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Sample records for calcitonin-gene-related peptide stimulates

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) stimulates purkinje cell dendrite growth in culture.

    PubMed

    D'Antoni, Simona; Zambusi, Laura; Codazzi, Franca; Zacchetti, Daniele; Grohovaz, Fabio; Provini, Luciano; Catania, Maria Vincenza; Morara, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    Previous reports described the transient expression during development of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) in rodent cerebellar climbing fibers and CGRP receptor in astrocytes. Here, mixed cerebellar cultures were used to analyze the effects of CGRP on Purkinje cells growth. Our results show that CGRP stimulated Purkinje cell dendrite growth under cell culture conditions mimicking Purkinje cell development in vivo. The stimulation was not blocked by CGRP8-37, a specific antagonist, suggesting the activation of other related receptors. CGRP did not affect survival of Purkinje cells, granule cells or astrocytes. The selective expression of Receptor Component Protein (RCP) (a component of CGRP receptor family) in astrocytes points to a role of these cells as mediators of CGRP effect. Finally, in pure cerebellar astrocyte cultures CGRP induced a transient morphological differentiation from flat, polygonal to stellate form. It is concluded that CGRP influences Purkinje cell dendrite growth in vitro, most likely through the involvement of astrocytes.

  2. Non-excitatory electrical stimulation attenuates myocardial infarction via homeostasis of calcitonin gene-related peptide in myocardium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Jia; Guo, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown protection of brain, retina, optic nerves and pancreatic β-cells but the effect on cardio-protection is still unknown. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in the pathology of injury and protection of myocardium but whether or not electrical stimulation modulates endogenous CGRP is not clear. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, without any treatment. (2) I/R group, animals were subjected to 30 min of myocardial ischemia followed by 60 min reperfusion. (3) NES+I/R group, non-excitatory electrical stimulation (NES) was commenced from 15 min before coronary artery occlusion till the end of reperfusion. (4) I/R+CGRP8-37 group, animals were given with CGRP8-37 (an antagonist of CGRP receptor, 10(-7) mol/L, 0.3 ml, i.v.) at 5 min before reperfusion without any electrical stimulation. The hemodynamics and electrocardiogram were monitored and recorded. Infarct size and troponin I were examined and CGRP expression in the myocardium and serum was analyzed. It was found that the infarct size and TnI were significantly reduced in NES+I/R group, by 45% and 58% respectively, accompanied by an obvious fall back of CGRP in myocardium, compared to I/R group (all p<0.05). Treatment with CGRP8-37 resulted in the same protection on myocardium as NES did. No significant difference in hemodynamics or ventricular tachycardia was detected among the groups (all p>0.05). It can be concluded that NES reduced the infarction size after acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, for which the underlying mechanism may be associated with modulation of endogenous CGRP in myocardium.

  3. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands enhance capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Schmutzler, B S; Roy, S; Hingtgen, C M

    2009-06-16

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family ligands (GFLs) are a group of peptides that have been implicated as important factors in inflammation, since they are released in increased amounts during inflammation and induce thermal hyperalgesia upon injection. Mouse isolated sensory neurons in culture and freshly dissociated spinal cord slices were used to examine the enhancement in stimulated-release of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), as a measure of sensitization. Exposure of isolated sensory neurons in culture to GDNF, neurturin, and artemin enhanced the capsaicin-stimulated release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (iCGRP) two- to threefold, but did not increase potassium-stimulated release of iCGRP. A similar profile of sensitization was observed in freshly dissociated spinal cord slices. Persephin, another member of the GFL family thought to be important in development, was unable to induce an enhancement in the release of iCGRP. These results demonstrate that specific GFLs are important mediators affecting sensory neuronal sensitivity, likely through modulation of the capsaicin receptor. The sensitization of sensory neurons during inflammation, and the pain and neurogenic inflammation resulting from this sensitization, may be due in part to the effects of these selected GFLs.

  4. Effect of a calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist (CGRP8-37) on skin vasodilatation and oedema induced by stimulation of the rat saphenous nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Escott, K. J.; Brain, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist (CGRP8-37, 400 nmol kg-1, i.v.) on the increased blood flow induced by calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), vasodilator prostaglandins, and topical capsaicin was measured with a laser Doppler blood flow meter in rat abdominal skin. 2. The saphenous nerve was electrically stimulated and the effect of CGRP8-37 (400 nmol kg-1, i.v.) on the increased blood flow (measured by laser Doppler flowmetry) and oedema formation (measured by the extravascular accumulation of [125I]-albumin) was investigated in the rat hind paw. 3. CGRP8-37 (400 nmol kg-1, i.v.) had no effect on basal cutaneous blood flow at uninjected sites and sites injected with Tyrode buffer, but acted selectively to inhibit the increased blood flow induced by intradermal CGRP (10 pmol/site, P < 0.05), but not that induced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 300 pmol/site) or carba-prostacyclin (cPGI2, 100 pmol/site). 4. Capsaicin (0.1-33 mM), applied topically, acted in a dose-related manner to increase blood flow. CGRP8-37 (400 nmol kg-1, i.v.) almost totally inhibited blood flow induced by capsaicin (10 mM; P < 0.05) but did not significantly inhibit blood flow induced by a higher dose of capsaicin (33 mM). 5. The increased blood flow induced by short stimulation of the saphenous nerve (10 V, 1 ms, 2 Hz for 30 s) was inhibited by 76%, 5 min after i.v. CGRP8-37 (400 nmol kg-1, i.v., P < 0.05). 6. A longer (5 min) electrical stimulation of the saphenous nerve caused oedema formation, in addition to increased blood flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8242250

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide as inflammatory mediator.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jochen; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Fischer, Axel; Groneberg, David A

    2003-01-01

    Sensory neuropeptides have been proposed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of a number of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic cough. Next to prominent neuropeptides such as tachykinins or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has long been suggested to participate in airway physiology and pathophysiology. CGRP is a 37 amino-acid peptide which is expressed by nerve fibers projecting to the airways and by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. The most prominent effects of CGRP in the airways are vasodilatation and in a few instances bronchoconstriction. A further pulmonary effect of CGRP is the induction of eosinophil migration and the stimulation of beta-integrin-mediated T cell adhesion to fibronectin at the site of inflammation. By contrast, CGRP inhibits macrophage secretion and the capacity of macrophages to activate T-cells, indicating a potential anti-inflammatory effect. Due to the complex pulmonary effects of CGRP with bronchoconstriction and vasodilatation and diverse immunomodulatory actions, potential anti-asthma drugs based on this peptide have not been established so far. However, targeting the effects of CGRP may be of value for future strategies in nerve modulation.

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide produces skeletal muscle vasodilation following antidromic stimulation of unmyelinated afferents in the dorsal root in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Shimura, M; Uchida, S

    2000-04-07

    In anesthetized rats, the contribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to antidromic vasodilation of skeletal muscle blood flow (MBF) following electrical stimulation of muscle afferent was investigated by measuring biceps femoris MBF using laser Doppler flowmetry. Repetitive antidromic electrical stimulation of unmyelinated C fibers in ipsilateral dorsal roots at the 3rd-5th lumbar segments for 30 s caused an increase in MBF for 3-15 min (mean 4.5 min) without significant change in systemic arterial blood pressure. The increase in skeletal MBF started about 10 s after the onset of stimulation, and peaked at approximately 130% of the control value at about 30 s after the end of the 30 s period of stimulation. The MBF response was totally abolished by topical application of hCGRP (8-37), a CGRP receptor antagonist. It is concluded that antidromic vasodilation in skeletal muscles following stimulation of unmyelinated C afferents in dorsal roots is independent of systemic blood pressure and is mediated essentially by CGRP. It is suggested that this CGRP-related antidromic vasodilation may be important in the clinical improvement of skeletal MBF produced by physical therapy, e.g. acupuncture.

  7. Calcitonin gene related peptide as inhibitory neurotransmitter in the ureter.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S; Meini, S; Santicioli, P

    1995-07-01

    A dense plexus of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) containing nerve fibres is present in the mammalian ureter, from which CGRP is released by depolarizing stimuli, including chemical normally present in the urine. CGRP exerts a profound, receptor-mediated, inhibitory effect on the evoked motility of the ureter by suppressing latent pacemakers in the smooth muscle. This effect is largely glibenclamide sensitive, indicating the activation of potassium (K) channels in its genesis. Electrical stimulation of intramural nerves in the guinea-pig ureter produces a transient membrane hyperpolarization, which is blocked by glibenclamide or by capsaicin pretreatment, enhanced in a low-K medium, and inhibited by a CGRP receptor antagonist. Thus endogenous CGRP acts as a neurotransmitter K channel opener in the ureter. The refractory period of the guinea-pig ureter is markedly and similarly reduced by capsaicin pretreatment or administration of a CGRP receptor antagonist, indicating that endogenous CGRP can modulate the maximal frequency of ureteral peristalsis. Using a three-chamber organ bath that enabled the separate perfusion of the renal, middle, and bladder regions of the organ, evidence was obtained that CGRP blocks propagation of impulses along the ureter through a glibenclamide-sensitive mechanism. These findings indicate a role of CGRP in the local regulation of ureteral motility and peristalsis.

  8. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulator of Cutaneous Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Granstein, Richard D.; Wagner, John A.; Stohl, Lori L.; Ding, Wanhong

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been viewed as a neuropeptide and vasodilator. However, CGRP is more appropriately thought of as a pleiotropic signaling molecule. Indeed, CGRP has key regulatory functions on immune and inflammatory processes within the skin. CGRP-containing nerves are intimately associated with epidermal LCs and CGRP has profound regulatory effects on Langerhans cell antigen-presenting capability. When LCs are exposed to CGRP in vitro, their ability to present antigen for in vivo priming of naïve mice or elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity is inhibited in at least some situations. Administration of CGRP intradermally inhibits acquisition of immunity to Th1-dominant haptens applied to the injected site while augmenting immunity to Th2-dominant haptens, although the cellular targets of activity in these experiments remains unclear. Although CGRP can be a pro-inflammatory agent, several studies have demonstrated that administration of CGRP can inhibit the elicitation of inflammation by inflammatory stimuli in vivo. In this regard, CGRP inhibits the release of certain chemokines by stimulated endothelial cells. This is likely to be physiologically relevant since cutaneous blood vessels are innervated by sensory nerves. Exciting new studies suggest a significant role for CGRP in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and, most strikingly, that CGRP inhibit the ability of LCs to transmit the human immunodeficiency virus 1 to T lymphocytes. A more complete understanding of the role of CGRP in the skin immune system may lead to new and novel approaches for the therapy of immune mediated skin disorders. PMID:25534428

  9. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kyani, Anahita; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Jenssen, Håvard

    2012-02-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression. The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model resulted in an extremely robust and highly predictive model with calibration, leave-one-out and leave-20-out validation R(2) of 0.9194, 0.9103, and 0.9214, respectively. We performed docking of the most potent calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor and demonstrated that peptide antagonists act by blocking access to the peptide-binding cleft. We also demonstrated the direct contact of residues 28-37 of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the receptor. These results are in agreement with the conclusions drawn from the quantitative structure-activity relationship model, indicating that both electrostatic and steric factors should be taken into account when designing novel calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

  11. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the sensitization of dorsal horn neurons to mechanical stimulation after intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Qing; Lawand, Nada B; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D

    2004-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor in the sensitization of dorsal horn neurons induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Extracellular recordings were made from wide dynamic range (WDR) dorsal horn neurons with receptive fields on the hindpaw in the lumbar enlargement of anesthetized rats. The background activity and responses to brushing, pressing, and pinching the skin were assessed. A postsuperfusion or a presuperfusion of CGRP(8-37) paradigm was followed. When tested 30 min after capsaicin injection, there was an increase in background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch applied to the receptive field. Superfusion of CGRP(8-37) into the spinal cord at 45 min after capsaicin injection significantly reversed the increased background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch applied to the receptive field. On the other hand, spinal superfusion of CGRP(8-37) prior to capsaicin injection prevented the increased background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch of WDR neurons that occurred following capsaicin injection in control experiments. A sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons could also be induced by superfusion of the spinal cord with CGRP. The effect could be blocked by CGRP(8-37) dose-dependently. Collectively, these results suggest that CGRP and its receptors are involved in the spinal cord central sensitization induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin.

