crystal growth rates were calculated from the increase in the size of the distribution with time. In the second method, growth rates were evaluated from the change in size with time of individual crystals observed under an inverted microscope. The results from each method compare favorably. The use of both techniques provides an excellent opportunity to exploit the strengths of each: an average growth rate from a population of crystals from batch crystallization and insight into the effect of growth on the morphology of the crystals from the individual crystal measurements.

  17. Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth

    DOEpatents

    Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  18. Optical Investigation of Nanoconfined Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, F.; Dysthe, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Crystals growing in a confined space exert forces on their surroundings. This crystallization force causes deformation of solids and is therefore particularly relevant for the comprehension of geological processes such as replacement and weathering [1]. In addition, these forces are relevant for the understanding of damages in porous building materials caused by crystallization, which is of great economical importance and fundamental for methods that can help to preserve our cultural heritage [2,3]. However, the exact behavior of the growth and the dissolution process in close contact to an interface are still not known in detail. The crystallization, the dissolution and the transport of material is mediated by a nanoconfined water film. We observe brittle NaClO3 crystals growing against a glass surface by optical methods such as reflective interference contrast microscopy (RICM) [4]. In order to carefully control the supersaturation of the fluid close to the crystal interface, a temperature regulated microfluidic system is used (fig. A). The interference based precision of RICM enables to resolve distance variations down to the sub nanometer range without any unwanted disturbances by the measuring method. The combination of RICM with a sensitive camera allows us to observe phenomena such as periodic, wavelike growth of atomic layers. These waves are particularly obvious when observing the difference between two consecutive images (fig. B). In contradiction to some theoretical results, which predict a smooth interface, some recent experiments have shown that the nanoconfined growth surfaces are rough. In combination with theoretical studies and Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations we aim at providing more realistic descriptions of surface energies and energy barriers which are able to explain the discrepancies between experiments and current theory. References:[1] Maliva, Diagenetic replacement controlled by force of crystallization, Geology, August (1988), v. 16 [2] G

  19. Physical phenomena related to crystal growth in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of crystal growth which may be affected by the space environment was studied. Conclusions as to the relative technical and scientific advantages of crystal growth in space over earth bound growth, without regard to economic advantage, were deduced. It was concluded that the crucibleless technique will most directly demonstrate the unique effects of the greatly reduced gravity in the space environment. Several experiments, including crucibleless crystal growth using solar energy and determination of diffusion coefficients of common dopants in liquid silicon were recommended.

  20. A Study of Biomolecules as Growth Modifiers of Calcium Oxalate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Junha John

    Crystallization processes are ubiquitous in nature, science, and technology. Controlling crystal growth is pivotal in many industries as material properties and functions can be tailored by tuning crystal habits (e.g. size, shape, phase). In biomineralization, organisms exert excellent control over bottom-up synthesis and assembly of inorganic-organic structures (e.g. bones, teeth, exoskeletons). This is made possible by growth modifiers that range from small molecules to macromolecules, such as proteins. Molecular recognition of the mineral phase allows proteins to function as nucleation templates, matrices, and growth inhibitors or promoters. We are interested in taking a biomimetic approach to control crystallization via biomolecular growth modifiers. We investigated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), found in plants and kidney stones, as a model system of crystallization. We studied the effects of four common proteins on COM crystallization: bovine serum albumin (BSA), transferrin, lactoferrin, and lysozyme. Through kinetic studies of COM crystallization, we classified BSA and lysozyme as COM growth inhibitor and promoter respectively. Their inhibition and promotion effects were also evident in the macroscopic crystal habit. Through adsorption and microscopy experiments, we showed that BSA exhibits binding specificity for the apical surfaces of macroscopic COM crystals. Lysozyme, on the other, functions via a non-binding mechanism at the surface to accelerate the growth of the apical surfaces. We also synthesized and studied peptides derived from the protein primary sequences to identify putative domains responsible for these inhibition and promotion effects. Collectively, our study of physiologically relevant biomolecules suggests potential roles of COM modifiers in pathological crystallization and helps to develop guidelines for rational design of biomolecular growth modifiers for applications in crystal engineering.

  1. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken eggshell matrix proteins during the primary events of eggshell mineralization and the active growth phase of calcification.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2015-09-01

    Chicken eggshell is a biomineral composed of 95% calcite calcium carbonate mineral and of 3.5% organic matrix proteins. The assembly of mineral and its structural organization is controlled by its organic matrix. In a recent study [1], we have used quantitative proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses to explore the distribution of 216 eggshell matrix proteins at four key stages of shell mineralization defined as: (1) widespread deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), (2) ACC transformation into crystalline calcite aggregates, (3) formation of larger calcite crystal units and (4) rapid growth of calcite as columnar structure with preferential crystal orientation. The current article detailed the quantitative analysis performed at the four stages of shell mineralization to determine the proteins which are the most abundant. Additionally, we reported the enriched GO terms and described the presence of 35 antimicrobial proteins equally distributed at all stages to keep the egg free of bacteria and of 81 proteins, the function of which could not be ascribed.

  2. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken eggshell matrix proteins during the primary events of eggshell mineralization and the active growth phase of calcification

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B.; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2015-01-01

    Chicken eggshell is a biomineral composed of 95% calcite calcium carbonate mineral and of 3.5% organic matrix proteins. The assembly of mineral and its structural organization is controlled by its organic matrix. In a recent study [1], we have used quantitative proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses to explore the distribution of 216 eggshell matrix proteins at four key stages of shell mineralization defined as: (1) widespread deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), (2) ACC transformation into crystalline calcite aggregates, (3) formation of larger calcite crystal units and (4) rapid growth of calcite as columnar structure with preferential crystal orientation. The current article detailed the quantitative analysis performed at the four stages of shell mineralization to determine the proteins which are the most abundant. Additionally, we reported the enriched GO terms and described the presence of 35 antimicrobial proteins equally distributed at all stages to keep the egg free of bacteria and of 81 proteins, the function of which could not be ascribed. PMID:26306314

  3. Studying of crystal growth and overall crystallization of naproxen from binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, E; Madejczyk, O; Tarnacka, M; Jurkiewicz, K; Kaminski, K; Paluch, M

    2017-04-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were applied to investigate the molecular dynamics and phase transitions in binary mixtures composed of naproxen (NAP) and acetylated saccharides: maltose (acMAL) and sucrose (acSUC). Moreover, the application of BDS method and optical microscopy enabled us to study both crystallization kinetics and crystal growth of naproxen from the solid dispersions with the highest content of modified carbohydrates (1:5wt ratio). It was found that the activation barriers of crystallization estimated from dielectric measurements are completely different for both studied herein mixtures. Much higher E a (=205kJ/mol) was obtained for NAP-acMAL solid dispersion. It is probably due to simultaneous crystallization of both components of the mixture. On the other hand, lower value of E a in the case of NAP-acSUC solid dispersion (81kJ/mol) indicated, that naproxen is the only crystallizing compound. This hypothesis was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. We also suggested that specific intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions between active substance and excipient may be an alternative explanation for the difference between activation barrier obtained for NAP-acMAL and NAP-acSUC binary mixtures. Furthermore, optical measurements showed that the activation energy for crystal growth of naproxen increases in binary mixtures. They also revealed that both excipients: acMAL and acSUC move the temperature of the maximum of crystal growth towards lower temperatures. Interestingly, this maximum occurs for nearly the same structural relaxation time, which is a good approximation of viscosity, for all samples. Finally, it was also noticed that although naproxen crystallizes to the same polymorphic form in both systems, there are some differences in morphology of obtained crystals. Thus, the observed behavior may have a significant impact on the bioavailability and dissolution rate of API produced in that way

  4. Delta L: An Apparatus for Measuring Macromolecular Crystal Growth Rates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In order to determine how macromolecule crystal quality improvement in microgravity is related to crystal growth characteristics, is was necessary to develop new hardware that could measure the crystal growth rates of a population of crystals growing under the same solution conditions. As crystal growth rate is defined as the change or delta in a defined dimension or length (L) of a crystal over time, the hardware was named Delta L. Delta L consists of fluids, optics, and data acquisition, sub-assemblies. Temperature control is provided for the crystal growth chamber. Delta L will be used in connection with the Glovebox Integrated Microgravity Isolation Technology (g-LIMIT) inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Delta L prototype hardware has been assembled. This paper will describe an overview of the design of Delta L and present preliminary crystal growth rate data.

  5. Ground Based Program for the Physical Analysis of Macromolecular Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malkin, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    During the past year we have focused on application of in situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for studies of the growth mechanisms and kinetics of crystallization for different macromolecular systems. Mechanisms of macrostep formation and their decay, which are important in understanding of defect formation, were studied on the surfaces of thaumatin, catalase, canavalin and lysozyme crystals. Experiments revealed that step bunching on crystalline surfaces occurred either due to two- or three-dimensional nucleation on the terraces of vicinal slopes or as a result of uneven step generation by complex dislocation sources. No step bunching arising from interaction of individual steps in the course of the experiment was observed. The molecular structure of the growth steps for thaumatin and lipase crystals were deduced. It was further shown that growth step advance occurs by incorporation of single protein molecules. In singular directions growth steps move by one-dimensional nucleation on step edges followed by lateral growth. One-dimensional nuclei have different sizes, less then a single unit cell, varying for different directions of step movement. There is no roughness due to thermal fluctuations, and each protein molecule which incorporated into the step remained. Growth kinetics for catalase crystals was investigated over wide supersaturation ranges. Strong directional kinetic anisotropy in the tangential step growth rates in different directions was seen. The influence of impurities on growth kinetics and cessation of macromolecular crystals was studied. Thus, for catalase, in addition to pronounced impurity effects on the kinetics of crystallization, we were also able to directly observe adsorption of some impurities. At low supersaturation we repeatedly observed filaments which formed from impurity molecules sedimenting on the surfaces. Similar filaments were observed on the surfaces of thaumatin, canavalin and STMV crystals as well, but the frequency was low

  6. Thermal Optimization of Growth and Quality in Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that larger and higher quality crystals can be attained in the microgravity of space; however, the effect of growth rate on protein crystal quality is not well documented. This research is the first step towards providing strategies to grow crystals under constant rates of growth. Controlling growth rates at a constant value allows for direct one-to-one comparison of results obtained in microgravity and on earth. The overall goal of the project was to control supersaturation at a constant value during protein crystal growth by varying temperature in a predetermined manner. Applying appropriate theory requires knowledge of specific physicochemical properties of the protein solution including the effect of supersaturation on growth rates and the effect of temperature on protein solubility. Such measurements typically require gram quantities of protein and many months of data acquisition. A second goal of the project applied microcalorimetry for the rapid determination of these physicochemical properties using a minimum amount of protein. These two goals were successfully implemented on hen egg-white lysozyme. Results of these studies are described in the attached reprints.

  7. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite.

    PubMed

    Belova, D A; Lakshtanov, L Z; Carneiro, J F; Stipp, S L S

    2014-12-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite and chalk and pH ranging from 7.7 to 8.8, explored the influence of initial concentration and the amount and type of sorbent on Ni uptake. Adsorption increases with increased surface area and pH. A surface complexation model describes the data well. Stability constants for the Ni surface complex are log KNi=-1.12 on calcite and log KNi=-0.43 and -0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts of polysaccharides and clay nanoparticles on the chalk surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hot zone design for controlled growth to mitigate cracking in laser crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Lili; Fang, Haisheng

    2011-03-01

    Cracking is a major problem during large diameter crystal growth. The objective of this work is to design an effective hot zone for a controlled growth of Yb:S-FAP [Yb3+:Sr5(PO4)3F] laser crystal by the Czochralski technology and effective cooling that can reduce stress. Theoretical and numerical analyses are performed to study the causes of cracking, mitigate the major cracking, as well as reduce cooling time. In the current system, three locations in the crystal are prone to crack, such as the top shoulder of the crystal, the middle portion above the crucible edge, and the bottom tail portion. Based on numerical simulations, we propose a new hot zone design and cooling procedure to grow and cool large diameter crystal without cracking.

  9. Mechanisms of protein and virus crystal growth: An atomic force microscopy study of canavalin and STMV crystallization

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Land, T.A.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Malkin, A.J.

    1996-05-01

    The evolution of surface morphology and step dynamics during growth of rhombohedral crystals of the protein canavalin and crystals of the cubic satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) have been investigated for the first time by in situ atomic force microscopy. These two crystals were observed to grow by very different mechanisms. Growth of canavalin occurs on complex vicinal hillocks formed by multiple, independently acting screw dislocations. Small clusters were observed on the terraces. STMV on the other hand, was observed to grow by 2D nucleation of islands. No dislocations were found on the crystal. The results are used to determinemore » the growth mechanisms and estimate the fundamental materials parameters. The images also illustrate the important mechanism of defect incorporation and provide insight to the processes that limit the growth rate and uniformity of these crystals.« less

  10. Up-scaling mineral-aqueous interfacial processes that govern isotope and trace element partitioning during calcite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    The dependence of the isotopic and trace element composition of calcium carbonate minerals on growth conditions including temperature, pH, and salinity is widely used to infer paleoclimate conditions. These inferences rely heavily on phenomenological observations of biogenic and inorganic precipitation both in and ex situ, where only limited variability in solution conditions can be explored. Ionic fluxes between the mineral surface and aqueous growth solution govern the net uptake of both stoichiometric and trace species during calcification, so developing a mechanistic understanding of the reactions governing these fluxes is critical to refine existing proxies and to develop new ones. The micro-scale mechanisms of calcite precipitation from aqueous solution have been extensively studied, and net ionic uptake post-nucleation is known to occur primarily at monomolecular kink sites along step edges at the mineral surface. In this talk, I will present a theoretical framework that uses the quasi-elementary ion attachment and detachment reactions governing ion uptake at kink sites to simultaneously model bulk mineral growth kinetics and tracer partitioning during calcite precipitation. Several distinct processes occur during ion uptake at kink sites that can influence the distribution of trace species, directly impacting the composition of various carbonate paleoproxies including δ44Ca, δ18O, Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca. The distribution of these trace species will be shown to depend on (1) the relative rates of ion desolvation during attachment to kink sites, (2) the relative rates of bond breaking during detachment from kink sites, and (3) the equilibrium partitioning of trace aqueous species. This model accounts for the impact of solution conditions on net ion fluxes and surface speciation, which in turn controls the population of kink sites available for direct ion exchange with the aqueous phase. The impacts of solution variables including pH, temperature and salinity can

  11. Progress in the Growth of Yb:S-FAP Laser Crystals

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schaffers, K I; Tassano, J B; Waide, P A

    The crystal growth of Yb:S-FAP [Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F] is being studied for 1.047-{micro}m laser operation. These crystals are not yet routinely available and the growth of high optical quality, low loss crystals poses a challenge due to a number of crystal growth issues, including, cloudiness, bubble core defects, anomalous absorption, low-angle grain boundaries, and cracking. At this time, a growth process has been formulated to simultaneously eliminate or greatly diminish each of the defects yielding high quality material. Laser slabs of dimension 4.0 x 6.0 x 0.75 cm are being fabricated from sub-scale pieces using the diffusion bondingmore » technique.« less

  12. Hydrothermal crystal growth of ABe 2BO 3F 2 (A=K, Rb, Cs, Tl) NLO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Colin D.; Kolis, Joseph W.

    2008-04-01

    Crystals of a family of compounds, ABe 2BO 3F 2 (ABBF, A=K, Rb, Cs, Tl), have been grown hydrothermally. Each of these materials was studied using the powder SHG technique and exhibited promising NLO behavior. Seeded crystal growth was demonstrated and the growth conditions were optimized by modifying the temperature, thermal gradient and mineralizer concentration. RbBe 2BO 3F 2 crystals possessed a particularly good combination of SHG intensity, favorable crystal habit and fast growth rates. High quality crystals suitable for advanced deep-UV NLO studies were grown at rates of 0.11 mm/day on (0 0 1) and 0.12 mm/day perpendicular to (0 0 1).

  13. Polysaccharide chemistry regulates kinetics of calcite nucleation through competition of interfacial energies.

    PubMed

    Giuffre, Anthony J; Hamm, Laura M; Han, Nizhou; De Yoreo, James J; Dove, Patricia M

    2013-06-04

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Here we quantify the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto a suite of high-purity polysaccharide (PS) substrates under controlled conditions. The energy barriers to nucleation are PS-specific by a systematic relationship to PS charge density and substrate structure that is rooted in minimization of the competing substrate-crystal and substrate-liquid interfacial energies. Chitosan presents a low-energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate-crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate-crystal interfaces. The findings support a directing role for PS in biomineral formation and demonstrate that substrate-crystal interactions are one end-member in a larger continuum of competing forces that regulate heterogeneous crystal nucleation.

