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Sample records for calcite seed crystals

  1. Calcite-seeded crystallization of calcium phosphate for phosphorus recovery.

    PubMed

    Song, Yonghui; Weidler, Peter G; Berg, Ute; Nüesch, Rolf; Donnert, Dietfried

    2006-04-01

    For phosphorus recovery from wastewater, the present paper aims at understanding the crystallization of calcium phosphate by using calcites (Juraperle and Coccolith) as seeds from hard water. Synthetic hard water with 60 mgCl(-1) carbonate and 10 mgPl(-1) phosphate was prepared and used in the batch experiments of calcite-seeded crystallization. The solution composition was measured throughout the batch crystallization process, and the corresponding saturation indices with respect to the minerals were calculated with PHREEQC Program. The surface of the calcite seeds was observed and measured with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and BET method. The studies show that both calcites are effective seeds for the crystallization of calcium phosphate from hard water; the used calcites are more efficient than the original ones because newly formed crystals with calcium phosphate have covered their surfaces. The studies show that the calcite seeds can be used for phosphorus recovery from hard waters.

  2. Crystal lattice tilting in prismatic calcite.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ian C; Metzler, Rebecca A; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Killian, Christopher E; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed the calcitic prismatic layers in Atrina rigida (Ar), Haliotis iris (Hi), Haliotis laevigata (HL), Haliotis rufescens (Hrf), Mytilus californianus (Mc), Pinctada fucata (Pf), Pinctada margaritifera (Pm) shells, and the aragonitic prismatic layer in the Nautilus pompilius (Np) shell. Dramatic structural differences were observed across species, with 100-μm wide single-crystalline prisms in Hi, HL and Hrf, 1-μm wide needle-shaped calcite prisms in Mc, 1-μm wide spherulitic aragonite prisms in Np, 20-μm wide single-crystalline calcite prisms in Ar, and 20-μm wide polycrystalline calcite prisms in Pf and Pm. The calcite prisms in Pf and Pm are subdivided into sub-prismatic domains of orientations, and within each of these domains the calcite crystal lattice tilts gradually over long distances, on the order of 100 μm, with an angle spread of crystal orientation of 10-20°. Furthermore, prisms in Pf and Pm are harder than in any other calcite prisms analyzed, their nanoparticles are smaller, and the angle spread is strongly correlated with hardness in all shells that form calcitic prismatic layers. One can hypothesize a causal relationship of these correlated parameters: greater angle spread may confer greater hardness and resistance to wear, thus providing Pf and Pm with a structural advantage in their environment. This is the first structure-property relationship thus far hypothesized in mollusk shell prisms.

  3. Visualization of acoustic cavitation effects on suspended calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Wagterveld, R M; Boels, L; Mayer, M J; Witkamp, G J

    2011-01-01

    The acoustic cavitation (42,080 Hz, 7.1 W cm(-2) or 17 W) effects on suspended calcite crystals, sized between 5 and 50 μm, have been visualized for the first time using high speed photography. High speed recordings with a duration of 1 s containing up to 300,000 frames per second, revealed the effect of cluster and streamer cavitation on several calcite crystals. Cavitation clusters, evolved from cavitation inception and collapse, caused attrition, disruption of aggregates and deagglomeration, whereas streamer cavitation was observed to cause deagglomeration only. Cavitation on the surface gave the crystals momentum. However, it is shown that breakage of accelerated crystals by interparticle collisions is unrealistic because of their small sizes and low velocities. Crystals that were accelerated by bubble expansion, subsequently experienced a deceleration much stronger than expected from drag forces, upon bubble collapse. Experiments with pre-dried crystals seemed to support the current theory on bubble nucleation through the presence of pre-existing gas pockets. However, experiments with fully wetted crystals also showed the nucleation of bubbles on the crystal surface. Although microjet impingement on the crystal surface could not be directly visualized with high speed photography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of irradiated calcite seeds showed deep circular indentations. It was suggested that these indentations might be caused by shockwave induced jet impingement. Furthermore, the appearance of voluminous fragments with large planes of fracture indicated that acoustic cavitation can also cause the breakage of single crystal structures.

  4. Interactions of salicylic acid derivatives with calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Ukrainczyk, Marko; Gredičak, Matija; Jerić, Ivanka; Kralj, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of basic interactions between the active pharmaceutical compounds and calcium carbonates is of great importance because of the possibility to use the carbonates as a mineral carrier in drug delivery systems. In this study the mode and extent of interactions of salicylic acid and its amino acid derivates, chosen as pharmaceutically relevant model compounds, with calcite crystals are described. Therefore, the crystal growth kinetics of well defined rhombohedral calcite seed crystals in the systems containing salicylic acid (SA), 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), N-salicyloil-l-aspartic acid (N-Sal-Asp) or N-salicyloil-l-glutamic acid (N-Sal-Glu), were investigated. The precipitation systems were of relatively low initial supersaturation and of apparently neutral pH. The data on the crystal growth rate reductions in the presence of the applied salicylate molecules were analyzed by means of Cabrera & Vermileya's, and Kubota & Mullin's models of interactions of the dissolved additives and crystal surfaces. The crystal growth kinetic experiments were additionally supported with the appropriate electrokinetic, spectroscopic and adsorption measurements. The Langmuir adsorption constants were determined and they were found to be in a good correlation with values obtained from crystal growth kinetic analyses. The results indicated that salicylate molecules preferentially adsorb along the steps on the growing calcite surfaces. The values of average spacing between the adjacent salicylate adsorption active sites and the average distance between the neighboring adsorbed salicylate molecules were also estimated. PMID:21963207

  5. Interactions of salicylic acid derivatives with calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Ukrainczyk, Marko; Gredičak, Matija; Jerić, Ivanka; Kralj, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of basic interactions between the active pharmaceutical compounds and calcium carbonates is of great importance because of the possibility to use the carbonates as a mineral carrier in drug delivery systems. In this study the mode and extent of interactions of salicylic acid and its amino acid derivates, chosen as pharmaceutically relevant model compounds, with calcite crystals are described. Therefore, the crystal growth kinetics of well defined rhombohedral calcite seed crystals in the systems containing salicylic acid (SA), 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), N-salicyloil-l-aspartic acid (N-Sal-Asp) or N-salicyloil-l-glutamic acid (N-Sal-Glu), were investigated. The precipitation systems were of relatively low initial supersaturation and of apparently neutral pH. The data on the crystal growth rate reductions in the presence of the applied salicylate molecules were analyzed by means of Cabrera & Vermileya's, and Kubota & Mullin's models of interactions of the dissolved additives and crystal surfaces. The crystal growth kinetic experiments were additionally supported with the appropriate electrokinetic, spectroscopic and adsorption measurements. The Langmuir adsorption constants were determined and they were found to be in a good correlation with values obtained from crystal growth kinetic analyses. The results indicated that salicylate molecules preferentially adsorb along the steps on the growing calcite surfaces. The values of average spacing between the adjacent salicylate adsorption active sites and the average distance between the neighboring adsorbed salicylate molecules were also estimated.

  6. Crystal growth of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solutions at constant PCO2 and 25°C: a test of a calcite dissolution model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Plummer, L. Neil; Busenberg, E.

    1981-01-01

    A highly reproducible seeded growth technique was used to study calcite crystallization from calcium bicarbonate solutions at 25°C and fixed carbon dioxide partial pressures between 0.03 and 0.3 atm. The results are not consistent with empirical crystallization models that have successfully described calcite growth at low PCO2 (< 10−3 atm). Good agreement was found between observed crystallization rates and those calculated from the calcite dissolution rate law and mechanism proposed by Plummer et al. (1978).

  7. Controlled calcite nucleation on polarized calcite single crystal substrates in the presence of polyacrylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Norio; Horiuchi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Miho; Nozaki, Kosuke; Hiyama, Tetsuo; Nagai, Akiko; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2015-04-01

    We studied theoretically and experimentally the effects of the surface electric field generated by polarization and polyacrylic acid (PAA) additives on the heterogeneous nucleation of calcite on the calcite single crystal substrates with (10.4), (10.0) and (00.1) orientations. A set of "in-situ" experiments with optical microscopy was performed to determine the waiting time of CaCO3 nucleation, defined as the time interval between the onset of the diffusion of CO2 and the appearance of the first visible precipitation. Calcite was nucleated on the oriented calcite substrates through diffusion of NH3 and CO2 gas from a solid ammonium carbonate into calcium chloride solutions. A theoretical analysis showed that the surface electric field of the polarized calcite substrate decrease the activation energy for nucleation and consequently promotes nucleation. Experimentally, the surface electric field and PAA addition were found to decrease both contact angles and waiting times, and as a result, promote the heterogeneous nucleation. Combined effect of PAA and surface electric field further reduced contact angles and waiting times regardless of orientation differences of the calcite substrates. The cooperation acts remarkably on N-surface of the respective calcite substrates. The results were explained by the Cassie's equation, a classical heterogeneous nucleation theory under a surface electric field, and matching of the charged sites on the PAA chain with the ion arrangement on the calcite substrate.

  8. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  9. Inhibition by glycosaminoglycans of CaCO3 (calcite) crystallization.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D; Long, W F; Williamson, F B

    1989-01-01

    Of a range of glycosaminoglycans, heparin and heparan sulphate were the most effective inhibitors in vitro of CaCO3 (calcite) crystallization as assayed by conductimetric measurements. The possible role of such glycosaminoglycans in modulating calcium-salt crystallizations in vivo is discussed. PMID:2719649

  10. Simulations of calcite crystallization on self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Colin L; Harding, John H; Duffy, Dorothy M

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents simulations of calcium carbonate ordering in contact with self-assembled monolayers. The calculations use potential-based molecular dynamics to model the crystallization of calcium carbonate to calcite expressing both the (00.1) and (01.2) surfaces. The effect of monolayer properties: ionization; epitaxial matching; charge density; and headgroup orientation on the crystallization process are examined in detail. The results demonstrate that highly charged surfaces are vital to stimulate ordering and crystallization. Template directed crystallization requires charge epitaxy between both the crystal surface and the monolayer. The orientation of the headgroup appears to make no contribution to the selection of the crystal surface.

  11. Monoclinic deformation of calcite crystals at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeniosło, R.; Fabrykiewicz, P.; Sosnowska, I.

    2016-09-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation powder diffraction shows that the average crystal structure of calcite at ambient conditions is described with the trigonal space group R 3 bar c but there is a systematic hkl-dependent Bragg peak broadening. A modelling of this anisotropic peak broadening with the microstrain model from Stephens (1999) [15] is presented. The observed lattice parameters' correlations can be described by assuming a monoclinic-type deformation of calcite crystallites. A quantitative model of this monoclinic deformation observed at ambient conditions is described with the space group C 2 / c . The monoclinic unit cell suggested at ambient conditions is related with the monoclinic unit cell reported in calcite at high pressure (Merrill and Bassett (1975) [10]).

  12. On the origin of fiber calcite crystals in moonmilk deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Cuezva, Soledad; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Lario, Javier; Laiz, Leonila; Gonzalez, Juan Miguel; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we show that moonmilk subaerial speleothems in Altamira Cave (Spain) consist of a network of fiber calcite crystals and active microbial structures. In Altamira moonmilks, the study of the typology and distribution of fiber crystals, extracellular polymeric substances, and microorganisms allowed us to define the initial stages of fiber crystal formation in recent samples as well as the variations in the microstructural arrangement in more evolved stages. Thus, we have been able to show the existence of a relationship among the different types of fiber crystals and their origins. This allowed us to outline a model that illustrates the different stages of formation of the moonmilk, developed on different substrata, concluding that microbes influence physicochemical precipitation, resulting in a variety of fiber crystal morphologies and sizes.

  13. The effect of sulfated polysaccharides on the crystallization of calcite superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Ruth; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2012-01-01

    Calcite with unique morphology and uniform size has been successfully synthesized in the presence of classes of polysaccharides based on carrageenans. In the crystallization of calcite, the choice of different carrageenans, (iota, lambda and kappa), as additives concedes systematic study of the influence of different chemical structures and particularly molecular charge on the formation of CaCO 3 crystals. The uniform calcite superstructures are formed by assemblies and aggregation of calcite crystals. The mechanism for the formation of calcite superstructures was studied by a variety of techniques, SEM, TEM, XRD, time-resolved conductivity and light scattering measurements, focusing on the early stages of crystals' nucleation and aggregation.

  14. Functionalizing single crystals: incorporation of nanoparticles inside gel-grown calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujing; Yuan, Wentao; Shi, Ye; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yong; Chen, Hongzheng; Li, Hanying

    2014-04-14

    Synthetic single crystals are usually homogeneous solids. Biogenic single crystals, however, can incorporate biomacromolecules and become inhomogeneous solids so that their properties are also extrinsically regulated by the incorporated materials. The discrepancy between the properties of synthetic and biogenic single crystals leads to the idea to modify the internal structure of synthetic crystals to achieve nonintrinsic properties by incorporation of foreign material. Intrinsically colorless and diamagnetic calcite single crystals are turned into colored and paramagnetic solids, through incorporation of Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles without significantly disrupting the crystalline lattice of calcite. The crystals incorporate the nanoparticles and gel fibers when grown in agarose gel media containing the nanoparticles, whereas the solution-grown crystals do not. As such, our work extends the long-history gel method for crystallization into a platform to functionalize single-crystalline materials.

  15. Crystallographic orientation inhomogeneity and crystal splitting in biogenic calcite.

    PubMed

    Checa, Antonio G; Bonarski, Jan T; Willinger, Marc G; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Kania, Bogusz; González-Segura, Alicia; Pina, Carlos M; Pospiech, Jan; Morawiec, Adam

    2013-09-01

    The calcitic prismatic units forming the outer shell of the bivalve Pinctada margaritifera have been analysed using scanning electron microscopy-electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In the initial stages of growth, the individual prismatic units are single crystals. Their crystalline orientation is not consistent but rather changes gradually during growth. The gradients in crystallographic orientation occur mainly in a direction parallel to the long axis of the prism, i.e. perpendicular to the shell surface and do not show preferential tilting along any of the calcite lattice axes. At a certain growth stage, gradients begin to spread and diverge, implying that the prismatic units split into several crystalline domains. In this way, a branched crystal, in which the ends of the branches are independent crystalline domains, is formed. At the nanometre scale, the material is composed of slightly misoriented domains, which are separated by planes approximately perpendicular to the c-axis. Orientational gradients and splitting processes are described in biocrystals for the first time and are undoubtedly related to the high content of intracrystalline organic molecules, although the way in which these act to induce the observed crystalline patterns is a matter of future research.

  16. Crystallographic orientation inhomogeneity and crystal splitting in biogenic calcite

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio G.; Bonarski, Jan T.; Willinger, Marc G.; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Kania, Bogusz; González-Segura, Alicia; Pina, Carlos M.; Pospiech, Jan; Morawiec, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The calcitic prismatic units forming the outer shell of the bivalve Pinctada margaritifera have been analysed using scanning electron microscopy–electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In the initial stages of growth, the individual prismatic units are single crystals. Their crystalline orientation is not consistent but rather changes gradually during growth. The gradients in crystallographic orientation occur mainly in a direction parallel to the long axis of the prism, i.e. perpendicular to the shell surface and do not show preferential tilting along any of the calcite lattice axes. At a certain growth stage, gradients begin to spread and diverge, implying that the prismatic units split into several crystalline domains. In this way, a branched crystal, in which the ends of the branches are independent crystalline domains, is formed. At the nanometre scale, the material is composed of slightly misoriented domains, which are separated by planes approximately perpendicular to the c-axis. Orientational gradients and splitting processes are described in biocrystals for the first time and are undoubtedly related to the high content of intracrystalline organic molecules, although the way in which these act to induce the observed crystalline patterns is a matter of future research. PMID:23804442

  17. Calcium bilirubinate intercalated calcite single crystal: evidence for microstructure of pigment gallstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Z.; Xu, D. J.; Soloway, Roger D.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Xu, Duan-Fu; Wu, JinGuang

    1994-01-01

    During the preparation of calcium bilirubinate (CaBR) single crystals, brown crystals were grown in a gel solution of CaCl2/Sodium bilirubinate. X-ray diffraction analysis proved that the crystal was calcite. FTIR investigations support this result. However, the subtracted spectra revealed that the CaBR dispersed in the crystals and interacted with calcite on the molecular level, since the maximum band shift of the CaBR in calcite from the correspond bands of CaBR was ca. 20 cm-1. It was confirmed that microstructure also by x- ray diffraction and photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  18. An assessment of calcite crystal growth mechanisms based on crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth experiments were undertaken to test a recently proposed model that relates crystal growth mechanisms to the shapes of crystal size distributions (CSDs). According to this approach, CSDs for minerals have three basic shapes: (1) asymptotic, which is related to a crystal growth mechanism having constant-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; (2) lognormal, which results from decaying-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; and (3) a theoretical, universal, steady-state curve attributed to Ostwald ripening. In addition, there is a fourth crystal growth mechanism that does not have a specific CSD shape, but which preserves the relative shapes of previously formed CSDs. This mechanism is attributed to supply-controlled growth. All three shapes were produced experimentally in the calcite growth experiments by modifying nucleation conditions and solution concentrations. The asymptotic CSD formed when additional reactants were added stepwise to the surface of solutions that were supersaturated with respect to calcite (initial Ω = 20, where Ω = 1 represents saturation), thereby leading to the continuous nucleation and growth of calcite crystals. Lognormal CSDs resulted when reactants were added continuously below the solution surface, via a submerged tube, to similarly supersaturated solutions (initial Ω = 22 to 41), thereby leading to a single nucleation event followed by surface-controlled growth. The Ostwald CSD resulted when concentrated reactants were rapidly mixed, leading initially to high levels of supersaturation (Ω >100), and to the formation and subsequent dissolution of very small nuclei, thereby yielding CSDs having small crystal size variances. The three CSD shapes likely were produced early in the crystallization process, in the nanometer crystal size range, and preserved during subsequent growth. Preservation of the relative shapes of the CSDs indicates that a supply-controlled growth mechanism

  19. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Endospores Function as Nuclei for the Formation of Single Calcite Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Rie

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-13C]- and [2-13C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  20. Effects of chitosan on the alignment, morphology and shape of calcite crystals nucleating under Langmuir monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyungil; Uysal, Ahmet; Kewalramani, Sumit; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak

    2009-04-22

    The growth of calcium carbonate crystals under Langmuir monolayers was investigated in the presence of chitosan, a soluble derivative of chitin added to the subphase to better simulate the polyelectrolyte-containing in vivo environment. Chitosan causes distinct concentration-dependent changes in the orientation, shape and morphology of the calcite crystals nucleating under acid and sulfate monolayers. Our results suggest that polyelectrolytes may play essential roles in controlling the growth of biogenic calcite crystals.

  1. Effects of Chitosan on the Morphology and Alignment of Calcite Crystals Nucleating Under Langmuir Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Uysal, A; Kewalramani, S; Stripe, B; Dutta, P

    2009-01-01

    The growth of calcium carbonate crystals under Langmuir monolayers was investigated in the presence of chitosan, a soluble derivative of chitin added to the subphase to better simulate the polyelectrolyte-containing in vivo environment. Chitosan causes distinct concentration-dependent changes in the orientation, shape and morphology of the calcite crystals nucleating under acid and sulfate monolayers. Our results suggest that polyelectrolytes may play essential roles in controlling the growth of biogenic calcite crystals.

  2. Origin of platy calcite crystals in hot-spring deposits in the Kenya Rift Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Renault, R.W.

    1998-09-01

    Platy calcite crystals, which have their c axis parallel to their shortest length axis, are common components of travertine deposits found around some hot springs in the Kenya Rift Valley. They are composite crystals formed of numerous paper-thin subcrystals. Individual plates allowed to grow without obstruction develop a hexagonal motif. The Kenyan crystals typically form in hot (>75 C) waters that have a low Ca content (<10 mg/l), a high CO{sub 2} content, and a high rate of CO{sub 2} degassing. At Chemurkeu, aggregates of numerous small platy crystals collectively form lattice crystals that superficially resemble ray crystals. The walls of the lattice crystals are formed of large platy crystals that have their long and intermediate length axes aligned parallel to the plane of the long axis of the lattice crystal. Internally, the lattice crystals are formed of small platy calcite crystals arranged in a boxlike pattern that creates the appearance of a lattice when viewed in thin section. Lattice crystals are highly porous, with each pore being enclosed by platy crystals. At Lorusio, travertines are mainly formed of pseudodentrites that are constructed by numerous small platy crystals attached to a main stem which is a large platy crystal that commonly curves along its long axis. The pseudodentrites are the main construction blocks in ledges and lilypads that form in the vent pool and spring outflow channels, where the water is too hot for microbes other than hyperthermophiles. The platy calcite crystals in the Kenyan travertines are morphologically similar to platy calcite crystals that form as scale in pipes in the geothermal fields of New Zealand and hydrothermal angel wing calcite from the La Fe mine in Mexico. Comparison of the Kenyan and New Zealand crystals indicates that platy calcite crystals form from waters with a low Ca{sup 2+} content and a high CO{sub 3}/Ca ratio due to rapid rates of CO{sub 2} degassing.

  3. Initial formation of calcite crystals in the thin prismatic layer with the periostracum of Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Nakayama, Seiji; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2013-02-01

    Although the formation mechanism of calcite crystals in the prismatic layer has been studied well in many previous works, the initial state of calcite formation has not been observed in detail using electron microscopes. In this study, we report that the soft prismatic layer with transparent color (the thin prismatic layer) in the tip of the fresh shell of Pinctada fucata was picked up to observe the early calcification phase. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) image showed that the growth tip of the thin prismatic layer was covered by the periostracum, which was also where the initial formation of calcite crystals began. A cross-section containing the thin calcite crystals in the thin prismatic layer with the periostracum was made using a focused ion beam (FIB) system. In a transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, the thin calcite crystal (thickness is about 1μm) on the periostracum was found to be a single crystal with the c-axis oriented perpendicular to the shell surface. On the other hand, many aggregated small particles consisting of bassanite crystals were observed in the periostracum suggesting the possibility that not only organic sulfate but also inorganic sulfates exist in the prismatic layer. These discoveries in the early calcification phase of the thin prismatic layer may help to clarify the mechanism of regulating the nucleation and orientation of the calcite crystal in the shell.

  4. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-12-01

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites.

  5. Skeletal crystals of calcite and trona from hot-spring deposits in Kenya and New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Renaut, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Skeletal crystals are hollow crystals that develop because their outer walls grow before their cores. The presence of skeletal crystals of calcite (three types--trigonal prisms, hexagonal prisms, and plates) and trona in hot (> 90 C) spring deposits in New Zealand (Waikite Springs and Ohaaki Pool) and Kenya (Lorusio hot springs) shows that they can form in natural sedimentary regimes. Analysis of samples from these deposits shows that this crystal morphology develops under disequilibrium conditions that are unrelated to a specific environmental or diagenetic setting. Skeletal crystals transform into solid crystals when subsequent precipitation fills their hollow cores. In some cases, this may involve precipitation of crystalline material that has a sieve-like texture. In other examples, the skeletal crystal provides a framework upon which other materials can be precipitated. Walls in the skeletal trigonal calcite prisms from Waikite Springs are formed of subcrystals that mimic the shape of the parent crystal. Similarly, plate-like skeletal crystals from Lorusio are formed of densely packed subcrystals that are < 0.5 {micro}m long. Conversely, the walls of the skeletal hexagonal calcite crystals from Ohaaki Pool and the skeletal trona crystals from Lorusio are not formed of subcrystals. Recognition of skeletal crystals is important because they represent growth that follows the reverse pattern of normal growth. Failure to recognize that crystal growth followed the skeletal motif may lead to false interpretations concerning the growth of a crystal.

  6. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product.

  7. Morphological and mechanical characterization of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Falini, Giuseppe; Pasquini, Luca; Reggi, Michela; Fermani, Simona; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    A growing number of classes of organic (macro)molecular materials have been trapped into inorganic crystalline hosts, such as calcite single crystals, without significantly disrupting their crystalline lattices. Inclusion of an organic phase plays a key role in enhancing the mechanical properties of the crystals, which are believed to share structural features with biogenic minerals. Here we report the synthesis and mechanical characterization of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals. Once entrapped into the crystals SWCNT-COOH appeared both as aggregates of entangled bundles and nanoropes. Their observation was possible only after crystal etching, fracture or FIB (focused ion beam) cross-sectioning. SWCNT-COOHs occupied a small volume fraction and were randomly distributed into the host crystal. They did not strongly affect the crystal morphology. However, although the Young's modulus of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals was similar to that of pure calcite their hardness increased by about 20%. Thus, SWCNT-COOHs provide an obstacle against the dislocation-mediated propagation of plastic deformation in the crystalline slip systems, in analogy with the well-known hardness increase in fiber-reinforced composites.

  8. Amelogenin processing by MMP-20 prevents protein occlusion inside calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Thompson, Mitchell; Lokappa, Sowmya B.; Gallon, Victoria A.; Cho, Kang R.; Qiu, S. Roger; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Calcite crystals were grown in the presence of full-length amelogenin and during its proteolysis by recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase 20 (rhMMP-20). Recombinant porcine amelogenin (rP172) altered the shape of calcite crystals by inhibiting the growth of steps on the {104} faces and became occluded inside the crystals. Upon co-addition of rhMMP-20, the majority of the protein was digested resulting in a truncated amelogenin lacking the C-terminal segment. In rP172-rhMMP-20 samples, the occlusion of amelogenin into the calcite crystals was drastically decreased. Truncated amelogenin (rP147) and the 25-residue C-terminal domain produced crystals with regular shape and less occluded organic material. Removal of the C-terminal diminished the affinity of amelogenin to the crystals and therefore prevented occlusion. We hypothesize that HAP and calcite interact with amelogenin in a similar manner. In the case of each material, full-length amelogenin binds most strongly, truncated amelogenin binds weakly and the C-terminus alone has the weakest interaction. Regarding enamel crystal growth, the prevention of occlusion into maturing enamel crystals might be a major benefit resulting from the selective cleavage of amelogenin at the C-terminus by MMP-20. Our data have important implications for understanding the hypomineralized enamel phenotype in cases of amelogenesis imperfecta resulting from MMP-20 mutations and will contribute to the design of enamel inspired biomaterials. PMID:23226976

  9. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Kulak, Alexander N.; Comyn, Timothy P.; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Robinson, Ian K.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-06-01

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. Here we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. This work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates.

  10. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Kulak, Alexander N.; Comyn, Timothy P.; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Robinson, Ian K.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. Here we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. This work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates. PMID:27302863

  11. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N; Côté, Alexander S; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S; Kulak, Alexander N; Comyn, Timothy P; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J; Duffy, Dorothy M; Robinson, Ian K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2016-01-01

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. Here we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. This work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates. PMID:27302863

  12. Control of macromolecule distribution within synthetic and biogenic single calcite crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenberg, J.; Weiner, S.; Addadi, L.; Hanson, J.; Koetzle, T.F.

    1997-02-05

    The ability of organisms to exercise control over crystal growth is wonderfully exemplified by skeleton formation in echinoderms. A sea urchin spine is a unique composite of a single crystal of calcite and glycoproteins intercalated inside the crystal during its growth. Here we performed a detailed morphological and high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of the textures of synthetic and biogenic calcite crystals. We show that the intracrystalline macromolecules from sea urchin spines, when allowed to interact with growing calcite crystals in vitro, selectively reduce the coherence lengths and degrees of alignment of the perfect domains in specific crystallographic directions. These directions also correspond to the newly-developed stable faces. In contrast, the defect distribution of young sea urchin spines composed entirely of spongy stereomic structure is much more isotropic. In mature spines containing secondarily filled-in wedges of calcite, the degree of anisotropy is intermediate between that of the synthetic crystals and the young spines. The macromolecules extracted from young and mature spines are, however, very similar. These observations demonstrate the inherent capability of occluded matrix macromolecules to finely differentiate between crystal planes by stereochemical recognition processes. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. In situ AFM crystal growth and dissolution study of calcite in the presence of aqueous fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavouraki, A.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Koutsoukos, P. G.

    2009-04-01

    Fluoride is naturally abundant, encountered in rocks, soil and fresh and ocean water. Calcite crystals, during crystal growth may incorporate fluoride ions into their lattice (Okumura et al., 1983). In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the growth and dissolution of calcite {104} surfaces in aqueous solutions in the presence of fluoride, using a fluid cell in which the supersaturated and the understaturated solutions respectively, flow over a freshly cleaved calcite crystal. For growth experiments, supersaturation index (S.I.) with respect to calcite was equal to 0.89 and the initial solution pH 10.2. The crystal growth rates were measured from the closure of the rhombohedral etch pits along the [010] direction induced by an initial dissolution step using pure water. The spreading rate of 2-dimensional nuclei was also measured along the same direction. In the presence of low fluoride concentrations (≤0.33 mM), the crystal growth rate of calcite was unaffected. At higher concentrations (up to 5 mM) growth rate decreased substantially to 50% of the rate in the absence of fluoride. Potential fluoride sorption over the calcite surface may ascribe the decrease of growth rates. Dissolution experiments were conducted at pH= 7.2 and dissolution rates of calcite were measured from the spreading of rhombohedral etch pits along both [010] and [42] directions. The presence of low concentrations of fluoride (≤1.1 mM) in the undersaturated solutions enhanced the dissolution rate along the [42] direction by 50% in comparison with pure water. The morphology of rhombohedral etch pits changed to hexagonal in the presence of fluoride in the undersaturated solutions. The AFM dissolution experiments suggested that the fluoride ions adsorbed onto the calcite surface. Further increase of fluoride concentrations (up to 1.6 mM) resulted in the decrease of the calcite dissolution rate by 60% in both [010] and [42] directions. Reference: Okumura, M, Kitano, Y

  14. Rosette-shaped calcite structures at surfaces: mechanistic implications for CaCO3 crystallization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung Ho; Choi, Insung S

    2010-07-01

    Biomineralization is believed to be achieved by the intimate cooperation of soluble macromolecules and an insoluble matrix at the specific inorganic-organic interface. It has been reported that positively charged matrices play an important role in controlling the structure of CaCO(3) at surfaces, although detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, we studied the transformation from amorphous CaCO(3) to calcite crystals on surfaces by using thin films of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and its quaternized form. The positively charged PDMAEMA film was found to possess unique properties for CaCO(3) crystallization: individually separated, single calcite crystals were formed on the PDMAEMA film in the absence of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), while circularly fused calcite crystals were formed in the presence of PAA. The circularly fused (rosette-shaped) calcite crystals could be changed from a completely packed rosette to a ring-shaped, hollow structure by tuning the crystallization conditions. A number of factors, such as reaction time, amount of (NH(4))(2)CO(3), concentration of PAA, and charge of matrix-films, were varied systematically, and we now propose a mechanism based on these observations.

  15. Common crystal nucleation mechanism in shell formation of two morphologically distinct calcite brachiopods.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Cusack, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    Closely related mineral-producing organisms share common biomineralisation processes. We demonstrate that, in cases of disparate mineral structures where crystal growth mechanisms are necessarily diverse, nucleation processes are the common underlying mechanism during shell formation. Detailed crystallography in the context of shell microstructure in two morphologically distinct calcite brachiopods indicates that, despite differences in shell growth and fabric, at the centre of growth, calcite crystals nucleate with the c-axis 0001 parallel to the shell surface. Such detailed contextual crystallography of biomineralisation using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) will have significant applications for future research in biological and medical sciences.

  16. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  17. Crystallization of ikaite and its pseudomorphic transformation into calcite: Raman spectroscopy evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Pastor, N.; Oehlerich, Markus; Astilleros, José Manuel; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Mayr, Christoph C.; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2016-02-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) is a metastable phase that crystallizes in nature from alkaline waters with high phosphate concentrations at temperatures close to 0 °C. This mineral transforms into anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorphs when temperatures rise or when exposed to atmospheric conditions. During the transformation in some cases the shape of the original ikaite crystal is preserved as a pseudomorph. Pseudomorphs after ikaite are considered as a valuable paleoclimatic indicator. In this work we conducted ikaite crystal growth experiments at near-freezing temperatures using the single diffusion silica gel technique, prepared with a natural aqueous solution from the polymictic lake Laguna Potrok Aike (51°57‧S, 70°23‧W) in Patagonia, Argentina. The ikaite crystals were recovered from the gels and the transformation reactions were monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy at two different temperatures. The first spectra collected showed the characteristic features of ikaite. In successive spectra new bands at 1072, 1081 and 1086 cm-1 and changes in the intensity of bands corresponding to the OH modes were observed. These changes in the Raman spectra were interpreted as corresponding to intermediate stages of the transformation of ikaite into calcite and/or vaterite. After a few hours, the characteristics of the Raman spectrum were consistent with those of calcite. While ikaite directly transforms into calcite at 10 °C in contact with air, at 20 °C this transformation involves the formation of intermediate, metastable vaterite. During the whole process the external shape of ikaite crystals was preserved. Therefore, this transformation showed the typical characteristics of a pseudomorphic mineral replacement, involving the generation of a large amount of porosity to account for the large difference in molar volumes between ikaite and calcite. A mechanism involving the coupled dissolution of ikaite and crystallization of calcite/vaterite is proposed for this

  18. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites. PMID:26675363

  19. Crystallization seeds favour crystallization only during initial growth

    PubMed Central

    Allahyarov, E.; Sandomirski, K.; Egelhaaf, S.U.; Löwen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization represents the prime example of a disorder–order transition. In realistic situations, however, container walls and impurities are frequently present and hence crystallization is heterogeneously seeded. Rarely the seeds are perfectly compatible with the thermodynamically favoured crystal structure and thus induce elastic distortions, which impede further crystal growth. Here we use a colloidal model system, which not only allows us to quantitatively control the induced distortions but also to visualize and follow heterogeneous crystallization with single-particle resolution. We determine the sequence of intermediate structures by confocal microscopy and computer simulations, and develop a theoretical model that describes our findings. The crystallite first grows on the seed but then, on reaching a critical size, detaches from the seed. The detached and relaxed crystallite continues to grow, except close to the seed, which now prevents crystallization. Hence, crystallization seeds facilitate crystallization only during initial growth and then act as impurities. PMID:25975451

  20. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants.

  1. Trigonal dendritic calcite crystals forming from hot spring waters at Waikite, North Island, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Renault, R.W.; Rosen, M.R.

    2000-05-01

    Amorphous silica and calcite form the deposits in the vent and on the discharge apron of Waikite Spring 100 (WS-100), which is located in the Waikite Geothermal area on North Island, New Zealand. These precipitates formed from spring water that has a temperature of >90 C and a pH of 8.1--8.8. The opaline silica is restricted to areas around the vent where cooling and evaporation of the spring water triggered precipitation. The calcite deposits in the spring vent and on the discharge apron are formed of large (up to 15 cm long) asymmetrical dendrite crystals that are characterized by multiple levels of branching. Branches grew preferentially from the downflow side of their parent branch. All branches have a trigonal transverse cross section except in areas where competition for growth space induced merger of neighboring crystals. The primary branches of the dendrite crystals are (sub)perpendicular to the substrate even in areas where the discharge apron slopes at a high angle (up to 80{degree}). On the steeper parts of the discharge apron, the plate-like primary branches form the floors of the small terrace pools whereas their distal edges form the rims of the pools. Growth of these dendrite crystals is attributed to abiotic processes. High levels of saturation with respect to calcite were caused by rapid CO{sub 2} degassing of the sheets of spring water that flowed down the steep discharge apron. Calcite crystals with different crystal morphologies characterize other springs near this spring. The variation in crystal morphologies from spring to spring is attributed to different levels of saturation that are related to the initial PCO{sub 2} of the spring water upon discharge and the rate of CO{sub 2} degassing at each spring.

  2. Nanobacteria-like calcite single crystals at the surface of the Tataouine meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Benzerara, Karim; Menguy, Nicolas; Guyot, François; Dominici, Christian; Gillet, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Nanobacteria-like objects evidenced at the surface of the orthopyroxenes of the Tataouine meteorite in South Tunisia have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. A method of micromanipulation has been developed to ensure that exactly the same objects were studied by both methods. We have shown that the nanobacteria-like objects are spatially correlated with filaments of microorganisms that colonized the surface of the meteoritic pyroxene during its 70 years of residence in the aridic Tataouine soil. Depressions of a few micrometers in depth are observed in the pyroxene below the carbonates, indicating preferential dissolution of the pyroxene and calcite precipitation at these locations. The nanobacteria-like small rods that constitute calcium carbonate rosettes are well crystallized calcite single crystals surrounded by a thin amorphous layer of carbonate composition that smoothes the crystal edges and induces rounded shapes. Those morphologies are unusual for calcite single crystals observed in natural samples. A survey of recent literature suggests that the intervention of organic compounds derived from biological activity is likely in their formation. PMID:12792020

  3. Nanobacteria-like calcite single crystals at the surface of the Tataouine meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerara, Karim; Menguy, Nicolas; Guyot, François; Dominici, Christian; Gillet, Philippe

    2003-06-01

    Nanobacteria-like objects evidenced at the surface of the orthopyroxenes of the Tataouine meteorite in South Tunisia have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. A method of micromanipulation has been developed to ensure that exactly the same objects were studied by both methods. We have shown that the nanobacteria-like objects are spatially correlated with filaments of microorganisms that colonized the surface of the meteoritic pyroxene during its 70 years of residence in the aridic Tataouine soil. Depressions of a few micrometers in depth are observed in the pyroxene below the carbonates, indicating preferential dissolution of the pyroxene and calcite precipitation at these locations. The nanobacteria-like small rods that constitute calcium carbonate rosettes are well crystallized calcite single crystals surrounded by a thin amorphous layer of carbonate composition that smoothes the crystal edges and induces rounded shapes. Those morphologies are unusual for calcite single crystals observed in natural samples. A survey of recent literature suggests that the intervention of organic compounds derived from biological activity is likely in their formation.

  4. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    DOE PAGES

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Kulak, Alexander N.; Comyn, Timothy P.; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; et al

    2016-06-15

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. In this study, we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated inmore » conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. In conclusion, this work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates.« less

  5. The effect of fluid composition, salinity, and acidity on subcritical crack growth in calcite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, Anne Schad; Røyne, Anja; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Aubry, Jérôme; Renard, François

    2016-03-01

    Chemically activated processes of subcritical cracking in calcite control the time-dependent strength of this mineral, which is a major constituent of the Earth's brittle upper crust. Here experimental data on subcritical crack growth are acquired with a double torsion apparatus to characterize the influence of fluid pH (range 5-7.5) and ionic strength and species (Na2SO4, NaCl, MgSO4, and MgCl2) on the propagation of microcracks in calcite single crystals. The effect of different ions on crack healing has also been investigated by decreasing the load on the crack for durations up to 30 min and allowing it to relax and close. All solutions were saturated with CaCO3. The crack velocities reached during the experiments are in the range 10-9-10-2 m/s and cover the range of subcritical to close to dynamic rupture propagation velocities. Results show that for calcite saturated solutions, the energy necessary to fracture calcite is independent of pH. As a consequence, the effects of fluid salinity, measured through its ionic strength, or the variation of water activity have stronger effects on subcritical crack propagation in calcite than pH. Consequently, when considering the geological sequestration of CO2 into carbonate reservoirs, the decrease of pH within the range of 5-7.5 due to CO2 dissolution into water should not significantly alter the rate of fracturing of calcite. Increase in salinity caused by drying may lead to further reduction in cracking and consequently a decrease in brittle creep. The healing of cracks is found to vary with the specific ions present.

  6. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Morphological tranformation of calcite crystal growth by prismatic "acidic" polypeptide sequences.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I; Giocondi, J L; Orme, C A; Collino, J; Evans, J S

    2007-02-13

    Many of the interesting mechanical and materials properties of the mollusk shell are thought to stem from the prismatic calcite crystal assemblies within this composite structure. It is now evident that proteins play a major role in the formation of these assemblies. Recently, a superfamily of 7 conserved prismatic layer-specific mollusk shell proteins, Asprich, were sequenced, and the 42 AA C-terminal sequence region of this protein superfamily was found to introduce surface voids or porosities on calcite crystals in vitro. Using AFM imaging techniques, we further investigate the effect that this 42 AA domain (Fragment-2) and its constituent subdomains, DEAD-17 and Acidic-2, have on the morphology and growth kinetics of calcite dislocation hillocks. We find that Fragment-2 adsorbs on terrace surfaces and pins acute steps, accelerates then decelerates the growth of obtuse steps, forms clusters and voids on terrace surfaces, and transforms calcite hillock morphology from a rhombohedral form to a rounded one. These results mirror yet are distinct from some of the earlier findings obtained for nacreous polypeptides. The subdomains Acidic-2 and DEAD-17 were found to accelerate then decelerate obtuse steps and induce oval rather than rounded hillock morphologies. Unlike DEAD-17, Acidic-2 does form clusters on terrace surfaces and exhibits stronger obtuse velocity inhibition effects than either DEAD-17 or Fragment-2. Interestingly, a 1:1 mixture of both subdomains induces an irregular polygonal morphology to hillocks, and exhibits the highest degree of acute step pinning and obtuse step velocity inhibition. This suggests that there is some interplay between subdomains within an intra (Fragment-2) or intermolecular (1:1 mixture) context, and sequence interplay phenomena may be employed by biomineralization proteins to exert net effects on crystal growth and morphology.

  8. In Vitro Calcite Crystal Morphology Is Modulated by Otoconial Proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin-90

    PubMed Central

    Moreland, K. Trent; Hong, Mina; Lu, Wenfu; Rowley, Christopher W.; Ornitz, David M.; De Yoreo, James J.; Thalmann, Ruediger

    2014-01-01

    Otoconia are formed embryonically and are instrumental in detecting linear acceleration and gravity. Degeneration and fragmentation of otoconia in elderly patients leads to imbalance resulting in higher frequency of falls that are positively correlated with the incidence of bone fractures and death. In this work we investigate the roles otoconial proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin 90 (OC90) perform in the formation of otoconia. We demonstrate by rotary shadowing and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that Otolin-1 forms homomeric protein complexes and self-assembled networks supporting the hypothesis that Otolin-1 serves as a scaffold protein of otoconia. Our calcium carbonate crystal growth data demonstrate that Otolin-1 and OC90 modulate in vitro calcite crystal morphology but neither protein is sufficient to produce the shape of otoconia. Coadministration of these proteins produces synergistic effects on crystal morphology that contribute to morphology resembling otoconia. PMID:24748133

  9. In vitro effects of recombinant Otoconin 90 upon calcite crystal growth. Significance of tertiary structure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenfu; Zhou, Dan; Freeman, John J.; Thalmann, Isolde; Ornitz, David M.; Thalmann, Ruediger

    2010-01-01

    Otoconia are biomineral particles of microscopic size essential for perception of gravity and maintenance of balance. Millions of older Americans are affected in their mobility, quality of life and in their health by progressive demineralization of otoconia. Currently, no effective means to prevent or counteract this process are available. Because of prohibitive anatomical and biological constraints, otoconial research is lagging far behind other systems such as bone and teeth. We have overcome these obstacles by generating otoconial matrix proteins by recombinant techniques. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of recombinant Otoconin 90 (OC90), the principal soluble matrix protein upon calcite crystal growth patterns in vitro. Our findings highlight multiple effects, including facilitation of nucleation, and inhibition of crystal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, OC90 induces morphologic changes characteristic of native otoconia. OC90 is considerably less acidic than the prototypical invertebrate CaCO3 –associated protein, but is nevertheless an effective modulator of calcite crystal growth. Based on homology modeling of the sPLA2-like domains of OC90, we propose that the lower density of acidic residues of the primary sequence is compensated by formation of major anionic surface clusters upon folding into tertiary conformation. PMID:20595020

  10. Incorporating Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles into Calcite Crystals: Do Anionic Carboxylate Groups Alone Ensure Efficient Occlusion?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    New spherical diblock copolymer nanoparticles were synthesized via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) at 70 °C and 20% w/w solids using either poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) or poly(proline methacrylate) as the steric stabilizer block. Both of these stabilizers contain carboxylic acid groups, but poly(proline methacrylate) is anionic above pH 9.2, whereas poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) has zwitterionic character at this pH. When calcite crystals are grown at an initial pH of 9.5 in the presence of these two types of nanoparticles, it is found that the anionic poly(proline methacrylate)-stabilized particles are occluded uniformly throughout the crystals (up to 6.8% by mass, 14.0% by volume). In contrast, the zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate)-stabilized particles show no signs of occlusion into calcite crystals grown under identical conditions. The presence of carboxylic acid groups alone therefore does not guarantee efficient occlusion: overall anionic character is an additional prerequisite. PMID:27042383

  11. Corrosion of calcite crystals by metal-rich mud in caves: Study case in Crovassa Ricchi in Argento Cave (SW Sardinia, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gázquez, Fernando; Calaforra, José-María; Forti, Paolo; De Waele, Jo; Sanna, Laura; Rull, Fernando; Sanz, Aurelio

    2013-09-01

    Unusual orange ochre crusts were recently discovered in Crovassa Ricchi in Argento Cave (San Giovanni Mine, SW Sardinia). These speleothems appear covering the cave walls on hydrothermal calcite spars as well as filling widened spaces between calcite crystals. Planar crusts display geometrical forms following the boundaries between the calcite spars. EDX-SEM microanalyses reveal that these deposits comprise substances of Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn and O that occur as solid inclusions in pits on the surface of altered calcite microcrystals. Micro-Raman spectroscopy analyses suggest the presence of calcite and ferromanganese oxides with a low degree of crystallinity. The genetic mechanism proposed for these speleothems describes an initial stage of precipitation of euhedral calcite crystals from warm water under subaqueous conditions. The crystal surfaces were eroded and corroded by colder aggressive water that smoothed the surfaces of the crystals and slightly widened the spaces between calcite spars. Metal-rich mud coming from alteration of bedrock and ore bodies filled the cave, also penetrating along the spaces between the calcite spars. When the water table fell below the cave level, part of the sediments was eroded but the cave walls remained covered with metal-rich clayey sediments. Under aerobic conditions, metals - which were reduced in previous stages - oxidized to oxides, lowering the pH and thus the crystal surface and the calcite planes between the spars were corroded. Subsequently, the polymetallic crusts became harder through evaporation within the cave, "fossilizing" the products of this process within the planes between spars. Finally, the exposed calcite surfaces continued to be altered due to CO2 diffusion into condensation water, while the boundaries between crystals were preserved against corrosion thanks to the crust coating. As a result, the external crystal edges protrude by several centimeters from the current cave wall, while the crystal surfaces are

  12. Device for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solution

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, K.E.; Zaitseva, N.P.; Deyoreo, J.J.; Vital, R.L.

    1999-05-18

    A device is described for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solutions. The device enables a seed crystal to be introduced into the solution without exposing the solution to contaminants or to sources of drying and cooling. The device constitutes a seed protector which allows the seed to be present in the growth solution during filtration and overheating operations while at the same time preventing the seed from being dissolved by the under saturated solution. When the solution processing has been completed and the solution cooled to near the saturation point, the seed protector is opened, exposing the seed to the solution and allowing growth to begin. 3 figs.

  13. Device for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solution

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Deyoreo, James J.; Vital, Russell L.

    1999-01-01

    A device for isolation of see crystals during processing of solutions. The device enables a seed crystal to be introduced into the solution without exposing the solution to contaminants or to sources of drying and cooling. The device constitutes a seed protector which allows the seed to be present in the growth solution during filtration and overheating operations while at the same time preventing the seed from being dissolved by the under saturated solution. When the solution processing has been completed and the solution cooled to near the saturation point, the seed protector is opened, exposing the seed to the solution and allowing growth to begin.

  14. Heterogeneous Crystallization on Pairs of Pre-Structured Seeds.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Studying the effects of small pre-structured seeds on the crystallization transition in an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid with transition interface path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the impact of the simultaneous presence of two seeds with various structures. In the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures, we find that decreasing the seed-to-seed distance enhances the probability of the crystalline clusters formed on one of the seeds to grow beyond the critical size, thus, increasing the crystal nucleation rates. In contrast, when seeds have an icosahedral structure, the crystalline clusters form mostly in the bulk. The crystal nucleation rate, however, is also determined by the distance between the seeds with regular structure in which the lattice spacing is equal to the bulk lattice constant, pointing to a heterogeneous crystal nucleation that occurs away from the icosahedrally structured seeds. For slightly squeezed seeds, the effects of the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures are reduced in comparison to the regular seeds, and we do not see any effect of the presence of the second seed for seeds with squeezed icosahedral structure. PMID:27479875

  15. Heterogeneous Crystallization on Pairs of Pre-Structured Seeds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effects of small pre-structured seeds on the crystallization transition in an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid with transition interface path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the impact of the simultaneous presence of two seeds with various structures. In the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures, we find that decreasing the seed-to-seed distance enhances the probability of the crystalline clusters formed on one of the seeds to grow beyond the critical size, thus, increasing the crystal nucleation rates. In contrast, when seeds have an icosahedral structure, the crystalline clusters form mostly in the bulk. The crystal nucleation rate, however, is also determined by the distance between the seeds with regular structure in which the lattice spacing is equal to the bulk lattice constant, pointing to a heterogeneous crystal nucleation that occurs away from the icosahedrally structured seeds. For slightly squeezed seeds, the effects of the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures are reduced in comparison to the regular seeds, and we do not see any effect of the presence of the second seed for seeds with squeezed icosahedral structure. PMID:27479875

  16. Calcite growth kinetics: Modeling the effect of solution stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolthers, Mariëtte; Nehrke, Gernot; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the influence of solution stoichiometry on calcite crystal growth kinetics has attracted little attention, despite the fact that in most aqueous environments calcite precipitates from non-stoichiometric solution. In order to account for the dependence of the calcite crystal growth rate on the cation to anion ratio in solution, we extend the growth model for binary symmetrical electrolyte crystals of Zhang and Nancollas (1998) by combining it with the surface complexation model for the chemical structure of the calcite-aqueous solution interface of Wolthers et al. (2008). To maintain crystal stoichiometry, the rate of attachment of calcium ions to step edges is assumed to equal the rate of attachment of carbonate plus bicarbonate ions. The model parameters are optimized by fitting the model to the step velocities obtained previously by atomic force microscopy (AFM, Teng et al., 2000; Stack and Grantham, 2010). A variable surface roughness factor is introduced in order to reconcile the new process-based growth model with bulk precipitation rates measured in seeded calcite growth experiments. For practical applications, we further present empirical parabolic rate equations fitted to bulk growth rates of calcite in common background electrolytes and in artificial seawater-type solutions. Both the process-based and empirical growth rate equations agree with measured calcite growth rates over broad ranges of ionic strength, pH, solution stoichiometry and degree of supersaturation.

  17. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  18. Homoepitaxial meso- and microscale crystal co-orientation and organic matrix network structure in Mytilus edulis nacre and calcite.

    PubMed

    Griesshaber, Erika; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Ubhi, Harbinder Singh; Huber, Julia; Nindiyasari, Fitriana; Maier, Bernd; Ziegler, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    New developments in high-resolution, low accelaration voltage electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) enable us to resolve and quantify the co-orientation of nanocrystals constituting biological carbonate crystals with a scan step resolution of 125 nm. This allows the investigation of internal structures in carbonate tablets and tower biocrystals in the nacre of mollusc shells, and it provides details on the calcite-aragonite polymorph interface in bivalves. Within the aragonite tablets of Mytilus edulis nacre we find a mesoscale crystallographic mosaic structure with a misorientation distribution of 2° full width at half maximum. Selective etching techniques with critical point drying reveal an organic matrix network inside the nacre tablets. The size scales of the visible aragonite tablet subunits and nanoparticles correspond to those of the open pore system in the organic matrix network. We further observe by EBSD that crystal co-orientation spans over tablet boundaries and forms composite crystal units of up to 20 stacked co-oriented tablets (tower crystals). Statistical evaluation of the misorientation data gives a probability distribution of grain boundary misorientations with two maxima: a dominant peak for very-small-angle grain boundaries and a small maximum near 64°, the latter corresponding to {110} twinning orientations. However, the related twin boundaries are typically the membrane-lined {001} flat faces of the tablets and not {110} twin walls within tablets. We attribute this specific pattern of misorientation distribution to growth by particle accretion and subsequent semicoherent homoepitaxial crystallization. The semicoherent crystallization percolates between the tablets through mineral bridges and across matrix membranes surrounding the tablets. In the "prismatic" calcite layer crystallographic co-orientation of the prisms reaches over more than 50 micrometers. PMID:23896564

  19. Homoepitaxial meso- and microscale crystal co-orientation and organic matrix network structure in Mytilus edulis nacre and calcite.

    PubMed

    Griesshaber, Erika; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Ubhi, Harbinder Singh; Huber, Julia; Nindiyasari, Fitriana; Maier, Bernd; Ziegler, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    New developments in high-resolution, low accelaration voltage electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) enable us to resolve and quantify the co-orientation of nanocrystals constituting biological carbonate crystals with a scan step resolution of 125 nm. This allows the investigation of internal structures in carbonate tablets and tower biocrystals in the nacre of mollusc shells, and it provides details on the calcite-aragonite polymorph interface in bivalves. Within the aragonite tablets of Mytilus edulis nacre we find a mesoscale crystallographic mosaic structure with a misorientation distribution of 2° full width at half maximum. Selective etching techniques with critical point drying reveal an organic matrix network inside the nacre tablets. The size scales of the visible aragonite tablet subunits and nanoparticles correspond to those of the open pore system in the organic matrix network. We further observe by EBSD that crystal co-orientation spans over tablet boundaries and forms composite crystal units of up to 20 stacked co-oriented tablets (tower crystals). Statistical evaluation of the misorientation data gives a probability distribution of grain boundary misorientations with two maxima: a dominant peak for very-small-angle grain boundaries and a small maximum near 64°, the latter corresponding to {110} twinning orientations. However, the related twin boundaries are typically the membrane-lined {001} flat faces of the tablets and not {110} twin walls within tablets. We attribute this specific pattern of misorientation distribution to growth by particle accretion and subsequent semicoherent homoepitaxial crystallization. The semicoherent crystallization percolates between the tablets through mineral bridges and across matrix membranes surrounding the tablets. In the "prismatic" calcite layer crystallographic co-orientation of the prisms reaches over more than 50 micrometers.

  20. Adjustment errors of sunstones in the first step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: studies with dichroic cordierite/ tourmaline and birefringent calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Egri, Ádám; Kretzer, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tibor; Jäger, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    According to an old but still unproven theory, Viking navigators analysed the skylight polarization with dichroic cordierite or tourmaline, or birefringent calcite sunstones in cloudy/foggy weather. Combining these sunstones with their sun-dial, they could determine the position of the occluded sun, from which the geographical northern direction could be guessed. In psychophysical laboratory experiments, we studied the accuracy of the first step of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. We measured the adjustment error e of rotatable cordierite, tourmaline and calcite crystals when the task was to determine the direction of polarization of white light as a function of the degree of linear polarization p. From the obtained error functions e(p), the thresholds p* above which the first step can still function (i.e. when the intensity change seen through the rotating analyser can be sensed) were derived. Cordierite is about twice as reliable as tourmaline. Calcite sunstones have smaller adjustment errors if the navigator looks for that orientation of the crystal where the intensity difference between the two spots seen in the crystal is maximal, rather than minimal. For higher p (greater than pcrit) of incident light, the adjustment errors of calcite are larger than those of the dichroic cordierite (pcrit=20%) and tourmaline (pcrit=45%), while for lower p (less than pcrit) calcite usually has lower adjustment errors than dichroic sunstones. We showed that real calcite crystals are not as ideal sunstones as it was believed earlier, because they usually contain scratches, impurities and crystal defects which increase considerably their adjustment errors. Thus, cordierite and tourmaline can also be at least as good sunstones as calcite. Using the psychophysical e(p) functions and the patterns of the degree of skylight polarization measured by full-sky imaging polarimetry, we computed how accurately the northern direction can be determined with the use of the Viking sun

  1. High surface area calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. N.; Andersson, M. P.; Dalby, K. N.; Müter, D.; Okhrimenko, D. V.; Fordsmand, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2013-05-01

    Calcite (CaCO3) is important in many fields—in nature, because it is a component of aquifers, oil reservoirs and prospective CO2 storage sites, and in industry, where it is used in products as diverse as paper, toothpaste, paint, plastic and aspirin. It is difficult to obtain high purity calcite with a high surface area but such material is necessary for industrial applications and for fundamental calcite research. Commercial powder is nearly always contaminated with growth inhibitors such as sugars, citrate or pectin and most laboratory synthesis methods deliver large precipitates, often containing vaterite or aragonite. To address this problem, we (i) adapted the method of carbonating a Ca(OH)2 slurry with CO2 gas to develop the first simple, cheap, safe and reproducible procedure using common laboratory equipment, to obtain calcite that reproducibly had a surface area of 14-17 m2/g and (ii) conducted a thorough characterization of the product. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed nanometer scale, rhombohedral crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed highly crystalline, pure calcite that more closely resembles the dimensions of the biogenic calcite produced by algae in coccoliths than other methods for synthesizing calcite. We suggest that this calcite is useful when purity and high surface area are important.

  2. Adjustment errors of sunstones in the first step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: studies with dichroic cordierite/ tourmaline and birefringent calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Egri, Ádám; Kretzer, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tibor; Jäger, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    According to an old but still unproven theory, Viking navigators analysed the skylight polarization with dichroic cordierite or tourmaline, or birefringent calcite sunstones in cloudy/foggy weather. Combining these sunstones with their sun-dial, they could determine the position of the occluded sun, from which the geographical northern direction could be guessed. In psychophysical laboratory experiments, we studied the accuracy of the first step of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. We measured the adjustment error e of rotatable cordierite, tourmaline and calcite crystals when the task was to determine the direction of polarization of white light as a function of the degree of linear polarization p. From the obtained error functions e(p), the thresholds p* above which the first step can still function (i.e. when the intensity change seen through the rotating analyser can be sensed) were derived. Cordierite is about twice as reliable as tourmaline. Calcite sunstones have smaller adjustment errors if the navigator looks for that orientation of the crystal where the intensity difference between the two spots seen in the crystal is maximal, rather than minimal. For higher p (greater than p crit) of incident light, the adjustment errors of calcite are larger than those of the dichroic cordierite (p crit=20%) and tourmaline (p crit=45%), while for lower p (less than p crit) calcite usually has lower adjustment errors than dichroic sunstones. We showed that real calcite crystals are not as ideal sunstones as it was believed earlier, because they usually contain scratches, impurities and crystal defects which increase considerably their adjustment errors. Thus, cordierite and tourmaline can also be at least as good sunstones as calcite. Using the psychophysical e(p) functions and the patterns of the degree of skylight polarization measured by full-sky imaging polarimetry, we computed how accurately the northern direction can be determined with the use of the Viking

  3. Adjustment errors of sunstones in the first step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: studies with dichroic cordierite/ tourmaline and birefringent calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Egri, Ádám; Kretzer, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tibor; Jäger, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    According to an old but still unproven theory, Viking navigators analysed the skylight polarization with dichroic cordierite or tourmaline, or birefringent calcite sunstones in cloudy/foggy weather. Combining these sunstones with their sun-dial, they could determine the position of the occluded sun, from which the geographical northern direction could be guessed. In psychophysical laboratory experiments, we studied the accuracy of the first step of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. We measured the adjustment error e of rotatable cordierite, tourmaline and calcite crystals when the task was to determine the direction of polarization of white light as a function of the degree of linear polarization p. From the obtained error functions e(p), the thresholds p* above which the first step can still function (i.e. when the intensity change seen through the rotating analyser can be sensed) were derived. Cordierite is about twice as reliable as tourmaline. Calcite sunstones have smaller adjustment errors if the navigator looks for that orientation of the crystal where the intensity difference between the two spots seen in the crystal is maximal, rather than minimal. For higher p (greater than p crit) of incident light, the adjustment errors of calcite are larger than those of the dichroic cordierite (p crit=20%) and tourmaline (p crit=45%), while for lower p (less than p crit) calcite usually has lower adjustment errors than dichroic sunstones. We showed that real calcite crystals are not as ideal sunstones as it was believed earlier, because they usually contain scratches, impurities and crystal defects which increase considerably their adjustment errors. Thus, cordierite and tourmaline can also be at least as good sunstones as calcite. Using the psychophysical e(p) functions and the patterns of the degree of skylight polarization measured by full-sky imaging polarimetry, we computed how accurately the northern direction can be determined with the use of the Viking

  4. Chemical and physical evolution of dolomite precipitation at 180°C and 220°C from calcite and aragonite seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell-Duivestein, Isaac; Dietzel, Martin; Mavromatis, Vasileios

    2016-04-01

    In this present study an experimental approach is taken to gain a better understanding of secondary dolomite formation under diagenetic hydrothermal conditions. A series of 60 experiments were set up in closed bomb reactors with Teflon inserts to simulate exposure of calcium carbonate materials of (i) aragonite and (ii) calcite to hydrothermal conditions. 30 reactors were prepared using calcite as a seed material and 30 using aragonite. In each experiment 330mg of the seed calcium carbonate was placed in 30mL of 0.2M MgCl2 solution along with 252mg NaHCO3 to balance charges. 15 of each the calcite and aragonite prepared reactors were placed in an oven at 180°C and 15 of each at 220°C. Samples were then progressively removed from the ovens beginning in short time intervals and increasing the time apart as the phase transformations became less rapid (ie. after 3, 6, 13, 21, 31, 56 days *ongoing*). Samples were separated into fluid and solid phases by filtration for separate analysis. Fluids were analysed by titration for alkalinity and ICP-OES for elemental concentrations of major cations to determine the migration of major cations between the calcium carbonate seed material and the reaction fluid. Solid samples were analysed with FTIR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction of powdered smears on glass loading slides to identify the present mineral phases. Rietveld analysis was conducted on the XRD patterns to quantify the mineral phases and to determine the stoichiometry and the superstructure of the formed magnesite and dolomite. Although experiments are still running, several trends have been identified. Transformation of the aragonite seed material occurs at a much faster rate than transformation of the calcite seed material, with each precursor material first transforming into a Ca-rich magnesite. With increased reaction time the Ca-rich magnesite recrystallizes to purer phases of magnesite, the Ca concentration of the fluid increases as the Ca is liberated into

  5. Hydration of Cuphea seeds containing crystallized triacylglycerols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds that exhibit intermediate storage behavior do not appear to survive under conventional -18C storage conditions. Cuphea wrightii, C. laminuligera, C. carthagenensis, and C. aequipetala are considered sensitive to low temperature storage. The seeds of these species have triacylglycerols (TAG) ...

  6. Specific features of seeding and growth of bulk polar crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, E. G.; Tyurikov, V. I.

    2000-07-01

    Formal analysis of seeding and growth of crystals exhibiting spontaneous polarization has been attempted using lithium iodate (α-LiIO 3) and barium metaborate (β-BaB 2O 4) as representative materials grown from aqueous and high-temperature solutions, respectively. We suggest that the specific growth features of nonlinear optical α-LiIO 3 and β-BaB 2O 4 crystals are being determined by formation and evolutionary restructuring of a double electric layer (DEL) at the growth interface. Both composition and structure of the DEL are governed by potential-determining ions of the growth medium as well as by the nature of crystal polarization and its properties. We have found that the composition and structure of the DEL together with the magnitude and direction of spontaneous polarization of the seed (crystal) predetermine the macrotwinning boundaries during seeding and subsequent stages of crystal growth as well as the formation of microtwin structures of various sizes. Similar reasoning is applied to possible crystal asymmetry, cellular growth, extinction of growth, etc. Model concepts of seeding and growth of bulk polar crystals are discussed.