  12. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypertension-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mark C; Katki, Khurshed A; Rao, Arundhati; Koehler, Michael; Patel, Parag; Spiekerman, Alvin; DiPette, Donald J; Supowit, Scott C

    2005-07-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide, a potent vasodilator neuropeptide, is localized in perivascular sensory nerves. We have reported that alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide knockout mice have elevated baseline blood pressure and enhanced hypertension-induced renal damage compared with wild-type controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the mechanism and functional significance of this increased hypertension-induced renal damage. We previously demonstrated by telemetric recording that the deoxycorticosterone-salt protocol produces a 35% increase in mean arterial pressure in both alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide knockout and wild-type mice. Both strains of mice were studied at 0, 14, and 21 days after deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertension. Renal sections from hypertensive wild-type mice showed no pathological changes at any time point studied. However, on days 14 and 21, hypertensive knockout mice displayed progressive increases in glomerular proliferation, crescent formation, and tubular protein casts, as well as the inflammatory markers intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. There was a significant increase in 24-hour urinary isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation, levels at days 14 and 21 in the hypertensive knockout compared with hypertensive wild-type mice. Urinary microalbumin was significantly higher (2-fold) at day 21 and creatinine clearance was significantly decreased 4-fold in the hypertensive knockout compared with hypertensive wild-type mice. Therefore, in the absence of alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide, deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertension induces enhanced oxidative stress, inflammation, and renal histopathologic damage, resulting in reduced renal function. Thus, sensory nerves, via alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide, appear to be renoprotective against hypertension-induced damage.

  13. Depletion of substance P, neurokinin A and calcitonin gene-related peptide from the contralateral and ipsilateral caudal trigeminal nucleus following unilateral electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion; a possible neurophysiological and neuroanatomical link to generalized head pain.

    PubMed

    Samsam, M; Coveñas, R; Csillik, B; Ahangari, R; Yajeya, J; Riquelme, R; Narváez, J A; Tramu, G

    2001-03-01

    Primary trigeminal neurons of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) innervate major parts of the face and head, including the dura. Electrical stimulation of the TG at specific parameters, can activate its nociceptive neurons and may serve as an experimental pain model. Markowitz [J. Neurosci. 7 (1987) 4129] reported that electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) causes extravasation of plasma proteins from venules of the trigeminally innervated domain possibly due to the release of vasoactive substances. Neurogenic inflammation (vasodilatation, plasma protein extravasation, release of vasoactive peptides) in dura may serve as one of the possible pathomechanisms underlying vascular head pain [Moskowitz, Ann. Neurol. 16 (1984) 157]. We performed a unilateral electrical stimulation (7.5 Hz, 5 ms, 0.8-1.4 mA for 5 min) of the TG in rat, to induce a neurogenic inflammation in the peripheral trigeminal domain including the dura, looking for calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) immunoreactivity (IR) in the caudal trigeminal nucleus (CTN) into which massive central trigeminal processes terminate. Here, we show patchy depletion(s) of CGRP-, SP- and NKA-IRs in the contralateral CTN of the rat in addition to their ipsilateral depletion. Such depletion is due to the release of these neuropeptides in the CTN leading to the activation of bilateral trigeminal nociceptive pathway. These data afford the possibility that under specific frequencies (which may roughly correlate to the intensity of the painful stimulus) and/or specific intensities (may correlate to specific areas of the peripheral trigeminal domain) of stimulation, activation of one side of the TG may activate bilateral trigeminal nociceptive pathway leading to the perception of an ill localized/generalized pain or headache rather than a unilateral one.

  14. Superior Cervical Ganglia Neurons Induce Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells via Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide.

    PubMed

    Szklany, Kirsten; Ruiter, Evelyn; Mian, Firoz; Kunze, Wolfgang; Bienenstock, John; Forsythe, Paul; Karimi, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems communicate bidirectionally, utilizing diverse molecular signals including cytokines and neurotransmitters to provide an integrated response to changes in the body's internal and external environment. Although, neuro-immune interactions are becoming better understood under inflammatory circumstances and it has been evidenced that interaction between neurons and T cells results in the conversion of encephalitogenic T cells to T regulatory cells, relatively little is known about the communication between neurons and naïve T cells. Here, we demonstrate that following co-culture of naïve CD4+ T cells with superior cervical ganglion neurons, the percentage of Foxp3 expressing CD4+CD25+ cells significantly increased. This was mediated in part by immune-regulatory cytokines TGF-β and IL-10, as well as the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide while vasoactive intestinal peptide was shown to play no role in generation of T regulatory cells. Additionally, T cells co-cultured with neurons showed a decrease in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ released upon in vitro stimulation. These findings suggest that the generation of Tregs may be promoted by naïve CD4+ T cell: neuron interaction through the release of neuropeptide CGRP.

  15. Anti-insulin effects of amylin and calcitonin-gene-related peptide on hepatic glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Foix, A M; Rodriguez-Gil, J E; Guinovart, J J

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of amylin and calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) as anti-insulin agents in hepatic tissue, we have studied whether these two agents counteracted the action of insulin on glycogen metabolism in isolated rat hepatocytes. In this system insulin stimulates [14C]glucose incorporation into glycogen and activates glycogen synthase. Incubation of the cells with insulin in the presence of amylin or CGRP markedly blocked the insulin stimulation of these two parameters, whereas amylin or CGRP acting alone did not induce any effect. We also examined the ability of amylin and CGRP to modify the anti-glucagon effects of insulin. In the presence of 100 nM-amylin or -CGRP, 10 nM-insulin was almost unable to counteract the inactivation of glycogen synthase and the activation of phosphorylase induced by glucagon. In contrast, neither amylin nor CGRP modified the effect of glucagon on these two enzymes. Our results indicate that amylin and CGRP are able to impair the action of insulin on hepatic glycogen metabolism. PMID:1905922

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Christensen, Anne Francke; Liu, Marie Louise; Janjooa, Benjamin Naveed; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-02-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide provokes migraine attacks in 65% of patients with migraine without aura. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives (family load) or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms contributes to migraine susceptibility to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine patients is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and, therefore, migraine without aura patients with high family load would report more migraine attacks after calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion than patients with low family load. Methods We allocated 40 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 1.5 µg/min calcitonin gene-related peptide and recorded migraine attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial aggregation was obtained by telephone interview of first-degree relatives using a validated semi-structured questionnaire. Results Calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion induced a migraine-like attack in 75% (12 out of 16) of patients with high family load compared to 52% (12 out of 23) with low family load ( P = 0.150). In addition, we found that the migraine response after calcitonin gene-related peptide was not associated with specific or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms of migraine without aura. Conclusion We found no statistical association between familial aggregation of migraine and hypersensitivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine without aura patients. We also demonstrated that the currently known single nucleotide polymorphisms conferring risk of migraine without aura have no additive effect on calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine-like attacks.

  17. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and receptor component protein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Claudia; Zambusi, Laura; Finardi, Annamaria; Ruffini, Francesca; Tolun, Adviye A.; Dickerson, Ian M.; Righi, Marco; Zacchetti, Daniele; Grohovaz, Fabio; Provini, Luciano; Furlan, Roberto; Morara, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) inhibits microglia inflammatory activation in vitro. We here analyzed the involvement of CGRP and Receptor Component Protein (RCP) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Alpha-CGRP deficiency increased EAE scores which followed the scale alpha-CGRP null > heterozygote > wild type. In wild type mice, CGRP delivery into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 1) reduced chronic EAE (C-EAE) signs, 2) inhibited microglia activation (revealed by quantitative shape analysis), and 3) did not alter GFAP expression, cell density, lymphocyte infiltration, and peripheral lymphocyte production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-17, IL-2, and IL-4. RCP (probe for receptor involvement) was expressed in white matter microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and vascular-endothelial cells: in EAE, also in infiltrating lymphocytes. In relapsing–remitting EAE (R-EAE) RCP increased during relapse, without correlation with lymphocyte density. RCP nuclear localization (stimulated by CGRP in vitro) was I) increased in microglia and decreased in astrocytes (R-EAE), and II) increased in microglia by CGRP CSF delivery (C-EAE). Calcitonin like receptor was rarely localized in nuclei of control and relapse mice. CGRP increased in motoneurons. In conclusion, CGRP can inhibit microglia activation in vivo in EAE. CGRP and its receptor may represent novel protective factors in EAE, apparently acting through the differential cell-specific intracellular translocationof RCP. PMID:24746422

  18. Substance P and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulators of Cutaneous Microbiota Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    N’Diaye, Awa; Gannesen, Andrei; Borrel, Valérie; Maillot, Olivier; Enault, Jeremy; Racine, Pierre-Jean; Plakunov, Vladimir; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2017-01-01

    Neurohormones diffuse in sweat and epidermis leading skin bacterial microflora to be largely exposed to these host factors. Bacteria can sense a multitude of neurohormones, but their role in skin homeostasis was only investigated recently. The first study focused on substance P (SP), a neuropeptide produced in abundance by skin nerve terminals. SP is without effect on the growth of Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria. However, SP is stimulating the virulence of Bacillus and Staphylococci. The action of SP is highly specific with a threshold below the nanomolar level. Mechanisms involved in the response to SP are different between bacteria although they are all leading to increased adhesion and/or virulence. The moonlighting protein EfTu was identified as the SP-binding site in B. cereus and Staphylococci. In skin nerve terminals, SP is co-secreted with the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which was shown to modulate the virulence of S. epidermidis. This effect is antagonized by SP. Identification of the CGRP sensor, DnaK, allowed understanding this phenomenon as EfTu and DnaK are apparently exported from the bacterium through a common system before acting as SP and CGRP sensors. Many other neuropeptides are expressed in skin, and their potential effects on skin bacteria remain to be investigated. Integration of these host signals by the cutaneous microbiota now appears as a key parameter in skin homeostasis. PMID:28194136

  19. Modulation of voltage-activated channels by calcitonin gene-related peptide in cultured rat neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Zona, C; Farini, D; Palma, E; Eusebi, F

    1991-01-01

    1. Whole-cell currents were recorded from cultures of dissociated neocortical neurones of the rat. Rat alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; 1 nM-1 microM) caused significant dose-dependent decreases in the voltage-activated transient (A-current) and delayed rectifier K+ currents. Forskolin (10 nM-20 microM) mimicked this effect. Peak K+ currents were gradually decreased after loading neurones with cyclic AMP (100 microM) through patch pipettes. CGRP was ineffective in neurones loaded with cyclic AMP. 2. CGRP (0.5-2 microM) increased cytosolic cyclic AMP concentration and this effect was mimicked by forskolin (5-40 microM). 3. CGRP (0.1-1 microM) reduced high-threshold Ca2+ currents; as did forskolin (5-20 microM) and cyclic AMP loaded into the neurones. In contrast, low-threshold Ca2+ currents were not affected by any of these agents. 4. Voltage-activated Na+ currents were significantly reduced by both CGRP (0.1-1 microM) and forskolin (5-20 microM). A similar effect was observed when cells were loaded with cyclic AMP. 5. We conclude that, in neocortical neurones, CGRP attenuates voltage-activated currents by stimulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signalling system. PMID:1726796

  20. Adrenomedullin and calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in endocrine-related cancers: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Poyner, David R

    2011-02-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), adrenomedullin 2 (AM2/intermedin) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are members of the calcitonin family of peptides. They can act as growth or survival factors for a number of tumours, including those that are endocrine-related. One mechanism through which this occurs is stimulating angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. AM is expressed by numerous tumour types and for some cancers, plasma AM levels can be correlated with the severity of the disease. In cancer models, lowering AM content or blocking AM receptors can reduce tumour mass. AM receptors are complexes formed between a seven transmembrane protein, calcitonin receptor-like receptor and one of the two accessory proteins, receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 2 or 3 to give the AM1 and AM2 receptors respectively. AM also has affinity at the CGRP receptor, which uses RAMP1. Unfortunately, due to a lack of selective pharmacological tools or antibodies to distinguish AM and CGRP receptors, the precise receptors and signal transduction pathways used by the peptides are often uncertain. Two other membrane proteins, RDC1 and L1/G10D (the 'ADMR'), are not currently considered to be genuine CGRP or AM receptors. In order to properly evaluate whether AM or CGRP receptor inhibition has a role in cancer therapy, it is important to identify which receptors mediate the effects of these peptides. To effectively distinguish AM1 and AM2 receptors, selective receptor antagonists need to be developed. The development of specific CGRP receptor antagonists suggests that this is now feasible.