  14. Polysaccharide chemistry regulates kinetics of calcite nucleation through competition of interfacial energies

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Laura M.; Han, Nizhou; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Here we quantify the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto a suite of high-purity polysaccharide (PS) substrates under controlled conditions. The energy barriers to nucleation are PS-specific by a systematic relationship to PS charge density and substrate structure that is rooted in minimization of the competing substrate–crystal and substrate–liquid interfacial energies. Chitosan presents a low-energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate–crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate–crystal interfaces. The findings support a directing role for PS in biomineral formation and demonstrate that substrate–crystal interactions are one end-member in a larger continuum of competing forces that regulate heterogeneous crystal nucleation. PMID:23690577

  15. Temperature cycling vapor deposition HgI.sub.2 crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Schieber, Michael M.; Beinglass, Israel; Dishon, Giora

    1977-01-01

    A method and horizontal furnace for vapor phase growth of HgI.sub.2 crystals which utilizes controlled axial and radial airflow to maintain the desired temperature gradients. The ampoule containing the source material is rotated while axial and radial air tubes are moved in opposite directions during crystal growth to maintain a desired distance and associated temperature gradient with respect to the growing crystal, whereby the crystal interface can advance in all directions, i.e., radial and axial according to the crystallographic structure of the crystal. Crystals grown by this method are particularly applicable for use as room-temperature nuclear radiation detectors.

  16. Direct observation of crystal growth from solution using optical investigation of a growing crystal face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, Ravindra

    1994-01-01

    The first technical report for the period 1 Jan. 1993 till 31 Dec. 1993 for the research entitled, 'Direct observation of crystal growth from solution using Optical Investigation of a growing crystal Face' is presented. The work on the project did not start till 1 June 1993 due to the non-availability of the required personnel. The progress of the work during the period 1 June 1993 till the end of 1993 is described. Significant progress was made for testing various optical diagnostic techniques for monitoring crystal solution. Some of the techniques that are being tested are: heterodyne detection technique, in which changes in phase are measured as a interferometric function of time/crystal growth; a conventional technique, in which a fringe brightness is measured as a function of crystal growth/time; and a Mach-Zehnder interferometric technique in which a fringe brightness is measured as a function of time to obtain information on concentration changes. During the second year it will be decided to incorporate the best interferometric technique along with the ellipsometric technique, to obtain real time in-situ growth rate measurements. A laboratory mock-up of the first two techniques were made and tested.

  17. Solidification and crystal growth of solid solution semiconducting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Problems associated with the solidification and crytal growth of solid-solution semiconducting alloy crystals in a terrestrial environment are described. A detailed description is given of the results for the growth of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) alloy crystals by directional solidification, because of their considerable technological importance. A series of HgCdTe alloy crystals are grown from pseudobinary melts by a vertical Bridgman method using a wide range of growth rates and thermal conditions. Precision measurements are performed to establish compositional profiles for the crystals. The compositional variations are related to compositional variations in the melts that can result from two-dimensional diffusion or density gradient driven flow effects ahead of the growth interface. These effects are discussed in terms of the alloy phase equilibrium properties, the recent high temperature thermophysical data for the alloys and the highly unusual heat transfer characteristics of the alloy/ampule/furnace system that may readily lead to double diffusive convective flows in a gravitational environment.

  18. Functionalization of biomineral reinforcement in crustacean cuticle: Calcite orientation in the partes incisivae of the mandibles of Porcellio scaber and the supralittoral species Tylos europaeus (Oniscidea, Isopoda).

    PubMed

    Huber, Julia; Griesshaber, Erika; Nindiyasari, Fitriana; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Ziegler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In arthropods the cuticle forms an exoskeleton with its physical and chemical properties adapted to functions of distinct skeletal elements. The cuticle of the partes incisivae (PI) in mandibles of terrestrial isopods is a composite of chitin-protein fibrils/fibres and minerals. It consists of an unmineralized tip, a middle region with organic fibrils reinforced mainly with amorphous calcium phosphate and a base region mineralized with amorphous calcium carbonate and calcite. In this study we extend our work on the structure and material properties of the incisive cuticle employing electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and investigate calcite orientation patterns in the PI of two terrestrial isopod species from different habitats. We trace small-scale differences in texture sharpness and calcite microstructure, and compare calcite organization and orientation patterns in the PI with those in the tergites of the same isopod species. We observe that in the PI calcite orientation, the degree of crystal alignment, and mode of crystalline domain assemblage is highly varied within short length scales. This contrasts to calcite organization in the tergite cuticle, where calcite has only one specific texture pattern. Such a large range in the variation of calcite organization has not been observed in other carbonate biological hard tissues, such as shells and teeth, where one specific texture and microstructure prevails. Thus, the investigated isopod species are able to control crystallization of the amorphous carbonate precursor in a differential way, most probably related to the function of the individual skeletal element and the animals' behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transport modes during crystal growth in a centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Carlson, Frederick; Chait, Arnon; Regel', Liia L.

    1992-01-01

    Flow modes arising under average acceleration in centrifugal crystal growth, the gradient of acceleration, and the Coriolis force are investigated using a fully nonlinear three-dimensional numerical model for a centrifugal crystal growth experiment. The analysis focuses on an examination of the quasi-steady state flow modes. The importance of the gradient acceleration is determined by the value of a new nondimensional number, Ad.

  20. Calcite dissolution rate spectra measured by in situ digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Alexander S; Feng, Pan; Bullard, Jeffrey W

    2017-09-01

    Digital holographic microscopy in reflection mode is used to track in situ , real-time nanoscale topography evolution of cleaved (104) calcite surfaces exposed to flowing or static deionized water. The method captures full-field holograms of the surface at frame rates of up to 12.5 s -1 . Numerical reconstruction provides 3D surface topography with vertical resolution of a few nanometers and enables measurement of time-dependent local dissolution fluxes. A statistical distribution, or spectrum, of dissolution rates is generated by sampling multiple area domains on multiple crystals. The data show, as has been demonstrated by Fischer et al. (2012), that dissolution is most fully described by a rate spectrum, although the modal dissolution rate agrees well with published mean dissolution rates ( e.g. , 0.1 µmol m -2 s -1 to 0.3 µmol m -2 s -1 ). Rhombohedral etch pits and other morphological features resulting from rapid local dissolution appear at different times and are heterogeneously distributed across the surface and through the depth. This makes the distribution in rates measured on a single crystal dependent both on the sample observation field size and on time, even at nominally constant undersaturation. Statistical analysis of the inherent noise in the DHM measurements indicates that the technique is robust and that it likely can be applied to quantify and interpret rate spectra for the dissolution or growth of other minerals.

  1. Fundamental Studies of Crystal Growth of Microporous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, P.; George, M.; Ramachandran, N.; Schoeman, B.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microporous materials are framework structures with well-defined porosity, often of molecular dimensions. Zeolites contain aluminum and silicon atoms in their framework and are the most extensively studied amongst all microporous materials. Framework structures with P, Ga, Fe, Co, Zn, B, Ti and a host of other elements have also been made. Typical synthesis of microporous materials involve mixing the framework elements (or compounds, thereof) in a basic solution, followed by aging in some cases and then heating at elevated temperatures. This process is termed hydrothermal synthesis, and involves complex chemical and physical changes. Because of a limited understanding of this process, most synthesis advancements happen by a trial and error approach. There is considerable interest in understanding the synthesis process at a molecular level with the expectation that eventually new framework structures will be built by design. The basic issues in the microporous materials crystallization process include: (1) Nature of the molecular units responsible for the crystal nuclei formation; (2) Nature of the nuclei and nucleation process; (3) Growth process of the nuclei into crystal; (4) Morphological control and size of the resulting crystal; (5) Surface structure of the resulting crystals; (6) Transformation of frameworks into other frameworks or condensed structures. The NASA-funded research described in this report focuses to varying degrees on all of the above issues and has been described in several publications. Following is the presentation of the highlights of our current research program. The report is divided into five sections: (1) Fundamental aspects of the crystal growth process; (2) Morphological and Surface properties of crystals; (3) Crystal dissolution and transformations; (4) Modeling of Crystal Growth; (5) Relevant Microgravity Experiments.

  2. Coccolithophore responses to environmental variability in the South China Sea: species composition and calcite content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaobo; Liu, Chuanlian; Poulton, Alex J.; Dai, Minhan; Guo, Xianghui

    2016-08-01

    Coccolithophore contributions to the global marine carbon cycle are regulated by the calcite content of their scales (coccoliths) and the relative cellular levels of photosynthesis and calcification rates. All three of these factors vary between coccolithophore species and with response to the growth environment. Here, water samples were collected in the northern basin of the South China Sea (SCS) during summer 2014 in order to examine how environmental variability influenced species composition and cellular levels of calcite content. Average coccolithophore abundance and their calcite concentration in the water column were 11.82 cells mL-1 and 1508.3 pg C mL-1, respectively, during the cruise. Water samples can be divided into three floral groups according to their distinct coccolithophore communities. The vertical structure of the coccolithophore community in the water column was controlled by the trophic conditions, which were regulated by mesoscale eddies across the SCS basin. The evaluation of coccolithophore-based calcite in the surface ocean also showed that three key species in the SCS (Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, Florisphaera profunda) and other larger, numerically rare species made almost equal contributions to total coccolith-based calcite in the water column. For Emiliania huxleyi biometry measurements, coccolith size positively correlated with nutrients (nitrate, phosphate), and it is suggested that coccolith length is influenced by light and nutrients through the regulation of growth rates. Larger-sized coccoliths were also linked statistically to low pH and calcite saturation states; however, it is not a simple cause and effect relationship, as carbonate chemistry was strongly co-correlated with the other key environmental factors (nutrients, light).

  3. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental setup for the in-situ high resolution optical monitoring of protein crystal growth/dissolution morphologies was substantially improved. By augmenting the observation system with a temperature-controlled enclosure, laser illumination for the interferometric microscope, and software for pixel by pixel light intensity recording, a height resolution of about two unit cells for lysozyme can now be obtained. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied. Quite unexpectedly, it was found that the longer crystals were in contact with their solution, the lower was their ion content. The development of a model for diffusive-convective transport and resulting distribution of the growth rate on facets was completed. Results obtained for a realistic growth cell geometry show interesting differences between 'growth runs' at 1g and 0g. The kinematic viscosity of lysozyme solutions of various supersaturations and salt concentrations was monitored over time. In contrast to the preliminary finding of other authors, no changes in viscosity were found over four days. The experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions was completed, and a computer program for the evaluation of multi-angle light scattering data was acquired.

  4. Minimal physical requirements for crystal growth self-poisoning

    DOE PAGES

    Whitelam, Stephen; Dahal, Yuba Raj; Schmit, Jeremy D.

    2016-02-10

    Self-poisoning is a kinetic trap that can impair or prevent crystal growth in a wide variety of physical settings. In this paper, we use dynamic mean-field theory and computer simulation to argue that poisoning is ubiquitous because its emergence requires only the notion that a molecule can bind in two (or more) ways to a crystal; that those ways are not energetically equivalent; and that the associated binding events occur with sufficiently unequal probability. If these conditions are met then the steady-state growth rate is in general a non-monotonic function of the thermodynamic driving force for crystal growth, which ismore » the characteristic of poisoning. Finally, our results also indicate that relatively small changes of system parameters could be used to induce recovery from poisoning.« less

  5. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ng, Joseph D; Baird, James K; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M; Hodge, Teresa A; Huang, Sijay

    2015-04-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  6. Unsteady-state transfer of impurities during crystal growth of sucrose in sugarcane solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, P. M.; Ferreira, A.; Polanco, S.; Rocha, F.; Damas, A. M.; Rein, P.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we present growth rate data of sucrose crystals in the presence of impurities that can be used by both sugar technologists and crystal growth scientists. Growth rate curves measured in a pilot-scale evaporative crystallizer suggest a period of slow growth that follows the seeding of crystals into supersaturated technical solutions. The observed trend was enhanced by adding typical sugarcane impurities such as starch, fructose or dextran to the industrial syrups. Maximum growth rates of sucrose resulted at intermediate rather than high supersaturation levels in the presence of the additives. The effects of the additives on the sucrose solubility and sucrose mass transfer in solution were taken into account to explain the observed crystal growth kinetics. A novel mechanism was identified of unsteady-state adsorption of impurities at the crystal surface and their gradual replacement by the crystallizing solute towards the equilibrium occupation of the active sites for growth. Specifically designed crystallization experiments at controlled supersaturation confirmed this mechanism by showing increasing crystal growth rates with time until reaching a steady-state value for a given supersaturation level and impurity content.

  7. Apparatus for single ice crystal growth from the melt.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Salvador; Nakatsubo, Shunichi; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2009-11-01

    A crystal growth apparatus was designed and built to study the effect of growth modifiers, antifreeze proteins and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), on ice crystal growth kinetics and morphology. We used a capillary growth technique to obtain a single ice crystal with well-defined crystallographic orientation grown in AFGP solution. The basal plane was readily observed by rotation of the capillary. The main growth chamber is approximately a 0.8 ml cylindrical volume. A triple window arrangement was used to minimize temperature gradients and allow for up to 10 mm working distance objective lens. Temperature could be established to within +/-10 mK in as little as 3.5 min and controlled to within +/-2 mK after 15 min for at least 10 h. The small volume growth chamber and fast equilibration times were necessary for parabolic flight microgravity experiments. The apparatus was designed for use with inverted and side mount configurations.

  8. The dynamic nature of crystal growth in pores

    DOE PAGES

    Godinho, Jose R. A.; Gerke, Kirill M.; Stack, Andrew G.; ...

    2016-09-12

    We report that the kinetics of crystal growth in porous media controls a variety of natural processes such as ore genesis and crystallization induced fracturing that can trigger earthquakes and weathering, as well as, sequestration of CO 2 and toxic metals into geological formations. Progress on understanding those processes has been limited by experimental difficulties of dynamically studying the reactive surface area and permeability during pore occlusion. Here, we show that these variables cause a time-dependency of barite growth rates in microporous silica. The rate is approximately constant and similar to that observed on free surfaces if fast flow velocitiesmore » predominate and if the time-dependent reactive surface area is accounted for. As the narrower flow paths clog, local flow velocities decrease, which causes the progressive slowing of growth rates. We conclude that mineral growth in a microporous media can be estimated based on free surface studies when a) the growth rate is normalized to the time-dependent surface area of the growing crystals, and b) the local flow velocities are above the limit at which growth is transport-limited. Lastly, accounting for the dynamic relation between microstructure, flow velocity and growth rate is shown to be crucial towards understanding and predicting precipitation in porous rocks.« less

  9. Nucleation and Epitaxy-Mediated Phase Transformation of a Precursor Cadmium Carbonate Phase at the Calcite/Water Interface

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Riechers, Shawn L.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    Mineral nucleation can be catalyzed by the presence of mineral substrates; however, the mechanisms of heterogeneous nucleation remain poorly understood. A combination of in situ time-sequenced measurements and nano-manipulation experiments were performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation of otavite (CdCO3) on calcite (CaCO3) single crystals that exposed the (10-14) surface. Otavite and calcite are isostructural carbonates that display a 4% lattice mismatch, based on their (10-14) surface areas. AFM observations revealed a two-stage process in the nucleation of cadmium carbonate surface precipitates. As evidenced by changes in height, shape, growth behavior, and frictionmore » signal of the precipitates, a precursor phase was observed to initially form on the surface and subsequently undergo an epitaxy-mediated phase transformation to otavite, which then grew epitaxially. Nano-manipulation experiments, in which the applied force was increased progressively until precipitates were removed from the surface, showed that adhesion of the precursor phase to the substrate was distinctively weaker than that of the epitaxial phase, consistent with that of an amorphous phase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that heterogeneous mineral nucleation can follow a non-classical pathway like that found in homogenous aqueous conditions.« less

  10. Delta L: An Apparatus for Measuring Macromolecule Crystal Growth Rates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Strongly diffracting high quality macromolecule crystals of suitable volume are keenly sought for X-ray diffraction analysis so that high-resolution molecular structure data can be obtained. Such data is of tremendous value to medical research, agriculture and commercial biotechnology. In previous studies by many investigators microgravity has been reported in some instances to improve biological macromolecule X-ray crystal quality while little or no improvement was observed in other cases. A better understanding of processes effecting crystal quality improvement in microgravity will therefore be of great benefit in optimizing crystallization success in microgravity. In ground based research with the protein lysozyme we have previously shown that a population of crystals grown under the same solution conditions, exhibit a variation in X-ray diffraction properties (Judge et al., 1999). We have also observed that under the same solution conditions, individual crystals will grow at slightly different growth rates. This phenomenon is called growth rate dispersion. For small molecule materials growth rate dispersion has been directly related to crystal quality (Cunningham et al., 1991; Ristic et al., 1991). We therefore postulate that microgravity may act to improve crystal quality by reducing growth rate dispersion. If this is the case then as different, Materials exhibit different degrees of growth rate dispersion on the ground then growth rate dispersion could be used to screen which materials may benefit the most from microgravity crystallization. In order to assess this theory the Delta L hardware is being developed so that macromolecule crystal growth rates can be measured in microgravity. Crystal growth rate is defined as the change or delta in crystal size (defined as a characteristic length, L) over time; hence the name of the hardware. Delta L will consist of an optics, a fluids, and a data acquisition sub-assemblies. The optics assembly will consist of a

  11. Modeling elasticity in crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Elder, K R; Katakowski, Mark; Haataja, Mikko; Grant, Martin

    2002-06-17

    A new model of crystal growth is presented that describes the phenomena on atomic length and diffusive time scales. The former incorporates elastic and plastic deformation in a natural manner, and the latter enables access to time scales much larger than conventional atomic methods. The model is shown to be consistent with the predictions of Read and Shockley for grain boundary energy, and Matthews and Blakeslee for misfit dislocations in epitaxial growth.