  7. Cloning polymer single crystals through self-seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianjun; Ma, Yu; Hu, Wenbing; Rehahn, Matthias; Reiter, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In general, when a crystal is molten, all molecules forget about their mutual correlations and long-range order is lost. Thus, a regrown crystal does not inherit any features from an initially present crystal. Such is true for materials exhibiting a well-defined melting point. However, polymer crystallites have a wide range of melting temperatures, enabling paradoxical phenomena such as the coexistence of melting and crystallization. Here, we report a self-seeding technique that enables the generation of arrays of orientation-correlated polymer crystals of uniform size and shape (`clones') with their orientation inherited from an initial single crystal. Moreover, the number density and locations of these cloned crystals can to some extent be predetermined through the thermal history of the starting crystal. We attribute this unique behaviour of polymers to the coexistence of variable fold lengths in metastable crystalline lamellae, typical for ordering of complex chain-like molecules.

  8. Puzzling calcite-III dimorphism: crystallography, high-pressure behavior, and pathway of single-crystal transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippinger, T.; Miletich, R.; Merlini, M.; Lotti, P.; Schouwink, P.; Yagi, T.; Crichton, W. A.; Hanfland, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-pressure phase transformations between the polymorphic forms I, II, III, and IIIb of CaCO3 were investigated by analytical in situ high-pressure high-temperature experiments on oriented single-crystal samples. All experiments at non-ambient conditions were carried out by means of Raman scattering, X-ray, and synchrotron diffraction techniques using diamond-anvil cells in the pressure range up to 6.5 GPa. The composite-gasket resistive heating technique was applied for all high-pressure investigations at temperatures up to 550 K. High-pressure Raman spectra reveal distinguishable characteristic spectral differences located in the wave number range of external modes with the occurrence of band splitting and shoulders due to subtle symmetry changes. Constraints from in situ observations suggest a stability field of CaCO3-IIIb at relatively low temperatures adjacent to the calcite-II field. Isothermal compression of calcite provides the sequence from I to II, IIIb, and finally, III, with all transformations showing volume discontinuities. Re-transformation at decreasing pressure from III oversteps the stability field of IIIb and demonstrates the pathway of pressure changes to determine the transition sequence. Clausius-Clapeyron slopes of the phase boundary lines were determined as: Δ P/Δ T = -2.79 ± 0.28 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (I-II); +1.87 ± 0.31 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (II/III); +4.01 ± 0.5 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (II/IIIb); -33.9 ± 0.4 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (IIIb/III). The triple point between phases II, IIIb, and III was determined by intersection and is located at 2.01(7) GPa/338(5) K. The pathway of transition from I over II to IIIb can be interpreted by displacement with small shear involved (by 2.9° on I/II and by 8.2° on II/IIIb). The former triad of calcite-I corresponds to the [20-1] direction in the P21/ c unit cell of phase II and to [101] in the pseudomonoclinic C setting of phase IIIb. Crystal structure investigations of triclinic CaCO3-III at non-ambient pressure

  9. Theoretical structure and surface energy of the reconstructed {01.2} form of calcite (CaCO 3) crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Marco; Massaro, Francesco Roberto; Prencipe, Mauro

    2008-08-01

    Two different reconstructions of the (01.2) face (Ca or CO 3 terminated) of calcite (CaCO 3) were studied: (i) R1 reconstruction: the outermost layer is based on the [0 1 0] × 1/3[2 1 1] rectangular mesh, which is symmetrical with respect to the c glide plane of the crystal, thus fulfilling the 2D symmetry of the face and (ii) R2 reconstruction: the outermost layer is based on a 1/6[4 2 1¯]×1/6[2 2¯ 1] lozenge shaped mesh that does not respect the 2D symmetry of the face. The (01.2)R1Ca, (01.2)R1CO, (01.2)R2Ca and (01.2)R2CO slabs geometry optimizations of calcite (CaCO 3) were performed either at DFT level or by using empirical potentials; the results obtained with these two different calculation methodologies are in good agreement. With respect to their arrangement in the bulk, the CO 3 groups of the outermost layer are significantly rotated about the crystallographic a-axis and about the normal to the 01.2 plane; further, the thickness of the outermost layer is significantly lower than that of the underneath ones. The surfaces energies ( γ) at 0 K, for relaxed and unrelaxed (01.2)R1Ca, (01.2)R1CO, (01.2)R2Ca and (01.2)R2CO faces, were determined either at DFT level or by using empirical potentials. Independently of the method of calculation employed, the stability order of the relaxed faces is (01.2)R1CO < (01.2)R2Ca < (01.2)R2CO < (01.2)R1Ca. Concerning the unrelaxed faces, whose energies were evaluated by using empirical potentials only, the stability order is instead (01.2)R1Ca < (01.2)R2Ca < (01.2)R1CO < (01.2)R2CO; such different ordering shows the importance of geometry relaxation in the calculation of the surface energy. The values of the relaxed surface energies are γ≈750, γ≈950, γ≈980 and γ≈1050 erg/cm 2.

  10. Kinetic and thermodynamic factors controlling the distribution of SO32- and Na+ in calcites and selected aragonites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, E.; Niel, Plummer L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant amounts of SO42-, Na+, and OH- are incorporated in marine biogenic calcites. Biogenic high Mg-calcites average about 1 mole percent SO42-. Aragonites and most biogenic low Mg-calcites contain significant amounts of Na+, but very low concentrations of SO42-. The SO42- content of non-biogenic calcites and aragonites investigated was below 100 ppm. The presence of Na+ and SO42- increases the unit cell size of calcites. The solid-solutions show a solubility minimum at about 0.5 mole percent SO42- beyond which the solubility rapidly increases. The solubility product of calcites containing 3 mole percent SO42- is the same as that of aragonite. Na+ appears to have very little effect on the solubility product of calcites. The amounts of Na+ and SO42- incorporated in calcites vary as a function of the rate of crystal growth. The variation of the distribution coefficient (D) of SO42- in calcite at 25.0??C and 0.50 molal NaCl is described by the equation D = k0 + k1R where k0 and k1 are constants equal to 6.16 ?? 10-6 and 3.941 ?? 10-6, respectively, and R is the rate of crystal growth of calcite in mg??min-1??g-1 of seed. The data on Na+ are consistent with the hypothesis that a significant amount of Na+ occupies interstitial positions in the calcite structure. The distribution of Na+ follows a Freundlich isotherm and not the Berthelot-Nernst distribution law. The numerical value of the Na+ distribution coefficient in calcite is probably dependent on the number of defects in the calcite structure. The Na+ contents of calcites are not very accurate indicators of environmental salinities. ?? 1985.

  11. Variations in the Sr/Ca, δ44Ca and δ18O composition of calcite as a function of solution chemistry and crystal growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; DePaolo, D. J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The trace element and isotopic composition of calcite can be used to probe the temperatures and rates of mineral formation as well as the degree of post-mineralization alteration. The accuracy with which these effects can be interpreted is limited by our ability to distinguish signatures arising from equilibrium partitioning versus kinetic or mass transport effects. Our focus in this work is on mass transport effects in aqueous environments, and specifically, the growth rate-dependence of trace element and isotopic incorporation into calcite. This requires experiments in which the degree of supersaturation, or the solution chemistry, is held constant and the rate of crystal growth can be determined. In our experiments, N2+CO2 gas mixture is bubbled through a beaker containing 1300 mL of solution (30 mM CaCl2 + 5 mM NH4Cl + 0.1 mM SrCl2). The degree of supersaturation with respect to calcite is controlled by the pCO2 of the gas mixture, which is constantly replenished from a gas source. As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls and the pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. During an experiment we control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate. At the same time we monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, the gas outflow rate, and the amount of NaOH added. The rate of calcite precipitation can be determined in three ways: (1) the change in total alkalinity due to Ca2+ removal, mass balance of C in the system, and (3) post-run measurement of [Ca2+] in aliquots of solution taken during an experiment. We present results from experiments where growth rates are estimated to range from 0.5 to 16 mmol/m2/hr. Our experiments thus far have yielded calcite crystals that are out of calcium and oxygen isotopic equilibrium with the parent solution. Crystals are enriched in the light isotope of Ca by 0.4 to 1.8‰. The light isotope

  12. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  13. Isothermal Crystallization Kinetics of Mango (Mangifera indica) Almond Seed Fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Fuentes, J. A.; Hernandez-Medel, M. R.; Duran-de-Bazua, M. C.

    In this study, the kinetics of isothermal crystallization of mango (Mangifera indica) almond seed fat var. Manila (MAF) was analyzed, within the theoretical context of the Sestak-Berggren model, the Avrami Equation and its modification by Khanna and Taylor. The results showed that the induction times for the formation of crystalline nuclei increased with the crystallization temperature (3.3 min at 8°C and 10.9 min at 12°C). The supercooling level notably influenced the MAF crystallization rate, since the global constant of crystallization rate, Z, grew 3.3 times from 12 to 8°C (for fractions of fat solids between 0.25 and 0.75, Z was 0.2904, 0.1584 and 0.0879 min-1 at 8, 10 and 12°C, respectively) and the Avrami parameter r was higher than 4; this demonstrates the effect of fat system complexity due to its multi-component nature and the heterogeneous character of this crystallization process, which includes additional participation of nucleation sites. The modified model by Khanna and Taylor provided better parametral values than the other two studied for explaining MAF crystallization kinetic.

  14. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices.Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni

  15. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite → Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite → calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite → calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation. PMID:26348458

  16. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite → Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite → calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite → calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation.

  17. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  18. Modification of calcite crystal morphology by designed phosphopeptides and primary structures and substrate specifities of the cysteine proteases mexicain and chymomexicain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zhirui

    In order to better understand the mechanism of biomineralization, we have undertaken to synthesize polypeptide model compounds of well-defined structure that can interact with specific faces of calcite and alter its crystal morphology. These peptides were designed based on the structure of alpha-helical winter flounder antifreeze polypeptide HPLC-6. In these peptides, from one to three of the threonine residues in HPLC-6 were substituted by phosphoserine or phosphotyrosine. CD spectra show that all the peptides have virtually the same alpha-helicity, i.e., about 90% at 4°C and 50% at 25°C. However, only peptides which contain at least two phosphate groups spaced 16.8-A apart can modify the crystal morphology of the calcite. The newly developed surface has been tentatively identified as the (001) basal face. Molecular modeling indicates that the spacing of phosphate groups allows for a good match with crystal lattice ions on the (001) plane. Another peptide, CBP-3D, in which the three threonine residues in HPLC-6 were substituted by aspartic acids, appears to bind only to {104} rhombohedral faces of calcite. These experiments suggest that conformation and orientation of the binding ligands in the peptide are important factors governing the mutual recognition of crystal surface and proteins. The complete amino acid sequences of the cysteine proteases mexicain and chymomexicain, isolated from the latex of the plant Pileus mexicanus , were determined by Edman degradation of proteolytic fragments. Mexicain and chymomexicain show-high sequence homology to the papain family of cysteine protease. Mexicain and chymomexicain are monomeric polypeptides, with molecular masses of 23,762 Da and 23,694 Da, respectively, and both contain three deduced disulfide bonds. The proteolytic substrate specificities of mexicain and chymomexicain were studied by digesting a series of synthetic peptides and analyzing the fragments by mass spectrometry. The two proteases showed virtually

  19. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-21

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices. PMID:27129106

  20. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-21

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices.

  1. The grinding tip of the sea urchin tooth exhibits exquisite control over calcite crystal orientation and Mg distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yurong; Aichmayer, Barbara; Paris, Oskar; Fratzl, Peter; Meibom, Anders; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Politi, Yael; Addadi, Lia; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Weiner, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The sea urchin tooth is a remarkable grinding tool. Even though the tooth is composed almost entirely of calcite, it is used to grind holes into a rocky substrate itself often composed of calcite. Here, we use 3 complementary high-resolution tools to probe aspects of the structure of the grinding tip: X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM), X-ray microdiffraction, and NanoSIMS. We confirm that the needles and plates are aligned and show here that even the high Mg polycrystalline matrix constituents are aligned with the other 2 structural elements when imaged at 20-nm resolution. Furthermore, we show that the entire tooth is composed of 2 cooriented polycrystalline blocks that differ in their orientations by only a few degrees. A unique feature of the grinding tip is that the structural elements from each coaligned block interdigitate. This interdigitation may influence the fracture process by creating a corrugated grinding surface. We also show that the overall Mg content of the tooth structural elements increases toward the grinding tip. This probably contributes to the increasing hardness of the tooth from the periphery to the tip. Clearly the formation of the tooth, and the tooth tip in particular, is amazingly well controlled. The improved understanding of these structural features could lead to the design of better mechanical grinding and cutting tools. PMID:19332795

  2. Relative Dispersion of Ice Crystals in Seeded Cumuli.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Jeffrey C.; Lawson, R. Paul; Rodi, Alfred R.

    1993-06-01

    Relative dispersion of ice crystals was measured in 30 seeded cumulus clouds. A quasi-instantaneous, vertical area source of ice was generated by releasing dry-ice pellets from an airplane. The ice concentration distribution and relative dispersion were measured normal to the source and were complemented by cloud turbulence measurements, namely, velocity variances and the energy dissipation rate . The clouds were selected based on an objective set of criteria and were treated as members of the same ensemble.The observed mean relative dispersion rx agreed well with predictions from a Lagrangian stochastic two-particle model, which reproduces Batchelor's theoretical results for rx. For short times t after the seeding time ts, the predictions and observations suggested a growth like rx t ts rather than Batchelor's `intermediate' time prediction, rx 1/2 (t ts)3/2. This difference was attributed to the rather large initial dispersion 0 of ice crystals, 27 53 m, inferred from the measurements; Batchelor's result is only valid for 0 va3/, where va2 is the average velocity variance. At long times, the predictions and observations approached the same asymptotic limit, rx (t ts)1/2.In addition to the mean dispersion, probability density functions (pdfs) of the individual dispersion observations were constructed and showed an evolution from a highly skewed pdf at small times to a more symmetrical one at large times. This is one of the first reports of the rx pdf, which is important for determining the variance and pdf of the randomly varying concentration in a small ice cloud or plume of material.

  3. Large single domain 123 material produced by seeding with single crystal rare earth barium copper oxide single crystals

    DOEpatents

    Todt, Volker; Miller, Dean J.; Shi, Donglu; Sengupta, Suvankar

    1998-01-01

    A method of fabricating bulk YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x where compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of Y and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x are heated in the presence of a Nd.sub.1+x Ba.sub.2-x Cu.sub.3 O.sub.y seed crystal to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x while maintaining the seed crystal solid. The materials are slowly cooled to provide a YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x material having a predetermined number of domains between 1 and 5. Crack-free single domain materials can be formed using either plate shaped seed crystals or cube shaped seed crystals with a pedestal of preferential orientation material.

  4. Growth of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals by Controlled Seeding Contactless Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Grasza, K.; Gillies, D.; Jerman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk crystals of cadmium-zinc telluride, 23 mm in diameter and up to 45 grams in weight were grown. Controlled seed formation procedure was used to limit the number of grains in the crystal. Most uniform distribution of ZnTe in the crystals was obtained using excess (Cd + Zn) pressure in the ampoule.

  5. Improved synthesis of fine zinc borate particles using seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürhan, Deniz; Çakal, Gaye Ö.; Eroğlu, İnci; Özkar, Saim

    2009-03-01

    Zinc borate is a flame retardant additive used in polymers, wood applications and textile products. There are different types of zinc borate having different chemical compositions and structures. In this study, the production of zinc borate having the molecular formula of 2ZnO·3B 2O 3·3.5H 2O was reexamined by studying the effects of reaction parameters on the properties of product as well as the reaction kinetics. Production of zinc borate from the reaction of boric acid and zinc oxide in the presence of seed crystals was performed in a continuously stirred, temperature-controlled batch reactor having a volume of 1.5 L. Samples taken in regular time intervals during the experiments were analyzed for the concentration of zinc oxide and boron oxide in the solid as well as for the conversion of zinc oxide to zinc borate versus time. The zinc borate production reaction was fit to the logistic model. The reaction rate, reaction completion time, composition and particle size distribution of zinc borate product were determined by varying the following parameters: the boric acid to zinc oxide ratio (H 3BO 3:ZnO=3:1, 3.5:1, 5:1 and 7:1), the particle size of zinc oxide (10 and 25 μm), stirring rate (275, 400, 800 and 1600 rpm), temperature (75, 85 and 95 °C) and the size of seed crystals (10 and 2 μm). The products were also analyzed for particle size distribution. The experimental results showed that the reaction rate increases with the increase in H 3BO 3:ZnO ratio, particle size of zinc oxide, stirring rate and temperature. Concomitantly, the reaction completion time is decreased by increasing the H 3BO 3:ZnO ratio, stirring rate and temperature. The average particle sizes of the zinc borate products are in the range 4.3-16.6 μm (wet dispersion analysis).

  6. Segregation during directional melting and its implications on seeded crystal growth: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourret, E. D.; Favier, J. J.; Witt, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    Directional melting of binary systems, as encountered during seeding in melt growth, is analyzed for concurrent compositional changes at the crystal-melt interface. It is shown that steady state conditions cannot normally be reached during seeding and that the growth interface temperature at the initial stages of seeded growth is a function of backmelt conditions. The theoretical treatment is numerically applied to Hg1-xCdXTe and Ga-doped Ge.

  7. Bulk AlN crystal growth: self-seeding and seeding on 6H-SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, J. H.; Liu, L.; Liu, B.; Zhuang, D.; Chaudhuri, J.; Kuball, M.; Rajasingam, S.

    2002-12-01

    The properties of bulk AlN crystals grown by sublimation recondensation and either randomly nucleated (i.e. self-seeded) or seeded on 6H-SiC substrates or compared. Self-seeding produces crystals of the highest perfection, lowest stress, and low Si and C impurity content, but the crystals grow in random crystallographic orientations. Crystals grown in boron nitride crucibles typically form thin platelets with the fastest growth occurring in the c-axis direction. Growth striations run the length of the crystals in the c-axis direction. Anisotropic etching in aqueous 45 wt% KOH solutions shows that the growth (0 0 0 1) planes exposed to the AlN source predominately have an aluminum polarity. AlN crystals seeded on 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) have a single crystallographic orientation and the largest dimensions are perpendicular to the c-axis, determined by the size of the substrate. Cracking and voids in the AlN layer produced by differences in thermal expansion coefficients of AlN and SiC and decomposition of the SiC were ameliorated by depositing an AlN-SiC alloy layer on the SiC before growing the AlN layer. Raman spectroscopy measurements suggest the AlN and AlN-SiC alloy layer are both under tensile stress. The defect density in AlN crystals grown on composite AlN-SiC/6H-SiC substrates was 3.7×10 5 cm -2, as determined by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography.

  8. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation significantly alters the transport properties of fractured rock. Chemical solubility gradients that favor precipitation induce mineral growth, which decreases the local aperture and alters preferential flow paths. Understanding the resulting development of spatial heterogeneities is necessary to predict the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. We present experimental results that quantify the relationship between mineral precipitation and aperture alteration in a transparent analog fracture, 7.62cm x 7.62cm, with a uniform aperture of ~200 μm. Prior to flow experiments, a pump circulated a super-saturated calcite solution over the bottom glass, coating the glass surface with calcite. This method of seeding resulted in clusters of calcite crystals with large reactive surface area and provided micro-scale variability in the aperture field. A continuous flow syringe pump injected a reactive fluid into the fracture at 0.5 ml/min. The fluid was a mixture of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 0.02M) and calcium chloride (CaCl2 0.0004M) with a saturation index, Ω, of 8.51 with respect to calcite. A strobed LED panel backlit the fracture and a high-resolution CCD camera monitored changes in transmitted light intensity. Light transmission techniques provided a quantitative measurement of fracture aperture over the flow field. Results from these preliminary experiments showed growth near the inlet of the fracture, with decreasing precipitation rates in the flow direction. Over a period of two weeks, the fracture aperture decreased by 17% within the first 4mm of the inlet. Newly precipitated calcite bridged individual crystal clusters and smoothed the reacting surface. This observation is an interesting contradiction to the expectation of surface roughening induced by mineral growth. Additionally, the aperture decreased uniformly across the width of the fracture due to the initial aperture distribution. Future experiments of precipitation

  9. Truncated tetrahedron seed crystals initiating stereoaligned growth of FeSi nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-in; Yoon, Hana; Seo, Kwanyong; Yoo, Youngdong; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2012-10-23

    We have synthesized epitaxially grown freestanding FeSi nanowires (NWs) on an m-Al(2)O(3) substrate by using a catalyst-free chemical vapor transport method. FeSi NW growth is initiated from FeSi nanocrystals, formed on a substrate in a characteristic shape with a specific orientation. Cross-section TEM analysis of seed crystals reveals the crystallographic structure and hidden geometry of the seeds. Close correlation of geometrical shapes and orientations of the observed nanocrystals with those of as-grown NWs indicates that directional growth of NWs is initiated from the epitaxially formed seed crystals. The diameter of NWs can be controlled by adjusting the composition of Si in a Si/C mixture. The epitaxial growth method for FeSi NWs via seed crystals could be employed to heteroepitaxial growth of other compound NWs.

  10. Seeded growth of AlN bulk single crystals by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesser, R.; Dalmau, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2002-06-01

    AlN bulk single crystals were grown by sublimation of AlN powder at temperatures of 2100-2300°C in an open crucible geometry in a 400 Torr nitrogen atmosphere. Small, single crystalline AlN c-platelets, prepared by vaporization of Al in a nitrogen atmosphere, were used as seeds. Seeded growth occurred preferentially in the crystallographic c-direction, with growth rates exceeding 500 μm/h, while the seed crystals grew only marginally in the c-plane. Transparent, centimeter-sized AlN single crystals were grown within 24 h. Characterization by X-ray diffraction showed that rocking curves around the (0 0 0 2) reflection were very narrow (25 arcsec full-width at half-maximum), thus indicating very high crystalline quality of the material grown on the seeds.

  11. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this pote...

  12. Seeding for sirtuins: microseed matrix seeding to obtain crystals of human Sirt3 and Sirt2 suitable for soaking

    SciTech Connect

    Rumpf, Tobias; Gerhardt, Stefan; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-11-18

    In the present study, microseed matrix seeding was successfully applied to obtain a large number of crystals of the human sirtuin isotypes Sirt2 and Sirt3. These crystals appeared predictably in diverse crystallization conditions, diffracted to a higher resolution than reported in the literature and were subsequently used to study the protein–ligand interactions of two indole inhibitors. Sirtuins constitute a family of NAD{sup +}-dependent enzymes that catalyse the cleavage of various acyl groups from the ∊-amino group of lysines. They regulate a series of cellular processes and their misregulation has been implicated in various diseases, making sirtuins attractive drug targets. To date, only a few sirtuin modulators have been reported that are suitable for cellular research and their development has been hampered by a lack of structural information. In this work, microseed matrix seeding (MMS) was used to obtain crystals of human Sirt3 in its apo form and of human Sirt2 in complex with ADP ribose (ADPR). Crystal formation using MMS was predictable, less error-prone and yielded a higher number of crystals per drop than using conventional crystallization screening methods. The crystals were used to solve the crystal structures of apo Sirt3 and of Sirt2 in complex with ADPR at an improved resolution, as well as the crystal structures of Sirt2 in complex with ADPR and the indoles EX527 and CHIC35. These Sirt2–ADPR–indole complexes unexpectedly contain two indole molecules and provide novel insights into selective Sirt2 inhibition. The MMS approach for Sirt2 and Sirt3 may be used as the basis for structure-based optimization of Sirt2/3 inhibitors in the future.

  13. Top seeded solution growth of KHo(WO 4) 2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrowski, A.; Borowiec, M. T.; Michalski, E.

    2004-03-01

    Monoclinic KHo(WO 4) 2 single crystals have been grown by means of the Top Seeded Solution Growth method from K 2W 2O 7 self-flux containing up to 30 mol% of the crystallized compound. KHo(WO 4) 2 seed was selected from small crystals obtained by spontaneous crystallization and used to grow the first bulky KHo(WO 4) 2 crystal, from which seeds perpendicular to { 1¯ 1 1} and {1 1 0} planes, used in subsequent experiments, were cut out. Crystals grown on these seeds are designated in this paper as 1 1 1 and 1 1 0 crystals, respectively. Properly chosen thermal conditions allowed growth of crystals with one dominating crystallographic plane forming the bottom of the 1 1 1 crystals. Under conditions of very low temperature gradients, growing crystals developed bottoms consisting of several crystallographic planes, while a slightly steeper temperature gradient led to cracking of the growing crystals due to high anisotropy of thermal expansion coefficients, which is characteristic of all double tungstates. It was found that 1 1 1 KHo(WO 4) 2 single crystals were much bulkier than 1 1 0 ones, which had a rectangular cross-section elongated in the c direction. The bottom of 1 1 1 KHo(WO 4) 2 crystals was built of one ( 1¯ 1 1) plane, while in 1 1 0 crystals additional planes appeared that could not be eliminated by increasing the temperature gradient because such an increase led to cracking of crystals. As-grown 1 1 1 and 1 1 0 KHo(WO 4) 2 single crystals were of good quality, free from such defects as bubbles, cracks, and inclusions. The morphology of KHo(WO 4) 2 single crystals was investigated. Miller's indices of crystallographic faces ( h k l ) and edge indices [ u v w ] were found. Positions of the crystallographic axes a, b, and c in relation to growth faces and edges were found as well. The refractive indices and optical axes have been determined. The investigations of absorption spectra of KHo(WO 4) 2 single crystals were performed in a wide spectral range (4000

  14. Large single domain 123 material produced by seeding with single crystal rare earth barium copper oxide single crystals

    DOEpatents

    Todt, V.; Miller, D.J.; Shi, D.; Sengupta, S.

    1998-07-07

    A method of fabricating bulk YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} where compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of Y and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are heated in the presence of a Nd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2{minus}x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} seed crystal to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} while maintaining the seed crystal solid. The materials are slowly cooled to provide a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} material having a predetermined number of domains between 1 and 5. Crack-free single domain materials can be formed using either plate shaped seed crystals or cube shaped seed crystals with a pedestal of preferential orientation material. 7 figs.

  15. Hydrothermal calcite in the Elephant Moraine

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, G.; Taylor, K.S.; Jones, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    In the course of geologic mapping of the Elephant Moraine on the east antarctic ice sheet, Faure and Taylor (1985) collected several specimens of black botryoidal calcite, composed of radiating acicular crystals that resemble stromatolites. Calcite from this and other specimens is significantly enriched in strontium-87 (the strontium-87/strontium-86 ratio equals 0.71417 +/- 0.00002), carbon-12 (delta carbon-13 equals -22.9 parts per thousand, PDB standard) and oxygen-16 (delta oxygen-18 equals -21.1 parts per thousand, standard mean ocean water) compared with calcite of marine origin. The enrichment in carbon-12 is similar to that of calcite associated with coal in the Allan Hills. The enrichment in oxygen-16 indicates that the calcite from the Elephant Moraine could only have precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with glacial melt water. Therefore, the temperature at which the black calcite precipitated from water of that isotope composition was about 85/sup 0/C. A temperature of this magnitude implies that the black calcite formed as a result of volcanic activity under the east antarctic ice sheet. The enrichment of the black calcite in carbon-12 suggests that it formed in part from carbon dioxide derived from the coal seams of the Weller Formation in the Beacon Supergroup. The isotopic composition of strontium in the black calcite is similar to that of carbonate beds and concretions in the Beacon rocks of southern Victoria Land. A volcanic-hydrothermal origin is also consistent with the very low total organic carbon content of 0.15% in the calcite.

  16. Seeding for sirtuins: microseed matrix seeding to obtain crystals of human Sirt3 and Sirt2 suitable for soaking

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Tobias; Gerhardt, Stefan; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins constitute a family of NAD+-dependent enzymes that catalyse the cleavage of various acyl groups from the ∊-amino group of lysines. They regulate a series of cellular processes and their misregulation has been implicated in various diseases, making sirtuins attractive drug targets. To date, only a few sirtuin modulators have been reported that are suitable for cellular research and their development has been hampered by a lack of structural information. In this work, microseed matrix seeding (MMS) was used to obtain crystals of human Sirt3 in its apo form and of human Sirt2 in complex with ADP ribose (ADPR). Crystal formation using MMS was predictable, less error-prone and yielded a higher number of crystals per drop than using conventional crystallization screening methods. The crystals were used to solve the crystal structures of apo Sirt3 and of Sirt2 in complex with ADPR at an improved resolution, as well as the crystal structures of Sirt2 in complex with ADPR and the indoles EX527 and CHIC35. These Sirt2–ADPR–indole complexes unexpectedly contain two indole molecules and provide novel insights into selective Sirt2 inhibition. The MMS approach for Sirt2 and Sirt3 may be used as the basis for structure-based optimization of Sirt2/3 inhibitors in the future. PMID:26625292

  17. Purification, crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of the Ginkgo biloba 11S seed globulin ginnacin

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tengchuan; Chen, Yu-Wei; Howard, Andrew; Zhang, Yu-Zhu

    2008-07-01

    The crystallization of ginnacin, the 11S seed storage protein from G. biloba, is reported. Ginkgo biloba, a well known ‘living fossil’ native to China, is grown worldwide as an ornamental shade plant. Medicinal and nutritional uses of G. biloba in Asia have a long history. However, ginkgo seed proteins have not been well studied at the biochemical and molecular level. In this study, the G. biloba 11S seed storage protein ginnacin was purified by sequential anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. A crystallization screen was performed and well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapor-diffusion method. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained. There are six protomers in an asymmetric unit. Structure refinement is currently in progress.

  18. In-situ growth of calcite at Devils Hole, Nevada: Comparison of field and laboratory rates to a 500,000 year record of near-equilibrium calcite growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; Riggs, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite grew continuously for 500,000 years on the submerged walls of an open fault plane (Devils Hole) in southern Nevada, U.S.A. at rates of 0.3 to 1.3 mm/ka, but ceased growing approximately 60,000 years ago, even though the fault plane remained open and was continuously submerged. The maximum initial in-situ growth rate on pre-weighed crystals of Iceland spar placed in Devils Hole (calcite saturation index, SI, is 0.16 to 0.21 at 33.7??C) for growth periods of 0.75 to 4.5 years was 0.22 mm/ka. Calcite growth on seed crystals slowed or ceased following initial contact with Devils Hole groundwater. Growth rates measured in synthetic Ca-HCO3 solutions at 34??C, CO2 partial pressures of 0.101, 0.0156 (similar to Devils Hole groundwater) and 0.00102 atm, and SI values of 0.2 to 1.9 were nearly independent of P(CO)(2), decreased with decreasing saturation state, and extrapolated through the historical Devils Hole rate. The results show that calcite growth rate is highly sensitive to saturation state near equilibrium. A calcite crystal retrieved from Devils Hole, and used without further treatment of its surface, grew in synthetic Devils Hole groundwater when the saturation index was raised nearly 10-fold that of Devils Hole water, but the rate was only 1/4 that of fresh laboratory crystals that had not contacted Devils Hole water. Apparently, inhibiting processes that halted calcite growth in Devils Hole 60,000 years ago continue today.

  19. Using natural seeding material to generate nucleation in protein crystallization experiments.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Allan; Mac Sweeney, Aengus; Haber, Alexander

    2003-07-01

    The nucleation event in protein crystallization is a part of the process that is poorly controlled. It is generally accepted that the protein should be in the metastable phase for crystal growth, but for nucleation higher levels of saturation are needed. Formation of nuclei in bulk solvent requires interaction of protein molecules until a critical size of aggregate is created. In many crystallization experiments sufficiently high levels of saturation are not reached to allow this critical nucleation event to occur. If an environment can be created that favours a higher local concentration of macromolecules, the energy barrier for nucleation may be lowered. When seeds are introduced at lower levels of saturation in a crystallization experiment, nucleation may be facilitated and crystal growth initiated. In this study, the use of natural materials as stable seeds for nucleation has been investigated. The method makes it possible to introduce seeds into crystallization trials at any stage of the experiment using both microbatch and vapour-diffusion methods.

  20. Dislocation formation in seed crystals induced by feedstock indentation during growth of quasimono crystalline silicon ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trempa, M.; Beier, M.; Reimann, C.; Roßhirth, K.; Friedrich, J.; Löbel, C.; Sylla, L.; Richter, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this work the dislocation formation in the seed crystal induced by feedstock indentation during the growth of quasimono (QM) silicon ingots for photovoltaic application was investigated. It could be shown by special laboratory indentation experiments that the formed dislocations propagate up to several millimeters deep into the volume of the seed crystal in dependence on the applied pressure of the feedstock particles on the surface of the seed crystal. Further, it was demonstrated that these dislocations if they were not back-melted during the seeding process grow further into the silicon ingot and drastically reduce its material quality. An estimation of the apparent pressure values in a G5 industrial crucible/feedstock setup reveals that the indentation phenomenon is a critical issue for the industrial production of QM silicon ingots. Therefore, some approaches to avoid/reduce the indentation events were tested with the result, that the most promising solution should be the usage of suitable feedstock particles as coverage of the seed.

  1. Heteroepitaxial growth of cubic boron nitride single crystal on diamond seed under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, T.; Yamaoka, S.

    1997-07-01

    Single crystal cubic boron nitride (cBN) was heteroepitaxially grown on a seed crystal of diamond under static high pressure and high temperature at 5.5GPa and 1,600--1,700 C, respectively, for 10--100 hour. A temperature gradient method was employed for the crystal growth by using lithium boron nitride as a solvent. Initial growth feature of cBN crystal was found on the diamond seed surface after the growing time of 10 minutes. The nucleation sites of the crystals seem to be near the etch pits on the diamond surface which were introduced by the surface dissolution by the solvent for cBN growth. Two types of growth features, island and step growth were typically shown on the surface. It can be seen that grown crystal appearing as a (111) nitrogen face was exhibited with the step growth feature, while the (11n) face exhibited the island growth feature. Considering the growth process under constant P-T growing condition, growth rate of cBN crystal was significantly small as compared to that of diamond.

  2. Study on the Seeded Growth of AlN Bulk Crystals by Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Krishnan; Iwaya, Motoaki; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu; Takagi, Takashi; Noro, Tadashi

    2004-11-01

    Seeded growth of AlN single crystals on 6H-SiC substrates by sublimation has been investigated. Pyrocarbon coated graphite crucibles were used. Temperature profile and source-substrate distance have been found to be the most influencing parameters of crystal growth. AlN crystals of maximum dimension 9 mm (length) × 5 mm (width) × 300 μm (thickness) were grown on SiC substrates and the best crystal showed an XRD omega rocking curve FWHM of 4.81 arcmin. AlN nucleated as independent hexagonal islands and coalesced as growth progressed on. Growth rate of AlN grown on C-face SiC has been found to be higher than that on Si-face SiC. Pyrocarbon coated crucibles have been found to be better suited for AlN growth as the impurity incorporation in to crystals due to crucible was less.

  3. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  4. Isolation, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of chitinase from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Datta, Manali; Chaudhary, Anshul; Tomar, Shailly; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-04-01

    A protein with chitinase activity has been isolated and purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis of this protein confirmed it to be an approximately 34 kDa endochitinase which belongs to the acidic class III chitinase family. The protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1), with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.6 A.

  5. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  6. Seed crystals with improved properties for melt processing superconductors for practical applications

    DOEpatents

    Veal, B.W.; Paulikas, A.; Balachandran, U.; Zhong, W.

    1997-03-18

    A method of fabricating bulk superconducting material is disclosed including RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} comprising heating compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of R and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} in physical contact with an oxide single crystal seed to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} while maintaining the single crystal seed solid to grow the superconducting material and thereafter cooling to provide a material including RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}. R is a rare earth or Y or La and the single crystal seed has a lattice mismatch with RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} of less than about 2% at the growth temperature. The starting material may be such that the final product contains a minor amount of R{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5}.

  7. Seed crystals with improved properties for melt processing superconductors for practical applications

    DOEpatents

    Veal, Boyd W.; Paulikas, Arvydas; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Zhong, Wei

    1997-01-01

    A method of fabricating bulk superconducting material including RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta. comprising heating compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of R and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta. in physical contact with an oxide single crystal seed to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta. while maintaining the single crystal seed solid to grow the superconducting material and thereafter cooling to provide a material including RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta.. R is a rare earth or Y or La and the single crystal seed has a lattice mismatch with RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta. of less than about 2% at the growth temperature. The starting material may be such that the final product contains a minor amount of R.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5.

  8. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of a vicilin-type seed storage protein from Pinus koraiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tengchuan; Fu, Tong-Jen; Kothary, Mahendra H.; Howard, Andrew; Zhang, Yu-Zhu

    2007-12-01

    In this study, the Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) vicilin-type 7S seed storage protein was isolated from defatted pine-nut extract and purified by sequential gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapour-diffusion method in hanging drops. The cupin superfamily of proteins includes the 7S and 11S seed storage proteins. Many members of this family of proteins are known allergens. In this study, the Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) vicilin-type 7S seed storage protein was isolated from defatted pine-nut extract and purified by sequential gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapor-diffusion method in hanging drops. The crystals belong to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 148.174 Å. Two vicilin molecules were present in the asymmetric unit and the Matthews coefficient was determined to be 2.90 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, with a corresponding solvent content of ∼58%. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained using the program Phaser. Refinement of the structure is currently under way.

  9. Development of a versatile high temperature top seeded solution growth unit for growing cesium lithium borate crystals.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Babu; Elizabeth, Suja; Bhat, H L; Karnal, A K

    2009-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a state of the art high temperature top seeded solution growth (HTTSSG) unit with seed and crucible rotation options is discussed. Crystals from solid solutions of high viscosity could be grown using the setup. The fabricated setup is used to grow high optical quality single crystals of cesium lithium borate with dimensions 50x40x40 mm(3) for frequency conversion of ir to UV laser through harmonic generation.

  10. Controlling mechano- and seeding-triggered single-crystal-to-single-crystal phase transition: molecular domino with a disconnection of aurophilic bonds.

    PubMed

    Seki, Tomohiro; Sakurada, Kenta; Ito, Hajime

    2013-12-01

    Green and blue polymorphs: A single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) phase transition of phenyl(3,5-dimethylphenyl isocyanide)gold(I) was triggered by mechanical picking or solid seeding and propagated spontaneously with a domino-like mechanism. As a result, one phase with intense green emission was transformed to another phase with weaker blue emission.

  11. The kinetics of desilication of synthetic spent Bayer liquor seeded with cancrinite and cancrinite/sodalite mixed-phase crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Mark C.; Addai-Mensah, Jonas; Gerson, Andrea R.

    1999-04-01

    Isothermal, batch desilication kinetics of synthetic, sodium aluminate solution (spent Bayer liquor) via cancrinite and cancrinite/sodalite mixed-phase crystal growth, have been studied under conditions at which sodium aluminosilicate scale forms at the surfaces of steel heat exchangers of alumina plant. Seeding with the pure cancrinite and mixed-phase crystals results in the suppression of scale formation and a faster rate of liquor desilication in comparison with its sodalite dimorph. Cancrinite seed crystals prepared from NO -3-rich solutions exhibited crystal growth mechanism and kinetic behaviour different from dimorphic mixed-phase crystals prepared from CO 2-3-rich solutions, when both were used to desilicate CO 2-3-rich spent Bayer liquor. The rate of desilication due to crystal growth on CO 2-3-cancrinite/sodalite mixed phase crystals followed a second-order dependence on the relative supersaturation of SiO 2. An activation energy of 52 kJ mol -1 was estimated for the crystal growth process. For desilication kinetics involving NO -3-cancrinite seed crystal growth, a third-order dependence on relative supersaturation of SiO 2 and an activation energy of 63 kJ mol -1 were obtained.

  12. Transformation of echinoid Mg calcite skeletons by heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, J. A. D.

    2001-02-01

    Interambularcral plates of echinoid Heterocentrotus trigonarius, composed of Mg calcite 1 (≈14 mol% MgCO 3), were heated in three timed series of experiments at 300°C. Dried plate fragments and fragments with added water were heated separately in pressurized bombs. X-ray powder diffractometry, unit cell dimensions, and phase compositions are used to monitor reaction progress. After 10 h heating in the bombs dolomite (43.5 mol% MgCO 3) and Mg calcite appear (4-7 mol% MgCO 3); by 20 h all Mg calcite 1 is consumed, and at 120 h dolomite composition has evolved to ≈47 mol% MgCO 3 and calcite to ≈2 mol% MgCO 3. Whole plates heated at 300°C in an open muffle furnace develop dolomite (≈42 mol% MgCO 3) and Mg calcite 2 (≈6 mol% MgCO 3) after 10 h and remain compositionally invariant throughout subsequent heating to 620 h. Limited skeletal water catalyzes the early reaction but escapes from the open furnace and consequently reaction ceases after ≈10 h. The experimentally produced dolomite has relative Mg-Ca ordering of 75% to 79%. The stabilization of echinoid Mg calcite by heating at 300°C to a mixture of dolomite and calcite occurs through a dissolution/precipitation reaction. The alteration fabric produced within the stereom consists of irregularly shaped, branched dolomite crystals > 5 μm homoaxially set in a calcite 2 (bomb) or Mg calcite 2 (furnace) matrix. Round and tubular pores 1 to 5 μm are randomly distributed throughout this fabric. The stereom pore system remains intact during furnace heating but is destroyed during heating in bombs. The texture of experimentally stabilized echinoid skeletons is different from that of fossil echinoderms that are composed of microrhomic dolomite homoaxially set in a single calcite crystal.

  13. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  14. Interaction of alcohols with the calcite surface.

    PubMed

    Bovet, N; Yang, M; Javadi, M S; Stipp, S L S

    2015-02-01

    A clearer understanding of calcite interactions with organic molecules would contribute to a range of fields including harnessing the secrets of biomineralisation where organisms produce hard parts, increasing oil production from spent reservoirs, remediating contaminated soils and drinking water aquifers and improving manufacturing methods for industrial products such as pigments, soft abrasives, building materials and optical devices. Biomineralisation by some species of blue green algae produces beautifully elaborate platelets of calcite where the individual crystals are of nanometer scale. Controlling their growth requires complex polysaccharides. Polysaccharide activity depends on the functionality of OH groups, so to simplify the system in order to get closer to a molecular level understanding, we investigated the interaction of OH from a suite of alcohols with clean, freshly cleaved calcite surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided binding energies and revealed the extent of surface coverage. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations supplemented with information about molecule ordering, orientation and packing density. The results show that all alcohols studied bond with the calcite surface through the OH group, with their carbon chains sticking away in a standing-up orientation. Alcohol molecules are closely packed and form a well-ordered monolayer on the surface.

  15. Interaction of alcohols with the calcite surface.

    PubMed

    Bovet, N; Yang, M; Javadi, M S; Stipp, S L S

    2015-02-01

    A clearer understanding of calcite interactions with organic molecules would contribute to a range of fields including harnessing the secrets of biomineralisation where organisms produce hard parts, increasing oil production from spent reservoirs, remediating contaminated soils and drinking water aquifers and improving manufacturing methods for industrial products such as pigments, soft abrasives, building materials and optical devices. Biomineralisation by some species of blue green algae produces beautifully elaborate platelets of calcite where the individual crystals are of nanometer scale. Controlling their growth requires complex polysaccharides. Polysaccharide activity depends on the functionality of OH groups, so to simplify the system in order to get closer to a molecular level understanding, we investigated the interaction of OH from a suite of alcohols with clean, freshly cleaved calcite surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided binding energies and revealed the extent of surface coverage. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations supplemented with information about molecule ordering, orientation and packing density. The results show that all alcohols studied bond with the calcite surface through the OH group, with their carbon chains sticking away in a standing-up orientation. Alcohol molecules are closely packed and form a well-ordered monolayer on the surface. PMID:25533590

  16. Purification, characterization, and crystallization of single molecular species of beta-conglycinin from soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Morita, S; Fukase, M; Yamaguchi, M; Fukuda, Y; Morita, Y

    1996-05-01

    Four major molecular species of beta-conglycinin, alpha 3, alpha 2 beta, alpha beta 2, and beta 3, were isolated and purified from seeds of an alpha' subunit-deficient strain of soybeans (Glycine max). All components were found to be homogeneous by high pressure liquid chromatography, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and amino acid and amino terminal sequence analyses. The amino acid compositions of the alpha 3 and beta 3 components agreed fairly well with the compositions deduced from the cDNA sequences, and all of the components were highly glycosylated. The alpha 3 and beta 3 components were compared regarding their secondary structures. The secondary structure of the alpha 3 component deduced from CD measurements showed a higher alpha-helix content than that of the beta 3 component. The beta 3 component was crystallized by decreasing the ionic strength from 0.5 to 0.14 in phosphate buffer, pH 7.3, and the crystals grew to a size (1.0 mm x 0.2 mm x 0.2 mm) suitable for X-ray crystallographic analysis. A preliminary X-ray analysis showed that the crystal belonged to an orthorhombic crystal system having the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) and unit cell dimensions of a = 185.1 A, b = 107.9 A, and c = 97.6 A.

  17. Improving the diffraction of full-length human selenomethionyl metavinculin crystals by streak-seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Izard, Tina

    2012-06-28

    Metavinculin is an alternatively spliced isoform of vinculin that has a 68-residue insert in its tail domain (1134 total residues) and is exclusively expressed in cardiac and smooth muscle tissue, where it plays important roles in myocyte adhesion complexes. Mutations in the metavinculin-specific insert are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in man. Crystals of a DCM-associated mutant of full-length selenomethionine-labeled metavinculin grown by hanging-drop vapor diffusion diffracted poorly and were highly sensitive to radiation, preventing the collection of a complete X-ray diffraction data set at the highest possible resolution. Streak-seeding markedly improved the stability, crystal-growth rate and diffraction quality of DCM-associated mutant metavinculin crystals, allowing complete data collection to 3.9 {angstrom} resolution. These crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 170, c = 211 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90{sup o}.

  18. Micro-CT observations of the 3D distribution of calcium oxalate crystals in cotyledons during maturation and germination in Lotus miyakojimae seeds.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Hayami, Masato; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Karahara, Ichirou; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Terada, Yasuko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takano, Hidekazu; Kagoshima, Yasushi; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2013-06-01

    The cotyledon of legume seeds is a storage organ that provides nutrients for seed germination and seedling growth. The spatial and temporal control of the degradation processes within cotyledons has not been elucidated. Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals, a common calcium deposit in plants, have often been reported to be present in legume seeds. In this study, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was employed at the SPring-8 facility to examine the three-dimensional distribution of crystals inside cotyledons during seed maturation and germination of Lotus miyakojimae (previously Lotus japonicus accession Miyakojima MG-20). Using this technique, we could detect the outline of the embryo, void spaces in seeds and the cotyledon venation pattern. We found several sites that strongly inhibited X-ray transmission within the cotyledons. Light and polarizing microscopy confirmed that these areas corresponded to CaOx crystals. Three-dimensional observations of dry seeds indicated that the CaOx crystals in the L. miyakojimae cotyledons were distributed along lateral veins; however, their distribution was limited to the abaxial side of the procambium. The CaOx crystals appeared at stage II (seed-filling stage) of seed development, and their number increased in dry seeds. The number of crystals in cotyledons was high during germination, suggesting that CaOx crystals are not degraded for their calcium supply. Evidence for the conservation of CaOx crystals in cotyledons during the L. miyakojimae germination process was also supported by the biochemical measurement of oxalic acid levels.

  19. Combining site-specific mutagenesis and seeding as a strategy to crystallize ‘difficult’ proteins: the case of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Goedele; Brosens, Elke; Wahni, Khadija; Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Wyns, Lode; Messens, Joris; Loris, Remy

    2006-12-01

    S. aureus thioredoxin was crystallized using a combination of seeding and site-specific mutagenesis. The P31T mutant of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin crystallizes spontaneously in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.7, b = 49.5, c = 55.6 Å. The crystals diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Isomorphous crystals of wild-type thioredoxin as well as of other point mutants only grow when seeded with the P31T mutant. These results suggest seeding as a valuable tool complementing surface engineering for proteins that are hard to crystallize.

  20. Magnetization behavior of RE123 bulk magnets bearing twin seed-crystals in pulsed field magnetization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Ogawa, J.; Fukui, S.; Sato, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Langer, M.

    2016-02-01

    Melt-textured Y-Ba-Cu-O high temperature superconducting bulk magnets were fabricated by the cold seeding method with using single or twin-seed crystals composed of Nd-Ba-Cu-O thin films on MgO substrates. The behavior of the magnetic flux penetration into anisotropic-grown bulk magnets thus fabricated was precisely evaluated during and after the pulsed field magnetization operated at 35 K. These seed crystals were put on the top surfaces of the precursors to grow large grains during the melt-processes. Although we know the magnetic flux motion is restricted by the enhanced pinning effect in temperature ranges lower than 77 K, we observed that flux invasion occurred at applied fields of 3.3 T when the twin seeds were used. This is definitely lower than those of 3.7 T when the single-seeds were employed. This means that the magnetic fluxes are capable of invading into twin-seeded bulk magnets more easily than single-seeded ones. The twin seeds form the different grain growth regions, the narrow-GSR (growth sector region) and wide-GSR, according to the different grain growth directions which are parallel and normal to the rows of seed crystals, respectively. The invading flux measurements revealed that the magnetic flux invades the sample from the wide-GSR prior to the narrow-GSR. It suggests that such anisotropic grain growth leads to different distributions of pinning centers, variations of J c values, and the formation of preferential paths for the invading magnetic fluxes. Using lower applied fields definitely contributed to lowering the heat generation during the PFM process, which, in turn, led to enhanced trapped magnetic fluxes.

  1. Growth of nanofibrous barium carbonate on calcium carbonate seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeijer, Sara J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Barrett, Richard A.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2008-05-01

    Fibrous barium carbonate (BaCO 3/witherite) crystals 50-100 nm in diameter and several microns in length were grown on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) seeds at temperatures as low as 4 °C. The BaCO 3 fibers were deposited onto calcite rhombs or CaCO 3 films using the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, which was induced with the sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (PAA). The structure and morphology of the resultant fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Fibers were successfully grown on calcite seeds of various morphologies, with a range of barium concentrations, and PAA molecular weight and concentration. Two categories of fibers were grown: straight and twisted. Both types of fibers displayed single-crystalline SAED diffraction patterns, but after examining high-resolution TEM lattice images, it was revealed that the fibers were in fact made up of nanocrystalline domains. We postulate that these nanocrystalline domains are well aligned due to a singular nucleation event (i.e., each fiber propagates from a single nucleation event on the seed crystal) with the nanocrystalline domains resulting from stresses caused by dehydration during crystallization of the highly hydrated precursor phase. These BaCO 3 fibers grown on calcite substrates further illustrate the robustness and non-specificity of the PILP process.

  2. Anisotropic parallel self-diffusion coefficients near the calcite surface: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luís F M; Castier, Marcelo; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-08-28

    Applying classical molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate the parallel self-diffusion coefficients of different fluids (methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) confined between two {101̄4} calcite crystal planes. We have observed that the molecules close to the calcite surface diffuse differently in distinct directions. This anisotropic behavior of the self-diffusion coefficient is investigated for different temperatures and pore sizes. The ion arrangement in the calcite crystal and the strong interactions between the fluid particles and the calcite surface may explain the anisotropy in this transport property. PMID:27586936

  3. Anisotropic parallel self-diffusion coefficients near the calcite surface: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Luís F. M.; Castier, Marcelo; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2016-08-01

    Applying classical molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate the parallel self-diffusion coefficients of different fluids (methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) confined between two { 10 1 ¯ 4 } calcite crystal planes. We have observed that the molecules close to the calcite surface diffuse differently in distinct directions. This anisotropic behavior of the self-diffusion coefficient is investigated for different temperatures and pore sizes. The ion arrangement in the calcite crystal and the strong interactions between the fluid particles and the calcite surface may explain the anisotropy in this transport property.

  4. Microstructures and elastic properties of sheared calcite flowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Ivanka; Grasemann, Bernhard; Plan, Lukas; Tesei, Telemaco; Baron, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    Flowstone is a monomineralic rock precipitated along cave walls and floors, composed of columnar centimeter-scale calcite crystals with strong growth orientation perpendicular to the growth surface. Broken and scratched flowstone can serve as evidence for active faulting and has been found in several alpine caves in Austria. In order to understand the fault mechanics, and associated potential earthquake hazard, experimentally deformed flowstone is studied using microstructural analysis and EBSD-measured physical properties of calcite crystals. For that purpose, we have performed sliding experiments using a rock deformation biaxial apparatus on rectangular blocks of flowstone that were sheared perpendicular to the calcite growth direction. The experiments were performed under room conditions, with sub-seismic sliding velocity (0.001-0.01 mm/s) and constant effective normal stress (3-10 MPa). The deformed samples show diverse brittle features, including high fracture density, the development of calcite-rich fault gouge with Riedel shears within a foliated cataclasite, and drastic grain size reduction down to nm-scale grains. The dominant plastic microstructure is mechanical twinning. Due to the strong growth orientation of calcite in flowstone, crystals can be bent due to shearing. We examine the bending by applying orientation distribution, Schmid factor and elasticity tensor calculations using MTEX Toolbox from EBSD data. In this unique case the flowstone deformation experiments bridge the gap between single crystal and rock powder experiments. This study is supported by the Austrian Science Foundation: SPELEOTECT project (P25884-N29).

  5. Sulfated Macromolecules as Templates for Calcite Nucleation and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Passalacqua, K.; Neira, A. C.; Fernandez, M. S.

    2003-12-01

    Mineralization of egg and seashells is controlled by an intimate association of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules. Among them, particular polyanionic sulfated macromolecules referred to as proteoglycans have been described to be involved in the calcification of these biominerals. The sulfated moieties of the proteoglycans are part of polymer chains constituted of building-blocks of disaccharide units, referred to as sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are covalently attached to a protein core. By using a sitting drop crystallization assay under controlled conditions of time, pH and reactants concentration, we have tested several sulfated and non-sulfated GAGs (i.e.: dermatan and keratan sulfate, hyaluronic acid and heparin), differing in their sulfonate and carboxylate degree and pattern, in their ability to modify calcium carbonate crystal morphology as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Without the addition of GAGs, regular \\{104\\} rhombohedral calcite crystals were obtained. When hyaluronic acid (HA), a non-sulfated but carboxylated GAG, was added, 20 mm long piles of unmodified calcite crystals were observed. When desulfated dermatan, which is an epimeric form of HA but shorter polymer, having their carboxylate groups in an inverted configuration, was added, isolated rhombohedral \\{104\\} calcite crystals showing rounded corners with planes oriented parallel to the c axis were observed. When dermatan sulfated was added, isolated calcite crystals exhibit a columnar morphology as a \\{hk0\\} cylinder with three \\{104\\} faces forming a cap at both ends. Heparin activity depends on the fraction added. Fast-moving heparin fraction (FM), is an undersulfated, low-molecular-weight heterogeneous polymer, while slow-moving heparin fraction (SM) is an high-molecular-weight homogeneous polymer rich in trisulfated-disaccharide units. When FM was added, isolated calcite crystals displayed rhombohedrical \\{104\\} faces but flat corners of

  6. Physicochemical characteristics of drip waters: Influence on mineralogy and crystal morphology of recent cave carbonate precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, Sylvia; Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Schreuer, Jürgen; Richter, Detlev K.; Riechelmann, Dana F. C.; Terente, Mihai; Constantin, Silviu; Mangini, Augusto; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    corners of the crystal seed, (ii) crystal habit tend to elongate along [0 0 1] due to slower growth of faces with high Mg2+ densities, (iii) reconstitution of crystal faces with low Mg2+ densities, and (iv) occurrence of calcite crystals with bended faces and edges due to very high Mg2+ (Mg/Ca ratios of 0.009-0.051) incorporation. Growth rates and possibly also organic compounds, however, may also affect the morphology of calcite crystals. Based on the data shown here, the relation of Mg2+ incorporation and the resulting changes in calcite crystal morphologies as well as the conditions of aragonite precipitation are now clearly better understood. Further work should aim at linking the calcite crystal morphology of watch glass precipitates with calcite crystal fabrics in speleothems in order to exploit the petrographic archive of speleothem deposits.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a new chitin-binding protein from Parkia platycephala seeds

    PubMed Central

    Cavada, Benildo S.; Castellón, Rolando E. R.; Vasconcelos, Georg G.; Rocha, Bruno A. M.; Bezerra, Gustavo A.; Debray, Henri; Delatorre, Plínio; Nagano, Celso S.; Toyama, Marcos; Pinto, Vicente P. T.; Moreno, Frederico B. M. B.; Canduri, Fernanda; de Azevedo, Walter F.

    2005-01-01

    A chitin-binding protein named PPL-2 was purified from Parkia platycephala seeds and crystallized. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.19, b = 59.95, c = 76.60 Å, and grew over several days at 293 K using the hanging-drop method. Using synchrotron radiation, a complete structural data set was collected to 1.73 Å resolution. The preliminary crystal structure of PPL-2, determined by molecular replacement, presents a correlation coefficient of 0.558 and an R factor of 0.439. Crystallographic refinement is in progress. PMID:16511174

  8. X-Ray Characterization of Structural Defects in Seeded and Self-Seeded ZnSe Crystal Grown by PVT in Horizontal and Vertical Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Su, C.-H.; Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As part of a pre-flight ground based investigation of crystal growth of II-VI compound semiconductors, a number of ZnSe boules have been grown by physical vapor transport (PVT) at Marshall Space Flight Center. Boules were grown in both horizontal and vertical configurations and seeded and self-seeded growth techniques were employed. As-grown and/or cleaved boules were examined by a combination of synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) and high resolution triple axis diffraction (HRTXD) to characterized the structural defects and correlate them with the growth conditions. Horizontal grown boules tend to grow away from the ampoule wall (contactless growth) and generally exhibit large (110) facets parallel to the gravity vector. Vertical grown boules grew to the full diameter of the ampoule and exhibited no faceting. X-ray topography combined with back reflection x-ray diffraction revealed the presence of lamellar twins (180 deg type about the [111] axis) in horizontal grown boules while vertically grown boules contain a few large grains, some of which are twinned. X-ray topographs and reciprocal space maps recorded from the boules show the better crystal quality of horizontal grown boules. The relationship between crystal quality and gravity vector is investigated. Further, an attempt is made to extend the Hurle theory of twin nucleation in Czochralski grown crystals to explain the twinning mechanisms in horizontal grown boules.

  9. Strong dependence of the tetragonal Mn2.1Ga thin film crystallization temperature window on seed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyang; Jiang, Xin; Samant, Mahesh G.; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2013-07-01

    For spintronic applications, such as magnetic memory and logic, magnetic thin films with high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and spin polarization are needed. An attractive candidate material is the Heusler compound Mn3-xGa (x varying from 0 to 2). We show that there is a correlation between the degree of crystallization of thin films of Mn3-xGa (x ˜ 0.9) and the magnitude of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Moreover, we find that the crystallization temperature window varies with the seed layer on which the Mn3-xGa films are deposited. Seed layers of Pt, Cr, Ru, Mo and SrTiO3 were considered and the largest crystallization window was found for Pt(100) layers.

  10. Crystal structure of mature 2S albumin from Moringa oleifera seeds.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Anwar; Mariutti, Ricardo Barros; Masood, Rehana; Caruso, Icaro Putinhon; Costa, Gustavo Henrique Gravatim; Millena de Freita, Cristhyane; Santos, Camila Ramos; Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; Rossini Mutton, Márcia Justino; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy

    2S albumins, the seed storage proteins, are the primary sources of carbon and nitrogen and are involved in plant defense. The mature form of Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera), a chitin binding protein isoform 3-1 (mMo-CBP3-1) a thermostable antifungal, antibacterial, flocculating 2S albumin is widely used for the treatment of water and is potentially interesting for the development of both antifungal drugs and transgenic crops. The crystal structure of mMo-CBP3-1 determined at 1.7 Å resolution demonstrated that it is comprised of two proteolytically processed α-helical chains, stabilized by four disulfide bridges that is stable, resistant to pH changes and has a melting temperature (TM) of approximately 98 °C. The surface arginines and the polyglutamine motif are the key structural factors for the observed flocculating, antibacterial and antifungal activities. This represents the first crystal structure of a 2S albumin and the model of the pro-protein indicates the structural changes that occur upon formation of mMo-CBP3-1 and determines the structural motif and charge distribution patterns for the diverse observed activities. PMID:26505799

  11. Crystal structure of mature 2S albumin from Moringa oleifera seeds.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Anwar; Mariutti, Ricardo Barros; Masood, Rehana; Caruso, Icaro Putinhon; Costa, Gustavo Henrique Gravatim; Millena de Freita, Cristhyane; Santos, Camila Ramos; Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; Rossini Mutton, Márcia Justino; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy

    2S albumins, the seed storage proteins, are the primary sources of carbon and nitrogen and are involved in plant defense. The mature form of Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera), a chitin binding protein isoform 3-1 (mMo-CBP3-1) a thermostable antifungal, antibacterial, flocculating 2S albumin is widely used for the treatment of water and is potentially interesting for the development of both antifungal drugs and transgenic crops. The crystal structure of mMo-CBP3-1 determined at 1.7 Å resolution demonstrated that it is comprised of two proteolytically processed α-helical chains, stabilized by four disulfide bridges that is stable, resistant to pH changes and has a melting temperature (TM) of approximately 98 °C. The surface arginines and the polyglutamine motif are the key structural factors for the observed flocculating, antibacterial and antifungal activities. This represents the first crystal structure of a 2S albumin and the model of the pro-protein indicates the structural changes that occur upon formation of mMo-CBP3-1 and determines the structural motif and charge distribution patterns for the diverse observed activities.

  12. The application of time-dependent ice crystal trajectory and growth model for the evaluation of cloud seeding experiment using liquid carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, K.; Wakimizu, K.; Maki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Morita, O.; Tomine, K.