  1. The role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in peripheral and central pain mechanisms including migraine.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Smriti; Ossipov, Michael H; Johnson, Kirk W

    2017-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid peptide found primarily in the C and Aδ sensory fibers arising from the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, as well as the central nervous system. Calcitonin gene-related peptide was found to play important roles in cardiovascular, digestive, and sensory functions. Although the vasodilatory properties of CGRP are well documented, its somatosensory function regarding modulation of neuronal sensitization and of enhanced pain has received considerable attention recently. Growing evidence indicates that CGRP plays a key role in the development of peripheral sensitization and the associated enhanced pain. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is implicated in the development of neurogenic inflammation and it is upregulated in conditions of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. It is most likely that CGRP facilitates nociceptive transmission and contributes to the development and maintenance of a sensitized, hyperresponsive state not only of the primary afferent sensory neurons but also of the second-order pain transmission neurons within the central nervous system, thus contributing to central sensitization as well. The maintenance of a sensitized neuronal condition is believed to be an important factor underlying migraine. Recent successful clinical studies have shown that blocking the function of CGRP can alleviate migraine. However, the mechanisms through which CGRP may contribute to migraine are still not fully understood. We reviewed the role of CGRP in primary afferents, the dorsal root ganglion, and in the trigeminal system as well as its role in peripheral and central sensitization and its potential contribution to pain processing and to migraine.

  2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide targeted immunotherapy for migraine: progress and challenges in treating headache.

    PubMed

    Peroutka, Stephen J

    2014-06-01

    A role for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the pathophysiology of migraine has been established over the past 25 years. There have now been at least five different small-molecule CGRP antagonists that have demonstrated statistical proof of efficacy in the acute treatment of migraine. At present, multiple clinical trials are underway that are assessing the ability of long-acting antibodies against CGRP to prevent frequent migraine attacks. This review summarizes the existing data concerning the role of CGRP in migraine and attempts to highlight some possible outcomes from the ongoing anti-CGRP antibody trials.

  3. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F; Hammond, Donna L

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) regulates excitability and refractory period of the guinea pig ureter.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S

    1994-08-01

    Previous studies have indicated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), released from the peripheral endings of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons, may play a role as an inhibitory transmitter in the guinea pig ureter. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of capsaicin desensitization and administration of a CGRP receptor antagonist on the excitability and refractory period of the guinea pig ureter to electrical field stimulation. Electrical field stimulation using a long (5 msec.) pulse width produced phasic contractions of the ureter which were unaffected by tetrodotoxin, that is, were produced through direct excitation of ureteral smooth muscle. Human alpha CGRP (1 to 10 nM.) produced a concentration-dependent transient suppression of the evoked contractions, and its effect was prevented by the CGRP receptor antagonist human alpha CGRP(8-37) (1 microM.). In vitro capsaicin pretreatment (10 microM. for 15 minutes) to block neuropeptide release from peripheral endings of sensory nerves or administration of the CGRP receptor antagonist enhanced the responsiveness of the guinea pig ureter to electrical stimulation. In control ureters, the application of two trains of electrical stimuli failed to produce a second contraction at intertrain intervals greater than 20 seconds. The intertrain interval required to obtain a second contraction averaging 50% of the amplitude of the first response (ITI50) of control ureters was about 50 seconds. In vitro capsaicin pretreatment or administration of the CGRP receptor antagonist reduced the refractory period of the ureter to electrical field stimulation: ITI50 averaged 8.8 and 9.1 seconds after capsaicin or CGRP antagonist pretreatment, respectively. These findings demonstrate that capsaicin pretreatment or blockade of CGRP receptors produced qualitatively and quantitatively similar excitatory effects on ureteral excitability and refractory period and are in general agreement with the idea that CGRP is a

  5. Spatiotemporal Changes of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Innervation in Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wu, Sui-Yi; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yi-Lin; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the role calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays in the process of spinal fusion. The aim of the present study is to observe the temporal and spatial changes of CGRP induced by experimental fusion surgery in rats and elucidate the role of CGRP in spinal fusion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study and the specimens were collected on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day, respectively. Then, histological and immunohistochemical analysis were applied to evaluate the fusion mass and spatiotemporal changes of CGRP chronologically. The results demonstrated that density of CGRP reached peak on the 21st day after surgery and most of the CGRP expression located surrounding the interface of allograft and fibrous tissue where the cells differentiate into osteoblasts, indicating that CGRP might be involved in the process of bone formation and absorption. PMID:27990431

  6. [Calcitonin gene-related peptide: a key player neuropeptide in migraine].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Romero, M L; Sobrino-Mejia, F E

    2016-11-16

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP is widely distributed in the nervous system, particularly at anatomical areas thought to be involved with migraine pathophysiology, including the trigeminovascular nociceptive system. Over the past two decades, a convergence of basic and clinical evidence has established the CGRP as a key player in migraine. CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Within the brain, the wide distribution of CGRP and CGRP receptors provides numerous possible targets for CGRP to act as a neuromodulator. Now, CGRP has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for a number of novel treatments for migraine. This review discusses the evidence behind the role of CGRP in migraine and the state of CGRP-based mechanism treatment development.

  7. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP): a molecular link between obesity and migraine?

    PubMed Central

    Recober, Ana; Goadsby, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have begun to suggest obesity is a risk factor for chronic migraine, although no causal relationship has been established, and risk factors for progression from episodic to chronic migraine remain unknown. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a important role in the pathophysiology of migraine. Here the potential role of CGRP as a molecular link between obesity and migraine is reviewed. A mechanistic association is supported by several lines of evidence: a) common markers are elevated in obesity and migraine, b) adipose tissue secretes pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipocytokines that have been implicated in migraine pathophysiology and c) elevated plasma levels of CGRP have been found in obese individuals. We propose that CGRP released from trigeminal neurons may represent a biological link between obesity and migraine. Enhanced trigeminal CGRP production in obese susceptible individuals may lower the threshold necessary to trigger migraine attacks, leading to more frequent episodes and eventually to chronic migraine. PMID:20369076

  8. Inhibition of calcitonin gene-related peptide function: a promising strategy for treating migraine.

    PubMed

    Durham, Paul L

    2008-09-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine. Serum levels of CGRP, which are elevated during a migraine attack, have been reported to return to normal with alleviation of pain. In addition, CGRP administration has been shown to cause a migraine-like headache in susceptible individuals. Importantly, CGRP receptors are found on many cell types within the trigeminovascular system that are thought to play important roles in controlling inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Based on these findings, it was proposed that blockage of CGRP receptor function and, hence, the physiological effects of CGRP would be effective in aborting a migraine attack. This review will summarize key preclinical data that support the therapeutic potential of using CGRP receptor antagonists or molecules that bind CGRP within the context of current neurovascular theories on migraine pathology.

  9. Peripheral amplification of sweating – a role for calcitonin gene-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Schlereth, Tanja; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Seewald, Bianca; Birklein, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Neuropeptides are the mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Some pain disorders, e.g. complex regional pain syndromes, are characterized by increased neurogenic inflammation and by exaggerated sudomotor function. The aim of this study was to explore whether neuropeptides have a peripheral effect on human sweating. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) on acetylcholine-induced axon reflex sweating in healthy subjects (total n = 18). All substances were applied via dermal microdialysis. The experiments were done in a parallel setting: ACh alone and ACh combined with CGRP, VIP or SP in various concentrations were applied. Acetylcholine (10−2m) always elicited a sweating response, neuropeptides alone did not. However, CGRP significantly enhanced ACh-induced sweating (P < 0.01). Post hoc tests revealed that CGRP in physiological concentrations of 10−7–10−9m was most effective. VIP at any concentration had no significant effect on axon reflex sweating. The duration of the sweating response (P < 0.01), but not the amount of sweat, was reduced by SP. ACh-induced skin blood flow was significantly increased by CGRP (P < 0.01), but unaltered by VIP and SP. The results indicate that CGRP amplifies axon reflex sweating in human skin. PMID:16931551

  10. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits local acute inflammation and protects mice against lethal endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rachel Novaes; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Bozza, Patricia T; Soares, Milena B P; Shoemaker, Charles B; David, John R; Bozza, Marcelo T

    2005-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilatory peptide present in central and peripheral neurons, is released at inflammatory sites and inhibits several macrophage, dendritic cell, and lymphocyte functions. In the present study, we investigated the role of CGRP in models of local and systemic acute inflammation and on macrophage activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Intraperitoneal pretreatment with synthetic CGRP reduces in approximately 50% the number of neutrophils in the blood and into the peritoneal cavity 4 h after LPS injection. CGRP failed to inhibit neutrophil recruitment induced by the direct chemoattractant platelet-activating factor, whereas it significantly inhibited LPS-induced KC generation, suggesting that the effect of CGRP on neutrophil recruitment is indirect, acting on chemokine production by resident cells. Pretreatment of mice with 1 mug of CGRP protects against a lethal dose of LPS. The CGRP-induced protection is receptor mediated because it is completely reverted by the CGRP receptor antagonist, CGRP 8-37. The protective effect of CGRP correlates with an inhibition of TNF-alpha and an induction of IL-6 and IL-10 in mice sera 90 min after LPS challenge. Finally, CGRP significantly inhibits LPS-induced TNF-alpha released from mouse peritoneal macrophages. These results suggest that activation of the CGRP receptor on macrophages during acute inflammation could be part of the negative feedback mechanism controlling the extension of acute inflammatory responses.

  11. Peripheral amplification of sweating--a role for calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Schlereth, Tanja; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Seewald, Bianca; Birklein, Frank

    2006-11-01

    Neuropeptides are the mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Some pain disorders, e.g. complex regional pain syndromes, are characterized by increased neurogenic inflammation and by exaggerated sudomotor function. The aim of this study was to explore whether neuropeptides have a peripheral effect on human sweating. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) on acetylcholine-induced axon reflex sweating in healthy subjects (total n = 18). All substances were applied via dermal microdialysis. The experiments were done in a parallel setting: ACh alone and ACh combined with CGRP, VIP or SP in various concentrations were applied. Acetylcholine (10(-2) m) always elicited a sweating response, neuropeptides alone did not. However, CGRP significantly enhanced ACh-induced sweating (P < 0.01). Post hoc tests revealed that CGRP in physiological concentrations of 10(-7)-10(-9) m was most effective. VIP at any concentration had no significant effect on axon reflex sweating. The duration of the sweating response (P < 0.01), but not the amount of sweat, was reduced by SP. ACh-induced skin blood flow was significantly increased by CGRP (P < 0.01), but unaltered by VIP and SP. The results indicate that CGRP amplifies axon reflex sweating in human skin.

  12. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: intersection of peripheral inflammation and central modulation

    PubMed Central

    Raddant, Ann C.; Russo, Andrew F.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a convergence of basic and clinical evidence has established the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) as a key player in migraine. Although CGRP is a recognised neuromodulator of nociception, its mechanism of action in migraine remains elusive. In this review, we present evidence that led us to propose that CGRP is well poised to enhance neurotransmission in migraine by both peripheral and central mechanisms. In the periphery, it is thought that local release of CGRP from the nerve endings of meningeal nociceptors following their initial activation by cortical spreading depression is critical for the induction of vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, neurogenic inflammation and the consequential sensitisation of meningeal nociceptors. Mechanistically, we propose that CGRP release can give rise to a positive-feedback loop involved in localised increased synthesis and release of CGRP from neurons and a CGRP-like peptide called procalcitonin from trigeminal ganglion glia. Within the brain, the wide distribution of CGRP and CGRP receptors provides numerous possible targets for CGRP to act as a neuromodulator. PMID:22123247

  13. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in autonomic cardiovascular regulation and vascular structure.