  12. Crystal growth of device quality GaAs in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.

    1983-01-01

    GaAs device technology has recently reached a new phase of rapid advancement, made possible by the improvement of the quality of GaAs bulk crystals. At the same time, the transition to the next generation of GaAs integrated circuits and optoelectronic systems for commercial and government applications hinges on new quantum steps in three interrelated areas: crystal growth, device processing and device-related properties and phenomena. Special emphasis is placed on the establishment of quantitative relationships among crystal growth parameters-material properties-electronic properties and device applications. The overall program combines studies of crystal growth on novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor material (i.e., GaAs and related compounds); investigation and correlation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro- and microscale; and investigation of electronic properties and phenomena controlling device applications and device performance.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Physical Vapor Transport in Contactless Crystal Growth Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Lowry, S.; Krishnam, A.; Przekwas, A.; Grasza, K.

    1998-01-01

    Growth from the vapor under conditions of limited contact with the walls of the growth ampoule is beneficial for the quality of the growing crystal due to reduced stress and contamination which may be caused by interactions with the growth container. The technique may be of a particular interest for studies on crystal growth under microgravity conditions: elimination of some factors affecting the crystal quality may make interpretation of space-conducted processes more conclusive and meaningful. For that reason, and as a part of our continuing studies on 'contactless' growth technique, we have developed a computational model of crystal growth process in such system. The theoretical model was built, and simulations were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code, (CFD) ACE. The code uses an implicit finite volume formulation with a gray discrete ordinate method radiation model which accounts for the diffuse absorption and reflection of radiation throughout the furnace. The three-dimensional model computes the heat transfer through the crystal, quartz, and gas both inside and outside the ampoule, and mass transport from the source to the crystal and the sink. The heat transport mechanisms by conduction, natural convection, and radiation, and mass transport by diffusion and convection are modeled simultaneously and include the heat of the phase transition at the solid-vapor interfaces. As the thermal boundary condition, temperature profile along the walls of the furnace is used. For different thermal profiles and furnace and ampoule dimensions, the crystal growth rate and development of the crystal-vapor and source-vapor interfaces (change of the interface shape and location with time) are obtained. Super/under-saturation in the ampoule is determined and critical factors determining the 'contactless' growth conditions are identified and discussed. The relative importance of the ampoule dimensions and geometry, the furnace dimensions and its

  14. FNAS/advanced protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1992-01-01

    A scintillation method is presented for determination of the temperature dependence of the solubility, S(T), of proteins in 50-100 micro-l volumes of solution. S(T) data for lysozyme and horse serum albumin were obtained for various combinations of pH and precipitant concentrations. The resulting kinetics and equilibrium information was used for dynamic control, that is the separation of nucleation and growth stages in protein crystallization. Individual lysozyme and horse serum albumin crystals were grown in 15-20 micro-l solution volumes contained in x-ray capillaries.

  15. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a crystal growth apparatus (10) generally used for growing protein crystals wherein a vapor diffusion method is used for growing the crystals. In this apparatus, a precipitating solution and a solution containing dissolved crystalline material are stored in separate vials (12, 14), each having a resilient diaphragm (28) across one end and an opening (24) with a puncturable septum (26) thereacross at an opposite end. The vials are placed in receptacles (30) having a manifold (41) with a manifold diaphragm (42) in contact with the vial diaphragm at one end of the receptacle and a hollow needle (36) for puncturing the septum at the other end of the manifold. The needles of each vial communicate with a ball mixer (40) that mixes the precipitate and protein solutions and directs the mixed solution to a drop support (64) disposed in a crystal growth chamber (16), the drop support being a tube with an inner bevelled surface (66) that provides more support for the drop (68) than the tubes of the prior art. A sealable storage region (70) intermediate the drop support and mixer provides storage of the drop (68) and the grown crystals.

  16. Inclusion free cadmium zinc tellurium and cadmium tellurium crystals and associated growth method

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleskey E [South Setauket, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2010-07-20

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for crystal growth of cadmium zinc tellurium (CZT) and cadmium tellurium (CdTe) crystals with an inverted growth reactor chamber. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables growth of single, large, high purity CZT and CdTe crystals that can be used, for example, in X-ray and gamma detection, substrates for infrared detectors, or the like. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables reductions in the presence of Te inclusions, which are recognized as an important limiting factor in using CZT or CdTe as radiation detectors. The inverted growth reactor chamber can be utilized with existing crystal growth techniques such as the Bridgman crystal growth mechanism and the like. In an exemplary embodiment, the inverted growth reactor chamber is a U-shaped ampoule.

  17. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton; ...

    2015-03-30

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for themore » growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. We report that these include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.« less

  18. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.; Hodge, Teresa A.; Huang, Sijay

    2015-01-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations. PMID:25849493

  19. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for themore » growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. We report that these include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.« less

  20. Dendritic Growth of Hard-Sphere Crystals. Experiment 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Meyer, W. V.; Rogers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations of the disorder-order transition for colloidal hard spheres under microgravity revealed dendritic crystallites roughly 1-2 mm in size for samples in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Order-of-magnitude estimates rationalize the absence of large or dendritic crystals under normal gravity and their stability to annealing in microgravity. A linear stability analysis of the Ackerson and Schaetzel model for crystallization of hard spheres establishes the domain of instability for diffusion-limited growth at small supersaturations. The relationship between hard-sphere and molecular crystal growth is established and exploited to relate the predicted linear instability to the well-developed dendrites observed.

  1. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation Employing Environmental Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gunjo; Youn, Heejung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, five microbes were employed to precipitate calcite in cohesionless soils. Four microbes were selected from calcite-precipitating microbes isolated from calcareous sand and limestone cave soils, with Sporosarcina pasteurii ATCC 11859 (standard strain) used as a control. Urease activities of the four microbes were higher than that of S. pasteurii. The microbes and urea–CaCl2 medium were injected at least four times into cohesionless soils of two different relative densities (60% and 80%), and the amount of calcite precipitation was measured. It was found that the relative density of cohesionless soils significantly affects the amount of calcite precipitation and that there is a weak correlation between urease activity and calcite precipitation. PMID:28773600

  2. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation Employing Environmental Isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gunjo; Youn, Heejung

    2016-06-15

    In this study, five microbes were employed to precipitate calcite in cohesionless soils. Four microbes were selected from calcite-precipitating microbes isolated from calcareous sand and limestone cave soils, with Sporosarcina pasteurii ATCC 11859 (standard strain) used as a control. Urease activities of the four microbes were higher than that of S. pasteurii . The microbes and urea-CaCl₂ medium were injected at least four times into cohesionless soils of two different relative densities (60% and 80%), and the amount of calcite precipitation was measured. It was found that the relative density of cohesionless soils significantly affects the amount of calcite precipitation and that there is a weak correlation between urease activity and calcite precipitation.

  3. Protein crystal growth in microgravity: Temperature induced large scale crystallization of insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Marianna M.; Delucas, Larry J.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Moore, K.; Harrington, Michael D.; Pillion, D. J.; Bishop, S. P.; Rosenblum, W. M.; Naumann, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    One of the major stumbling blocks that prevents rapid structure determination using x-ray crystallography is macro-molecular crystal growth. There are many examples where crystallization takes longer than structure determination. In some cases, it is impossible to grow useful crystals on earth. Recent experiments conducted in conjuction with NASA on various Space Shuttle missions have demonstrated that protein crystals often grow larger and display better internal molecular order than their earth-grown counterparts. This paper reports results from three Shuttle flights using the Protein Crystallization Facility (PCF). The PCF hardware produced large, high-quality insulin crystals by using a temperature change as the sole means to affect protein solubility and thus, crystallization. The facility consists of cylinders/containers with volumes of 500, 200, 100, and 50 ml. Data from the three Shuttle flights demonstrated that larger, higher resolution crystals (as evidenced by x-ray diffraction data) were obtained from the microgravity experiments when compared to earth-grown crystals.

  4. Preliminary investigations of protein crystal growth using the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, L. J.; Suddath, F. L.; Snyder, R.; Naumann, R.; Broom, M. B.; Pusey, M.; Yost, V.; Herren, B .; Carter, D.

    1986-01-01

    Four preliminary Shuttle experiments are described which have been used to develop prototype hardware for a more advanced system that will evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. The first phase of these experiments has centered on the development of micromethods for protein crystal growth by vapor-diffusion techniques (using a space version of the hanging-drop method) and on dialysis using microdialysis cells. Results suggest that the elimination of density-driven sedimentation can effect crystal morphology. In the dialysis experiment, space-grown crystals of concanavalin B were three times longer and 1/3 the thickness of earth-grown crystals.

  5. Zeolite crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Thompson, Robert W.; Dixon, Anthony G.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of large, uniform zeolite crystals in high yield in space can have a major impact on the chemical process industry. Large zeolite crystals will be used to improve basic understanding of adsorption and catalytic mechanisms, and to make zeolite membranes. To grow large zeolites in microgravity, it is necessary to control the nucleation event and fluid motion, and to enhance nutrient transfer. Data is presented that suggests nucleation can be controlled using chemical compounds (e.g., Triethanolamine, for zeolite A), while not adversely effecting growth rate. A three-zone furnace has been designed to perform multiple syntheses concurrently. The operating range of the furnace is 295 K to 473 K. Teflon-lined autoclaves (10 ml liquid volume) have been designed to minimize contamination, reduce wall nucleation, and control mixing of pre-gel solutions on orbit. Zeolite synthesis experiments will be performed on USML-1 in 1992.

  6. Protein crystal growth; Proceedings of the First International Conference, Stanford University, CA, August 14-16, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, R. S. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on mechanisms of nucleation and growth of protein crystals, the role of purification in the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids, and the effect of chemical impurities in polyethylene glycol on macromolecular crystallization. Also considered are growth kinetics of tetragonal lysozyme crystals, thermodynamic and kinetic considerations for crystal growth of complex molecules from solution, protein single-crystal growth under microgravity, and growth of organic crystals in a microgravity environment. Papers are also presented on preliminary investigations of protein crystal growth using the Space Shuttle, convective diffusion in protein crystal growth, and the growth and characterization of membrane protein crystals.

  7. Crystal growth of device quality GaAs in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, Harry C.; Lagowski, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    The program on Crystal Growth of Device Quality GaAs in Space was initiated in 1977. The initial stage covering 1977 to 1984 was devoted strictly to ground-based research. By 1985 the program had evolved into its next logical stage aimed at space growth experiments; however, since the Challenger disaster, the program has been maintained as a ground-based program awaiting activation of experimentation in space. The overall prgram has produced some 80 original scientific publications on GaAs crystal growth, crystal characterization, and new approaches to space processing. Publication completed in the last three years are listed. Their key results are outlined and discussed in the twelve publications included as part of the report.

  8. Gordon Research Conference on Crystal Growth (1990)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    Labs, MH) 14. Cox Vapor Levitation Epitaxy of Quantum Wires and Wire-like Structures Using Laterally Propagating Surface Steps. (Bellcore, Red Bank) 15...introduced many new aspects of crystal growth, including strained layer superlattices, quantum cluster growth, and vertical zone melting of GaAs...Films 2. E. Bauser Semiconductor Liquid Phase Epitaxy: Growth and Properties of Layers and Heterostructures 3. M. L. Steigerwald Growth of Quantum

  9. Crystal Growth of Ternary Compound Semiconductors in Low Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A low gravity material experiment will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). There are two sections of the flight experiment: (I) crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, such as ZnSeS and ZnSeTe, by physical vapor transport (PVT) and (II) melt growth of CdZnTe by directional solidification. The main objective of the project is to determine the relative contributions of gravity-driven fluid flows to the compositional distribution, incorporation of impurities and defects, and deviation from stoichiometry observed in the grown crystals as results of buoyancy-driven convection and growth interface fluctuations caused by irregular fluid-flows on Earth. The investigation consists of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research efforts and concurrent flight experimentation. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the PVT crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds. The objectives of the ground-based studies are (1) obtain the experimental data and conduct the analyses required to define the optimum growth parameters for the flight experiments, (2) perfect various characterization techniques to establish the standard procedure for material characterization, (3) quantitatively establish the characteristics of the crystals grown on Earth as a basis for subsequent comparative evaluations of the crystals grown in a low-gravity environment and (4) develop theoretical and analytical methods required for such evaluations. ZnSe and related ternary compounds have been grown by vapor transport technique with real time in-situ non-invasive monitoring techniques. The grown crystals have been characterized extensively by various techniques to correlate the grown crystal properties with the growth conditions.

  10. The Growth of Berlinite (AlPO4) Single Crystals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    Solubility of AlPO 4 18 6. Solubility Data of Jahn and Kordes on AlPO4 19 7. AlPO 4 Seed Crystal 23 8. Tem-Pres Hydrothermal Research Unit 25 9...Since the vapor pressure of water rises rapidly with temperature, a closed hydrothermal system was used. In a seeded hydrothermal growth process, the...to investigate the hydrothermal growth of Berlinite (AlPO4 ) to determine the optimum growth conditions for large high quality crystals. Over thirty

  11. Crucibleless crystal growth and Radioluminescence study of calcium tungstate single crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. S.; Jesus, L. M.; Barbosa, L. B.; Ardila, D. R.; Andreeta, J. P.; Silva, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    In this article, single phase and high optical quality scheelite calcium tungstate single crystal fibers were grown by using the crucibleless laser heated pedestal growth technique. The as-synthesized calcium tungstate powders used for shaping seed and feed rods were investigated by X-ray diffraction technique. As-grown crystals were studied by Raman spectroscopy and Radioluminescence measurements. The results indicate that in both two cases, calcined powder and single crystal fiber, only the expected scheelite CaWO4 phase was observed. It was verified large homogeneity in the crystal composition, without the presence of secondary phases. The Radioluminescence spectra of the as-grown single crystal fibers are in agreement with that present in Literature for bulk single crystals, presented a single emission band centered at 420 nm when irradiated with β-rays.

  12. Crystal growth in a low gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Crystal growth in microgravity possesses several distinct technological advantages over earth-bound processes; containerless handling and reduction of density gradient driven as well as sedimentation flows. Experiments performed in space to date have been basically reproductions of processes currently used on earth and the results have clarified our understanding of crystal growth dynamics. In addition, both unresolved problems and areas requiring further study on earth have been identified. Future work in space processing of materials must address these areas of study as soon as possible if the full potential of a space environment to develop new techniques and materials is to be realized.

  13. Calcite Biomineralization by Bacterial Isolates from the Recently Discovered Pristine Karstic Herrenberg Cave

    PubMed Central

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M.; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R.; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves. PMID:22179248

  14. Calcite biomineralization by bacterial isolates from the recently discovered pristine karstic herrenberg cave.

    PubMed

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Küsel, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves.

  15. Melt-growth dynamics in CdTe crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, X. W.; Ward, D. K.; Wong, B. M.; ...

    2012-06-01

    We use a new, quantum-mechanics-based bond-order potential (BOP) to reveal melt growth dynamics and fine scale defect formation mechanisms in CdTe crystals. Previous molecular dynamics simulations of semiconductors have shown qualitatively incorrect behavior due to the lack of an interatomic potential capable of predicting both crystalline growth and property trends of many transitional structures encountered during the melt → crystal transformation. Here, we demonstrate successful molecular dynamics simulations of melt growth in CdTe using a BOP that significantly improves over other potentials on property trends of different phases. Our simulations result in a detailed understanding of defect formation during themore » melt growth process. Equally important, we show that the new BOP enables defect formation mechanisms to be studied at a scale level comparable to empirical molecular dynamics simulation methods with a fidelity level approaching quantum-mechanical methods.« less

  16. Microstructures and rheology of a calcite-shale thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Rachel K.; Newman, Julie; Wojtal, Steven

    2014-08-01

    A thin (˜2 cm) layer of extensively sheared fault rock decorates the ˜15 km displacement Copper Creek thrust at an exposure near Knoxville, TN (USA). In these ultrafine-grained (<0.3 μm) fault rocks, interpenetrating calcite grains form an interconnected network around shale clasts. One cm below the fault rock layer, sedimentary laminations in non-penetratively deformed footwall shale are cut by calcite veins, small faults, and stylolites. A 350 μm thick calcite vein separates the fault rocks and footwall shale. The vein is composed of layers of (1) coarse calcite grains (>5 μm) that exhibit a lattice preferred orientation (LPO) with pores at twin-twin and twin-grain boundary intersections, and (2) ultrafine-grained (0.3 μm) calcite that exhibits interpenetrating grain boundaries, four-grain junctions and lacks a LPO. Coarse calcite layers crosscut ultrafine-grained layers indicating intermittent vein formation during shearing. Calcite in the fault rock layer is derived from vein calcite and grain-size reduction of calcite took place by plasticity-induced fracture. The ultrafine-grained calcite deformed primarily by diffusion-accommodated grain boundary sliding and formed an interconnected network around shale clasts within the shear zone. The interconnected network of ultrafine-grained calcite indicates that calcite, not shale, was the weak phase in this fault zone.