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the results of cloud seeding experiment conducted on 17th January, 2008, in western Kyushu, Japan, using simplified time-dependent ice crystal growth and trajectory cloud model, which is characterized by 1) depositional diffusion growth process only of an ice crystal, and 2) the pursuit of the growing ice crystal based on wind field and ice crystal terminal velocity. For the estimation of the ice crystal growth and trajectory, the model specifies ice supersaturation ratio that expresses the degree of competition growth among ice crystals formed by LC seeding for existing water vapor, assuming no effect of natural ice crystals. The model is based on ice crystal growth along a- and c-axes depending on air temperature and ice supersatuation, according to Chen and Lamb (1994). The cloud seeding experiment was conducted by applying homogeneous nucleation (rapid cooling of air mass and subsequent formation of many ice crystals~1013/g LC) of Liquid Carbon (LC) dioxide seeding under typical winter-type snowfall-inducing weather situation characterized by the outbreak of cold air masses from the Siberia. The result of aircraft horizontally-penetrating seeding of LC into lower layer (-2 degree C) of supercooled convective cloud with 1km thickness above the freezing level led to the formation of an artificially-induced 'isolated' radar echo (the left figures of Fig. 1) in dominant 'no-natural radar echo region'. In other words, natural biases were eliminated by the formation of the isolated radar echo. This fact provides the shortcut for evaluating the result of cloud seeding experiment. In the next, the observed cloud seeding results were evaluated by estimating the trajectory of artificially-induced growing ice crystal. The results show that the trajectory of artificial ice crystals depends on the degree of completion growth mode. Free growth brings rapid growth of an ice crystal and, therefore, the ice crystal falls into lower layers for a short time

  13. Chemistry and petrography of calcite in the KTB pilot borehole, Bavarian Oberpfalz, Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    The KTB pilot borehole in northeast Bavaria, Germany, penetrates 4000 m of gneiss, amphibolite, and subordinate calc-silicate, lamprophyre and metagabbro. There are three types of calcite in the drilled section: 1) metamorphic calcite in calc-silicate and marble; 2) crack-filling calcite in all lithologies; and 3) replacement calcite in altered minerals. Crack-filling and replacement calcite postdate metamorphic calcite. Multiple calcite generations in individual cracks suggest that different generations of water repeatedly flowed through the same cracks. Crack-filling mineral assemblages that include calcite originally formed at temperatures of 150-350??C. Presently, crack-filling calcite is in chemical and isotopic equilibrium with saline to brackish water in the borehole at temperatures of ???120??C. The saline to brackish water contains a significant proportion of meteoric water. Re-equilibration of crack-filling calcite to lower temperatures means that calcite chemistry tells us little about water-rock interactions in the crystal section of temperatures higher than ~120??C. -from Author

  14. Catalytic Biomineralization of Fluorescent Calcite by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naoto; Higashimura, Eiji; Saeki, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus bacterium catalyzed the formation of 100-μm hexagonal crystals at 60°C in a hydrogel containing sodium acetate, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate. Under fluorescence microscopy, crystals fluoresced upon excitation at 365 ± 5, 480 ± 20, or 545 ± 15 nm. X-ray diffraction indicated that the crystals were magnesium-calcite in calcite-type calcium carbonate. PMID:20851984

  15. Investigation of organic matter entrapped during calcite growth by a multi-method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmin, E.; Perrette, Y.; Fanget, B.; Drysdale, R.

    2012-04-01

    Organic matter (OM) entrapped in calcite is regularly used for environmental studies; however, incorporation mechanisms and types of interaction remain poorly understood. This study used a new methodology to investigate interactions between OM and the calcite matrix during crystallization processes using humic acid entrapment. A multi-method approach confirmed that OM is both adsorbed onto the calcite surface and incorporated into the calcite lattice during crystallization. Our results also confirm the log-linear correlation between fluorescence intensity and calcite matrix OM concentration. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that OM in colloidal conformation is adsorbed onto the calcite surface as a result of the structure of the OH stretching band. Based on synchrotron analysis (XRF and XANES), we also developed a new method in which sulfur is used as a tracer for entrapped humic acid and for locating the OM electrostatically adsorbed onto the calcite surface. Changes in the sulfur environment, determined using XANES, indicated partitioning during calcite crystallization due to the effect of the matrix on OM incorporation. Desorption experiments revealed the stability of the OM atomic structure and the layered nature of that structure. These results have allowed us to devise a general model of OM incorporation into calcite.

  16. Atomistic simulation of the differences between calcite and dolomite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Titiloye, J.O.; Leeuw, N.H. de; Parker, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    Atomistic simulation methods have been used to calculate and compare the surface structures and energies of the {l_brace}10{bar 1}4{r_brace}, {l_brace}0001{r_brace}, {l_brace}10{bar 1}0{r_brace}, {l_brace}11{bar 2}0{r_brace} and {l_brace}10{bar 1}1{r_brace} surfaces of calcite and dolomite and to evaluate their equilibrium morphologies. The calcite {l_brace}10{bar 1}4{r_brace} and the dolomite {l_brace}10{bar 1}0{r_brace} and {l_brace}11{bar 2}0{r_brace} surfaces are the most stable crystal planes. Investigation of the segregation of Mg and Ca ions in the dolomite crystal shows a clear preference for Ca{sup 2+} ions at the surface sites and for Mg{sup 2+} ions in the bulk sites and hence growth onto dolomite results in calcium carbonate or high magnesian calcite crystals which helps explain the difficulty in crystallizing dolomite vs. calcite under laboratory conditions.

  17. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  18. Effects of self-seeding and crystal post-selection on the quality of Monte Carlo-integrated SFX data.

    PubMed

    Barends, Thomas; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Foucar, Lutz; Messerschmidt, Marc; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Botha, Sabine; Chapman, Henry; Doak, R Bruce; Galli, Lorenzo; Gati, Cornelius; Gutmann, Matthias; Koglin, Jason; Markvardsen, Anders; Nass, Karol; Oberthur, Dominik; Shoeman, Robert L; Schlichting, Ilme; Boutet, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) is an emerging method for data collection at free-electron lasers (FELs) in which single diffraction snapshots are taken from a large number of crystals. The partial intensities collected in this way are then combined in a scheme called Monte Carlo integration, which provides the full diffraction intensities. However, apart from having to perform this merging, the Monte Carlo integration must also average out all variations in crystal quality, crystal size, X-ray beam properties and other factors, necessitating data collection from thousands of crystals. Because the pulses provided by FELs running in the typical self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation have very irregular, spiky spectra that vary strongly from pulse to pulse, it has been suggested that this is an important source of variation contributing to inaccuracies in the intensities, and that, by using monochromatic pulses produced through a process called self-seeding, fewer images might be needed for Monte Carlo integration to converge, resulting in more accurate data. This paper reports the results of two experiments performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source in which data collected in both SASE and self-seeded mode were compared. Importantly, no improvement attributable to the use of self-seeding was detected. In addition, other possible sources of variation that affect SFX data quality were investigated, such as crystal-to-crystal variations reflected in the unit-cell parameters; however, these factors were found to have no influence on data quality either. Possibly, there is another source of variation as yet undetected that affects SFX data quality much more than any of the factors investigated here.

  19. Effects of self-seeding and crystal post-selection on the quality of Monte Carlo-integrated SFX data.

    PubMed

    Barends, Thomas; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Foucar, Lutz; Messerschmidt, Marc; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Botha, Sabine; Chapman, Henry; Doak, R Bruce; Galli, Lorenzo; Gati, Cornelius; Gutmann, Matthias; Koglin, Jason; Markvardsen, Anders; Nass, Karol; Oberthur, Dominik; Shoeman, Robert L; Schlichting, Ilme; Boutet, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) is an emerging method for data collection at free-electron lasers (FELs) in which single diffraction snapshots are taken from a large number of crystals. The partial intensities collected in this way are then combined in a scheme called Monte Carlo integration, which provides the full diffraction intensities. However, apart from having to perform this merging, the Monte Carlo integration must also average out all variations in crystal quality, crystal size, X-ray beam properties and other factors, necessitating data collection from thousands of crystals. Because the pulses provided by FELs running in the typical self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation have very irregular, spiky spectra that vary strongly from pulse to pulse, it has been suggested that this is an important source of variation contributing to inaccuracies in the intensities, and that, by using monochromatic pulses produced through a process called self-seeding, fewer images might be needed for Monte Carlo integration to converge, resulting in more accurate data. This paper reports the results of two experiments performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source in which data collected in both SASE and self-seeded mode were compared. Importantly, no improvement attributable to the use of self-seeding was detected. In addition, other possible sources of variation that affect SFX data quality were investigated, such as crystal-to-crystal variations reflected in the unit-cell parameters; however, these factors were found to have no influence on data quality either. Possibly, there is another source of variation as yet undetected that affects SFX data quality much more than any of the factors investigated here. PMID:25931080

  20. Gamma-linolenic acid enrichment from Borago officinalis and Echium fastuosum seed oils and fatty acids by low temperature crystallization.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Juan Carlos; Campra-Madrid, Pablo; Guil-Guerrero, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Solvent winterization of seed oil and free fatty acids (FFAs) was employed to obtain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3omega6) concentrates from seed oils of two Boraginaceae species, Echium fastuosum and Borago officinalis. Different solutions of seed oils and FFAs from these two oils at 10%, 20% and 40% (w/w) were crystallized at 4 degrees C, -24 degrees C and -70 degrees C, respectively, using hexane, acetone, diethyl ether, isobutanol and ethanol as solvents. Best results were obtained for B. officinalis FFAs in hexane, reaching a maximum GLA concentration of 58.8% in the liquid fraction (LF). In E. fastuosum, the highest GLA concentration (39.9%) was also achieved with FFAs in hexane. PMID:16233632

  1. Gamma-linolenic acid enrichment from Borago officinalis and Echium fastuosum seed oils and fatty acids by low temperature crystallization.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Juan Carlos; Campra-Madrid, Pablo; Guil-Guerrero, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Solvent winterization of seed oil and free fatty acids (FFAs) was employed to obtain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3omega6) concentrates from seed oils of two Boraginaceae species, Echium fastuosum and Borago officinalis. Different solutions of seed oils and FFAs from these two oils at 10%, 20% and 40% (w/w) were crystallized at 4 degrees C, -24 degrees C and -70 degrees C, respectively, using hexane, acetone, diethyl ether, isobutanol and ethanol as solvents. Best results were obtained for B. officinalis FFAs in hexane, reaching a maximum GLA concentration of 58.8% in the liquid fraction (LF). In E. fastuosum, the highest GLA concentration (39.9%) was also achieved with FFAs in hexane.

  2. Top-seeded solution crystal growth of noncentrosymmetric and polar Zn2TeMoO7 (ZTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Halasyamani, P. Shiv

    2016-04-01

    A top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) method was used to grow large, centimeter size, crystals of Zn2TeMoO7 (ZTM) - a noncentrosymmetric and polar material. A TeO2-MoO3 mixture in combination with the parent compound was used as a flux. The morphologies of the crystals can be controlled by different rotation speeds. Optical spectra indicate that ZTM is transparent up to 5.25 μm with a UV absorption edge of 300 nm. In addition, the refractive index along the optical x, y, and z axes was measured at different wavelengths.

  3. Human 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-ligand complexes: crystals of different space groups with various cations and combined seeding and co-crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.-W.; Han, Q.; Qiu, W.; Campbell, R. L.; Xie, B.-X.; Azzi, A.; Lin, S.-X.

    1999-01-01

    Human estrogenic 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD1) is responsible for the synthesis of active estrogens that stimulate the proliferation of breast cancer cells. The enzyme has been crystallized using a Mg 2+/PEG (3500)/β-octyl glucoside system [Zhu et al., J. Mol. Biol. 234 (1993) 242]. The space group of these crystals is C2. Here we report that cations can affect 17β-HSD1 crystallization significantly. In the presence of Mn 2+ instead of Mg 2+, crystals have been obtained in the same space group with similar unit cell dimensions. In the presence of Li + and Na + instead of Mg 2+, the space group has been changed to P2 12 12 1. A whole data set for a crystal of 17ß-HSD1 complex with progesterone grown in the presence of Li + has been collected to 1.95 Å resolution with a synchrotron source. The cell dimensions are a=41.91 Å, b=108.21 Å, c=117.00 Å. The structure has been preliminarily determined by molecular replacement, yielding important information on crystal packing in the presence of different cations. In order to further understand the structure-function relationship of 17β-HSD1, enzyme complexes with several ligands have been crystallized. As the steroids have very low aqueous solubility, we used a combined method of seeding and co-crystallization to obtain crystals of 17β-HSD1 complexed with various ligands. This method provides ideal conditions for growing complex crystals, with ligands such as 20α-hydroxysteroid progesterone, testosterone and 17β-methyl-estradiol-NADP +. Several complex structures have been determined with reliable electronic density of the bound ligands.

  4. Calcite sealing in a fractured geothermal reservoir: Insights from combined EBSD and chemistry mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, David D.; Lister, Aaron; Prior, Dave J.

    2016-09-01

    Fractures play an important role as fluid flow pathways in geothermal resources hosted in indurated greywacke basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, including the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Over time, the permeability of such geothermal reservoirs can be degraded by fracture sealing as minerals deposit out of transported geothermal fluids. Calcite is one such fracture sealing mineral. This study, for the first time, utilises combined data from electron backscatter diffraction and chemical mapping to characterise calcite vein fill morphologies, and gain insight into the mechanisms of calcite fracture sealing in the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Two calcite sealing mechanisms are identified 1) asymmetrical syntaxial growth of calcite, inferred by the presence of single, twinned, calcite crystals spanning the entire fracture width, and 2) 3D, interlocking growth of bladed vein calcite into free space as determined from chemical and crystallographic orientation mapping. This study also identifies other potential uses of combined EBSD and chemical mapping to understand geothermal field evolution including, potentially informing on levels of fluid supersaturation from the study of calcite lattice distortion, and providing information on a reservoir's history of stress, strain, and deformation through investigation of calcite crystal deformation and twinning patterns.

  5. Calcite precipitation rates in the field: Measurement and prediction for a travertine-depositing stream

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.S.; Lorah, M.M. )

    1988-10-01

    Rates of calcite precipitation from a travertine-depositing stream were determined from changes in stream composition between consecutive sampling points and were compared with rates predicted from a laboratory-derived rate law. The agreement in rates was generally within an order of magnitude and routinely within a factor of 3. Least agreement between measured and predicted rates was obtained for sections of flowpath where relatively little change in bulk chemical composition occurred, which were the sections with the greatest mass transfer calculation error, and for the stream segment including a waterfall, which was the section with the greatest error in estimated surface area. Reaction rate obtained from the mass of calcite precipitated onto seed crystals placed in the stream significantly underestimated the mass transfer rate. For the travertine-depositing stream of Warm River Cave and Falling Spring Creek, Virginia, the coupling of equilibrium speciation models with mass balance calculations and simple field measurements allowed successful field-based quantification of reaction rates.

  6. Biotic Control of Skeletal Growth by Scleractinian Corals in Aragonite–Calcite Seas

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Yuyama, Ikuko; Harii, Saki; Agostini, Sylvain; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2014-01-01

    Modern scleractinian coral skeletons are commonly composed of aragonite, the orthorhombic form of CaCO3. Under certain conditions, modern corals produce calcite as a secondary precipitate to fill pore space. However, coral construction of primary skeletons from calcite has yet to be demonstrated. We report a calcitic primary skeleton produced by the modern scleractinian coral Acropora tenuis. When uncalcified juveniles were incubated from the larval stage in seawater with low mMg/Ca levels, the juveniles constructed calcitic crystals in parts of the primary skeleton such as the septa; the deposits were observable under Raman microscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed different crystal morphologies of aragonite and calcite in a single juvenile skeleton. Quantitative analysis using X-ray diffraction showed that the majority of the skeleton was composed of aragonite even though we had exposed the juveniles to manipulated seawater before their initial crystal nucleation and growth processes. Our results indicate that the modern scleractinian coral Acropora mainly produces aragonite skeletons in both aragonite and calcite seas, but also has the ability to use calcite for part of its skeletal growth when incubated in calcite seas. PMID:24609012

  7. Time and metamorphic petrology: calcite to aragonite experiments.

    PubMed

    Hacker, B R; Kirby, S H; Bohlen, S R

    1992-10-01

    Although the equilibrium phase relations of many mineral systems are generally well established, the rates of transformations, particularly in polycrystalline rocks, are not. The results of experiments on the calcite to aragonite transformation in polycrystalline marble are different from those for earlier experiments on powdered and single-crystal calcite. The transformation in the polycrystalline samples occurs by different mechanisms, with a different temperature dependence, and at a markedly slower rate. This work demonstrates the importance of kinetic studies on fully dense polycrystalline aggregates for understanding mineralogic phase changes in nature. Extrapolation of these results to geological time scales suggests that transformation of calcite to aragonite does not occur in the absence of volatiles at temperatures below 200 degrees C. Kinetic hindrance is likely to extend to higher temperatures in more complex transformations.

  8. Time and metamorphic petrology: Calcite to aragonite experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, B.R.; Kirby, S.H.; Bohlen, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    Although the equilibrium phase relations of many mineral systems are generally well established, the rates of transformations, particularly in polycrystalline rocks, are not. The results of experiments on the calcite to aragonite transformation in polycrystalline marble are different from those for earlier experiments on powdered and single-crystal calcite. The transformation in the polycrystalline samples occurs by different mechanisms, with a different temperature dependence, and at a markedly slower rate. This work demonstrates the importance of kinetic studies on fully dense polycrystalline aggregates for understanding mineralogic phase changes in nature. Extrapolation of these results to geological time scales suggests that transformation of calcite to aragonite does not occur in the absence of volatiles at temperatures below 200??C. Kinetic hindrance is likely to extend to higher temperatures in more complex transformations.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of an anti-H(O) lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista; Martil, Daiana Evelin; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2006-07-01

    The seed lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA) has been crystallized. The best crystals grew over several days and were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method at a constant temperature of 293 K. A complete structural data set was collected at 2.00 angstroms resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. LTA crystals were found to be monoclinic, belonging to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.89, b = 65.83, c = 102.53 angstroms, alpha = gamma = 90, beta = 92 degrees. Molecular replacement yielded a solution with a correlation coefficient and R factor of 34.4 and 51.6%, respectively. Preliminary analysis of the molecular-replacement solution indicates a new quaternary association in the LTA structure. Crystallographic refinement is under way.

  10. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D.; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G.; Kunitake, Miki E.; Tang, Chiu C.; Duer, Melinda J.; Freeman, Colin L.; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H.; Estroff, Lara A.; Baker, Shefford P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit--mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules--remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules.

  11. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G; Kunitake, Miki E; Tang, Chiu C; Duer, Melinda J; Freeman, Colin L; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H; Estroff, Lara A; Baker, Shefford P; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit-mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules-remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules. PMID:27135858

  12. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: calcite present early in the aboral plumula.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stuart R; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D; Dorvee, Jason R

    2012-11-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: when and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth.

  13. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. PMID:22940703

  14. Seeded growth of bulk AlN crystals and grain evolution in polycrystalline AlN boules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noveski, V.; Schlesser, R.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Mahajan, S.; Beaudoin, S.; Sitar, Z.

    2005-05-01

    Large AlN crystals were grown by powder sublimation in a nitrogen atmosphere at low supersaturation and growth rates of 0.1-0.3 mm/h. The starting deposition surface was a sintered TaC disc. An appropriate adjustment of the system pressure and source-seed temperature gradient during the early stages of growth allowed epitaxial re-growth on AlN seeds that had been exposed to air. Single-crystalline AlN grains of 1 cm in size were achieved through multiple sublimation growth runs conducted at P=500 Torr and growth temperatures of 2050-2150 °C. Elemental analysis of impurities in the grown AlN boules confirmed low oxygen contamination levels of ˜10 19/cm 3. No discontinuities were introduced in the structural defect distribution in the individual single-crystalline grains by the multiple re-growth steps. Absence of preferred growth directions of grains suggest the epitaxial re-growth process is suitable for seeded single-crystal growth in any orientation.

  15. Enhancing mechanical properties of calcite by Mg substitutions: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elstnerova, Pavlina; Friak, Martin; Hickel, Tilmann; Fabritius, Helge Otto; Lymperakis, Liverios; Petrov, Michal; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Joerg; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Zigler, Andreas; Hild, Sabine

    2011-03-01

    Arthropoda representing a majority of all known animal species are protected by an exoskeleton formed by their cuticle. The cuticle represents a hierarchically structured multifunctional bio-composite based on chitin and proteins. Some groups like Crustacea reinforce the load-bearing parts of their cuticle with calcite. As the calcite sometimes contains Mg it was speculated that Mg may have a stiffening impact on the mechanical properties of the cuticle. We present a theoretical parameter-free quantum-mechanical study of thermodynamic, structural and elastic properties of Mg-substituted calcite. Our results show that substituting Ca by Mg causes an almost linear decrease in the crystal volume with Mg concentration and of substituted crystals. As a consequence the calcite crystals become stiffer giving rise e.g. to substantially increased bulk moduli.

  16. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Chaudhry, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-07-01

    A Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor has been purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. SDS-PAGE analysis of a purified sample showed a homogeneous band corresponding to a molecular weight of 21 kDa. The protein was identified as a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor based on N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis. It was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6000. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 77.1, c = 129.1 A. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 A. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of one proteinase inhibitor molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 44%.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data of a neutrophil migration-inducing lectin (KM+) extracted from the seed of Artocarpus integrifolia.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, P S; Garratt, R C; Mascarenhas, Y P; Beltramini, L M; Roque-Barreira, M C; Harvey, I; Oliva, G

    1997-01-01

    The tetrameric KM+ lectin from the seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia has, when compared to other plant lectins, the singular property of directly inducing neutrophil migration into the peritoneal cavity or into the air pouch of rats. This protein crystals have been grown and they belong to the orthorhombic system with space group C222(1). The unit cell parameters are a = 54.4 A, b = 127.9 A and c = 99.8 A. A native diffraction dataset to 2.8 A was collected and an analysis of the self-rotation function has shown the presence of only one independent non-crystallographic 2-fold axis orthogonal to the crystal b-axis, compatible with a dimer in the asymmetric unit.

  19. Low limit of Mn 2+-activated cathodoluminescence of calcite: state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, Dirk; Neuser, Rolf D.; Richter, Detlev K.

    1998-02-01

    In the literature, the lower limit for Mn 2+-activated cathodoluminescence (CL) of calcite is variously reputed to over a very wide range of values above 10 ppm Mn. Our spectroscopic investigations of the CL response in natural calcite reveal that below 10 ppm manganese content Mn 2+-activation is also present. Using the Quantitative High Resolution Spectral analysis of CL (QHRS-CL) an activation by Mn 2+ in the range of 700 ppb is proved, which cannot be determined visually. So, if not quenched, the minimum Mn 2+ content for Mn 2+-activation is one atom in the irradiated calcite crystal lattice volume. As the intrinsic (background blue) luminescence is used to determine non-altered biogenic calcite, the limit of Mn 2+-activation plays an important role in the interpretation of diagenetic processes. Our results of spectroscopic analyses require a revision of current opinions about the diagenesis of calcite as revealed by CL investigation.

  20. Noncrystallographic calcite dendrites from hot-spring deposits at Lake Bogoria, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Renaut, R.W.

    1995-01-02

    Complex calcite crystals are an integral component of precipitates that form around the orifices of the Loburu and Mawe Moto hot springs on the shores of Lake bogoria, Kenya. Two types of large (up to 4 cm long) noncrystallographic dendrites are important components of these deposits. Feather dendrites are characterized by multiple levels of branching with individual branches developed through crystal splitting and spherulitic growth. Scandulitic (from Latin meaning shingle) dendrites are formed of stacked calcite crystals and are generally more compact than feather dendrites. These developed through the incremental stacking of rectangular-shaped calcite crystals that initially grew as skeletal crystals. Feather and scandulitic dendrites precipitated from the same waters in the same springs. The difference in morphology is therefore related to microenvironments in which they grew. Feather dendrites grew in any direction in pools of free-standing water provided that they were in constant contact with the solute. Conversely, scandulitic dendrites grew on rims of dams where water flowed over the surface in concert with the pulses of spring water. Thus, each calcite crystal in these dendrites represents one episode of crystal growth. The orientation of the component crystals in scandulitic dendrites is controlled by the topography of the dam or surface, not crystallographic criteria. The noncrystallographic dendrites formed from spring waters with initial temperatures of 90--99 C. Surficial water cooling, loss of CO{sub 2}, and presence of other elements that can interfere with crystal growth contributed to the formation of these unusual crystals.

  1. Dislocation Creep in Magnesium Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, X.; Evans, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the effect of dissolved Mg on plastic deformation of calcite, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on synthetic calcite with varying amount of Mg content. Mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite were isostatically hot pressed (HIP) at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 20hrs) resulting in homogeneous aggregates of high-magnesium calcite; Mg content varied from 0.07 to 0.17 mol%. Creep tests were performed at differential stresses from 20 to 160 MPa at 700 to 800° C. Grain sizes before and after deformation were determined from the images obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Grain sizes are in the range of 5 to 20 microns depending on the HIP time, and decrease with increasing magnesium content. Both BSE images and chemical analysis suggest that all dolomite are dissolved and the Mg distribution is homogeneous through the sample, after 2 hrs HIP. At stresses below 40 MPa, the samples deformed in diffusion region (Coble creep), as described previously by Herwegh. The strength decreases with increasing magnesium content, owing to the difference of grain size. At stresses above 80 MPa, the stress exponent is greater than 3, indicating an increased contribution of dislocation creep. The transition between diffusion to dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. Preliminary data suggests a slight increase in strength with increasing magnesium content, but more tests are needed to verify this effect. In a few samples, some strain weakening may have been evident. The activation energy in the transition region (at 80 MPa) is ˜200 KJ/mol with no dependence on magnesium content, agreeing with previous measurements of diffusion creep in natural and synthetic marbles.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a new chitin-binding protein from Parkia platycephala seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Cavada, Benildo S. Castellón, Rolando E. R.; Vasconcelos, Georg G.; Rocha, Bruno A. M.; Bezerra, Gustavo A.; Debray, Henri; Delatorre, Plínio; Nagano, Celso S.; Toyama, Marcos; Pinto, Vicente P. T.; Moreno, Frederico B. M. B.; Canduri, Fernanda; Azevedo, Walter F. Jr de

    2005-09-01

    Crystals of P. platycephala chintinase/lectin (PPL-2) belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.19, b = 59.95, c = 76.60 Å. The preliminary cystal structure of PPL-2 was solved at a resolution of 1.73 Å by molecular replacement, presenting a correlation coefficient of 0.558 and an R factor of 0.439. A chitin-binding protein named PPL-2 was purified from Parkia platycephala seeds and crystallized. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.19, b = 59.95, c = 76.60 Å, and grew over several days at 293 K using the hanging-drop method. Using synchrotron radiation, a complete structural data set was collected to 1.73 Å resolution. The preliminary crystal structure of PPL-2, determined by molecular replacement, presents a correlation coefficient of 0.558 and an R factor of 0.439. Crystallographic refinement is in progress.

  3. Nickel and manganese interaction with calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Doner, H; Zavarin, M

    1999-08-09

    Many divalent metal cations sorb to calcite surfaces and incorporate into calcite to varying degrees. Since calcite may sorb trace elements in the environment, the factors controlling metal-calcite interactions are critical to understanding element cycling. The interaction of divalent metal cations with calcite can be critical to toxic metal immobilization, nutrient cycling, interpretation of past redox conditions, tracing fluid flow, for example. Sorption of Ni and Mn on calcite surfaces was studied by Zachara et al.. At any particular pH, the sorption of Mn on calcite was greater than Ni. This was attributed in part to the similarity of divalent Mn and Ca with respect to ion size. Although direct spectroscopic evidence was not available, sorption/desorption results suggested that Mn quickly forms a surface precipitate or solid solution while Ni forms a hydrated surface complex that may incorporate into calcite much more slowly via recrystallization. Because Mn(II) ionic radius is similar to that of Ca(II) (0.80 versus 1.0{angstrom}), and because MnCO{sub 3} has a structure similar to calcite, it is likely that Mn can substitute directly for Ca in the calcite structure. The ionic radius of Ni(II) is significantly smaller (0.69{angstrom}) and Ni(OH){sub 2} precipitation is likely to be favored in most systems. For Ni, direct substitution for Ca is less likely or may require more significant calcite lattice deformation.

  4. Magnesium stable isotope fractionation in marine biogenic calcite and aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wombacher, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Böhm, F.; Gussone, N.; Regenberg, M.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Rüggeberg, A.

    2011-10-01

    activation energy required for cation incorporation, which probably reflects the dehydration of the cation and the crystal surface and bond formation at the incorporation site. This kinetic incorporation model predicts (i) no intrinsic dependence on growth rate, unless significant back reaction upon slow growth reduces the isotope fractionation towards that characteristic for equilibrium isotope partitioning (this may be observed for Ca isotopes in calcites), (ii) a small decrease of isotope fractionation with increasing temperature that may be amplified if higher temperatures promote back reaction and (iii) a sensitivity to changes in the activation barrier caused by additives such as anions or biomolecules or by the initial formation of amorphous CaCO 3.

  5. The effect of stirring and seeding on the AcPheLeuNH(2) synthesis and crystallization in a reversed micellar system.

    PubMed

    Feliciano; Dias; Prazeres

    2000-08-01

    The present work describes the enzymatic synthesis and simultaneous crystallization of the dipeptide AcPheLeuNH(2) by alpha-chymotrypsin in a reversed micellar system of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB)/heptane/octanol/carbonate buffer. The low solubility of the dipeptide in the micellar solution led to the formation and growth of needle-like crystals during the synthesis as soon as supersaturation was achieved. The crystallization process then followed a typical pattern, proceeding in three phases: nucleation, de-supersaturation, and re-equilibrium of saturation. Crystallization was followed by visual observation with an optical microscope, and the increase of crystal number and size was confirmed. Experiments showed that the supersaturation concentration decreases with the addition of AcPheLeuNH(2) seeds before the reaction, and also with a decrease of the stirring speed. It was also observed that the increase of both seed concentration and stirring advances the start of crystallization, so that the dipeptide is more quickly removed from solution. The consequent decrease in its loss through hydrolysis causes an increase in its yield. Both stirring and seeding could constitute important generic strategies for promoting crystallization of more soluble dipeptides during their synthesis in similar reversed micellar systems.

  6. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions.

    PubMed

    Hellebrandt, S E; Hofmann, S; Jordan, N; Barkleit, A; Schmidt, M

    2016-09-13

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu(3+) occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na(+). These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site.

  7. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hellebrandt, S. E.; Hofmann, S.; Jordan, N.; Barkleit, A.; Schmidt, M.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu3+ occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na+. These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site. PMID:27618958

  8. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebrandt, S. E.; Hofmann, S.; Jordan, N.; Barkleit, A.; Schmidt, M.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu3+ occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na+. These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site.

  9. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions.

    PubMed

    Hellebrandt, S E; Hofmann, S; Jordan, N; Barkleit, A; Schmidt, M

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu(3+) occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na(+). These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site. PMID:27618958

  10. Barium recovery by crystallization in a fluidized-bed reactor: effects of pH, Ba/P molar ratio and seed.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Chi; Reano, Resmond L; Dalida, Maria Lourdes P; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of process conditions, including upward velocity inside the column, the amount of added seed and seed size, the pH value of the precipitant or the phosphate stream and the Ba/P molar ratio in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) were studied with a view to producing BaHPO₄ crystals of significant size and maximize the removal of barium. XRD were used to identify the products that were collected from the FBR. Experimental results show that an upward velocity of 48 cmmin(-1) produced the largest BaHPO₄ crystals with a size of around 0.84-1.0mm. The addition of seed crystals has no effect on barium removal. The use of a seed of a size in the ranges unseeded<0.149-0.29 mm<0.149 mm<0.29-0.42 mm produced increasing amounts of increasingly large crystals. The largest BaHPO₄ crystals were obtained at pH 8.4-8.8 with a Ba/P molar ratio of 1.0. In the homogeneous and heterogeneous processes, around 98% of barium was removed at pH 8.4-8.6 and [Ba]/[P]=1.0. The XRD results show that a significant amount of barium phosphate (Ba₃(PO₄)₂) was obtained at pH 11. The compounds BaHPO₄ and BaO were present at a pH of below 10.

  11. Low-temperature (˜180 °C) position-controlled lateral solid-phase crystallization of GeSn with laser-anneal seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Ryo; Chikita, Hironori; Kai, Yuki; Sadoh, Taizoh; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Miyao, Masanobu

    2015-12-01

    To realize next-generation flexible thin-film devices, solid-phase crystallization (SPC) of amorphous germanium tin (GeSn) films on insulating substrates combined with seeds formed by laser annealing (LA) has been investigated. This technique enables the crystallization of GeSn at controlled positions at low temperature (˜180 °C) due to the determination of the starting points of crystallization by LA seeding and Sn-induced SPC enhancement. The GeSn crystals grown by SPC from LA seeds showed abnormal lateral profiles of substitutional Sn concentration. These lateral profiles are caused by the annealing time after crystallization being a function of distance from the LA seeds. This observation of a post-annealing effect also indicates that GeSn with a substitutional Sn concentration of up to ˜10% possesses high thermal stability. These results will facilitate the fabrication of next-generation thin-film devices on flexible plastic substrates with low softening temperatures (˜250 °C).

  12. Microstructural control of calcite via incorporation of intracrystalline organic molecules in shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Taiga; Suzuki, Michio; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2013-10-01

    It is widely accepted that organic substances regulate or influence the structure of biominerals, but its direct evidences are not plenty. Here we show that the crystallographic microstructures in biotic calcites arise from incorporated intracrystalline organic molecules (IOMs), through a comparison between biotic calcites in shells and synthetic ones with the IOMs extracted from the shells. Although the prismatic layers of a pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) and a pen shell (Atrina pectinata) morphologically resemble each other, the crystallographic features of constituent calcites are considerably different; in Pinctada, the IOMs are distributed inhomogeneously to form small-angle grain boundaries and associated crystal defects, whereas in Atrina, the IOMs are distributed almost homogeneously and defects are rare in the calcite crystals. We conducted in vitro calcite syntheses in the presence of the IOMs in EDTA-soluble extracts from the prisms. The IOMs in the extracts from Pinctada and Atrina were incorporated into synthetic calcites in a different manner, exhibiting defect-rich/free features as observed in the natural shells. With regard to amino acid compositions of the IOMs, the extract from Atrina has a higher proportion of acidic amino acids than that from Pinctada, implying that acidic proteins do not correlate directly to their affinity for calcium carbonate crystals.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the lectin from Dioclea rostrata Benth seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Delatorre, Plínio; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Melo, Luciana Magalhães; Souza, Emmanuel Prata de; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias da; Benevides, Raquel G.; Oliveira, Taiana Maia de; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Bezerra, Maria Júlia Barbosa; Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva da; Cunha, Francisco Assis Bezerra da; Freire, Valder Nogueira; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2006-02-01

    D. rostrata lectin was crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222 and diffracted to 1.87 Å resolution. Lectins from the Diocleinae subtribe (Leguminosae) are highly similar proteins that promote various biological activities with distinctly differing potencies. The structural basis for this experimental data is not yet fully understood. Dioclea rostrata lectin was purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion at 293 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.51, b = 88.22, c = 87.76 Å. Assuming the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be about 47.9%. A complete data set was collected at 1.87 Å resolution.

  14. Effect of inorganic anions on the morphology and structure of magnesium calcite.

    PubMed

    Kralj, Damir; Kontrec, Jasminka; Brecević, Ljerka; Falini, Giuseppe; Nöthig-Laslo, Vesna

    2004-04-01

    Calcium carbonate was precipitated from calcium hydroxide and carbonic acid solutions at 25 degrees C, with and without addition of different magnesium (MgSO(4), Mg(NO(3))(2) and MgCl(2)) and sodium salts (Na(2)SO(4), NaNO(3) and NaCl) of identical anions, in order to study the mode of incorporation of magnesium and inorganic anions and their effect on the morphology of calcite crystals over a range of initial reactant concentrations and limited c(i)(Mg(2+))/c(i)(Ca(2+)) molar ratios. The morphology, crystal size distribution, composition, structure, and specific surface area of the precipitated crystals, as well as the mode of cation and anion incorporation into the calcite crystal lattice, were studied by a combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electronic counting, a multiple BET method, thermogravimetry, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In the systems of high initial relative supersaturation, precipitation of an amorphous precursor phase preceded the formation of calcite, whereas in those of lower supersaturation calcite was the first and only polymorphic modification of calcium carbonate that appeared in the system. The magnesium content in calcite increased with the magnesium concentration in solution and was correlated with the type of magnesium salt used. Mg incorporation caused the formation of crystals elongated along the calcite c axis and, in some cases, the appearance of new [011] faces. Polycrystalline aggregates were formed when the c(i)(Mg(2+))/c(i)(Ca(2+)) molar ratios in solution were increased. Addition of sulfate ions, alone, caused formation of spherical calcite polycrystalline aggregates.

  15. Alternative origins for nannobacteria-like objects in calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, Brenda L.; Lynch, F. Leo; Rahnis, Michael A.; Folk, Robert L.; Molineux, Ian J.; McLean, Robert J. C.

    1999-04-01

    More than 40 calcite-precipitation experiments were performed under sterile conditions in order to investigate the origins of 25 300 nm spherical-, rod-, and ovoid-shaped objects that have been widely interpreted as evidence of nanometer-scale life (i.e., nannobacteria). Individual experiments included the addition of soluble organic compounds, common species of eubacteria, or phage-induced eubacterial lysates. These experiments indicate that many of the nanometer-scale objects have inorganic or nonnannobacterial origins. In the precipitation experiments, calcite formed euhedral crystals 50 800 nm in diameter and smaller (<50 nm) anhedral or rounded particles or protocrystals. The small anhedral or rounded solids resembled nannobacteria. The relative amount of anhedral or rounded calcite was greatest in experiments with a dissolved organic component. These controlled experiments are in accord with observations that rounded nanometer-scale objects are more common in minerals formed in organic-rich environments. Bacterial fragments occur as rounded to irregularly shaped particles that included cell-wall fragments, expulsed cytoplasm, and relict capsules that also closely resembled nannobacteria. Acid etching of the large euhedral crystals produced in the precipitation experiments also resulted in the formation of nanometer-scale features that resembled nannobacteria in natural carbonates. The shapes of the etching artifacts vary as a function of the strength of the acid and the duration of etching. Much caution is advisable in interpreting the origin of rounded features <50 nm.

  16. Stabilities of calcite and aragonite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christ, C.L.; Hostetler, P.B.; Siebert, R.M.

    1974-01-01

    A revaluation of the 25° C activity-product constants of calcite (KC) and aragonite (KA) was made on the basis of the known solubilities of these phases for which the activity of total dissolved calcium was corrected for the presence of the ion pair CaHCO3+ in the aqueous phase. The value of the dissociation constant of CaHCO3+ was taken to be 10-1.225±0.02. This value, combined with values of the analytical concentrations in solutions with partial pressure PCO2 =0.97 atmosphere, leads to KC=l0-8.52±0.04 and KA= 10-8.36±0.04. Based on these K values, standard free energies of formation of calcite and aragonite were calculated to be -270,144±375 and -269,926±375 calories mole-1, (-1,130,282±1,569 and -1,129,370±1,569 joules mole-1), respectively. From the 25°C K values, using appropriate entropy and heat capacity data, values of KC and KA were calculated over the temperature range 0° to 200°C. Possible errors in interpretation of measured pH values and inferred PCO2values and the bearing of these errors on calculations of K values are discussed.

  17. Growth of SiC single crystals on patterned seeds by a sublimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xianglong; Chen, Xiufang; Peng, Yan; Xu, Xiangang; Hu, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Growth of 6H-SiC on patterned seeds with the vertical sidewalls composed of {11-20} and {1-100} faces by a sublimation method at 1700-2000 °C was studied. Anisotropy in lateral growth rates was observed, i.e the growth rate towards <11-20> was faster than that along <1-100>. It was found that free lateral growth on mesas was accompanied by a sharp decrease in the density of threading dislocation. The dependence of lateral growth rate on growth conditions such as reactor pressure and growth temperature was investigated. The factors governing the process of lateral growth of 6H-SiC on patterned seeds were discussed.

  18. Effect of heating conditions on flow patterns during the seeding stage of Kyropoulos sapphire crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Vladimir V.; Kalaev, Vladimir V.; Ivanov, Vadim G.

    2016-07-01

    We apply numerical simulation to understand the effect of heating conditions on melt convection in an industrial Ky furnace. The direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach was used to investigate the features of melt flow during the seeding stage. Two different cases of Kyropoulos furnace hot zone design were studied numerically, and results were compared with experimental data to understand the effect of modifications on melt convection.

  19. Uranium Isotope Fractionation During Coprecipitation with Aragonite and Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Romaniello, S. J.; Herrmann, A. D.; Wasylenki, L. E.; Anbar, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Natural variations in the 238U/235U ratio of marine carbonates may provide a useful way of constraining past variations in ocean redox conditions. However, before applying this novel redox proxy, it is essential to explore possible isotopic fractionation during U coprecipitation with aragonite and calcite. We investigated these effects in laboratory experiments. Aragonite and calcite coprecipitation experiments were conducted at pH 8.5±0.1 using a constant addition method [1]. More than 90% of the U was incorporated into the solid phase at the end of each experiment. Samples were purified using UTEVA chemistry and δ238/235U was measured using 233U-236U double-spike MC-ICP-MS with a precision of ±0.10‰ [2]. The aragonite experiment demonstrated a 238U/235U Rayleigh fractionation factor of α=1.00008±0.00002 with the 238U preferentially incorporated. In contrast, the calcite experiment demonstrated no resolvable U isotope fractionation (α=1.00001±0.00003). To determine if U isotopes are affected during the early diagenetic conversion of aragonite to calcite, natural carbonate samples were collected along an aragonite-calcite transition across a single coral head in the Key Largo limestone, and characterized for U concentration and δ238/235U [3]. We found that the mean δ238/235U in aragonite (-0.33±0.07‰ 2se) was slightly heavier than that in calcite (-0.37±0.02‰ 2se). Further work is needed to address the mechanisms leading to differential isotopic fractionation of U(VI) during incorporation into aragonite and calcite. Possible drivers include differences in coordination in the crystal structure or equilibrium isotopic fractionation between various aqueous U(VI) species prior to incorporation. [1] Reeder et al. (2001) GCA 65, 3491-3503. [2] Weyer et al., (2008) GCA 72, 345-359. [3] Gill et al., (2008) GCA 72, 4699-4722.

  20. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    signals occur with characteristics consistent with phosphate monoesters. The results of this study indicate that trace- to minor concentrations of dissolved organic molecules can be effectively taken up during calcite precipitation and incorporated in the structure, leaving a resilient record of materials present during crystallization.

  1. In-Situ Partial Pressure Measurements and Visual Observation during Crystal Growth of ZnSe by Seeded Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, Shari; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1999-01-01

    An in-situ monitoring furnace was constructed with side windows to perform partial pressure measurements by optical absorption and visual observation of the growing crystal. A fused silica -rowth ampoule with a 4.5 cm long square tube between the source and the seed was prepared for the optical absorption measurements. A ZnSe crystal was grown by the seeded physical vapor transport (PVT) technique in the horizontal configuration. The growth temperature was 1120 C and the furnace translation rate was 3nmVday. Partial pressures of Se2, P(sub Se2), at three locations along the length of the growth ampoule were measured at 90 min intervals during the growth process. The measured P (sub Se2) were in the range of 2.0 to 6.5 x 10(exp -3) atm. The P(sub Se2) results indicated that the partial pressure profile was inconsistent with the results of the one-dimensional diffusion mass transport model and that the source composition shifted toward Se-rich during the run, i.e. the grown crystal was more Zn-rich than the source. The visual observation showed that the seed crystal first etched back, with greater thermal etching occurring along the edges of the seed crystal. Once the growth started, the crystal crew in a predominately contactless mode and facets were evident during growth. The crystal did not grow symmetrically which is believed to be due to the unintentional asymmetry of the radial thermal profile in the furnace.

  2. Self-Assembly of Protein Nanofibrils Orchestrates Calcite Step Movement through Selective Nonchiral Interactions.

    PubMed

    So, Christopher R; Liu, Jinny; Fears, Kenan P; Leary, Dagmar H; Golden, Joel P; Wahl, Kathryn J

    2015-06-23

    The recognition of atomically distinct surface features by adsorbed biomolecules is central to the formation of surface-templated peptide or protein nanostructures. On mineral surfaces such as calcite, biomolecular recognition of, and self-assembly on, distinct atomic kinks and steps could additionally orchestrate changes to the overall shape and symmetry of a bulk crystal. In this work, we show through in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that an acidic 20 kDa cement protein from the barnacle Megabalanus rosa (MRCP20) binds specifically to step edge atoms on {101̅4} calcite surfaces, remains bound and further assembles over time to form one-dimensional nanofibrils. Protein nanofibrils are continuous and organized at the nanoscale, exhibiting striations with a period of ca. 45 nm. These fibrils, templated by surface steps of a preferred geometry, in turn selectively dissolve underlying calcite features displaying the same atomic arrangement. To demonstrate this, we expose the protein solution to bare and fibril-associated rhombohedral etch pits to reveal that nanofibrils accelerate only the movement of fibril-forming steps when compared to undecorated steps exposed to the same solution conditions. Calcite mineralized in the presence of MRCP20 results in asymmetric crystals defined by frustrated faces with shared mirror symmetry, suggesting a similar step-selective behavior by MRCP20 in crystal growth. As shown here, selective surface interactions with step edge atoms lead to a cooperative regime of calcite modification, where templated long-range protein nanostructures shape crystals.

  3. Self-Assembly of Protein Nanofibrils Orchestrates Calcite Step Movement through Selective Nonchiral Interactions.

    PubMed

    So, Christopher R; Liu, Jinny; Fears, Kenan P; Leary, Dagmar H; Golden, Joel P; Wahl, Kathryn J

    2015-06-23

    The recognition of atomically distinct surface features by adsorbed biomolecules is central to the formation of surface-templated peptide or protein nanostructures. On mineral surfaces such as calcite, biomolecular recognition of, and self-assembly on, distinct atomic kinks and steps could additionally orchestrate changes to the overall shape and symmetry of a bulk crystal. In this work, we show through in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that an acidic 20 kDa cement protein from the barnacle Megabalanus rosa (MRCP20) binds specifically to step edge atoms on {101̅4} calcite surfaces, remains bound and further assembles over time to form one-dimensional nanofibrils. Protein nanofibrils are continuous and organized at the nanoscale, exhibiting striations with a period of ca. 45 nm. These fibrils, templated by surface steps of a preferred geometry, in turn selectively dissolve underlying calcite features displaying the same atomic arrangement. To demonstrate this, we expose the protein solution to bare and fibril-associated rhombohedral etch pits to reveal that nanofibrils accelerate only the movement of fibril-forming steps when compared to undecorated steps exposed to the same solution conditions. Calcite mineralized in the presence of MRCP20 results in asymmetric crystals defined by frustrated faces with shared mirror symmetry, suggesting a similar step-selective behavior by MRCP20 in crystal growth. As shown here, selective surface interactions with step edge atoms lead to a cooperative regime of calcite modification, where templated long-range protein nanostructures shape crystals. PMID:25970003

  4. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Leroy, Philippe; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-04-15

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength ⩽ 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted the corrected zeta potential by assuming that the zeta potential is located at the outer Helmholtz plane, i.e. without considering a stagnant diffuse layer at the calcite-water interface. The surface conductivity of calcite crystals was inferred from electrical conductivity measurements and computed using our basic Stern model. Surface conductivity was also successfully predicted by our surface complexation model. PMID:26852350

  5. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Leroy, Philippe; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-04-15

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength ⩽ 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted the corrected zeta potential by assuming that the zeta potential is located at the outer Helmholtz plane, i.e. without considering a stagnant diffuse layer at the calcite-water interface. The surface conductivity of calcite crystals was inferred from electrical conductivity measurements and computed using our basic Stern model. Surface conductivity was also successfully predicted by our surface complexation model.

  6. Controls of carbonate mineralogy and solid-solution of Mg in calcite: evidence from spelean systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, L.A.; Lohmann, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation of carbonate minerals in spelean systems occurs under a wide range of fluid chemistry, Mg-Ca ratios, alkalinities, pH and temperatures; thus, spelean systems provide ideal settings to determine factors controlling the mineralogy of precipitated carbonates and solid-solution of Mg in calcite. Cave waters and actively-precipitating carbonate speleothems were collected from Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico and the Mammoth-Flint Cave System, Kentucky. Carbonate mineralogy of precipitated phases was determined by x-ray diffraction, and major and minor element composition of waters and accompanying minerals were determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Results demonstrate that at a constant CO3 concentration the precipitation threshold for calcite to aragonite is controlled dominantly by the Mg/Ca ratio of the ambient fluid. Aragonite precipitation is favored by high Mg/Ca ratios. Conversely, with increasing CO3 concentration at constant fluid Mg/Ca ratios, calcite is preferentially precipitated. Solid-solution of Mg in calcite is positively correlated with both increased Mg/Ca ratios and CO3 concentrations. These data suggest that Mg contents of calcite can not be defined solely in terms of a homogeneous distribution coefficient. Rather, Mg concentrations can be also be affected by the CO3 concentration and degree of calcite saturation, suggesting that the rate of crystal growth also plays and important role in Mg solid-solution in calcites.

  7. Effects of the method of apatite seed crystals addition on setting reaction of α-tricalcium phosphate based apatite cement.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Kanji; Ruslin; Maruta, Michito; Matsuya, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate setting time is an important parameter that determines the effectiveness of apatite cement (AC) for clinical application, given the issues of crystalline inflammatory response phenomena if AC fails to set. To this end, the present study analyzes the effects of the method of apatite seed crystals addition on the setting reaction of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) based AC. Two ACs, both consisting of α-TCP and calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHAp), were analyzed in this study. In one AC, cdHAp was added externally to α-TCP and this AC was abbreviated as AC(EA). In the other AC, α-TCP was partially hydrolyzed to form cdHAp on the surface of α-TCP. This AC was referred to as AC(PH). Results indicate a decrease in the setting time of both ACs with the addition of cdHAp. Among them, for the given amount of added cdHAp, AC(PH) showed relatively shorter setting time than AC(EA). Besides, the mechanical strength of the set AC(PH) was also higher than that of set AC(EA). These properties of AC(PH) were attributed to the predominant crystal growth of cdHAp in the vicinity of the α-TCP particle surface. Accordingly, it can be concluded that the partial hydrolysis of α-TCP may be a better approach to add low crystalline cdHAp onto α-TCP based AC.

  8. Flexible minerals: self-assembled calcite spicules with extreme bending strength.

    PubMed

    Natalio, Filipe; Corrales, Tomas P; Panthöfer, Martin; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Müller, Werner E G; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2013-03-15

    Silicatein-α is responsible for the biomineralization of silicates in sponges. We used silicatein-α to guide the self-assembly of calcite "spicules" similar to the spicules of the calcareous sponge Sycon sp. The self-assembled spicules, 10 to 300 micrometers (μm) in length and 5 to 10 μm in diameter, are composed of aligned calcite nanocrystals. The spicules are initially amorphous but transform into calcite within months, exhibiting unusual growth along [100]. They scatter x-rays like twinned calcite crystals. Whereas natural spicules evidence brittle failure, the synthetic spicules show an elastic response, which greatly enhances bending strength. This remarkable feature is linked to a high protein content. With nano-thermogravimetric analysis, we measured the organic content of a single spicule to be 10 to 16%. In addition, the spicules exhibit waveguiding properties even when they are bent.

  9. The calcite → aragonite transformation in low-Mg marble: Equilibrium relations, transformations mechanisms, and rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Rubie, David C.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental transformation of a rather pure natural calcite marble to aragonite marble did not proceed via the expected straightforward polymorphic replacement. Instead, the small amount of Mg in the starting material (0.36 wt %) was excluded from the growing aragonite and diffused preferentially into the remaining calcite grains, producing Mg-rich calcite rods that persisted as relicts. Nucleation of aragonite occurred exclusively on grain boundaries, with aragonite [001] oriented subparallel to calcite [0001]. The aragonite crystals preferentially consumed the calcite crystal on which they nucleated, and the reaction fronts developed preferentially along the {010} and {110} planes of aragonite. Each aragonite neoblast that grew was nearly free of Mg (typically <0.1 wt %). The excess Mg was taken up by the calcite grains in between, stabilizing them and causing a few volume percent rodlike relicts of Mg-enriched calcite (up to 10 wt % MgO) to be left behind by the advancing reaction front. The aragonite growth rates are approximately linear and range from ∼3 × 10−11 m s−1 at 600°C to ∼9 × 10−9 m s−1 at 850°C, with an apparent activation enthalpy of 166 ± 91 kJ mol−1. This reaction mechanism and the resultant texture are akin to cellular precipitation reactions in metals. Similar transformation textures have been reported from high-Mg marbles in Japan and China that disproportionated to low-Mg calcite and dolomite.

  10. Heterogeneous growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases at the (101¯4) calcite surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Man; Ilton, Eugene S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of surface precipitates to form heteroepitaxially is an important factor that controls the extent of heterogeneous growth. In this work, the growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases on (10-14) calcite surfaces is compared for a range of initial saturation states with respect to otavite (CdCO3) and sphaerocobaltite (CoCO3), two isostructural metal carbonates that exhibit different lattice misfits with respect to calcite. Calcite single crystals were reacted in static conditions for 16 hours with CdCl2 and CoCl2 aqueous solutions with initial concentrations 0.3 ≤ [Cd2+]0 ≤ 100 μM and 25 ≤ [Co2+]0 ≤ 200 μM. The reacted crystals were imaged in situ with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed ex situ with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM images of Cd-reacted crystals showed the formation of large islands elongated along the direction, clear evidence of heteroepitaxial growth, whereas surface precipitates on Co-reacted crystals were small round islands. Deformation of calcite etch pits in both cases indicated the incorporation of Cd and Co at step edges. XPS analysis pointed to the formation of a Cd-rich (Ca,Cd)CO3 solid solution coating atop the calcite substrate. In contrast, XPS measurements of the Co-reacted crystals provided evidence for the formation of a mixed hydroxy-carbonate cobalt phase. The combined AFM and XPS results suggest that the lattice misfit between CoCO3 and CaCO3 ( 15% based on surface areas) is too large to allow for heteroepitaxial growth of a pure cobalt carbonate phase on calcite surfaces in aqueous solutions and at ambient conditions. The use of the satellite structure of the Co 2p3/2 photoelectron line as a tool for determining the nature of cobalt surface precipitates is also discussed.

  11. Growth and Dissolution of Calcite in the Presence of Adsorbed Stearic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maria; Segura, Juan José; Erickson, Blake W; Fantner, Georg; Stellacci, Francesco; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2015-07-14

    The interaction of organic molecules with the surface of calcite plays a central role in many geochemical, petrochemical, and industrial processes and in biomineralization. Adsorbed organics, typically fatty acids, can interfere with the evolution of calcite when immersed in aqueous solutions. Here we use atomic force microscopy in liquid to explore in real-time the evolution of the (1014) surface of calcite covered with various densities of stearic acid and exposed to different saline solutions. Our results show that the stearic acid molecules tend to act as "pinning points" on the calcite's surface and slow down the crystal's restructuring kinetics. Depending on the amount of material adsorbed, the organic molecules can form monolayers or bilayer islands that become embedded into the growing crystal. The growth process can also displaces the organic molecules and actively concentrate them into stacked multilayers. Our results provide molecular-level insights into the interplay between the adsorbed fatty acid molecules and the evolving calcite crystal, highlighting mechanisms that could have important implications for several biochemical and geochemical processes and for the oil industry.

  12. Mechanism of Calcite Co-Orientation in the Sea Urchin Tooth

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, Christopher; Metzler, Rebecca; Gong, Y. U. T.; Olson, Ian; Aizenberg, Joanna; Politi, Yael; Wilt, Fred; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Doran, Andrew; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Coppersmith, Susan; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Sea urchin teeth are remarkable and complex calcite structures, continuously growing at the forming end and self-sharpening at the mature grinding tip. The calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) crystals of tooth components, plates, fibers, and a high-Mg polycrystalline matrix, have highly co-oriented crystallographic axes. This ability to co-orient calcite in a mineralized structure is shared by all echinoderms. However, the physico-chemical mechanism by which calcite crystals become co-oriented in echinoderms remains enigmatic. Here, we show differences in calcite c-axis orientations in the tooth of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and microbeam X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD). All plates share one crystal orientation, propagated through pillar bridges, while fibers and polycrystalline matrix share another orientation. Furthermore, in the forming end of the tooth, we observe that CaCO{sub 3} is present as amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). We demonstrate that co-orientation of the nanoparticles in the polycrystalline matrix occurs via solid-state secondary nucleation, propagating out from the previously formed fibers and plates, into the amorphous precursor nanoparticles. Because amorphous precursors were observed in diverse biominerals, solid-state secondary nucleation is likely to be a general mechanism for the co-orientation of biomineral components in organisms from different phyla.

  13. Nucleation, growth and evolution of calcium phosphate films on calcite.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Sonia; Scherer, George W

    2014-12-01

    Marble, a stone composed of the mineral calcite, is subject to chemically induced weathering in nature due to its relatively high dissolution rate in acid rain. To protect monuments and sculpture from corrosion, we are investigating the application of thin layers of hydroxyapatite (HAP) onto marble. The motivation for using HAP is its low dissolution rate and crystal and lattice compatibility with calcite. A mild, wet chemical synthesis route, in which diammonium hydrogen phosphate salt was reacted with marble, alone and with cationic and anionic precursors under different reaction conditions, was used to produce inorganic HAP layers on marble. Nucleation and growth on the calcite substrate was studied, as well as metastable phase evolution, using scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Film nucleation was enhanced by surface roughness. The rate of nucleation and the growth rate of the film increased with cationic (calcium) and anionic (carbonate) precursor additions. Calcium additions also influenced phase formation, introducing a metastable phase (octacalcium phosphate) and a different phase evolution sequence.

  14. Nucleation, growth and evolution of calcium phosphate films on calcite.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Sonia; Scherer, George W

    2014-12-01

    Marble, a stone composed of the mineral calcite, is subject to chemically induced weathering in nature due to its relatively high dissolution rate in acid rain. To protect monuments and sculpture from corrosion, we are investigating the application of thin layers of hydroxyapatite (HAP) onto marble. The motivation for using HAP is its low dissolution rate and crystal and lattice compatibility with calcite. A mild, wet chemical synthesis route, in which diammonium hydrogen phosphate salt was reacted with marble, alone and with cationic and anionic precursors under different reaction conditions, was used to produce inorganic HAP layers on marble. Nucleation and growth on the calcite substrate was studied, as well as metastable phase evolution, using scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Film nucleation was enhanced by surface roughness. The rate of nucleation and the growth rate of the film increased with cationic (calcium) and anionic (carbonate) precursor additions. Calcium additions also influenced phase formation, introducing a metastable phase (octacalcium phosphate) and a different phase evolution sequence. PMID:25233226

  15. Intercalation of sea urchin proteins in calcite: Study of a crystalline composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, A.; Addadi, L.; Leiserowitz, L.; Weiner, S. ); Kvick, A.; Nelson, M. )

    1990-11-02

    Sea urchin skeletal elements are composed of single crystals of calcite. Unlike their synthetic counterparts, these crystals do not have well-developed cleavage and are consequently much more resistant to fracture. This phenomenon is due in part to the presence of acidic glycoproteins occluded within the crystals. By means of x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation, it is shown that the presence of the protein in synthetic calcite only slightly decreases the coherence length but significantly increases the angular spread of perfect domains of the crystals. In biogenic calcite, the coherence length is 1/3 to 1/4 as much as that in synthetic calcite and the angular spread is 20 to 50 times as wide. It is proposed that the presence of macromolecules concentrated at mosaic boundaries that are oblique to cleavage planes is responsible for the change in fracture properties. These results may be important in the material sciences, because of the unusual nature of this material, namely, a composite based on the controlled intercalation of macromolecules inside single-crystal lattices. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Simulating Succinate-Promoted Dissolution at Calcite {104} Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhonto, D.; Sahai, N.

    2008-12-01

    Organic molecules of a wide range of molecular weights from small organic acids, amino-acids, acidic peptides and acidic proteins to humic and fulvic acids play a key role in modulating nucleation, crystal growth and dissolution of calcium carbonate polymorphs. In general, these acidic molecules inhibit calcite growth and, promote dissolution preferentially along specific crystallographic directions, in the process, regulating crystal shape and size, and even whether a metastable polymorph (e.g., vaterite or aragonite) is nucleated first. For example, chiral faces of calcite are selected by chiral amino-acids and the unusual {hk0} faces are expressed in the presence of amino-acids [Orme et al., 2001], and unusual heptagonal dissolution etch-pit are seen in the presence of succinate compared to the normal rhombohedral pits in water alone [Teng et al., 2006]. Thus, the presence of unusual crystal morphologies may indicate organic-mediated growth, thus serving as a biosignature. We have conducted the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations using the Consistent Valence Force Field (CVFF) as implemented in the FORCITE© module of the Materials Studio © software package (Accelrys, Inc. TM) to model the adsorption of succinate, a dicarboxylic acid, and charge- balancing Na+ ions on dry and hydrated steps in different directions on the {104} cleavage face of calcite [Mkhonto and Sahai, in prep.]. At the site of succinate adsorption, we find elongation of the interatomic distances (Ca-OCO3,i) between surface Ca2+ cation and the oxygen of the underlying inorganic CO32- anion the first surface layer of calcite, compared to the corresponding distances in the presence of water alone, suggesting greater ease of surface Ca2+ detachment. This result is consistent with the empirically observed increase in overall dissolution rate with succinate [Teng et al., 2006]. Furthermore, succinate adsorption lowers the step energies, which explains the appearance of steps in the unsusual [42

  17. Calcite mylonites in the Central Alpine ``root zone''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzmann, Peter

    1987-04-01

    North of the Insubric line, in the Central Alpine "root zone", carbonate rocks are concentrated in very narrow zones and have been metamorphosed under amphibolite facies conditions by the Tertiary Lepontine metamorphism (grain size ~1 mm). Post-metamorphic deformation under greenschist facies conditions produced calcite mylonite bands a few millimeters to tens of meters wide in these marble zones. Microstructural development begins with twin formation, bending of twin boundaries, grain and twin boundary migration and recrystallization in high stress regions. Progressive mylonitization—by dynamic recrystallization—results in a microstructure with elongated calcite crystals (long axis 20-50 μm, axial ration 1:4). In this fine-grained matrix, porphyroclasts of calcite, quartz, white mica, biotite, diopside, tremolite, scapolite and plagioclase are preserved. Ultra-mylonite bands in pure calcite rocks show an even finer grain size of 5-10 μm. Lattice preferred orientation is not present in the undeformed marbles, but it develops during mylonitization. The c-axis orientation in the mylonites forms an asymmetric point maximum. In the ultra-mylonite no preferred orientation is left. It is concluded from microstructural and textural aspects, that during mylonitization, dislocation creep accompanied by dynamic recrystallization were the most important processes, whilst grain-boundary sliding was the dominant mechanism during the formation of the ultra-mylonites. Shear-sense determinations indicate a horizontal right-lateral strike-slip shear system. This is in good agreement with evidence regarding other movements along the Insubric line which can be observed in ductile and brittle shear zones.