    PubMed

    Mai, Tu H; Wu, Jing; Diedrich, André; Garland, Emily M; Robertson, David

    2014-05-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is reported to play important roles in cardiovascular regulation in human and animal models. In spite of this, its role remains controversial. We aim to clarify this by studying the autonomic cardiovascular function and vascular structure in CGRP knockout (CGRP(-/-)) mice. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were assessed by telemeters. Urine (24-hour) and blood were collected for catecholamines measurements. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed using phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside administered in an acute study. Daytime mean arterial pressure (MAP; 12-hour period) was significantly higher in the CGRP(-/-) mice than in the wild type (WT) mice (114.5 vs. 104.5 mm Hg; P = .04). Norepinephrine was elevated in plasma and 24-hour urine in the knockouts (Urine, 956 vs. 618 pg/mL; P = .004; Plasma, 2505 vs. 1168 pg/mL; P = .04). Paradoxically, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity was higher in CGRP(-/-) mice (3.2 vs. 1.4 ms/mm Hg; P = .03). To increase insight, we studied aortic stiffness in CGRP(-/-) mice and found it increased compared with age-matched WT mice, as evidenced by the depression of the compliance curve (P < .05). CGRP(-/-) mice have higher BP due to elevated sympathetic signals and abnormalities in blood vessel structure. Moreover, our data also showed that CGRP plays an important role in the regulation of the cardio-vagal tone.

  14. Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor expression in alternatively activated monocytes/macrophages during irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Caviedes-Bucheli, Javier; Moreno, Gloria Cristina; López, María Paula; Bermeo-Noguera, Ana Milena; Pacheco-Rodríguez, Gloriana; Cuellar, Adriana; Muñoz, Hugo Roberto

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the percentage and the mean fluorescence intensity of viable alternatively activated monocytes/macrophages (AAMø) CD163+ positive for calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor (CGRPr) within the total AAMø population in human dental pulp. Pulp tissue samples were collected from teeth with a clinical diagnosis of irreversible pulpitis (n = 13), pulps with induced inflammation (n = 13), and normal pulps (n = 13). All samples were labeled to identify positive cells for CGRPr and CD163 using a flow cytometry assay. Results demonstrated that a high percentage of total viable AAMø CD163+ expressed CGRPr on their membranes (72.12% in healthy pulp, 62.20% in irreversible pulpitis, and 58.01% in induced pulpitis). Significant differences were found between mean AAMø CD163+ fluorescence for CGRPr according to pulp condition, being greater in irreversible pulpitis. It can be concluded that AAMø CD163+ are expressed during normal and inflammatory processes, supporting the hypothesis that they could exercise an anti-inflammatory action that could be controlled by CGRP signaling after its binding.

  15. Acupuncture as Treatment of Hot Flashes and the Possible Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara E.; Frisk, Jessica; Hammar, Mats L.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms behind hot flashes in menopausal women are not fully understood. The flashes in women are probably preceded by and actually initiated by a sudden downward shift in the set point for the core body temperature in the thermoregulatory center that is affected by sex steroids, β-endorphins, and other central neurotransmitters. Treatments that influence these factors may be expected to reduce hot flashes. Since therapy with sex steroids for hot flashes has appeared to cause a number of side effects and risks and women with hot flashes and breast cancer as well as men with prostate cancer and hot flashes are prevented from sex steroid therapy there is a great need for alternative therapies. Acupuncture affecting the opioid system has been suggested as an alternative treatment option for hot flashes in menopausal women and castrated men. The heat loss during hot flashes may be mediated by the potent vasodilator and sweat gland activator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the concentration of which increases in plasma during flashes in menopausal women and, according to one study, in castrated men with flushes. There is also evidence for connections between the opioid system and the release of CGRP. In this paper we discuss acupuncture as a treatment alternative for hot flashes and the role of CGRP in this context. PMID:22110545

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide pre-administration acts as a novel antidepressant in stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Matsuo, Yumi; Ogawa, Mami; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa, Naoya

    2015-08-07

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide that has potent vasodilator properties and is involved in various behavioral disorders. The relationship between CGRP and depression-like behavior is unclear. In this study, we used chronically stressed mice to investigate whether CGRP is involved in depression-like behavior. Each mouse was exposed to restraint and water immersion stress for 15 days. After stress exposure, mice were assessed using behavioral tests: open field test, forced swim test and sucrose preference test. Serum corticosterone levels, hippocampal proliferation and mRNA expression of neurotrophins were measured. After stress exposure, mice exhibited depression-like behavior and decreased CGRP mRNA levels in the hippocampus. Although intracerebroventricular CGRP administration (0.5 nmol) did not alter depression-like behavior after 15-day stress exposure, a single CGRP administration into the brain, before the beginning of the 15-day stress exposure, normalized the behavioral dysfunctions and increased nerve growth factor (Ngf) mRNA levels in stressed mice. Furthermore, in the mouse E14 hippocampal cell line, CGRP treatment induced increased expression of Ngf mRNA. The NGF receptor inhibitor K252a inhibited CGRP's antidepressant-like effects in stressed mice. These results suggest that CGRP expression in the mouse hippocampus is associated with depression-like behavior and changes in Ngf mRNA levels.

  17. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in the joint: contributions to pain and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, David A; Mapp, Paul I; Kelly, Sara

    2015-11-01

    Arthritis is the commonest cause of disabling chronic pain, and both osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain major burdens on both individuals and society. Peripheral release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) contributes to the vasodilation of acute neurogenic inflammation. Contributions of CGRP to the pain and inflammation of chronic arthritis, however, are only recently being elucidated. Animal models of arthritis are revealing the molecular and pathophysiological events that accompany and lead to progression of both arthritis and pain. Peripheral actions of CGRP in the joint might contribute to both inflammation and joint afferent sensitization. CGRP and its specific receptors are expressed in joint afferents and up-regulated following arthritis induction. Peripheral CGRP release results in activation of synovial vascular cells, through which acute vasodilatation is followed by endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis, key features of chronic inflammation. Local administration of CGRP to the knee also increases mechanosensitivity of joint afferents, mimicking peripheral sensitization seen in arthritic joints. Increased mechanosensitivity in OA knees and pain behaviour can be reduced by peripherally acting CGRP receptor antagonists. Effects of CGRP pathway blockade on arthritic joint afferents, but not in normal joints, suggest contributions to sensitization rather than normal joint nociception. CGRP therefore might make key contributions to the transition from normal to persistent synovitis, and the progression from nociception to sensitization. Targeting CGRP or its receptors within joint tissues to prevent these undesirable transitions during early arthritis, or suppress them in established disease, might prevent persistent inflammation and relieve arthritis pain.

  18. Acupuncture as treatment of hot flashes and the possible role of calcitonin gene-related Peptide.

    PubMed

    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara E; Frisk, Jessica; Hammar, Mats L

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms behind hot flashes in menopausal women are not fully understood. The flashes in women are probably preceded by and actually initiated by a sudden downward shift in the set point for the core body temperature in the thermoregulatory center that is affected by sex steroids, β-endorphins, and other central neurotransmitters. Treatments that influence these factors may be expected to reduce hot flashes. Since therapy with sex steroids for hot flashes has appeared to cause a number of side effects and risks and women with hot flashes and breast cancer as well as men with prostate cancer and hot flashes are prevented from sex steroid therapy there is a great need for alternative therapies. Acupuncture affecting the opioid system has been suggested as an alternative treatment option for hot flashes in menopausal women and castrated men. The heat loss during hot flashes may be mediated by the potent vasodilator and sweat gland activator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the concentration of which increases in plasma during flashes in menopausal women and, according to one study, in castrated men with flushes. There is also evidence for connections between the opioid system and the release of CGRP. In this paper we discuss acupuncture as a treatment alternative for hot flashes and the role of CGRP in this context.

  19. Local neurogenic regulation of rat hindlimb circulation: CO2-induced release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Masami; Ishikawa, Tomohisa; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Fujimori, Akira; Goto, Katsutoshi

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory nerves in response to skeletal muscle contraction was investigated in the rat hindlimb in vivo and in vitro. In the anaesthetized rat, sciatic nerve stimulation at 10 Hz for 1 min caused a hyperaemic response in the hindlimb. During the response, partial pressure of CO2 in the venous blood effluent from the hindlimb significantly increased from 43±3 to 73±8 mmHg, whereas a small decrease in pH and no appreciable change in partial pressure of O2 were observed. An intra-arterial bolus injection of NaHCO3 (titrated to pH 7.2 with HCl), which elevated PCO2 of the venous blood, caused a sustained increase in regional blood flow of the iliac artery. Capsaicin (0.33 μmol kg−1, i.a.) and a specific calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, CGRP(8–37), (100 nmol kg−1 min−1, i.v.) significantly suppressed the hyperaemic response to NaHCO3. Neither NDΩ-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (1 μmol kg−1 min−1, i.v.) nor indomethacin (5 mg kg−1, i.v.) affected the response. The serum level of CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the venous blood was significantly increased by a bolus injection of NaHCO3 (pH=7.2) from 50±4 to 196±16 fmol ml−1. In the isolated hindlimb perfused with Krebs-Ringer solution, a bolus injection of NaHCO3 (pH=7.2) caused a decrease in perfusion pressure which was composed of two responses, i.e., an initial transient response and a slowly-developing long-lasting one. CGRP(8–37) significantly inhibited the latter response by 73%. These results suggest that CO2 liberated from exercising skeletal muscle activates capsaicin-sensitive perivascular sensory nerves locally, which results in the release of CGRP from their peripheral endings, and then the released peptide causes local vasodilatation. PMID:9375968

  20. Activin Acts with Nerve Growth Factor to Regulate Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide mRNA in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pin; Hall, Alison K.

    2009-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) increases in sensory neurons after inflammation and plays an important role in abnormal pain responses, but how this neuropeptide is regulated is not well understood. Both activin A and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) increase in skin after inflammation and induce CGRP in neurons in vivo and in vitro. This study was designed to understand how neurons integrate these two signals to regulate the neuropeptide important for inflammatory pain. In adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, NGF but not activin alone produced a dose-dependent increase in CGRP mRNA. When added together with NGF, activin synergistically increased CGRP mRNA, indicating that sensory neurons combine these signals. Studies were then designed to learn if that combination occurred at a common receptor or shared intracellular signals. Studies with Activin IB receptor or trkA inhibitors suggested that each ligand required its cognate receptor to stimulate the neuropeptide. Further, activin did not augment NGF-initiated intracellular MAPK signals but instead stimulated Smad phosphorylation, suggesting these ligands initiated parallel signals in the cytoplasm. Activin synergy required several NGF intracellular signals to be present. Because activin did not further stimulate, but did require NGF intracellular signals, it appears that activin and NGF converge not in receptor or cytoplasmic signals, but in transcriptional mechanisms to regulate CGRP in sensory neurons after inflammation. PMID:17964731

  1. Critical role of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in cortical spreading depression

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Costa, Cinzia; Caproni, Stefano; Pisani, Antonio; Bonsi, Paola; Picconi, Barbara; Cupini, Letizia M.; Materazzi, Serena; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Sarchielli, Paola; Calabresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a key pathogenetic step in migraine with aura. Dysfunctions of voltage-dependent and receptor-operated channels have been implicated in the generation of CSD and in the pathophysiology of migraine. Although a known correlation exists between migraine and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), the possibility that CGRP is involved in CSD has not been examined in detail. We analyzed the pharmacological mechanisms underlying CSD and investigated the possibility that endogenous CGRP contributes to this phenomenon. CSD was analyzed in rat neocortical slices by imaging of the intrinsic optical signal. CSD was measured as the percentage of the maximal surface of a cortical slice covered by the propagation of intrinsic optical signal changes during an induction episode. Reproducible CSD episodes were induced through repetitive elevations of extracellular potassium concentration. AMPA glutamate receptor antagonism did not inhibit CSD, whereas NMDA receptor antagonism did inhibit CSD. Blockade of voltage-dependent sodium channels by TTX also reduced CSD. CSD was also decreased by the antiepileptic drug topiramate, but not by carbamazepine. Interestingly, endogenous CGRP was released in the cortical tissue in a calcium-dependent manner during CSD, and three different CGRP receptor antagonists had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on CSD, suggesting a critical role of CGRP in this phenomenon. Our findings show that both glutamate NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent sodium channels play roles in CSD. They also demonstrate that CGRP antagonism reduces CSD, supporting the possible use of drugs targeting central CGRP receptors as antimigraine agents. PMID:23112192