  17. Boron Arsenide and Boron Phosphide for High Temperature and Luminescent Devices. [semiconductor devices - crystal growth/crystal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal growth of boron arsenide and boron phosphide in the form of bulk crystals and epitaxial layers on suitable substrates is discussed. The physical, chemical, and electrical properties of the crystals and epitaxial layers are examined. Bulk crystals of boron arsenide were prepared by the chemical transport technique, and their carrier concentration and Hall mobility were measured. The growth of boron arsenide crystals from high temperature solutions was attempted without success. Bulk crystals of boron phosphide were also prepared by chemical transport and solution growth techniques. Techniques required for the fabrication of boron phosphide devices such as junction shaping, diffusion, and contact formation were investigated. Alloying techniques were developed for the formation of low-resistance ohmic contacts to boron phosphide. Four types of boron phosphide devices were fabricated: (1) metal-insulator-boron phosphide structures, (2) Schottky barriers; (3) boron phosphide-silicon carbide heterojunctions; and (4) p-n homojunctions. Easily visible red electroluminescence was observed from both epitaxial and solution grown p-n junctions.

  18. Growth Of Oriented Crystals At Polymerized Membranes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H. , Berman, Amir

    2000-01-25

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the growth and alignment of crystals at biopolymeric films. The methods and compositions of the present invention provide means to generate a variety of dense crystalline ceramic films, with totally aligned crystals, at low temperatures and pressures, suitable for use with polymer and plastic substrates.

  19. Morphology and Kinetics of Growth of CaCO3 Precipitates Formed in Saline Water at 30°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Xin; Wang, Baohui; Wu, Haiming

    2018-02-01

    The crystallization kinetics and morphology of CaCO3 crystals precipitated from the high salinity oilfield water were studied. The crystallization kinetics measurements show that nucleation and nuclei growth obey the first order reaction kinetics. The induction period of precipitation is extended in the high salinity solutions. Morphological studies show that impurity ions remain mostly in the solution phase instead of filling the CaCO3 crystal lattice. The morphology of CaCO3 precipitates can be changed from a smooth surface (calcite) to rough spheres (vaterite), and spindle rod bundles, or spherical, ellipsoid, flowers, plates and other shapes (aragonite).

  20. Fluid mechanics in crystal growth - The 1982 Freeman scholar lecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, S.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to unify the current state of knowledge in crystal growth techniques and fluid mechanics. After identifying important fluid dynamic problems for such representative crystal growth processes as closed tube vapor transport, open reactor vapor deposition, and the Czochralski and floating zone melt growth techniques, research results obtained to date are presented. It is noted that the major effort to date has been directed to the description of the nature and extent of bulk transport under realistic conditions, where bulk flow determines the heat and solute transport which strongly influence the temperature and concentration fields in the vicinity of the growth interface. Proper treatment of near field, or interface, problems cannot be given until the far field, or global flow, involved in a given crystal growth technique has been adequately described.

  1. Microstructural Damage During High-Strain Torsion Experiments on Calcite-Anhydrite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, A. J.; Skemer, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Ductile shear zones play a critical role in localising deformation in the Earth's crust and mantle. Severe grain size reduction - a ubiquitous feature of natural mylonites - is commonly thought to cause strain weakening via a transition to grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms. Although grain size reduction is modulated by grain growth in single-phase aggregates, grain boundary pinning in well-mixed poly-phase composites can inhibit grain growth, leading to microstructural `damage' which is likely a critical element of strain localization in the lithosphere. While dynamic recrystallization has been widely explored in rock mechanics and materials science, the mechanisms behind phase-mixing remain poorly understood. In this contribution we present results from high-strain, deformation experiments on calcite-anhydrite composites. Experiments were conducted in torsion at T = 500-700°C and P 1.5 GPa, using the new Large Volume Torsion (LVT) solid-medium apparatus, to shear strains of 0.5-30. As shear strain increases, progressive thinning and necking of initially large (≤ 1 mm) calcite domains is observed, resulting in an increase in the proportion of interphase boundaries. Grain-size is negatively correlated with the fraction of interphase boundaries, such that calcite grains in well-mixed regions are significantly smaller than those in single-phase domains. Crucially, progressive deformation leads to a reduction in grain-size beyond the lower limit established by the grain size piezometer for mono-phase calcite, implying microstructural damage. These data therefore demonstrate continued microstructural evolution in two-phase composites that is not possible in single-phase aggregates. These observations mark a new `geometric' mechanism for phase mixing, complementing previous models for phase mixing involving chemical reactions, material diffusion, and/or grain boundary sliding.

  2. Vapor Growth and Characterization of Cr-Doped ZnSe Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, Shari; Volz, M. P.; Matyi, R.; George, M. A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Burger, A.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Cr-doped ZnSe single crystals were grown by a self-seeded physical vapor transport technique in both vertical (stabilized) and horizontal configurations. The source materials were mixtures of ZnSe and CrSe. Growth temperatures were in the range of 1140-1150 C and the furnace translation rates were 1.9-2.2 mm/day. The surface morphology of the as-grown crystals was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Different features of the as-grown surface of the vertically and horizontally grown crystals suggest that different growth mechanisms were involved in the two growth configurations. The [Cr] doping levels were determined to be in the range of 1.8-8.3 x 10 (exp 19) cm (exp -3) from optical absorption measurements. The crystalline quality of the grown crystals were examined by high-resolution triple-crystal X-ray diffraction (HRTXD) analysis.

  3. Containerless protein crystal growth technology: Electrostatic multidrop positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1990-01-01

    A brief discussion of containerless protein crystal growth in space and a diagram of the electrostatic multidrop positioner are presented. A picture of lysome crystals growing in a drop and a graph of levitation voltage versus time (minutes) are also presented.

  4. Effect of compression rate on ice VI crystal growth using dDAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Yong-Jae; Lee, Sooheyong; Cho, Yong Chan; Lee, Geun Woo; Frontier in Extreme Physics Team

    It is well known that static and dynamic pressure give different results in many aspects. Understanding of crystal growth under such different pressure condition is one of the crucial issues for the formation of materials in the earth and planets. To figure out the crystal growth under the different pressure condition, we should control compression rate from static to dynamic pressurization. Here, we use a dynamic diamond anvil cell (dDAC) technique to study the effect of compression rate of ice VI crystal growth. Using dDAC with high speed camera, we monitored growth of a single crystal ice VI. A rounded ice crystal with rough surface was selected in the phase boundary of water and ice VI and then, its repetitive growth and melting has been carried out by dynamic operation of the pressure cell. The roughened crystal showed interesting growth transition with compression rate from three dimensional to two dimensional growth as well as faceting process. We will discuss possible mechanism of the growth change by compression rate with diffusion mechanism of water. This research was supported by the Converging Research Center Program through the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Korea (NRF-2014M1A7A1A01030128).

  5. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  6. Strain rate dependent calcite microfabric evolution - An experiment carried out by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard; Huet, Benjamin; Habler, Gerlinde

    2014-12-01

    A flanking structure developed along a secondary shear zone in calcite marbles, on Syros (Cyclades, Greece), provides a natural laboratory for directly studying the effects of strain rate variations on calcite deformation at identical pressure and temperature conditions. The presence and rotation of a fracture during progressive deformation caused extreme variations in finite strain and strain rate, forming a localized ductile shear zone that shows different microstructures and textures. Textures and the degree of intracrystalline deformation were measured by electron backscattered diffraction. Marbles from the host rocks and the shear zone, which deformed at various strain rates, display crystal-preferred orientation, suggesting that the calcite preferentially deformed by intracrystalline-plastic deformation. Increasing strain rate results in a switch from subgrain rotation to bulging recrystallization in the dislocation-creep regime. With increasing strain rate, we observe in fine-grained (3 μm) ultramylonitic zones a change in deformation regime from grain-size insensitive to grain-size sensitive. Paleowattmeter and the paleopiezometer suggest strain rates for the localized shear zone around 10-10 s-1 and for the marble host rock around 10-12 s-1. We conclude that varying natural strain rates can have a first-order effect on the microstructures and textures that developed under the same metamorphic conditions.

  7. Crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L. (Inventor); Reiss, Donald A. (Inventor); Lehoczky, Sandor L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational phenomena, including convection, sedimentation, and interactions of materials with their containers all affect the crystal growth process. If they are not taken into consideration they can have adverse effects on the quantity and quality of crystals produced. As a practical matter, convection, and sedimentation can be completely eliminated only under conditions of low gravity attained during orbital flight. There is, then, an advantage to effecting crystallization in space. In the absence of convection in a microgravity environment cooling proceeds by thermal diffusion from the walls to the center of the solution chamber. This renders control of nucleation difficult. Accordingly, there is a need for a new improved nucleation process in space. Crystals are nucleated by creating a small localized region of high relative supersaturation in a host solution at a lower degree of supersaturation.

  8. Crystal Growth of II-VI Semiconducting Alloys by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Szofran, Frank R.; Su, Ching-Hua; Cobb, Sharon D.; Scripa, Rosalia A.; Sha, Yi-Gao

    1999-01-01

    This research study is investigating the effects of a microgravity environment during the crystal growth of selected II-VI semiconducting alloys on their compositional, metallurgical, electrical and optical properties. The on-going work includes both Bridgman-Stockbarger and solvent growth methods, as well as growth in a magnetic field. The materials investigated are II-VI, Hg(1-x)Zn(x)Te, and Hg(1-x)Zn(x)Se, where x is between 0 and 1 inclusive, with particular emphasis on x-values appropriate for infrared detection and imaging in the 5 to 30 micron wavelength region. Wide separation between the liquidus and solidus of the phase diagrams with consequent segregation during solidification and problems associated with the high volatility of one of the components (Hg), make the preparation of homogeneous, high-quality, bulk crystals of the alloys an extremely difficult nearly an impossible task in a gravitational environment. The three-fold objectives of the on-going investigation are as follows: (1) To determine the relative contributions of gravitationally-driven fluid flows to the compositional redistribution observed during the unidirectional crystal growth of selected semiconducting solid solution alloys having large separation between the liquidus and solidus of the constitutional phase diagram; (2) To ascertain the potential role of irregular fluid flows and hydrostatic pressure effects in generation of extended crystal defects and second-phase inclusions in the crystals; and, (3) To obtain a limited amount of "high quality" materials needed for bulk crystal property characterizations and for the fabrication of various device structures needed to establish ultimate material performance limits. The flight portion of the study was to be accomplished by performing growth experiments using the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) manifested to fly on various Spacelab missions.

  9. Device and method for screening crystallization conditions in solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A device and method for detecting optimum protein crystallization conditions and for growing protein crystals in either 1g or microgravity environments comprising a housing, defining at least one pair of chambers for containing crystallization solutions is presented. The housing further defines an orifice therein for providing fluid communication between the chambers. The orifice is adapted to receive a tube which contains a gelling substance for limiting the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. The solutions are diffusively mixed over a period of time defined by the quantity of gelling substance sufficient to achieve equilibration and to substantially reduce density driven convection disturbances therein. The device further includes endcaps to seal the first and second chambers. One of the endcaps includes a dialysis chamber which contains protein solution in which protein crystals are grown. Once the endcaps are in place, the protein solution is exposed to the crystallization solutions wherein the solubility of the protein solution is reduced at a rate responsive to the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. This allows for a controlled approach to supersaturation and allows for screening of crystal growth conditions at preselected intervals.

  10. Device and Method for Screening Crystallization Conditions in Solution Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A device and method for detecting optimum protein crystallization conditions and for growing protein crystals in either 1 g or microgravity environments comprising a housing defining at least one pair of chambers for containing crystallization solutions. The housing further defines an orifice therein for providing fluid communication between the chambers. The orifice is adapted to receive a tube which contains a gelling substance for limiting the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. The solutions are diffusively mixed over a period of time defined by the quantity of gelling substance sufficient to achieve equilibration and to substantially reduce density driven convection disturbances therein. The device further includes endcaps to seal the first and second chambers. One of the endcaps includes a dialysis chamber which contains protein solution in which protein crystals are grown. Once the endcaps are in place. the protein solution is exposed to the crystallization solutions wherein the solubility of the protein solution is reduced at a rate responsive to the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. This allows for a controlled approach to supersaturation and allows for screening of crystal growth conditions at preselected intervals.

  11. Bulk Group-III Nitride Crystal Growth in Supercritical Ammonia-Sodium Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Steven Herbert

    Gallium nitride (GaN) and its alloys with indium nitride (InGaN) and aluminum nitride (AlGaN), collectively referred to as Group-III Nitride semiconductors, have enabled white solid-state lighting (SSL) sources and power electronic devices. While these technologies have already made a lasting, positive impact on society, improvements in design and efficiency are anticipated by shifting from heteroepitaxial growth on foreign substrates (such as sapphire, Si, SiC, etc.) to homoepitaxial growth on native, bulk GaN substrates. Bulk GaN has not supplanted foreign substrate materials due to the extreme conditions required to achieve a stoichiometric GaN melt (temperatures and pressures in excess of 2200°C and 6 GPa, respectively). The only method used to produce bulk GaN on an industrial scale is hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), but the high cost of gaseous precursors and relatively poor crystal quality have limited the adoption of this technology. A solution growth technique known as the ammonothermal method has attracted interest from academia and industry alike for its ability to produce bulk GaN boules of exceedingly high crystal quality. The ammonothermal method employs supercritical ammonia (NH3) solutions to dissolve, transport, and crystallize GaN. However, ammonothermal growth pressures are still relatively high (˜200 MPa), which has thus far prevented the acquisition of fundamental crystal growth knowledge needed to efficiently (i.e. through data-driven approaches) advance the field. This dissertation focused on addressing the gaps in the literature through two studies employing in situ fluid temperature analysis. The first study focused on identifying the solubility of GaN in supercritical NH3-Na solutions. The design and utilization of in situ and ex situ monitoring equipment enabled the first reports of the two-phase nature of supercritical NH3-Na solutions, and of Ga-alloying of Ni-containing autoclave components. The effects of these error sources on

  12. Computer simulation of rapid crystal growth under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisada, Yasuhiro; Saito, Osami; Mitachi, Koshi; Nishinaga, Tatau

    We are planning to grow a Ge single crystal under microgravity by the TR-IA rocket in 1992. The furnace temperature should be controlled so as to finish the crystal growth in a quite short time interval (about 6 min). This study deals with the computer simulation of rapid crystal growth in space to find the proper conditions for the experiment. The crystal growth process is influenced by various physical phenomena such as heat conduction, natural and Marangoni convections, phase change, and radiation from the furnace. In this study, a 2D simulation with axial symmetry is carried out, taking into account the radiation field with a specific temperature distribution of the furnace wall. The simulation program consists of four modules. The first module is applied for the calculation of the parabolic partial differential equation by using the control volume method. The second one evaluates implicitly the phase change by the enthalpy method. The third one is for computing the heat flux from surface by radiation. The last one is for calculating with the Monte Carlo method the view factors which are necessary to obtain the heat flux.

  13. Experiment 3: Zeolite Crystal Growth in Microgravity- The USML-2 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bac, Nurcan; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive use of zeolites and their impact on the world's economy leads to many efforts to characterize their structure, and to improve the knowledge base for nucleation and growth of these crystals. The Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) experiment on USML-2 aims to enhance the understanding of nucleation and growth of zeolite crystals while attempting to provide a means of controlling the defect concentration in microgravity. Zeolites A, X, Beta, and Silicalite were grown during the 16-day USML-2 mission. The solutions where the nucleation event was controlled yielded larger and more uniform crystals of better morphology and purity than their terrestrial/control counterparts. Space-grown Beta crystals were free of line defects while terrestrial/controls had substantial defects.