  18. Structural Characterization of Lateral-grown 6H-SiC am-plane Seed Crystals by Hot Wall CVD Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goue, Ouloide Yannick; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Woodworth, Andrew A.; Spry, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) power devices is limited due to inherently high density of screw dislocations (SD), which are necessary for maintaining polytype during boule growth and commercially viable growth rates. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently proposed a new bulk growth process based on axial fiber growth (parallel to the c-axis) followed by lateral expansion (perpendicular to the c-axis) for producing multi-faceted m-plane SiC boules that can potentially produce wafers with as few as one SD per wafer. In order to implement this novel growth technique, the lateral homoepitaxial growth expansion of a SiC fiber without introducing a significant number of additional defects is critical. Lateral expansion is being investigated by hot wall chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) growth of 6H-SiC am-plane seed crystals (0.8mm x 0.5mm x 15mm) designed to replicate axially grown SiC single crystal fibers. The post-growth crystals exhibit hexagonal morphology with approximately 1500 m (1.5 mm) of total lateral expansion. Preliminary analysis by synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) confirms that the growth was homoepitaxial, matching the polytype of the respective underlying region of the seed crystal. Axial and transverse sections from the as grown crystal samples were characterized in detail by a combination of SWBXT, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy to map defect types and distribution. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the seed crystal contained stacking disorders and this appears to have been reproduced in the lateral growth sections. Analysis of the relative intensity for folded transverse acoustic (FTA) and optical (FTO) modes on the Raman spectra indicate the existence of stacking faults. Further, the density of stacking faults is higher in the seed than in the grown crystal. Bundles of dislocations are observed propagating from the seed in m-axis lateral directions

  19. Project Explorer: Get Away Special #007. [alloy solidification, seed germination, crystal growth, and radio transmission of payload data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, A. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Tentatively scheduled to fly on STS-17 (41G), this get away special aims to demonstrate amateur radio transmissions to global ground stations in the English language. Experiments No. 1, 2, and 3 use the micro-gravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the germination of radish seeds, and the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution. Flight results are to be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 (the Marshall Amateur Radio Club Experiment - MARCE) features radio transmissions and also provides timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor obtains real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements within the GAS canister. These data are to be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they are converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception. The support structure for the G #007 experiments consists of two primary plates and four bumper assemblies.

  20. Do organic ligands affect calcite dissolution rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Steady state Iceland-spar calcite dissolution rates were measured at 25 °C in aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl and up to 0.05 M dissolved bicarbonate at pH from 7.9 to 9.1 in the presence of 13 distinct dissolved organic ligands in mixed-flow reactors. The organic ligands considered in this study include those most likely to be present in either (1) aquifers at the conditions pertinent to CO 2 sequestration or (2) soil/early diagenetic environments: acetate, phthalate, citrate, EDTA 4-, succinate, D-glucosaminate, L-glutamate, D-gluconate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, fumarate, malonate, and gallate. Results show that the presence of <0.05 mol/kg of these organic anions changes calcite dissolution rates by less than a factor of 2.5 with the exception of citrate and EDTA 4-. The presence of 0.05 mol/kg citrate and EDTA 4- increases calcite dissolution rates by as much as a factor of 35 and 500, respectively, compared to rates in organic anion-free solutions. Further calcite dissolution experiments were performed in the presence of organic polymers similar to bacterial exudates, cell exopolysaccharides, and analogs of microbial cell envelopes: alginate, lichen extract, humic acid, pectin, and gum xanthan. In no case did the presence of <100 ppm of these organics change calcite dissolution rates by more than a factor of 2.5. Results obtained in this study suggest that the presence of aqueous organic anions negligibly affects calcite forward dissolution rates in most natural environments. Some effect on calcite reactivity may be observed, however, by the presence of organic anions if they change substantially the chemical affinity of the fluid with respect to calcite.

  1. Unravelling the enigmatic origin of calcitic nanofibres in soils and caves: purely physicochemical or biogenic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschedler, S.; Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Millière, L.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2014-05-01

    Calcitic nanofibres are ubiquitous habits of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) accumulations observed in calcareous vadose environments. Despite their widespread occurrence, the origin of these nanofeatures remains enigmatic. Three possible mechanisms fuel the debate: (i) purely physicochemical processes, (ii) mineralization of rod-shaped bacteria, and (iii) crystal precipitation on organic templates. Nanofibres can be either mineral (calcitic) or organic in nature. They are very often observed in association with needle fibre calcite (NFC), another typical secondary CaCO3 habit in terrestrial environments. This association has contributed to some confusion between both habits, however they are truly two distinct calcitic features and their recurrent association is likely to be an important fact to help understanding the origin of nanofibres. In this paper the different hypotheses that currently exist to explain the origin of calcitic nanofibres are critically reviewed. In addition to this, a new hypothesis for the origin of nanofibres is proposed based on the fact that current knowledge attributes a fungal origin to NFC. As this feature and nanofibres are recurrently observed together, a possible fungal origin for nanofibres which are associated with NFC is investigated. Sequential enzymatic digestion of the fungal cell wall of selected fungal species demonstrates that the fungal cell wall can be a source of organic nanofibres. The obtained organic nanofibres show a striking morphological resemblance when compared to their natural counterparts, emphasizing a fungal origin for part of the organic nanofibres observed in association with NFC. It is further hypothesized that these organic nanofibres may act as templates for calcite nucleation in a biologically influenced mineralization process, generating calcitic nanofibres. This highlights the possible involvement of fungi in CaCO3 biomineralization processes, a role still poorly documented. Moreover, on a global

  2. Unravelling the enigmatic origin of calcitic nanofibres in soils and caves: purely physicochemical or biogenic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschedler, S.; Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Millière, L.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitic nanofibres are ubiquitous habits of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) accumulations observed in calcareous vadose environments. Despite their widespread occurrence, the origin of these nanofeatures remains enigmatic. Three possible mechanisms fuel the debate: (i) purely physicochemical processes, (ii) mineralization of rod-shaped bacteria, and (iii) crystal precipitation on organic templates. Nanofibres can be either mineral (calcitic) or organic in nature. They are very often observed in association with Needle Fibre Calcite (NFC), another typical secondary CaCO3 habit in terrestrial environments. This association has contributed to some confusion between both habits, however they are truly two distinct calcitic features and their recurrent association is likely to be an important fact to help understanding the origin of nanofibres. In this manuscript the different hypotheses that currently exist to explain the origin of calcitic nanofibres are critically reviewed. In addition to this, a new hypothesis for the origin of nanofibres is proposed based on the fact that current knowledge attributes a fungal origin to NFC. As this feature and nanofibres are recurrently observed together, a possible fungal origin for nanofibres which are associated with NFC is investigated. Sequential enzymatic digestion of the fungal cell wall of selected fungal species demonstrates that the fungal cell wall can be a source of organic nanofibres. The obtained organic nanofibres show a striking morphological resemblance when compared to their natural counterparts, emphasizing a fungal origin for part of the organic nanofibres observed in association with NFC. It is further hypothesized that these organic nanofibres may act as templates for calcite nucleation in a biologically-influenced mineralization process, generating calcitic nanofibres. This highlights the possible involvement of Fungi in CaCO3 biomineralization processes, a role still poorly documented at present

  3. The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation by calcite precipitation in UK freshwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Colin

    This paper examines the potential for calcium carbonate to reduce phosphate pollution in freshwaters by co-precipitation, a process known as a "self cleansing mechanism". Calcium carbonate saturation levels and phosphate concentrations (SRP - soluble reactive phosphate) across the major eastern UK river basins are examined to test for solubility controls. The study shows that calcite saturation varies for each catchment as a function of flow and biological activity rather than by direct regulation by SRP. Indeed, there is no evidence, for any of the rivers studied, that calcite solubility controls hold. However, for groundwater and groundwater-fed springs in the Chalk of the Thames basin, calcite saturation is observed with associated low SRP levels. A self-cleansing mechanism may well be operative within the Chalk due to two factors. Firstly, there is a high potential for nucleation on the calcite micro-crystals in the aquifer. Secondly, there are within aquifer reactions that remove the calcite nucleating inhibitors (SRP and dissolved organic carbon, DOC) to levels lower than those occurring within the rivers do. These inhibitors enter the catchment at very high concentrations in association with agricultural pollution (fertilizer application and animal slurry) and household contamination (e.g. sewage sources from septic tanks). Under low flow conditions, when the saturation index for calcite is at its highest, so too is the concentration of the nucleation inhibitor SRP. Companion work shows that calcite precipitation can occur at the water-sediment interface of the river and this may involve SRP removal. The data, as a whole, define an apparent bound for calcite solubility control where in the presence of nucleating centres, SRP must be less than 4 mM-P l-1 and DOC must be less than 150 mM-C l-1: a condition that does not seem to pertain within most UK rivers.

  4. Trace concentration - Huge impact: Nitrate in the calcite/Eu(III) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Sascha; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Schmidt, Moritz; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of trivalent lanthanides and actinides with secondary mineral phases such as calcite is of high importance for the safety assessment of deep geological repositories for high level nuclear waste (HLW). Due to similar ionic radii, calcium-bearing mineral phases are suitable host minerals for Ln(III) and An(III) ions. Especially calcite has been proven to retain these metal ions effectively by both surface complexation and bulk incorporation. Since anionic ligands (e.g., nitrate) are omnipresent in the geological environment and due to their coordinating properties, their influence on retentive processes should not be underestimated. Nitrate is a common contaminant in most HLW forms as a result of using nitric acid in fuel reprocessing. It is also formed by microbial activity under aerobic conditions. In this study, atomic force microscopy investigations revealed a major influence of nitrate upon the surface of calcite crystals. NaNO3 causes serious modifications even in trace amounts (<10-7 M) and forms a soft surface layer of low crystallinity on top of the calcite crystal. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Eu(III) showed that, within this layer, Eu(III) ions are incorporated, while losing most of their hydration shell. The results show that solid solution modelling for actinides in calcite must take into account the presence of nitrate in pore and ground waters.

  5. Hydrothermal replacement of calcite by Mg-carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Laura; Mueller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The transport of heat and mass through the Earth's crust is coupled to mineral reactions and the exchange of isotopes and elements between different phases. Carbonate minerals are a major constituent of the Earth's crust and play an important role in different physical, chemical and even biological processes. In this experimental study, the element exchange reaction between calcite (CaCO3) and a Mg-rich fluid phase is investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Single crystals of calcite (2x2x2 mm) react with 1 ml of a 1 M MgCl2 solution at 200° C in a Teflon-lined steel autoclave for different times between one day and four weeks. The reaction leads to the formation of a porous reaction front and the pseudomorphic replacement of calcite by dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] and magnesite (MgCO3). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the reaction rim consists of small Mg-carbonate rhombs closely attached to each other, suggesting that the replacement reaction takes place by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Typically, the observed reaction front can be divided into two different domains. The outer part of the reaction rim, i.e. from the mineral surface in contact to the fluid inwards, consists of magnesite, whereas the inner part of the rim surrounding the unreacted calcite core consists of Ca-rich dolomite. The formation of a porous microstructure that varies in different parts of the reaction rim is a direct result of the large molar volume change induced by the replacement of calcite by magnesite and dolomite. The developing porosity therefore creates fluid pathways that promote the progress of the reaction front towards the unreacted core of the single crystal. Compositional profiles measured perpendicular to the mineral surface across the reactions rims using electron microprobe (EMPA) further revealed a compositional gradient within the reaction rim with regard to the structure-forming elements Mg and Ca. Here, the amount of Mg incorporated in both product

  6. Acceleration of calcite kinetics by abalone nacre proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G; Qiu, S R; Orme, C A; Morse, D E; De Yoreo, J J

    2005-06-09

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures have long been an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over synthesis of crystalline materials. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineral surfaces. Indeed, numerous studies have demonstrated that bio-organic additives can dramatically alter crystal shapes and growth-rates in vitro. However, previous molecular-scale studies revealing mechanisms of growth modification focused on small molecules such as amino acids or peptides and always observed growth inhibition. In contrast, studies using full proteins were non-quantitative and underlying sources of growth modification were ill-defined. Here we investigate interactions between proteins isolated from abalone shell nacre and growing surfaces of calcite. We find that these proteins significantly accelerate the molecular-scale kinetics and, though much larger than atomic steps, alter growth morphology through step-specific interactions that lower their free energies. We propose that these proteins act as surfactants to promote ion attachment at calcite surfaces.

  7. 4He behavior in calcite filling viewed by (U-Th)/He dating, 4He diffusion and crystallographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, Alexandre; Gautheron, Cécile; Pagel, Maurice; Berthet, Patrick; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Douville, Eric; Pinna-Jamme, Rosella; Sarda, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Fault-filling calcite crystals sampled from the Eocene/Oligocene Gondrecourt graben, Paris Basin, Eastern France, have been studied in order to test the potentiality of calcite (U-Th)/He dating, based on recognized He retention behavior in crystal lattice at surface temperature (Copeland et al., 2007). The samples have been selected because of their relatively old Eocene to Oligocene precipitation age and cold thermal history (<40 °C since precipitation). They were sorted into three main tectonic and morphological groups in order of precipitation, including (1) micro-fracture calcites, (2) breccia and associated geodic calcites, and (3) vein and associated geodic calcites. (U-Th)/He dating of 63 calcite fragments yields ages dispersed from 0.2 ± 0.02 to 35.8 ± 2.7 Ma, as well as two older dates of 117 ± 10 and 205 ± 28 Ma (1σ). These He ages correlate with grain chemistry, such as Sr, ΣREE concentrations or (La/Yb)N ratios, likely reflecting parent fluid evolution. Only the oldest He ages, which correspond to the most recently precipitated crystals, have preserved the total 4He budget since precipitation. To better understand both the age dispersion and why calcites precipitated earlier show younger ages, 4He diffusion experiments have been conducted on 10 Gondrecourt calcite fragments from 3 samples with He ages of ∼0.2-6 Ma. Additionally, a crystallographic investigation by X-ray diffraction (XRD) performed on similar samples reveals that crystal structure evolves with increasing temperature, beginning with micro-cracks and cleavage opening. These XRD results shed light on the (U-Th)/He data, indicating that, in fault-filling calcite, He retention is controlled by multiple diffusion domains (MDD) with various sizes, and therefore, evolves through time with strong consequences on (U-Th)/He age. We thus interpret the Gondrecourt calcite (U-Th)/He age scatter as a consequence of the production of defects due to successive calcite crystallization phases

  8. Nano-cluster composite structure of calcitic sponge spicules--a case study of basic characteristics of biominerals.

    PubMed

    Sethmann, Ingo; Hinrichs, Ruth; Wörheide, Gert; Putnis, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Spicules of calcareous sponges are elaborately shaped skeletal elements that nonetheless show characteristics of calcite single-crystals. Our atomic force microscopic and transmission electron microscopic investigation of the triradiate spicules of the sponge Pericharax heteroraphis reveals a nano-cluster structure with mostly well-aligned small crystal domains and pockets with accumulated domain misalignments. Combined high-resolution and energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy revealed carbon enrichments located in between crystal domain boundaries, which strongly suggests an intercalated network-like proteinaceous organic matrix. This matrix is proposed to be involved in the nano-clustered calcite precipitation via a transient phase that may enable a 'brick-by-brick' formation of composite and yet single-crystalline spicules with elaborate morphologies. This composite cluster structure reduces the brittleness of the material by dissipating strain energy and deflecting crack propagation from the calcite cleavage planes, but the lattice symmetry and anisotropic growth properties of calcite still play a major role in the morphogenesis of these unusual calcite single-crystals. Our structural, crystallographic, textural, and chemical analysis of sponge spicules corroborates the view that nano-clustered crystal growth, induced by organic matrices, is a basic characteristic of biomineralisation that enables the production of composite materials with elaborate morphologies.

  9. Calcite dissolution in two deep eutrophic lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramisch, F.; Dittrich, M.; Mattenberger, C.; Wehrli, B.; Wueest, A.

    1999-10-01

    The calcium cycle, in particular carbonate dissolution, was analyzed in two deep eutrophic lakes, Lago di Lugano (288 m maximum depth) and Sempachersee (87 m) located in Switzerland. A box model approach was used to calculate calcite dissolution in the water column and at the sediment-water interface based on various lake monitoring data such as sediment traps, sediment cores, water and pore-water interface based on various lake monitoring data such as sediment traps, sediment cores, water and pore-water analysis. A model for stationary conditions allowing the calculation of calcite dissolution in the water column for a given particle size distribution was developed. The relative values of the simulated flux were consistent with sediment trap observations. The best fit of the dissolution rate constant of sinking calcite in Lago di Lugano was on the same order of magnitude (3 {center{underscore}dot} 10{sup {minus}10} kg{sup 1/3} s{sup {minus}1}) as published laboratory values for this surface controlled process. Both lakes show a similar specific calcite precipitation rate of 170 g Ca m{sup {minus}2} a{sup {minus}1}. The diffusive flux across the sediment-water interface amounts to about 15 and 10% of total calcite precipitation in Sempachersee and Lago di Lugano, respectively. However, 61% of the precipitated calcite is dissolved in the water column of Lago di Lugano compared to only 13% in Sempachersee. These results point towards the importance of grain size distributions and settling times in stratified deep waters as the two most important factors determining calcite retention in sediments of hard water lakes.

  10. Hydro-gel environment and solution additives modify calcite growth mechanism to an accretion process of amorphous nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, A.; Kahil, K.; Habraken, W.; Gur, D.; Fratzl, P.; Addadi, L.; Weiner, S.

    2013-12-01

    Various biominerals form via the transformation of a transient amorphous precursor phase into a mature crystalline phase. The mature biominerals usually exhibit morphology reminiscent of aggregated nanoparticles. Although these observations suggest an accretion-based growth process consisting on nanoparticles, the key factors that control the accretion process are unknown. We investigated the transformation of solid amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite. When plant cystoliths, a biogenic stable ACC phase, are transformed into calcite in vitro by immersion in water, calcite crystals grow in two distinct steps (Gal et al., Angewandte Chemie, 2013). First, rhombohedral crystals grow that show flat facets as expected from ion-by-ion growth. These crystals then grow by the aggregation and crystallization of the original ACC nanospheres leading to a surface morphology dominated by aggregated spheres. The transformation process occurs within an organic hydro-gel that originates from inside the cystoliths. We tested the importance of the gel phase to the transformation process by transforming synthetic ACC into calcite inside various gels. In all the investigated systems: in gelatin, agarose, and pectin gels, calcite crystals grew that showed the nanosphere aggregation morphology. In additional experiments we demonstrated that also other additives, such as phosphate ions and biogenic macromolecules, that slow down ACC dissolution and calcite precipitation from ions can induce the accretion process dominance (see figure attached). These experiments show that although in solution the dominant process is dissolution to ions of the ACC and crystal growth by ion-by-ion mechanism, the presence of an additive that slows the ion-mediated processes makes the ACC nanospheres stable long enough to interact with the crystal surface. As a result, the metastable ACC nanospheres undergo secondary nucleation on the crystal surface without dissolving. These experiments highlight

  11. Eu3+ uptake by calcite: preliminary results from coprecipitation experiments and observations with surface-sensitive techniques.

    PubMed

    Stipp, S L S; Lakshtanov, L Z; Jensen, J T; Baker, J A

    2003-03-01

    A lack of information in databases for contamination risk assessment about the transport behaviour of the trivalent f-orbital elements in groundwater systems where calcite is at equilibrium motivated this study of Eu(3+) uptake. The free drift technique was used to examine the effects of Eu(3+) concentration, presence of Na(+) or K(+) and temperature, as well as calcite nucleation and precipitation kinetics, on the partitioning of calcite. Changes in surface composition and morphology resulting from exposure of single crystals of Iceland spar to Eu(3+)-bearing solutions were observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). First results confirm that calcite has high affinity for Eu(3+). Rates of nucleation and precipitation strongly affect the extent of uptake but the presence of Na(+) and K(+) has no effect, suggesting formation of solid solution as CaCO(3)-EuOHCO(3). Surface-sensitive techniques prove that Eu(3+) is adsorbed to calcite even when the surface is dissolving and adsorption is not accompanied by precipitation of a separate Eu(3+)-solid phase. Adsorbed Eu modifies calcite's dissolution behaviour, roughening terraces and rounding step edges, and producing surface morphology where some surface sites appear blocked. Results imply that Eu(3+) concentrations in natural calcites are limited by Eu(3+) availability rather than by a lack of ability to fit into calcite's atomic structure. This behaviour can probably be expected for other trivalent rare Earth elements (REE), actinides and fission products whose behaviour is similar to that of Eu(3+). These elements are likely to be incorporated within the calcite bulk in systems where it is precipitating and the demonstrated strong partitioning ensures some uptake even where calcite is at or under saturation.

  12. Ages and Origins of Calcite and Opal in the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2001-01-01

    Deposits of calcite and opal are present as coatings on open fractures and lithophysal cavities in unsaturated-zone tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Outermost layers of calcite and opal have radiocarbon ages of 16,000 to 44,000 years before present and thorium-230/uranium ages of 28,000 to more than 500,000 years before present. These ages are young relative to the 13-million-year age of the host rocks. Multiple subsamples from the same outer layer typically show a range of ages with youngest ages from the thinnest subsamples. Initial uranium-234/uranium-238 activity ratios between 1 and 9.5 show a distinct negative correlation with thorium-230/uranium age and are greater than 4 for all but one sample younger than 100,000 years before present. These data, along with micrometer-scale layering and distinctive crystal morphologies, are interpreted to indicate that deposits formed very slowly from water films migrating through open cavities. Exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor probably took place between downward-migrating liquids and upward-migrating gases at low rates, resulting in oversaturation of mineral constituents at crystal extremities and more or less continuous deposition of very thin layers. Therefore, subsamples represent mixtures of older and younger layers on a scale finer than sampling techniques can resolve. Slow, long-term rates of deposition (less than about 5 millimeters of mineral per million years) are inferred from subsamples of outermost calcite and opal. These growth rates are similar to those calculated assuming that total coating thicknesses of 10 to 40 millimeters accumulated over 12 million years. Calcite has a wide range of delta carbon-13 values from about -8.2 to 8.5 per mil and delta oxygen-18 values from about 10 to 21 per mil. Systematic microsampling across individual mineral coatings indicates basal (older) calcite tends to have the largest delta carbon-13 values

  13. Biosequestration of copper by bacteria isolated from an abandoned mine by using microbially induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Shin, YuJin; Anbu, Periasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; So, Jae-Seong

    2016-09-12

    Abandoned mine sites are frequently polluted with high concentrations of heavy metals. In this study, 25 calcite-forming bacteria were newly isolated from the soil of an abandoned metal mine in Korea. Based on their urease activity, calcite production, and resistance to copper toxicity, four isolates were selected and further identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the isolates, Sporosarcina soli B-22 was selected for subsequent copper biosequestration studies, using the sand impermeability test by production of calcite and extracellular polymeric substance. High removal rates (61.8%) of copper were obtained when the sand samples were analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer following 72 h of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the copper carbonate precipitates had a diameter of approximately 5-10 μm. X-ray diffraction further confirmed the presence of copper carbonate and calcium carbonate crystals. PMID:27488956

  14. Selective adsorption of L- and D-amino acids on calcite: Implications for biochemical homochirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, R. M.; Filley, T. R.; Goodfriend, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of biochemical homochirality was a key step in the origin of life, yet prebiotic mechanisms for chiral separation are not well constrained. Here we demonstrate a geochemically plausible scenario for chiral separation of amino acids by adsorption on mineral surfaces. Crystals of the common rock-forming mineral calcite (CaCO(3)), when immersed in a racemic aspartic acid solution, display significant adsorption and chiral selectivity of d- and l-enantiomers on pairs of mirror-related crystal-growth surfaces. This selective adsorption is greater on crystals with terraced surface textures, which indicates that d- and l-aspartic acid concentrate along step-like linear growth features. Thus, selective adsorption of linear arrays of d- and l-amino acids on calcite, with subsequent condensation polymerization, represents a plausible geochemical mechanism for the production of homochiral polypeptides on the prebiotic Earth.

  15. Transformation mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate into calcite in the sea urchin larval spicule.

    PubMed

    Politi, Yael; Metzler, Rebecca A; Abrecht, Mike; Gilbert, Benjamin; Wilt, Fred H; Sagi, Irit; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Gilbert, P U P A; Gilbert, Pupa

    2008-11-11

    Sea urchin larval spicules transform amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite single crystals. The mechanism of transformation is enigmatic: the transforming spicule displays both amorphous and crystalline properties, with no defined crystallization front. Here, we use X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy with probing size of 40-200 nm. We resolve 3 distinct mineral phases: An initial short-lived, presumably hydrated ACC phase, followed by an intermediate transient form of ACC, and finally the biogenic crystalline calcite phase. The amorphous and crystalline phases are juxtaposed, often appearing in adjacent sites at a scale of tens of nanometers. We propose that the amorphous-crystal transformation propagates in a tortuous path through preexisting 40- to 100-nm amorphous units, via a secondary nucleation mechanism.

  16. Transformation mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate into calcite in the sea urchin larval spicule

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Yael; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Abrecht, Mike; Gilbert, Benjamin; Wilt, Fred H.; Sagi, Irit; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Sea urchin larval spicules transform amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite single crystals. The mechanism of transformation is enigmatic: the transforming spicule displays both amorphous and crystalline properties, with no defined crystallization front. Here, we use X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy with probing size of 40–200 nm. We resolve 3 distinct mineral phases: An initial short-lived, presumably hydrated ACC phase, followed by an intermediate transient form of ACC, and finally the biogenic crystalline calcite phase. The amorphous and crystalline phases are juxtaposed, often appearing in adjacent sites at a scale of tens of nanometers. We propose that the amorphous-crystal transformation propagates in a tortuous path through preexisting 40- to 100-nm amorphous units, via a secondary nucleation mechanism. PMID:18987314

  17. Nanocrystalline calcitic lens arrays fabricated by self-assembly followed by amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ingo; Lee, Kyubock; Zolotoyabko, Emil; Werner, Peter; Shim, Tae Soup; Oh, You-Kwan; Fratzl, Peter; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-09-23

    Natural calcium carbonate-based nanocomposites often have superior physical properties and provide a comprehensive source for bioinspired synthetic materials. Here we present thermodynamically stable, transparent CaCO3 microlens arrays (MLA) produced by transforming an amorphous CaCO3 phase into nanocrystalline calcite. We analyze the structure and properties of crystallized MLA by X-ray scattering, transmitted and polarized light microscopy, and electron microscopy and find that MLA are crystallized in spherulite-like patterns without changing the shape of the microlens. The key finding is that nanocrystallinity of the calcite formed diminishes structural anisotropy on the wavelength scale and results in greatly reduced birefringent effects. The remnant preferred orientation of the optical axes of calcite crystals in the plane of the microlens arrays leads to some directionality of optical properties, which may be beneficial for technical applications.

  18. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires—Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45–50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  19. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires--Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Caroline; Whiticar, Alexander; Dick, Kimberly A; Sköld, Niklas; Nygård, Jesper; Bolinsson, Jessica

    2016-04-13

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45-50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV.

  20. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires--Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Caroline; Whiticar, Alexander; Dick, Kimberly A; Sköld, Niklas; Nygård, Jesper; Bolinsson, Jessica

    2016-04-13

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45-50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  1. Structure and reactivity of the calcite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Frank; Trainor, Thomas P; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Eng, Peter; Denecke, Melissa A; Bosbach, Dirk

    2011-02-15

    The zetapotential of calcite in contact with aqueous solutions of varying composition is determined for pre-equilibrated suspensions by means of electrophoretic measurements and for non-equilibrium solutions by means of streaming potential measurements. Carbonate and calcium are identified as charge determining ions. Studies of the equilibrium solutions show a shift of isoelectric point with changing CO(2) partial pressure. Changes in pH have only a weak effect in non-equilibrium solutions. The surface structure of (104)-faces of single crystal calcite in contact to solutions corresponding to those of the zetapotential investigations is determined from surface diffraction measurements. The results reveal no direct indication of calcium or carbonate inner-sphere surface species. The surface ions are found to relax only slightly from their bulk positions; the most significant relaxation is a ∼4° tilt of the surface carbonate ions towards the surface. Two ordered layers of water molecules are identified, the first at 2.35±0.05Å above surface calcium ions and the second layer at 3.24±0.06Å above the surface associated with surface carbonate ions. A Basic-Stern surface complexation model is developed to model observed zetapotentials, while only considering outer-sphere complexes of ions other than protons and hydroxide. The Basic-Stern SCM successfully reproduces the zetapotential data and gives reasonable values for the inner Helmholtz capacitance, which are in line with the Stern layer thickness estimated from surface diffraction results. PMID:21087772

  2. Functionalization of biomineral reinforcement in crustacean cuticle: Calcite orientation in the partes incisivae of the mandibles of Porcellio scaber and the supralittoral species Tylos europaeus (Oniscidea, Isopoda).

    PubMed

    Huber, Julia; Griesshaber, Erika; Nindiyasari, Fitriana; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Ziegler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In arthropods the cuticle forms an exoskeleton with its physical and chemical properties adapted to functions of distinct skeletal elements. The cuticle of the partes incisivae (PI) in mandibles of terrestrial isopods is a composite of chitin-protein fibrils/fibres and minerals. It consists of an unmineralized tip, a middle region with organic fibrils reinforced mainly with amorphous calcium phosphate and a base region mineralized with amorphous calcium carbonate and calcite. In this study we extend our work on the structure and material properties of the incisive cuticle employing electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and investigate calcite orientation patterns in the PI of two terrestrial isopod species from different habitats. We trace small-scale differences in texture sharpness and calcite microstructure, and compare calcite organization and orientation patterns in the PI with those in the tergites of the same isopod species. We observe that in the PI calcite orientation, the degree of crystal alignment, and mode of crystalline domain assemblage is highly varied within short length scales. This contrasts to calcite organization in the tergite cuticle, where calcite has only one specific texture pattern. Such a large range in the variation of calcite organization has not been observed in other carbonate biological hard tissues, such as shells and teeth, where one specific texture and microstructure prevails. Thus, the investigated isopod species are able to control crystallization of the amorphous carbonate precursor in a differential way, most probably related to the function of the individual skeletal element and the animals' behavior.

  3. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  4. Growing spherulitic calcite grains in saline, hyperalkaline lakes: experimental evaluation of the effects of Mg-clays and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes-Martín, R.; Rogerson, M. R.; Brasier, A. T.; Vonhof, H. B.; Prior, T. J.; Fellows, S. M.; Reijmer, J. J. G.; Billing, I.; Pedley, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    The origin of spherical-radial calcite bodies - spherulites - in sublacustrine, hyperalkaline and saline systems is unclear, and therefore their palaeoenvironmental significance as allochems is disputed. Here, we experimentally investigate two hypotheses concerning the origin of spherulites. The first is that spherulites precipitate from solutions super-saturated with respect to magnesium-silicate clays, such as stevensite. The second is that spherulite precipitation happens in the presence of dissolved, organic acid molecules. In both cases, experiments were performed under sterile conditions using large batches of a synthetic and cell-free solution replicating waters found in hyperalkaline, saline lakes (such as Mono Lake, California). Our experimental results show that a highly alkaline and highly saline solution supersaturated with respect to calcite (control solution) will precipitate euhedral to subhedral rhombic and trigonal bladed calcite crystals. The same solution supersaturated with respect to stevensite precipitates sheet-like stevensite crystals rather than a gel, and calcite precipitation is reduced by ~ 50% compared to the control solution, producing a mixture of patchy prismatic subhedral to euhedral, and minor needle-like, calcite crystals. Enhanced magnesium concentration in solution is the likely the cause of decreased volumes of calcite precipitation, as this raised equilibrium ion activity ratio in the solution. On the other hand, when alginic acid was present then the result was widespread development of micron-size calcium carbonate spherulite bodies. With further growth time, but falling supersaturation, these spherules fused into botryoidal-topped crusts made of micron-size fibro-radial calcite crystals. We conclude that the simplest tested mechanism to deposit significant spherical-radial calcite bodies is to begin with a strongly supersaturated solution that contains specific but environmentally-common organic acids. Furthermore, we found

  5. [In situ experimental study of phase transition of calcite by Raman spectroscopy at high temperature and high pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-jiang; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2012-02-01

    The phase transitions of calcite at high temperature and high pressure were investigated by using hydrothermal diamond anvil cell combined with Raman spectroscopy. The result showed that the Raman peak of 155 cm(-1) disappeared, the peak of 1 087 cm(-1) splited into 1083 and 1 090 cm(-1) peaks and the peak of 282 cm(-1) abruptly reduced to 231 cm(-1) at ambient temperature when the system pressure increased to 1 666 and 2 127 MPa respectively, which proved that calcite transformed to calcite-II and calcite-III. In the heating process at the initial pressure of 2 761 MPa and below 171 degrees C, there was no change in Raman characteristic peaks of calcite-III. As the temperature increased to 171 degrees C, the color of calcite crystal became opaque completely and the symmetric stretching vibration peak of 1 087 cm(-1), in-plane bending vibration peak of 713 cm(-1) and lattice vibration peaks of 155 and 282 cm(-1) began to mutate, showing that the calcite-III transformed to a new phase of calcium carbonate at the moment. When the temperature dropped to room temperature, this new phase remained stable all along. It also indicated that the process of phase transformation from calcite to the new phase of calcium carbonate was irreversible. The equation of phase transition between calcite-III and new phase of calcium carbonate can be determined by P(MPa) = 9.09T x (degrees C) +1 880. The slopes of the Raman peak (v1 087) of symmetrical stretching vibration depending on pressure and temperature are dv/dP = 5.1 (cm(-1) x GPa(-1)) and dv/dT = -0.055 3(cm(-1) x degrees C(-1)), respectively. PMID:22512172

  6. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability-implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M P; Dideriksen, K; Sakuma, H; Stipp, S L S

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase. PMID:27352933

  7. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability-implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, M. P.; Dideriksen, K.; Sakuma, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-06-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase.

  8. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability–implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, M. P.; Dideriksen, K.; Sakuma, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase. PMID:27352933

  9. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability–implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, M. P.; Dideriksen, K.; Sakuma, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-06-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase.

  10. Calcite and dolomite in intrusive carbonatites. I. Textural variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhmouradian, Anton R.; Reguir, Ekaterina P.; Zaitsev, Anatoly N.

    2016-04-01

    Carbonatites are nominally igneous rocks, whose evolution commonly involves also a variety of postmagmatic processes, including exsolution, subsolidus re-equilibration of igneous mineral assemblages with fluids of different provenance, hydrothermal crystallization, recrystallization and tectonic mobilization. Petrogenetic interpretation of carbonatites and assessment of their mineral potential are impossible without understanding the textural and compositional effects of both magmatic and postmagmatic processes on the principal constituents of these rocks. In the present work, we describe the major (micro)textural characteristics of carbonatitic calcite and dolomite in the context of magma evolution, fluid-rock interaction, or deformation, and provide information on the compositional variation of these minerals and its relation to specific evolutionary processes.

  11. Shock-induced effects in calcite from Cactus Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizgirda, J.; Ahrens, T. J.; Tsay, F.-D.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses shock metamorphism of calcite from coralline limestone samples retrieved from a borehole drilled into rocks beneath Cactus Crater, a nuclear explosion crater at Eniwetok Atoll. The metamorphism was detected and quantified using electron spin resonance (ESR); the ESR spectra of Mn(+) present as a trace constituent in the coral samples, show a consistent decrease in hyperfine peak splitting with decreasing depth of sample. It is suggested that the decrease in hyperfine peak splitting reflects a decrease in crystal field splitting, and therefore, small increases on cation-anion distances produced by mechanical energy input during the shock process. Two alternative crater models suggested by the ESR results are a depiction of a steady decay of the shock wave, and a delineation of a breccia lens with a breccia-bedrock interface at 20 plus or minus 5 m.

  12. Structural evolution of calcite at high temperatures: Phase V unveiled

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, Nobuo; Setoguchi, Hayato; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi

    2013-01-01

    The calcite form of calcium carbonate CaCO3 undergoes a reversible phase transition between Rc and Rm at ~1240 K under a CO2 atmosphere of ~0.4 MPa. The joint probability density function obtained from the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed that the oxygen triangles of the CO3 group in the high temperature form (Phase V) do not sit still at specified positions in the space group Rm, but migrate along the undulated circular orbital about carbon. The present study also shows how the room temperature form (Phase I) develops into Phase V through an intermediate form (Phase IV) in the temperature range between ~985 K and ~1240 K. PMID:24084871

  13. The puzzling presence of calcite in skeletons of modern solitary corals from the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffredo, Stefano; Caroselli, Erik; Mezzo, Francesco; Laiolo, Leonardo; Vergni, Patrizia; Pasquini, Luca; Levy, Oren; Zaccanti, Francesco; Tribollet, Aline; Dubinsky, Zvy; Falini, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    The skeleton of scleractinian corals is commonly believed to be composed entirely of aragonite due to the current Mg/Ca molar ratio of seawater, which thermodynamically favours the deposition of this polymorph of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). However, some studies have shown that other forms of CaCO3 such as calcite can be present in significant amount (1-20%) inside tropical coral skeletons, significantly impacting paleo-reconstructions of SST or other environmental parameters based on geochemical proxies. This study aims at investigating for the first time, (1) the skeletal composition of two Mediterranean solitary corals, the azooxanthellate Leptopsammia pruvoti and the zooxanthellate Balanophyllia europaea, across their life cycle, (2) the distribution of the different CaCO3 forms inside skeletons, and (3) their implications in paleoclimatology. The origin of the different forms of CaCO3 observed inside studied coral skeletons and their relationships with the species' habitat and ecological strategies are also discussed. CaCO3 composition of L. pruvoti and B. europaea was investigated at six sites located along the Italian coasts. Skeleton composition was studied by means of X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A significant amount of calcite (1-23%) was found in more than 90% of the studied coral skeletons, in addition to aragonite. This calcite was preferentially located in the basal and intermediate areas than at the oral pole of coral skeletons. Calcite was also mainly located in the epitheca that covered the exposed parts of the coral in its aboral region. Interestingly in B. europaea, the calcite content was negatively correlated with skeleton size (age). The presence of calcite in scleractinian corals may result from different mechanisms: (1) corals may biologically precipitate calcite crystals at their early stages in order to insure their settlement on the substrate of fixation, especially in surgy environments; (2

  14. Fluid inclusion studies of calcite veins from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Tuffs: Environment of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Roedder, E.; Whelan, J.F.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1994-12-31

    Calcite vein and vug fillings at four depths (130-314m), all above the present water table in USW G-1 bore hole at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contain primary fluid inclusions with variable vapor/liquid raitos: Most of these inclusions are either full of liquid or full of vapor. The liquid-filled inclusions show that most of the host calcite crystallized from fluids at <100{degrees}C. The vapor-filled inclusions provide evidence that a separate vapor phase was present in the fluid during crystallization. Studies of these vapor-filled inclusions on the microscope crushing stage were interpreted in an earlier paper as indicating trapping of an air-water-CO{sub 2} vapor phase at ``<100{degrees}C``. Our new studies reveal the additional presence of major methane in the vapor-filled inclusion, indicating even lower temperatures of trapping, perhaps at near-surface temperatures. They also show that the host calcite crystals grew from a flowing film of water on the walls of fractures open to the atmosphere, the vapor-filled inclusions representing bubbles that exsolved from this film onto the crystal surface.

  15. Inhibition of calcite precipitation by natural organic material: Kinetics, mechanism, and thermodynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Y.-P.; Singer, P.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    The inhibition of calcite precipitation by natural organic material (NOM) in solutions seeded with calcite was investigated using a pH-stat system. Experiments were carried out using three NOMs with different physical/chemical properties. For each of the materials, inhibition was found to be more effective at lower carbonate/calcium ratios and lower pH values. The reduction in the precipitation rate could be explained by a Langmuir adsorption model using a conditional equilibrium constant. By identification of the type of site on the NOM molecules that is involved in the adsorption reaction, the "conditional" equilibrium constants obtained at different solution compositions converged to a single "nonconditional" value. The thermodynamic data determined at 25??C and 1 atm suggest that the interaction between NOM molecules and the calcite surface is chemisorptive in nature and that adsorption is an endothermic reaction driven by the entropy change. The greatest degree of inhibition was observed for the NOM with the highest molecular weight and aromatic carbon content. For a given type of NOM, the degree of inhibition of calcite precipitation was dictated by the balance between the enthalpy change and the entropy change of the adsorption reaction. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  16. Thermodynamics of magnesian calcite solid-solutions at 25°C and 1 atm total pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L. Niel

    1989-01-01

    protodolomite. Group I and II solid-solutions differ significantly in stability. The rate of crystal growth and the chemical composition of the aqueous solutions from which the solids were formed are the main factors controlling stoichiometric solubility of the magnesian calcites and the density of crystal defects. The literature on the occurrence and behavior of magnesian calcites in sea water and other aqueous solutions is also examined.

  17. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at

  18. Controls on trace-element partitioning in cave-analogue calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Christopher C.; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2013-11-01

    We report trace-element data from a series of carbonate growth experiments in cave-analogue conditions in the laboratory with the goal of better understanding environmental controls on trace-element incorporation in stalagmites. The experimental setup closely mimics natural processes (e.g. precipitation driven by CO2-degassing, low ionic strength solution, thin solution-film) but with a tight control on growth conditions (temperature, pCO2, drip rate, calcite saturation index and the composition of the initial solution). Calcite is dissolved in deionized water in a 20,000 ppmV pCO2 environment, with trace-elements (Li, Na, Mg, Co, Sr, Cd, Ba, U) at appropriate concentrations to mimic natural cave drip-waters. This solution is dripped onto glass plates (coated with seed-calcite) in a lower pCO2 environment at 7, 15, 25 and 35 °C and drip rates of 2, 6 and 10 drips per minute. D(Sr) was shown to be statistically invariant over the full range of temperature and growth rate studied. No relationship between Sr/Ca and growth rate is therefore expected in stalagmite samples over comparable growth rates. D(Mg) has a relationship with temperature defined by D(Mg) = 0.01e0.02[±0.006]T, but temperature is not expected to be the dominant control on Mg/Ca in cave calcite due to the larger impact of calcite precipitation on Mg/Ca. Over short timescales, in conditions where temperature is well buffered, the fraction of calcium remaining in solution (f) is likely to be the dominant control on Mg/Ca and other trace-element ratios. But differences in the response of trace-elements to f and T may allow their combined use to assess past cave conditions. High Cd/Castalagmite is particularly indicative of low amounts of prior calcite precipitation and Cd/Ca would be a useful addition to trace-element studies of natural stalagmites. Significant scatter is observed in trace-element ratios during the laboratory experiments, which cannot be explained by simple Rayleigh distillation. This

  19. Ultra-high-speed lateral solid phase crystallization of GeSn on insulator combined with Sn-melting-induced seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikita, H.; Matsumura, R.; Kai, Y.; Sadoh, T.; Miyao, M.

    2014-11-01

    To produce high-performance devices on flexible plastic substrates, it is essential to form Ge-based group IV semiconductors on insulating substrates at low temperatures (≤250 °C). We have developed a technique for solid phase crystallization of amorphous GeSn (≤220 °C) enhanced by Sn doping, and combined with a seeding technique induced by Sn melting (˜250 °C). This combination produces lateral crystallization of amorphous GeSn from seed arrays with no incubation time. As a result, extremely high growth velocities at 220 °C, depending on Sn concentration, e.g., 0.13 μm/h (14% Sn) and 1100 μm/h (23% Sn), are achieved. These velocities are 104-108 times higher than that of pure Ge. This technique enables growth of crystalline GeSn island arrays (diameters: 50-150 μm) at low temperatures (≤250 °C) at controlled positions on insulating substrates.

  20. Dissolution Kinetics of Biogenic Magnesian Calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R.; Guidry, M.; Mackenzie, F. T.; De Carlo, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is a serious concern for the health of calcifying ecosystems in the near future. During the past century, surface ocean pH has decreased by ~0.1 pH units, and is expected to decrease further by 0.3-0.4 pH units by the end of this century. The process of OA will likely result in both decreased calcification rates and increased rates of carbonate mineral dissolution, particularly involving the magnesian calcite (Mg-calcite) calcifiers found in shallow-water reef and other carbonate environments. Many Mg-calcite compositions are the most soluble of the carbonate phases commonly found in reef environments (often comprising much of the cementation and structure within a reef), and are therefore potentially the most susceptible to dissolution processes associated with OA. However, the dissolution kinetics of these phases is poorly known, limiting our ability to understand their behavior in nature. Laboratory experiments designed to investigate the mechanisms and dissolution rates of biogenic Mg-calcite mineral phases in distilled water and seawater over a range of CO2 and T conditions were conducted employing both batch and fluidized-bed reactor systems and using a variety of cleaned and annealed biogenic Mg-calcite phases. Our initial results have shown that the dissolution rate at 298 K and a pCO2 of ~350 ppm of the crustose coralline alga Amphiroa rigida (~20 mol% MgCO3) in seawater undersaturated with respect to this phase is 3.6 μmol g-1 hr-1, nearly 50% greater than that under similar conditions for aragonite. This rate and the derived experimental rate law are consistent with the preliminary findings of Walter and Morse (1985). Additional kinetic (and also solubility) data will be presented for the following species: Chiton tuberculatus (~0-4 mol% MgCO3); Echinometra mathei and/or Lytechinus variegatus (~8-12 mol% MgCO3); Homotrema rubrum (12-16 mol% MgCO3); and Lithothamnion sp. (~18-24 mol% MgCO3). Quantification of the rates of

  1. Calcite-forming bacteria for compressive strength improvement in mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Yu-Mi; Chun, Woo-Young; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2010-04-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar. However, very few studies have been conducted on the use of calcite-forming bacteria (CFB) to improve compressive strength. In this study, we discovered new bacterial genera that are capable of improving the compressive strength of concrete mortar. We isolated 4 CFB from 7 environmental concrete structures. Using sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes, the CFB could be partially identified as Sporosarcina soli KNUC401, Bacillus massiliensis KNUC402, Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403, and Lysinibacillus fusiformis KNUC404. Crystal aggregates were apparent in the bacterial colonies grown on an agar medium. Stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analyses illustrated both the crystal growth and the crystalline structure of the CaCO3 crystals. We used the isolates to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar cubes and found that KNUC403 offered the best improvement in compressive strength.

  2. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Brian P

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  3. Preparation and formation mechanism of wood-block-like calcite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Hua; Yu Jiaguo . E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com; Cheng Bei

    2006-08-15

    Pure calcite crystal with different morphologies such as wood-block and spherical aggregates were prepared by a precipitation reaction in the presence of citric acid. The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that citric acid obviously influenced the formation of precipitates and the morphology of final products. The formation mechanism of wood-block-like particles was proposed according to theoretical deduction and the proposed growth mode. - Graphical abstract: Pure calcite crystal with different morphologies such as wood-block and spherical aggregates were prepared by a simple precipitation reaction in the presence of citric acid and the formation mechanism was proposed.

  4. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  5. [Study on Mineralogical Characteristics of Quartz and Calcite from Feieling Skarn-Type Pb-Zn Deposit in Southwest Margin of Yunkai Massif].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chang-yu; Zhao, Ming-zhen; Li, Hong-zhong; Niu, Jia; Zhang, Jie-tang; He, Jun-guo; Zhou, Yong-zhang; Yang, Zhi-jun

    2015-09-01

    The Feieling Pb-Zn deposit of skarn-type is located the in Southwest margin of Yunkai massif, China. This ore deposit can be divided into wall rock near ore, concealed rock mass, endoskarn, exoskarn and orebody. The Raman and FTIR spectrum are conducted to study the mineralogical characteristics of quartz and calcite from five types of rocks from Feieling skarn-type deposit. The analysis shows that the quartz included in the near ore wall rock, endoskarn and exoskarn, comparing with recrystallized quartz of concealed rock mass, has a tend to change into low symmetry quartz in varying degrees. The crystalinity and order degree of quartz from near ore wall rock to concealed rock mass and to endoskarn are becoming higher, but that of quartz from different exoskarn samples display no regular. The origin or the quartz microstructure changes may be related to the multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization process. The quartz, included in near ore wall rock, endoskarn and exoskarn, become easier to recrystallize and adjust microstructure under the influence of the multi-stage hydrothermal and temperature effect. In anyone sample, the earlier crystalline calcite, showing subhedral-euhedral crystal, display higher crystalinity and order degree. On the contrary, the later crystalline calcite, showing xenomorphic crystal, display lower crystalinity and order degree. Calcite crystal of exoskarn rock contains some silica impurity, while endoskarn and orebody rock is pure. The purity of calcite crystal may relate to Multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization process. At the early and late skarn stage, active silica-containing fluid is easier to join into calcite, which is under higher temperature environments. On the contrary, at the late quartz-surfide stage, the later crystalized calcite displays higher purity, which is under lower temperature environments. Therefore, spectral characteristics of quartz and calcite reflect multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization

  6. [Study on Mineralogical Characteristics of Quartz and Calcite from Feieling Skarn-Type Pb-Zn Deposit in Southwest Margin of Yunkai Massif].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chang-yu; Zhao, Ming-zhen; Li, Hong-zhong; Niu, Jia; Zhang, Jie-tang; He, Jun-guo; Zhou, Yong-zhang; Yang, Zhi-jun

    2015-09-01

    The Feieling Pb-Zn deposit of skarn-type is located the in Southwest margin of Yunkai massif, China. This ore deposit can be divided into wall rock near ore, concealed rock mass, endoskarn, exoskarn and orebody. The Raman and FTIR spectrum are conducted to study the mineralogical characteristics of quartz and calcite from five types of rocks from Feieling skarn-type deposit. The analysis shows that the quartz included in the near ore wall rock, endoskarn and exoskarn, comparing with recrystallized quartz of concealed rock mass, has a tend to change into low symmetry quartz in varying degrees. The crystalinity and order degree of quartz from near ore wall rock to concealed rock mass and to endoskarn are becoming higher, but that of quartz from different exoskarn samples display no regular. The origin or the quartz microstructure changes may be related to the multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization process. The quartz, included in near ore wall rock, endoskarn and exoskarn, become easier to recrystallize and adjust microstructure under the influence of the multi-stage hydrothermal and temperature effect. In anyone sample, the earlier crystalline calcite, showing subhedral-euhedral crystal, display higher crystalinity and order degree. On the contrary, the later crystalline calcite, showing xenomorphic crystal, display lower crystalinity and order degree. Calcite crystal of exoskarn rock contains some silica impurity, while endoskarn and orebody rock is pure. The purity of calcite crystal may relate to Multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization process. At the early and late skarn stage, active silica-containing fluid is easier to join into calcite, which is under higher temperature environments. On the contrary, at the late quartz-surfide stage, the later crystalized calcite displays higher purity, which is under lower temperature environments. Therefore, spectral characteristics of quartz and calcite reflect multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization

  7. Frictional behavior of talc-calcite mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgetti, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Collettini, C.

    2015-09-01

    Faults involving phyllosilicates appear weak when compared to the laboratory-derived strength of most crustal rocks. Among phyllosilicates, talc, with very low friction, is one of the weakest minerals involved in various tectonic settings. As the presence of talc has been recently documented in carbonate faults, we performed laboratory friction experiments to better constrain how various amounts of talc could alter these fault's frictional properties. We used a biaxial apparatus to systematically shear different mixtures of talc and calcite as powdered gouge at room temperature, normal stresses up to 50 MPa and under different pore fluid saturated conditions, i.e., CaCO3-equilibrated water and silicone oil. We performed slide-hold-slide tests, 1-3000 s, to measure the amount of frictional healing and velocity-stepping tests, 0.1-1000 µm/s, to evaluate frictional stability. We then analyzed microstructures developed during our experiments. Our results show that with the addition of 20% talc the calcite gouge undergoes a 70% reduction in steady state frictional strength, a complete reduction of frictional healing and a transition from velocity-weakening to velocity-strengthening behavior. Microstructural analysis shows that with increasing talc content, deformation mechanisms evolve from distributed cataclastic flow of the granular calcite to localized sliding along talc-rich shear planes, resulting in a fully interconnected network of talc lamellae from 20% talc onward. Our observations indicate that in faults where talc and calcite are present, a low concentration of talc is enough to strongly modify the gouge's frictional properties and specifically to weaken the fault, reduce its ability to sustain future stress drops, and stabilize slip.

  8. Evolution of calcite growth morphology in the presence of magnesium: Implications for the dolomite problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mina; Xu, Jie; Teng, Henry H.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of magnesium on calcite growth morphology was known to occur as step rounding in some cases and surface segmentation in others. What remains unknown are the conditions for and the relations between the different effects, suggesting a lack of comprehensive understanding of the fundamental cause. Here we investigated the evolution of spiral hillock morphology on calcite cleavage surfaces in solutions with increasing Ca to Mg ratios and supersaturation levels using in situ atomic force microscopy. We isolated the effects of Mg and saturation by conducting experiments under conditions of constant pH, ionic strength, and Ca2+/CO32-. Our results revealed three types of morphological variations, ranging from step rounding in one direction (type I), to all directions (type II), and finally to a mosaic-like surface segmentation associated with monolayer buckling and step bunching (type III). These results suggest that the effect of magnesium on calcite growth depends upon multiple parameters including the concentration of Mg in solution, the step speed, as well as the extensiveness of Mg for Ca substitution in calcite lattice. We propose that the morphological variation may be understood by a model taken into consideration of (1) the lifespan and flux size of Mg ions at kinks in comparison to step kinetics, and (2) the diffusion and alignment of point defects created by the substitution of Mg for Ca in the crystal lattice. Stress calculations show that the maximum amount of Mg which calcite lattice can sustain before plastic deformation is ∼40%, suggesting that lattice stress due to the mismatch between MgCO3 and CaCO3 is likely the ultimate cause for the difficulty of ambient condition dolomite crystallization.

  9. Orientation and Mg Incorporation of Calcite Grown on Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers: A Synchrotron X-ray Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak,S.; DiMasi, E.; Han, Y.; Aizenberg, J.; Kuzmenko, I.

    2005-01-01

    Calcite crystals were nucleated from MgCl2/CaCl2 solutions onto functionalized self-assembled monolayers adsorbed onto E-beam evaporated Au films. Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies of the crystals reveal new information about preferred orientation and Mg incorporation. The Au [111] axis is distributed within 2.6 degrees of the film surface normal, but the oriented crystals may be tilted up to 6 degrees away from this axis. For low Mg{sup 2+} content, SO{sub 3}--functionalized films nucleated primarily near the (106) calcite face, odd-chain-length carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiol films nucleated near the (012) face, and even-chain-length carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiol films nucleated near the (113) face. [Mg{sup 2+}]/[Ca{sup 2+}] concentration ratios (n) of 2 and greater defeated this preferred orientation and created a powder texture. Diffraction patterns within the layer plane from the coarse calcite powders indicated a shift to higher 2 accompanied by peak broadening with increasing n. For 0.5 < n < 3.5, a double set of calcite peaks is observed, showing that two distinct Mg calcite phases form: one of comparatively lower Mg content, derived from the templated crystals, and a Mg-rich phase derived from amorphous precursor particles. According to the refinement of lattice parameters, Mg incorporation of up to 18 mol % occurs for n = 4, independent of film functionality. We discuss the differences between the differently functionalized monolayers and also introduce the hypothesis that two separate routes to Mg calcite formation occur in this system.

  10. Bendable, free-standing calcite thin films.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shiho; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-02-17

    Since the hardness and toughness of natural nacre are determined by hierarchical microstructures with organic matters, it is of great importance to control the microstructures of artificial free-standing CaCO3 thin films. However, the fabrication of such films has so far been quite limited, to the extent that their mechanical properties have not been reported. To address this, free-standing calcite thin films were prepared through repeated cycles of layer-by-layer deposition of vaterite precursor composite particles with organic polymers, followed by a phase transition to calcite. In this way, two distinct calcite thin film types were produced based on either 3.2 or 1.0 wt % organic material, with subsequent three-point bending tests revealing that both exhibit elastic bending prior to fracture. More importantly, by increasing the organic content from 1.0 to 3.2 wt %, the bending strength increased from 0.95 ± 0.26 MPa to 1.90 ± 0.21 MPa. PMID:25621634

  11. Biogenic calcite granules--are brachiopods different?

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cusack, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    Brachiopods are still one of the least studied groups of organisms in terms of biomineralization despite recent studies indicating the presence of highly complex biomineral structures, particularly in taxa with calcitic shells. Here, we analyze the nanostructure of calcite biominerals, fibers and semi-nacre tablets, in brachiopod shells by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate that basic mechanisms of carbonate biomineralization are not uniform within the phylum, with semi-nacre tablets composed of spherical aggregates with sub-rounded granules and fibers composed of large, triangular or rod-like particles composed of small sub-rounded granules (40-60 nm). Additionally, proteinaceous envelopes surrounding calcite fibers have been shown for the first time to have a dual function: providing a micro-environment in which granules are produced and acting as the organic template for particle orientation as fiber components. In summary, these new findings in brachiopod shells reveal a complex and distinctive style of biomineralization among carbonate-producing organisms. PMID:23026148

  12. Calcite cements in the modern Floridan aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes, U.; Budd, D.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Calcite cements in the Ocala (Eocene) and Suwannee (Oligocene) formations, southwestern Floridan aquifer have been studied to determine updip to downdip variations in cement chemistries and cathodoluminescence within a modern regional confined aquifer. Interparticle, intraparticle, and fracture-fill cements comprise 5-15% of the limestones. Five different calcite cement morphologies are distinguishable and occur throughout the aquifer: (1) circumgranular microspar, (2) fine- to medium-crystalline rhombs, (3) medium-crystalline syntaxial overgrowths on echinoderms, (4) fine-crystalline pore-filling mosaics, and (5) micrite. Type 5 occurs only below former exposure surfaces. Volumetrically, type 3 is the most important and type 4 is the least. Cathodoluminescence observations reveal only nonluminescent cements updip and an increase in luminescent zones and luminescent intensity downdip. Updip nonluminescent cements have very low Fe and Mn concentrations, but high Mg and Sr concentrations. These relations are interpreted to reflect oxidizing conditions and high rock/water interaction. Fe and Mn concentrations increase and Sr and Mg contents decrease downdip. These trends are interpreted to reflect reducing conditions, cross-formational flow, and slower rock/water interaction. Downdip cathodoluminescence zonations consist of a broad nonluminescent zone, followed by a thin bright orange zone, and then a dull luminescence zone. These geochemical and luminescent patterns along a regional flow line in the confined Floridan aquifer have many similarities to those observed in calcite cements described from ancient aquifers.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of frutalin, an α-D-galactose-specific lectin from Artocarpus incisa seeds.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de Oliveira; D'Muniz Pereira, Humberto; Vieira Neto, Antonio Eufrasio; Mendes Batista Moreno, Frederico Bruno; Duarte Pinto Lobo, Marina; de Sousa, Felipe Domingos; Moreira, Renato de Azevedo

    2015-10-01

    Frutalin is an α-D-galactose-specific carbohydrate-binding glycoprotein with antitumour properties and is a powerful tool for tumour biomarker discovery. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of this lectin, which was isolated from Artocarpus incisa seeds, are reported here. Frutalin was purified and submitted to mass-spectrometric analysis. Diverse masses at approximately 16 kDa were observed in the deconvoluted spectra, which support the presence of isoforms. The best frutalin crystals were grown within a week in 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5 which contained 25% PEG 3350 as a precipitant at 293 K, and diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.81 Å. The monoclinic crystals belonged to space group I2, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.17, b = 74.56, c = 118.98 Å, β = 96.56°. A molecular-replacement solution was obtained which indicated the presence of four monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystallographic refinement of the structure is in progress.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of frutalin, an α-D-galactose-specific lectin from Artocarpus incisa seeds.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de Oliveira; D'Muniz Pereira, Humberto; Vieira Neto, Antonio Eufrasio; Mendes Batista Moreno, Frederico Bruno; Duarte Pinto Lobo, Marina; de Sousa, Felipe Domingos; Moreira, Renato de Azevedo

    2015-10-01

    Frutalin is an α-D-galactose-specific carbohydrate-binding glycoprotein with antitumour properties and is a powerful tool for tumour biomarker discovery. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of this lectin, which was isolated from Artocarpus incisa seeds, are reported here. Frutalin was purified and submitted to mass-spectrometric analysis. Diverse masses at approximately 16 kDa were observed in the deconvoluted spectra, which support the presence of isoforms. The best frutalin crystals were grown within a week in 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5 which contained 25% PEG 3350 as a precipitant at 293 K, and diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.81 Å. The monoclinic crystals belonged to space group I2, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.17, b = 74.56, c = 118.98 Å, β = 96.56°. A molecular-replacement solution was obtained which indicated the presence of four monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystallographic refinement of the structure is in progress. PMID:26457519

  15. Progress of p-channel bottom-gate poly-Si thin-film transistor by nickel silicide seed-induced lateral crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sol Kyu; Seok, Ki Hwan; Park, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Chae, Hee Jae; Jang, Gil Su; Lee, Yong Hee; Han, Ji Su; Joo, Seung Ki

    2016-06-01

    Excimer laser annealing (ELA) is known to be the most common crystallization technology for the fabrication of low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs) in the mass production industry. This technology, however, cannot be applied to bottom-gate (BG) TFTs, which are well developed for the liquid-crystal display (LCD) back-planes, because strong laser energy of ELA can seriously damage the other layers. Here, we propose a novel high-performance BG poly-Si TFT using Ni silicide seed-induced lateral crystallization (SILC). The SILC technology renders it possible to ensure low damage in the layers, smooth surface, and longitudinal large grains in the channel. It was observed that the electrical properties exhibited a steep subthreshold slope of 110 mV/dec, high field-effect mobility of 304 cm2/Vsec, high I on/ I off ratio of 5.9 × 107, and a low threshold voltage of -3.9 V.

  16. Microstructural analysis of calcite-filled fractures inherited from basement structures, southern Ontario, Canada: long term instability of the craton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Jennifer; Schneider, David

    2016-04-01

    Intra-cratonic regions are generally characterized by tectonic stability and low seismicity. In southern Ontario, Canada, moderate levels of seismicity have been recorded over the last few decades reaching magnitudes of 5 MN, indicating that the geosphere is not as stable as predicted. The stratigraphy of the region consists of Ordovician limestone with a thickness of ~200 m that unconformably overlays the Mesoproterozoic crystalline Grenville Province. Subsequent tectonism including repeated Paleozoic orogenies and rifting along the east coast of North America has reactivated Proterozoic structures that have propagated into the overlying carbonate platform forming mesoscopic-scale brittle structures. Exposed along the shores of Lake Ontario are decameter-scale fracture zones, with a fracture spacing of 0.5 to 10 meters. The dominant fracture set trends E-W, and often forms conjugate sets with less prominent NNE-oriented fractures. More locally, an older NW-oriented fracture set is cross cut by the E-W and NNE oriented fractures. Regionally, there have been six directions of maximum horizontal stress in southern Ontario since the Precambrian, with the current orientation of maximum stress oriented ENE as a consequence of far field Atlantic ridge-push forces generated at distant plate boundaries. Calcite mineralization along fractured surfaces locally form sub-horizontal slickenside fabrics which are covered by a layer of euhedral calcite crystals, suggesting that fracture dilation (and fluid flow) occurred after fracture slip to allow the growth of calcite crystals. Due to the proximity of the carbonate units to the crystalline basement, we expect the calcitic veins to be enriched in rare earth elements and are presently conducting geochemical analyses. The calcite veins and surfaces vary from 2.5 cm to 1 mm thicknesses, often with larger calcite crystals in the center of the vein and smaller crystals at the vein boundaries, likely representing nucleation on small

  17. Heterogeneous growth of calcite at aragonite {001}- and vaterite {001}-melt interfaces: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nada, Hiroki; Nishimura, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Kato, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Crystal growth at the interface between a calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystal and its melt at a high temperature of 1500 K is investigated by means of a molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation is performed for the interfaces of a calcite {104} plane, aragonite {001}, {100}, and {010} planes, and vaterite {001}, {110}, and {100} planes. The growth from a pure melt and that from a melt containing Mg2+ are examined. Calcite growth occurs on the calcite {104} plane, aragonite growth occurs on the aragonite {100}, and {010} planes, and vaterite growth occurs on the vaterite {110} and {100} planes. However, the heterogeneous growth of calcite occurs on the {001} plane of aragonite and vaterite, irrespective of the presence of Mg2+. The results advance our understanding of geological processes that occur at high temperature, such as the formation of CaCO3 crystals from carbonatite magma and the formation of marble. Moreover, the results provide useful information for the control of CaCO3 crystal formation in material design.