  2. The modulation of inflammatory oedema by calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, P.; Brain, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) when given with or as a pretreatment to oedema inducing agents was investigated in the skin and paws of male Wistar and Sprague Dawley rats. 2. Oedema formation at intradermally-injected sites in the skin was measured by a 125I-labelled human serum albumin accumulation technique and paw oedema was measured by a weight displacement technique. 3. CGRP (30 pmol) when given with, or as a 20 min pretreatment, markedly potentiated oedema formation induced by substance P (100 pmol) in rat skin. In comparison, CGRP had little effect on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 0.1-3 nmol)-induced oedema when given as a co-injection but significantly potentiated 5-HT-induced oedema when given as a 20 min pretreatment in the skin. Similar results were obtained in both Wistar and Sprague Dawley rats. 4. Pretreatment with CGRP (30 pmol) had little modulatory effect on oedema induced by substance P (100 pmol) in the presence of the vasodilator prostanoid, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 850 pmol) in the skin of Wistar rats. 5. Pretreatment with CGRP (30 pmol) caused a non-significant increase in carrageenin (300 micrograms)-induced oedema in the hind paw of Wistar rats. Capsaicin (100 nmol) given as a pretreatment had little effect on carrageenin-induced oedema. 6. CGRP (30 pmol), given as a pretreatment, had little modulatory effect on 5-HT (3 nmol)-induced oedema in the paw of Wistar rats but a non-significant decrease in paw oedema was observed in Sprague Dawley rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682134

  3. Calcitonin gene-related peptide down-regulates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Wei; Li, Xiao-Hui; Du, Jie; Li, Dai; Li, Yuan-Jian; Hu, Chang-Ping

    2016-12-01

    We have found that eIF3a plays an important role in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and up-regulation of eIF3a induced by TGF-β1 is mediated via the ERK1/2 pathway. Whether ERK1/2 - eIF3a signal pathway is involved in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-mediated pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis remains unknown. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (5 mg/kg) in rats. Primary pulmonary fibroblasts were cultured to investigate the proliferation by BrdU incorporation method and flow cytometry. Sensory CGRP depletion by capsaicin exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, as shown by a significant disturbed alveolar structure, marked thickening of the interalveolar septa and dense interstitial infiltration by inflammatory cells and fibroblasts, accompanied with increased expression of TGF-β1, eIF3a, phosphorylated ERK1/2, α-SMA, collagen I, and collagen III. Exogenous application of CGRP significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced proliferation and differentiation of pulmonary fibroblasts concomitantly with decreased expression of eIF3a, phosphorylated ERK1/2, α-SMA, collagen I, and collagen III. These effects of CGRP were abolished in the presence of CGRP8-37. These results suggest that endogenous CGRP is related to the development of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin, and the inhibitory effect of CGRP on proliferation of lung fibroblasts involves the ERK1/2 - eIF3a signaling pathway.

  4. Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Functional Adaptation of the Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sample, Susannah J.; Heaton, Caitlin M.; Behan, Mary; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Racette, Molly A.; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Peptidergic sensory nerve fibers innervating bone and periosteum are rich in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), an osteoanabolic neurotransmitter. There are two CGRP isoforms, CGRPα and CGRPβ. Sensory fibers are a potential means by which the nervous system may detect and respond to loading events within the skeleton. However, the functional role of the nervous system in the response of bone to mechanical loading is unclear. We used the ulna end-loading model to induce an adaptive modeling response in CGRPα and CGRPβ knockout mouse lines and their respective wildtype controls. For each knockout mouse line, groups of mice were treated with cyclic loading or sham-loading of the right ulna. A third group of mice received brachial plexus anesthesia (BPA) of the loaded limb before mechanical loading. Fluorochrome labels were administered at the time of loading and 7 days later. Ten days after loading, bone responses were quantified morphometrically. We hypothesized that CGRP signaling is required for normal mechanosensing and associated load-induced bone formation. We found that mechanically-induced activation of periosteal mineralizing surface in mice and associated blocking with BPA were eliminated by knockout of CGRPα signaling. This effect was not evident in CGRPβ knockout mice. We also found that mineral apposition responses to mechanical loading and associated BPA blocking were retained with CGRPα deletion. We conclude that activation of periosteal mineralizing surfaces in response to mechanical loading of bone is CGRPα-dependent in vivo. This suggests that release of CGRP from sensory peptidergic fibers in periosteum and bone has a functional role in load-induced bone formation. PMID:25536054

  5. Skin-bacteria communication: Involvement of the neurohormone Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) in the regulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence.

    PubMed

    N'Diaye, Awa R; Leclerc, Camille; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Poc, Cecile Duclairoir; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2016-10-14

    Staphylococci can sense Substance P (SP) in skin, but this molecule is generally released by nerve terminals along with another neuropeptide, Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP). In this study, we investigated the effects of αCGRP on Staphylococci. CGRP induced a strong stimulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence with a low threshold (<10(-12 )M) whereas Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to CGRP. We observed that CGRP-treated S. epidermidis induced interleukin 8 release by keratinocytes. This effect was associated with an increase in cathelicidin LL37 secretion. S. epidermidis displayed no change in virulence factors secretion but showed marked differences in surface properties. After exposure to CGRP, the adherence of S. epidermidis to keratinocytes increased, whereas its internalization and biofilm formation activity were reduced. These effects were correlated with an increase in surface hydrophobicity. The DnaK chaperone was identified as the S. epidermidis CGRP-binding protein. We further showed that the effects of CGRP were blocked by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), an inhibitor of MscL mechanosensitive channels. In addition, GdCl3 inhibited the membrane translocation of EfTu, the Substance P sensor. This work reveals that through interaction with specific sensors S. epidermidis integrates different skin signals and consequently adapts its virulence.

  6. Skin-bacteria communication: Involvement of the neurohormone Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) in the regulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence

    PubMed Central

    N’Diaye, Awa R.; Leclerc, Camille; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Poc, Cecile Duclairoir; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci can sense Substance P (SP) in skin, but this molecule is generally released by nerve terminals along with another neuropeptide, Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP). In this study, we investigated the effects of αCGRP on Staphylococci. CGRP induced a strong stimulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence with a low threshold (<10−12 M) whereas Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to CGRP. We observed that CGRP-treated S. epidermidis induced interleukin 8 release by keratinocytes. This effect was associated with an increase in cathelicidin LL37 secretion. S. epidermidis displayed no change in virulence factors secretion but showed marked differences in surface properties. After exposure to CGRP, the adherence of S. epidermidis to keratinocytes increased, whereas its internalization and biofilm formation activity were reduced. These effects were correlated with an increase in surface hydrophobicity. The DnaK chaperone was identified as the S. epidermidis CGRP-binding protein. We further showed that the effects of CGRP were blocked by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), an inhibitor of MscL mechanosensitive channels. In addition, GdCl3 inhibited the membrane translocation of EfTu, the Substance P sensor. This work reveals that through interaction with specific sensors S. epidermidis integrates different skin signals and consequently adapts its virulence. PMID:27739485

  7. Elevated levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide in upper spinal cord promotes sensitization of primary trigeminal nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Lauren E; Hawkins, Jordan L; Durham, Paul L

    2016-12-17

    Orofacial pain conditions including temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and migraine are characterized by peripheral and central sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive neurons. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in promoting bidirectional signaling within the trigeminal system to mediate sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intercisternally with CGRP or co-injected with the receptor antagonist CGRP8-37 or KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Nocifensive head withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation was investigated using von Frey filaments. Expression of PKA, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) in the spinal cord and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK) in the ganglion was studied using immunohistochemistry. Some animals were co-injected with CGRP and Fast Blue dye and the ganglion was imaged using fluorescent microscopy. CGRP increased nocifensive responses to mechanical stimulation when compared to control. Co-injection of CGRP8-37 or KT 5720 with CGRP inhibited the nocifensive response. CGRP stimulated PKA and GFAP expression in the spinal cord, and P-ERK in ganglion neurons. Seven days post injection, Fast Blue was observed in ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells. Our results demonstrate that elevated levels of CGRP in the upper spinal cord promote sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons via a mechanism that involves activation of PKA centrally and P-ERK in ganglion neurons. Our findings provide evidence of bidirectional signaling within the trigeminal system that facilitate increased neuron-glia communication within the ganglion associated with trigeminal sensitization.

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100 μg kg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation.

  9. Changes in the Expression of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide After Exposure to Injurious Stretch-Shortening Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C.; Miller, G.R.; Baker, B.A.; Hollander, M.; Kashon, M.L.; Waugh, S; Krajnak, K.

    2016-01-01

    One of the factors that can result in musculoskeletal injuries, and time off work, is exposure to repetitive motion. The goal of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle injury induced by exposure to injurious stretch-shortening cycles (iSSCs), resulted in hyperalgesia in the hind limb and changes in calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) immunolabeling in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in young and old male rats. Methods Young (3 mo) and old (30 mo) male Fisher 344 × BN F1 rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and the left hind limbs were exposed to 15 sets of 10 SSCs. Control animals were exposed to a single bout of SSCs of equal intensity. Sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was assessed using von Frey filaments prior to beginning the experiment, and on days 2 and 9 following exposure to iSSCs. Rats were euthanized one, 3 or 10 days after the exposure. The ipsilateral DRG were dissected from the L4-5 region of the spine, along with the left tibialis anterior (LTA) muscle. Results Rats exposed to iSSCs were more sensitive to mechanical stimulation than control rats 2 days after the exposure, and showed a reduction in peak force 3 days after exposure. Changes in sensitivity to pressure were not associated with increases in CGRP labeling in the DRG at 3 days. However, 9 days after exposure to iSSCs, old rats still displayed an increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation, and this hyperalgesia was associated with an increase in CGRP immunolabeling in the DRG. Young rats exposed to iSSC did not display a change in CGRP immunolabeling and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation returned to control levels at 10 days. Conclusions These findings suggest that hyperalgesia seen shortly after exposure to iSSC is not influenced by CGRP levels. However, in cases where recovery from injury may be slower, as it is in older rats, CGRP may contribute to the maintenance of hyperalgesia. PMID:26972633

  10. Effects of Voluntary Locomotion and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide on the Dynamics of Single Dural Vessels in Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The dura mater is a vascularized membrane surrounding the brain and is heavily innervated by sensory nerves. Our knowledge of the dural vasculature has been limited to pathological conditions, such as headaches, but little is known about the dural blood flow regulation during behavior. To better understand the dynamics of dural vessels during behavior, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) to measure the diameter changes of single dural and pial vessels in the awake mouse during voluntary locomotion. Surprisingly, we found that voluntary locomotion drove the constriction of dural vessels, and the dynamics of these constrictions could be captured with a linear convolution model. Dural vessel constrictions did not mirror the large increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) during locomotion, indicating that dural vessel constriction was not caused passively by compression. To study how behaviorally driven dynamics of dural vessels might be altered in pathological states, we injected the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which induces headache in humans. CGRP dilated dural, but not pial, vessels and significantly reduced spontaneous locomotion but did not block locomotion-induced constrictions in dural vessels. Sumatriptan, a drug commonly used to treat headaches, blocked the vascular and behavioral the effects of CGRP. These findings suggest that, in the awake animal, the diameters of dural vessels are regulated dynamically during behavior and during drug-induced pathological states. SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT The vasculature of the dura has been implicated in the pathophysiology of headaches, but how individual dural vessels respond during behavior, both under normal conditions and after treatment with the headache-inducing peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is poorly understood. To address these issues, we imaged individual dural vessels in awake mice and found that dural vessels constricted during voluntary locomotion, and

  11. C-terminal calcitonin gene-related peptide fragments and vasopressin but not somatostatin-28 induce miosis in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Almegård, B; Bill, A

    1993-11-30

    The miotic effects of C-terminal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) fragments, somatostatin-28 and vasopressin have been evaluated with special attention being paid to possible interactions with cholecystokinin (CCK)A receptors. The peptides were injected intracamerally to anesthetized monkeys pretreated with indomethacin and atropine. CGRP-(32-37) induced a miosis with a potency 1000 times lower than that previously found with sulphated CCK-8. Two other fragments, CGRP-(30-37) and CGRP-(31-37), also had miotic properties. The CGRP-(32-37)-induced miosis was antagonized by the CCKA receptor antagonist loxiglumide. No contractile effect was elicited by 67 pmol-7.4 nmol somatostatin-28. Vasopressin (360 pmol) caused a small reduction in pupil size. Loxiglumide pretreatment did not affect the reduction in pupil size but a vasopressin receptor antagonist partly inhibited the response. The results indicate that CGRP-(32-37) is a miotic with low potency but high efficacy in the monkey eye, probably interacting with CCKA receptors, and that vasopressin is a mitotic with low potency and efficacy, probably acting via vasopressin receptors.