  14. Crystal growth and molecular modeling studies of inhibition of struvite by phosphocitrate.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, A; Sallis, J D; Stevens, E D; Smith, M; Sikes, C S

    1997-09-01

    The inhibition by phosphocitrate of struvite crystal formation and growth has been examined in the present study. Crystal growth in a gel matrix was controlled by phosphocitrate in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of inhibition were followed using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and single crystal X-ray analysis. The presence of phosphocitrate induced very strong, crystal face specific inhibition of struvite, leading to total cessation of crystal growth when sufficient concentration of the inhibitor was made available. Crystal growth studies and results from molecular modeling indicated strong affinity of phosphocitrate to (101) faces of struvite. This in turn led to an alteration in the expression of these faces and the development of a characteristic arrowhead struvite morphology. Similar changes were not observed in the presence of identical concentrations of citrate, acetohydroxamic acid, and N-sulfo-2 amino tricarballylate (an analog of phosphocitrate), emphasizing the unique interaction of phosphocitrate with the struvite crystal lattice.

  15. Inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2007-12-26

    The inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate produced by papain action was studied. The ice crystal growth was monitored by thermal cycling between -14 and -12 degrees C at a rate of one cycle per 3 min. It is shown that the hydrolysate fraction containing peptides in the molecular weight range of about 2000-5000 Da exhibited the highest inhibitory activity on ice crystal growth in ice cream mix, whereas fractions containing peptides greater than 7000 Da did not inhibit ice crystal growth. The size distribution of gelatin peptides formed in the hydrolysate was influenced by the pH of hydrolysis. The optimum hydrolysis conditions for producing peptides with maximum ice crystal growth inhibitory activity was pH 7 at 37 degrees C for 10 min at a papain to gelatin ratio of 1:100. However, this may depend on the type and source of gelatin. The possible mechanism of ice crystal growth inhibition by peptides from gelatin is discussed. Molecular modeling of model gelatin peptides revealed that they form an oxygen triad plane at the C-terminus with oxygen-oxygen distances similar to those found in ice nuclei. Binding of this oxygen triad plane to the prism face of ice nuclei via hydrogen bonding appears to be the mechanism by which gelatin hydrolysate might be inhibiting ice crystal growth in ice cream mix.

  16. Strain rate dependent calcite microfabric evolution at natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard; Huet, Benjamin; Habler, Gerlinde

    2014-05-01

    Crystal plastic deformational behaviour of calcite has been the focus of many experimental studies. Different strain rates, pressure and temperature conditions have been addressed to investigate a wide range of deformation regimes. However, a direct comparison with natural fault rocks remains difficult because of extreme differences between experimental and natural strain rates. A flanking structure developed in almost pure calcite marble on Syros (Cyclades, Greece). Due to rotation of a planar feature (crack) a heterogeneous strain field in the surrounding area occurred resulting in different strain domains and the formation of the flanking structure. Assuming that deformation was active continuously during the development of the flanking structure, the different strain domains correspond to different strain-rate domains. The outcrop thus represents the final state of a natural experiment and gives us a great opportunity to get natural constraints on strain rate dependent deformation behaviour of calcite. Comparing the microfabrics in the 1 to 2.5 cm thick shear zone and the surrounding host rocks, which formed under the same metamorphic conditions but with different strain rates, is the central focus of this study. Due to the extreme variation in strain and strain rate, different microstructures and textures can be observed corresponding to different deformation mechanisms. With increasing strain rate we observe a change in dominant deformation mechanism from dislocation glide to dislocation creep and finally diffusion creep. Additionally, a change from subgrain rotation to bulging recrystallization can be observed in the dislocation creep regime. Crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) and the grade of intracrystalline deformation were measured on a FEI Quanta 3D FEG instrument equipped with an EDAX Digiview IV EBSD camera. At all strain rates clear CPOs developed leading to the assumption that calcite preferentially deforms within the dislocation creep

  17. Growth mechanism changes in pseudo-dewetted monolayer poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dun-Shen; Chen, Er-Qiang; Shi, An-Chang; Cheng, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    Crystal growth mechanism changes have been observed in pseudo-dewetted monolayers of low molecular weight (LMW) (PEO) on freshly cleaved hydrophilic mica surfaces [HPEO(4250) which have -OH groups at both ends and MHPEO(4700) which has one -OH and one -OCH3 as end groups]. X-ray scattering reflectivity measurements show a wetted monolayer of molten PEO with a thickness of ˜ 4.5 nm on the mica surface. Non-adsorbed PEO droplets sit on top of the wetted monolayer. A two-step process for PEO single crystal growth under isothermal conditions was identified utilizing in-situ atomic force microscopy at different crystallization temperatures (Tx). In the first step, the crystal grows within the droplet which supplies the molten PEO that participates in the crystal formation. In this second-step, the wetted monolayer at the growth front is depleted by about 1.5 - 2.5 nm. The growing crystal lateral sizes obey a power law of t^α (t: time). At a high Tx of 63 C for MHPEO(4700), the growth behavior obeys r t (α = 1). While in the case of HPEO(4250), its growth behavior follows r t^0.5 (α = 0.5) in the whole Tx range. With decreasing Tx, the growth of MHPEO(4700) falls into a scaling law of r t^α (0.5 < α < 1).

  18. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A crystal growth apparatus is presented. It utilizes a vapor diffusion method for growing protein crystals, and particularly such an apparatus wherein a ball mixer is used to mix the fluids that form a drop within which crystals are grown. Particular novelty of this invention lies in utilizing a ball mixer to completely mix the precipitate and protein solutions prior to forming the drop. Additional novelty lies in details of construction of the vials, the fluid deployment system, and the fluid storage system of the preferred embodiment.

  19. Bridgman growth of lead potassium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shiji; Sun, Renying; Lin, Yafang; Wu, Jindi

    1999-03-01

    Lead potassium niobate Pb 2KNb 5O 15 (PKN) crystals with tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) structure have been grown by the modified Bridgman (BR) method. Nearly sealed Pt crucibles and small temperature gradients in the Bridgman furnace can limit volatilization of PbO and cracking of as-grown PKN crystals. Transparent PKN crystals of 1 inch diameter by ˜2 inch length with brownish color have been grown successfully at a crucible lowering rate <0.5 mm/h and a temperature gradient of 10-15°C/cm across the solid-liquid interface. Coupling between twins and growth directions of the crystal is also discussed.

  20. Nanometer-Scale Chemistry of a Calcite Biomineralization Template: Implications for Skeletal Composition and Nucleation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Branson, Oscar; Bonnin, Elisa A.; Perea, Daniel E.

    Biomineralizing organisms exhibit exquisite control over skeletal morphology and composition. The promise of understanding and harnessing this feat of natural engineering has motivated an intense search for the mechanisms that direct in vivo mineral self-assembly. We used atom probe tomography, a sub-nanometer 3D chemical mapping technique, to examine the chemistry of a buried organic-mineral interface in biomineral calcite from a marine foraminifer. The chemical patterns at this interface capture the processes of early biomineralization, when the shape, mineralogy, and orientation of skeletal growth are initially established. Sodium is enriched by a factor of nine on the organic side of themore » interface. Based on this pattern, we suggest that sodium plays an integral role in early biomineralization, potentially altering interfacial energy to promote crystal nucleation, and that interactions between organic surfaces and electrolytes other than calcium or carbonate could be a crucial aspect of CaCO3 biomineralization.« less

  1. Nanometer-Scale Chemistry of a Calcite Biomineralization Template: Implications for Skeletal Composition and Nucleation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Branson, Oscar; Bonnin, Elisa A.; Perea, Daniel E.

    2016-10-28

    Biomineralizing organisms exhibit exquisite control over skeletal morphology and composition. The promise of understanding and harnessing this feat of natural engineering has motivated an intense search for the mechanisms that direct in vivo mineral self-assembly. We used atom probe tomography, a sub-nanometer 3D chemical mapping technique, to examine the chemistry of a buried organic-mineral interface in biomineral calcite from a marine foraminifer. The chemical patterns at this interface capture the processes of early biomineralization, when the shape, mineralogy, and orientation of skeletal growth are initially established. Sodium is enriched by a factor of nine on the organic side of themore » interface. Based on this pattern, we suggest that sodium plays an integral role in early biomineralization, potentially altering interfacial energy to promote crystal nucleation, and that interactions between organic surfaces and electrolytes other than calcium or carbonate could be a crucial aspect of CaCO3 biomineralization.« less

  2. Nanometer-Scale Chemistry of a Calcite Biomineralization Template: Implications for Skeletal Composition and Nucleation

    DOE PAGES

    Branson, Oscar; Bonnin, Elisa A.; Perea, Daniel E.; ...

    2016-10-28

    Biomineralizing organisms exhibit exquisite control over skeletal morphology and composition. The promise of understanding and harnessing this feat of natural engineering has motivated an intense search for the mechanisms that direct in vivo mineral self-assembly. We used atom probe tomography, a sub-nanometer 3D chemical mapping technique, to examine the chemistry of a buried organic-mineral interface in biomineral calcite from a marine foraminifer. Here, the chemical patterns at this interface capture the processes of early biomineralization, when the shape, mineralogy, and orientation of skeletal growth are initially established. Sodium is enriched by a factor of nine on the organic side ofmore » the interface. Based on this pattern, we suggest that sodium plays an integral role in early biomineralization, potentially altering interfacial energy to promote crystal nucleation, and that interactions between organic surfaces and electrolytes other than calcium or carbonate could be a crucial aspect of CaCO 3 biomineralization.« less

  3. A preliminary review of organic materials single crystal growth by the Czochralski technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, B. G.; Shields, A. W.; Frazier, D. O.

    1988-09-01

    The growth of single crystals of organic compounds by the Czochralski method is reviewed. From the literature it is found that single crystals of benzil, a nonlinear optical material with a d sub 11 value of 11.2 + or - 1.5 x d sub 11 value of alpha quartz, has fewer dislocations than generally contained in Bridgman crystals. More perfect crystals were grown by repeated Czochralski growth. This consists of etching away the defect-containing portion of a Czochralski grown crystal and using it as a seed for further growth. Other compounds used to grow single crystals are benzophenone, 12-tricosanone (laurone), and salol. The physical properties, growth apparatus, and processing conditions presented in the literature are discussed. Moreover, some of the possible advantages of growing single crystals of organic compounds in microgravity to obtain more perfect crystals than on Earth are reviewed.

  4. A preliminary review of organic materials single crystal growth by the Czochralski technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Shields, A. W.; Frazier, D. O.

    1988-01-01

    The growth of single crystals of organic compounds by the Czochralski method is reviewed. From the literature it is found that single crystals of benzil, a nonlinear optical material with a d sub 11 value of 11.2 + or - 1.5 x d sub 11 value of alpha quartz, has fewer dislocations than generally contained in Bridgman crystals. More perfect crystals were grown by repeated Czochralski growth. This consists of etching away the defect-containing portion of a Czochralski grown crystal and using it as a seed for further growth. Other compounds used to grow single crystals are benzophenone, 12-tricosanone (laurone), and salol. The physical properties, growth apparatus, and processing conditions presented in the literature are discussed. Moreover, some of the possible advantages of growing single crystals of organic compounds in microgravity to obtain more perfect crystals than on Earth are reviewed.

  5. Nucleation and Convection Effects in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Work during the second year under this grant (NAG8-1161) resulted in several major achievements. We have characterized protein impurities as well as microheterogeneities in the proteins hen egg white lysozyme and horse spleen apoferritin, and demonstrated the effects of these impurities on nucleation and crystallization. In particular, the purification of apoferritin resulted in crystals with an X-ray diffraction resolution of better than 1.8 A, i.e. a 1 A improvement over earlier work on the cubic form. Furthermore, we have shown, in association with studies of liquid-liquid phase separation, that depending on the growth conditions, lysozyme can produce all growth morphologies that have been observed with other proteins. Finally, in connection with our experimental and simulation work on growth step bunching, we have developed a system-dependent criterion for advantages and disadvantages of crystallization from solution under reduced gravity. In the following, these efforts are described in some detail.

  6. Optical monitoring of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudry, A.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using various optical techniques for detecting the onset of nucleation in protein crystal growth was investigated. Direct microscopy, general metrologic techniques, light scattering, ultraviolet absorption, and interferometry are addressed along with techniques for determining pH value. The necessity for collecting basic data on the optical properties of the growth solution as a prerequisite to the evaluation of monitoring techniques is pointed out.

  7. Unravelling the enigmatic origin of calcitic nanofibres in soils and caves: purely physicochemical or biogenic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschedler, S.; Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Millière, L.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2014-05-01

    Calcitic nanofibres are ubiquitous habits of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) accumulations observed in calcareous vadose environments. Despite their widespread occurrence, the origin of these nanofeatures remains enigmatic. Three possible mechanisms fuel the debate: (i) purely physicochemical processes, (ii) mineralization of rod-shaped bacteria, and (iii) crystal precipitation on organic templates. Nanofibres can be either mineral (calcitic) or organic in nature. They are very often observed in association with needle fibre calcite (NFC), another typical secondary CaCO3 habit in terrestrial environments. This association has contributed to some confusion between both habits, however they are truly two distinct calcitic features and their recurrent association is likely to be an important fact to help understanding the origin of nanofibres. In this paper the different hypotheses that currently exist to explain the origin of calcitic nanofibres are critically reviewed. In addition to this, a new hypothesis for the origin of nanofibres is proposed based on the fact that current knowledge attributes a fungal origin to NFC. As this feature and nanofibres are recurrently observed together, a possible fungal origin for nanofibres which are associated with NFC is investigated. Sequential enzymatic digestion of the fungal cell wall of selected fungal species demonstrates that the fungal cell wall can be a source of organic nanofibres. The obtained organic nanofibres show a striking morphological resemblance when compared to their natural counterparts, emphasizing a fungal origin for part of the organic nanofibres observed in association with NFC. It is further hypothesized that these organic nanofibres may act as templates for calcite nucleation in a biologically influenced mineralization process, generating calcitic nanofibres. This highlights the possible involvement of fungi in CaCO3 biomineralization processes, a role still poorly documented. Moreover, on a global

  8. Unravelling the enigmatic origin of calcitic nanofibres in soils and caves: purely physicochemical or biogenic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschedler, S.; Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Millière, L.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitic nanofibres are ubiquitous habits of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) accumulations observed in calcareous vadose environments. Despite their widespread occurrence, the origin of these nanofeatures remains enigmatic. Three possible mechanisms fuel the debate: (i) purely physicochemical processes, (ii) mineralization of rod-shaped bacteria, and (iii) crystal precipitation on organic templates. Nanofibres can be either mineral (calcitic) or organic in nature. They are very often observed in association with Needle Fibre Calcite (NFC), another typical secondary CaCO3 habit in terrestrial environments. This association has contributed to some confusion between both habits, however they are truly two distinct calcitic features and their recurrent association is likely to be an important fact to help understanding the origin of nanofibres. In this manuscript the different hypotheses that currently exist to explain the origin of calcitic nanofibres are critically reviewed. In addition to this, a new hypothesis for the origin of nanofibres is proposed based on the fact that current knowledge attributes a fungal origin to NFC. As this feature and nanofibres are recurrently observed together, a possible fungal origin for nanofibres which are associated with NFC is investigated. Sequential enzymatic digestion of the fungal cell wall of selected fungal species demonstrates that the fungal cell wall can be a source of organic nanofibres. The obtained organic nanofibres show a striking morphological resemblance when compared to their natural counterparts, emphasizing a fungal origin for part of the organic nanofibres observed in association with NFC. It is further hypothesized that these organic nanofibres may act as templates for calcite nucleation in a biologically-influenced mineralization process, generating calcitic nanofibres. This highlights the possible involvement of Fungi in CaCO3 biomineralization processes, a role still poorly documented at present

  9. The coordination of sulfur in synthetic and biogenic Mg calcites: The red coral case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, J.; Rivard, C.; Vielzeuf, D.; Laporte, D.; Fonquernie, C.; Ricolleau, A.; Cotte, M.; Floquet, N.

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur has been recognized in biogenic calcites for a long time. However, its structural position is matter of debate. For some authors, sulfur is a marker of the organic matrix while it is part of the calcite structure itself for others. To better understand the place of sulfur in calcite, sulfated magnesian calcites (S-MgCalcite) have been synthetized at high pressure and temperature and studied by μ-XANES spectroscopy. S-MgCalcite XANES spectra show two different types of sulfur: sulfate (SO42-) as a predominant species and a small contribution of sulfite (SO32-), both substituting for carbonate ions in the calcite structure. To address the question of the position of sulfur in biogenic calcites, the oxidation states of sulfur in the skeleton and organic tissues of Corallium rubrum have been investigated by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and sulfur K-edge micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF, Grenoble, France) on beamline ID21. In the skeleton, sulfur is mainly present as oxidized sulfur SO42- (+VI), plus a weak sulfite contribution. XANES spectra indicate that sulfur is inorganically incorporated as sulfur structurally substituted to carbonate ions (SSS). Although an organic matrix is present in the red coral skeleton, reduced organic sulfur could not be detected by μ-XANES spectroscopy in the skeleton probably due to low organic/inorganic sulfur ratio. In the organic tissues surrounding the skeleton, several sulfur oxidation states have been detected including disulfide (S-S), thioether (R-S-CH3), sulfoxide (SO2), sulfonate (SO2O-) and sulfate (SO42-). The unexpected occurrence of inorganic sulfate within the organic tissues suggests the presence of pre-organized organic/inorganic complexes in the circulatory system of the red coral, precursors to biomineralization ahead of the growth front.