  18. Calcite Supersaturation and Precipitation Kinetics in the Lower Colorado River, Ail-American Canal and East Highline Canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, D. L.

    1983-06-01

    In situ pH determinations and analysis of major ions in solution indicated that the lower Colorado River is supersaturated with respect to calcite throughout the entire daily cycle, in both winter and summer. Although the ion activity product was 4 to 6 times greater than the calcite solubility product, there was no detectable precipitation. Chemical analyses of water samples taken along 350 km of the river and canals from Parker Dam to the Salton Sea also revealed no evidence of calcium carbonate precipitation despite the inflow of saline and highly supersaturated irrigation return flows. Laboratory kinetic studies indicated that calcite crystal growth rates with Colorado River water are about 30% of the rate for pure Ca-HCO3 waters and about 70% of that for synthetic Colorado River water. Calcite precipitation by crystal growth in the river is limited by the combination of short residence times and unavailability of reactive calcite. Critical supersaturation levels necessary for heterogeneous nucleation do not occur; a high suspended load limits algal photosynthesis and thus prevents large decreases in daytime H2CO3 levels.

  19. Origin of zoning within dedolomite and calcitized gypsum of the Mississippian Arroyo Penasco Group

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Mississippian Arroyo Penasco Group carbonates are the oldest Paleozoic rocks present in north-central New Mexico. These supratidal to shallow,subtidal sediments exhibit complex diagenetic fabrics produced by periods of pre-Pennsylvanian subaerial exposure. Both extensive recrystallization of the Espiritu Santo carbonates and brecciation of the overlying Macho Member of the Tererro Formation resulted from an extended period of Mississippian subaerial exposure of broad, low-relief tidal flats. Cathodoluminescent petrography indicates that the recrystallized limestones consist of calcite pseudomorphs of dolomite and gypsum. Dedolomite and calcitized gypsum crystals, with /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios of -2 to +1.5% PDB, range from highly zoned to uniformly luminescent. Electron microprobe analyses reveals variable Mn and Fe contents across the pseudomorphs which are responsible for differences in observed luminosity. These features are interpreted to reflect a period of subaerial exposure after deposition of Macho Member sediments, which caused dissolution of gypsum and dolomite by sulfate and Mg depleted meteoric fluids and produced the collapse breccia. Preservation of zoning within some pseudomorphs required simultaneous dissolution of gypsum and dolomite and precipitation of calcite. C-isotope data indicates a meteoric to mixed phreatic origin for pore fluids which precipitated calcite; repetitive zoning within dolomite and gypsum pseudomorphs is indicative of interactions between marine and meteoric phreatic fluids in the intertidal environment.

  20. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Cadmium Carbonate Heteroepitaxial Growth at the Calcite (101¯4) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Man; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation and growth at mineral-water interfaces is essential to understanding surface reactivity in geochemical systems. In the present work, the formation of heteroepitaxial cadmium carbonate coatings at calcite-water interfaces was investigated by exposing calcite (10-14) surfaces to Cd-bearing aqueous solutions. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed as the primary technique. The AFM results indicate that the heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate proceeds via three different mechanisms depending on the initial supersaturation of the aqueous solution: advancement of existing steps, nucleation and growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands, and nucleation and spread of two-dimensional (2D) nuclei. The 3D islands and 2D nuclei exhibit different morphologies and growth kinetics. The effects of supersaturation on heteroepitaxial growth mechanisms can be interpreted in terms of the free energy barrier for nucleation. At low initial supersaturation, where 3D nucleation dominates, it is hypothesized, from the growth rate and morphology of the 3D islands observed with AFM, that the crystallization of the overgrowth follows a non-classical pathway involving the formation of a surface precursor that is not fully crystalline, whereas high supersaturation favors the formation of crystalline 2D nuclei whose morphology is based on the atomic structure of the calcite substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that the atomic structure of the interface between the cadmium carbonate coating and calcite shows perfect, dislocation-free epitaxy.

  1. Visualising the molecular alteration of the calcite (104) - water interface by sodium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sascha; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Spijker, Peter; Schmidt, Moritz; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The reactivity of calcite, one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust, is determined by the molecular details of its interface with the contacting solution. Recently, it has been found that trace concentrations of NaNO3 severely affect calcite's (104) surface and its reactivity. Here we combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the calcite (104) - water interface in the presence of NaNO3. Simulations reveal density profiles of different ions near calcite's surface, with NO3(-) able to reach closer to the surface than CO3(2-) and in higher concentrations. Reflectivity measurements show a structural destabilisation of the (104) surfaces' topmost atomic layers in NaNO3 bearing solution, with distorted rotation angles of the carbonate groups and substantial displacement of the lattice ions. Nanoscale AFM results confirm the alteration of crystallographic characteristics, and the ability of dissolved NaNO3 to modify the structure of interfacial water was observed by AFM force spectroscopy. Our experiments and simulations consistently evidence a dramatic deterioration of the crystals' surface, with potentially important implications for geological and industrial processes. PMID:26877225

  2. Kinetic model of impurity poisoning during growth of calcite

    SciTech Connect

    DeYoreo, J; Wasylenki, L; Dove, P; Wilson, D; Han, N

    2004-05-18

    The central role of the organic component in biologically controlled mineralization is widely recognized. These proteins are characterized by a high proportion of acidic amino acid residues, especially aspartate, Asp. At the same time, biomineralization takes place in the presence of a number of naturally-occurring, inorganic impurities, particularly Mg and Sr. In an attempt to decipher the controls on calcite growth imposed by both classes of modifiers, we have used in situ AFM to investigate the dependence of growth morphology and step kinetics on calcite in the presence of Sr{sup 2+}, as well as a wide suite of Aspartic acid-bearing polypeptides. In each case, we observe a distinct and step-specific modification. Most importantly, we find that the step speed exhibits a characteristic dependence on impurity concentration not predicted by existing crystal growth models. While all of the impurities clearly induce appearance of a 'dead zone,' neither the width of that dead zone nor the dependence of step speed on activity or impurity content can be explained by invoking the Gibbs-Thomson effect, which is the basis for the Cabrera-Vermilyea model of impurity poisoning. Common kink-blocking models also fail to explain the observed dependencies. Here we propose a kinetic model of inhibition based on a 'cooperative' effect of impurity adsorption at adjacent kink sites. The model is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results in that it predicts a non-linear dependence of dead zone width on impurity concentration, as well as a sharp drop in step speed above a certain impurity content. However, a detailed model of impurity adsorption kinetics that give quantitative agreement with the data has yet to be developed.

  3. Physical and stable-isotope evidence for formation of secondary calcite and silica in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whelan, J.F.; Paces, J.B.; Peterman, Z.E.

    2002-01-01

    Calcite and silica form coatings on fracture footwalls and cavity floors in the welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain, the potential site of a high-level radioactive waste repository. These secondary mineral deposits are heterogeneously distributed in the unsaturated zone (UZ) with fewer than 10% of possible depositional sites mineralized. The paragenetic sequence, compiled from deposits throughout the UZ, consists of an early-stage assemblage of calcite??fluorite??zeolites that is frequently capped by chalcedony??quartz. Intermediate- and late-stage deposits consist largely of calcite, commonly with opal on buried growth layers or outermost crystal faces of the calcite. Coatings on steep-dipping fractures usually are thin (??? 3 mm) with low-relief outer surfaces whereas shallow-dipping fractures and lithophysal cavities typically contain thicker, more coarsely crystalline deposits characterized by unusual thin, tabular calcite blades up to several cms in length. These blades may be capped with knobby or corniced overgrowths of late-stage calcite intergrown with opal. The observed textures in the fracture and cavity deposits are consistent with deposition from films of water fingering down fracture footwalls or drawn up faces of growing crystals by surface tension and evaporated at the crystal tips. Fluid inclusion studies have shown that most early-stage and some intermediate-stage calcite formed at temperatures of 35 to 85??C. Calcite deposition during the past several million years appears to have been at temperatures < 30??C. The elevated temperatures indicated by the fluid inclusions are consistent with temperatures estimated from calcite ??18O values. Although others have interpreted the elevated temperatures as evidence of hydrothermal activity and flooding of the tuffs of the potential repository, the authors conclude that the temperatures and fluid-inclusion assemblages are consistent with deposition in a UZ environment that experienced prolonged heat input from

  4. Effect of a High Magnetic Field on Microstructures of Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy During Seed Melt-Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weidong; Liu, Huan; Li, Chuanjun; Ren, Zhongming; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Cao, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    The effects of a high magnetic field on microstructures during seed melt-back of superalloy were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the high magnetic field significantly modified the melt-back interface shape and the melt-back zone length. In addition, stray grain on the edge of sample was effectively suppressed in the high magnetic field. Based on experimental results and quantitative analysis, the above results should be attributed to the increasing temperature gradient in a high magnetic field.

  5. Removal of organic magnesium in coccolithophore calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Ameijeiras, S.; Lebrato, M.; Stoll, H. M.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M. D.; Méndez-Vicente, A.; Sett, S.; Müller, M. N.; Oschlies, A.; Schulz, K. G.

    2012-07-01

    Coccolithophore calcite refers to the plates of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) produced by the calcifying phytoplankton, coccolithophores. The empirical study of the elemental composition has a great potential in the development of paleoproxies. However, the difficulties to separate coccolithophore carbonates from organic phases hamper the investigation of coccoliths magnesium to calcium ratios (Mg/Ca) in biogeochemical studies. Magnesium (Mg) is found in organic molecules in the cells at concentrations up to 400 times higher than in inorganically precipitated calcite in present-day seawater. The aim of this study was to optimize a reliable procedure for organic Mg removal from coccolithophore samples to ensure reproducibility in measurements of inorganic Mg in calcite. Two baseline methods comprising organic matter oxidations with (1) bleach and (2) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were tested on synthetic pellets, prepared by mixing reagent grade CaCO3 with organic matter from the non-calcifying marine algae Chlorella autotrophica and measured with an ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer). Our results show that treatments with a reductive solution [using hydroxylamine-hydrochloride (NH2OH·HCl + NH4OH)] followed by three consecutive oxidations (using H2O2) yielded the best cleaning efficiencies, removing >99% of organic Mg in 24 h. P/Ca and Fe/Ca were used as indicators for organic contamination in the treated material. The optimized protocol was tested in dried coccolithophore pellets from batch cultures of Emiliania huxleyi, Calcidiscus leptoporus and Gephyrocapsa oceanica. Mg/Ca of treated coccolithophores were 0.151 ± 0.018, 0.220 ± 0.040, and 0.064 ± 0.023 mmol/mol, respectively. Comparison with Mg/Ca literature coccolith values, suggests a tight dependence on modern seawater Mg/Ca, which changes as a consequence of different seawater origins (<10%). The reliable determination of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, and the low levels of organic contamination

  6. Biological control of crystal texture: A widespread strategy for adapting crystal properties to function

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, A.; Leiserowitz, L.; Weiner, S.; Addadi, L. ); Hanson, J.; Koetzle, T.F. )

    1993-02-05

    Textures of calcite crystals from a variety of mineralized tissues belong to organisms from four phyla were examined with high-resolution synchrotron x-ray radiation. Significant differences in coherence length and angular spread were observed between taxonomic groups. Crystals from polycrystalline skeletal ensembles were more perfect than those that function as single-crystal elements. Different anistropic effects on crystal texture were observed for sea urchin and mollusk calcite crystals, whereas none was found for the foraminifer, Patellina, and the control calcite crystals. These results show that the manipulation of crystal texture in different organisms is under biological control and that crystal textures in some tissues are adapted to function. A better understanding of this apparently widespread biological phenomenon may provide new insights for improving synthetic crystal-containing materials. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of the basic lectin from the seeds of Artocarpus hirsuta.

    PubMed

    Rao, K N; Gurjar, M M; Gaikwad, S M; Khan, M I; Suresh, C G

    1999-06-01

    The basic lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta specific towards methyl alpha-galactose has been purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as precipitant. Three different crystal forms, orthorhombic I, orthorhombic II and hexagonal, were grown under the same crystallization conditions. The orthorhombic forms belonged to space group P212121 with unit-cell dimensions a = 92.9, b = 99.8, c = 166. 2 A and a = 89.9, b = 121.9, c = 131.6 A, respectively. The unit-cell dimensions of the hexagonal form were a = b = 84.1 and c = 271.7 A and the space group was P6122.

  8. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunlong; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-09-05

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic interactions (EI) and hydrophobic interactions (HI), with HI playing the dominant role. While either strong EI or HI inhibit growth and suppress (104) face expression, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate EI allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate HI cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of (104) faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.

  9. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Long; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Deyoreo, James J.

    2014-09-01

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, with hydrophobic interactions playing the dominant role. While either strong electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions inhibit growth and reduces expression of the {104} faces, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate electrostatic interactions allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate hydrophobic interactions cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of the {104} faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.

  10. Impact of trace metals on the water structure at the calcite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolthers, Mariette; Di Tommaso, Devis; De Leeuw, Nora

    2014-05-01

    Carbonate minerals play an important role in regulating the chemistry of aquatic environments, including the oceans, aquifers, hydrothermal systems, soils and sediments. Through mineral surface processes such as dissolution, precipitation and sorption, carbonate minerals affect the biogeochemical cycles of not only the constituent elements of carbonates, such as Ca, Mg, Fe and C, but also H, P and trace elements. Surface charging of the calcite mineral-water interface, and its reactivity towards foreign ions can be quantified using a surface structural model that includes, among others, the water structure at the interface (i.e. hydrogen bridging) [1,2] in accordance with the CD-MUSIC formalism [3]. Here we will show the impact of foreign metals such as Mg and Sr on the water structure around different surface sites present in etch pits and on growth terraces at the calcite (10-14) surface. We have performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of metal-doped calcite surfaces, using different interatomic water potentials. Results show that the local environment around the structurally distinct sites differs depending on metal presence, suggesting that metal substitutions in calcite affect its reactivity. The information obtained in this study will help in improving existing macroscopic surface model for the reactivity of calcite [2] and give more general insight in mineral surface reactivity in relation to crystal composition. [1] Wolthers, Charlet, & Van Cappellen (2008). Am. J. Sci., 308, 905-941. [2] Wolthers, Di Tommaso, Du, & de Leeuw (2012). Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 14, 15145-15157. [3] Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996) J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488-508.

  11. Basal slip and texture development in calcite: new results from torsion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D. J.; Wenk, H.-R.; Gomez-Barreiro, J.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G.

    2008-06-09

    The deformation behavior of calcite has been of longstanding interest. Through experiments on single crystals, deformation mechanisms were established such as mechanical twinning on e = {l_brace}{bar 1}018{r_brace} <40{bar 4}1> in the positive sense and slip on r = {l_brace}10{bar 1}4{r_brace} <20{bar 2}{bar 1}> and f = {l_brace}{bar 1}012{r_brace} <0{bar 2}2{bar 1}> both in the negative sense. More recently it was observed that at higher temperatures f{l_brace}{bar 1}012{r_brace} <10{bar 1}1> slip in both senses becomes active and, based on slip line analysis, it was suggested that e(0001) <11{bar 2}0> slip may occur. So far there had been no direct evidence for basal slip, which is the dominant system in dolomite. With new torsion experiments on calcite single crystals at 900 K and transmission electron microscopy, this study identifies (0001) <11{bar 2}0> slip unambiguously by direct imaging of dislocations and diffraction contrast analysis. Including this slip system in polycrystal plasticity simulations, enigmatic texture patterns observed in compression and torsion of calcite rocks at high temperature can now be explained, resolving a long-standing puzzle.

  12. Biomineralization processes of calcite induced by bacteria isolated from marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shiping; Cui, Hongpeng; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; He, Hao; Fang, Nianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Biomineralization is a known natural phenomenon associated with a wide range of bacterial species. Bacterial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation by marine isolates was investigated in this study. Three genera of ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina sp., Bacillus sp. and Brevundimonas sp. were observed to precipitate calcium carbonate minerals. Of these species, Sporosarcina sp. dominated the cultured isolates. B. lentus CP28 generated higher urease activity and facilitated more efficient precipitation of calcium carbonate at 3.24 ± 0.25 × 10−4 mg/cell. X-ray diffraction indicated that the dominant calcium carbonate phase was calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that morphologies of the minerals were dominated by cubic, rhombic and polygonal plate-like crystals. The dynamic process of microbial calcium carbonate precipitation revealed that B. lentus CP28 precipitated calcite crystals through the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, and that when ammonium ion concentrations reached 746 mM and the pH reached 9.6, that favored calcite precipitation at a higher level of 96 mg/L. The results of this research provide evidence that a variety of marine bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation, and may influence the marine carbonate cycle in natural environments. PMID:26273260

  13. Global calcite cycling constrained by sediment preservation controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, John P.; Hales, Burke; Toggweiler, J. R.

    2012-09-01

    We assess the global balance of calcite export through the water column and burial in sediments as it varies regionally. We first drive a comprehensive 1-D model for sediment calcite preservation with globally gridded field observations and satellite-based syntheses. We then reformulate this model into a simpler five-parameter box model, and combine it with algorithms for surface calcite export and water column dissolution for a single expression for the vertical calcite balance. The resulting metamodel is optimized to fit the observed distributions of calcite burial flux. We quantify the degree to which calcite export, saturation state, organic carbon respiration, and lithogenic sedimentation modulate the burial of calcite. We find that 46% of burial and 88% of dissolution occurs in sediments overlain by undersaturated bottom water with sediment calcite burial strongly modulated by surface export. Relative to organic carbon export, we find surface calcite export skewed geographically toward relatively warm, oligotrophic areas dominated by small, prokaryotic phytoplankton. We assess century-scale projected impacts of warming and acidification on calcite export, finding high sensitive to inferred saturation state controls. With respect to long-term glacial cycling, our analysis supports the hypothesis that strong glacial abyssal stratification drives the lysocline toward much closer correspondence with the saturation horizon. Our analysis suggests that, over the transition from interglacial to glacial ocean, a resulting ˜0.029 PgC a-1decrease in deep Atlantic, Indian and Southern Ocean calcite burial leads to slow increase in ocean alkalinity until Pacific mid-depth calcite burial increases to compensate.

  14. Fibrous calcite from the Middle Ordovician Holston Formation (east Tennessee)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.J.; Walker, K.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Fibrous calcite from buildups, which occur near the top of the Middle Ordovician Holston Formation, were examined from two localities near Knoxville, TN (Alcoa Highway and Deanne Quarry). Buildups at these localities were deposited under open-marine conditions, slightly down-slope from the platform edge. Fibrous calcite (mainly radiaxial fibrous) occur most commonly as cements in mainly stromatactis structures present in bioherms and intergranular porosity in beds that flank bioherms. Fibrous calcite is interpreted to have been precipitated in a marine setting. Fibrous calcite is uniformly turbid or banded with interlayered turbid and clearer cement. Fibrous calcite most commonly shows patchy or blotchy dull-non-luminescence under cathodoluminescence. Bands of uniformly non-luminescent and relatively bright luminescent calcite are present. [delta][sup 13]C compositions of fibrous calcite vary little (0.6 to 1.0%) but [delta][sup 18]O values are highly variable ([minus]4.8 to [minus]7.1%). Post-marine cement consists of ferroan and non-ferroan, dull luminescent equant calcite ([delta][sup 13]C = 0.3 to 0.8; [delta][sup 18]O = [minus]8.6 to [minus]11.5) and is interpreted as precipitated in a deep meteoric or burial setting. Depleted [delta][sup 18]O compositions of fibrous calcite reflect addition of post-depositional calcite during stabilization. Most enriched [delta][sup 13]C and [delta][sup 18]O fibrous calcite composition are similar to enriched values from other Middle Ordovician southern Appalachian buildups (other localities of Holston (TN) and Effna (VA) formations) ([delta][sup 13]C = 0.3 to 0.8; [delta][sup 18]O = [minus]3.9 to [minus]4.8) and may reflect fibrous calcite precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with Middle Ordovician sea water.

  15. Cyclic growth and branching phenomena of calcite grown in Mg(2+) containing solutions and in natural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiethoff, Felix; Richter, Detlef K.; Neuser, Rolf D.; Immenhauser, Adrian; Gies, Hermann; Schreuer, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Undulosity in calcites (radiaxial fibrous calcite (RFC) and fascicular-optic fibrous calcite (FOFC)) is a common phenomenon in paleozoic and mesozoic limestones. Despite their importance as archives for climate reconstruction the underlying mechanisms and processes of their formation are still poorly understood [1]. To improve the application of such archives for climate reconstruction a better knowledge of their formation and possible alteration scenarios is necessary. In Mg2+ containing gel based growth experiments calcite crystals develop pathological morphologies. The morphology can be described as a product of a geometrical selective branching process at the rhombohedral crystal faces. Multiple sheet like building blocks evolve at the branching crystal face; each slightly tilted in respect to their substrate. The product is a crystal aggregate consisting out of several misoriented sub domains. In polarized light thin section microscopy the extinction behaviour of these sub units resemble the optical undulosity of radiaxial fibrous cements. In a multi method approach the local Mg2+ concentration was measured using EMPA and compared with maps of the local crystal orientation (via electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)) and thin section microscopy. We found that Mg2+ is enriched at the sub-domain boundaries and deduced that lattice misfit as a consequence of impurity incorporation causes the crystal branching. We propose that this process is cyclic and each new misoriented sheet represents a growth period after a phase of inhibited growth caused by crystal faces covered by Mg2+-ions. In comparison to natural systems we found that radiaxial-fibrous cave cements show a pathological morphology based on the same formation principles. [1] Richter et al. (2011) Sediment. Geol. 239, 23-36 [2] Reeder & Paquette (1989) Sediment. Geol. 65, 239-247 [3] Davis et al. (2004) Am. Min. 89, 714-720

  16. Cyclic growth and branching phenomena of calcite grown in Mg(2+) containing solutions and in natural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiethoff, Felix; Richter, Detlef K.; Neuser, Rolf D.; Immenhauser, Adrian; Gies, Hermann; Schreuer, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Undulosity in calcites (radiaxial fibrous calcite (RFC) and fascicular-optic fibrous calcite (FOFC)) is a common phenomenon in paleozoic and mesozoic limestones. Despite their importance as archives for climate reconstruction the underlying mechanisms and processes of their formation are still poorly understood [1]. To improve the application of such archives for climate reconstruction a better knowledge of their formation and possible alteration scenarios is necessary. In Mg2+ containing gel based growth experiments calcite crystals develop pathological morphologies. The morphology can be described as a product of a geometrical selective branching process at the rhombohedral crystal faces. Multiple sheet like building blocks evolve at the branching crystal face; each slightly tilted in respect to their substrate. The product is a crystal aggregate consisting out of several misoriented sub domains. In polarized light thin section microscopy the extinction behaviour of these sub units resemble the optical undulosity of radiaxial fibrous cements. In a multi method approach the local Mg2+ concentration was measured using EMPA and compared with maps of the local crystal orientation (via electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)) and thin section microscopy. We found that Mg2+ is enriched at the sub-domain boundaries and deduced that lattice misfit as a consequence of impurity incorporation causes the crystal branching. We propose that this process is cyclic and each new misoriented sheet represents a growth period after a phase of inhibited growth caused by crystal faces covered by Mg2+‑ions. In comparison to natural systems we found that radiaxial-fibrous cave cements show a pathological morphology based on the same formation principles. [1] Richter et al. (2011) Sediment. Geol. 239, 23-36 [2] Reeder & Paquette (1989) Sediment. Geol. 65, 239-247 [3] Davis et al. (2004) Am. Min. 89, 714-720

  17. Spectroscopic characterization of natural calcite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2007-11-01

    The FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR spectral data of ten different limestone samples have been compared. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral data show that calcium carbonate in limestone, principally in the form of calcite, as identified by its main absorption bands at 1426, 1092, 876 and 712 cm -1. The sharp diffractions at the d-spacings, 3.0348, 1.9166 and 1.8796 confirm the presence of calcite structure and the calculated lattice parameters are: a = 4.9781 Å, c = 17.1188 Å. The range of 13C chemical shifts for different limestone samples is very small, varying from 198.38 to 198.42 ppm. The observed chemical shifts are consistent with the identical C-O bonding in different limestone samples. 27Al MAS NMR spectra of the samples exhibit a central line at 1 ppm and another line at 60 ppm corresponding to octahedral and tetrahedral Al ions, respectively. The five component resonances were observed in 29Si MAS NMR spectrum of limestone and these resonances were assigned to Si (4 Al), Si (3 Al), Si (2 Al), Si (1 Al) and Si (0 Al) from low field to high field.

  18. Carbonates in thrust faults: High temperature investigations into deformation processes in calcite-dolomite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, A.; Kennedy, L.; Misra, S.; Benson, P.

    2012-04-01

    The role of dolomite on the strength and evolution of calcite-dolomite fold and thrust belts and nappes (as observed in the Canadian Rockies, the Swiss Alps, the Italian Apennines, and the Naukluft Nappe Complex) is largely unknown. Field investigations indicate that strain in natural systems is localized in calcite, resulting in a ductile response, while dolomite deforms in a dominantly brittle manner. To date, experimental studies on polymineralic carbonate systems are limited to homogeneous, fine-grained, calcite-dolomite composites of relatively low dolomite content. The effect of dolomite on limestone rheology, the onset of crystal-plastic deformation in dolomite in composites, and the potential for strain localization in composites have not yet been fully quantified. Constant displacement rate (3x10-4 s-1and 10-4 s-1), high confining pressure (300 MPa) and high temperature (750° C and 800° C) torsion experiments were conducted to address the role of dolomite on the strength of calcite-dolomite composites. Experiments were performed on samples produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) amalgams of a natural, pure dolomite and a reagent, pure calcite. We performed experiments on the following mixtures (given as dolomite%): 25%, 35%, 50%, and 75%. These synthetic HIP products eliminated concerns of mineralogical impurities and textural anomalies due to porosity, structural fabrics (e.g., foliation) and fossil content. The samples were deformed up to a maximum finite shear strain of 5.0 and the experimental set up was unvented to inhibit sample decarbonation. Mechanical data shows a considerable increase in sample yield strength with increasing dolomite content. Experimental products with low starting dolomite content (dol%: 25% and 35%) display macroscopic strain localization along compositionally defined foliation. Experimental products with high dolomite content (dol%: 50% and 75%) demonstrate no macroscopic foliation. Post-deformation microstructure analysis

  19. Neptunium(V) adsorption to calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberling, Frank; Brendebach, Boris; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-01

    The migration behavior of the actinyl ions U(VI)O 22+, Np(V)O 2+ and Pu(V,VI)O 2(+,2+) in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption reactions (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, coprecipitation/structural incorporation) with minerals. Here NpO 2+ adsorption onto calcite is studied in batch type experiments over a wide range of pH (6.0-9.4) and concentration (0.4 μM-40 μM) conditions. pH is adjusted by variation of CO 2 partial pressure. Adsorption is found to be pH dependent with maximal adsorption at pH 8.3 decreasing with increasing and decreasing pH. pH dependence of adsorption decreases with increasing Np(V) concentration. EXAFS data of neptunyl adsorbed to calcite and neptunyl in the supernatant shows differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance, 1.85 ± 0.01 Å for the adsorbed and 1.82 ± 0.01 Å for the solution species. The equatorial environment of the neptunyl in solution shows about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.45 ± 0.02 Å. For adsorbed neptunyl there are also about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.46 ± 0.01 Å. An additional feature in the adsorbed species' R-space spectrum can be related to carbonate neighbours, 3 to 6 carbon backscatterers (C-eq) at 3.05 ± 0.03 Å and 3 to 6 oxygen backscatterers (O-eq2) at 3.31 ± 0.02 Å. The differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance and the C-eq and O-eq2 backscatterers which are only present for the adsorbed species indicate inner-sphere bonding of the adsorbed neptunyl species to the calcite surface. Experiments on adsorption kinetics indicate that after a fast surface adsorption process a continuous slow uptake occurs which may be explained by incorporation via surface dissolution and reprecipitation processes. This is also indicated by the part irreversibility of the adsorption as shown by increased KD values after desorption compared to adsorption.

  20. Dissolution dynamics of the calcite-water interface observed in situ by glancing-incidence X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N.C.; Chiarello, R.P.

    1995-06-02

    Glancing-incidence X-ray scattering measurements made at the National Synchrotron Light Source were used to investigate dissolution dynamics in situ at the calcite-water interface. The relation between calcite saturation state and roughness of the calcite (1014) cleavage surface as a function of time was examined during pH titrations of an initially calcite-saturated solution. Systematic variations in roughness were observed as a function of saturation state as pH was titrated to values below that of calcite saturation. Different steady-state values of roughness were evident at fixed values of {Delta}G{sub r}, and these were correlated with the extent of undersaturation. A significant increase in roughness begins to occur with increasing undersaturation at a {Delta}G{sub r} value of approximately {minus}2.0 kcal/mol. The dissolution rate corresponding to this increase is about 1.5 x 10{sup 7} mmol/cm {center_dot} sec. This increase in roughness is attributed to a transition in the principal rate-determining dissolution mechanism, and is consistent with both powder-reaction studies of dissolution kinetics and single-crystal dissolution studies by atomic force microscopy. These data indicate some important potential applications of GIXS in the study of mineral-water interface geochemistry.

  1. Complete subsite mapping of a "loopful" GH19 chitinase from rye seeds based on its crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kondo, Kaori; Numata, Tomoyuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2013-08-19

    Crystallographic analysis of a mutated form of "loopful" GH19 chitinase from rye seeds a double mutant RSC-c, in which Glu67 and Trp72 are mutated to glutamine and alanine, respectively, (RSC-c-E67Q/W72A) in complex with chitin tetrasaccharide (GlcNAc)₄ revealed that the entire substrate-binding cleft was completely occupied with the sugar residues of two (GlcNAc)₄ molecules. One (GlcNAc)₄ molecule bound to subsites -4 to -1, while the other bound to subsites +1 to +4. Comparisons of the main chain conformation between liganded RSC-c-E67Q/W72A and unliganded wild type RSC-c suggested domain motion essential for catalysis. This is the first report on the complete subsite mapping of GH19 chitinase.

  2. Emission polarization study on quartz and calcite.

    PubMed

    Vincent, R K

    1972-09-01

    Spectral emission polarization of quartz and calcite polished plates for observation angles of 20 degrees and 70 degrees is calculated by the substitution of complex index of refraction values for each mineral into Fresnel's equations. The emission polarization is shown to be quite wavelength-dependent, demonstrating that selected narrow or medium-width (Deltalambda approximately 1.5 microm) spectral bands exhibit a significantly higher percentage of polarization than a broad spectral band (Deltalambda approximately 6microm) for these two minerals. Field measurements with a broadband infrared radiometer yield polarizations on the order of 2% for a coarse-grained granite rock and beach sand (both quartz-rich). This implies that a more sensitive detector with a selected mediumwidth filter may be capable of measuring emission polarization accurately enough to make this parameter useful as a remote sensing tool for discrimination among rocks on the basis of texture.

  3. A Microkinetic Model of Calcite Step Growth.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M P; Dobberschütz, S; Sand, K K; Tobler, D J; De Yoreo, J J; Stipp, S L S

    2016-09-01

    In spite of decades of research, mineral growth models based on ion attachment and detachment rates fail to predict behavior beyond a narrow range of conditions. Here we present a microkinetic model that accurately reproduces calcite growth over a very wide range of published experimental data for solution composition, saturation index, pH and impurities. We demonstrate that polynuclear complexes play a central role in mineral growth at high supersaturation and that a classical complexation model is sufficient to reproduce measured rates. Dehydration of the attaching species, not the mineral surface, is rate limiting. Density functional theory supports our conclusions. The model provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of mineral growth that control biomineralization, mineral scaling and industrial material synthesis. PMID:27532505

  4. Calcite and dolomite in intrusive carbonatites. II. Trace-element variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhmouradian, Anton R.; Reguir, Ekaterina P.; Couëslan, Christopher; Yang, Panseok

    2016-04-01

    The composition of calcite and dolomite from several carbonatite complexes (including a large set of petrographically diverse samples from the Aley complex in Canada) was studied by electron-microprobe analysis and laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry to identify the extent of substitution of rare-earth and other trace elements in these minerals and the effects of different igneous and postmagmatic processes on their composition. Analysis of the newly acquired and published data shows that the contents of rare-earth elements (REE) and certain REE ratios in magmatic calcite and dolomite are controlled by crystal fractionation of fluorapatite, monazite and, possibly, other minerals. Enrichment in REE observed in some samples (up to ~2000 ppm in calcite) cannot be accounted for by coupled substitutions involving Na, P or As. At Aley, the REE abundances and chondrite-normalized (La/Yb)cn ratios in carbonates decrease with progressive fractionation. Sequestration of heavy REE from carbonatitic magma by calcic garnet may be responsible for a steeply sloping "exponential" pattern and lowered Ce/Ce* ratios of calcite from Magnet Cove (USA) and other localities. Alternatively, the low levels of Ce and Mn in these samples could result from preferential removal of these elements by Ce4+- and Mn3+-bearing minerals (such as cerianite and spinels) at increasing f(O2) in the magma. The distribution of large-ion lithophile elements (LILE = Sr, Ba and Pb) in rock-forming carbonates also shows trends indicative of crystal fractionation effects (e.g., concomitant depletion in Ba + Pb at Aley, or Sr + Ba at Kerimasi), although the phases responsible for these variations cannot be identified unambiguously at present. Overall, element ratios sensitive to the redox state of the magma and its complexing characteristics (Eu/Eu*, Ce/Ce* and Y/Ho) are least variable and in both primary calcite and dolomite, approach the average chondritic values. In consanguineous

  5. Dissolution of coccolithophorid calcite by microzooplankton and copepod grazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antia, A. N.; Suffrian, K.; Holste, L.; Müller, M. N.; Nejstgaard, J. C.; Simonelli, P.; Carotenuto, Y.; Putzeys, S.

    2008-01-01

    Independent of the ongoing acidification of surface seawater, the majority of the calcium carbonate produced in the pelagial is dissolved by natural processes above the lysocline. We investigate to what extent grazing and passage of coccolithophorids through the guts of copepods and the food vacuoles of microzooplankton contribute to calcite dissolution. In laboratory experiments where the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi was fed to the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, the heterotrophic flagellate Oxyrrhis marina and the copepod Acartia tonsa, calcite dissolution rates of 45-55%, 37-53% and 5-22% of ingested calcite were found. We ascribe higher loss rates in microzooplankton food vacuoles as compared to copepod guts to the strongly acidic digestion and the individual packaging of algal cells. In further experiments, specific rates of calcification and calcite dissolution were also measured in natural populations during the PeECE III mesocosm study under differing ambient pCO2 concentrations. Microzooplankton grazing accounted for between 27 and 70% of the dynamic calcite stock being lost per day, with no measurable effect of CO2 treatment. These measured calcite dissolution rates indicate that dissolution of calcite in the guts of microzooplankton and copepods can account for the calcite losses calculated for the global ocean using budget and model estimates.

  6. The influence of impurities on the growth rate of calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H. J.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of 34 different additives on the growth rate of calcite were investigated. An initial growth rate of about one crystal monolayer (3 × 10 -8 cm) per minute was adjusted at a constant supersaturation which was maintained by a control circuit. Then the impurity was added step by step and the reduction of the growth rate was measured. The impurity concentration necessary to reduce the initial growth rate by a certain percentage increased in the order Fe 2+, ATP, P 3O 5-10, P 2O 4-7, (PO 3) 6-6, Zn 2+, ADP, Ce 3+, Pb 2+, carbamyl phosphate, Fe 3+, PO 3-4, Co 2+, Mn 2+, Be 2+, β-glycerophosphate, Ni 2+, Cd 2+, "Tris", phenylphosphate, chondroitine sulphate, Ba 2+, citrate, AMP, Sr 2+, tricarballylate, taurine, SO 2-4, Mg 2+ by 4 orders of magnitude. The most effective additives halved the initial growth rate in concentrations of 2 × 10 -8 mol/1. For Fe 2+ the halving concentration was nearly proportional to the initial rate. The mechanism of inhibition by adsorption of the impurities at growth sites (kinks) is discussed.

  7. X-ray crystal structure determination and refinement at 1.9 A resolution of isolectin I from the seeds of Lathyrus ochrus.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Y; Abergel, C; Cambillau, C; Frey, M; Rougé, P; Fontecilla-Camps, J C

    1990-07-20

    Orthorhombic crystals of isolectin I (LOLI) from the seeds of Lathyrus ochrus were first obtained during the STS 29 space shuttle mission. Subsequently, isostructural crystals were also obtained in the laboratory. They belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2, with cell dimensions a = 135.84 A, b = 63.12 A and c = 54.54 A with one functional entity, a dimer, in the asymmetric unit (Vm = 2.2 A3/Da). The three-dimensional structure of LOLI, which was solved by the molecular replacement method using a 3 A resolution model of pea lectin, has subsequently been refined by using crystallographic data between 8.0 A and 1.9 A resolution, coupled to molecular dynamics and energy minimization techniques. The conventional R-factor is 0.185 for Fo greater than 1 sigma(Fo). The final model includes 220 well-defined water molecules and has root-mean-square deviations from ideal bond distances and angles of 0.004 A and 3 degrees, respectively. Only slight conformation differences have been found between the two alpha beta monomers. The molecular structure of LOLI, the first to be determined from the genus Lathyrus, is very similar to those of concanavalin A, pea lectin and favin. Differences are confined to the loop regions and beta-chain termini. Comparison of equivalent C alpha atom positions between our final model and the pea lectin structure shows slight differences in the association of the two monomers, which are probably due to the different environments in the crystals. The root-mean-square deviation between C alpha atoms of LOLI and pea lectin is 0.40 A. The metal binding sites are very similar in pea lectin, concanavalin A and LOLI. The sugar-binding sites of LOLI are occupied by four well-ordered water molecules each. The cleavage site for one of the monomers is specially well defined in the final electron density map: the amino group of Glul (alpha) seems to form a salt bridge with the carboxylate group of the terminal Asn181 (beta). A detailed analysis of the difference

  8. Nano-structured calcite produced by micro-organisms in ancient and modern loess in Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Chen, T.; Lu, H.; Wang, X.

    2005-12-01

    The results from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission gun scanning microscopy (FEG-SEM) investigation show that there are calcite nano-fibers (CNFs) formed during pedogenic process. The CNFs are widely distributed in the loess and red clay samples of Caoxian, Luochuan, Lingtai, Lantian, and Xifeng profiles as well as the samples of modern surface loess soils in Chinese Loess Plateau. Diameters of all the NFCs are about 40 nm, the length of the CNFs ranges from tens nanometer to several micrometers. Elongation direction of NFCs is unusual near parallel (105)* or (115)*. Crystals of NFCs arrange as bird net like and lattice-like frameworks. X-ray EDS spectra show the weak peaks of magnesium, phosphorous, and sulfur. Our investigation indicates that CNFs are in pore space of loess and paleosol and made up most of carbonate except for caliche nodular layers. Concentration of NFCs in the loess layers are significantly higher than those of paleosol layers because of leaching of carbonate in the paleosol forming environment (warn and wet paleoclimate). The "nanobacteria-like CNFs are well crystalline calcite single crystals with smoothes surfaces. The morphologies of CNFs are very unusual and different from the calcite single crystals observed in most geological environments. The CNFs are directly related to microbial activities in both ancient and modern loess. It is proposed that the intervention of organic compounds derived from microbial activities control the formation of the calcite nano-fibers. Both morphology and bulk composition of CNFs indicate that the formation of the CNFs involves bio-organics derived from microorganisms in loess deposit environment. Formation conditions of the calcite nano-fibers may information about paleoclimate, paleo-environment and paleoecology. So, the discovery of CNFs in loess-paloesol sequences can provide a new route for reconstruct paleoclimate by oxygen and carbon isotope from the CNFs.

  9. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrau, Ulf; Fletcher, Luke B.; Galtier, Eric Ch.; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Heimann, Philipp; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Förster, Eckhart; Marschner, Heike; Wehrhan, Ortrud

    2014-09-15

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution ΔE/E = 1.1 × 10{sup −4} and wave-number resolution of Δk/k = 3 × 10{sup −3}, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to 5.2/Å in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418 eV/13.5 μm agrees with predictions within 1.3%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic highly annealed pyrolytic graphite spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1 eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  10. Prediction of calcite morphology from computational and experimental studies of mutations of a de novo-designed peptide.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Sarah B; Sayeg, Marianna K; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2011-09-20

    Many organisms use macromolecules, often proteins or peptides, to control the growth of inorganic crystals into complex materials. The ability to model peptide-mineral interactions accurately could allow for the design of novel peptides to produce materials with desired properties. Here, we tested a computational algorithm developed to predict the structure of peptides on mineral surfaces. Using this algorithm, we analyzed energetic and structural differences between a 16-residue peptide (bap4) designed to interact with a calcite growth plane and single- and double-point mutations of the charged residues. Currently, no experimental method is available to resolve the structures of proteins on solid surfaces, which precludes benchmarking for computational models. Therefore, to test the models, we chemically synthesized each peptide and analyzed its effects on calcite crystal growth. Whereas bap4 affected the crystal growth by producing heavily stepped corners and edges, point mutants had variable influences on morphology. Calculated residue-specific binding energies correlated with experimental observations; point mutations of residues predicted to be crucial to surface interactions produced morphologies most similar to unmodified calcite. These results suggest that peptide conformation plays a role in mineral interactions and that the computational model supplies valid energetic and structural data that can provide information about expected crystal morphology.

  11. The dissolution of calcite in aqueous acid: The influence of humic species

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.G.; Sanders, G.H.W. )

    1993-07-01

    The kinetics of proton-induced calcite dissolution in aqueous solution in the presence of humic acids and their sodium salts are reported. In equilibrated acid solutions (pH <4) there is no inhibition by humic material and dissolution proceeds at a rate simply determined by the solution pH. Contrastingly the sodium salts of humic acids were found to have a significant inhibitory effect on the acid catalyzed dissolution. This was quantified using a novel channel flow cell experiment which employed two electrodes, the upstream of which was used to inject protons into a neutral solution, which also contained sodium salts of humic acid, via electrolytic oxidation of dissolved hydroquinone. The two electrodes were located immediately upstream and downstream of a calcite crystal so that the proton injection served to dissolve the calcite in the (inhibiting) presence of humic salts unequilibrated with the solution pH. The amount of H[sup +] which survived passage to the downstream detector'' electrode was used to quantify the rate of dissolution and hence the inhibitory effects of the humic acid. The latter were found to operate in a manner not inconsistent with Langmuirian adsorption.

  12. Calcite Biomineralization by Bacterial Isolates from the Recently Discovered Pristine Karstic Herrenberg Cave

    PubMed Central

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M.; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R.; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves. PMID:22179248

  13. Calcite biomineralization by bacterial isolates from the recently discovered pristine karstic herrenberg cave.

    PubMed

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Küsel, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves.

  14. Epitaxial high saturation magnetization FeN thin films on Fe(001) seeded GaAs(001) single crystal wafer using facing target sputterings

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Nian; Wu Yiming; Wang Jianping

    2011-04-01

    It was demonstrated that Fe-N martensite ({alpha}') films were grown epitaxially on Fe(001) seeded GaAs(001) single crystal wafer by using a facing target sputtering method. X-ray diffraction pattern implies an increasing c lattice constant as the N concentration increases in the films. Partially ordered Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} films were synthesized after in situ post-annealing the as-sputtered samples with pure Fe{sub 8}N phase. Multiple characterization techniques including XRD, XRR, TEM, and AES were used to determine the sample structure. The saturation magnetization of films with pure Fe{sub 8}N phase measured by VSM was evaluated in the range of 2.0-2.2 T. The post annealed films show systematic and dramatic increase on the saturation magnetization, which possess an average value of 2.6 T. These observations support the existence of giant saturation magnetization in {alpha}''-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase that is consistent with a recent proposed cluster-atom model and the first principles calculation [N. Ji, X. Q. Liu, and J. P. Wang, New J. Phys. 12 063032 (2010)].

  15. Quantifying Surface Kinetic Fractionations for Isotopes and Trace Elements in Calcite Precipitated from Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaolo, D. J.; Nielsen, L. C.; Hofmann, A. E.; DeYoreo, J.; Gagnon, A. C.; Watkins, J. M.; Ryerson, F. J.; Brown, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    The isotopic ratios and trace element concentrations in calcite and other carbonate minerals form the basis for several paleoenvironmental indicators that are relied upon to reconstruct past Earth climates and ocean processes. Most of these carbonate minerals form at low temperatures (0 to 30C) and consequently are unlikely to have precipitated from aqueous solutions at equilibrium. The non-equilibrium nature of the precipitation process is well illustrated by the experimentally demonstrated precipitation rate-dependence of parameters such as the Ca and O isotopic composition, and the Sr, Mg, and Mn concentrations of calcite. We have been focused on understanding how to predict the magnitude and controls on these kinetic effects using a general transition-state theory approach, as well as models of ion-by-ion growth, molecular dynamics simulations of the desolvation step required for addition of cations to a mineral surface, and further experiments that involve carefully controlled solution compositions and crystal growth rates. Although models have been proposed that invoke diffusion as the primary control on the non-equilibrium aspects of calcite precipitation, it is relatively easy to show that diffusion is not likely to be the primary controlling process. We have focused on understanding the kinetic effects operating at and near the mineral surface, which are undeniably present and important, and appear to be of the correct magnitude and direction to account for observations in both laboratory and natural calcites. The approach we are using is also applicable to higher temperature aqueous precipitation. There are indications from Ca isotopes that similar surface kinetic effects occur at temperatures of 300 to 400C. Kinetic isotope and trace element effects are critically dependent on molecular exchange rates between the mineral surface and the aqueous solution, and the ratio of these rates to the net crystal growth rate. The challenge is to predict and

  16. Strontium incorporation into calcite generated by bacterial ureolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Redden, George D.; Ingram, Jani C.; Cortez, Marnie M.; Ferris, F. Grant; Smith, Robert W.

    2004-08-01

    Strontium incorporation into calcite generated by bacterial ureolysis was investigated as part of an assessment of a proposed remediation approach for 90Sr contamination in groundwater. Urea hydrolysis produces ammonium and carbonate and elevates pH, resulting in the promotion of calcium carbonate precipitation. Urea hydrolysis by the bacterium Bacillus pasteurii in a medium designed to mimic the chemistry of the Snake River Plain Aquifer in Idaho resulted in a pH rise from 7.5 to 9.1. Measured average distribution coefficients (D EX) for Sr in the calcite produced by ureolysis (0.5) were up to an order of magnitude higher than values reported in the literature for natural and synthetic calcites (0.02-0.4). They were also higher than values for calcite produced abiotically by ammonium carbonate addition (0.3). The precipitation of calcite in these experiments was verified by X-ray diffraction. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS) depth profiling (up to 350 nm) suggested that the Sr was not merely sorbed on the surface, but was present at depth within the particles. X-ray absorption near edge spectra showed that Sr was present in the calcite samples as a solid solution. The extent of Sr incorporation appeared to be driven primarily by the overall rate of calcite precipitation, where faster precipitation was associated with greater Sr uptake into the solid. The presence of bacterial surfaces as potential nucleation sites in the ammonium carbonate precipitation treatment did not enhance overall precipitation or the Sr distribution coefficient. Because bacterial ureolysis can generate high rates of calcite precipitation, the application of this approach is promising for remediation of 90Sr contamination in environments where calcite is stable over the long term.

  17. Calcitization and silicification of evaporites in Guadalupian back-reef carbonates of the Delaware basin, west Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, D.S.; Scholle, P.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Outcrop of the Seven Rivers, Yates, and Tansill formations contain numerous examples of evaporites that have been replaced by both quartz and calcite. The original evaporites consisted of discrete horizons, scattered nodules, enterolithic layers, and individual crystal laths of gypsum and/or anhydrite within a predominantly dolomitic matrix. Based on field and petrographic observations, evaporite replacement proceeded from the exterior to the interior of the nodules. The earliest replacement was by euhedral, black megaquartz containing abundant hydrocarbon inclusions. Calcite replacement followed silicification and consists of coarse, equant, blocky spar. Isotopic analyses of these calcites form two distinct groups: the first group ranges from -10.9 to -20.1{per thousand} (average -16.4{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 13}C and -6.4 to -13.8{per thousand} (average -10.9{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 18}O; the second group ranges from +1.4 to 5.8{per thousand} (average -2.4{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 13}C and -6.2 to 14.1{per thousand} (average -9.2{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 18}O. Evaporite silicification was coeval with hydrocarbon migration as indicated by the inclusion data. Calcitization, however, was associated with mid-Tertiary block faulting that uplifted the area causing deep groundwater circulation. The isotopically very light calcites resulted from the mixing of meteoric fluids and hydrocarbon-rich pore fluids, probably during early uplift while these strata were still at significant depth. The calcites with heavier isotopic values were produced somewhat later by meteoric fluids that had little or no contact with hydrocarbons. Evaporite diagenesis in the Delaware basin is an ongoing process that started during hydrocarbon migration, continued over millions of years, and has the potential to significantly change the porosity of these units.

  18. Crystallization Pathways in Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2011-08-01

    A crystallization pathway describes the movement of ions from their source to the final product. Cells are intimately involved in biological crystallization pathways. In many pathways the cells utilize a unique strategy: They temporarily concentrate ions in intracellular membrane-bound vesicles in the form of a highly disordered solid phase. This phase is then transported to the final mineralization site, where it is destabilized and crystallizes. We present four case studies, each of which demonstrates specific aspects of biological crystallization pathways: seawater uptake by foraminifera, calcite spicule formation by sea urchin larvae, goethite formation in the teeth of limpets, and guanine crystal formation in fish skin and spider cuticles. Three representative crystallization pathways are described, and aspects of the different stages of crystallization are discussed. An in-depth understanding of these complex processes can lead to new ideas for synthetic crystallization processes of interest to materials science.

  19. Formation of chiral morphologies through selective binding of amino acids to calcite surface steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, C. A.; Noy, A.; Wierzbicki, A.; McBride, M. T.; Grantham, M.; Teng, H. H.; Dove, P. M.; DeYoreo, J. J.

    2001-06-01

    Many living organisms contain biominerals and composites with finely tuned properties, reflecting a remarkable level of control over the nucleation, growth and shape of the constituent crystals. Peptides and proteins play an important role in achieving this control. But the general view that organic molecules affect mineralization through stereochemical recognition, where geometrical and chemical constraints dictate their binding to a mineral, seems difficult to reconcile with a mechanistic understanding, where crystallization is controlled by thermodynamic and kinetic factors. Indeed, traditional crystal growth models emphasize the inhibiting effect of so-called `modifiers' on surface-step growth, rather than stereochemical matching to newly expressed crystal facets. Here we report in situ atomic force microscope observations and molecular modelling studies of calcite growth in the presence of chiral amino acids that reconcile these two seemingly divergent views. We find that enantiomer-specific binding of the amino acids to those surface-step edges that offer the best geometric and chemical fit changes the step-edge free energies, which in turn results in macroscopic crystal shape modifications. Our results emphasize that the mechanism underlying crystal modification through organic molecules is best understood by considering both stereochemical recognition and the effects of binding on the interfacial energies of the growing crystal.

  20. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, M; Di Tommaso, D; Du, Z; de Leeuw, N H

    2012-11-21

    Calcite-water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity. Firstly, we employ classical Molecular Dynamics simulations of calcite surfaces containing an etch pit and a growth terrace, to show that the local environment in water around structurally different surface sites is distinct. In addition to observing the expected formation of more calcium-water interactions and hydrogen-bonds at lower-coordinated sites, we also observed subtle differences in hydrogen bonding around acute versus obtuse edges and corners. We subsequently used this information to refine the protonation constants for the calcite surface sites, according to the Charge Distribution MUltiSite Ion Complexation (CD-MUSIC) approach. The subtle differences in hydrogen bonding translate into markedly different charging behaviour versus pH, in particular for acute versus obtuse corner sites. The results show quantitatively that calcite surface reactivity is directly related to surface topography. The information obtained in this study is not only crucial for the improvement of existing macroscopic surface models of the reactivity of calcite towards contaminants, but also improves our atomic-level understanding of mineral-water interactions.

  1. High-pressure deformation of calcite marble and its transformation to aragonite under non-hydrostatic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, B.R.; Kirby, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    We conducted deformation experiments on Carrara marble in the aragonite and calcite stability fields to observe the synkinematic transformation of calcite to aragonite, and to identify any relationships between transformation and deformation or sample strength. Deformation-induced microstructures in calcite crystals varied most significantly with temperature, ranging from limited slip and twinning at 400??C, limited recrystallization at 500??C, widespread recrystallization at 600 and 700??C, to grain growth at 800-900??C. Variations in confining pressure from 0.3 to 2.0 GPa have no apparent effect on calcite deformation microstructures. Aragonite grew in 10-6-10-7 s-1strain rate tests conducted for 18-524 h at confining pressures of 1.7-2.0 GPa and temperatures of 500-600??C. As in our previously reported hydrostatic experiments on this same transformation, the aragonite nucleated on calcite grain boundaries. The extent of transformation varied from a few percent conversion near pistons at 400??C, 2.0 GPa and 10-4 s-1 strain rate in a 0.8 h long experiment, to 98% transformation in a 21-day test at a strain rate of 10-7 s-7, a temperature of 600??C and a pressure of 2.0 GPa. At 500??C, porphyroblastic 100-200 ??m aragonite crystals grew at a rate faster than 8 ?? 10-1m s-1. At 600??C, the growth of aragonite neoblasts was slower, ???6 ?? 10-1 m s -1, and formed 'glove-and-finger' cellularprecipitation-like textures identical to those observed in hydrostatic experiments. The transformation to aragonite is not accompanied by a shear instability or anisotropic aragonite growth, consistent with its relatively small volume change and latent heat in comparison with compounds that do display those features. ?? 1993.

  2. Annual trace element cycles in calcite-aragonite speleothems: evidence of drought in the western Mediterranean 1200-1100 yr BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Emily A.; Fairchild, Ian J.; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea; McDermott, Frank

    2005-07-01

    Each of two calcitic stalagmites from Grotte de Clamouse, Herault, southern France, displays a discrete aragonite layer dated at around 1100 yr BP. The layer of fanning aragonite ray crystals is immediately preceded by calcite with Mg and Sr compositions that are uniquely high for the past 3 kyr. Trace element compositions close to the boundary between original aragonite and calcite are consistent with quasi-equilibrium partitioning of trace elements between the phases. Study of modern dripwaters demonstrates that pronounced covariation of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in dripwater occurs owing to large amounts of calcite precipitation upflow of the drips that fed the stalagmites. Trace element to Ca ratios are enhanced during seasonally dry periods. Ion microprobe data demonstrate a pronounced covariation of trace elements, including Mg and Sr in calcite, and Sr, U and Ba in aragonite. The mean peak spacing is close to the long-term mean of annual growth rates determined by differences in U-series ages and so the trace element peaks are interpreted as annual. The trace element chemistry of the stalagmites on annual to inter-annual scales thus directly reflects the amounts of prior calcite precipitation, interpreted as an index of aridity. The longer-term context is a multi-decadal period of aridity (1200-1100 yr BP) possibly correlated with an analogous episode in Central America. The arid period culminated in the nucleation of aragonite, but within a decade was followed by a return to precursor conditions. Copyright

  3. Paleoclimatic and paleohydrologic records from secondary calcite: Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.F.; Stuckless, J.S.; Moscati, R.J.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1994-12-31

    Stable isotope analyses of calcite and opal, fluid inclusion formation conditions and gas compositions, Sr isotope ratios, and REE compositions all support formation of secondary calcite in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain from infiltration of surface-derived (and soil zone buffered) waters of meteoric origin. Detailed sampling of growth-banding preserved by the secondary calcite should provide a record of past variations in the stable isotope chemistry of these infiltrating waters, and, hence, of precipitation at Yucca Mountain, i.e., a proxy of past climate at Yucca Mountain. The precision of this record depends on how well it can be dated. The distribution and texture of secondary calcite occurrences, if mapped in careful detail from existing bore hole samples and underground workings (as exposures become accessible), could provide a time/space map of fracture and fault unsaturated-zone ground water flow-paths during past wetter climates which might prevail in the future with change in climate.

  4. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Piers; *Morse, John W.

    2010-11-15

    1. Objective The general objective of this research was to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and modest ranges of T and P. This would be done by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry. Also, nanoscale observations of calcite surface morphology and composition would be made to provide an understanding of rate controlling mechanisms.

  5. Mg isotope fractionation during calcite precipitation: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Ségolène; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Vigier, Nathalie; Chaussidon, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Experimental precipitations of calcite and other carbonate minerals were performed under various conditions of pH, temperature and solution Mg/Ca to determine the Mg partition coefficient and Mg isotope fractionation. Fifteen experiments were performed at pH ranging from 7.41 ± 0.07 to 8.51 ± 0.39, temperature ranging from 16.2 ± 0.7 to 26.5 ± 0.3 °C and Mg/Casolution ranging from 0.11 to 0.52 mol/mol. The apparent Mg partition coefficient between calcite and solution (DMg) spans a large range of values from 0.018 ± 0.014 to 0.15 ± 0.11 and carbonate Mg isotope fractionation (Δ26Mg) ranges from -2.53 ± 0.25‰ to -1.33 ± 0.14‰ and does not correlate with either pH or temperature. The range in DMg and Δ26Mg suggests non-equilibrium partitioning controlled by the processes of calcite growth, i.e. mixing between calcite grown at equilibrium and fluid inclusions, and entrapment of a surface Mg-rich calcite layer in isotopic equilibrium with the solution. The equilibrium Mg isotope fractionation between inorganic calcite and solution is estimated to be -2.13 ± 0.24‰. Additional Mg elemental and isotopic fractionations are observed to occur during biogenic formation of calcite due to variable removal of Mg by the organisms (high-Mg calcite corals, foraminifera) of seawater Mg from their calcification medium.

  6. Indications for the past redox environments in deep groundwaters from the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in fracture calcite, Olkiluoto, SW Finland.

    PubMed

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Karhu, Juha A; Pitkanen, Petteri

    2010-09-01

    In paleohydrogeological studies, the geochemical and isotope geochemical composition of fracture calcites can be utilised to gain information about the evolution of the composition of deep groundwaters in crystalline bedrock. The aim of our study was to investigate the latest hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwaters in the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto, which is the planned site for deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Samples were collected from drill cores intercepting water-conducting fractures at the upper ~500 m of the bedrock. The latest fracture calcite generations were identified using optical microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur as thin ~10-200 μm crusts or small euhedral crystals on open fracture surfaces. These latest calcite fillings were carefully sampled and analysed for the isotopic composition on carbon and oxygen. In addition, fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures were determined on selected calcite samples. Fluid inclusion data indicated a low temperature of formation for the latest fracture calcite fillings. The δ(18)O values of calcite in these fracture fillings vary only slightly, from-7.3 to-11.5 ‰ (Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite, VPDB), whereas the δ(13)C values fluctuate widely, from-30 to+31 ‰ (VPDB). The δ(13)C values of latest calcite fillings show a systematic pattern with depth, with high and variable δ(13)C values below 50 m. The high δ(13)C values indicate active methanogenesis during the formation of the latest calcite fillings. In contrast, the present-day methanic redox environment is restricted to depths below 200-300 m. It is possible that the shift in the redox environment at Olkiluoto has occurred during infiltration of SO2-(4)-rich marine waters, the latest of such events being the infiltration of brackish waters of the Littorina Sea stage of the Baltic Sea at ~8000-3000 BP. PMID:20665300

  7. Indications for the past redox environments in deep groundwaters from the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in fracture calcite, Olkiluoto, SW Finland.

    PubMed

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Karhu, Juha A; Pitkanen, Petteri

    2010-09-01

    In paleohydrogeological studies, the geochemical and isotope geochemical composition of fracture calcites can be utilised to gain information about the evolution of the composition of deep groundwaters in crystalline bedrock. The aim of our study was to investigate the latest hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwaters in the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto, which is the planned site for deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Samples were collected from drill cores intercepting water-conducting fractures at the upper ~500 m of the bedrock. The latest fracture calcite generations were identified using optical microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur as thin ~10-200 μm crusts or small euhedral crystals on open fracture surfaces. These latest calcite fillings were carefully sampled and analysed for the isotopic composition on carbon and oxygen. In addition, fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures were determined on selected calcite samples. Fluid inclusion data indicated a low temperature of formation for the latest fracture calcite fillings. The δ(18)O values of calcite in these fracture fillings vary only slightly, from-7.3 to-11.5 ‰ (Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite, VPDB), whereas the δ(13)C values fluctuate widely, from-30 to+31 ‰ (VPDB). The δ(13)C values of latest calcite fillings show a systematic pattern with depth, with high and variable δ(13)C values below 50 m. The high δ(13)C values indicate active methanogenesis during the formation of the latest calcite fillings. In contrast, the present-day methanic redox environment is restricted to depths below 200-300 m. It is possible that the shift in the redox environment at Olkiluoto has occurred during infiltration of SO2-(4)-rich marine waters, the latest of such events being the infiltration of brackish waters of the Littorina Sea stage of the Baltic Sea at ~8000-3000 BP.

  8. Climate and cave control on Pleistocene/Holocene calcite-to-aragonite transitions in speleothems from Morocco: Elemental and isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Fietzke, Jan; Deininger, Michael; Goos, Manuela; Scholz, Denis; Sabaoui, Abdellah

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence of aragonite in speleothems has commonly been related to high dripwater Mg/Ca ratios, because Mg is known to be a growth inhibitor for calcite. Laboratory aragonite precipitation experiments, however, suggested a more complex array of controlling factors. Here, we present data from Pleistocene to Holocene speleothems collected from both a dolostone and a limestone cave in northern Morocco. These stalagmites exhibit both lateral and stratigraphic calcite-to-aragonite transitions. Aragonite fabrics are well-preserved and represent primary features. In order to shed light on the factors that control alternating calcite and aragonite precipitation, elemental (Mg, Sr, Ba, U, P, Y, Pb, Al, Ti and Th) abundances were measured using LA-ICP-MS, and analysed with Principal Component Analysis. Samples were analyzed at 100-200 μm resolution across stratigraphic and lateral transitions. Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were analysed at 100 μm resolution covering stratigraphic calcite-to-aragonite transitions. Results show that the precipitation of aragonite was driven by a decrease in effective rainfall, which enhanced prior calcite precipitation. Different geochemical patterns are observed between calcite and aragonite when comparing data from the Grotte de Piste and Grotte Prison de Chien. This may be explained by the increased dripwater Mg/Ca ratio and enhanced prior aragonite precipitation in the dolostone cave versus lower dripwater Mg/Ca ratio and prior calcite precipitation in the limestone cave. A full understanding for the presence of lateral calcite-to-aragonite transitions is not reached. Trace elemental analysis, however, does suggest that different crystallographic parameters (ionic radius, amount of crystal defect sites, adsorption potential) may have a direct effect on the incorporation of Sr, Mg, Ba, Al, Ti, Th and possibly Y and P.