  12. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Modulates Heat Nociception in the Human Brain - An fMRI Study in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Borsook, David; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we recorded blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the brain by functional MRI after infusion of CGRP in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 27 healthy volunteers. BOLD-signals were recorded in response to noxious heat stimuli in the V1-area of the trigeminal nerve. In addition, we measured BOLD-signals after injection of sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D antagonist). Results Brain activation to noxious heat stimuli following CGRP infusion compared to baseline resulted in increased BOLD-signal in insula and brainstem, and decreased BOLD-signal in the caudate nuclei, thalamus and cingulate cortex. Sumatriptan injection reversed these changes. Conclusion The changes in BOLD-signals in the brain after CGRP infusion suggests that systemic CGRP modulates nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal pain pathways in response to noxious heat stimuli. PMID:26990646

  13. Statins decrease expression of the proinflammatory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bucelli, Robert C; Gonsiorek, Eugene A; Kim, Woo-Yang; Bruun, Donald; Rabin, Richard A; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2008-03-01

    Clinical and experimental observations suggest that statins may be useful for treating diseases presenting with predominant neurogenic inflammation, but the mechanism(s) mediating this potential therapeutic effect are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that statins act directly on sensory neurons to decrease expression of proinflammatory neuropeptides that trigger neurogenic inflammation, specifically calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, radioimmunoassay, and immunocytochemistry were used to quantify CGRP and substance P expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) harvested from adult male rats and in primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat DRG. Systemic administration of statins at pharmacologically relevant doses significantly reduced CGRP and substance P levels in DRG in vivo. In cultured sensory neurons, statins blocked bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced CGRP and substance P expression and decreased expression of these neuropeptides in sensory neurons pretreated with BMPs. These effects were concentration-dependent and occurred independent of effects on cell survival or axon growth. Statin inhibition of neuropeptide expression was reversed by supplementation with mevalonate and cholesterol, but not isoprenoid precursors. BMPs signal via Smad activation, and cholesterol depletion by statins inhibited Smad1 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. These findings identify a novel action of statins involving down-regulation of proinflammatory neuropeptide expression in sensory ganglia via cholesterol depletion and decreased Smad1 activation and suggest that statins may be effective in attenuating neurogenic inflammation.

  14. Expression pattern of sonic hedgehog signaling and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the socket healing process after tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Pang, Pai; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Yoshioka, Norie; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Sasaki, Akira

    2015-11-06

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), a neural development inducer, plays a significant role in the bone healing process. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide marker of sensory nerves, has been demonstrated to affect bone formation. The roles of SHH signaling and CGRP-positive sensory nerves in the alveolar bone formation process have been unknown. Here we examined the expression patterns of SHH signaling and CGRP in mouse socket by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. We found that the expression level of SHH peaked at day 3 and was then decreased at 5 days after tooth extraction. CGRP, PTCH1 and GLI2 were each expressed in a similar pattern with their highest expression levels at day 5 and day 7 after tooth extraction. CGRP and GLI2 were co-expressed in some inflammatory cells and bone forming cells. In some areas, CGRP-positive neurons expressed GLI2. In conclusion, SHH may affect alveolar bone healing by interacting with CGRP-positive sensory neurons and thus regulate the socket's healing process after tooth extraction.

  15. Cells showing immunoreactivity for calcitonin or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the central nervous system of some invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Y; Katoh, A; Oguro, C; Kambegawa, A; Yoshizawa, H

    1991-09-01

    In the central nervous system of some species of several invertebrate phyla, including land planarians (Platyhelminthes), ribbon worms (Nemertina), slugs (Mollusca), polychaetes, earthworms and leeches (Annelida), pill bugs (Arthropoda), and beard worms (Pogonophora), salmon calcitonin-immunoreactive cells and rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive cells were found by immunohistochemistry. These immunoreactive cells were located in the region surrounding the neuropile, although the sizes of the cells varied according to species. Some of them were round or polygonal and regarded as apolar nerve cells because of their lack of cytoplasmic processes, whereas others were spindle-shaped or elongated, being comparable with unipolar nerve cells because of extension of their cytoplasmic processes in the direction of the neuropile. In some cases, it was noted that the cytoplasmic processes had complicated branches or formed loop-like structures at their ends. These observations suggest that a calcitonin-like or CGRP-like substance is extensively present in invertebrates as well as vertebrates.

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive sensory neurons in the vagal and glossopharyngeal ganglia innervating the larynx of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tetsu; Kuwahara-Otani, Sachi; Maeda, Seishi; Tanaka, Koichi; Seki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We have examined whether calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) neurons in the vagal and glossopharyngeal ganglia innervate the larynx. Many CGRP-ir neurons were located mostly in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex that was fused the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion and the jugular ganglion in the cranial cavity. When Fluorogold was applied to the cut end of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) or the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), many Fluorogold-labeled neurons were found in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex and the nodose ganglion. Double-labeling for CGRP and Fluorogold showed that about 80% of Fluorogold-labeled neurons in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex expressed CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the case of application to the SLN, and about 50% of Fluorogold-labeled neurons expressed CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the case of the RLN. Only a few double-labeled neurons were found in the nodose ganglion. The number of the Fluorogold-labeled neurons and double-labeled neurons in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex in the case of the SLN was larger than that in the case of the RLN. These results indicate that sensory information from the larynx might be conveyed by many CGRP-ir neurons located in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex by way of the SLN and the RLN.

  17. Immature osteoblastic MG63 cells possess two calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor subtypes that respond differently to [Cys(Acm)(2,7)] calcitonin gene-related peptide and CGRP(8-37).

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tomoyuki; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Burns, Douglas M

    2005-10-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is clearly an anabolic factor in skeletal tissue, but the distribution of CGRP receptor (CGRPR) subtypes in osteoblastic cells is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that the CGRPR expressed in osteoblastic MG63 cells does not match exactly the known characteristics of the classic subtype 1 receptor (CGRPR1). The aim of the present study was to further characterize the MG63 CGRPR using a selective agonist of the putative CGRPR2, [Cys(Acm)(2,7)]CGRP, and a relatively specific antagonist of CGRPR1, CGRP(8-37). [Cys(Acm)(2,7)]CGRP acted as a significant agonist only upon ERK dephosphorylation, whereas this analog effectively antagonized CGRP-induced cAMP production and phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and p38 MAPK. Although it had no agonistic action when used alone, CGRP(8-37) potently blocked CGRP actions on cAMP, CREB, and p38 MAPK but had less of an effect on ERK. Schild plot analysis of the latter data revealed that the apparent pA2 value for ERK is clearly distinguishable from those of the other three plots as judged using the 95% confidence intervals. Additional assays using 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine or the PKA inhibitor N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino]ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-89) indicated that the cAMP-dependent pathway was predominantly responsible for CREB phosphorylation, partially involved in ERK dephosphorylation, and not involved in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Considering previous data from Scatchard analysis of [125I]CGRP binding in connection with these results, these findings suggest that MG63 cells possess two functionally distinct CGRPR subtypes that show almost identical affinity for CGRP but different sensitivity to CGRP analogs: one is best characterized as a variation of CGRPR1, and the second may be a novel variant of CGRPR2.

  18. Anti-nociceptive effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide in nucleus raphe magnus of rats: an effect attenuated by naloxone.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Brodda-Jansen, G; Lundeberg, T; Yu, L C

    2000-08-04

    The present study investigated the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on nociception in nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) and the interaction between CGRP and opioid peptides in NRM of rats. CGRP-like immunoreactivity was found at a concentration of 6.0+/-0. 77 pmol/g in NRM tissue of ten samples of rats, suggesting that it may contribute to physiological responses orchestrated by the NRM. The hindpaw withdrawal latency (HWL) to thermal and mechanical stimulation increased significantly after intra-NRM administration of 0.5 or 1 nmol of CGRP in rats, but not 0.25 nmol. The anti-nociceptive effect induced by CGRP was antagonized by following intra-NRM injection of 1 nmol of the CGRP receptor antagonist CGRP8-37. Furthermore, the CGRP-induced anti-nociceptive effect was attenuated by following intra-NRM administration of 6 nmol of naloxone. The results indicate that CGRP and its receptors play an important role in anti-nociception, and there is a possible interaction between CGRP and opioid peptides in NRM of rats.

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide elevates cyclic AMP levels in chick skeletal muscle: possible neurotrophic role for a coexisting neuronal messenger.

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, R; Changeux, J P

    1987-01-01

    Recent immunocytochemical studies have shown that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) coexists with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in spinal motoneurons of the chick. Moreover, CGRP causes an increase in the number of acetylcholine receptors on the surface of cultured chick myotubes. CGRP might thus serve as one of the signals by which motoneurons regulate endplate development. In a search for the second messengers involved, we now demonstrate that CGRP stimulates accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in cultured chick myotubes. This effect is, at least in part, mediated by an increase in cAMP synthesis, as the peptide also activates adenylate cyclase in chick muscle membranes. Nanomolar concentrations of CGRP elicit significant increases in both cellular cAMP levels and acetylcholine receptor numbers. The present findings suggest that cAMP is one of the second messengers which mediate the increase in acetylcholine receptor number elicited by CGRP. Furthermore, CGRP might be implicated in other trophic actions mediated by cAMP in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:3036493

  20. Distribution and fine structure of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat skin.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, A; Senba, E; Tohyama, M

    1989-07-03

    Distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive (CGRPI) nerve fibers and their fine structure were examined in the skin of rat foot pads using immunocytochemistry. The CGRPI fibers formed bundles in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Two types of single-stranded CGRPI fibers were seen to leave the fiber bundles: one was located along the blood vessels or around the eccrine sweat glands, while the other entered the epidermis directly or through the Meissner's corpuscles in the dermal papillae. CGRPI fibers in the epidermis were distributed widely and were occasionally associated with Merkel cells. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed that CGRPI fibers located around blood vessels, sweat glands, epidermal keratinocytes and Merkel cells, or in the Meissner's corpuscles did not form typical synaptic contacts with underlying cells, despite being varicose and filled with vesicles resembling synaptic ones. These findings suggested that the CGRP is released non-synaptically from these terminals to influence diffusely the organs surrounding the terminals. These cutaneous fibers seemed to originate from CGRPI neurons (both small type B cells and large type A cells) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), because injection of fast blue dye into the cutaneous nerve resulted in labeling of these CGRPI cells in the DRG and excision of the L3-L6 DRG resulted in the non-detection of cutaneous CGRPI fibers in the foot pads. Analysis of the composition of CGRPI fibers found in the rat skin has revealed that these are mostly unmyelinated. C-type fibers with some of them being thin myelinated fibers. This was true even of CGRPI fibers at the proximal end of peripheral neurites of the DRG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. The paradoxical vascular interactions between endothelin-1 and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the rat gastric mucosal microcirculation.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Belmonte, J.; Whittle, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. The interactions between local intra-arterial infusion of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and rat alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (alpha-CGRP) on gastric mucosal damage and blood flow have been investigated in the pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rat. 2. Close-arterial infusion of ET-1 (2-200 pmol kg-1 min-1) induced a significant and dose-dependent increase in gastric mucosal haemorrhagic injury. 3. Close-arterial infusion of the higher doses of ET-1 (100 and 200 pmol kg-1 min-1) resulted in a biphasic effect on mucosal blood flow, as determined by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). This consisted of an initial transient increase followed by a pronounced and sustained fall in LDF. 4. Local microvascular constriction may thus contribute to the mechanisms underlying the gastric injury induced by these higher doses of ET-1. 5. However, close-arterial infusion of lower doses of ET-1 (2-50 pmol kg-1 min-1), that also provoked substantial mucosal damage, induced only a sustained and significant mucosal hyperaemia, which may be secondary to microvascular injury. 6. Concurrent dose-arterial administration of rat alpha-CGRP (50 pmol kg-1 min-1) significantly inhibited the extent of gastric mucosal injury induced by ET-1 (5 pmol kg-1 min-1). 7. Furthermore, concurrent close-arterial infusion of this dose of alpha-CGRP, which itself increased mucosal LDF, significantly inhibited the hyperaemic response induced by close-arterial infusion of ET-1 (5 pmol kg-1 min-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220913