  10. Potassium-cobalt sulphate crystal growth assisted by low frequency vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovsky, A.; Ermochenkov, I.; Dubovenko, E.; Sukhanova, E.; Bebyakin, M.; Dubov, V.; Avetissov, I.

    2018-02-01

    Single crystals of K2Co(SO4)2·6H2O were grown from solution using the temperature reduction method enhanced by the axial low frequency vibration control technique (AVC-technique). Physical modeling of heat-mass transfer in solution under the AVC action was performed. The growth rate of the AVC grown crystal was found to be twice that of the crystal grown under natural convection conditions. Analysis of spectral characteristics (absorption and Raman spectra) as well as structural properties (dislocation density and microhardness) of the grown crystals showed the significant superiority of the AVC technique for the growth of K2Co(SO4)2·6H2O crystals.

  11. Molecular insights into the heterogeneous crystal growth of si methane hydrate.

    PubMed

    Vatamanu, Jenel; Kusalik, Peter G

    2006-08-17

    In this paper we report a successful molecular simulation study exploring the heterogeneous crystal growth of sI methane hydrate along its [001] crystallographic face. The molecular modeling of the crystal growth of methane hydrate has proven in the past to be very challenging, and a reasonable framework to overcome the difficulties related to the simulation of such systems is presented. Both the microscopic mechanisms of heterogeneous crystal growth as well as interfacial properties of methane hydrate are probed. In the presence of the appropriate crystal template, a strong tendency for water molecules to organize into cages around methane at the growing interface is observed; the interface also demonstrates a strong affinity for methane molecules. The maximum growth rate measured for a hydrate crystal is about 4 times higher than the value previously determined for ice I in a similar framework (Gulam Razul, M. S.; Hendry, J. G.; Kusalik, P. G. J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 204722).

  12. Growth of organic crystals via attachment and transformation of nanoscopic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuan; Kellermeier, Matthias; Gebaue, Denis; Lu, Zihao; Rosenberg, Rose; Moise, Adrian; Przybylski, Michael; Cölfen, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    A key requirement for the understanding of crystal growth is to detect how new layers form and grow at the nanoscale. Multistage crystallization pathways involving liquid-like, amorphous or metastable crystalline precursors have been predicted by theoretical work and have been observed experimentally. Nevertheless, there is no clear evidence that any of these precursors can also be relevant for the growth of crystals of organic compounds. Herein, we present a new growth mode for crystals of DL-glutamic acid monohydrate that proceeds through the attachment of preformed nanoscopic species from solution, their subsequent decrease in height at the surface and final transformation into crystalline 2D nuclei that eventually build new molecular layers by further monomer incorporation. This alternative mechanism provides a direct proof for the existence of multistage pathways in the crystallization of molecular compounds and the relevance of precursor units larger than the monomeric constituents in the actual stage of growth.

  13. Protein Crystal Movements and Fluid Flows During Microgravity Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, Titus J.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Snell, Edward H.; Dong, Jun; Lautenschlager, Peter; Potthast, Lothar; Siddons, D. Peter; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gordon, Elspeth; Thompson, Andrew W.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals suitable for x-ray crystal structure analysis is an important topic. The quality (perfection) of protein crystals is now being evaluated by mosaicity analysis (rocking curves) and x-ray topographic images as well as the diffraction resolution limit and overall data quality. In yet another study, use of hanging drop vapour diffusion geometry on the IML-2 shuttle mission showed, again via CCD video monitoring, growing apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) protein crystal executing near cyclic movement, reminiscent of Marangoni convection flow of fluid, the crystals serving as "markers" of the fluid flow. A review is given here of existing results and experience over several microgravity missions. Some comment is given on gel protein crystal growth in attempts to 'mimic' the benefits of microgravity on Earth. Finally, the recent new results from our experiments on the shuttle mission LMS are described. These results include CCD video as well as interferometry during the mission, followed, on return to Earth, by reciprocal space mapping at the NSLS, Brookhaven, and full X-ray data collection on LMS and Earth control lysozyme crystals. Diffraction data recorded from LMS and ground control apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) crystals are also described.

  14. Calcite dissolution rate spectra measured by in situ digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Alexander S.; Feng, Pan; Bullard, Jeffrey W.

    2017-09-01

    Digital holographic microscopy in reflection mode is used to track in situ, real-time nanoscale topography evolution of cleaved (104) calcite surfaces exposed to flowing or static deionized water. The method captures full-field holograms of the surface at frame rates of up to 12.5 s-1. Numerical reconstruction provides 3D surface topography with vertical resolution of a few nanometers and enables measurement of time-dependent local dissolution fluxes. A statistical distribution, or spectrum, of dissolution rates is generated by sampling multiple area domains on multiple crystals. The data show, as has been demonstrated by Fischer et al. (2012), that dissolution is most fully described by a rate spectrum, although the modal dissolution rate agrees well with published mean dissolution rates (e.g., 0.1 μmol m-2 s-1 to 0.3 μmol m-2 s-1). Rhombohedral etch pits and other morphological features resulting from rapid local dissolution appear at different times and are heterogeneously distributed across the surface and through the depth. This makes the distribution in rates measured on a single crystal dependent both on the sample observation field size and on time, even at nominally constant undersaturation. Statistical analysis of the inherent noise in the DHM measurements indicates that the technique is robust and that it likely can be applied to quantify and interpret rate spectra for the dissolution or growth of other minerals.

  15. The Effects of Impurities on Protein Crystal Growth and Nucleation: A Preliminary Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schall, Constance A.

    1998-01-01

    Kubota and Mullin (1995) devised a simple model to account for the effects of impurities on crystal growth of small inorganic and organic molecules in aqueous solutions. Experimentally, the relative step velocity and crystal growth of these molecules asymptotically approach zero or non-zero values with increasing concentrations of impurities. Alternatively, the step velocity and crystal growth can linearly approach zero as the impurity concentration increases. The Kubota-Mullin model assumes that the impurity exhibits Langmuirian adsorption onto the crystal surface. Decreases in step velocities and subsequent growth rates are related to the fractional coverage (theta) of the crystal surface by adsorbed impurities; theta = Kx / (I +Kx), x = mole fraction of impurity in solution. In the presence of impurities, the relative step velocity, V/Vo, and the relative growth rate of a crystal face, G/Go, are proposed to conform to the following equations: V/Vo approx. = G/Go = 1 - (alpha)(theta). The adsorption of impurity is assumed to be rapid and in quasi-equilibrium with the crystal surface sites available. When the value of alpha, an effectiveness factor, is one the growth will asymptotically approach zero with increasing concentrations of impurity. At values less than one, growth approaches a non-zero value asymptotically. When alpha is much greater than one, there will be a linear relationship between impurity concentration and growth rates. Kubota and Mullin expect alpha to decrease with increasing supersaturation and shrinking size of a two dimensional nucleus. It is expected that impurity effects on protein crystal growth will exhibit behavior similar to that of impurities in small molecule growth. A number of proteins were added to purified chicken egg white lysozyme, the effect on crystal nucleation and growth assessed.

  16. Genesis and microstratigraphy of calcite coralloids analysed by high resolution imaging and petrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanghi, V.; Frisia, S.; Borsato, A.

    2017-08-01

    The genesis of calcite coralloid speleothems from Lamalunga cave (Southern Italy) is here investigated from a purely petrographic perspective, which constitutes the basis for any subsequent chemical investigation. Lamalunga cave coralloids formed on bones and debris on the floor of the cave. They consist of elongated columnar crystals whose elongation progressively increases from the flanks to the tips of the coralloid, forming a succession of lens-shaped layers, which may be separated by micrite or impurity-rich layers. Organic molecules are preferentially concentrated toward the centre of convex lenses as highlighted by epifluorescence. Their occurrence on cave floor, lens-shaped morphology and concentration of impurities toward the apex of the convex lenses supports the hypothesis that their water supply was hydroaerosol, generated by the fragmentation of cave drips. Evaporation and degassing preferentially occurred on tips, enhancing the digitated morphology and trapping the organic molecules and impurities, carried by the hydroaerosol, between the growing crystals which became more elongated. Micrite layers, that cap some coralloid lenses, likely identify periods when decreasing in hydroaerosol resulted in stronger evaporation and higher supersaturation with respect to calcite of the parent film of fluid. This interpretation of coralloid formation implies that these speleothems can be used to extract hydroclimate information.

  17. Biomimetic synthesis of calcite films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process. 1. Influence and incorporation of magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xingguo; Varona, Philip L.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2007-09-01

    Magnesium-bearing calcium carbonate films have been synthesized via a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. A variety of morphological features of biominerals can be mimicked with this PILP process; therefore, our group has proposed that this crystallization system can be used as an effective in vitro model system for examining mechanistic issues related to biomineralization. Here, the effect of the Mg 2+/Ca 2+ ratio on the rate of transformation of the amorphous precursor films was investigated using polarized optical microscopy (POM), and the final crystalline structure and composition were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The entrapment of high levels of magnesium in the deposited precursor films had a pronounced inhibitory effect on the amorphous to crystalline transformation, and furthermore, influenced the polycrystalline nature of the film. The magnesium content incorporated within the calcite lattice (8-26%) resembles the range found in biologically formed high magnesium-bearing calcite, while much lower levels were formed via the conventional solution crystallization process. The formation of non-equilibrium morphologies and similar compositions of magnesium-bearing calcite via the PILP process further supports our hypothesis that the PILP process may play a fundamental role in the formation of calcitic biominerals in nature. In the realm of biomimetic engineering, the PILP process may also establish itself as a new method to produce thin ceramic films with variable compositions under ambient conditions.

  18. Crystal Growth of ZnSe and Related Ternary Compound Semiconductors by Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Brebrick, Robert F.; Volz, Martin P.; Burger, Arnold; Dudley, Michael; Matyi, Richard J.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Sha, Yi-Gao; Volz, Martin P.; Shih, Hung-Dah

    2001-01-01

    Crystal growth by vapor transport has several distinct advantages over melt growth techniques. Among various potential benefits from material processing in reduced gravity the followings two are considered to be related to crystal growth by vapor transport: (1) elimination of the crystal weight and its influence on the defect formation and (2) reduction of natural buoyancy-driven convective flows arising from thermally and/ or solutally induced density gradient in fluids. The previous results on vapor crystal growth of semiconductors showed the improvements in surface morphology, crystalline quality, electrical properties and dopant distribution of the crystals grown in reduced gravity as compared to the crystals grown on Earth. But the mechanisms, which are responsible for the improvements and cause the gravitational effects on the complicated and coupled processes of vapor mass transport and growth kinetics, are not well understood.

  19. Time-Lapse, in Situ Imaging of Ice Crystal Growth Using Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ice crystals nucleate and grow when a water solution is cooled below its freezing point. The growth velocities and morphologies of the ice crystals depend on many parameters, such as the temperature of ice growth, the melting temperature, and the interactions of solutes with the growing crystals. Three types of morphologies may appear: dendritic, cellular (or fingerlike), or the faceted equilibrium form. Understanding and controlling which type of morphology is formed is essential in several domains, from biology to geophysics and materials science. Obtaining, in situ, three dimensional observations without introducing artifacts due to the experimental technique is nevertheless challenging. Here we show how we can use laser scanning confocal microscopy to follow in real-time the growth of smoothed and faceted ice crystals in zirconium acetate solutions. Both qualitative and quantitative observations can be made. In particular, we can precisely measure the lateral growth velocity of the crystals, a measure otherwise difficult to obtain. Such observations should help us understand the influence of the parameters that control the growth of ice crystals in various systems. PMID:27917410

  20. Time-Lapse, in Situ Imaging of Ice Crystal Growth Using Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marcellini, Moreno; Noirjean, Cecile; Dedovets, Dmytro; Maria, Juliette; Deville, Sylvain

    2016-11-30

    Ice crystals nucleate and grow when a water solution is cooled below its freezing point. The growth velocities and morphologies of the ice crystals depend on many parameters, such as the temperature of ice growth, the melting temperature, and the interactions of solutes with the growing crystals. Three types of morphologies may appear: dendritic, cellular (or fingerlike), or the faceted equilibrium form. Understanding and controlling which type of morphology is formed is essential in several domains, from biology to geophysics and materials science. Obtaining, in situ, three dimensional observations without introducing artifacts due to the experimental technique is nevertheless challenging. Here we show how we can use laser scanning confocal microscopy to follow in real-time the growth of smoothed and faceted ice crystals in zirconium acetate solutions. Both qualitative and quantitative observations can be made. In particular, we can precisely measure the lateral growth velocity of the crystals, a measure otherwise difficult to obtain. Such observations should help us understand the influence of the parameters that control the growth of ice crystals in various systems.

  1. Twin-mediated crystal growth: an enigma resolved

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Ashwin J.; Gulsoy, E. Begum; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Xiao, Xianghui; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    During crystal growth, faceted interfaces may be perturbed by defects, leading to a rich variety of polycrystalline growth forms. One such defect is the coherent Σ3 {111} twin boundary, which is widely known to catalyze crystal growth. These defects have a profound effect on the properties of many materials: for example, electron-hole recombination rates strongly depend on the character of the twin boundaries in polycrystalline Si photovoltaic cells. However, the morphology of the twinned interface during growth has long been a mystery due to the lack of four-dimensional (i.e., space and time resolved) experiments. Many controversial mechanisms have been proposed for this process, most of which lack experimental verification. Here, we probe the real-time interfacial dynamics of polycrystalline Si particles growing from an Al-Si-Cu liquid via synchrotron-based X-ray tomography. Our novel analysis of the time evolution of the interfacial normals allows us to quantify unambiguously the habit plane and grain boundary orientations during growth. This, when combined with direct measurements of the interfacial morphology provide the first confirmation of twin-mediated growth, proposed over 50 years ago. Using the insights provided by these experiments, we have developed a unified picture of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics of faceted Si growth. PMID:27346073

  2. Twin-mediated crystal growth: an enigma resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahani, Ashwin J.; Gulsoy, E. Begum; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Xiao, Xianghui; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2016-06-01

    During crystal growth, faceted interfaces may be perturbed by defects, leading to a rich variety of polycrystalline growth forms. One such defect is the coherent Σ3 {111} twin boundary, which is widely known to catalyze crystal growth. These defects have a profound effect on the properties of many materials: for example, electron-hole recombination rates strongly depend on the character of the twin boundaries in polycrystalline Si photovoltaic cells. However, the morphology of the twinned interface during growth has long been a mystery due to the lack of four-dimensional (i.e., space and time resolved) experiments. Many controversial mechanisms have been proposed for this process, most of which lack experimental verification. Here, we probe the real-time interfacial dynamics of polycrystalline Si particles growing from an Al-Si-Cu liquid via synchrotron-based X-ray tomography. Our novel analysis of the time evolution of the interfacial normals allows us to quantify unambiguously the habit plane and grain boundary orientations during growth. This, when combined with direct measurements of the interfacial morphology provide the first confirmation of twin-mediated growth, proposed over 50 years ago. Using the insights provided by these experiments, we have developed a unified picture of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics of faceted Si growth.

  3. Unsteady Crystal Growth Due to Step-Bunch Cascading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Lin, Hong; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Based on our experimental findings of growth rate fluctuations during the crystallization of the protein lysozym, we have developed a numerical model that combines diffusion in the bulk of a solution with diffusive transport to microscopic growth steps that propagate on a finite crystal facet. Nonlinearities in layer growth kinetics arising from step interaction by bulk and surface diffusion, and from step generation by surface nucleation, are taken into account. On evaluation of the model with properties characteristic for the solute transport, and the generation and propagation of steps in the lysozyme system, growth rate fluctuations of the same magnitude and characteristic time, as in the experiments, are obtained. The fluctuation time scale is large compared to that of step generation. Variations of the governing parameters of the model reveal that both the nonlinearity in step kinetics and mixed transport-kinetics control of the crystallization process are necessary conditions for the fluctuations. On a microscopic scale, the fluctuations are associated with a morphological instability of the vicinal face, in which a step bunch triggers a cascade of new step bunches through the microscopic interfacial supersaturation distribution.