  9. Vertical Distribution of Calcite at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as an Indicator of Flow Through a Thick Unsaturated Zone

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman

    2001-07-20

    Meteoric water percolating through 500 to 700 m of hydrologically unsaturated felsic tuffs provides a mechanism for release and transport of radionuclides from a potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Modern flow through the unsaturated zone (UZ) is low (probably <20 mm/year) and has not been observed directly. However, calcite formed from water percolating through fracture and lithophysal cavities over the last 12.8 million years provides, in part, a time-integrated record of UZ flow. Calcite concentration profiles were determined in dry-drilled boreholes USW WT-24 and USW SD-6 by acidifying samples of powdered rock cuttings collected over 5-foot intervals and measuring the evolved CO{sub 2} using gas chromatography. Resulting CO{sub 2}-derived calcite concentrations ranged from 30,800 to less than 20 ppm. Aliquots of the same powders also were analyzed for Ca, Ti, and Zr by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence. Concentrations of Ti and Zr in the crystal-poor, high-silica rhyolite parts of the Topopah Spring Tuff are uniform (standard deviations of 3 to 4%); however, Ca scatters widely (standard deviations of 21 and 32%). Concentrations of Ca are positively correlated to CO{sub 2}-derived calcite concentrations and regressions for samples of the two major rhyolitic tuffs yielded r{sup 2} values >0.9, CO{sub 2}-intercept Ca concentrations in the range of values determined on fresh rock samples, and slopes equivalent to addition of stoichiometric calcite. Therefore, combined CO{sub 2} and Ca data provide a means of determining the amount of secondary calcite added to the rock mass from percolating water. The vertical distribution of calcite is related to lithostratigraphy with the largest concentrations in the welded hydrogeologic unit of the Tiva Canyon Tuff near the land surface and progressively smaller values with depth into the underlying nonwelded units. Large values also may be present in the upper parts of the underlying

  10. Relative Shock Effects in Mixed Powders of Calcite, Gypsum, and Quartz: A Calibration Scheme from Shock Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    The shock behavior of calcite and gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Tertiary event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets. Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of CO2 or SO2 to better understand their role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [e.g., papers in 1,2,3,4]. Devolatilization of carbonate is also important because the dispersion and fragmentation of ejecta is strongly controlled by the expansion of large volumes of gas during the impact process as well [5,6]. Shock recovery experiments for calcite yield seemingly conflicting results: early experimental devolatilization studies [7,8,9] suggested that calcite was substantially outgassed at 30 GPa (> 50%). However, the recent petrographic work of [10,11,12] presented evidence that essentially intact calcite is recovered from 60 GPa experiments. [13] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of those phases with silica. Their observations indicate little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another (preliminary) report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, [14] observe calcite recrystallization when shock loaded at 61 GPa, only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa. [15] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa. All of the quartz grains were trans-formed to glass and the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggest that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid state transformation. [16] reanalyzed the calcite and anhydrite shock

  11. Microstructure and frictional properties of sheared calcite speleothems: natural vs. experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, I.; Tesei, T.; Grasemann, B.; Collettini, C.; Plan, L.; Baron, I.

    2015-12-01

    Several alpine caves in Austria preserve evidences related to active faulting, such as broken and scratched speleothems. Here, in order to better understand fault slip behavior and related potential earthquake hazards, microstructures of experimentally deformed speleothems are presented and compared with naturally deformed ones. Speleothems are monomineralitic rocks precipitated in caves, composed of columnar centimeter-scale calcite crystals with strong growth orientation. In order to better study the origin and evolution of deformation in faulted speleothems we performed sliding experiments using a rock deformation biaxial apparatus. In order to recreate the faulting conditions observed in Austrian caves, speleothems were cut into rectangular blocks and sheared against each other, with long growth axes of calcite perpendicular to the shearing direction. The experiments were performed under room conditions, sliding velocity in the range of 0.001-0.01 mm/s, and constant effective normal stress of 3 MPa. The mechanical data show fairly high friction coefficient (0.7-0.95) accompanied by the production of calcite-rich fault gouge which displays Riedel shears within a foliated cataclasite and drastic grain size reduction (nano-scale). The transition from the fault gouge towards the undeformed crystals is characterized first by a series of in situ jigsaw puzzle fracturing, then dense mechanical twin network, which is decreasing in its intensity away from the gouge (i.e. principal slip surface). The similarity between laboratory induced and naturally formed microstructures reinforce the tectonic interpretation of the damaged speleothems. Detailed microstructure investigations, including electron backscattered diffraction technique combined with electron microprobe and cathodoluminescence, are on the way to help distinguishing between seismic slip and/or aseismic creep.

  12. The kinetics of the ordering of 13C-18O bonds in calcite and apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, D. A.; Halevy, I.; Eiler, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Eiler and Schauble (2004) showed that the isotopes of C and O are not randomly distributed within single phases such as CO2 gas and carbonates, and in particular, that heavy isotopes of C and O tend to bond preferentially (clump) at lower temperatures. Consequently, the measurement of the deviation from a random distribution of C and O isotope distributions in a single phase can be used as a thermometer. As with other geothermometers based on homogeneous or heterogeneous equilibria, the clumped-isotope thermometer is susceptible to resetting (e.g., if the phase is reheated or experiences slow cooling). Thus, clumped-isotope "temperatures" of phases that have experienced complex thermal histories may, in fact, be closure temperatures, the interpretation of which requires quantification of the kinetics of redistribution of C and O isotopes as a function of temperature. These kinetics have received increasing attention (Dennis and Schrag, 2010; Passey 2010), and are likely to be critical for understanding clumped-isotope temperatures of samples that have been buried for long periods of time. To better constrain these kinetics we performed experiments on natural optical calcite from Mexico and carbonate-bearing apatite from the Siilinjarvi carbonatite (Finland). For each experiment, multiple single crystal grains (~2 mm in diameter) of calcite or apatite were loaded in open Pt capsules, pressurized with Ar gas, and held at 400-700 °C, 550 bars using a rapid quench TZM apparatus for 5 min to 520 hrs. After quenching, 13C-18O clumping was measured in the samples; the change from the initial Δ47 with time for each phase at each temperature was fit to simple mechanistic models of isotope exchange between sites in these phases. One conclusion of the experimental study is that resetting the internal ordering of carbonate groups proceeds more rapidly in calcites than in apatites. For example, heating apatite at 400 °C results in no change in clumping over a 24 hr period

  13. Palaeotemperature reconstruction during the Last Glacial from δ18O of earthworm calcite granules from Nussloch loess sequence, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Charlotte; Lécuyer, Christophe; Antoine, Pierre; Moine, Olivier; Hatté, Christine; Fourel, François; Martineau, François; Rousseau, Denis-Didier

    2016-05-01

    The Nussloch loess-palaeosol sequence (Rhine Valley, Germany) is considered to be one of the most complete records of the last glacial period in Western Europe due to its very high sedimentation rate and its good chronological control. This sequence is therefore a good framework in which to develop new proxies for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. In this study, we explore, for the first time, the potential of earthworm calcite granules as a new bio-indicator and climatic proxy of absolute air and soil temperature in the context of Last Glacial loess. These granules are composed of rhomboedric calcite crystals, organized in a radial crystalline structure. As these granules are individually generated by earthworms at a relative fast rate, they are expected to record intra-annual variations in the available sources of oxygen: percolating waters of meteoric origin. We extracted thirty earthworm calcite granules from 11 of 5 cm layers thick from tundra gley and brown soil horizons previously, dated at 45 to 23 ka. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured on each individual granule. The δ18O of calcite granules and interlinked transfer functions between water cycle, air and soil temperatures allowed us to estimate air temperatures ranging from 10 to 12 ± 4°C, which most likely reflect the warm periods of the year when earthworms were the most active.

  14. Calcite Farming at Hollow Ridge Cave: Calibrating Net Rainfall and Cave Microclimate to Dripwater and Calcite Chemical Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, D. M.; Kilgore, B. P.; Froelich, P. N.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) and trace element records in cave speleothems are often interpreted as climate changes in rainfall amount or source, cave air temperature, overlying vegetation and atmospheric pCO2. However, these records are difficult to verify without in situ calibration of changes in cave microclimate (e.g., net rainfall, interior ventilation changes) to contemporaneous variations in dripwater and speleothem chemistry. In this study at Hollow Ridge Cave (HRC) in Marianna, Florida (USA), cave dripwater, bedrock, and modern calcite (farmed in situ) were collected in conjunction with continuous cave air pCO2, temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, radon-222 activity, airflow velocity and direction, rainfall amount, and drip rate data [1]. We analyzed rain and dripwater δD and δ18O, dripwater Ca2+, pH, δ13C and TCO2, cave air pCO2 and δ13C, and farmed calcite δ18O and δ13C to examine the relationships among rainwater isotopic composition, cave air ventilation, cave air temperature, calcite growth rate and seasonal timing, and calcite isotopic composition. Farmed calcite δ13C decreases linearly with distance from the front entrance to the interior of the cave during all seasons, with a maximum entrance-to-interior gradient of Δδ13C = -7‰ . A whole-cave "Hendy test" at distributed contemporaneous farming sites reveals that ventilation induces a +1.9 ± 0.96‰ δ13C offset between calcite precipitated in a ventilation flow path and out of flow paths. Farmed calcite δ18O exhibits a +0.82 ± 0.24‰ offset from values predicted by both theoretical calcite-water calculations and by laboratory-grown calcite [2]. Unlike calcite δ13C, oxygen isotopes show no ventilation effects and are a function only of temperature. Combining our data with other speleothem studies, we find a new empirical relationship for cave-specific water-calcite oxygen isotope fractionation across a range of temperatures and cave environments: 1000 ln α = 16

  15. Calcite precipitation on glass substrates and active stalagmites in Katerloch Cave (Austria): Constraints from environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakoparnig, Marlene; Boch, Ronny; Wang, Xianfeng; Lin, Ke; Spötl, Christoph; Leis, Albrecht; Gollowitsch, Anna; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Located near Graz at the SE-rim of the Alps Katerloch is well-known for its impressive dripstone decoration, e.g. several metres tall and relatively fast growing (0.2-0.7 mm/yr on average) candle-stick-type stalagmites. In the course of an ongoing multi-annual and partially high-resolution cave monitoring program we study modern (active) sites of carbonate deposition focusing on the site-specific growth dynamics and connection of modern regional and cave environmental conditions with petrographic, chemical and stable isotopic information captured in the speleothems. Fresh calcite precipitates on artificial (glass) substrates underneath active drip sites were collected continuously from 2006 to 2014 (eight years!). The samples (up to 7 mm thick) represent cave sections of different temperature and drip sites of partially different characteristics (e.g. drip rate). We also recovered short drill cores (up to 3 cm length, 1 cm diameter) from the top of active stalagmites probably representing the last decades to centuries of calcite crystallization. Moreover, an actively growing stalagmite (K10) comprising both modern and past calcite deposition was collected. 238U-234U-230Th dating using MC-ICP-MS of K10 (71 cm long) revealed several distinct growth intervals (separated by growth interruptions) starting at 129.1 ±1.2 kyr BP (Last Interglacial) up to now, mostly reflecting warm and humid climate intervals. High-resolution (100 μm) isotope profiles micromilled from the multi-annual modern calcite precipitates on artificial substrates revealed low δ13C values of -12.8 to -8.3 ‰ (VPDB) and relatively high δ18O of -6.9 to -4.9 ‰Ṫhe δ18O curves from all collection sites (different growth rate) record a pronounced decrease during their most recent growth period most likely corresponding to a significant decrease towards lower oxygen isotope values observed in drip waters collected in the year 2014 compared with samples from 2005 to 2007. Drip water δ2H /δ18O

  16. Controls on Calcite Solubility in Metamorphic and Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Eguchi, J.; Galvez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Calcite is an important hydrothermal alteration product in a wide range of environments. The role of calcite in hydrothermal alteration depends on its solubility in geologic fluids, especially H2O. At ambient T and P, calcite solubility is low and it exhibits well-known declining, or "reverse", solubility with rising T. However, experimental and theoretical studies show that increasing P yields higher solubility and restricts the region of reverse solubility behavior to higher temperature. At 0.2 GPa the reverse solubility region lies at T>600°C; at 0.5 GPa, >800°C. Thus, whereas calcite possesses relatively low solubility in pure H2O in shallow hydrothermal systems (typically <10 ppm C), it is substantially more soluble at conditions of middle and lower crustal metamorphism and magmatism, reaching concentrations ≥1000 ppm. At the higher P of subduction zones, aragonite solubility in H2O is even greater. Thus, neglecting other solubility controls, calcite precipitation is favored as crustal fluids cool and/or decompress. However, the solubility of calcite in H2O also depends strongly on other solutes, pH, and fO2. Sources of alkalinity decrease calcite solubility. In contrast, sources of acidity such as CO2 and Cl increase solubility. Crustal fluids can be enriched in alkali halides such as NaCl. Calcite solubility increases with increasing salt content at a given P and T. From approximately seawater salinity to salt saturation, the fluid behaves as a dilute molten salt and calcite solubility increases as the square of the salt mole fraction regardless of the alkali (Li, Na, K, Cs) or halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) considered. Similar behavior is seen in mixed salt solutions. At lower salinities, solubility behavior is as expected in dilute electrolyte solutions. The transition from dilute electrolyte to molten salt is fundamental to the properties of crustal fluids. Reduction of carbonate species or CO2 in the fluid to CH4, which is common during serpentinization of

  17. Defluoridation of drinking water by boiling with brushite and calcite.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M J; Pearce, E I F

    2002-01-01

    Existing methods for defluoridating drinking water involve expensive high technology or are slow, inefficient and/or unhygienic. A new method is now suggested, encompassing brushite and calcite suspension followed by boiling. Our aim was to examine the efficiency of the method and the chemical reactions involved. Brushite, 0.3-0.5 g, and an equal weight of calcite were suspended in 1 litre water containing 5-20 ppm fluoride. The suspensions were boiled in an electric kettle, left to cool and the calcium salts to sediment. Solution ion concentrations were determined and sediments were examined by X-ray diffraction. In distilled water initially containing 5, 10 and 20 ppm fluoride the concentration was reduced to 0.06, 0.4 and 5.9 ppm, respectively. Using Aarhus tap water which contained 2.6 mmol/l calcium the final concentrations were 1.2, 2.5 and 7.7 ppm, respectively, and runs without calcite gave results similar to those with calcite. Without boiling the fluoride concentration remained unaltered, as did the brushite and calcite salts, despite occasional agitation by hand. All solutions were supersaturated with respect to fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite and close to saturation with respect to brushite. Boiling produced well-crystallised apatite and traces of calcite, while boiling of brushite alone left a poorly crystallised apatite. We conclude that boiling a brushite/calcite suspension rapidly converts the two salts to apatite which incorporates fluoride if present in solution, and that this process may be exploited to defluoridate drinking water.

  18. Grain size dependency in clumped isotope ratios in high temperature calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Y.; Ghosh, P.; Misra, S.

    2013-12-01

    Here we have extended the application of clumped isotope thermometry for understanding the geospeedometers using calcite produced at high temperature and pressure. Static recrystallization experiments were conducted on cylindrical discs of AR grade carbonate with three different grain sizes (40μm, 200μm and 400μm) at constant pressure (170×5 MPa) and two different temperatures (6000×10°C and 8000×10°C) for 24 hours. The rate of temperature ramps for heating and cooling were set at 20°C/min and 60°C/min, respectively, mimicking a laboratory scale metamorphic condition of sudden burial and exhumation. The carbonate rocks, with prominent calcite mineral composition were prepared in a cylindrical capsule and were investigated for grain size distribution using Mastersizer, a laser technology to measure grain size. We identified three categories of crystals with grain size varying between 40μm, 200μm and 400μm. 15mg carbonate powder drilled from the periphery of the cylindrical discs were analysed for Clumped isotope ratio (Ghosh et al., 2006). Calcite formation experiment allowed re-crystallization of original powder produced at ambient temperature by subjecting the experimental setup to the temperatures of 800 and 600°C (Pressure was maintained constant at 170×5 MPa). We found broadly three different grain size fractions measured using in-situ laser probe. The present experiments were performed in dry environment unlike the wet high pressure experiment presented in the Passey and Henkes (2012). The present experimental value for Δ 47 was translated into absolute temperature using thermometry equation proposed by Ghosh et al., (2006). We observed a strong relationship of clumped isotopic composition with grain sizes of carbonates, which was rather inconsistent with the earlier presumption (Passey and Henkes 2012). The clumped temperature value was found matching with the true temperature in cases where grain size attained 400 micron, while finer fraction

  19. Calcite and Picocyanobacteria in Lakes: Factors Affecting Their Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, M.; Obst, M.; Mavrocordatos, D.

    2003-12-01

    Calcites build large deposits which have been observed in the rock record throughout geological time at various localities around the globe. Carbonate deposits have affected atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. As it has been generally accepted, inorganic precipitation represents a source of carbon dioxide on short geological time scales and a sink of inorganic carbon at long time scales from millions to thousands of millions years. However, recent research indicates that calcite deposits may result from microbial calcification instead of inorganic precipitation. In this case the process may reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide on geologically short time scales. Thus the effect of carbonate sediment deposition on global carbon cycling depends on the origin of carbonate. Thus it is essential to understand the cause and the key parameters affecting calcite precipitation. The role of algae and bacteria in calcite formation in lakes has not been evaluated in detail. Some evidence, however, exists supporting precipitation of calcium carbonate by microbes as the origin of whiting. Several field studies on lakes have also produced puzzling results: The peaks of algal blooms were often not found at the same time as precipitation events of calcite. We suspect that parts of the discrepancies in the interpretation of field observations are due to the activity of autotrophic picoplankton. The unicellular autotrophic picoplankton (APP) is a ubiquitous component of pelagic ecosystems. But it has often been overlooked due to its small cell size of 0.2 - 2 μ m in diameter. Coccoid picocyanobacteria of the Synechococcus-type dominate the picoplankton community in most oligotrophic systems. Recently, laboratory experiments and field observations suggested that APP may play an important role in calcite precipitation. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of environmental factors such as saturation state, concentration of different dissolved ions and characteristics of

  20. Polysaccharide chemistry regulates kinetics of calcite nucleation through competition of interfacial energies

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Laura M.; Han, Nizhou; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Here we quantify the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto a suite of high-purity polysaccharide (PS) substrates under controlled conditions. The energy barriers to nucleation are PS-specific by a systematic relationship to PS charge density and substrate structure that is rooted in minimization of the competing substrate–crystal and substrate–liquid interfacial energies. Chitosan presents a low-energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate–crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate–crystal interfaces. The findings support a directing role for PS in biomineral formation and demonstrate that substrate–crystal interactions are one end-member in a larger continuum of competing forces that regulate heterogeneous crystal nucleation. PMID:23690577

  1. Hydrochemical controls on aragonite versus calcite precipitation in cave dripwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Carlos; Lozano, Rafael P.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the paleoclimatic relevance of primary calcite to aragonite transitions in stalagmites, the relative role of fluid Mg/Ca ratio, supersaturation and CO32- concentration in controlling such transitions is still incompletely understood. Accordingly, we have monitored the hydrochemistry of 50 drips and 8 pools that are currently precipitating calcite and/or aragonite in El Soplao and Torca Ancha Caves (N. Spain), investigating the mineralogy and geochemistry of the CaCO3 precipitates on the corresponding natural speleothem surfaces. The data reveal that, apart from possible substrate effects, dripwater Mg/Ca is the only obvious control on CaCO3 polymorphism in the studied stalagmites and pools, where calcite- and aragonite-precipitating dripwaters are separated by an initial (i.e. at stalactite tips) Mg/Ca threshold at ≈1.1 mol/mol. Within the analyzed ranges of pH (8.2-8.6), CO32- concentration (1-6 mg/L), supersaturation (SIaragonite: 0.08-1.08; SIcalcite: 0.23-1.24), drip rate (0.2-81 drops/min) and dissolved Zn (6-90 μg/L), we observe no unequivocal influence of these parameters on CaCO3 mineralogy. Despite the almost complete overlapping supersaturations of calcite- and aragonite-precipitating waters, the latter are on average less supersaturated because the waters having Mg/Ca above ∼1.1 have mostly achieved such high ratios by previously precipitating calcite. Both calcite and aragonite precipitated at or near oxygen isotopic equilibrium, and Mg incorporation into calcite was consistent with literature-based predictions, indicating that in the studied cases CaCO3 precipitation was not significantly influenced by strong kinetic effects. In the studied cases, the calcites that precipitate at ∼11 °C from dripwaters with initial Mg/Ca approaching ∼1.1 incorporate ∼5 mol% MgCO3, close to the published value above which calcite solubility exceeds aragonite solubility, suggesting that aragonite precipitation in high-relative-humidity caves is

  2. Effect of otoconial proteins fetuin A, osteopontin, and otoconin 90 on the nucleation and growth of calcite

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Mina; Moreland, K. Trent; Chen, Jiajun; Teng, Henry H.; Thalmann, Ruediger; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-10-30

    Here, we investigated the roles of three proteins associated with the formation of otoconia including fetuin A, osteopontin (OPN), and otoconin 90 (OC90). In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the effects of these proteins on the growth of atomic steps on calcite surfaces were performed to obtain insight into their effects on the growth kinetics. We also used scanning electron microscopy to examine the effects of these proteins on crystal morphology. All three proteins were found to be potent inhibitors of calcite growth, although fetuin A promoted growth at concentrations below about 40 nM and only became anmore » inhibitor at higher concentrations. We then used in situ optical microscopy to observe calcite nucleation on films of these proteins adsorbed onto mica surfaces. By measuring the calcite nucleation rate as a function of supersaturation, the value of the interfacial energy that controls the free energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation was determined for each protein. OPN and OC90 films led to significantly reduced interfacial energies as compared to the value for homogeneous calcite nucleation in bulk solution. The value for fetuin A was equal to that for bulk solution within experimental error. Zeta potential measurements showed all of the proteins possessed negative surface charge and varied in magnitude according to sequence fetuin A > OC90 > OPN. In addition, the interfacial energies exhibited an inverse scaling with the zeta potential. In analogy to previous measurements on polysaccharide films, this scaling indicates the differences between the proteins arise from the effect of protein surface charge on the solution–substrate interfacial energy.« less

  3. Effect of otoconial proteins fetuin A, osteopontin, and otoconin 90 on the nucleation and growth of calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Mina; Moreland, K. Trent; Chen, Jiajun; Teng, Henry H.; Thalmann, Ruediger; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-10-30

    Here, we investigated the roles of three proteins associated with the formation of otoconia including fetuin A, osteopontin (OPN), and otoconin 90 (OC90). In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the effects of these proteins on the growth of atomic steps on calcite surfaces were performed to obtain insight into their effects on the growth kinetics. We also used scanning electron microscopy to examine the effects of these proteins on crystal morphology. All three proteins were found to be potent inhibitors of calcite growth, although fetuin A promoted growth at concentrations below about 40 nM and only became an inhibitor at higher concentrations. We then used in situ optical microscopy to observe calcite nucleation on films of these proteins adsorbed onto mica surfaces. By measuring the calcite nucleation rate as a function of supersaturation, the value of the interfacial energy that controls the free energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation was determined for each protein. OPN and OC90 films led to significantly reduced interfacial energies as compared to the value for homogeneous calcite nucleation in bulk solution. The value for fetuin A was equal to that for bulk solution within experimental error. Zeta potential measurements showed all of the proteins possessed negative surface charge and varied in magnitude according to sequence fetuin A > OC90 > OPN. In addition, the interfacial energies exhibited an inverse scaling with the zeta potential. In analogy to previous measurements on polysaccharide films, this scaling indicates the differences between the proteins arise from the effect of protein surface charge on the solution–substrate interfacial energy.

  4. Effect of Otoconial Proteins Fetuin A, Osteopontin, and Otoconin 90 on the Nucleation and Growth of Calcite

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the roles of three proteins associated with the formation of otoconia including fetuin A, osteopontin (OPN), and otoconin 90 (OC90). In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the effects of these proteins on the growth of atomic steps on calcite surfaces were performed to obtain insight into their effects on the growth kinetics. We also used scanning electron microscopy to examine the effects of these proteins on crystal morphology. All three proteins were found to be potent inhibitors of calcite growth, although fetuin A promoted growth at concentrations below about 40 nM and only became an inhibitor at higher concentrations. We then used in situ optical microscopy to observe calcite nucleation on films of these proteins adsorbed onto mica surfaces. By measuring the calcite nucleation rate as a function of supersaturation, the value of the interfacial energy that controls the free energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation was determined for each protein. OPN and OC90 films led to significantly reduced interfacial energies as compared to the value for homogeneous calcite nucleation in bulk solution. The value for fetuin A was equal to that for bulk solution within experimental error. Zeta potential measurements showed all of the proteins possessed negative surface charge and varied in magnitude according to sequence fetuin A > OC90 > OPN. In addition, the interfacial energies exhibited an inverse scaling with the zeta potential. In analogy to previous measurements on polysaccharide films, this scaling indicates the differences between the proteins arise from the effect of protein surface charge on the solution–substrate interfacial energy. PMID:25709560

  5. A Raman spectroscopic comparison of calcite and dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junmin; Wu, Zeguang; Cheng, Hongfei; Zhang, Zhanjun; Frost, Ray L.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize and differentiate the two minerals calcite and dolomite and the bands related to the mineral structure. The (CO3)2- group is characterized by four prominent Raman vibrational modes: (a) the symmetric stretching, (b) the asymmetric deformation, (c) asymmetric stretching and (d) symmetric deformation. These vibrational modes of the calcite and dolomite were observed at 1440, 1088, 715 and 278 cm-1. The significant differences between the minerals calcite and dolomite are observed by Raman spectroscopy. Calcite shows the typical bands observed at 1361, 1047, 715 and 157 cm-1, and the special bands at 1393, 1098, 1069, 1019, 299, 258 and 176 cm-1 for dolomite are observed. The difference is explained on the basis of the structure variation of the two minerals. Calcite has a trigonal structure with two molecules per unit cell, and dolomite has a hexagonal structure. This is more likely to cause the splitting and distorting of the carbonate groups. Another cause for the difference is the cation substituting for Mg in the dolomite mineral.

  6. Nuclear anomalies in the buccal cells of calcite factory workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The micronucleus (MN) assay on exfoliated buccal cells is a useful and minimally invasive method for monitoring genetic damage in humans. To determine the genotoxic effects of calcite dust that forms during processing, MN assay was carried out in exfoliated buccal cells of 50 (25 smokers and 25 non-smokers) calcite factory workers and 50 (25 smokers and 25 non-smokers) age- and sex-matched control subjects. Frequencies of nuclear abnormalities (NA) other than micronuclei, such as binucleates, karyorrhexis, karyolysis and ‘broken eggs', were also evaluated. Micronuclei and the other aforementioned anomalies were analysed by two way analysis of covariance. The linear correlations between the types of micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities were determined by Spearman's Rho. There was a positive correlation between micronuclei and other types of nuclear abnormalities in accordance with the Spearman's Rho test. Results showed statistically significant difference between calcite fabric workers and control groups. MN and NA frequencies in calcite fabric workers were significantly higher than those in control groups (p < 0.05). The results of this study indicate that calcite fabric workers are under risk of significant cytogenetic damage. PMID:21637497

  7. Photoinduced synthesis of single-digit micrometer-size spheroidal calcite composites in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-06-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), which was based on the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphyenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions of pH 8.4 and 10 was studied for preparation of CaCO3 composite particles in single-digit micrometer-sizes. In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol%) was used as a precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. After the UV irradiation for 50 min, calcite spheroids in single-digit micrometer-sizes were obtained as major products at pH 8.4. The obtained calcite spheroids contained organic components of about 10 wt%. The comparison of the characteristics of the CaCO3 obtained at pH 8.4 and 10 suggests that the nucleation and crystallization of both vaterite and calcite continuously took place in a moderated supersaturation owing to the CO2 hydration equilibrium as long as the photodecarboxylation of KP continued. Consequently, the aggregation-based crystal growth in the presence of PVAPS seemed to enable the formation of the spheroidal composites of calcite in single-digit micrometer-sizes.

  8. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, D.

    2010-10-15

    A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (R{sub p}) to the gross forward precipitation rate (R{sub f}), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of R{sub p} has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of R{sub f} is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, R{sub f} can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (R{sub b} or k{sub b}), since at equilibrium R{sub f} = R{sub b}, and R{sub p} = 0. Hence it can be inferred that R{sub f} {approx} R{sub p} + R{sub b}. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when R{sub p} (= R{sub f} - R{sub b}) << R{sub b}. For precipitation rates high enough that R{sub p} >> R{sub b}, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near R{sub p} {approx} R{sub b} for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate R{sub f} for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant at constant T and pH, but rather is dependent also on solution saturation state and hence R{sub p

  9. Climate proxies from Sr/Ca of coccolith calcite: calibrations from continuous culture of Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather M.; Rosenthal, Yair; Falkowski, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Continuous culture of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi reveals that coccolith Sr/Ca ratios depend on temperature and growth rate. At a constant temperature of 18°C, coccolith Sr/Ca ratios increased nearly 15% as growth rate increased from 0.1 to 1.5 divisions per day and calcification rate increased from 1.5 to 50 pg calcite per cell per day. When temperature increased from 7 to 26°C, Sr/Ca ratios increased by more than 25% (i.e., 1%/1°C), although the range in growth and calcification rates was the same as for experiments at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of Sr/Ca ratios in coccoliths is consistent with that observed in planktonic foraminifera and abiogenic calcites, suggesting that it is controlled by thermodynamic processes. However, the positive correlation of coccolith Sr/Ca with temperature contrasts with field studies in the equatorial Pacific, where Sr/Ca ratios are highest at the locus of maximum upwelling and productivity despite depressed temperatures. This paradox may reflect different calcification rate effects between E. huxleyi and the other species dominating assemblages in the equatorial Pacific sediments, which may be resolved by new techniques for separation of monospecific coccolith samples from sediments. Models of crystal growth indicate that kinetic effects on Sr partitioning in calcite due to surface enrichment could explain the Sr/Ca variations observed in constant temperature experiments but not the larger amplitude calcification rate effects observed in equatorial Pacific sediments. Despite the dual influence of temperature and growth rate on coccolith Sr/Ca, coccolith Sr/Ca correlates with "b," the slope of the dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in biomarkers (ɛ p) on CO 2(aq) at a range of growth rates and temperatures. Consequently, using coccolith Sr/Ca in combination with alkenone ɛ p may improve paleo-CO 2 determinations.

  10. Geochemical Proxy Distribution at the Atomic-Scale: Atom Probe Tomography of Foraminiferal Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branson, O.; Perea, D. E.; Winters, M. A.; Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Russell, A. D.; Spero, H. J.; Gagnon, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Biomineral composition reflects a complex interplay between minute-scale biological control, mineral growth processes, and the influence of environmental conditions. For this reason, the mechanisms responsible for the formation of these minerals, as well as the incorporation of trace elements during biomineral growth, are poorly understood. Potential mechanisms governing the production and composition of biominerals can be organized into two distinct groups: a) biological mechanisms controlling the calcifying environment and b) mineral growth processes from this controlled environment. Despite significant advances in both these areas, critical gaps remain in our understanding of biomineral production and geochemical tracer incorporation. We are adapting Atom Probe Tomography (APT), a technique that maps the arrangement and identity of individual atoms within a bulk material, to analyze foraminiferal calcite for the first time. These data-rich atom-scale chemical maps provide a unique opportunity to deconvolve the effects of biological and crystal growth processes in the incorporation of geochemical tracers. Our first experiments have examined the influence of the biological-mineral interface on geochemical proxy element incorporation. Preliminary measurements show that (1) we can successfully map impurities in calcite biominerals, while also distinguishing between mineral and organic zones, overcoming a major technical hurdle; and (2) that elements like sodium appear to be recruited to the organic-mineral interface. The high-resolution chemical data from the APT will further allow us to investigate the fundamental basis for geochemical proxy behavior. For example, we can determine for a certain set of conditions whether the substitution of trace elements into the calcite follows ideal solid-solution behavior, as tacitly assumed in many geochemical proxy systems, or is modulated by intra-shell organics, or coupled-substitution interactions. Collectively, the

  11. Small scale shear zone in calcite: AMS and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxerová, Zuzana; Machek, Matěj; Kusbach, Vladimír; Racek, Martin; Silva, Pedro F.

    2016-04-01

    Two structural profiles across thin shear zone in calcite from quarry in Estremoz (Portugal) were studied to find a relationship between AMS and strain in natural rocks. The mesoscopic fabric is characterized by the change from the subhorizontal coarse-grained foliation towards the ~2cm-wide shear zone center with subvertical fine-grained foliation. In microstructure, the shear zone records dynamic recrystallization of calcite aggregate which resulted in development of porphyroclastic microstructure with increasing proportion of fine-grained recrystallized matrix towards the shear zone center. Two distinct crystallographic preferred orientations of calcite were recorded. One related with porphyroclasts, characterized by subvertical orientation of calcite axes and another associated with recrystallized matrix showing subhorizontal calcite axes orientation. The magnetic susceptibility ranges from -8e-6SI to 9e-6SI, with the average -4e-6SI. The majority of the rock mass is diamagnetic, corresponding well with the thermomagnetic curves, with local paramagnetic accumulations in form of thin bands. The AMS of the both profiles exhibits stable subvertical foliation bearing vertical lineation which is locally alternated by the medium-angle foliation. We interpret the AMS fabric pattern which is perpendicular to the mineral one as a type of inverse AMS fabric, due to high iron content in major part of calcite grains The magnetic and microstructural description of the shear zone is accompanied by numerical modeling of AMS based on CPO and different proportion of porphyroclasts, matrix and mica for purposes of deciphering the influence of present microstructural features on AMS.

  12. Radiaxial-fibrous calcites of shallow subsurface diagenetic origin

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Bischoff, W.D.; Lobitzer, H.

    1989-03-01

    Radiaxial-fibrous calcites (RFC) in marine carbonates are generally considered syndepositional cements. In Upper Triassic and basal Liassic reef and platform limestones in Austria (Steinplatte complex), however, isopachous RFC is demonstrably a postdepositional diagenetic component that precipitated in shallow-burial phreatic environments during a time of periodic meteoric exposure. Isopachous RFC occurs solely within solution cavities and is interlayered with internal red sediment; discontinuities due to leaching separate sequential generations of RFC in the rocks. Accordingly, one possibility is that the RFC was originally low-magnesium calcite that precipitated in the meteoric phreatic zone during lowstands. Such calcites contain relatively low magnesium concentrations (average 0.87 mole % MgCO/sub 3/) and are /sup 18/O depleted (average - 5.81 /per thousand/ PDB). However, most other RFC cements in the sequence average slightly higher magnesium comparable to crinoidal calcites (1.13 mole % MgCO/sub 3/), are less depleted in /sup 18/O (average - 1.88 /per thousand/ PDB), and are partly dolomitized. Additionally, all the RFC cements are enriched in /sup 13/C to values similar to that of Triassic and Jurassic seawater (+ 2.86 /per thousand/ PDB) and are nonluminescent. Trace element studies indicate alteration of the rocks in partly closed, rock-dominated diagenetic systems. By these facts, the authors favor a precursor high-magnesium calcite mineralogy for the RFC cements, which possibly precipitated during highstands when meteoric pore waters were replaced by marine fluids. Thus, the geochemical trends observed are likely due to variations in the degree of meteoric alteration of high-magnesium calcite RFC rather than to differences in original mineralogy.

  13. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, M. P.; Rodriguez-Blanco, J. D.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3- <=> CO32- + H+, when HCO3- is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80-100 atoms) to represent the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from -6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 < pH < 6.35, where H2CO30 is the dominant dissolved species. When bicarbonate is adsorbed on calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution, 10.35. This means that adsorbed carbonate is stable even when the concentration of dissolved CO32- is several orders of magnitude lower. This has a significant effect on surface charge and thus the behaviour of the calcite surface. Our results help explain the potential determining behaviour of the carbonate species in calcite-water systems, particularly in the pH range where the bicarbonate species dominates in water and where the carbonate species dominates at the surface, i.e. when 7.5 < pH < 10.35. Our atomic scale data for the various calcite surface sites provide the needed input to improve and constrain surface complexation modelling and are especially useful for predicting behaviour in systems where experiments are difficult or impossible, such as at high temperature and pressure.

  14. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for Subsurface Immobilization of Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Fujita, Y.; Ginn, T. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Dafflon, B.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Henriksen, J. R.; Peterson, J.; Taylor, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of the greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have found that calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr can be accelerated by the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms, that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning, and that nutrient additions can stimulate ureolytic activity. To extend our understanding of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in an aquifer setting a continuous recirculation field experiment evaluating MICP was conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO. In this experiment, groundwater extracted from an onsite well was amended with urea (total mass of 42.5 kg) and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into a well approximately 4 meters up-gradient for a period of 12 days followed by 10 months of groundwater sampling and monitoring. Crosshole radar and electrical tomographic data were collected prior, during, and after the MICP treatment. The urea and molasses treatment resulted in an enhanced population of sediment associated urea hydrolyzing organisms as evidenced by increases in the number of ureC gene copies, increases in 14C urea hydrolysis rates, and long-term observations of ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) in the injection, extraction and down gradient monitoring wells. Permeability changes and increases in the calcite saturation indexes in the well field suggest that mineral precipitation has occurred; ongoing analysis of field samples seeks to confirm this. Changes in dielectric constant and electrical conductivity were used to interpret the spatiotemporal distribution of the injectate and subsequent calcite precipitation. Modeling activities are underway to

  15. Magnesium incorporation in calcite in the presence of organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Baldermann, Andre; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The formation of authigenic Mg-calcites in marine early diagenetic environments is commonly driven by a bio-induced process, the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), which provides inorganic carbon required for the precipitation of such authigenic carbonates. In such settings the availability of major and/or trace divalent metal cations (Me2+) incorporated in calcite and their aqueous speciation are controlled by the presence of aqueous organic molecules that are produced either as (by-)products of biological activity (i.e. exopolymeric substances) or during degradation of allochthonous organic matter in the sediments. Despite the fact that the presence of aqueous organic ligands strongly affects the growth rates and the mineralogy of precipitating CaCO3 polymorphs, till now no study addresses the role of Me2+-ligand aqueous complexes on the extent of Mg and/or other trace element content of Mg-calcites. In order to shed light on this process, relevant to authigenic calcite formation in organic-rich marine sediments and continental soils, we precipitated calcite in the presence of aqueous Mg and a variety of low molecular weight carboxylic- and aminoacids. Our experimental data indicate that the presence of organic ligands augments significantly the saturation state of calcite in the parent fluid during its precipitation. Moreover, they suggest that the higher the ligand concentration, the higher the obtained distribution coefficient of Mg in calcite. The latter is directly proportional to the ratio of Mg2+/Ca2+ aqueous ions for all ligands used. Hydrogeochemical modelling of the aqueous fluids indicate that the observed correlation can be explained by the stronger complexation of Ca2+ with organic ligands compared to Mg2+, which results in higher availability of Mg2+ vs. Ca2+ aqueous ions. Overall the obtained results suggest that the higher the organic ligand aqueous concentration the higher the Mg content of calcite forming from this fluid. These findings are

  16. Theoretical and experimental aspects of optical storage of information via refreshing by inverse seeding in a photorefractive Ba0.77Ca0.23TiO3 crystal (BCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusevich, V.; Kiessling, A.; Kowarschik, R.

    2001-05-01

    We present a new experimental setup for the optical storage of information via refreshing by inverse seeding (OSIRIS), which allows a sixfold increase of the storage time of holograms in a Ba0.77Ca0.23TiO3 crystal (BCT). The setup consists of two four-wave mixing processes with common amplified signal waves and phase-conjugated (pc) waves. Temporal behaviours of the amplified and pc signal waves for the OSIRIS experiment as well as for the common four-wave mixing experiment are compared and discussed. The solutions of coupled equations under the depleted-pump approximation are obtained in order to estimate the pc reflectivities and coupling gains of gratings inside the crystal.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-01-01

    The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å. PMID:17768341

  18. Chalk-calcite-microfluidic experiments: construction and flooding of microsystems with reactive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, Amélie; Thuy Luu, Thi; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Hiorth, Aksel

    2015-04-01

    Direct in situ observation of the pore structure changes that occur when chalk is flooded with brines could resolve many of the open questions that remain about the interactions between mineralogical alterations and oil-liberating mechanisms. Experiments on core scale and field tests that have been carried out the last decade have clearly shown that water chemistry affects the final oil recovery. However, there is generally no consensus in the scientific community of why additional oil is released. In this work, our aim is to focus on in-situ observations of single phase flow and interactions at the pore scale. To do so, we create several types of custom-made microsystems with chalk and calcite crystals. We then do experiments with reacting fluids in these microsystems. During these experiments, we realize in-situ observations (geometrical characteristics, reaction rate) using microsopy techniques (white light vertical/phase shift interferometric microscopy, and classical microscopy), and show how they vary as function as the water chemistry. In simple systems made of calcite, we obtain reactive rates that are coherent with the litterature and with numerical simulations based on Lattice-Boltzmann methods.

  19. Field test of a calcite dissolution rate law: Fort's Funnel Cave, Mammoth Cave National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Slunder, J.S. ); Groves, C.G. . Center for Cave and Karst Studies)

    1994-03-01

    The laboratory-derived calcite dissolution rate law of Plummer et al. (1978) is the most widely used and mechanistically detailed expression currently available for predicting dissolution rates as a function of water chemistry. Such rate expressions are of great use in understanding timescales associated with limestone karst development. Little work has gone into the field testing of the rate law under natural conditions. This work measured dissolution rates by a crystal weight loss experiment in Buffalo Creek within Fort's funnel Cave, which lies within a pristine, forested catchment of Mammoth Cave National Park. Continuous water chemistry sampling over the same period allowed a time-integrated prediction of the dissolution based on the Plummer et al. (1978) expression. Results indicate that the rate law overpredicted dissolution by a factor of about ten. This concurs with earlier laboratory work suggesting that the law tends to overpredict rates in solutions close to equilibrium with respect to calcite, as were the waters within this part of the groundwater flow system.

  20. Structure and properties of Bi(Zn0.5Ti0.5)O3- Pb(Zr(1-x)Ti(x))O3 ferroelectric single crystals grown by a top-seeded solution growth technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bixia; Wu, Xiaoqing; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2015-06-01

    Bi(Zn0.5Ti0.5)O3 (BZT)-modified Pb(Zr(1-x)Ti(x))O3 (PZT) single crystals have been grown using a top-seeded solution growth technique and characterized by various methods. The crystal structure is found to be rhombohedral by means of X-ray powder diffraction. The composition and homogeneity of the as-grown single crystals are studied by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The domain structure of a (001)(cub) platelet is investigated by polarized light microscopy (PLM), which confirms the rhombohedral symmetry. The paraelectric-to-ferroelectric phase transition temperature T(C) is found to be 313°C with the absence of rhombohedral-tetragonal phase transition. The ferroelectric properties of the ternary crystals are enhanced by the BZT substitution with a remanent polarization of 28 μC/cm(2) and a coercive field E(C) of 22.1 kV/cm.

  1. Inversion of calcite twin data for stress (2) : EBSD as a tool for data measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlangeau, Camille; Lacombe, Olivier; Brisset, Francois; Kohler, Eric; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Schueller, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Inversion of calcite twin data are known to be a powerful tool to reconstruct the past state(s) of stress in carbonate rocks of the crust, especially in fold-and-thrust belts and sedimentary basins. Twin data measurements have been for long carried out optically using a Universal-Stage. This data collection is time-consuming and suffers from limitations and bias related to measurements of twin planes oblique at low angle or parallel to the thin section, or the unambiguous evaluation of the twinned/untwinned character of collected twin data. EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) is a well-known technique applied to characterize textures and microstructures of metals or deformed fine-grained rocks. The challenge is to define a strategy for measuring calcite-twin orientations that should be fast, without any loss of information, and which must reconcile (1) the need for a large amount of calcite twin data (3 mutually perpendicular thin sections and at least 30 crystals per thin section), (2) the spacing between EBSD spots, that should take into account (3) the small width of twin lamellae within grains deformed at low pressure and temperature and (4) the large size (usually several hundreds of microns) of twinned calcite grains used for stress analysis. To date, these multiple requirements preclude any (classical) automatic twin data acquisition but instead imply a preliminary definition of the areas of the thin section to be scanned by the EBSD spots, including grain boundaries, because the stress inversion technique requires to know for each grain the orientations of the C axis and of the 3 potential e twin planes. In order to reconcile a perfectly polished surface as required by EBSD and the recognition of grain boundaries, we adopted the double etching technique (Herwegh, 2000) to first reveal grain and twin boundaries. Then, with a SEM and a very fine coating sample, the section is scanned using secondary electrons bin; each spot of interest is visually defined

  2. Utricular otoconia of some amphibians have calcitic morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pote, K. G.; Ross, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    This report concerns the morphological features of otoconia removed from the inner ear of four amphibian species. Results from scanning electron microscopic examination are compared based on the site of origin. These results show that utricular otoconia have a mineral structure that mimics calcite, rather than the widely accepted idea that they are mineralized by calcium carbonate of the aragonite polymorph.

  3. Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas azotoformans for induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Heidari Nonakaran, Siamak; Pazhouhandeh, Maghsoud; Keyvani, Abdullah; Abdollahipour, Fatemeh Zahra; Shirzad, Akbar

    2015-12-01

    Biomineralization is a process by which living organisms produce minerals. The extracellular production of these biominerals by microbes has potential for various bioengineering applications. For example, crack remediation and improvement of durability of concrete is an important goal for engineers and biomineral-producing microbes could be a useful tool in achieving this goal. Here we report the isolation, biochemical characterization and molecular identification of Pseudomonas azotoformans, a microbe that produces calcite and which potentially be used to repair cracks in concrete structures. Initially, 38 bacterial isolates were isolated from soil and cements. As a first test, the isolates were screened using a urease assay followed by biochemical tests for the rate of urea hydrolysis, calcite production and the insolubility of calcite. Molecular amplification and sequencing of a 16S rRNA fragment of selected isolates permitted us to identify P. azotoformans as a good candidate for preparation of biotechnological concrete. This species was isolated from soil and the results show that among the tested isolates it had the highest rate of urea hydrolysis, produced the highest amount of calcite, which, furthermore was the most adhesive and insoluble. This species is thus of interest as an agent with the potential ability to repair cracks in concrete. PMID:26386580

  4. Aragonite / Calcite seas and the evolution of biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    The vast majority of marine invertebrate skeletons are composed of the CaCO3 polymorphs aragonite and calcite, yet the influence of seawater composition on the evolution of calcareous skeletal composition is poorly understood. The main theoretical framework in which the evolution of CaCO3 shell mineralogy is assessed is the aragonite-calcite sea hypothesis with conventional thinking suggesting that a threshold in the marine Mg:Ca ratio determines CaCO3 polymorph formation. I present data from CaCO3 precipitation experiments to show that the concept of a distinct threshold is misleading because Mg:Ca ratio and temperature combined result in a Phanerozoic continuum of co-existing aragonite-calcite seas with aragonite-facilitating conditions existing throughout the Phanerozoic in shallow warm-water (>20° C) environments. The stable reservoir of aragonite-favouring conditions in shallow warm water environments potentially explains the trend of increasing occurrences of skeletal aragonite throughout the Phanerozoic, particularly in the context of the 'out of the tropics' hypothesis. By contrast, the most prominent fluctuations with respect to aragonite-calcite sea conditions can be expected to have occurred in mid- to high latitudes.

  5. Origin of authigenic calcite and aragonite in pelagic sediments of the Mendeleev Ridge (Arctic Ocean) and their paleoceanographicimplications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, K. S.; Ji, H. S.; Nam, S.; Stein, R. H.; Mackensen, A.; Matthiessen, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonate minerals were discovered from the giant box core (PS72/410-1) of the pelagic sediments recovered from the Canadian Arctic across the central Mendeleev Ridge (Station location= Lat. 80°30.37"N, Long. 175°44.38"W) during the Arctic cruise by Polarstern in 2008. The core was 39 cm long and was collected from the water depth of 1802 meters. The sediments show various colours from grey to brown as previously reported in other Arctic pelagic sediments. The sediments include planktonic foraminifers together with carbonate minerals. The contents of planktonic foraminifers and carbonate minerals vary with core depth, however these carbonate minerals are present through the whole sequence except for a few centimetres. After wet sieving, coarse fractions were texturally examined with binocular microscope and SEM, and stable isotope and trace element contents were obtained. Mineralogy of carbonate minerals were determined using crystal shapes and qualitative Sr contents by EDAX together with trace element analysis. The carbonates are composed of high Mg-calcite, low Mg-calcite and aragonite. Aragonite crystals show (1) radiating fibrous texture, (2) randomly oriented fibrous texture, (3) spherulitic fibrous texture, and (4) bladed texture, and calcite crystals show (1) foliated texture, (2) randomly bladed texture, (3) spherulitic fibrous texture, and (4) equant texture. Various crystal shapes of aragonite and calcite together with clear growth shapes of the crystals suggest that they are inorganic in origin. Highly enriched carbon isotope compositions (δ13C = 0 ~ +5‰ vs. PDB) strongly indicate that they formed in methanogenic zone below sediment/water interface by the reaction between anoxic pore fluids and host sediments induced by methanogenic bacteria. However, a wide range of oxygen isotope values (δ18O = -5 ~ +5‰ vs. PDB) may indicate that porewater has been changed due to reaction between residual seawater and volcanic sediments. Four types of stable

  6. Reconstructing Cambro-Ordovician Seawater Composition using Clumped Isotope Paleothermometry on Calcitic and Phosphatic Brachiopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, K.; Robles, M.; Finnegan, S.; Hughes, N. C.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    A secular increase in δ18O values of marine fossils through early Phanerozoic time raises questions about the evolution of climate and the water cycle. This pattern suggests two end-member hypotheses 1) surface temperatures during early Paleozoic time were very warm, in excess of 40°C (tropical MAT), or 2) the isotopic composition of seawater increased by up to 7-8‰. It has been difficult to evaluate these hypotheses because the δ18O composition of fossils depends on both temperature and the δ18O of water. Furthermore, primary isotopic signatures can be overprinted by diagenetic processes that modify geological materials. This too could explain the decrease in δ18O values of marine fossils with age. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry can constrain this problem by providing an independent measure of crystallization temperature and, when paired with classical δ18O paleothermometry, can determine the isotopic composition of the fluid the mineral last equilibrated with. Combined with traditional tools, this method has the potential to untangle primary isotopic signatures from diagenetic signals. We measured the isotopic ordering of CO3 groups (Δ47) substituted into the phosphate lattice of phosphatic brachiopods in Cambrian strata. Phosphatic fossils are generally less soluble than carbonates in surface and diagenetic environments, and so are hypothesized to provide a more robust record of primary growth conditions. They also provide an archive prior to the rise of thick shelled calcitic fossils during the Ordovician Radiation. Additionally, measurements of the δ18O of the CO3 groups can be compared with the δ18O of PO4 groups to test whether their mutual fractionation is consistent with primary growth and the apparent temperature recorded by carbonate clumped isotope measurements. We are constructing a phosphatic brachiopod calibration for carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, and Δ47 values of CO2 extracted from modern phosphatic brachiopods suggest

  7. Biomimetic synthesis of calcite films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process. 1. Influence and incorporation of magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xingguo; Varona, Philip L.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2007-09-01

    Magnesium-bearing calcium carbonate films have been synthesized via a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. A variety of morphological features of biominerals can be mimicked with this PILP process; therefore, our group has proposed that this crystallization system can be used as an effective in vitro model system for examining mechanistic issues related to biomineralization. Here, the effect of the Mg 2+/Ca 2+ ratio on the rate of transformation of the amorphous precursor films was investigated using polarized optical microscopy (POM), and the final crystalline structure and composition were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The entrapment of high levels of magnesium in the deposited precursor films had a pronounced inhibitory effect on the amorphous to crystalline transformation, and furthermore, influenced the polycrystalline nature of the film. The magnesium content incorporated within the calcite lattice (8-26%) resembles the range found in biologically formed high magnesium-bearing calcite, while much lower levels were formed via the conventional solution crystallization process. The formation of non-equilibrium morphologies and similar compositions of magnesium-bearing calcite via the PILP process further supports our hypothesis that the PILP process may play a fundamental role in the formation of calcitic biominerals in nature. In the realm of biomimetic engineering, the PILP process may also establish itself as a new method to produce thin ceramic films with variable compositions under ambient conditions.

  8. Molecular ordering of ethanol at the calcite surface.

    PubMed

    Pasarín, I S; Yang, M; Bovet, N; Glyvradal, M; Nielsen, M M; Bohr, J; Feidenhans'l, R; Stipp, S L S

    2012-02-01

    To produce biominerals, such as shells, bones, and teeth, living beings create organic compounds that control the growth of the solid phase. Investigating the atomic scale behavior of individual functional groups at the mineral-fluid interface provides fundamental information that is useful for constructing accurate predictive models for natural systems. Previous investigations of the activity of coccolith-associated polysaccharides (CAP) on calcite, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [Henriksen, K., Young, J. R., Bown, P. R., and Stipp, S. L. S. Palentology 2004, 43 (Part 3), 725-743] and molecular dynamics (MD) modeling [Yang, M., Stipp, S. L. S., and Harding, J. H. Cryst. Growth Des. 2008, 8 (11), 4066-4074], have suggested that OH functional groups control polysaccharide attachment. The purpose of this work was to characterize, using X-ray reflectivity (XR) combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the structuring on calcite of a layer of the simplest carbon chain molecule that contains an OH group, ethanol (CH(3)-CH(2)-OH). We found evidence that EtOH forms a highly ordered structure at the calcite surface, where the first layer molecules bond with calcite. The ethanol molecules stand up perpendicularly at the interface or nearly so. As a consequence, the fatty, CH(3) ends form a new surface, about 6 Å from the termination of the bulk calcite, and beyond that, there is a thin gap where ethanol density is low. Following is a more disordered layer that is two to three ethanol molecules thick, about 14 Å, where density more resembles that of bulk liquid ethanol. The good agreement between theory and experiment gives confidence that a theoretical approach can offer information about behavior in more complex systems.

  9. Experimental study of the replacement of calcite by calcium sulphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Hövelmann, J.; Álvarez-Lloret, P.; Ibáñez-Velasco, A.; Putnis, A.

    2015-05-01

    Among the most relevant mineral replacement reactions are those involving sulphates and carbonates, which have important geological and technological implications. Here it is shown experimentally that during the interaction of calcite (CaCO3) cleavage surfaces with sulphate-bearing acidic solutions, calcite is ultimately replaced by gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4), depending on the reaction temperature. Observations suggest that this occurs most likely via an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction, in which the substrate is replaced pseudomorphically by the product. At 120 and 200 °C gypsum and/or bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O) form as precursor phases for the thermodynamically stable anhydrite. Salinity promotes the formation of less hydrated precursor phases during the replacement of calcite by anhydrite. The reaction stops before equilibrium with respect to calcite is reached and during the course of the reaction most of the bulk solutions are undersaturated with respect to the precipitating phase(s). A mechanism consisting of the dissolution of small amounts of solid in a thin layer of fluid at the mineral-fluid interface and the subsequent precipitation of the product phase from this layer is in agreement with these observations. PHREEQC simulations performed in the framework of this mechanism highlight the relevance of transport and surface reaction kinetics on the volume change associated with the CaCO3-CaSO4 replacement. Under our experimental conditions, this reaction occurs with a positive volume change, which ultimately results in passivation of the unreacted substrate before calcite attains equilibrium with respect to the bulk solution.

  10. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29. PMID:16678843

  11. Formation of a ternary neptunyl(V) biscarbonato inner-sphere sorption complex inhibits calcite growth rate.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Frank; Scheinost, Andreas C; Bosbach, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    Neptunyl, Np(V)O(2)(+), along with the other actinyl ions U(VI)O(2)(2+) and Pu(V,VI)O(2)((+,2+)), is considered to be highly mobile in the geosphere, while interaction with mineral surfaces (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, and coprecipitation/structural incorporation) may retard its migration. Detailed information about the exact interaction mechanisms including the structure and stoichiometry of the adsorption complexes is crucial to predict the retention behavior in diverse geochemical environments. Here, we investigated the structure of the neptunyl adsorption complex at the calcite-water interface at pH 8.3 in equilibrium with air by means of low-temperature (15K) EXAFS spectroscopy at the Np-L(III) edge. The coordination environment of neptunyl consists of two axial oxygen atoms at 1.87(±0.01)Å, and an equatorial oxygen shell of six atoms at 2.51(±0.01)Å. Two oxygen backscatterers at 3.50(±0.04)Å along with calcium backscatterers at 3.95(±0.03)Å suggest that neptunyl is linked to the calcite surface through two monodentate bonds towards carbonate groups of the calcite surface. Two additional carbon backscatterers at 2.94(±0.02)Å are attributed to two carbonate ions in bidentate coordination. This structural environment is conclusively interpreted as a ternary surface complex, where a neptunyl biscarbonato complex sorbs through two monodentate carbonate bonds to steps at the calcite (104) face, while the two bidentately coordinated carbonate groups point away from the surface. This structural information is further supported by Mixed Flow Reactor (MFR) experiments. They show a significant decrease of the calcite growth rate in the presence of neptunyl(V), in line with blockage of the most active crystal growth sites, step and kink sites, by adsorption of neptunyl. Formation of this sorption complex constitutes an important retention mechanism for neptunyl in calcite-rich environments.

  12. Formation of a ternary neptunyl(V) biscarbonato inner-sphere sorption complex inhibits calcite growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberling, Frank; Scheinost, Andreas C.; Bosbach, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    Neptunyl, Np(V)O 2+, along with the other actinyl ions U(VI)O 22+ and Pu(V,VI)O 2(+,2+), is considered to be highly mobile in the geosphere, while interaction with mineral surfaces (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, and coprecipitation/structural incorporation) may retard its migration. Detailed information about the exact interaction mechanisms including the structure and stoichiometry of the adsorption complexes is crucial to predict the retention behavior in diverse geochemical environments. Here, we investigated the structure of the neptunyl adsorption complex at the calcite-water interface at pH 8.3 in equilibrium with air by means of low-temperature (15 K) EXAFS spectroscopy at the Np-L III edge. The coordination environment of neptunyl consists of two axial oxygen atoms at 1.87(± 0.01) Å, and an equatorial oxygen shell of six atoms at 2.51(± 0.01) Å. Two oxygen backscatterers at 3.50(± 0.04) Å along with calcium backscatterers at 3.95(± 0.03) Å suggest that neptunyl is linked to the calcite surface through two monodentate bonds towards carbonate groups of the calcite surface. Two additional carbon backscatterers at 2.94(± 0.02) Å are attributed to two carbonate ions in bidentate coordination. This structural environment is conclusively interpreted as a ternary surface complex, where a neptunyl biscarbonato complex sorbs through two monodentate carbonate bonds to steps at the calcite (104) face, while the two bidentately coordinated carbonate groups point away from the surface. This structural information is further supported by Mixed Flow Reactor (MFR) experiments. They show a significant decrease of the calcite growth rate in the presence of neptunyl(V), in line with blockage of the most active crystal growth sites, step and kink sites, by adsorption of neptunyl. Formation of this sorption complex constitutes an important retention mechanism for neptunyl in calcite-rich environments.

  13. Growth and composition of high-Mg calcite in the skeleton of a Bermudian gorgonian (Plexaurella dichotoma): Potential for paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Zoë A.; Cohen, Anne L.; Smith, Struan R.; Jenkins, William J.

    2005-08-01

    We used a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) ion microprobe to analyze magnesium-to-calcium (Mg/Ca) and strontium-to-calcium (Sr/Ca) ratios of high-Mg calcite loculi within the skeleton of a shallow water gorgonian, Plexaurella dichotoma, from Bermuda. A cross section of the gorgonian skeleton reveals loculi embedded within proteinaceous gorgonin arranged in concentric rings about the axial core. Viewed in cross section, the loculi are fan-shaped, 10-140 μm in diameter, and composed of bundles of needle-shaped crystals that appear to radiate out from a calcification center. Discrete sample spots, each 20 μm diameter, were sputtered from successive loculi along a sample track 3 mm long. Over this distance, 25 bands of high-low density gorgonin couplets were encountered, estimated to represent the period 1963 to 1988. Mg/Ca ratios show an overall, positive correlation with annual sea surface temperatures (SSTs) that is strongest in the autumn months (October-December). High-resolution analyses along the growth axes of individual loculi reveal low variability and no trend, consistent with our interpretation of seasonal growth of these calcite inclusions. The sensitivity of Mg/Ca to interannual changes in average autumn temperatures is 0.47 mmol/mol per °C. Conversely, interannual variability in calcite Sr/Ca does not follow the interannual variability in SST and may be influenced primarily by growth rate.

  14. Fluid mediated transformation of aragonitic cuttlebone to calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdikouri, C.; Kasioptas, A.; Putnis, A.