  2. Crossed and uncrossed projections to the cat sacrocaudal spinal cord: III. Axons expressing calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ritz, L A; Murray, C R; Foli, K

    2001-10-01

    We have investigated the projection patterns of peptidergic small-diameter primary afferent fibers to the cat sacrocaudal spinal cord, a region associated with midline structures of the lower urogenital system and of the tail. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) primary afferent fibers were observed within the superficial laminae, rostrally as the typical inverted U-shaped band that capped the separate dorsal horns (S1 to rostral S2) and caudally as a broad band that spanned the entire mediolateral extent of the fused dorsal horns (caudal S2 and caudal). Within the dorsal gray commissure, labeling was seen as a periodic vertical, midline band. CGRP-IR labeling was prevalent in an extensive mediolateral distribution at the base of the dorsal horn, originating from both lateral and medial collateral bundles that extend from the superficial dorsal horn. Some bundles, in part traveling within the dorsal commissure, conspicuously crossed the midline. In addition to the robust projection to the superficial dorsal horn, there was a more extensive distribution of CGRP-IR fibers within the deeper portions of the cat sacrocaudal dorsal horn than has been reported for other regions of the cat spinal cord. Presumably, these deep projections convey visceral information to projection or segmental neurons at the neck of the dorsal horn and in the region of the central canal. This deep distribution overlaps the reported projections of the pelvic and pudendal nerves. In addition, the contralateral projections of CGRP-IR fibers may form an anatomical substrate of the bilateral receptive fields for selective dorsal horn neurons. The density and variety of CGRP-IR projection patterns is a reflection of the functional attributes of the innervated structures.

  3. CGRP-RCP, a novel protein required for signal transduction at calcitonin gene-related peptide and adrenomedullin receptors.

    PubMed

    Evans, B N; Rosenblatt, M I; Mnayer, L O; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2000-10-06

    It is becoming clear that receptors that initiate signal transduction by interacting with G-proteins do not function as monomers, but often require accessory proteins for function. Some of these accessory proteins are chaperones, required for correct transport of the receptor to the cell surface, but the function of many accessory proteins remains unknown. We determined the role of an accessory protein for the receptor for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator neuropeptide. We have previously shown that this accessory protein, the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP), is expressed in CGRP responsive tissues and that RCP protein expression correlates with the biological efficacy of CGRP in vivo. However, the function of RCP has remained elusive. In this study stable cell lines were made that express antisense RCP RNA, and CGRP- and adrenomedullin-mediated signal transduction were greatly reduced. However, the loss of RCP did not effect CGRP binding or receptor density, indicating that RCP did not behave as a chaperone but was instead coupling the CGRP receptor to downstream effectors. A candidate CGRP receptor named calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been identified, and in this study RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR indicating that these two proteins interact directly. Since CGRP and adrenomedullin can both signal through CRLR, which has been previously shown to require a chaperone protein for function, we now propose that a functional CGRP or adrenomedullin receptor consists of at least three proteins: the receptor (CRLR), the chaperone protein (RAMP), and RCP that couples the receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway.

  4. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  5. Involvement of multiple receptors in the biological effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide and amylin in rat and guinea-pig preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, S.; Wimalawansa, S. J.; Maggi, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The activity of rat alpha and beta calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as compared to the structurally related peptide, rat amylin, has been investigated in the guinea-pig isolated left atrium (electrically driven), in mucosa-free strips from the base of the guinea-pig urinary bladder and in the rat isolated vas deferens (pars prostatica). The antagonist activity of the C-terminal fragment of human alpha CGRP, alpha CGRP(8-37), was also investigated. 2. In the guinea-pig isolated left atrium the three peptides produced a concentration-related positive inotropic effect, amylin being about 16 and 31 times less potent than alpha or beta CGRP, respectively. Human alpha CGRP(8-37) produced a rightward displacement of the log concentration-response curve to the three agonists tested, without depression of maximal response attainable. Apparent pKB values calculated on the basis of the displacement produced by 1 microM human alpha CGRP(8-37) indicated an agonist-independent affinity of the antagonist (6.66 +/- 0.11 for alpha CGRP, 6.42 +/- 0.17 for beta CGRP and 6.95 +/- 0.11 for amylin). 3. In the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder, alpha or beta CGRP or amylin produce a concentration-related inhibition of twitch contractions evoked by train electrical field stimulation (10 Hz frequency, 0.25 ms duration at 100 V for 0.5 s every 60 s). Amylin was about 100 times less potent than alpha or beta CGRP. Human alpha CGRP(8-37) (3 microM) did not significantly affect the inhibitory action of the three agonists tested.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1330181

  6. RT97- and calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity in lumbar intervertebral discs and adjacent tissue from the rat.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, P W; Petts, P; Hamilton, A

    1992-01-01

    The innervation of rat intervertebral disc and adjacent ligamentous tissue has been investigated using 2 antibodies, RT97 and anti-calcitonin gene-related peptide. Immunoreactivity to the peptide was found in many fibres throughout the long ligaments around the intervertebral discs and in the periosteum, especially associated with vascular channels entering the vertebral bodies. Few of the immunoreactive fibres entered the annular lamellae of the disc tissue. Most of those which terminated did so as fine fibres which lay close to, or in, the interlamellar spaces of the outer annulus fibrosus. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity was also found in more complex endings in the longitudinal ligaments and rarely within the annulus fibrosus. RT97-immunoreactivity was also present in the complex endings and associated fibres. Conversely, RT97-immunoreactivity was apparent only in a few fine filamentous fibre endings. This suggested that the majority of fine filamentous, or free, nerve endings were of an unmyelinated sensory origin. Alternatively, those endings of a more complex nature, which were RT97-immunoreactive, were of a myelinated sensory origin. No immunoreactivity to either antibody was seen in the inner annular or nuclear tissue. It was therefore concluded that the sensory innervation of the rat intervertebral disc has both myelinated and unmyelinated components, the latter being more extensive. Both types of innervation appear to be restricted to the outermost rings of the annulus fibrosus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1452470

  7. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion-A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further.

  8. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion—A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further. PMID:27376323

  9. Diverse Physiological Roles of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Migraine Pathology: Modulation of Neuronal-Glial-Immune Cells to Promote Peripheral and Central Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Durham, Paul L

    2016-08-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine by promoting the development of a sensitized state of primary and secondary nociceptive neurons. The ability of CGRP to initiate and maintain peripheral and central sensitization is mediated by modulation of neuronal, glial, and immune cells in the trigeminal nociceptive signaling pathway. There is accumulating evidence to support a key role of CGRP in promoting cross excitation within the trigeminal ganglion that may help to explain the high co-morbidity of migraine with rhinosinusitis and temporomandibular joint disorder. In addition, there is emerging evidence that CGRP facilitates and sustains a hyperresponsive neuronal state in migraineurs mediated by reported risk factors such as stress and anxiety. In this review, the significant role of CGRP as a modulator of the trigeminal system will be discussed to provide a better understanding of the underlying pathology associated with the migraine phenotype.

  10. Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor component protein (CGRP-RCP) in human myometrium in differing physiological states and following misoprostol administration.

    PubMed

    Goharkhay, Nina; Lu, Jing; Felix, Juan C; Wing, Deborah A

    2007-09-01

    Our objective was to assess relative expression levels of mRNA for calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor component protein (CGRP-RCP) in human myometrium in various physiological states. Using semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we analyzed myometrial samples from 46 women (10 menopausal, 10 nongravid premenopausal, 19 gravidae, and 7 premenopausal misoprostol-treated nongravid women) for the specific expression of CGRP-RCP mRNA. The expression of CGRP-RCP was significantly increased in gravid compared with nongravid myometrium ( P < 0.002). No significant differences in CGRP-RCP expression were found among the other study groups. We concluded that the increased mRNA expression CGRP-RCP in gravid myometrium supports the possibility of involvement of CGRP in the control of myometrial contractility. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate the exact mechanism of action of CGRP and CGRP-RCP in human myometrium.

  11. Structural studies on the [Bu(t)-Cys18](19-37)-fragment of human beta-calcitonin-gene-related peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, J K; Bose, C; Beeley, N R; Tendler, S J

    1991-01-01

    High-field n.m.r. studies were undertaken upon a peptide fragment of the C-terminal region of human beta-calcitonin-gene-related peptide (beta-hCGRP). Studies on the antigenic [Bu(t)-Cys18]beta-hCGRP-(19-37)-fragment revealed that several elements of secondary structure were present when the peptide was dissolved in [2H6]dimethyl sulphoxide. In particular an unspecified turn in the region of Ser19-Gly20 and a type I beta-turn in the region of Asn31-Val32-Gly33 were identified. Through-space connections between the terminal Phe37 amide group and the beta-protons of Thr50 suggest that the peptide may be folded into a loop-type conformation. These structural elements appear to overlap with the epitopes of a number of monoclonal antibodies and provide a molecular basis for understanding the role of the terminal Phe37 amide residue in the immune recognition of beta-hCGRP. Images Fig. 3. PMID:1741742

  12. Effects of rizatriptan on the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and cholecystokinin in the periaqueductal gray of a rat migraine model.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Han, Ximei; Hao, Tingting; Huang, Qian; Yu, Tingmin

    2015-02-05

    Triptans are serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1B/D agonists that are highly effective in the treatment of migraine. We previously found that rizatriptan can reduce the expression of proenkephalin and P substance in the rat midbrain, suggesting that rizatriptan may exert its analgesic effects by influencing the endogenous pain modulatory system. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are mainly responsible for antagonizing the analgesic effects of opioid peptides in the endogenous pain modulatory system. In this study, we investigated the effects of rizatriptan on the expression of CGRP and CCK in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a key structure of the endogenous pain modulatory system, in a rat migraine model induced by nitroglycerin. We found that the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and CCK in the PAG of migraine rats were significantly increased compared to those in control rats, and these levels were significantly reduced upon treatment with rizatriptan in migraine rats (P<0.05). Our results suggest that the expression of CGRP and CCK in the endogenous pain modulatory system may be increased during migraine attacks, which further antagonizes the analgesic effects of endogenous opioid peptides and induces sustained migraine. Rizatriptan, however, significantly reduces the levels of CGRP and CCK to enhance the inhibition of pain signals via the endogenous pain modulatory system, resulting in effective treatment of migraine.

  13. Calcitonin gene-related peptide erases the fear memory and facilitates long-term potentiation in the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Liu, Jue; Yang, Si; Chen, Tao; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37 amino acid neuropeptide, which plays a critical role in the central nervous system. CGRP binds to G protein-coupled receptors, including CGRP1, which couples positively to adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. CGRP and CGRP1 receptors are enriched in central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the main part of the amygdala, which regulates conditioned fear memories. Here, we reported the importance of CGRP and CGRP1 receptor for synaptic plasticity in the CeA and the extinction of fear memory in rats. Our electrophysiological and behavioral in vitro and in vivo results showed exogenous application of CGRP induced an immediate and lasting long-term potentiation in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, but not in the lateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, while bilateral intra-CeA infusion CGRP (0, 5, 13 and 21 μM/side) dose dependently enhanced fear memory extinction. The effects were blocked by CGRP1 receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 ), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors antagonist MK801 and PKA inhibitor H89. These results demonstrate that CGRP can lead to long-term potentiation of basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway through a PKA-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and enhance the extinction of fear memory in rats. Together, the results strongly support a pivotal role of CGRP in the synaptic plasticity of CeA and extinction of fear memory. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays an essential role in synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and fear memory. We found that CGRP-induced chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) in a dose-dependent way in the BLA-CeA (basolateral and central nucleus of amygdala, respectively) pathway and enhanced fear memory extinction in rats through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved NMDA receptors. These results support a pivotal role of CGRP in amygdala.