  4. Occurrences of ikaite and pseudomorphs after ikaite in Patagonian lakes - crystal morphologies and stable isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlerich, Markus; Mayr, Christoph; Griesshaber, Erika; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Kremer, Barbara; Lücke, Andreas; Oeckler, Oliver; Schmahl, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3•6H2O), a hydrated calcium carbonate mineral occasionally found in marine sediments, has so far rarely been reported from non-marine sites. Modern ikaite and calcitic pseudomorphs after ikaite were recently discovered in Patagonian Argentina at the polymictic lakes of Laguna Potrok Aike (51°57´S, 70°23´W) and Laguna Cháltel (49°57´S, 71°07´W), respectively. Both lakes are of volcanic origin and have phosphorous-rich, alkaline waters, but differ in altitude (790 m asl and 110 m asl for Laguna Cháltel and Laguna Potrok Aike, respectively) and water temperature. The aim of this study is (1) to investigate conditions for the formation of ikaite and its transformation to more stable, water-free carbonate pseudomorphs after ikaite and (2) to assess the potential of ikaite and calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite as a paleoenvironmental tool in freshwater lakes. Crystallographic, morphological and isotopic characteristics of the pseudomorphs were investigated. Ikaite crystals were found (in September 2008) primarily on aquatic macrophytes and cyanobacteria colonies at Laguna Potrok Aike. Ikaite crystals transformed quickly to calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite after recovery from the cool lake water (4°C). The crystal structure of ikaite was investigated with single crystal X-ray diffraction on samples that were permanently kept cold (in the lake water). At Laguna Cháltel calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite were discovered in littoral sediment cores from 25 m water depth. The mm-sized, porous, polycrystalline calcium carbonate aggregates from the 104 cm long sediment core of Laguna Cháltel are morphologically pseudomorphs after ikaite. SEM and XRD analyses highlight that these pseudomorphs consist of several µm-small calcite crystals in a calcitic matrix. The shape of these micro-crystals changes from rounded to fibrous with increasing sediment depth. Some specimens show casts of cyanobacteria trichomes. The oxygen isotopic composition of calcite

  5. Dewetting During the Crystal Growth of (Cd,Zn)Te:In Under Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylla, Lamine; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Duffar, Thierry; Dieguez, Ernesto; Zanotti, Lucio; Zappettini, Andrea; Roosen, GÉrald

    2009-08-01

    The phenomenon of ldquodewettingrdquo associated with the Vertical Bridgman (VB) crystal growth technique leads to the growth of a crystal without contact with the crucible. One dramatic consequence of this modified VB process is the reduction of structural defects within the crystal. It has been observed in several microgravity experiments for different semiconductor crystals. This work is concentrated on the growth of high resistivity (Cd,Zn)Te:In (CZT) crystals by achieving the phenomenon of dewetting under microgravity condition and its application in the processing of CZT detectors. Two Cd0.9Zn0.1Te:In crystals were grown in space on the Russian FOTON satellite in the POLIZON-M facility in September 2007 (mission M3). At the end of the preliminary melting phase of one crystal, a Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) was applied in order to reduce the typical tellurium clusters within the melt before the pulling. The other crystal was superheated with 20 K above the melting point before the pulling. A third reference crystal has been grown on the ground in similar thermal conditions. Profiles measurements of the space grown crystals surface gave the evidence of a successful dewetting during the crystal growth. Characterization methods such as IR microscopy and CoReMa have been performed on the three crystals. CZT detectors have been processed from the grown part of the different crystals. The influence of the dewetting on the material quality and the detector properties completes the study.

  6. Growth and characterization of high-purity SiC single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, G.; Balakrishna, V.; Brandt, C. D.

    2000-04-01

    High-purity SiC single crystals with diameter up to 50 mm have been grown by the physical vapor transport method. Finite element analysis was used for thermal modeling of the crystal growth cavity in order to reduce stress in the grown crystal. Crystals are grown in high-purity growth ambient using purified graphite furniture and high-purity SiC sublimation sources. Undoped crystals up to 50 mm in diameter with micropipe density less than 100 cm -2 have been grown using this method. These undoped crystals exhibit resistivities in the 10 3 Ω cm range and are p-type due to the presence of residual acceptor impurities, mainly boron. Semi-insulating SiC material is obtained by doping the crystal with vanadium. Vanadium has a deep donor level located near the middle of the band gap, which compensates the residual acceptor resulting in semi-insulating behavior.

  7. Stable calcium isotope composition of a pedogenic carbonate in forested ecosystem: the case of the needle fibre calcite (NFC).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliere, Laure; Verrecchia, Eric; Gussone, Nikolaus

    2014-05-01

    Calcium (Ca), carbon (C) and oxygen (O) are important elements in terrestrial environment, as their biogeochemical cycles are directly related to the storage of atmospheric carbon. Nevertheless, contrarily to C and O, Ca isotope composition has been only poorly studied in the terrestrial carbonates. Needle Fibre Calcite (NFC) is one of the most common pedogenic carbonates, unless its origin is still under debate. Recent studies explain its formation by precipitation inside fungal hyphae. Due to this possible biogenic origin, NFC can be considered as a potential bridge between the biochemistry (precipitation inside organic structure) and geochemistry (pedogenic carbonate related to soil conditions) of the Ca. Thus, the study of the Ca isotope composition of NFC seem to be of first interest in order to shed light on the behaviour of Ca in terrestrial environment, especially when precipitation of secondary carbonates is involved. The sampling site is situated in the Swiss Jura Mountains and has been chosen due to a previous complete study of the C and O isotope composition of NFC in relation to the ecosystem, which represent a good precondition for the understanding of the NFC Ca isotope signatures in this context. In this study, the implication of the fungi in the origin of NFC is investigated, by comparing the Ca isotope composition of NFC and a purely physicochemical calcite cement (LCC), both precipitated in the same environment. The δ44Ca signature of NFC and LCC crystals were used to determine possible differences of the precipitation rate during their formation. NFC and LCC have similar δ18O composition and are supposed to precipitate at the same temperature (Milliere et al., 2011a). Thus the study of Ca isotope composition of NFC seems to demonstrate that the elongated shape of the calcite needle can be explained by different precipitation processes than the rhombohedric calcite crystals precipitated in the same environment; and more precisely, the specific

  8. Fluorapatite crystal growth from modified seawater solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cappellen, Philippe; Berner, Robert A.

    Seeded precipitation experiments were conducted in a pH/fluoride-stat system to study the crystal growth of fluorapatite ( FAP ) in carbonate-free NaCl-CaCl 2-NaF-Na 2HPO 4 solutions, at seawater calcium concentration, chlorinity, and pH. With increasing supersaturation, the dependence of the growth rate on the relative supersaturation changes from parabolic to exponential. This is interpreted as reflecting a transition in the crystal growth mechanism from growth at dislocation-induced surface steps to surface nucleation-controlled growth. The analysis of the kinetic data leads to a mineral-aqueous solution interfacial tension for FAP of 289 mJ/m 2. The Arrhenius activation energy of the growth reaction in the temperature range 12 to 35°C is 47 kJ/mol. The inhibition of FAP growth by Mg 2+ ions was investigated over a range of total dissolved Mg of 0 to 60 mM. At dissolved magnesium concentrations typical of marine pore waters (40-60 mM), the rate of FAP growth is 15 to 20 times slower than in the absence of Mg 2+, for the same degree of supersaturation, at 25 °C and pH = 8. The inhibitory effect can be explained by the blocking of growth sites at the surface of FAP crystals by adsorbed Mg 2+ ions. A simple Langmuir adsorption model for the retardation effect of Mg 2+ is supported by the results. The effect of pH on FAP growth was tested for pH values from 7 to 8.5. In this range, growth of FAP is catalyzed by hydrogen ions. The apparent growth rate constant is proportional to ( aH+) m where m, the rate order with respect to H +, is a non-integral number which depends on pH. At identical degrees of supersaturation, the growth rate of FAP at pH = 7 is nearly twice that at pH = 8. When corrected for bottom water temperatures, pore water pH, and the retardation of Mg 2+, the experimental growth rates predict that during burial in modern phosphatic sediments, apatite particles grow to sizes on the order of 0.1-10 μrn. The relatively slow growth kinetics of FAP are

  9. Deducing growth mechanisms for minerals from the shapes of crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of natural and synthetic samples are observed to have several distinct and different shapes. We have simulated these CSDs using three simple equations: the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), a mass balance equation, and equations for Ostwald ripening. The following crystal growth mechanisms are simulated using these equations and their modifications: (1) continuous nucleation and growth in an open system, during which crystals nucleate at either a constant, decaying, or accelerating nucleation rate, and then grow according to the LPE; (2) surface-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with an essentially unlimited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (3) supply-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with a specified, limited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (4) supply- or surface-controlled Ostwald ripening in a closed system, during which the relative rate of crystal dissolution and growth is controlled by differences in specific surface area and by diffusion rate; and (5) supply-controlled random ripening in a closed system, during which the rate of crystal dissolution and growth is random with respect to specific surface area. Each of these mechanisms affects the shapes of CSDs. For example, mechanism (1) above with a constant nucleation rate yields asymptotically-shaped CSDs for which the variance of the natural logarithms of the crystal sizes (??2) increases exponentially with the mean of the natural logarithms of the sizes (??). Mechanism (2) yields lognormally-shaped CSDs, for which ??2 increases linearly with ??, whereas mechanisms (3) and (5) do not change the shapes of CSDs, with ??2 remaining constant with increasing ??. During supply-controlled Ostwald ripening (4), initial lognormally-shaped CSDs become more symmetric, with ??2 decreasing with increasing ??. Thus, crystal growth mechanisms often can be deduced by noting trends in ?? versus ??2 of CSDs for

  10. Protein crystal growth results from the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Moore, K. M.; Vanderwoerd, M.; Bray, T. L.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Narayana, S. V. L.; Rosenblum, W. M.; Carter, D.; Clark, A. D, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Protein crystal growth experiments have been performed by this laboratory on 18 Space Shuttle missions since April, 1985. In addition, a number of microgravity experiments also have been performed and reported by other investigators. These Space Shuttle missions have been used to grow crystals of a variety of proteins using vapor diffusion, liquid diffusion, and temperature-induced crystallization techniques. The United States Microgravity Laboratory - 1 mission (USML-1, June 25 - July 9, 1992) was a Spacelab mission dedicated to experiments involved in materials processing. New protein crystal growth hardware was developed to allow in orbit examination of initial crystal growth results, the knowledge from which was used on subsequent days to prepare new crystal growth experiments. In addition, new seeding hardware and techniques were tested as well as techniques that would prepare crystals for analysis by x-ray diffraction, a capability projected for the planned Space Station. Hardware that was specifically developed for the USML-1 mission will be discussed along with the experimental results from this mission.

  11. New developments on size-dependent growth applied to the crystallization of sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, P. M.; Rocha, F.

    2007-12-01

    The effect of crystal size on the growth rate of sucrose (C 12H 22O 11) at 40 °C is investigated from a theoretical and an experimental point of view. Based on new perspectives resulting from the recently introduced spiral nucleation model [P.M. Martins, F. Rocha, Surf. Sci. 601 (2007) 3400], crystal growth rates are expressed in terms of mass deposition per time and crystal volume units. This alternative definition is demonstrated to be size-independent over the considered supersaturation range. The conventional overall growth rate expressed per surface area units is found to be linearly dependent on crystal size. The advantages of the "volumetric" growth rate concept are discussed. Sucrose dissolution rates were measured under reciprocal conditions of the growth experiments in order to investigate the two-way effect of crystal size on mass transfer rates and on the integration kinetics. Both effects are adequately described by combining a well-established diffusion-integration model and the spiral nucleation mechanism.

  12. Low-Temperature Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Chalcogenide Crystals on Liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubing; Deng, Bing; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xibiao; Yin, Jianbo; Jin, Chuanhong; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2016-03-09

    The growth of high-quality two-dimensional (2D) layered chalcogenide crystals is highly important for practical applications in future electronics, optoelectronics, and photonics. Current route for the synthesis of 2D chalcogenide crystals by vapor deposition method mainly involves an energy intensive high-temperature growth process on solid substrates, often suffering from inhomogeneous nucleation density and grain size distribution. Here, we first demonstrate a facile vapor-phase synthesis of large-area high-quality 2D layered chalcogenide crystals on liquid metal surface with relatively low surface energy at a growth temperature as low as ∼100 °C. Uniform and large-domain-sized 2D crystals of GaSe and GaxIn1-xSe were grown on liquid metal surface even supported on a polyimide film. As-grown 2D GaSe crystals have been fabricated to flexible photodetectors, showing high photoresponse and excellent flexibility. Our strategy of energy-sustainable low-temperature growth on liquid metal surface may open a route to the synthesis of high-quality 2D crystals of Ga-, In-, Bi-, Hg-, Pb-, or Sn-based chalcogenides and halides.

  13. Center for the development of commercial crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1989-01-01

    The second year of operation of the Center for Commercial Crystal Growth in Space is described. This center is a consortium of businesses, universities and national laboratories. The primary goal of the Center's research is the development of commercial crystal growth in space. A secondary goal is to develop scientific understanding and technology which will improve commercial crystal growth on earth. In order to achieve these goals the Center's research is organized into teams by growth technique; melt growth, solution growth, and vapor growth. The melt growth team is working on solidification and characterization of bulk crystals of gallium arsenide and cadmium telluride. They used high resolution X-ray topography performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Streak-like features were found in the diffraction images of semi-insulating undoped LEC GaAs. These were shown to be (110) antiphase boundaries, which have not been reported before but appear to be pervasive and responsible for features seen via less-sensitive characterization methods. The results on CdTe were not as definitive, but indicate that antiphase boundaries may also be responsible for the double peaks often seen in X-ray rocking curves of this material. A liquid encapsulated melt zone system for GaAs has been assembled and techniques for casting feed rods developed. It was found that scratching the inside of the quartz ampoules with silicon carbide abrasive minimized sticking of the GaAs to the quartz. Twelve floating zone experiments were done.

  14. Organic/inorganic-doped aromatic derivative crystals: Growth and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanculescu, F.; Ionita, I.; Stanculescu, A.

    2014-09-01

    Results of a comparative study on the growth from melt by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method of meta-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB) and benzil (Bz) crystals in the same experimental set-up and the same experimental conditions are presented. The incorporation of an inorganic (iodine) dopant in m-DNB was analyzed in the given experimental conditions from the point of view of the solid-liquid interface stability. The limits for a stable growth and the conditions that favor the generation of morphological instability are emphasized. These limits for m-DNB are compatible with those previously determined for Bz, and therefore, even for a high gradient concentration at the growth interface, it is possible to grow m-DNB and Bz crystals in the same experimental conditions characterized by a high ΔT and v. The optical properties were investigated in relation with the dopant incorporation in the crystal in the mentioned experimental conditions. Effects of the dopant (m-DNB/iodine in Bz and iodine in m-DNB) on the optical band gap and optical non-linear properties of the crystals are discussed.

  15. Linking Crystal Populations to Dynamic States: Crystal Dissolution and Growth During an Open-System Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergantz, G. W.; Schleicher, J.; Burgisser, A.

    2016-12-01

    The identification of shared characteristics in zoned crystals has motivated the definition of crystal populations. These populations reflect the simultaneous transport of crystals, heat and composition during open-system events. An obstacle to interpreting the emergence of a population is the absence of a way to correlate specific dynamic conditions with the characteristic attributes of a population. By combining a boundary-layer diffusion controlled model for crystal growth/dissolution with discrete-element magma dynamics simulations of crystal-bearing magmas, the creation of populations can be simulated. We have implemented a method that decomposes the chemical potential into the thermal and compositional contributions to crystal dissolution/growth. This allows for the explicit treatment of thermal inertia and thermal-compositional decoupling as fluid circulation stirs the system during an open-system event. We have identified three distinct dynamic states producing crystal populations. They are based on the volume fraction of crystals. In a mushy system, thermal and compositional states are tightly linked as the volume involved in the mixing is constrained by the so-called mixing bowl (Bergantz et al., 2015). The mixing bowl volume is a function of the visco-plastic response of the mush and the intrusion width, not by the progressive entrainment of the new intrusion as commonly assumed. Crystal dissolution is the dominate response to input of more primitive magma. At the other endmember, under very dilute conditions, thermal and compositional conditions can become decoupled, and the in-coming magma forms a double-diffusive low-Re jet. This can allow for both dissolution and growth as crystals circulate widely into an increasingly stratified system. A middle range of crystal concentration produces a very complex feedback, as sedimenting crystals form fingers and chains that interact with the incoming magma, break-up the entrainment with chaotic stirring and add

  16. Growth and Characteristics of Bulk Single Crystals Grown from Solution on Earth and in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of crystals has been of interest to physicists and engineers for a long time because of their unique properties. Single crystals are utilized in such diverse applications as pharmaceuticals, computers, infrared detectors, frequency measurements, piezoelectric devices, a variety of high technology devices and sensors. Solution crystal growth is one of the important techniques to grow a variety of crystals when the material decomposes at the melting point and a suitable solvent is available to make a saturated solution at a desired temperature. In this chapter an attempt is made to give some fundamentals of growing crystals from solution including improved designs of various crystallizers. Since the same solution crystal growth technique could not be used in microgravity, authors had proposed a new cooled sting technique to grow crystals in space. Authors? experiences of conducting two space shuttle experiments relating to solution crystal growth are also detailed in this work. The complexity of these solution growth experiments to grow crystals in space are discussed. These happen to be some of the early experiments performed in space, and various lessons learned are described. A brief discussion of protein crystal growth that also shares basic principles of solution growth technique is given along with some flight hardware information for its growth in microgravity.