    2009-04-01

    The aragonite to calcite transition has been studied extensively over the years because of its wide spectra of applications and of its significant geochemical interest. While studies of kinetics (e.g. Topor et al., 1981), thermodynamics (e.g. Wolf et al., 1996) and behavior of ions such as Sr and Mg (e.g. Yoshioka et al., 1986) have been made there are still unanswered questions regarding this reaction especially in the cases where the effects of fluid composition are considered. It is well known that when heated in air, aragonite transforms by a solid state reaction to calcite. The aragonite cuttlebone of the sepia officinalis that was used for our experiments undergoes a phase transition at ~370-390˚ C, measured by in situ heating experiments in a Philips X'pert X-ray powder diffractometer equipped with a HTK 1200 High temperature oven. Successive X-ray scans were taken at isothermal temperatures at 200C intervals. A similar temperature range was found by Vongsavat et al. 2006, who studied this transition in Acropora corals. It is possible however to promote this transition at considerably lower temperatures by means of a fluid mediated reaction where the replacement takes place by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism (Putnis & Putnis, 2007). We have successfully carried out hydrothermal experiments where cuttlebone has been converted to calcite at 200˚ C. Using the PhreeqC program we calculated the required composition of a solution that would be undersaturated with respect to aragonite and saturated with respect to calcite leading to dissolution of the aragonite and to a consequent precipitation of the new calcite phase, similar to the experiments described in an earlier study (Perdikouri et al, 2008). This reaction is not pseudomorphic and results in the destruction of the morphology, presumably due to the molar volume increase. A total transformation of the cuttlebone produced a fine calcite powder. The cuttlebone exhibits a unique microstructure, made

  15. Stability of Basalt plus Anhydrite plus Calcite at HP-HT: Implications for Venus, the Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Treiman, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    "Canali" observed at Venus surface by Magellan are evidence for very long melt flows, but their composition and origin remain uncertain. The hypothesis of water-rich flow is not reasonable regarding the temperature at Venus surface. The length of these channels could not be explained by a silicate melt composition but more likely, by a carbonate-sulfate melt which has a much lower viscosity (Kargel et al 1994). One hypothesis is that calcite CaCO3 and anhydrite CaSO4 which are alteration products of basalts melted during meteorite impacts. A famous example recorded on the Earth (Chicxulub) produced melt and gas rich in carbon and sulfur. Calcite and sulfate evaporites are also present on Mars surface, associated with basalts. An impact on these materials might release C- and S-rich melt or fluid. Another type of planetary phenomenon (affecting only the Earth) might provoke a high pressure destabilization of basalt+anhydrite+calcite. Very high contents of C and S are measured in some Earth s magmas, either dissolved or in the form of crystals (Luhr 2008). As shown by the high H content and high fO2 of primary igneous anhydrite-bearing lavas, the high S content in their source may be explained by subduction of an anhydrite-bearing oceanic crust, either directly (by melting followed by eruption) or indirectly (by release of S-rich melt or fluid that metasomatize the mantle) . Calcite is a major product of oceanic sedimentation and alteration of the crust. Therefore, sulfate- and calcite-rich material may be subducted to high pressures and high temperatures (HP-HT) and release S- and C-rich melts or fluids which could influence the composition of subduction zone lavas or gases. Both phenomena - meteorite impact and subduction - imply HP-HT conditions - although the P-T-time paths are different. Some HP experimental/theoretical studies have been performed on basalt/eclogite, calcite and anhydrite separately or on a combination of two. In this study we performed piston

  16. Occlusion of Sulfate-Based Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles within Calcite: Effect of Varying the Surface Density of Anionic Stabilizer Chains

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) offers a highly versatile and efficient route to a wide range of organic nanoparticles. In this article, we demonstrate for the first time that poly(ammonium 2-sulfatoethyl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) [PSEM–PBzMA] diblock copolymer nanoparticles can be prepared with either a high or low PSEM stabilizer surface density using either RAFT dispersion polymerization in a 2:1 v/v ethanol/water mixture or RAFT aqueous emulsion polymerization, respectively. We then use these model nanoparticles to gain new insight into a key topic in materials chemistry: the occlusion of organic additives into inorganic crystals. Substantial differences are observed for the extent of occlusion of these two types of anionic nanoparticles into calcite (CaCO3), which serves as a suitable model host crystal. A low PSEM stabilizer surface density leads to uniform nanoparticle occlusion within calcite at up to 7.5% w/w (16% v/v), while minimal occlusion occurs when using nanoparticles with a high PSEM stabilizer surface density. This counter-intuitive observation suggests that an optimum anionic surface density is required for efficient occlusion, which provides a hitherto unexpected design rule for the incorporation of nanoparticles within crystals. PMID:27509298

  17. Microbes Caught in the Act: Disentangling the Role of Biofilms in the Formation of Low Mg Calcite Ooids in a Freshwater Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plee, K.; Ariztegui, D.; Sahan, E.; Martini, R.; Davaud, E.

    2006-12-01

    Biofilms and molds of cyanobacteria infilling depressions within the outermost cortex of ooids have been previously described in recent ooidal sands of Lake Geneva (Switzerland). Detailed sedimentological and mineralogical analyses of these ooids further indicated a low-Mg calcite composition of their cortex. Observed ooidal morphological features called for a fundamental role of biofilms triggering carbonate precipitation. A detailed microbiological study was much needed, however, in order to decipher the relative role of organic versus purely physicochemical processes during ooid formation. An experimental device consisting of frosted microscope slides was set at 2.50 m water depth in western Lake Geneva. These slides provide an attractive substrate for the microorganisms involved in low-Mg calcite precipitation allowing the in-situ harvesting of biofilms on a regular basis during more than three years. The inspection of the frosted slides showed the development of biofilms on their surface containing coccoid and filamentous cyanobacteria, heterotrophic bacteria and diatom frustules. Microscopical observations under natural light and autoflorescence show a close association between freshly low Mg-calcite precipitates and biofilms containing at least five species of filamentous and coccoid cyanobacteria. Carbonate precipitation peaks at early spring and late summer, and low Mg calcite crystals are always in close association with mostly cyanobacteria filaments (e.g., Tolipothrix, Oscillatoria). Ultra high-resolution elemental analyses performed immediately after recovering the samples confirmed the microscopical observations. Further SEM inspection of the samples revealed a clear seasonal pattern of carbonate precipitation identifying low Mg- calcite with crystal shapes varying from poorly to not crystallized compact aggregates; subautomorph to automorph rhomboedric crystals; and snowy cluster in which particles are very little or not crystallized. Liquid and

  18. Growth rate controlled barium partitioning in calcite and aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetschl, Katja Elisabeth; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Baldermann, Andre; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The barium (Ba) content and the Ba/Ca molar ratios in biogenic and abiotic carbonates have been widely used from the scientific community as a geochemical proxy especially in marine and early diagenetic settings. The Ba content of carbonate minerals has been earlier associated to changes in oceanic circulation that may have been caused by upwelling, changes in weathering regimes and river-runoff as well as melt water discharge. The physicochemical controls of Ba ion incorporation in the two most abundant CaCO3 polymorphs found in Earth's surface environments, i.e. calcite and aragonite, have adequately been studied only for calcite. These earlier studies (i.e. [1]) suggest that at increasing growth rate, Ba partitioning in calcite is increasing as well. In contrast, to date the effect of growth rate on the partitioning of Ba in aragonite remains questionable, despite the fact that this mineral phase is the predominant carbonate-forming polymorph in shallow marine environments. To shed light on the mechanisms controlling Ba ion uptake in carbonates in this study we performed steady-state Ba co-precipitation experiments with calcite and aragonite at 25°C. The obtained results for the partitioning of Ba in calcite are in good agreement with those reported earlier by [1], whereas those for aragonite indicate a reduction of Ba partitioning at elevated aragonite growth rates, with the partitioning coefficient value between solid and fluid to be approaching the unity. This finding is good agreement with the formation of a solid solution in the aragonite-witherite system, owing to the isostructural crystallography of the two mineral phases. Moreover, our data set provides new insights that are required for reconstructing the evolution of the Ba content of pristine marine versus diagenetically altered carbonate minerals commonly occurring in marine subfloor settings, as the thermodynamically less stable aragonite will transform to calcite enriched in Ba, whilst affecting

  19. Electronic and optical characteristics of an m-plane GaN single crystal grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a GaN seed synthesized by the ammonothermal method using an acidic mineralizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Kazunobu; Tsukada, Yusuke; Furukawa, Erika; Saito, Makoto; Mikawa, Yutaka; Kubo, Shuichi; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Fujito, Kenji; Uedono, Akira; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2016-05-01

    Fundamental electronic and optical properties of a low-resistivity m-plane GaN single crystal, which was grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a bulk GaN seed crystal synthesized by the ammonothermal method in supercritical ammonia using an acidic mineralizer, were investigated. The threading dislocation and basal-plane staking-fault densities of the crystal were around 104 cm-2 and less than 100 cm-1, respectively. Oxygen doping achieved a high electron concentration of 4 × 1018 cm-3 at room temperature. Accordingly, a photoluminescence (PL) band originating from the recombination of hot carriers was observed at low temperatures, even under weak excitation conditions. The simultaneous realization of low-level incorporation of Ga vacancies (VGa) less than 1016 cm-3 was confirmed by using the positron annihilation technique. Consistent with our long-standing claim that VGa complexes are the major nonradiative recombination centers in GaN, the fast-component PL lifetime of the near-band-edge emission at room temperature longer than 2 ns was achieved.

  20. Top Seeded Solution Growth, Structural and Vibrational Analyses of K1- x Na x Gd(WO4)2 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durairajan, A.; Thangaraju, D.; Valente, M. A.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2016-08-01

    Laser host single crystals of K1- x Na x Gd(WO4)2 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) have been grown by high temperature top seeded solution with low viscus K2WO4 as flux. The powder x-ray diffraction pattern of the synthesised charge confirmed the crystalline quality and possible incorporation of sodium in the KGd(WO4)2 (KGW) matrix. Estimated lattice parameters of the grown crystals revealed that there were no anomalous structural changes due to the incorporation of sodium in the KGW matrix. The change in structural phase transition and its thermal stability due to addition of sodium ions have been studied through differential thermal analysis. The homogeneous distribution of sodium and other metal ions in the matrix were qualitatively studied from energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements. The Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses have shown the influence of vibrational changes due to the incorporation of sodium ions in KGW. The optical absorption studies have shown the broad absorption band in the near-ultra violet region corresponding to the W6+ to O2- charge transfer band. These results suggest that incorporation of sodium in a KGW matrix appear to have modulated the physical properties of the grown crystals.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-09-01

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å.

  2. Bed-parallel calcite veins in the core of Wills Mountain anticline: Implications for deformation conditions and fluid flow during the Alleghanian orogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.A.; Battles, D.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1994-03-01

    Thick, bed-parallel to sub-bed-parallel calcite veins are found in Upper Ordovician Trenton and Black River Group limestones exposed in the core of Wills Mountain anticline, Pendleton County, West Virginia. The veins range in thickness from less than 5 centimeters to over 2 meters, and contain individual crystals up to 20 centimeters across. The veins have a 1 to 3 mete spacing, and are planar to lensoid. They are also subhorizontal, and can be traced for tens of meters along the outcrop. The calcite is opaque to translucent white, and occasionally colorless and transparent. Tectonic slickenlines are found at the top and bottom margins of the veins, as well as within the veins. These slickenlines indicate transport directed toward 280[degree]--315[degree]. When crushed the calcite emits a strong odor of H[sub 2]S. The calcite contains abundant two-phase aqueous inclusions that have ice melting temperatures (T[sub m]) of [minus]9.0 to [minus]14.1 C. This corresponds to a salinity of 13 to 17 wt.% NaCl equiv. Inclusion homogenization (T[sub b]) values range from 91.8 to 135.1 C, with a medium value of 124 C. Since the calcite veins are bed-parallel and subhorizontal, they must have formed under lithostatic conditions. The calcite veins occur along a fault that is proposed to be a splay from the Ordovician Martinsburg Fm. decollement. This major decollement separates two Cambro-Ordovician carbonate flats east of the Wills Mountain anticline. The splay served as a conduit for the release of massive amounts of H[sub 2]S-saturated brine from the decollement.

  3. Sr2+/Ca2+ and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during inorganic calcite formation: III. Impact of salinity/ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianwu; Niedermayr, Andrea; Köhler, Stephan J.; Böhm, Florian; Kısakürek, Basak; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In order to apply Sr/Ca and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation as a proxy to reconstruct paleo-environments, it is essential to evaluate the impact of various environmental factors. In this study, a CO2 diffusion technique was used to crystallize inorganic calcite from aqueous solutions at different ionic strength/salinity by the addition of NaCl at 25 °C. Results show that the discrimination of Sr2+ versus Ca2+ during calcite formation is mainly controlled by precipitation rate (R in μmol/m2/h) and is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity. In analogy to Sr incorporation, 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during precipitation of calcite is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity too. At 25 °C the calcium isotope fractionation between calcite and aqueous calcium ions (Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq = δ44/40Cacalcite − δ44/40Caaq) correlates inversely to log R values for all experiments. In addition, an inverse relationship between Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq and log DSr, which is independent of temperature, precipitation rate, and aqueous (Sr/Ca)aq ratio, is not affected by ionic strength/salinity either. Considering the log DSr and Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq relationship, Sr/Ca and δ44/40Cacalcite values of precipitated calcite can be used as an excellent multi-proxy approach to reconstruct environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) of calcite growth and diagenetic alteration. PMID:22347722

  4. Vaterite Crystals Contain Two Interspersed Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalah-Amitai, Lee; Mayzel, Boaz; Kauffmann, Yaron; Fitch, Andrew N.; Bloch, Leonid; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.; Pokroy, Boaz

    2013-04-01

    Calcite, aragonite, and vaterite are the three anhydrous polymorphs of calcium carbonate, in order of decreasing thermodynamic stability. Although vaterite is not commonly found in geological settings, it is an important precursor in several carbonate-forming systems and can be found in biological settings. Because of difficulties in obtaining large, pure, single crystals, the crystal structure of vaterite has been elusive for almost a century. Using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that vaterite is actually composed of at least two different crystallographic structures that coexist within a pseudo-single crystal. The major structure exhibits hexagonal symmetry; the minor structure, existing as nanodomains within the major matrix, is still unknown.

  5. Does calcite encrustation in Chara provide a phosphorus nutrient sink?

    PubMed

    Siong, Kian; Asaeda, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effect of calcite encrustation in stoneworts (Chara spp.) on P cycling in an aquatic ecosystem. Sequential fractionation was performed to quantify P fractions of the internodes of calcified (Ca-CF) and uncalcified (UCa-CF) Chara fibrosa Agardh ex Bruzelius. Our results showed that Ca-CF was able to store more P and about 14 to 23% of total P in Ca-CF was co-precipitated with encrusted calcite, while only 2 to 3% was found in UCa-CF. Furthermore, in Ca-CF, an increased amount of total P did not result in a higher release of bioavailable water-soluble and sodium hydroxide-extractable P. Extracellular calcification in Chara enhanced nutrient sink for P, provided a further bottom-up control of phytoplankton, and should be regarded as a positive feedback in stabilizing Chara dominance in lakes.

  6. U(VI) behaviour in hyperalkaline calcite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kurt F.; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Swinburne, Adam N.; Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel; Natrajan, Louise S.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.; Livens, Francis R.; Morris, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of U(VI) in hyperalkaline fluid/calcite systems was studied over a range of U(VI) concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM to 42.0 μM) and in two high pH systems, young and old synthetic cement leachate in batch sorption experiments. These systems were selected to be representative of young- (pH 13.3) and old-stage (pH 10.5) leachate evolution within a cementitious geological disposal facility. Batch sorption experiments, modelling, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electron microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering and luminescence spectroscopy were used to define the speciation of U(VI) across the systems of study. At the lowest concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM 232U(VI)) significant U removal was observed for both old and young cement leachates, and this was successfully modelled using a first order kinetic adsorption modelling approach. At higher concentrations (>4.20 μM) in the young cement leachate, U(VI) showed no interaction with the calcite surface over an 18 month period. Small angle X-ray scattering techniques indicated that at high U concentrations (42.0 μM) and after 18 months, the U(VI) was present in a colloidal form which had little interaction with the calcite surface and consisted of both primary and aggregated particles with a radius of 7.6 ± 1.1 and 217 ± 24 Å, respectively. In the old cement leachate, luminescence spectroscopy identified two surface binding sites for U(VI) on calcite: in the system with 0.21 μM U(VI), a liebigite-like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 surface complex was identified; at higher U(VI) concentrations (0.42 μM), a second binding site of undetermined coordination was identified. At elevated U(VI) concentrations (>2.10 μM) in old cement leachate, both geochemical data and luminescence spectroscopy suggested that surface mediated precipitation was controlling U(VI) behaviour. A focused ion beam mill was used to create a section across the U(VI) precipitate-calcite interface. Transmission electron

  7. Interaction of copper with the surface of calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, M.L.; Morse, J.W.

    1981-05-01

    The interaction of Cu ions in solution with the surface of calcite has been studied in a range of solutions from pure water to seawater. Observations of the uptake of Cu from solution onto calcite indicates that the process is rapid and strong in both distilled water and seawater. In distilled water, Cu uptake is directly proportional to the concentration of Cu in solution; Cu/sub s/ = K/sub s/Cu/sub 1/. This Cu/sub s/ dependence on Cu/sub 1/ is linear over the entire Cu concentration range studied (0.1 to 200 ..mu..M). Results do not indicate the formation of a precipitate of either malachite or copper carbonate. In seawater, the uptake of Cu is also directly proportional to the concentration of Cu/sub 1/ up to a limiting value of approximately 13 ..mu..M. The average value for K/sub s/ in seawater, 0.24 +- 0.06 (Cu/sub 1/ less than or equal to 13 ..mu..M), is approximately an order of magnitude less than in distilled water. This is probably the result of smaller Cu/sub 1/ activity coefficients and increased site competition by other ions in seawater. Attempts to increase the Cu/sub 1/ concentration above 13 ..mu..M resulted in the additional Cu being deposited on the surface of the calcite. A possible explanation for this behavior is the formation of a precipitate of malachite on the calcite surface. The value of K/sub s/ decreased slightly with increasing solid to solution ratios in seawater.

  8. Heterogeneous conversion of calcite aerosol by nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Preszler Prince, A; Grassian, V H; Kleiber, P; Young, M A

    2007-02-01

    The reaction of nitric acid with calcite aerosol at varying relative humidities has been studied under suspended particle conditions in an atmospheric reaction chamber using infrared absorption spectroscopy. The reactant concentration in the chamber, as well as the appearance of gas phase products and surface adsorbed species, was spectroscopically monitored before and after mixing with CaCO(3) (calcite) particles. The interaction with HNO(3) was found to lead to gas phase CO(2) evolution and increased water uptake due to heterogeneous conversion of the carbonate to particulate nitrate. The reaction was enhanced as the relative humidity of the system was increased, especially at relative humidities above the reported deliquescence point of particulate Ca(NO(3))(2). The measured reaction extent demonstrates that the total calcite particulate mass is available for reaction with HNO(3) and the conversion process is not limited to the particle surface. The spectroscopy of the surface formed nitrate suggests a highly concentrated solution environment with a significant degree of ion pairing. The implications of the HNO(3) loss and the formation of the particulate nitrate product for atmospheric chemistry are discussed. PMID:17242744

  9. How tightly does calcite e-twin constrain stress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Atsushi

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical twinning along calcite e-planes has been used for paleostress analyses. Since the twinning has a critical resolved shear stress at ˜10 MPa, not only principal stress axes but also differential stress can be determined from the twins. In this article, five-dimensional stress space used in plasticity theory was introduced to describe the yield loci of calcite e-twinning. The constraints to paleostress from twin and untwin data and from calcite grains twinned on 0, 1, 2 and 3 e-planes were quantified by using their information contents, which were defined in the stress space. The orientations of twinned and untwinned e-planes are known to constrain not only stress axes but also differential stress, D, but they loose the resolution of D if the twin lamellae were formed at D greater than 50-100 MPa. On the other hand, it is difficult to observe twin lamellae subparallel to a thin section. The stochastic modeling of this effect showed that 20-25% of twin lamellae can be overlooked. The degradation of the constraints by this sampling bias can be serious especially for the determination of D.

  10. Earthworm-produced calcite granules: A new terrestrial palaeothermometer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteegh, Emma A. A.; Black, Stuart; Canti, Matthew G.; Hodson, Mark E.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we show for the first time that calcite granules, produced by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, and commonly recorded at sites of archaeological interest, accurately reflect temperature and soil water δ18O values. Earthworms were cultivated in an orthogonal combination of two different (granule-free) soils moistened by three types of mineral water and kept at three temperatures (10, 16 and 20 °C) for an acclimatisation period of three weeks followed by transfer to identical treatments and cultivation for a further four weeks. Earthworm-secreted calcite granules were collected from the second set of soils. δ18O values were determined on individual calcite granules (δ18Oc) and the soil solution (δ18Ow). The δ18Oc values reflect soil solution δ18Ow values and temperature, but are consistently enriched by 1.51 (± 0.12)‰ in comparison to equilibrium in synthetic carbonates. The data fit the equation 1000 ln α = [20.21 ± 0.92] (103 T-1) - [38.58 ± 3.18] (R2 = 0.95; n = 96; p < 0.0005). As the granules are abundant in modern soils, buried soils and archaeological contexts, and can be dated using U-Th disequilibria, the developed palaeotemperature relationship has enormous potential for application to Holocene and Pleistocene time intervals.

  11. Microbially-Mediated Subsurface Calcite Precipitation for Removal of Hazardous Divalent Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Smith, R.W.; Ferris, F. Gratn; Ingram, Jani C.; Reysenbach, A.-L.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Tyler, T.L.; Taylor, J.L.; Banta, A.; Delwiche, M.E.; McLing, T.; Cortez, Marnie, M.; Watwood, M.E.

    2003-03-27

    We are investigating microbially-mediated acceleration of calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of hazardous divalent cations (e.g., 90Sr) in calcite saturated subsurface systems. In theory, the addition of urea to an aquifer or vadose zone and its subsequent hydrolysis by indigenous microbes will cause an increase in alkalinity, pH and calcite precipitation. Lab studies indicated the ability of various bacteria to precipitate calcite through urea hydrolysis and that incorporation of strontium in biogenically-formed calcite is greater than in abiotically formed calcite. Results from a field experiment in a pristine location in the Snake River Plain aquifer involving the phased addition of molasses and then urea showed increases in total cell numbers, rate of urea hydrolysis and calcite formation during the study. The combined diagnostic approaches of microbiology, molecular ecology and analytical chemistry demonstrate the feasibility of this biogeochemical manipulation for subsurface remediation at arid Western DOE sites such as Hanford and INEEL.

  12. Interaction of copper with the surface of calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, M.L.; Morse, J.W.

    1981-12-01

    The interaction of Cu ions in solution with the surface of calcite has been studied in a range of solutions from pure water to seawater. Observations of the uptake of Cu from solution onto calcite indicates that the process is rapid and strong in both distilled water and seawater. In distilled water, Cu uptake is directly proportional to the concentration of Cu in solution; Cu/sub s/ = K/sub s/Cu/sub 1/. The average value for K/sub s/ is 3.5 +- 1.7. The Cu/sub s/ dependence on Cu/sub 1/ is linear over the entire Cu concentration range studied (0.1 to 200 ..mu..M). Results do not indicate the formation of a precipitate of either malachite or copper carbonate. A precipitate of the form Cu/sub x/Ca/sub 1-x/CO/sub 3/ may be deposited onto the calcite surface in distilled water. The value of K/sub s/ in distilled water decreased sharply over the solid to solution ratio range of 0.1 to 2 g CaCO/sub 3/ 1/sup -1/. This was followed by a small change in K/sub s/ for solid to solution ratios in the range of 2 to 10 g CaCO/sub 3/ 1/sup -1/. In seawater, the uptake of Cu is also directly proportional to the concentration of Cu/sub 1/ up to a limiting value of approximately 13 ..mu..M. The average value for K/sub s/ in seawater, 0.24 +- 0.06 (Cu/sub 1/ less than or equal to 13 ..mu..M), is approximately an order of magnitude less than in distilled water. This is probably the result of smaller Cu/sub 1/ activity coefficients and increased site competition by other ions in seawater. Attempts to increase the Cu/sub 1/ concentration above 13 ..mu..M resulted in the additional Cu being deposited on the surface of the calcite. A possible explanation for this behavior is the formation of a precipitate of malachite on the calcite surface. The value of K/sub s/ decreased slightly with increasing solid to solution ratios in seawater.

  13. Origin of gem corundum in calcite marble: The Revelstoke occurrence in the Canadian Cordillera of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzikowski, Tashia J.; Cempírek, Jan; Groat, Lee A.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Giuliani, Gaston

    2014-06-01

    The calcite marble-hosted gem corundum (ruby, sapphire) occurrence near Revelstoke, British Columbia, Canada, occurs in the Monashee Complex of the Omineca Belt of the Canadian Cordillera. Corundum occurs in thin, folded and stretched layers with green muscovite + Ba-bearing K-feldspar + anorthite (An0.85-1) ± phlogopite ± Na-poor scapolite. Other silicate layers within the marble are composed of: (1) diopside + tremolite ± quartz and (2) garnet (Alm0.7-0.5Grs0.2-0.4) + Na-rich scapolite + diopside + tremolite + Na,K-amphiboles. Non-silicate layers in the marble are either magnetite- or graphite-bearing. Predominantly pink (locally red or purple) opaque to transparent corundum crystals have elevated Cr2O3 (≤ 0.21 wt.%) and variable amounts of TiO2; rare blue rims on the corundum crystals contain higher amounts of TiO2 (≤ 0.53 wt.%) and Fe2O3 (≤ 0.07 wt.%). The associated micas have elevated Cr, V, Ti, and Ba contents. Petrography of the silicate layers show that corundum formed from muscovite at the peak of metamorphism (~ 650-700 °C at 8.5-9 kbar). Because the marble is almost pure calcite (dolomite is very rare), the corundum was preserved because it did not react with dolomite to spinel + calcite during decompression. The scapolite-bearing assemblages formed during or after decompression of the rock at ~ 650 °C and 4-6 kbar. Gem-quality corundum crystals formed especially on borders of the mica-feldspar layers in an assemblage with calcite. Whole rock geochemistry data show that the corundum-bearing silicate (mica-feldspar) layers formed by mechanical mixing of carbonate with the host gneiss protolith; the bulk composition of the silicate layers was modified by Si and Fe depletion during prograde metamorphism. High element mobility is supported by the homogenization of δ18O and δ13C values in carbonates and silicates for the marble and silicate layers. The silicate layers and the gneiss contain elevated contents of Cr and V due to the volcanoclastic

  14. Stable isotope (C, O) and monovalent cation fractionation upon synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyl apatite (CHAP) via calcite transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Schmiedinger, Iris; Wacker, Ulrike; Conrad, Anika C.; Grathoff, Georg; Schmidt, Burkhard; Bahlo, Rainer; Gehlken, Peer-L.; Fiebig, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate-bearing hydroxyl-apatite (CHAP) is of fundamental and applied interest to the (bio)geochemical, paleontological, medical and material science communities, since it forms the basic mineral phase in human and animal teeth and bones. In addition, it is found in non-biogenic phosphate deposits. The stable isotope and foreign element composition of biogenic CHAP is widely used to estimate the formation conditions. This requires careful experimental calibration under well-defined boundary conditions. Within the DFG project EXCALIBOR, synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyapatite was conducted via the transformation of synthetic calcite powder in aqueous solution as a function of time, pH, and temperature using batch-type experiments. The aqueous solution was analyzed for the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbonate (gas irmMS), the oxygen isotope composition of water (LCRDS), and the cationic composition. The solid was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, micro Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, elemental analysis (EA, ICP-OES) and gas irmMS. Temperature was found to significantly impact the transformation rate of calcite to CHAP. Upon complete transformation, CHAP was found to contain up to 5% dwt carbonate, depending on the solution composition (e.g., pH), both incorporated on the A and B type position of the crystal lattice. The oxygen isotope fractionation between water and CHAP decreased with increasing temperature with a tentative slope shallower than those reported in the literature for apatite, calcite or aragonite. In addition, the presence of dissolved NH4+, K+ or Na+ in aqueous solution led to partial incorporation into the CHAP lattice. How these distortions of the crystal lattice may impact stable isotope discrimination is subject of future investigations.

  15. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Dunbar, R.

    2015-12-01

    corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite, although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect that crystals may attain nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures only under conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological "vital-effect" influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological "vital" effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on Δ47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.

  16. First-principles study of boron speciation in calcite and aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Etienne; Pietrucci, Fabio; Gervais, Christel; Blanchard, Marc; Schott, Jacques; Gaillardet, Jérome

    2016-11-01

    Despite the importance of boron as a proxy of past ocean pH, the crystal-chemical factors controlling its incorporation in the structure of calcium carbonates are still poorly understood. This is partly linked to an imperfect knowledge of the coordination, protonation state and local environment of boron species in these minerals. In the present study, we use first-principles quantum mechanical tools to model selected trigonal and tetragonal boron species in calcite and aragonite. The stable geometry of the models is obtained from standard energy minimization schemes or using a more advanced metadynamics exploration of their configurational space. The computation of 11B NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar coupling parameters enables a straightforward comparison of the models to existing experimental NMR data. The results show that B in calcium carbonates does occur as structural species substituted for CO32- anions. The B speciation depends on the polymorph considered. In calcite, structural boron is present as partially deprotonated trigonal BO2(OH)2- species coexisting with a fraction of substituted B(OH)4- groups. In aragonite, the B(OH)4- substitution for CO32- anions is dominant. Different species, including entrapped B(OH)3 molecules and substituted BO33- groups also occur in biogenic samples. The diversity of B speciation reflects a diversity of B incorporation mechanisms and sheds light on previous studies confronting B isotopic composition determination with NMR observations. The mechanisms of boron incorporation in calcium carbonates are probably more complex than usually assumed in the literature using boron isotopes as a proxy of paleo-atmospheric CO2 reconstructions. Although not invalidating the empirical paleo-pH proxy, these results call for a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of boron incorporation in carbonates.

  17. In situ study on δ11B and B/Ca in synthetic aragonite and calcite: the effect of growth rate and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabitov, R. I.; Rollion-Bard, C.; Sadekov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Boron isotopic and chemical content of carbonates (expressed as δ11B and B) is being developed as seawater pH and CO32- proxy. However, thermodynamic and kinetic effects on δ11B and B are not well understood. It underscores the importance of exploring possible effects of temperature and growth rate on δ11B and B fractionation in synthetic calcium carbonate minerals, which is the focus of this study. In situ Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of δ11B were conducted in the aragonite spherulites precipitated from seawater at 50°C, 65°C and 75°C. Here spherulite centers represent the onset of crystallization with the rates that are significantly higher than those of the later grown fibres [1,2]. Boron isotopic composition reflects these two morphologically distinct domains: δ11B (centers) are lower than δ11B (fibres) by up to one order of magnitude. This observation is consistent with δ11B difference between coral early mineralization zone and fibrous aragonite [3]. Also, our preliminary results suggest averaged δ11B (centers+fibres) increases with temperature within the range of 55 to 75°C. SIMS measurements of B/Ca were performed on single crystals of calcites synthesized from laboratory prepared solution of NH4Cl-CaCl2 doped with boron by diffusion of CO2. Growth rates of calcite (V) within crystals grown isothermally (T=2, 15, 20, 22 and 25°C) were monitored by sequentially spiking calcite-precipitating fluids with rare earth element (REE) dopants. The REE were analyzed with SIMS at spots matching those where B/Ca were determined. REE patterns reveal concentric domains of calcite growth. The growth rate of calcite generally decreases with time - i.e., crystal rims advanced at slower rates than cores. Fluids were sampled periodically for B, Ca, dissolved inorganic carbon, and pH. Boron Nernst partition coefficient DB=B(calcite)/B(fluid) increases from 0.38 (pH=8.11±0.04) to 0.68 (pH=8.03±0.03) with increasing V from 0.039 to 0.12 nm/s at

  18. Pyrite-pyrrhotite intergrowths in calcite marble from Bistriški Vintgar, Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavašnik, J.

    2016-02-01

    Roman marble quarry in Bistrica gorge in southern Pohorje Mt. (north-eastern Slovenia) is situated in a 20 m thick lens of layered marble, at the contact zone between granodiorite and metamorphites. Grey and yellowish non-homogenous calcite marble is heavily included by mica, quartz, feldspars, zoisite, pyrite and amphiboles. In the present research, we have studied numerous pyrite (FeS2) crystals associated with yellowish-bronze non-stoichiometric pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS), not previously reported from this locality. SEM investigation revealed unusual sequence of crystallisation: primary skeletal pyrrhotite matrix is sparsely overgrown by well-crystalline pyrite, both being overgrown by smaller, well-developed hexagonal pyrrhotite crystals of the second generation. With TEM we identify the pyrrhotite as 5T-Fe1-xS phase, where x is about 0.1 and is equivalent to Fe9S10. The pyrite-pyrrhotite coexistence allows us a construction of fO2-pH diagram of stability fields, which reflects geochemical conditions at the time of marble re-crystallisation.

  19. Principles of Calcite Dissolution in Human and Artificial Otoconia

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik; Blödow, Alexander; Buder, Jana; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Human otoconia provide mechanical stimuli to deflect hair cells of the vestibular sensory epithelium for purposes of detecting linear acceleration and head tilts. During lifetime, the volume and number of otoconia are gradually reduced. In a process of degeneration morphological changes occur. Structural changes in human otoconia are assumed to cause vertigo and balance disorders such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The aim of this study was to investigate the main principles of morphological changes in human otoconia in dissolution experiments by exposure to hydrochloric acid, EDTA, demineralized water and completely purified water respectively. For comparison reasons artificial (biomimetic) otoconia (calcite gelatin nanocomposits) and natural calcite were used. Morphological changes were detected in time steps by the use of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Under in vitro conditions three main dissolution mechanisms were identified as causing characteristic morphological changes of the specimen under consideration: pH drops in the acidic range, complex formation with calcium ions and changes of ion concentrations in the vicinity of otoconia. Shifts in pH cause a more uniform reduction of otoconia size (isotropic dissolution) whereas complexation reactions and changes of the ionic concentrations within the surrounding medium bring about preferred attacks at specific areas (anisotropic dissolution) of human and artificial otoconia. Owing to successive reduction of material, all the dissolution mechanisms finally produce fragments and remnants of otoconia. It can be assumed that the organic component of otoconia is not significantly attacked under the given conditions. Artificial otoconia serve as a suitable model system mimicking chemical attacks on biogenic specimens. The underlying principles of calcite dissolution under in vitro conditions may play a role in otoconia degeneration processes such as BPPV. PMID:25048115

  20. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  1. Calcite dissolution: an in situ study in the Panama Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Thunell, R.C.; Keir, R.S.; Honjo, S.

    1981-05-08

    The results of an in situ study of calcite dissolution in the Panama Basin indicate that the rate of dissolution in the water column increases suddenly below a water depth of about 2800 meters. This coincides with the depth at which the calcium carbonate content of surface sediments begins to decrease rapidly or the sedimentary lysocline. Since this level of increased dissolution both in the water column and on the sea floor does not appear to be related to the transition from supersaturation to undersaturation with respect to carbonate, there may be a kinetic origin for the lysocline in this region.

  2. Synthesis of KCa₂Nb₃O₁₀ Crystals with Varying Grain Sizes and Their Nanosheet Monolayer Films As Seed Layers for PiezoMEMS Applications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huiyu; Nguyen, Minh; Hammer, Tom; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Guus; ten Elshof, Johan E

    2015-12-16

    The layered perovskite-type niobate KCa2Nb3O10 and its derivatives show advantages in several fields, such as templated film growth and (photo)catalysis. Conventional synthesis routes generally yield crystal size smaller than 2 μm. We report a flux synthesis method to obtain KCa2Nb3O10 crystals with significantly larger sizes. By using different flux materials (K2SO4 and K2MoO4), crystals with average sizes of 8 and 20 μm, respectively, were obtained. The KCa2Nb3O10 crystals from K2SO4 and K2MoO4 assisted synthesis were protonated and exfoliated into monolayer nanosheets, and the optimal exfoliation conditions were determined. Using pulsed laser deposition, highly (001)-oriented piezoelectric stacks (SrRuO3/PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3/SrRuO3, SRO/PZT/SRO) were deposited onto Langmuir-Blodgett films of Ca2Nb3O10(-) (CNO) nanosheets with varying lateral nanosheet sizes on Si substrates. The resulting PZT thin films showed high crystallinity irrespective of nanosheet size. The small sized nanosheets yielded a high longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient d33 of 100 pm/V, while the larger sized sheets had a d33 of 72 pm/V. An enhanced transverse piezoelectric coefficient d31 of -107 pm/V, an important input parameter for the actuation of active structures in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, was obtained for PZT films grown on CNO nanosheets with large lateral size, while the corresponding value on small sized sheets was -96 pm/V. PMID:26583282

  3. The evolution of calcite-bearing kimberlites by melt-rock reaction: evidence from polymineralic inclusions within clinopyroxene and garnet megacrysts from Lac de Gras kimberlites, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussweiler, Y.; Stone, R. S.; Pearson, D. G.; Luth, R. W.; Stachel, T.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; Menzies, A.

    2016-07-01

    Megacrystic (>1 cm) clinopyroxene (Cr-diopside) and garnet (Cr-pyrope) xenocrysts within kimberlites from Lac de Gras (Northwest Territories, Canada) contain fully crystallized melt inclusions. These `polymineralic inclusions' have previously been interpreted to form by necking down of melts at mantle depths. We present a detailed petrographical and geochemical investigation of polymineralic inclusions and their host crystals to better understand how they form and what they reveal about the evolution of kimberlite melt. Genetically, the megacrysts are mantle xenocrysts with peridotitic chemical signatures indicating an origin within the lithospheric mantle (for the Cr-diopsides studied here ~4.6 GPa, 1015 °C). Textural evidence for disequilibrium between the host crystals and their polymineralic inclusions (spongy rims in Cr-diopside, kelyphite in Cr-pyrope) is consistent with measured Sr isotopic disequilibrium. The preservation of disequilibrium establishes a temporal link to kimberlite eruption. In Cr-diopsides, polymineralic inclusions contain phlogopite, olivine, chromite, serpentine, and calcite. Abundant fluid inclusion trails surround the inclusions. In Cr-pyropes, the inclusions additionally contain Al-spinel, clinopyroxene, and dolomite. The major and trace element compositions of the inclusion phases are generally consistent with the early stages of kimberlite differentiation trends. Extensive chemical exchange between the host phases and the inclusions is indicated by enrichment of the inclusions in major components of the host crystals, such as Cr2O3 and Al2O3. This chemical evidence, along with phase equilibria constraints, supports the proposal that the inclusions within Cr-diopside record the decarbonation reaction: dolomitic melt + diopside → forsterite + calcite + CO2, yielding the observed inclusion mineralogy and producing associated (CO2-rich) fluid inclusions. Our study of polymineralic inclusions in megacrysts provides clear mineralogical

  4. The ubiquitous nature of accessory calcite in granitoid rocks: Implications for weathering, solute evolution, and petrogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Vivit, D.V.; Bullen, T.D.

    2005-01-01

    Calcite is frequently cited as a source of excess Ca, Sr and alkalinity in solutes discharging from silicate terrains yet, no previous effort has been made to assess systematically the overall abundance, composition and petrogenesis of accessory calcite in granitoid rocks. This study addresses this issue by analyzing a worldwide distribution of more than 100 granitoid rocks. Calcite is found to be universally present in a concentration range between 0.028 to 18.8 g kg-1 (mean = 2.52 g kg-1). Calcite occurrences include small to large isolated anhedral grains, fracture and cavity infillings, and sericitized cores of plagioclase. No correlation exists between the amount of calcite present and major rock oxide compositions, including CaO. Ion microprobe analyses of in situ calcite grains indicate relatively low Sr (120 to 660 ppm), negligible Rb and 87Sr/86Sr ratios equal to or higher than those of coexisting plagioclase. Solutes, including Ca and alkalinity produced by batch leaching of the granitoid rocks (5% CO2 in DI water for 75 d at 25??C), are dominated by the dissolution of calcite relative to silicate minerals. The correlation of these parameters with higher calcite concentrations decreases as leachates approach thermodynamic saturation. In longer term column experiments (1.5 yr), reactive calcite becomes exhausted, solute Ca and Sr become controlled by feldspar dissolution and 87Sr/ 86Sr by biotite oxidation. Some accessory calcite in granitoid rocks is related to intrusion into carbonate wall rock or produced by later hydrothermal alteration. However, the ubiquitous occurrence of calcite also suggests formation during late stage (subsolidus) magmatic processes. This conclusion is supported by petrographic observations and 87Sr/86Sr analyses. A review of thermodynamic data indicates that at moderate pressures and reasonable CO2 fugacities, calcite is a stable phase at temperatures of 400 to 700??C. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. [Removal of Phosphate by Calcite in Open-System].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-xuan; Diao, Jia-yong; Huang, Li-dong; Chen, Yan-fan; Liu, Da-gang; Xu, Zheng-wen

    2015-12-01

    Batch methods were deployed to study the removal of phosphate by calcite in an open-system. Results showed that: (1) The pre-equilibrium process of calcite in open system could be achieved within 24 hours (2) The kinetic results showed that, at initial concentration of 0.5 mg · L⁻¹, the phosphate removal was almost completed within 10 hours of the first phase. The observation may be attributed to surface adsorption. At initial concentration of 2.5 mg · L⁻¹, the phosphate removal was mainly carried out by the precipitation of phosphate at later stage of the process; (3) At initial concentration of ≤ 2.5 mg · L⁻¹ setting 10 h as reaction time, the phosphate removal process was described well by the Langmuir model. It is hypothesized that surface adsorption was the principal removal way of phosphate; (4) With the addition of phthalate, at initial concentration of < 2.5 mg · L⁻¹, the phosphate removal rate experienced a small decrease. That was because phosphate was mainly removed by surface adsorption, and thus, phthalate was a competitor to phosphate for the same adsorption site. The phosphate removal rate increased a little at initial concentration of > 2.5 mg · L⁻¹, this was because the phosphate precipitation was reinforced by the increase of calcium concentration, which was caused by phthalate addition. PMID:27011989

  6. Porosity and hydric behavior of typical calcite microfabrics in stalagmites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-García, M. B.; López-Arce, P.; Fernández-Valle, M. E.; Martín-Chivelet, J.; Fort, R.

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical techniques commonly used for material characterization are applied for the first time to speleothem samples to investigate the porosity and hydric behavior of calcite stalagmites used in paleoclimatology. These techniques allow the determination of the stalagmites' potential to undergo diagenetic transformations when substantial changes in drip waters occur in the cave environment. The petrophysical techniques include water absorption under vacuum and by capillarity, nuclear magnetic resonance, environmental scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The studied samples comprise five common calcite microfabrics, which have markedly different porosities and hydric behaviors and, as a consequence, different sensibilities to diagenetic processes related to the influx of water. The experiments show that stalagmites can behave as complex, small-scale hydrological systems and that the circulation of water through them by complex nets of interconnected pores might be common. As the circulation of water favors diagenetic transformations that involve geochemical and isotopic changes, the characterization of flow patterns is key for outlining areas that are susceptible to such modifications, which is critical to paleoclimatic studies that are based on speleothems because geochemical and stable isotopic data are used as paleoenvironmental proxies and absolute ages are obtained by using radioactive isotope ratios. These potential modifications also have obvious implications for studies based on fluid inclusions in speleothems. The integrated methodology, which uses primarily non-destructive techniques, shows a high potential for characterization of any type of speleothem and other continental carbonates such as tufas or sinters.

  7. Isotopic analysis for degradation diagnosis of calcite matrix in mortar.

    PubMed

    Dotsika, E; Psomiadis, D; Poutoukis, D; Raco, B; Gamaletsos, P

    2009-12-01

    Mortar that was used in building as well as in conservation and restoration works of wall paintings have been analysed isotopically (delta(13)C and delta(18)O) in order to evaluate the setting environments and secondary processes, to distinguish the structural components used and to determine the exact causes that incurred the degradation phenomena. The material undergoes weathering and decay on a large proportion of its surface and in depth, due to the infiltration of water through the structural blocks. Mineralogical analysis indicated signs of sulphation and dissolution/recrystallisation processes taking place on the material, whereas stable isotopes provided information relative to the origin of the CO(2) and water during calcite formation and degradation processes. Isotopic change of the initial delta(13)C and delta(18)O in carbonate matrix was caused by alteration of the primary source of CO(2) and H(2)O in mortar over time, particularly by recrystallisation of calcite with porewater, evaporated or re-condensed water, and CO(2) from various sources of atmospheric and biogenic origin. Human influence (surface treatment) and biological growth (e.g. fungus) are major exogenic processes which may alter delta(18)O and delta(13)C in lime mortar.

  8. String stabilized ribbon growth a method for seeding same

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanuel M.

    1987-08-25

    This invention is a method of initiating or seeding the growth of a crystalline or polycrystalline ribbon by the String Stabilized Ribbon Growth Method. The method for seeding the crystal growth comprises contacting a melt surface with a seed and two strings used in edge stabilization. The wetted strings attach to the wetted seed as a result of the freezing of the liquid melt. Upon drawing the seed, which is attached to the strings, away from the melt surface a melt liquid meniscus, a seed junction, and a growth interface forms. Further pulling of the attached seed causes a crystal ribbon to grow at the growth interface. The boundaries of the growing ribbon are: at the top the seed junction, at the bottom the freezing boundary of the melt liquid meniscus, and at the edges frozen-in strings.

  9. Utilization of calcite and waste glass for preparing construction materials with a low environmental load.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hirotaka; Imaizumi, Haruki; Ishida, Emile Hideki

    2011-11-01

    In this study, porous calcite materials are hydrothermally treated at 200 °C using powder compacts consisting of calcite and glasses composed of silica-rich soda-lime. After treatment, the glasses are converted into calcium aluminosilicate hydrates, such as zeolite phases, which increase their strength. The porosity and morphology of new deposits of hydrothermally solidified materials depend up on the chemical composition of glass. The use of calcite and glass in the hydrothermal treatment plays an important role in the solidification of calcite without thermal decomposition. PMID:21794973

  10. Sulfate-dependent Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane as a Generation Mechanism for Calcite Cap Rock in Gulf Coast Salt Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesar, K. H.; Kyle, R.; Lyons, T. W.; Loyd, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gulf Coast salt domes, specifically their calcite cap rocks, have been widely recognized for their association with significant reserves of crude oil and natural gas. However, the specific microbial reactions that facilitate the precipitation of these cap rocks are still largely unknown. Insight into the mineralization mechanism(s) can be obtained from the specific geochemical signatures recorded in these structures. Gulf Coast cap rocks contain carbonate and sulfur minerals that exhibit variable carbon (d13C) and sulfur isotope (δ34S) signatures. Calcite d13C values are isotopically depleted and show a large range of values from -1 to -52‰, reflecting a mixture of various carbon sources including a substantial methane component. These depleted carbon isotope compositions combined with the presence of abundant sulfide minerals in cap rocks have led to interpretations that invoke microbial sulfate reduction as an important carbonate mineral-yielding process in salt dome environments. Sulfur isotope data from carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS: trace sulfate incorporated within the carbonate mineral crystal lattice) provide a more direct proxy for aqueous sulfate in salt dome systems and may provide a means to directly fingerprint ancient sulfate reduction. We find CAS sulfur isotope compositions (δ34SCAS) significantly greater than those of the precursor Jurassic sulfate-salt deposits (which exhibit δ34S values of ~ +15‰). This implies that cap rock carbonate generation occurred via microbial sulfate reduction under closed-system conditions. The co-occurrence of depleted carbonate d13C values (< ~30‰) and the enriched δ34SCAS values are evidence for sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). AOM, which has been shown to yield extensive seafloor carbonate authigenesis, is also potentially partly responsible for the carbonate minerals of the Gulf Coast calcite cap rocks through concomitant production of alkalinity. Collectively, these data shed

  11. A generalised chemical precipitation modelling approach in wastewater treatment applied to calcite.

    PubMed

    Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Batstone, Damien J; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Tait, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Process simulation models used across the wastewater industry have inherent limitations due to over-simplistic descriptions of important physico–chemical reactions, especially for mineral solids precipitation. As part of the efforts towards a larger Generalized Physicochemical Modelling Framework, the present study aims to identify a broadly applicable precipitation modelling approach. The study uses two experimental platforms applied to calcite precipitating from synthetic aqueous solutions to identify and validate the model approach. Firstly, dynamic pH titration tests are performed to define the baseline model approach. Constant Composition Method (CCM) experiments are then used to examine influence of environmental factors on the baseline approach. Results show that the baseline model should include precipitation kinetics (not be quasi-equilibrium), should include a 1st order effect of the mineral particulate state (Xcryst) and, for calcite, have a 2nd order dependency (exponent n = 2.05 ± 0.29) on thermodynamic supersaturation (σ). Parameter analysis indicated that the model was more tolerant to a fast kinetic coefficient (kcryst) and so, in general, it is recommended that a large kcryst value be nominally selected where insufficient process data is available. Zero seed (self nucleating) conditions were effectively represented by including arbitrarily small amounts of mineral phase in the initial conditions. Both of these aspects are important for wastewater modelling, where knowledge of kinetic coefficients is usually not available, and it is typically uncertain which precipitates are actually present. The CCM experiments confirmed the baseline model, particularly the dependency on supersaturation. Temperature was also identified as an influential factor that should be corrected for via an Arrhenius-style correction of kcryst. The influence of magnesium (a common and representative added impurity) on kcryst was found to be significant but was considered

  12. A generalised chemical precipitation modelling approach in wastewater treatment applied to calcite.

    PubMed

    Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Batstone, Damien J; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Tait, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Process simulation models used across the wastewater industry have inherent limitations due to over-simplistic descriptions of important physico–chemical reactions, especially for mineral solids precipitation. As part of the efforts towards a larger Generalized Physicochemical Modelling Framework, the present study aims to identify a broadly applicable precipitation modelling approach. The study uses two experimental platforms applied to calcite precipitating from synthetic aqueous solutions to identify and validate the model approach. Firstly, dynamic pH titration tests are performed to define the baseline model approach. Constant Composition Method (CCM) experiments are then used to examine influence of environmental factors on the baseline approach. Results show that the baseline model should include precipitation kinetics (not be quasi-equilibrium), should include a 1st order effect of the mineral particulate state (Xcryst) and, for calcite, have a 2nd order dependency (exponent n = 2.05 ± 0.29) on thermodynamic supersaturation (σ). Parameter analysis indicated that the model was more tolerant to a fast kinetic coefficient (kcryst) and so, in general, it is recommended that a large kcryst value be nominally selected where insufficient process data is available. Zero seed (self nucleating) conditions were effectively represented by including arbitrarily small amounts of mineral phase in the initial conditions. Both of these aspects are important for wastewater modelling, where knowledge of kinetic coefficients is usually not available, and it is typically uncertain which precipitates are actually present. The CCM experiments confirmed the baseline model, particularly the dependency on supersaturation. Temperature was also identified as an influential factor that should be corrected for via an Arrhenius-style correction of kcryst. The influence of magnesium (a common and representative added impurity) on kcryst was found to be significant but was considered

  13. Stable carbon isotopes and lipid biomarkers provide new insight into the formation of calcite and siderite concretions in organic-matter rich deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Lydia; Birgel, Daniel; Wagreich, Michael; Peckmann, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    Carbonate concretions from two distinct settings have been studied for their petrography, stable carbon and oxygen isotopes, and lipid biomarker content. Carbonate concretions are in large part products of microbial degradation of organic matter, as for example by sulfate-reducing bacteria, iron-reducing bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. For these prokaryotes certain lipid biomarkers such as hopanoids, terminally-branched fatty acids (bacteria) and isoprenoids (archaea) are characteristic. Two different types of concretions were studied: a) Upper Miocene septarian calcite concretions of the southern Vienna Basin embedded in brackish sediments represented by partly bituminous calcareous sands, silts and clays; b) Paleocene-Eocene siderite concretions enclosed in marine, sandy to silty turbidites with varying carbonate contents and marl layers from the Upper Gosau Subgroup in northern Styria. Calcite concretions consist of abundant calcite microspar (80-90 vol.%), as well as detrital minerals and iron oxyhydroxides. The septarian cracks show beginning cementation with dog-tooth calcite to varying degrees. Framboidal pyrite occurs in some of the calcite concretions, pointing to bacterial sulfate reduction. Siderite concretions consist of even finer carbonate crystals, mainly siderite (40-70 vol.%) but also abundant ferroan calcite, accompanied by iron oxyhydroxides and detrital minerals. The δ13C values of the calcite concretions (-6.8 to -4.1o ) most likely reflect a combination of bacterial organic matter oxidation and input of marine biodetrital carbonate. The δ18O values range from -8.9 to -7.8o agreeing with a formation within a meteoric environment. The surrounding host sediment shows about 1-2o higher δ13C and δ18O values. The siderite δ13C values (-11.1 to -7.5o ) point to microbial respiration of organic carbon and the δ18O values (-3.5 to +2.2o ) agree with a marine depositional environment. In contrast to the calcite concretions, the stable isotope

  14. X-ray dose response of calcite-A comprehensive analysis for optimal application in TL dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various annealing treatments on dosimetric characteristics of orange calcite (CaCO3) mineral has been studied in detail. Quantitative analysis on the dose response shows that the 573 K annealed sample showed sublinear dose response from 10 mGy to 1 Gy. The fading and reproducibility of this sample are also good enough for dosimetric application. However, a specific annealing treatment after irradiation shows some significant improvements in the dosimetric characteristics of the sample. The 773 K pre-annealed sample, after X-ray irradiation post-annealing at 340 K for 6 min provides linear dose response from 10 mGy to 3.60 Gy, very less fading and good reproducibility. Moreover, this sample after post-annealing at 380 K for 6 min shows linear dose response from 10 mGy to 5.40 Gy when analyzed from the ∼408 K thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak. Analysis of TL glow curves confirmed that the 1.30 eV trap center in calcite crystal is the most effective trapping site for dosimetric application.

  15. Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

    2001-04-29

    The {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88 {+-} 0.05 and 9.7 {+-} 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event.

  16. Calcite orientations and composition ranges within teeth across Echinoidea.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stuart R; Ignatiev, Konstantin; Lee, Peter L; Almer, Jonathan D

    2014-08-01

    Sea urchin's teeth from four families of order Echinoida and from orders Temnopleuroida, Arbacioida and Cidaroida were studied with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The high and very high Mg calcite phases of the teeth, i.e. the first and second stage mineral constituents, respectively, have the same crystallographic orientations. The co-orientation of first and second stage mineral, which the authors attribute to epitaxy, extends across the phylogenic width of the extant regular sea urchins and demonstrates that this is a primitive character of this group. The range of compositions Δx for the two phases of Ca1-xMgxCO3 is about 0.20 or greater and is consistent with a common biomineralization process. PMID:25158180

  17. Calcite orientations and composition ranges within teeth across Echinoidea

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Stuart R.; Ignatiev, Konstantin; Lee, Peter L.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchin’s teeth from four families of order Echinoida and from orders Temnopleuroida, Arbacioida and Cidaroida were studied with synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The high and very high Mg calcite phases of the teeth, i.e. the first and second stage mineral constituents, respectively, have the same crystallographic orientations. The co-orientation of first and second stage mineral, which the authors attribute to epitaxy, extends across the phylogenic width of the extant regular sea urchins and demonstrates that this is a primitive character of this group. The range of compositions Δx for the two phases of Ca1−xMgxCO3 is about 0.20 or greater and is consistent with a common biomineralization process. PMID:25158180

  18. A global deglacial negative carbon isotope excursion in speleothem calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C values of speleothem calcite decreased globally during the last deglaciation defining a carbon isotope excursion (CIE) despite relatively constant δ13C values of carbon in the ocean-atmosphere system. The magnitude of the CIE varied with latitude, increasing poleward from ~2‰ in the tropics to as much as 7‰ at high latitudes. This recent CIE provides an interesting comparison with CIEs observed in deep time. A substantial portion of this CIE can be explained by the increase in atmospheric pCO2 that accompanied deglaciation. The dependence of C3 plant δ13C values on atmospheric pCO2 predicts a 2‰ δ13C decrease driven by the deglacial pCO2 increase. I propose that this signal was transferred to caves and thus explains nearly 100% of the CIE magnitude observed in the tropics and no less than 30% at the highest latitudes in the compilation. An atmospheric pCO2 control on speleothem δ13C values, if real, will need to be corrected for using ice core data before δ13C records can be interpreted in a paleoclimate context. The decrease in the magnitude of the equilibrium calcite-CO2 carbon isotope fractionation factor explains a maximum of 1‰ of the CIE at the highest northern latitude in the compilation, which experienced the largest deglacial warming. Much of the residual extratropical CIE was likely driven by increasing belowground respiration rates, which were presumably pronounced at high latitudes as glacial retreat exposed fresh surfaces and/or vegetation density increased. The largest increases in belowground respiration would have therefore occurred at the highest latitudes, explaining the meridional trend. This work supports the notion that increases in atmospheric pCO2 and belowground respiration rates can result in large CIEs recorded in terrestrial carbonates, which, as previously suggested, may explain the magnitude of the PETM CIE as recorded by paleosol carbonates.

  19. Isotopic composition of a calcite-cemented layer in the Lower Jurassic Bridport Sands, southern England: Implications for formation of laterally extensive calcite-cemented layers

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerkum, P.A. ); Walderhaug, O. )

    1993-07-01

    [delta][sup 18]O[sub PDB] and [delta][sup 13]C[sub PDB] values have been measured on 107 calcite cement samples from a laterally extensive (> 3 km) and continuous calcite-cemented layer 0.5 m thick in the coastal exposures of the Lower Jurassic shallow-marine Bridport Sands in Dorset, southern England. The samples were taken from a two-dimensional grid with 10-cm horizontal and vertical spacing between samples and along individual vertical lines across the calcite-cemented layer, [delta][sup 18]O[sub PDB] values vary between [minus]4.8% and [minus]9.2% and decrease radially outwards from points with lateral spacings on the order of 0.5-1 m in the middle of the calcite-cemented layer. The [delta][sup 18]O[sub PDB] values therefore indicate that the calcite-cemented layer was formed by merging of concretions. All [delta][sup 13]C[sub PDB] values measured are in the narrow range [minus]2.2% to [minus]0.5%, which suggests that the dominant source of calcite cement in the layer was biogenic carbonate.

  20. Carbon and oxygen isotopes in apatite CO/sub 2/ and co-existing calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodny, Y.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1981-04-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopes were analyzed in carbonate apatite CO/sub 2/ and in co-existing calcite. Both C and O in apatite CO/sub 2/ are enriched in the respective light isotopes relative to calcite. These results confirm the proposition that carbonate is part of the apatite structure.

  1. Microbially induced calcite precipitation-based sequestration of strontium by Sporosarcina pasteurii WJ-2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Choi, Jae-Ho; Noh, JunGu; Kwak, Dae Young; Han, Sang-Hyun; So, Jae-Seong

    2014-12-01

    Contamination by radioactive strontium ((90)Sr) is a significant environmental problem. Ureolytically driven calcium carbonate precipitation has been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil remediation applications. In this study, 68 ureolytic bacterial strains were newly isolated from various environments. Of these, 19 strains were selected based on ureolytic activity shown when cultured on urea agar plates and identified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From these selected strains, Sporosarcina pasteurii WJ-2 (WJ-2) was selected for subsequent study. A simple method was developed to determine the effectiveness of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP). Unlike any other methods, it does not require advanced skills and sophisticated tools. Using this method, we were able to determine the ability of the bioconsolidated sand to retard the flow of crystal violet through the 25-mL column. Also, MICP by WJ-2 was evaluated for its potential to counteract Sr contamination in column experiments using natural sand. WJ-2-induced precipitation led to successful sequestration of approximately 80 % of the Sr from the soluble fraction of the sand. The utility of MICP in bioremediation was further confirmed through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  2. Circular economy in drinking water treatment: reuse of ground pellets as seeding material in the pellet softening process.

    PubMed

    Schetters, M J A; van der Hoek, J P; Kramer, O J I; Kors, L J; Palmen, L J; Hofs, B; Koppers, H

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate pellets are produced as a by-product in the pellet softening process. In the Netherlands, these pellets are applied as a raw material in several industrial and agricultural processes. The sand grain inside the pellet hinders the application in some high-potential market segments such as paper and glass. Substitution of the sand grain with a calcite grain (100% calcium carbonate) is in principle possible, and could significantly improve the pellet quality. In this study, the grinding and sieving of pellets, and the subsequent reuse as seeding material in pellet softening were tested with two pilot reactors in parallel. In one reactor, garnet sand was used as seeding material, in the other ground calcite. Garnet sand and ground calcite performed equally well. An economic comparison and a life-cycle assessment were made as well. The results show that the reuse of ground calcite as seeding material in pellet softening is technologically possible, reduces the operational costs by €38,000 (1%) and reduces the environmental impact by 5%. Therefore, at the drinking water facility, Weesperkarspel of Waternet, the transition from garnet sand to ground calcite will be made at full scale, based on this pilot plant research.

  3. Circular economy in drinking water treatment: reuse of ground pellets as seeding material in the pellet softening process.

    PubMed

    Schetters, M J A; van der Hoek, J P; Kramer, O J I; Kors, L J; Palmen, L J; Hofs, B; Koppers, H

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate pellets are produced as a by-product in the pellet softening process. In the Netherlands, these pellets are applied as a raw material in several industrial and agricultural processes. The sand grain inside the pellet hinders the application in some high-potential market segments such as paper and glass. Substitution of the sand grain with a calcite grain (100% calcium carbonate) is in principle possible, and could significantly improve the pellet quality. In this study, the grinding and sieving of pellets, and the subsequent reuse as seeding material in pellet softening were tested with two pilot reactors in parallel. In one reactor, garnet sand was used as seeding material, in the other ground calcite. Garnet sand and ground calcite performed equally well. An economic comparison and a life-cycle assessment were made as well. The results show that the reuse of ground calcite as seeding material in pellet softening is technologically possible, reduces the operational costs by €38,000 (1%) and reduces the environmental impact by 5%. Therefore, at the drinking water facility, Weesperkarspel of Waternet, the transition from garnet sand to ground calcite will be made at full scale, based on this pilot plant research. PMID:25746637

  4. The quantitative determination of calcite associated with the carbonate-bearing apatites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silverman, Sol R.; Fuyat, Ruth K.; Weiser, Jeanne D.

    1951-01-01

    The CO2 combined as calcite in carbonate-bearing apatites as been distinguished from that combined as carbonate-apatite, or present in some form other than calcite, by use of X-ray powder patterns, differential thermal analyses, and differential solubility tests. These methods were applied to several pure apatite minerals, to one fossil bone, and to a group of phosphorites from the Phosphoria formation of Permian age from Trail Canyon and the Conda mine, Idaho, and the Laketown district, Utah. With the exceptions of pure fluorapatite, pure carbonate-flueorapatite, and one phosphorite from Trail Canyon, these substances contain varying amounts of calcite, but in all the samples an appreciable part of the carbonite content is not present as calcite. The results of solubility tests, in which the particle size of sample and the length of solution time were varied, imply that the carbonate content is not due to shielded calcite entrapped along an internal network of surfaces.

  5. Unusual micrometric calcite-aragonite interface in the abalone shell Haliotis (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Chevallard, Corinne; Farre, Bastien; Meibom, Anders

    2014-02-01

    Species of Haliotis (abalone) show high variety in structure and mineralogy of the shell. One of the European species (Haliotis tuberculata) in particular has an unusual shell structure in which calcite and aragonite coexist at a microscale with small patches of aragonite embedded in larger calcitic zones. A detailed examination of the boundary between calcite and aragonite using analytical microscopies shows that the organic contents of calcite and aragonite differ. Moreover, changes in the chemical composition of the two minerals seem to be gradual and define a micrometric zone of transition between the two main layers. A similar transition zone has been observed between the layers in more classical and regularly structured mollusk shells. The imbrication of microscopic patches of aragonite within a calcitic zone suggests the occurrence of very fast physiological changes in these taxa.

  6. Influence of calcite on uranium(VI) reactive transport in the groundwater–river mixing zone

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2014-01-23

    Calcite is an important mineral that can affect uranyl reactive transport in subsurface sediments. This study investigated the distribution of calcite and its influence on uranyl adsorption and reactive transport in the groundwater-river mixing zone at US Hanford 300A, Washington State. Simulations using a 2D reactive transport model under field-relevant hydrogeochemical conditions revealed a complex distribution of calcite concentration as a result of dynamic groundwater-river interactions. The calcite concentration distribution in turn affected the spatial and temporal changes in aqueous carbonate, calcium, and pH, which subsequently influenced U(VI) mobility and discharge rates into the river. The results implied that calcite distribution and its concentration dynamics is an important consideration for field characterization, monitoring, and reactive transport prediction.

  7. Transformation of Mg-bearing amorphous calcium carbonate to Mg-calcite - In situ monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The formation of Mg-bearing calcite via an amorphous precursor is a poorly understood process that is of relevance for biogenic and abiogenic carbonate precipitation. In order to gain an improved insight on the controls of Mg incorporation in calcite formed via an Mg-rich amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC) precursor, the precipitation of Mg-ACC and its transformation to Mg-calcite was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The experiments were performed at 25.0 ± 0.03 °C and pH 8.3 ± 0.1 and revealed two distinct pathways of Mg-calcite formation: (i) At initial aqueous Mg/Ca molar ratios ⩽ 1:6, Mg-calcite formation occurs via direct precipitation from solution. (ii) Conversely, at higher initial Mg/Ca molar ratios, Mg-calcite forms via an intermediate Mg-rich ACC phase. In the latter case, the final product is a calcite with up to 20 mol% Mg. This Mg content is significant higher than that of the Mg-rich ACC precursor phase. Thus, a strong net uptake of Mg ions from the solution into the crystalline precipitate throughout and also subsequent to ACC transformation is postulated. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the geochemical composition of the reactive solution and the Mg-ACC has no significant effect on the obtained "solubility product" of Mg-ACC. The enrichment of Mg in calcite throughout and subsequent to Mg-ACC transformation is likely affected by the high aqueous Mg/Ca ratio and carbonate alkalinity concentrations in the reactive solution. The experimental results have a bearing on the formation mechanism of Mg-rich calcites in marine early diagenetic environments, where high carbonate alkalinity concentrations are the rule rather than the exception, and on the insufficiently investigated inorganic component of biomineralisation pathways in many calcite secreting organisms.

  8. Interactions of arsenic with calcite surfaces revealed by in situ nanoscale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, François; Putnis, Christine V.; Montes-Hernandez, German; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Hovelmann, Jörn; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-06-01

    Arsenic dissolved in water represents a key environmental and health challenge because several million people are under the threat of contamination. In calcareous environments calcite may play an important role in arsenic solubility and transfer in water. Arsenic-calcite interactions remain controversial, especially for As(III) which was proposed to be either incorporated as such, or as As(V) after oxidation. Here, we provide the first time-lapse in situ study of the evolution of the (10-14) calcite cleavage surface morphology during dissolution and growth in the presence of solutions with various amounts of As(III) or As(V) at room temperature and pH range 6-11 using a flow-through cell connected to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Reaction products were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, co-precipitation experiments with either As(III) or As(V) were performed in batch reactors, and the speciation of arsenic in the resulting solids was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For As(V), AFM results showed that it interacts strongly with the calcite surface, and XAS results showed that As(V) was mostly incorporated in the calcite structure. For As(III), AFM results showed much less impact on calcite growth and dissolution and less incorporation was observed. This was confirmed by XAS results that indicate that As(III) was partly oxidized into As(V) before being incorporated into calcite and the resulting calcite contained 36% As(III) and 64% As(V). All these experimental results confirm that As(V) has a much stronger interaction with calcite than As(III) and that calcite may represent an important reservoir for arsenic in various geological environments.

  9. Diel cycles in calcite production and dissolution in a eutrophic basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cicerone, D.S.; Stewart, A.J.; Roh, Y.

    1999-10-01

    Calcite production is understood largely as a longer-term phenomenon (e.g., seasonal whitings) that can occur in hardwater lakes, and is significant ecologically because it can slow the rate of eutrophication by reducing, through adsorption, the availability of nutrients to primary producers. In this study the authors show that rapid changes in concentration of dissolved CO{sub 2} by photosynthesis and respiration within a eutrophic basin generated strong day-to-night cycles in calcite production and dissolution. Diel cycles in calcite production and dissolution were large enough that they could drive secondary diel cycles in the availability of metals that strongly sorb to the surfaces of calcite particles. They explored the possibility of the secondary diel cycling of metals by intensive 7-d in situ monitoring of water-quality conditions in a shallow, eutrophic spill-control basin near an industrial facility in eastern Tennessee; inspecting data from a 7-year record of water-quality parameters for this basin; analyzing physicochemical characteristics and mineralogic composition of sediments in the basin; and conducting laboratory experiments to characterize the interaction of calcite with Cd, under solid-liquid nonequilibrium conditions. The authors found that the basin accumulated and stored calcite. In situ monitoring showed that calcite was produced during daylight, and tended to dissolve again at night; the calcite production and dissolution processes seemed to be modulated by dissolved-phase CO{sub 2} dynamics, in concert with large diel fluctuations in pCa, pH, and Po{sub 2}. Laboratory experiments showed a rapid interaction ({lt}6 h) of Cd with calcite, in response to dissolved CO{sub 2} changes. Thus, concentrations of dissolved Cd can vary over daily cycles, mediated by diel changes in calcite production and dissolution. Thermodynamic considerations suggest that other metals, such as Zn, Sr, Ni, and Ba, may demonstrate this behavior as well.

  10. Growth of single crystals of BaFe12O19 by solid state crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, John G.; Sun, Hengyang; Kook, Young-Geun; Kim, Joon-Seong; Le, Phan Gia

    2016-10-01

    Single crystals of BaFe12O19 are grown for the first time by solid state crystal growth. Seed crystals of BaFe12O19 are buried in BaFe12O19+1 wt% BaCO3 powder, which are then pressed into pellets containing the seed crystals. During sintering, single crystals of BaFe12O19 up to ∼130 μm thick in the c-axis direction grow on the seed crystals by consuming grains from the surrounding polycrystalline matrix. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis shows that the single crystal and the surrounding polycrystalline matrix have the same chemical composition. Micro-Raman scattering shows the single crystal to have the BaFe12O19 structure. The optimum growth temperature is found to be 1200 °C. The single crystal growth behavior is explained using the mixed control theory of grain growth.

  11. Nanoscale controls of inorganic impurities and peptides on shape modification during calcite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; de Yoreo, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Many organisms produce crystalline structures during controlled biomineralization that exhibit complex topological forms. These biominerals often express facets or pseudofacets that are not found on crystals grown from pure solutions in the laboratory. This modification of growth shape, whether by inorganic and organic modulators, is generally explained within the paradigm of "stereochemical recognition". According to this model, stereochemical matching of the growth modulator to the molecular structure of these new and otherwise unexpressed faces, stabilizes the formation of new faces to result in a new crystal shape. This idea, however, was developed primarily from bulk crystallization experiments and geometrical models that focused on interactions between impurities and atomic planes of the newly expressed faces. Over the last several years, we have reported nanoscale investigations of how small molecule modifiers (Mg, Sr, amino acids) interact with calcite surfaces during growth. Low concentrations of these `simple' impurities have significant shape-modifying effects. While the observed mechanisms of growth modification are highly diverse, in all cases, it is clear that the source of shape modification always arises from step-specific interactions that alter either the equilibrium properties of the crystal (step edge and bulk free energy) or the kinetics of step motion. The resulting macroscopic shape changes can be traced to these effects at steps on existing faces rather than to stereochemical matching to and thermodynamic stabilization of new faces. Molecular modeling shows that the essential reason for this is that steps provide non-planar environments in which non-planar modifiers can form contacts to both the lower terrace and the step riser. Our findings provide a mechanism-based understanding of shape modification. This is essential as biomineralization studies advance to investigate more complex studies of systems that employ long-chain polypeptides or

  12. Total immersion crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Crystals of wide band gap materials are produced by positioning a holder receiving a seed crystal at the interface between a body of molten wide band gap material and an overlying layer of temperature-controlled, encapsulating liquid. The temperature of the layer decreases from the crystallization temperature of the crystal at the interface with the melt to a substantially lower temperature at which formation of crystal defects does not occur, suitably a temperature of 200 to 600 C. After initiation of crystal growth, the leading edge of the crystal is pulled through the layer until the leading edge of the crystal enters the ambient gas headspace which may also be temperature controlled. The length of the column of liquid encapsulant may exceed the length of the crystal such that the leading edge and trailing edge of the crystal are both simultaneously with the column of the crystal. The crystal can be pulled vertically by means of a pulling-rotation assembly or horizontally by means of a low-angle withdrawal mechanism.

  13. Orientation with a Viking sun-compass, a shadow-stick, and two calcite sunstones under various weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Bernáth, Balázs; Blahó, Miklós; Egri, Adám; Barta, András; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2013-09-01

    It is widely accepted that Vikings used sun-compasses to derive true directions from the cast shadow of a gnomon. It has been hypothesized that when a cast shadow was not formed, Viking navigators relied on crude skylight polarimetry with the aid of dichroic or birefringent crystals, called "sunstones." We demonstrate here that a simple tool, that we call "shadow-stick," could have allowed orientation by a sun-compass with satisfying accuracy when shadows were not formed, but the sun position could have reliably been estimated. In field tests, we performed orientation trials with a set composed of a sun-compass, two calcite sunstones, and a shadow-stick. We show here that such a set could have been an effective orientation tool for Vikings only when clear, blue patches of the sky were visible. PMID:24085076

  14. Orientation with a Viking sun-compass, a shadow-stick, and two calcite sunstones under various weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Bernáth, Balázs; Blahó, Miklós; Egri, Adám; Barta, András; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2013-09-01

    It is widely accepted that Vikings used sun-compasses to derive true directions from the cast shadow of a gnomon. It has been hypothesized that when a cast shadow was not formed, Viking navigators relied on crude skylight polarimetry with the aid of dichroic or birefringent crystals, called "sunstones." We demonstrate here that a simple tool, that we call "shadow-stick," could have allowed orientation by a sun-compass with satisfying accuracy when shadows were not formed, but the sun position could have reliably been estimated. In field tests, we performed orientation trials with a set composed of a sun-compass, two calcite sunstones, and a shadow-stick. We show here that such a set could have been an effective orientation tool for Vikings only when clear, blue patches of the sky were visible.

  15. STRONTIUM ISOTOPE EVOLUTION OF PORE WATER AND CALCITE IN THE TOPOPAH SPRING TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN , NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Marshall; K. Futa

    2001-02-07

    Yucca Mountain, a ridge of Miocene volcanic rocks in southwest Nevada, is being characterized as a site for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. One issue of concern for the future performance of the potential repository is the movement of water in and around the potential repository horizon. Past water movement in this unsaturated zone is indicated by fluid inclusions trapped in calcite coatings on fracture footwall surfaces and in some lithophysal cavities. Some of the fluid inclusions have homogenization temperatures above the present-day geotherm (J.F. Whelan, written communication), so determining the ages of the calcite associated with those fluid inclusions is important in understanding the thermal history of the potential repository site. Calcite ages have been constrained by uranium-lead dating of silica polymorphs (opal and chalcedony) that are present in most coatings. The opal and chalcedony ages indicate that deposition of the calcite and opal coatings in the welded part of the Topopah Spring Tuff (TSw hydrogeologic unit) spanned nearly the entire history of the 12.8-million-year-old rock mass at fairly uniform overall long-term rates of deposition (within a factor of five). Constraining the age of a layer of calcite associated with specific fluid inclusions is complicated. Calcite is commonly bladed with complex textural relations, and datable opal or chalcedony may be millions of years older or younger than the calcite layer or may be absent from the coating entirely. Therefore, a more direct method of dating the calcite is presented in this paper by developing a model for strontium evolution in pore water in the TSw as recorded by the strontium coprecipitated with calcium in the calcite. Although the water that precipitated the calcite in fractures and cavities may not have been in local isotopic equilibrium with the pore water, the strontium isotope composition of all water in the TSw is primarily controlled by water

  16. Crystallization of Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David; Messick, Troy; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has evolved into a very powerful tool to determine the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. The major bottleneck in structure determination by X-ray crystallography is the preparation of suitable crystalline samples. This unit outlines steps for the crystallization of a macromolecule, starting with a purified, homogeneous sample. The first protocols describe preparation of the macromolecular sample (i.e., proteins, nucleic acids, and macromolecular complexes). The preparation and assessment of crystallization trials is then described, along with a protocol for confirming whether the crystals obtained are composed of macromolecule as opposed to a crystallization reagent . Next, the optimization of crystallization conditions is presented. Finally, protocols that facilitate the growth of larger crystals through seeding are described. PMID:22045560

  17. Transformation and Crystallization Energetics of Synthetic and Biogenic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, A. V.; Forbes, Tori Z.; Killian, Christopher E.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC → less metastable hydrated ACC→anhydrous ACC ~ biogenic anhydrous ACC→vaterite → aragonite → calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO₂ sequestration.

  18. Uranium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with aragonite and calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinming; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Herrmann, Achim D.; Wasylenki, Laura E.; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2016-09-01

    Natural variations in 238U/235U of marine calcium carbonates might provide a useful way of constraining redox conditions of ancient environments. In order to evaluate the reliability of this proxy, we conducted aragonite and calcite coprecipitation experiments at pH ∼7.5 and ∼8.5 to study possible U isotope fractionation during incorporation into these minerals. Small but significant U isotope fractionation was observed in aragonite experiments at pH ∼8.5, with heavier U isotopes preferentially enriched in the solid phase. 238U/235U of dissolved U in these experiments can be fit by Rayleigh fractionation curves with fractionation factors of 1.00007 + 0.00002/-0.00003, 1.00005 ± 0.00001, and 1.00003 ± 0.00001. In contrast, no resolvable U isotope fractionation was observed in an aragonite experiment at pH ∼7.5 or in calcite experiments at either pH. Equilibrium isotope fractionation among different aqueous U species is the most likely explanation for these findings. Certain charged U species are preferentially incorporated into calcium carbonate relative to the uncharged U species Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq), which we hypothesize has a lighter equilibrium U isotope composition than most of the charged species. According to this hypothesis, the magnitude of U isotope fractionation should scale with the fraction of dissolved U that is present as Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq). This expectation is confirmed by equilibrium speciation modeling of our experiments. Theoretical calculation of the U isotope fractionation factors between different U species could further test this hypothesis and our proposed fractionation mechanism. These findings suggest that U isotope variations in ancient carbonates could be controlled by changes in the aqueous speciation of seawater U, particularly changes in seawater pH, PCO2 , Ca2+, or Mg2+ concentrations. In general, these effects are likely to be small (<0.13‰), but are nevertheless potentially significant because of the small natural range of

  19. The surface reactivity of chalk (biogenic calcite) with hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhrimenko, D. V.; Dalby, K. N.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Bovet, N.; Christensen, J. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-03-01

    The surface properties of calcium carbonate minerals play an important role in a number of industrial and biological processes. Properties such as wettability and adsorption control liquid-solid interface behaviour and thus have a strong influence on processes such as biomineralisation, remediation of aquifers and oil recovery. We investigated how two model molecules of different polarity, namely water and ethanol, interact with reservoir and outcrop chalk samples and we compared their behaviour with that of pure, inorganically precipitated calcite. Thermodynamic quantities, such as the work of wetting, surface energy and isosteric adsorption enthalpy, were determined from vapour adsorption isotherms. The chalks were studied fresh and after extraction of organic residues that were originally present in these samples. The work of wetting correlates with the amount of organic matter present in the chalk samples but we observed a fundamental difference between the adsorption properties of chalk and pure, inorganically precipitated calcite toward the less polar, ethanol molecule. Further analysis of the chemical composition of the organic matter extracted from the chalk samples was made by gas chromatography (GC-MS). Monitoring surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after extraction of the organic material, and with atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed that nanometer sized clay crystals observed on the chalk particle surfaces could be an important part of the reason for the differences. Removal of the extractable portion of the hydrocarbons liberates adsorption sites that have different wetting properties than the rest of the chalk and these have an energy distribution that is similar to clays. Thus, the results exemplify the complexity of biogenic calcite adsorption behaviour and demonstrate that chalk wetting in drinking water aquifers as well as oil reservoirs is controlled partly by the nanoparticles of clay that have grown on the

  20. Fabrication of porous calcite using chopped nylon fiber and its evaluation using rats.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Tram, Nguyen Xuan Thanh; Tsuru, Kanji; Toita, Riki

    2015-02-01

    Although porous calcite has attracted attention as bone substitutes, limited studies have been made so far. In the present study, porous calcite block was fabricated by introducing chopped nylon fiber as porogen. Ca(OH)2 powder containing 10 wt% chopped nylon fiber was compacted at 150 MPa, and sintered to burn out the fiber and to carbonate the Ca(OH)2 under stream of 1:2 O2-CO2. Sintering of Ca(OH)2 at 750 °C or lower temperature resulted in incomplete burning out of the fiber whereas sintering at 800 °C or higher temperature resulted in the formation of CaO due to the thermal decomposition of Ca(OH)2. However, sintering at 770 °C resulted in complete burning out of the fiber and complete carbonation of Ca(OH)2 to calcite without forming CaO. Macro- and micro-porosities of the porous calcite were approximately 23 and 16%, respectively. Diameter of the macropores was approximately 100 μm which is suitable for bone tissue penetration. Porous calcite block fabricated by this method exhibited good tissue response when implanted in the bone defect in femur of 12-weeks-old rat. Four weeks after implantation, bone bonded on the surface of calcite. Furthermore, bone tissue penetrated interior to the macropore at 8 weeks. These results demonstrated the good potential value of porous calcite as artificial bone substitutes.

  1. Direct nanoscale observations of the coupled dissolution of calcite and dolomite and the precipitation of gypsum.

    PubMed

    Offeddu, Francesco Giancarlo; Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep Maria; Putnis, Christine V

    2014-01-01

    In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the overall process of dissolution of common carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and precipitation of gypsum in Na2SO4 and CaSO4 solutions with pH values ranging from 2 to 6 at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C). The dissolution of the carbonate minerals took place at the (104) cleavage surfaces in sulfate-rich solutions undersaturated with respect to gypsum, by the formation of characteristic rhombohedral-shaped etch pits. Rounding of the etch pit corners was observed as solutions approached close-to-equilibrium conditions with respect to calcite. The calculated dissolution rates of calcite at pH 4.8 and 5.6 agreed with the values reported in the literature. When using solutions previously equilibrated with respect to gypsum, gypsum precipitation coupled with calcite dissolution showed short gypsum nucleation induction times. The gypsum precipitate quickly coated the calcite surface, forming arrow-like forms parallel to the crystallographic orientations of the calcite etch pits. Gypsum precipitation coupled with dolomite dissolution was slower than that of calcite, indicating the dissolution rate to be the rate-controlling step. The resulting gypsum coating partially covered the surface during the experimental duration of a few hours. PMID:25161860

  2. Direct nanoscale observations of the coupled dissolution of calcite and dolomite and the precipitation of gypsum

    PubMed Central

    Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep Maria; Putnis, Christine V

    2014-01-01

    Summary In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the overall process of dissolution of common carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and precipitation of gypsum in Na2SO4 and CaSO4 solutions with pH values ranging from 2 to 6 at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C). The dissolution of the carbonate minerals took place at the (104) cleavage surfaces in sulfate-rich solutions undersaturated with respect to gypsum, by the formation of characteristic rhombohedral-shaped etch pits. Rounding of the etch pit corners was observed as solutions approached close-to-equilibrium conditions with respect to calcite. The calculated dissolution rates of calcite at pH 4.8 and 5.6 agreed with the values reported in the literature. When using solutions previously equilibrated with respect to gypsum, gypsum precipitation coupled with calcite dissolution showed short gypsum nucleation induction times. The gypsum precipitate quickly coated the calcite surface, forming arrow-like forms parallel to the crystallographic orientations of the calcite etch pits. Gypsum precipitation coupled with dolomite dissolution was slower than that of calcite, indicating the dissolution rate to be the rate-controlling step. The resulting gypsum coating partially covered the surface during the experimental duration of a few hours. PMID:25161860

  3. Effect of Second-phase Particles on Static Adjustment of Calcite Grain Boundaries in Carbonate Mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ree, J.; Lee, S.; Jung, H.

    2010-12-01

    Static adjustment of grain boundaries during the waning stage of deformation with sustained heat (e.g. at the end of an orogeny) has not been studied much, although it is important for the interpretation of microstructural status during the main stage of deformation. We report here that static adjustment of calcite grain boundaries is dependent on second-phase particles in carbonate mylonites from the Geounri Shear Zone in the Taebaeksan Basin of South Korea. The carbonate mylonites consist of relic (porphyroclastic) calcites (120-400 μm) and dynamically recrystallized calcites (30-35 μm) with second-phase particles (15-20 μm) of quartz and phyllosilicates. Both calcite grains contain mechanical twins and the twins are wider (10-20 μm thick) in the relic calcites than in the dynamically recrystallized ones (1-3 μm thick). In the layers of carbonate mylonite with less than 3% of second phases, grain boundaries of calcites are straight with triple junctions. In contrast, calcite grain boundaries are lobate to wavy in the layers with more than 3% of second phases, suggesting dynamic grain boundary migration. Calcite grains in both layers show a strong lattice preferred orientation indicating dominant slip system of basal with minor one of rhomb . We interpret that the foam texture of calcite in the mylonite layers with less than 3% of second phases was produced during the waning stage of the main deformation with a sustained heat since both syntectonic and posttectonic chloritoid porphyroblasts occur in adjacent phyllonite layers in the shear zone. 3% volume fraction of second-phase particles might be a critical value above which deformation microstructures of the main phase were ‘frozen’ without static adjustment in our carbonate mylonites.

  4. Microbiologically Induced Calcite Precipitation Mediated by Sporosarcina pasteurii.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Swayamdipta; Debnath, Nandini; Mitra, Sushanta; Liu, Yang; Kumar, Aloke

    2016-04-16

    The particular bacterium under investigation here (S. pasteurii) is unique in its ability, under the right conditions, to induce the hydrolysis of urea (ureolysis) in naturally occurring environments through secretion of an enzyme urease. This process of ureolysis, through a chain of chemical reactions, leads to the formation of calcium carbonate precipitates. This is known as Microbiologically Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP). The proper culture protocols for MICP are detailed here. Finally, visualization experiments under different modes of microscopy were performed to understand various aspects of the precipitation process. Techniques like optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to chemically characterize the end-product. Further, the ability of these precipitates to clog pores inside a natural porous medium was demonstrated through a qualitative experiment where sponge bars were used to mimic a pore-network with a range of length scales. A sponge bar dipped in the culture medium containing the bacterial cells hardens due to the clogging of its pores resulting from the continuous process of chemical precipitation. This hardened sponge bar exhibits superior strength when compared to a control sponge bar which becomes compressed and squeezed under the action of an applied external load, while the hardened bar is able to support the same weight with little deformation.

  5. Alkaline flocculation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum induced by brucite and calcite.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Dries; Pohl, Philip I; Beuckels, Annelies; Foubert, Imogen; Brady, Patrick V; Hewson, John C; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2015-11-01

    Alkaline flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for marine microalgae biomass production. Alkaline flocculation is induced by an increase in pH and is related to precipitation of calcium and magnesium salts. In this study, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as model organism to study alkaline flocculation of marine microalgae cultured in seawater medium. Flocculation started when pH was increased to 10 and flocculation efficiency reached 90% when pH was 10.5, which was consistent with precipitation modeling for brucite or Mg(OH)2. Compared to freshwater species, more magnesium is needed to achieve flocculation (>7.5mM). Zeta potential measurements suggest that brucite precipitation caused flocculation by charge neutralization. When calcium concentration was 12.5mM, flocculation was also observed at a pH of 10. Zeta potential remained negative up to pH 11.5, suggesting that precipitated calcite caused flocculation by a sweeping coagulation mechanism.

  6. Alkaline flocculation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum induced by brucite and calcite

    DOE PAGES

    Vandamme, Dries; Pohl, Philip I.; Beuckels, Annelies; Foubert, Imogen; Brady, Patrick Vane; Muylaert, Koenraad; Hewson, John C.

    2015-08-20

    Alkaline flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for marine microalgae biomass production. Alkaline flocculation is induced by an increase in pH and is related to precipitation of calcium and magnesium salts. In this study, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as model organism to study alkaline flocculation of marine microalgae cultured in seawater medium. Flocculation started when pH was increased to 10 and flocculation efficiency reached 90% when pH was 10.5, which was consistent with precipitation modeling for brucite or Mg(OH)2. Compared to freshwater species, more magnesium is needed to achieve flocculation (>7.5 mM). Zeta potential measurementsmore » suggest that brucite precipitation caused flocculation by charge neutralization. When calcium concentration was 12.5 mM, flocculation was also observed at a pH of 10. Furthermore, zeta potential remained negative up to pH 11.5, suggesting that precipitated calcite caused flocculation by a sweeping coagulation mechanism.« less

  7. Thin-film-induced morphological instabilities over calcite surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Vesipa, R.; Camporeale, C.; Ridolfi, L.

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbonate from water films generates fascinating calcite morphologies that have attracted scientific interest over past centuries. Nowadays, speleothems are no longer known only for their beauty but they are also recognized to be precious records of past climatic conditions, and research aims to unveil and understand the mechanisms responsible for their morphological evolution. In this paper, we focus on crenulations, a widely observed ripple-like instability of the the calcite–water interface that develops orthogonally to the film flow. We expand a previous work providing new insights about the chemical and physical mechanisms that drive the formation of crenulations. In particular, we demonstrate the marginal role played by carbon dioxide transport in generating crenulation patterns, which are indeed induced by the hydrodynamic response of the free surface of the water film. Furthermore, we investigate the role of different environmental parameters, such as temperature, concentration of dissolved ions and wall slope. We also assess the convective/absolute nature of the crenulation instability. Finally, the possibility of using crenulation wavelength as a proxy of past flows is briefly discussed from a theoretical point of view. PMID:27547086

  8. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  9. Distribution of Minor Elements in Calcite From the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. D.; Whelan, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Calcite is sporadically distributed in fractures and cavities in the volcanic rocks that form the 500- to 700-m-thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. Previous work has shown that the calcite precipitated from water moving downward through the unsaturated zone since the volcanic rocks were emplaced approximately 13 Ma. Calcite thus serves as a proxy for the chemistry and amounts of past percolation, two parameters that are important in predictions of the future behavior of the potential radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Latest calcite, which began forming between approximately 5 and 2 Ma, typically displays fine-scale growth zoning defined by distributions of Mn (inferred from cathodoluminescence), Mg, and Sr. Electron microprobe (EPMA) mapping of outermost calcite reveals Mg growth zoning1 and higher overall concentrations of Mg in late calcite than in older calcite. Micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) maps were obtained by slow rastering of the samples over a 100-watt X-ray source collimated through a final aperture of 100 μ m. Although the spatial resolution of the micro-XRF mapping is much less than that of EPMA, this technique reveals distributions of some elements to which EPMA is less sensitive. Micro-XRF maps show that Sr is spatially correlated with Mg; Sr concentrations range to 500 μ g/g at the resolution of the 100-μ m collimator. Because both Mg and Sr have similar calcite-water distribution coefficients much less than one, the Mg/Sr in calcite reflects the Mg/Sr of the water that precipitated the calcite. The distribution coefficient for Mn is greater than one and variations in Mn are not correlated with Mg and Sr. Covariation of Mg and Sr in the percolating water may be explained by reactions that affect the rate of uptake of chemical constituents from the overlying rock and soil, and/or evaporation. Late calcite has lower δ 13C values, probably due to a regional change from wetter to drier climate conditions. The higher Mg and

  10. Recurrent Pure Calcite Urolithiasis Confirmed by Endoscopic Removal and Infrared Spectroscopy in a Malnourished Anorectic Female

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Kim Hovgaard; Sloth Osther, Palle Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Often when calcite is found as a component of urinary calculi, they are considered false calculi or artifacts. We present a case of true calcite urolithiasis. The stone material was removed percutaneously from a severely malnourished anorectic woman and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (IRS). In addition, calcite urolithiasis was confirmed in several recurrent stone events by IRS. Laxative abuse with magnesium oxide was believed to be the underlying cause of stone formation, and ammonium chloride given as one weekly dose turned out to be effective for stone prevention. PMID:27579419

  11. Recurrent Pure Calcite Urolithiasis Confirmed by Endoscopic Removal and Infrared Spectroscopy in a Malnourished Anorectic Female.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Frederikke Eichner; Andreassen, Kim Hovgaard; Sloth Osther, Palle Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Often when calcite is found as a component of urinary calculi, they are considered false calculi or artifacts. We present a case of true calcite urolithiasis. The stone material was removed percutaneously from a severely malnourished anorectic woman and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (IRS). In addition, calcite urolithiasis was confirmed in several recurrent stone events by IRS. Laxative abuse with magnesium oxide was believed to be the underlying cause of stone formation, and ammonium chloride given as one weekly dose turned out to be effective for stone prevention. PMID:27579419

  12. Electron-optical study of microstructures and related properties of crystal surfaces (sodium nitrate and calcite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. J.

    The rapidly expanding oil sands of western Canada, the third largest reserves in the world, are creating serious challenges, such as ecological harm, labour shortages, and extensive natural gas consumption. This thesis develops three practical real options models to evaluate the feasibility of oil sands projects and to estimate the optimal rate of oil sands expansion, while accounting for the stated concerns. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  13. Control of carbonate alkalinity on Mg incorporation in calcite: Insights on the occurrence of high Mg calcites in diagenetic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    High Mg calcites (HMC), with up to 25 mol % of Mg, are common features in early diagenetic environments and are frequently associated with bio-induced anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Such archives hold valuable information about the biogeochemical processes occurring in sedimentary environments in the geological past. Despite the frequency AOM-induced HMC observed in marine diagenetic settings and their potential role in dolomitization, only a minor number of experimental studies has been devoted on deciphering their formation conditions. Thus, in order to improve our understanding on the formation mechanism of HMC induced by elevated carbonate ion concentrations, we precipitated HMC by computer controlled titration of a (Mg,Ca)Cl2 solution at different Mg/Ca ratios into a NaHCO3 solution under precisely defined physicochemical conditions (T = 25.00 ±0.03°C; pH = 8.3 ±0.1). The formation of carbonates was monitored at a high temporal resolution using in situ Raman spectroscopy as well as by continuous sampling and analyzing of precipitates and reactive solutions. We identified two distinct mechanisms of HMC formation. In solutions with molar Mg/Ca ratios ≤ 1/8 calcium carbonate was precipitated as crystalline phases directly from homogeneous solution. In contrast, higher Mg/Ca ratios induced the formation of Mg-rich ACC (up to 10 mol % of Mg), which was subsequently transformed to HMC with up 20 mol % of Mg. Our experimental results highlight that the finally formed HMC has a higher Mg content than the ACC precursor phase. Considering experimental data for Mg containing ACC transformation to crystalline calcium carbonate from literature, the continuous enrichment of Mg in the precipitate throughout transformation of amorphous to crystalline CaCO3 most likely occurs due to the high carbonate alkalinity (DIC about 0.1 M) of our reactive solutions. The Mg incorporation into calcite lattice seems to be favored by intensive supply of carbonate ions as

  14. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  15. Seed Treatment. Bulletin 760.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, Harvey C.

    This manual gives a definition of seed treatment, the types of seeds normally treated, diseases and insects commonly associated with seeds, fungicides and insecticides used, types of equipment used for seed treatment, and information on labeling and coloring of treated seed, pesticide carriers, binders, stickers, and safety precautions. (BB)

  16. Calcium sulfoaluminate (Ye'elimite) hydration in the presence of gypsum, calcite, and vaterite

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Craig W.; Telesca, Antonio; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-11-15

    Six calcium sulfoaluminate-based cementitious systems composed of calcium sulfoaluminate, calcite, vaterite, and gypsum were cured as pastes and mortars for 1, 7, 28 and 84 days. Pastes were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Mortars were tested for compressive strength, dimensional stability and setting time. Furthermore, pastes with a water/cementitious material mass ratio of 0.80 were tested for heat evolution during the first 48 h by means of isothermal conduction calorimetry. It has been found that: (1) both calcite and vaterite reacted with monosulfoaluminate to give monocarboaluminate and ettringite, with vaterite being more reactive; (2) gypsum lowered the reactivity of both carbonates; (3) expansion was reduced by calcite and vaterite, irrespective of the presence of gypsum; and (4) both carbonates increased compressive strength in the absence of gypsum and decreased compressive strength less in the presence of gypsum, with vaterite's action more effective than that of calcite.

  17. Simulation of calcite dissolution and porosity changes in saltwater mixing zones in coastal aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, W.E.; Konikow, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    Thermodynamic models of aqueous solutions have indicated that the mixing of seawater and calcite-saturated fresh groundwater can produce a water that is undersaturated with respect to calcite. Mixing of such waters in coastal carbonate aquifers could lead to significant amounts of limestone dissolution. The potential for such dissolution in coastal saltwater mixing zones is analyzed by coupling the results from a reaction simulation model (PHREEQE) with a variable density groundwater flow and solute transport model. Idealized cross sections of coastal carbonate aquifers are simulated to estimate the potential for calcite dissolution under a variety of hydrologic and geochemical conditions. Results show that limestone dissolution in mixing zones is strongly dependent on groundwater flux and nearly independent of the dissolution kinetics of calcite. -from Authors

  18. Phase transformation of Mg-calcite to aragonite in active-forming hot spring travertines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Heather F.; Zhou, Wuzong; Guo, Li

    2015-08-01

    A travertine specimen collected from the western part of Yunnan Province of China was subjected to microstructural analysis by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A new formation mechanism was proposed whereby polycrystalline rhombohedral particles of magnesium-containing calcite underwent a phase transformation into sheaf-like clusters of aragonite microrods. It is proposed that a high concentration of magnesium ions and embedded biological matter poisoned the growth of calcite and therefore instigated the phase transformation of the core of the rhombohedral calcite particles to an aragonite phase with a higher crystallinity. The single crystalline aragonite microrods with a higher density than the Mg-calcite nanocrystallites grew at the expense of the latter to generate sheaf-like clusters. This newly discovered formation mechanism is expected to enhance previous knowledge on this geologically important phase transformation from a morphology point of view.

  19. High School Forum: "Invitations to Enquiry": The Calcite/Acid Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, J. Dudley, Ed.; Driscoll, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a high school chemistry experiment which involves the reaction between calcite and hydrochloric and sulfuric acids. This reaction can be carried out as a projected demonstration and on an individual basis. (HM)

  20. In Situ Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Analyses of Calcite in CM1 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telus, M.; Alexander, C. M. O.'D.; Wang, J.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-08-01

    We present results from in situ C and O isotope analyses of calcite from CM1 chondrites. There are large isotope variations on small spatial scales. This provides some insight into the evolution of fluids in chondrite parent bodies.

  1. Chiral morphology of calcite through selective binding of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Christine

    2002-03-01

    Many living organisms contain biominerals and composites with finely tuned properties, reflecting a remarkable level of control over the nucleation, growth and shape of the constituent crystals. Peptides and proteins play an important role in achieving this control. Using in situ AFM we find that site-specific binding of amino acid residues to surface steps changes the step-edge free energies, giving rise to direction-specific binding energies unique to individual amino acid enantiomers and leading to chiral modifications that propagate from atomic length scales to macroscopic length scales. Molecular modeling studies support an energetic basis for the differences in binding. Our results emphasize that the mechanism under-lying crystal modification through organic molecules is best understood by considering both stereochemical recognition as well as the effects of binding on the interfacial energies of the growing crystal.

  2. Some Debye temperatures from single-crystal elastic constant data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Edwards, J.L.

    1966-01-01

    The mean velocity of sound has been calculated for 14 crystalline solids by using the best recent values of their single-crystal elastic stiffness constants. These mean sound velocities have been used to obtain the elastic Debye temperatures ??De for these materials. Models of the three wave velocity surfaces for calcite are illustrated. ?? 1966 The American Institute of Physics.

  3. Origin of sulfate in barite and calcite cements in the Jebel Madar salt dome (Oman)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandeginste, V.; John, C. M.; Gilhooly, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Jebel Madar is a 500-m high mountain rising in the desert at the Oman Foothills. The Jebel consists of Triassic to Cretaceous carbonate host rocks forming the carapace of a salt dome. Halokinesis caused major fracturing and faulting at Jebel Madar, and the resulting structures acted as the main pathways for fluids that generated diagenetic cements composed of both barite and calcite. The spatial distribution of calcite and barite occurrences shows that calcite is formed in large abundance along the three main faults, whereas barite is more concentrated along faults further away from the three main ones. The stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of calcite and fluid inclusion data from both calcite and barite show a distinct evolution of the fluid with a highly saline component towards more mixing with meteoric water. This is in agreement with clumped isotopes data on calcite cements indicating an evolution towards lower temperatures, consistent with doming of the Jebel and greater input of lower-temperature descending meteoric fluids. Here, we present sulphur and oxygen isotopic data on barite that suggest a link between the barite formation and the Precambrian salt underlying Jebel Madar. The average δ34S measured in barite is 33‰ CDT (1σ = 5‰; n = 33), which falls at the lower end of the δ34S range reported for the Ara Group anhydrite. The average δ18O in the same barite samples is 23‰ VSMOW (1σ = 2‰; n = 33). Data from the barite will be compared with sulphur isotopes from the carbonate-associate sulfate in the calcite cements. The overall goal of our research is to gain a better insight in the formation process of barite and calcite in Jebel Madar and its link with salt tectonics. We would like to acknowledge the financial support of QCCSRC (funded jointly by Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science & Technology Park) and the GSA Laubach fund for this study.

  4. Growth rate effects on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios constrained by belemnite calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Multiple temperature proxies from single species are important to achieve robust palaeotemperature estimates. Besides the commonly employed oxygen isotope thermometer, also Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios perform well as proxies for calcification temperature in the shells of some species. While salinity changes affect the ratios of earth alkaline elements much less than the δ18O thermometer, metabolic effects may exert a strong control on the expression of element ratios. Such effects are hard to study because biomineralization experiments have to overcome large intraspecific variability and can hardly ever isolate the controls of a single parameter on shell geochemistry. The unique geometry of the belemnite rostrum constitutes an exception to this rule. Its shape, large size, and the visibility of growth increments as bands enable the analysis of multiple, correlatable, high resolution geochemical profiles in a single fossil. The effects of the growth rate variability amongst these profiles on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios has been tested here. Within a specimen of Passaloteuthis bisulcata (Early Toarcian, Cleveland Basin, UK), Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca data were obtained from four profiles. With respect to growth rate in the first profile, which was taken as a reference, the relative growth rates in the remaining three profiles varied by a factor of 0.9 to 2.7. Results suggest that relative growth rate is linearly correlated with Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, with a decrease of Mg/Ca by 8 % and increase of Sr/Ca by 6 % per 100 % increase in relative growth rate. The observed trends are consistent with abiogenic precipitation experiments and suggest that crystal precipitation rate exerts a significant, predictable control on the element distribution in biogenic calcite.

  5. What Are Chia Seeds?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men For Women For Seniors What Are Chia Seeds? Published February 05, 2014 Print Email When you ... number of research participants. How to Eat Chia Seeds Chia seeds can be eaten raw or prepared ...

  6. Fabrication of microporous calcite block from calcium hydroxide compact under carbon dioxide atmosphere at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Akihiro; Tsuru, Kanji; Maruta, Michito; Munar, Melvin L; Matsuya, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2012-01-01

    Effects of carbonation temperature and compacting pressure on basic properties of calcite block were studied using Ca(OH)2 compact made with 0.2-2.0 MPa and their carbonation at 200-800ºC for 1 h. Microporous calcite was obtained only when carbonated at 600ºC using Ca(OH)2 compact made with 0.2 MPa even though thermogravimetry analysis showed that calcite powder was stable up to 920ºC under CO2 atmosphere. CaO formed by carbonation at 700ºC and 800ºC is thought to be caused by the limited CO2 diffusion interior to the Ca(OH)2 compact. Also, unreacted Ca(OH)2 was found for Ca(OH)2 compact prepared with 0.5 MPa or higher pressure even when carbonated at 600ºC. As a result of high temperature carbonation, crystallite size of the calcite, 58.0 nm, was significantly larger when compared to that of calcite prepared at room temperature, 35.5 nm. Porosity and diametral tensile strength of the microporous calcite were 39.5% and 6.4 MPa. PMID:22864212

  7. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  8. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  9. Estimation of past seepage volumes from calcite distribution in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, B.D.; Neymark, L.A.; Peterman, Z.E.

    2003-01-01

    Low-temperature calcite and opal record the past seepage of water into open fractures and lithophysal cavities in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a proposed high-level radioactive waste repository. Systematic measurements of calcite and opal coatings in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel at the proposed repository horizon are used to estimate the volume of calcite at each site of calcite and/or opal deposition. By estimating the volume of water required to precipitate the measured volumes of calcite in the unsaturated zone, seepage rates of 0.005 to 5 liters/year (l/year) are calculated at the median and 95th percentile of the measured volumes, respectively. These seepage rates are at the low end of the range of seepage rates from recent performance assessment (PA) calculations, confirming the conservative nature of the performance assessment. However, the distribution of the calcite and opal coatings indicate that a much larger fraction of the potential waste packages would be contacted by this seepage than is calculated in the performance assessment.

  10. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated. PMID:25429955

  11. Multiple origins for zoned cathodoluminescent and noncathodoluminescent calcite cements in Pennsylvanian limestones

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.H.; Anderson, J.E.; Phares, R.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Noncathodoluminescent calcite containing brightly to moderately luminescent zones is a common early cement in limestones. Three such cements in Upper Pennsylvanian limestones from different areas were studied. All three units are overlain up-section by Permian evaporites and consist of carbonate-siliciclastic 'cyclothems' in which individual cycles were subject to subaerial exposure. With such similar settings, one might predict that petrographically similar calcite cements would have similar origins. In the Holder Formation (New Mexico), the zoned calcite predates compaction, and cross-cutting relationships with cycle-capping paleosols show that zoned cements precipitated during 15 events of subaerial exposure. Therefore, cements precipitated from freshwater during early and repeated subaerial exposure. For the Lansing-Kansas City groups in northwestern Kansas, the zoned calcite cements commonly are among the first precipitated but may postdate some compaction. All-liquid fluid inclusions indicated precipitation below about 50C, from brines of approximately 23 weight %. NaCl equivalent. The brines may have refluxed downward during deposition of Permian evaporites. A limestone of the Lansing-Kansas City groups of west-central Kansas contains early zoned calcite cement that predates compaction. The cement contains all-liquid fluid inclusions indicating precipitation below about 50C. The presence of nonluminescent calcite containing bright subzones is not indicative of a single diagenetic environment. Petrographically similar cements from similar settings may originate in markedly different diagenetic environments.

  12. Spin Hamiltonian parameters and local structures for Co 2+ ions in calcite-type trigonal carbonates MCO 3 (M=Co, Cd and Ca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chen, Zheng; Shao-Yi, Wu; Hui-Ning, Dong; Sheng, Tang

    2004-01-01

    From the perturbation formulas based on the cluster approach for 3d 7 ion in trigonal octahedral sites of crystals, the spin Hamiltonian parameters ( g factors g , g⊥ and hyperfine structure constants A , A⊥) for Co 2+ in calcite-type MCO 3 (M=Co, Cd, Ca) crystals are calculated. In the calculations, for CoCO 3 crystal, the structural data of pure crystal are used, whereas for the Co 2+-doped CdCO 3 and CaCO 3 crystals, the local structural data caused by the impurity-induced local lattice relaxation are considered. The calculated results show good agreement with the observed values obtained from electron paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic resonance experiments. The difficulty shown in the previous paper related to the g⊥ value of CoCO 3 obtained from the change of the g factor as a function of the crystallographic data (i.e., the unit cell parameters) a0 and α0 of pure MCO 3 crystals is removed.

  13. Bean Seed Imbibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Enables students to examine the time course for seed imbibition and the pressure generated by imbibing seeds. Provides background information, detailed procedures, and ideas for further investigation. (DDR)

  14. Bacterially Induced Calcite Precipitation and Strontium Co-Precipitation under Flow Conditions in a Porous Media System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Mitchell, A. C.; Schultz, L.; Cunningham, A.

    2009-12-01

    The process of in situ carbonate mineral formation has implications in many environmental applications, including, but not limited to aquifer decontamination, enhancement of soil stability, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The high stability of carbonates and the potential for co-precipitation of contaminants within carbonates are attractive attributes for several potential engineering applications. Ureolytic precipitation of calcium and strontium carbonates by Sporosarcina pasteurii was examined in two-dimensional flat plate porous media reactors. Complete reactor plugging due to biofilm formation and calcium carbonate precipitation was achieved in Sr-free systems after 14 hours and in Sr-inclusive systems after 15 hours. Comparison of the reactor influent and effluent after 11 hours indicated that Ca2+ concentrations in the Sr-free reactor effluent were reduced to approximately 0.48% of the influent concentration while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations of the Sr-inclusive effluent were reduced to 0.64% and 2.34% of the influent concentration indicating a slight inhibitory effect of strontium on calcium carbonate precipitation . Despite this slight inhibition, more than 98% of the Ca2+ entering the reactors was precipitated. Calcite was identified as the main mineral formed and a larger mean crystal size and density were observed near the reactor influent. Homogenous partition coefficients calculated from extracted precipitates suggest higher Sr2+ partitioning near the inlet region, where higher precipitation kinetics exist. Results confirm the possibility of effective calcite-based co-precipitation of Sr2+ under flow conditions and contributes towards the development of field-scale calcium carbonate mineral-based immobilization strategies.

  15. Bacterially Induced Calcite Precipitation and Strontium Co-Precipitation under Flow Conditions in a Porous Media System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Robin; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Schultz, Logan N.; Cunningham, Al B.

    2010-05-01

    The process of in situ carbonate mineral formation has implications in many environmental applications, including, but not limited to aquifer decontamination, enhancement of soil stability, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The high stability of carbonates and the potential for co-precipitation of contaminants within carbonates are attractive attributes for several potential engineering applications. Ureolytic precipitation of calcium and strontium carbonates by Sporosarcina pasteurii was examined in two-dimensional flat plate porous media reactors. Complete reactor plugging due to biofilm formation and calcium carbonate precipitation was achieved in Sr-free systems after 14 hours and in Sr-inclusive systems after 15 hours. Comparison of the reactor influent and effluent after 11 hours indicated that Ca2+ concentrations in the Sr-free reactor effluent were reduced to approximately 0.48% of the influent concentration while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations of the Sr-inclusive effluent were reduced to 0.64% and 2.34% of the influent concentration indicating a slight inhibitory effect of strontium on calcium carbonate precipitation . Despite this slight inhibition, more than 98% of the Ca2+ entering the reactors was precipitated. Calcite was identified as the main mineral formed and a larger mean crystal size and density were observed near the reactor influent. Homogenous partition coefficients calculated from extracted precipitates suggest higher Sr2+ partitioning near the inlet region, where higher precipitation kinetics exist. Results confirm the possibility of effective calcite-based co-precipitation of Sr2+ under flow conditions and contributes towards the development of field-scale calcium carbonate mineral-based immobilization strategies.

  16. Co-Precipitation of Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Strontium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclid

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, F. Grant

    2003-06-01

    A suite of experiments were performed to investigate the partitioning of Sr2+ (to mimic the radionuclide 90Sr) between calcite and artificial groundwater in response to the hydrolysis of urea by Bacillus pasteurii under conditions that simulate in-situ aquifer conditions. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20 C over 7 days in microcosms inoculated with B. pasteurii ATCC 11859 and containing an artificial groundwater and urea (AGW), and an AGW including a Sr contaminant treatment. During the experiments ammonium concentration from bacterial urea hydrolysis increased asymptotically, and derived rate constants (kurea) that were between 13 and 10 times greater at 20 C, than at 15 and 10 C. Calcite precipitation was initiated after similar amounts of urea had been hydrolysed ({approx} 4.0 mmoles L-1) and a similar critical saturation state (mean Scritical = 53, variation = 20%) had been reached, independent of temperature and Sr treatment. Because of the positive relationship between urea hydrolysis rate and temperature, precipitation began by the end of day 1 at 20 C, and between days 1 and 2 at 15 and 10 C. The rate of calcite precipitation increased with, and was fundamentally controlled by S, irrespective of temperature, which connects the dissimilar patterns of urea hydrolysis and dissolved concentrations which are exhibited at the different experiments. The presence of Sr slightly slowed calcite precipitation rates at equivalent values of S, which may reflect the screening of active nucleation and crystal growth sites by Sr. Instantaneous heterogeneous partitioning coefficients (DSr) exhibited a positive association with calcite precipitation rates, but were greater at higher experimental temperatures at equivalent precipitation rates (20 C mean = 0.46; 15 C mean = 0.24; 10 C mean = 0.29). This is likely to reflect the large ionic radius of the Sr ion, which cannot fully co-ordinate relative to ions smaller than Ca at equilibrium conditions, but i s

  17. Strain localization and the onset of dynamic weakening in calcite fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Nielsen, S.; Di Toro, G.

    2015-03-01

    To determine the role of strain localization during dynamic weakening of calcite gouge at seismic slip rates, single-slide and slide-hold-slide experiments were conducted on 2-3-mm thick layers of calcite gouge at normal stresses up to 26 MPa and slip rates up to 1 m s-1. Microstructures were analyzed from short displacement (< 35 cm) experiments stopped prior to and during the transition to dynamic weakening. In fresh calcite gouge layers, dynamic weakening occurs after a prolonged strengthening phase that becomes shorter with increasing normal stress and decreasing layer thickness. Strain is initially distributed across the full thickness of the gouge layer, but within a few millimeters displacement the strain becomes localized to a boundary-parallel, high-strain shear band c. 20 μm wide. During the strengthening phase, which lasts between 3 and 30 cm under the investigated conditions, the shear band broadens to become c. 100 μm wide at peak stress. The transition to dynamic weakening in calcite gouges is associated with the nucleation of micro-slip surfaces dispersed throughout the c. 100 μm wide shear band. Each slip surface is surrounded by aggregates of extremely fine grained and tightly packed calcite, interpreted to result from grain welding driven by local frictional heating in the shear band. By the end of dynamic weakening strain is localized to a single 2- 3-μm wide principal slip surface, flanked by layers of recrystallized gouge. Calcite gouge layers re-sheared following a hold period weaken nearly instantaneously, much like solid cylinders of calcite marble deformed under the same experimental conditions. This is due to reactivation of the recrystallized and cohesive principal slip surface that formed during the first slide, reducing the effective gouge layer thickness to a few microns. Our results suggest that formation of a high-strain shear band is a critical precursor to dynamic weakening in calcite gouges. Microstructures are most compatible

  18. The role of disseminated calcite in the chemical weathering of granitoid rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Bullen, T.D.; Vivit, D.V.; Schulz, M.S.; Clow, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    Accessory calcite, present at concentrations between 300 and 3000 mg kg-1, occurs in fresh granitoid rocks sampled from the Merced watershed in Yosemite National Park, CA, USA; Loch Vale in Rocky Mountain National Park CO USA; the Panola watershed, GA USA; and the Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico. Calcite occurs as fillings in microfractures, as disseminated grains within the silicate matrix, and as replacement of calcic cores in plagioclase. Flow-through column experiments, using de-ionized water saturated with 0.05 atm. CO2, produced effluents from the fresh granitoid rocks that were dominated by Ca and bicarbonate and thermodynamically saturated with calcite. During reactions up to 1.7 yr, calcite dissolution progressively decreased and was superceded by steady state dissolution of silicates, principally biotite. Mass balance calculations indicate that most calcite had been removed during this time and accounted for 57-98% of the total Ca released from these rocks. Experimental effluents from surfically weathered granitoids from the same watersheds were consistently dominated by silicate dissolution. The lack of excess Ca and alkalinity indicated that calcite had been previously removed by natural weathering. The extent of Ca enrichment in watershed discharge fluxes corresponds to the amounts of calcite exposed in granitoid rocks. High Ca/Na ratios relative to plagioclase stoichiometries indicate excess Ca in the Yosemite, Loch Vale, and other alpine watersheds in the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains of the western United States. This Ca enrichment correlates with strong preferential weathering of calcite relative to plagioclase in exfoliated granitoids in glaciated terrains. In contrast, Ca/Na flux ratios are comparable to or less than the Ca/Na ratios for plagioclase in the subtropical Panola and tropical Rio Icacos watersheds, in which deeply weathered regoliths exhibit concurrent losses of calcite and much larger masses of plagioclase during transport

  19. Calcite Fluid Inclusion, Paragenetic, and Oxygen Isotopic Records of Thermal Event(s) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    B. Peterman; R. Moscati

    2000-08-10

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is under consideration as a potential high-level radioactive waste repository situated above the water table in 12.7 Ma tuffs. A wealth of textural and geochemical evidence from low-temperature deposits of calcite and silica, indicates that their genesis is related to unsaturated zone (UZ) percolation and that the level of the potential repository has never been saturated. Nonetheless, some scientists contend that thermal waters have periodically risen to the surface depositing calcite and opal in the tuffs and at the surface. This hypothesis received some support in 1996 when two-phase fluid inclusions (FIs) with homogenization temperatures (Th) between 35 and 75 C were reported from UZ calcite. Calcite deposition likely followed closely on the cooling of the tuffs and continues into the present. The paragenetic sequence of calcite and silica in the UZ is early stage calcite followed by chalcedony and quartz, then calcite with local opal during middle and late stages. Four types of FIs are found in calcite assemblages: (1) all-liquid (L); (2) all-vapor (V); (3) 2-phase with large and variable V:L ratios; and (4) a few 2-phase with small and consistent V:L ratios. Late calcite contains no FI assemblages indicating elevated depositional temperatures. In early calcite, the Th of type 4 FIs ranges from {approx} 40 to {approx} 85 C. Such temperatures (sub-boiling) and the assemblage of FIs are consistent with deposition in the UZ. Some delta 18O values < 10 permil in early calcite support such temperatures. Type 4 FIs, however, seem to be restricted to the early calcite stage, during which either cooling of the tuffs or regional volcanism were possible heat sources. Nonetheless, at present there is no compelling evidence of upwelling water as a source for the calcite/opal deposits.

  20. Probing the record of seawater carbonate chemistry in coccolithophore calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelier, Yael; Minoletti, Fabrice; Hermoso, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Previous works on the biogeochemistry of the ubiquist coccolithophore Calcidiscus leptoporus quantified an oxygen isotope fractionation of about -2.2 ‰ with respect to equilibrium. New cultures experiments and core top study of this taxon enable the calibration of the temperature dependance recorded in δ18O of this coccolith providing a new tool to decipher surfaces water temperatures through the Cenozoic. These findings, concordant in the two approaches show a reduced range of vital effect (-1.1 ‰ ). Other cultured and isolated species (Gephyrocapsa oceanica, Emiliania huxleyi and C.pelagicus) show similar patterns that raise the question of a possible overestimation of isotopic disequilibria in coccolith calcite. A promising research topic in palaeoceanography consists of exploiting interspecific isotopic fractionation because species respond differently to ambient changes in carbonate system chemistry. While E.huxleyi or G.oceanica are isotopically sensitive to changes in dissolved inorganic carbon speciation or concentration, others such as C.leptoporus remains almost unaffected. This may indicate that in addition to traditional δ18O temperature proxy, coccolith interspecific isotopic offsets can provide an innovative means to constrain the carbonate chemistry of the mixed-layer. We investigated this hypothesis with a study case of the last Pleistocene deglaciation that appears to be a good candidate by his abrupt changes in temperatures, oxygen isotope composition of seawater and atmospheric pCO2. While numerous studies have investigated climate changes at high latitudes, we present here the first coccoliths-based isotopic record of mixed-layer temperature at the border of North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre (southwards of the polar front). From Site DSDP 607 we successfully isolated fractions of coccolithophore species C.leptoporus, G.oceanica, E. huxleyi and C.pelagicus over the last 17 kyr. Oxygen isotope variations from these fractions exhibit a shift of

  1. Thermal and Evolved Gas Behavior of Calcite Under Mars Phoenix TEGA Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D.W.; Niles, P.B.; Morris, R.V.; Boynton, W.V.; Golden, D.C.; Lauer, H.V.; Sutter, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS). Martian soil was heated up to 1000 C in the DSC ovens and evolved gases from mineral decomposition products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil. Initial TEGA results indicated the presence of endothermic peaks with onset temperatures that ranged from 675 C to 750 C with corresponding CO2 release. This result suggests the presence of calcite (CaCO3. CaO + CO2). Organic combustion to CO2 is not likely since this mostly occurs at temperatures below 550 C. Fe-carbonate and Mg-carbonate are not likely because their decomposition temperatures are less than 600 C. TEGA enthalpy determinations suggest that calcite, may occur in the Martian soil in concentrations of approx.1 to 5 wt. %. The detection of calcite could be questioned based on previous results that suggest Mars soils are mostly acidic. However, the Phoenix landing site soil pH was measured at pH 8.3 0.5, which is typical of terrestrial soils where pH is controlled by calcite solubility. The range of onset temperatures and calcite concentration as calculated by TEGA is poorly con-strained in part because of limited thermal data of cal-cite at reduced pressures. TEGA operates at <30 mbar while most calcite literature thermal data was obtained at 1000 mbar or higher pressures.

  2. Origin and paleoenvironmental significance of calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite in the Oligocene Creede Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1994-07-01

    Pseudomorphs of calcite are present in lacustrine strata and travertine of the Oligocene Creede Formation, the sedimentary moat fill of the Creede caldera in the Tertiary San Juan volcanic field. The pseudomorphs, previously thought to have formed after gaylussite (Ca-CO[sub 3]Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] [center dot] 5H[sub 2]O), are interpreted to have formed after ikaite (CaCO[sub 3] [center dot] 6H[sub 2]O) on the basis of their modes of occurrence, pseudomorph morphology, and textural and chemical aspects of the calcite replacement. The extent of their exposure and degree of preservation in the Creede Formation allow elucidation of the depositional conditions in which the ikaite formed and was subsequently pseudomorphically replaced. The revised paleoenvironmental interpretation of the Creede Formation also has implications for understanding of the late Oligocene climate of the southwestern US. Formation of ikaite requires water temperatures of 0--3 C, supersaturation with respect to calcite, and the presence of a chemical inhibitor, such as dissolved phosphate, to prevent growth of calcite or aragonite (Shearman and Smith 1985). Geochemical calculations and hydrogeologic considerations suggest that waters with dissolved phosphate contents sufficient to inhibit calcite growth and stabilize ikaite could have developed in the Creede moat lake, although a chemical remnant of high phosphate content is not observed in the strata. The granular texture of the Creede pseudomorphs is common to calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite from many localities. A model is proposed in which slow pseudomorphic replacement (over a period of a day or more) results in sand-size calcite grains formed directly from the ikaite. This model has important implications for the interpretation of isotopic and chemical data obtained from pseudomorphs (and thinolitic tufa).

  3. Effect of Mg on the Grain Growth and Dislocation Creep of Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.

    2004-12-01

    We tested the effect of variations in the amount of the solute impurity (Mg) on grain growth and strength of calcite aggregate. Synthetic marbles were produced by hot isostatic pressing mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 30 hrs). The HIP treatment resulted in homogeneous aggregates of calcite with Mg content from 0.5 to 17 mol%. Stress stepping tests and constant strain rate tests were used to examine the effect of Mg content on the dislocation creep of calcite. The grain growth rate under static conditions was decreased with Mg content from 7 to 17 mol%, indicating perhaps that grain boundary mobility is suppressed by the solute drag effect. In the diffusion creep at stresses below 40 Mpa, the strength of calcite decreases with increasing Mg content owing to the difference in grain size at 800° C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The contribution of dislocation creep increases with increasing stress, and the transition between diffusion and dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. The creep data were fit assuming a composite flow law consisting of a linear combination of diffusion and dislocation creep and a single-valued grain size. The best agreement was obtained by using a dislocation creep law with exponential dependence of strain rate on stress (e.g. Peierls law). More evidence from microstructure is needed to identify the dominant deformation mechanism conclusively. Most of the samples were compressed up to strains of 0.25; small recrystallized grains are formed resulting in a bimodal grain size distribution in some of the deformed samples. Preliminary data shows that the recrystallized grain sizes are smaller for Mg-calcite compared with that of pure calcite. This study will help to understand the effect of impurities on grain-growth kinetics and strain weakening in localized shear zones.

  4. Tropical Silurian Paleotemperatures from Clumped Isotope Analysis of Coexisting Dolomite and Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelstern, I. Z.; Lohmann, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    In many instances, pervasive diagenetic alteration of original material prevents the use of quantitative climate proxies on Paleozoic or older rocks. As an inherently diagenetic phase, dolomite may provide a more resilient paleotemperature resource. The Δ47 carbonate clumped isotope thermometer has been shown to be an accurate paleothermometer and, in a limited way, has been shown to be applicable to dolomites. The shallow water carbonates of the Pipe Creek Jr. Reef in central Indiana offer an opportunity to test the viability of the technique in ancient dolomite. After formation in the late Silurian, a sea level drop resulted in a diagenetic sequence of meteoric phreatic alteration of marine cement and biotic components, which included precipitation of dolomite cements inter-grown within the meteoric phreatic calcite cement. This was post-dated by a coarse void filling calcite spar formed at burial temperatures of ~100°C (based on fluid inclusion analysis). Preliminary analyses of coexisting dolomite and calcite suggest that near-surface temperatures are preserved in dolomites despite having experienced elevated thermal diagenetic effects.. In contrast, co-existing early-formed calcites exhibit resetting of earth surface temperatures to elevated values. Δ47 measurements in dolomites yield temperatures around 30°C using the Guo et al., (2009) theoretical calibration. This contrasts with analyses of early (original) and late (hydrothermal) calcites, which record temperatures greater than ~80°C using the Δ47-calcite calibration of Dennis and Schrag (2010). These data support the hypothesis that dolomite can be a more resilient paleotemperature proxy relative to calcite in deep-time studies. Temperatures from dolomites compare reasonably with other late Silurian paleoclimate studies, and offer insight into regional-scale paleoclimate.

  5. Mg-calcite dissolution in carbonate sediments: role in ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2014-12-01

    An array of porewater wells at two locations on Hawaiian reefs have been utilized to obtain interstitial pore fluid from various depths in permeable sandy sediments. The total alkalinity (AT) and pH (total scale) were measured for each sample (depths 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 20, 30, 40, and 60 cm) as well as calcium, magnesium, and strontium concentrations. Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations co-vary and appear to be directly related to AT and pH. The ratio of the change in calcium and magnesium (ΔCa, ΔMg) between the overlying water column and the porewater indicates that an 18 mol % Mg-calcite phase is dissolving within the sediment column. This could represent the dissolution of coralline algae such as Porolithon or Lithothamnion both of which produce ~18% Mg-calcite skeletons and are present on Hawaiian reefs. The small changes in Mg concentrations from dissolution/precipitation of high Mg-calcites is typically difficult to measure against the high background matrix of seawater and to our knowledge these data represent some of the first magnesium concentrations measured in permeable sediments. Saturation state (Ω) for Mg-calcites was calculated using both sets of stoichiometric solubility products (K) widely accepted in the literature. Depending on the K used, most of the porewater was undersaturated with respect to the high Mg calcites (>12%). Saturation states were determined using an ion activity product (IAP) calculated from the measured values of calcium and magnesium. This produces a more accurate Ω than assuming calcium and magnesium concentrations based on salinity, as is typically done in surface waters. As surface water becomes more corrosive to carbonate minerals due to enhanced ocean acidification through the next century, it is expected that dissolution of both biogenic high Mg-calcites and abiotic Mg-calcite cements will increase, potentially destabilizing reef framework and altering the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in these environments.

  6. Sublimation growth of aluminum nitride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Z.; Du, L.; Edgar, J. H.; Nepal, N.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Witt, R.

    2006-12-01

    The crystal growth of AlN unseeded on a tungsten crucible lid and seeded on a polycrystalline AlN wafer is compared. AlN crystals with a preferential (0 0 0 1) orientation were achieved in both methods, as demonstrated by electron backscattering diffraction. The AlN grain size increased with the thickness of the AlN crystals. Seeded growth produced larger grains than unseeded growth (average grain size of less than 500 μm compared to 2-3 mm). Photoluminescence confirmed the high quality of the resultant AlN crystals.