  17. Optical analysis of crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Passeur, Andrea; Harper, Sabrina

    1994-01-01

    Processing and data reduction of holographic images from Spacelab presents some interesting challenges in determining the effects of microgravity on crystal growth processes. Evaluation of several processing techniques, including the Computerized Holographic Image Processing System and the image processing software ITEX150, will provide fundamental information for holographic analysis of the space flight data.

  18. Astronauts Don Lind observes growth of crystals in VCGS aboard orbiter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-04-30

    51B-01-007 (30 April 1985) --- Astronaut Don L. Lind, 51-B Spacelab 3 mission specialist, observes the growth of mercuric iodide crystal in the vapor crystal growth system (VCGS) on the Spacelab 3 science module aboard the orbiter Challenger.

  19. Mechanism of abnormally slow crystal growth of CuZr alloy

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yan, X. Q.; Lü, Y. J., E-mail: yongjunlv@bit.edu.cn; State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027

    2015-10-28

    Crystal growth of the glass-forming CuZr alloy is shown to be abnormally slow, which suggests a new method to identify the good glass-forming alloys. The crystal growth of elemental Cu, Pd and binary NiAl, CuZr alloys is systematically studied with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature dependence of the growth velocity indicates the different growth mechanisms between the elemental and the alloy systems. The high-speed growth featuring the elemental metals is dominated by the non-activated collision between liquid-like atoms and interface, and the low-speed growth for NiAl and CuZr is determined by the diffusion across the interface. Wemore » find that, in contrast to Cu, Pd, and NiAl, a strong stress layering arisen from the density and the local order layering forms in front of the liquid-crystal interface of CuZr alloy, which causes a slow diffusion zone. The formation of the slow diffusion zone suppresses the interface moving, resulting in much small growth velocity of CuZr alloy. We provide a direct evidence of this explanation by applying the compressive stress normal to the interface. The compression is shown to boost the stress layering in CuZr significantly, correspondingly enhancing the slow diffusion zone, and eventually slowing down the crystal growth of CuZr alloy immediately. In contrast, the growth of Cu, Pd, and NiAl is increased by the compression because the low diffusion zones in them are never well developed.« less

  20. In situ observation of containerless protein crystallization by magnetically levitating crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Syou; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi; Udagawa, Chikako; Morimoto, Shotaro; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    We report on the results of the crystal growth of hen-egg lysozyme by magnetically levitating crystals in a small amount of buffer solution. The concentrations of lysozyme and the precipitating agent (gadolinium chloride) were 6.53 wt % and 0.362 mol/kg, respectively. Gadolinium chloride, which induces the magneto-Archimedes effect, was utilized to levitate the crystals with Bz · (dBz/dz) = 22.46 T2/m, where Bz is the vertical (z) component of the magnetic flux density vector. Although the collected crystals were small, we succeeded in maintaining the levitation of the crystals into a specific place in the liquid phase from the beginning of nucleation. In situ observation revealed that a state of pseudo-weightlessness was generated in the vicinity of the magnet bore edge, and small crystals were concentrated inside the domain moving along an hourglass-shaped surface. We found by numerical computations that the formation of the hourglass-shaped domain is attributable to the radial component of the magnetic force.

  1. Magnetic field controlled floating-zone single crystal growth of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, R.; Gerbeth, G.; Priede, J.

    2013-03-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) floating zone single crystal growth is an important technique for the preparation of single bulk crystals. The advantage of the floating-zone method is the crucible-free growth of single crystals of reactive materials with high melting points. The strong heat diffusion on the surface, as well as the melt convection in the molten zone due to induction heating, often leads to an undesired solid-liquid interface geometry with a concave (towards the solid phase) outer rim. These concave parts aggravate the single crystal growth over the full cross-section. A two-phase stirrer was developed at IFW Dresden in order to avoid the problems connected with these concave parts. It acts as a magnetic field pump and changes the typical double vortex structure to a single roll structure, thus pushing hot melt into the regions where the concave parts may arise. The current in the secondary coil is induced by the primary coil, and the capacitor and the resistance of the secondary circuit are adjusted to get a stable 90 degree phase-shift between the coil currents. Single crystal growth of industrial relevant RuAl and TiAl intermetallic compounds was performed based on the material parameters and using the adjusted two-phase stirrer. Very recently, the magnetic system was applied to the crystal growth of biocompatible TiNb alloys and antiferromagnetic Heusler MnSi compounds.

  2. Understanding the barriers to crystal growth: dynamical simulation of the dissolution and growth of urea from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Piana, Stefano; Gale, Julian D

    2005-02-16

    Both the dissolution and growth of a molecular crystalline material, urea, has been studied using dynamical atomistic simulation. The kinetic steps of dissolution and growth are clearly identified, and the activation energies for each possible step are calculated. Our molecular dynamics simulations indicate that crystal growth on the [001] face is characterized by a nucleation and growth mechanism. Nucleation on the [001] urea crystal face is predicted to occur at a very high rate, followed by rapid propagation of the steps. The rate-limiting step for crystallization is actually found to be the removal of surface defects, rather than the initial formation of the next surface layer. Through kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of the surface growth, it is found that this crystal face evolves via a rough surface topography, rather than a clean layer-by-layer mechanism.

  3. Crystallization of calcium carbonate with the filtration of aqueous solutions through a microporous membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananeva, E. A.; Mesyats, E. A.; Sergievskii, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    It is established that the filtration of water through a microporous membrane does not change the hardness of the water; it does, however, reduce the amount of scale deposit, due to the crystallization of salts in water in the form of aragonite. The effect is consistently observed in water with a hardness of more than 7.0 H, a content of hydrocarbonate ions of more than 500 mg/L, and a pH ≥ 7.3. It is shown that introducing the seeds of calcite crystals into a filtrate results in the precipitation of calcite rather than aragonite. It is concluded that quasi-softening in the case of hard water microfiltration is caused by the removal of calcite micronuclei, and thus by conditions being created for the crystallization of aragonite as a thermodynamically less stable form.

  4. Dynamics of melt crystal interface and thermal stresses in rotational Bridgman crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ronghui; Zhang, Hui; Larson, David J.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2004-05-01

    The growth process of potassium bromide (KBr) single crystals in a vertical Bridgman furnace has been studied numerically using an integrated model that combines formulation of global heat transfer and thermal elastic stresses. The global heat transfer sub-model accounts for conduction, convection and interface movement in the multiphase system. Using the elastic stress sub-model, thermal stresses in the growing crystal caused by the non-uniform temperature distribution is predicted. Special attention is directed to the interaction between the crystal and the ampoule. The global temperature distribution in the furnace, the flow pattern in the melt and the interface shapes are presented. We also investigate the effects of the natural convection and rotational forced convection on the shape of the growth fronts. Furthermore, the state of the thermal stresses in the crystal is studied to understand the plastic deformation mechanisms during the cooling process. The influence of the wall contact on thermal stresses is also addressed.

  5. A first-principle model of 300 mm Czochralski single-crystal Si production process for predicting crystal radius and crystal growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhongchao; Seto, Tatsuru; Kim, Sanghong; Kano, Manabu; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Mizuta, Masahiko; Hasebe, Shinji

    2018-06-01

    The Czochralski (CZ) process is the dominant method for manufacturing large cylindrical single-crystal ingots for the electronics industry. Although many models and control methods for the CZ process have been proposed, they were only tested with small equipment and only a few industrial application were reported. In this research, we constructed a first-principle model for controlling industrial CZ processes that produce 300 mm single-crystal silicon ingots. The developed model, which consists of energy, mass balance, hydrodynamic, and geometrical equations, calculates the crystal radius and the crystal growth rate as output variables by using the heater input, the crystal pulling rate, and the crucible rise rate as input variables. To improve accuracy, we modeled the CZ process by considering factors such as changes in the positions of the crucible and the melt level. The model was validated with the operation data from an industrial 300 mm CZ process. We compared the calculated and actual values of the crystal radius and the crystal growth rate, and the results demonstrated that the developed model simulated the industrial process with high accuracy.

  6. A simple apparatus for controlling nucleation and size in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Kim M.; Smith, Robert; Carter, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    A simple device is described for controlling vapor equilibrium in macromolecular crystallization as applied to the protein crystal growth technique commonly referred to as the 'hanging drop' method. Crystal growth experiments with hen egg white lysozyme have demonstrated control of the nucleation rate. Nucleation rate and final crystal size have been found to be highly dependent upon the rate at which critical supersaturation is approached. Slower approaches show a marked decrease in the nucleation rate and an increase in crystal size.

  7. Astronauts Lodewijk van den Berg observes growth of crystals in VCGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-04-30

    51B-06-010 (29 April-6 May 1985) --- Lodewijk van den Berg, 51-B payload specialist, observes the growth of mercuric iodide crystal in the vapor crystal growth system (VCGS) on the Spacelab 3 science module aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger.

  8. Crystal defects induced by chitin and chitinolytic enzymes in the prismatic layer of Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Kintsu, Hiroyuki; Okumura, Taiga; Negishi, Lumi; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Kogure, Toshihiro; Sakuda, Shohei; Suzuki, Michio

    2017-07-22

    Biomineralization, in which organisms create biogenic hard tissues, with hardness or flexibility enhanced by organic-inorganic interaction is an interesting and attractive focus for application of biomimetic functional materials. Calcites in the prismatic layer of Pinctada fucata are tougher than abiotic calcites due to small crystal defects. However, the molecular mechanism of the defect formation remains unclear. Here, chitin and two chitinolytic enzymes, chitinase and chitobiase, were identified as organic matrices related to for the formation of small crystal defects in the prismatic layer. Experiments with a chitinase inhibitor in vivo showed chitinase is necessary to form the prismatic layer. Analysis of calcite crystals, which were synthesized in a chitin hydrogel treated with chitinolytic enzymes, by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that crystal defects became larger as chitin was more degraded. These results suggest that interactions between chitin and calcium carbonate increase as chitin is thinner. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Uncovering molecular details of urea crystal growth in the presence of additives.

    PubMed

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Vetter, Thomas; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2012-10-17

    Controlling the shape of crystals is of great practical relevance in fields like pharmacology and fine chemistry. Here we examine the paradigmatic case of urea which is known to crystallize from water with a needle-like morphology. To prevent this undesired effect, inhibitors that selectively favor or discourage the growth of specific crystal faces can be used. In urea the most relevant faces are the {001} and the {110} which are known to grow fast and slow, respectively. The relevant growth speed difference between these two crystal faces is responsible for the needle-like structure of crystals grown in water solution. To prevent this effect, additives are used to slow down the growth of one face relative to another, thus controlling the shape of the crystal. We study the growth of fast {001} and slow {110} faces in water solution and the effect of shape controlling inhibitors like biuret. Extensive sampling through molecular dynamics simulations provides a microscopic picture of the growth mechanism and of the role of the additives. We find a continuous growth mechanism on the {001} face, while the slow growing {110} face evolves through a birth and spread process, in which the rate-determining step is the formation on the surface of a two-dimensional crystalline nucleus. On the {001} face, growth inhibitors like biuret compete with urea for the adsorption on surface lattice sites; on the {110} face instead additives cannot interact specifically with surface sites and play a marginal sterical hindrance of the crystal growth. The free energies of adsorption of additives and urea are evaluated with advanced simulation methods (well-tempered metadynamics) allowing a microscopic understanding of the selective effect of additives. Based on this case study, general principles for the understanding of the anisotropic growth of molecular crystals from solutions are laid out. Our work is a step toward a rational development of novel shape-affecting additives.

  10. Effects of Convective Solute and Impurity Transport in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Thomas, Bill R.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution optical interferometry was used to investigate the effects of forced solution convection on the crystal growth kinetics of the model protein lysozyme. Most experiments were conducted with 99.99% pure protein solutions. To study impurity effects, approx. 1% of lysozyme dimer (covalently bound) was added in some cases. We show that the unsteady kinetics, corresponding to bunching of growth steps, can be characterized by the Fourier components of time traces of the growth rate. Specific Fourier spectra are uniquely determined by the solution conditions (composition, temperature, and flow rate) and the growth layer source activity. We found that the average step velocity and growth rate increase by approx. I0% with increasing flow rate, as a result of the enhanced solute supply to the interface. More importantly, faster convective transport results in lower fluctuation amplitudes. This observation supports our rationale for system-dependent effects of transport on the structural perfection of protein crystals. We also found that solution flow rates greater than 500 microns/s result in stronger fluctuations while the average growth rate is decreased. This can lead to growth cessation at low supersaturations. With the intentionally contaminated solutions, these undesirable phenomena occurred at about half the flow rates required in pure solutions. Thus, we conclude that they are due to enhanced convective supply of impurities that are incorporated into the crystal during growth. Furthermore, we found that the impurity effects are reduced at higher crystal growth rates. Since the exposure time of terraces is inversely proportional to the growth rate, this observation suggests that the increased kinetics instability results from impurity adsorption on the interface. Finally, we provide evidence relating earlier observations of "slow protein crystal growth kinetics" to step bunch formation in response to nonsteady step generation.

  11. A physicist's view of biotechnology. [small molecule crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1987-01-01

    Theories and techniques for small molecule crystal growth are reviewed, with emphasis on space processing possibilities, particularly for protein crystal growth. The general principles of nucleation, growth, and mass and heat transport are first discussed. Optical systems using schlieren, shadowgraph, and holographic techniques are considered, and are illustrated with the example of the NASA developed Fluids Experiment System flow aboard Spacelab 3.

  12. Pancreatic stone protein (lithostathine), a physiologically relevant pancreatic calcium carbonate crystal inhibitor?

    PubMed

    Bimmler, D; Graf, R; Scheele, G A; Frick, T W

    1997-01-31

    Apart from digestive enzymes, pancreatic juice contains several proteins that are not directly involved in digestion. One of these, lithostathine, has been reported to exhibit calcite crystal inhibitor activity in vitro. As pancreatic juice is supersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate, it was hypothesized that lithostathine stabilizes pancreatic juice. Lithostathine is cleaved by trace amounts of trypsin, resulting in a C-terminal polypeptide and an N-terminal undecapeptide, which has been identified as the active site of lithostathine regarding crystal inhibition. We produced rat lithostathine in a baculovirus expression system. In order to test its functional activity, the protein was purified using a nondenaturing multi-step procedure. In the low micromolar range, recombinant rat lithostathine in vitro exhibited calcite crystal inhibitor activity, confirming earlier reports. Limited tryptic proteolysis of recombinant lithostathine was performed, and the two cleavage products were separated; the C-terminal polypeptide was precipitated by centrifugation, and the N-terminal undecapeptide was purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Only the C-terminal peptide displayed measurable calcite crystal inhibitory activity. Furthermore, synthetic undecapeptides with identical sequence to the N-terminal undecapeptides of rat or human lithostathine were inactive. However, when tested in the same in vitro assays, other pancreatic or extra-pancreatic proteins show inhibitory activity in the same concentration range as lithostathine, and inorganic phosphate is active as well. Based on these findings it seems unlikely that lithostathine is a physiologically relevant calcite crystal inhibitor. The name "lithostathine" is therefore inappropriate, and the protein's key function remains to be elucidated.

  13. Occlusion of Sulfate-Based Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles within Calcite: Effect of Varying the Surface Density of Anionic Stabilizer Chains.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yin; Fielding, Lee A; Ratcliffe, Liam P D; Wang, Yun-Wei; Meldrum, Fiona C; Armes, Steven P

    2016-09-14

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) offers a highly versatile and efficient route to a wide range of organic nanoparticles. In this article, we demonstrate for the first time that poly(ammonium 2-sulfatoethyl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) [PSEM-PBzMA] diblock copolymer nanoparticles can be prepared with either a high or low PSEM stabilizer surface density using either RAFT dispersion polymerization in a 2:1 v/v ethanol/water mixture or RAFT aqueous emulsion polymerization, respectively. We then use these model nanoparticles to gain new insight into a key topic in materials chemistry: the occlusion of organic additives into inorganic crystals. Substantial differences are observed for the extent of occlusion of these two types of anionic nanoparticles into calcite (CaCO3), which serves as a suitable model host crystal. A low PSEM stabilizer surface density leads to uniform nanoparticle occlusion within calcite at up to 7.5% w/w (16% v/v), while minimal occlusion occurs when using nanoparticles with a high PSEM stabilizer surface density. This counter-intuitive observation suggests that an optimum anionic surface density is required for efficient occlusion, which provides a hitherto unexpected design rule for the incorporation of nanoparticles within crystals.

  14. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that s