  14. High arterial compliance in cirrhosis is related to low adrenaline and elevated circulating calcitonin gene related peptide but not to activated vasoconstrictor systems

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, J; Moller, S; Schifter, S; Abrahamsen, J; Becker, U

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Static and dynamic functions of the wall of large arteries are largely unknown in cirrhosis in vivo. The present study was undertaken to determine arterial compliance (COMPart) in relation to vasodilator and vasoconstrictor systems in patients with cirrhosis. In addition, vasoactivity was manipulated by inhalation of oxygen.
STUDY POPULATION AND METHODS—In 20 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and 12 controls we determined COMPart (stroke volume relative to pulse pressure), cardiac output, plasma volume, systemic vascular resistance, central circulation time, plasma catecholamines, renin activity, endothelin-1, and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) at baseline and during oxygen inhalation.
RESULTS—COMPart was significantly increased in cirrhotic patients compared with controls (1.32 v 1.06 ml/mm Hg; p< 0.05) and inversely related to plasma adrenaline levels (r=−0.53; p<0.02) but positively related to circulating levels of CGRP (r=0.58; p<0.01). No significant relation was found for plasma noradrenaline, renin activity, or endothelin-1. COMPart was positively related to plasma volume (r=0.50; p<0.02) and inversely to systemic vascular resistance (r=−0.69; p<0.001) and central circulation time (r=−0.49; p<0.02). During oxygen inhalation, COMPart decreased (−13%; p<0.005) and systemic vascular resistance increased (+10%; p<0.001) towards normal values without significant changes in mean arterial pressure. Plasma adrenaline (−16%; p<0.01) decreased and the relation to COMPart disappeared. The relation of COMPart to CGRP and circulatory variables remained unchanged.
CONCLUSION—Elevated arterial compliance in cirrhosis is related to low adrenaline, high CGRP, and systemic hyperdynamics but not to indicators of the activated vasoconstrictor systems (noradrenaline, renin, endothelin-1). Thus the altered static and dynamic characteristics of the wall of large arteries are intimately associated with circulatory and

  15. Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-directed G Protein Signaling Specificity for the Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Family of Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Winfield, Ian; Harris, Matthew; Hodgson, Rose; Shah, Archna; Dowell, Simon J.; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Woodlock, David A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Poyner, David R.; Watkins, Harriet A.; Ladds, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is formed through the association of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Binding of one of the three peptide ligands, CGRP, adrenomedullin (AM), and intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 (AM2), is well known to result in a Gαs-mediated increase in cAMP. Here we used modified yeast strains that couple receptor activation to cell growth, via chimeric yeast/Gα subunits, and HEK-293 cells to characterize the effect of different RAMP and ligand combinations on this pathway. We not only demonstrate functional couplings to both Gαs and Gαq but also identify a Gαi component to CLR signaling in both yeast and HEK-293 cells, which is absent in HEK-293S cells. We show that the CGRP family of receptors displays both ligand- and RAMP-dependent signaling bias among the Gαs, Gαi, and Gαq/11 pathways. The results are discussed in the context of RAMP interactions probed through molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of the RAMP-GPCR-G protein complexes. This study further highlights the importance of RAMPs to CLR pharmacology and to bias in general, as well as identifying the importance of choosing an appropriate model system for the study of GPCR pharmacology. PMID:27566546

  16. Endothelin in normal lung tissue of newborn mammals: immunocytochemical distribution and co-localization with serotonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Seldeslagh, K A; Lauweryns, J M

    1993-10-01

    We demonstrated immunoreactivity for endothelins (ET)-1, -2, and -3 and for the precursor, big-ET-1, in the pulmonary diffuse neuroendocrine system (PDNES) of newborn cat, rat, hamster, and mouse. ET-like positive neuroepithelial bodies (NEB) were numerous in the intrapulmonary airways and the alveolar parenchyma. Single neuroendocrine cells (NEC) were less often labeled and mainly localized in the larger bronchi. ET-3-reactive neuronal elements were rarely observed. The intensity and number of immunostained NEB were highest for ET-3, followed in declining order by big-ET-1, ET-1, and ET-2. ET-like possessing NEB displayed interspecies differences. We conclude that ET-3 represents a neuroendocrine form of the ET peptide family. NEB expressing several ET isoforms can be grouped into NEB containing either big-ET-1 and ET-1 or ET-3 only. ET-like immunoreactivity was present in a subpopulation of serotonin (5HT)- and/or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-positive NEB. As ET, 5HT, and CGRP have potent pulmonary vaso- and/or bronchomotor effects, our observations suggest that they play a separate or synergistic role in regulatory function of the mammalian PDNES, exerting their influence by paracrine, endocrine, and neurocrine pathways or a combination of these.

  17. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a key factor in the homing of transplanted human MSCs to sites of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jinhua; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jianwei; Fan, Zhihai; Shen, Yixin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used to treat many diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment relies mostly on the precise navigation of cells to the injury site for rebuilding the damaged spinal cord. However, the key factors guiding MSCs to the epicenter of SCI remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neural peptide synthesized in spinal cord, can dramatically aid the homing of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in spinal cord-transected SCI rats. First, HUMSCs exhibited chemotactic responses in vitro to CGRP. By time-lapse video analysis, increased chemotactic index (CMI), forward migration index (FMI) and speed contributed to this observed migration. Then, through enzyme immunoassay, higher CGRP concentrations at the lesion site were observed after injury. The release of CGRP directed HUMSCs to the injury site, which was suppressed by CGRP 8–37, a CGRP antagonist. We also verified that the PI3K/Akt and p38MAPK signaling pathways played a critical role in the CGRP-induced chemotactic migration of HUMSCs. Collectively, our data reveal that CGRP is a key chemokine that helps HUMSCs migrate to the lesion site and thereby can be used as a model molecule to study MSCs homing after SCI. PMID:27296555

  18. Colocalization and shared distribution of endomorphins with substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and the mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Inglis, Fiona M; Zadina, James E

    2007-07-10

    The endomorphins are endogenous opioids with high affinity and selectivity for the mu opioid receptor (MOR, MOR-1, MOP). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH(2); EM1) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH(2); EM2) have been localized to many regions of the central nervous system (CNS), including those that regulate antinociception, autonomic function, and reward. Colocalization or shared distribution (overlap) of two neurotransmitters, or a transmitter and its cognate receptor, may imply an interaction of these elements in the regulation of functions mediated in that region. For example, previous evidence of colocalization of EM2 with substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and MOR in primary afferent neurons suggested an interaction of these peptides in pain modulation. We therefore investigated the colocalization of EM1 and EM2 with SP, CGRP, and MOR in other areas of the CNS. EM2 was colocalized with SP and CGRP in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and with SP, CGRP and MOR in the parabrachial nucleus. Several areas in which EM1 and EM2 showed extensive shared distributions, but no detectable colocalization with other signaling molecules, are also described.

  19. The potentiating effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide on transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 activity and the electrophysiological responses of rat trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chatchaisak, Duangthip; Connor, Mark; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2017-02-15

    Growing evidence suggests that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in trigeminal nociceptive responses. However, the role of CGRP in sensitization or desensitization of nociceptive transduction remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to further investigate the CGRP-induced up-regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and the responses of trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli. Rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) organ cultures and isolated trigeminal neurons were incubated with CGRP. An increase in TRPV1 levels was observed in CGRP-incubated TG organ cultures. CGRP potentiated capsaicin-induced increase in phosphorylated CaMKII levels in the TG organ cultures. The incubation of the trigeminal neurons with CGRP significantly increased the inward currents in response to capsaicin challenge, and this effect was inhibited by co-incubation with the CGRP receptor antagonist, BIBN4068BS or the inhibitor of protein kinase A, H-89. These findings reveal that CGRP acting on trigeminal neurons may play a significant role in facilitating cellular events that contribute to the peripheral sensitization of the TG in nociceptive transmission.

  20. Quinoline derivatives: candidate drugs for a Class B G-protein coupled receptor, the Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, a cause of migraines

    PubMed Central

    Iftikhar, Hira; Ahmad, Iqra; Gan, Siew Hua; Shaik, Munvar Miya; Iftikhar, Naveed; Nawaz, Muhammad Sulaman; Greig, Nigel H.; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Class B G-protein coupled receptors are involved in a wide variety of diseases and are a major focus in drug design. Migraines are a common problem, and one of their major causative agents is class B G-protein coupled receptor, Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor, a target for competitive drug discovery. The calcitonin receptor-like receptor generates complexes with a receptor activity-modifying protein, which determines the type of receptor protein formed. The CGRP receptor comprises a complex formed from the calcitonin receptor-like receptor and receptor activity-modifying protein 1. In this study, an in silico docking approach was used to target calcitonin receptor-like receptor in the bound form with receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (CGRP receptor), as well as in the unbound form. In both cases, the resulting inhibitors bound to the same cavity of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor. The twelve evaluated compounds were competitive inhibitors and showed efficient inhibitory activity against the CGRP receptor and Calcitonin receptor-like receptor. The two studied quinoline derivatives demonstrated potentially ideal inhibitory activity in terms of binding interactions and low range nano-molar inhibition constants. These compounds could prove helpful in designing drugs for the effective treatment of migraines. We propose that quinoline derivatives possess inhibitory activity by disturbing CGRP binding in the trigeminovascular system and may be considered for further preclinical appraisal for the treatment of migraines. PMID:25230231

  1. Quantitative analysis of afferents expressing substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, isolectin B4, neurofilament 200, and Peripherin in the sensory root of the rat trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jin Young; Kim, Jae Hyun; Cho, Yi Sul; Mah, Won; Bae, Yong Chul

    2015-01-01

    Substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and isolectin B4 (IB4) are widely used as markers for peripheral neurons with unmyelinated fibers, whereas neurofilament 200 (NF200), and Peripherin are used as markers for neurons with myelinated fibers, and with unmyelinated or small-caliber fibers, respectively. To study the selectivity of these markers for specific neuronal types, we analyzed their expression in neurons in the rat trigeminal ganglion by light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry. Most SP-immunopositive (+), CGRP+, and IB4+ fibers were unmyelinated, but a small fraction (∼5%) were small myelinated fibers (<20 µm(2) in cross-sectional area, equivalent to <5 µm in diameter, Aδ fiber). Similarly, whereas the majority of NF200+ fibers were myelinated, a large fraction (23.9%) were unmyelinated, and whereas the majority of Peripherin+ fibers were unmyelinated and small myelinated, a significant fraction (15.5%) were large myelinated (>20 µm(2) in cross-sectional area, equivalent to >5 µm in diameter, Aβ fiber). Our findings confirm that SP, CGRP, and IB4 can be used as reliable markers for neurons with unmyelinated fibers, and question the suitability of NF200 as a marker for neurons with myelinated fibers, and of Peripherin as a marker for neurons with unmyelinated, or fine-caliber fibers.

  2. Topographic distribution of serotonin-immunoreactive urethral endocrine cells and their relationship with calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive nerves in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takuya; Saino, Tomoyuki; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the topographic distribution and morphology of serotonin (5-HT)-immunoreactive endocrine cells in the urethra of male rats, and focused on their relationship with peptidergic nerve fibers immunoreactive for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Urethral endocrine cells immunoreactive for 5-HT were densely distributed in the epithelial layers of the prostatic part, but were sparsely distributed in the membranous and spongy parts of urethra. Distribution of urethral endocrine cells with 5-HT immunoreactivity in the prostatic part was restricted from the internal urethral orifice to the region of seminal colliculus. 5-HT-immunoreactive endocrine cells were also observed in the ductal epithelial layers of coagulating glands, prostatic glands, and seminal vesicles. 5-HT-immunoreactive endocrine cells were triangular or flask in shape and possessed an apical projection extending toward the urethral lumen, and basal or lateral protrusions intruding between other epithelial cells were also detected in some cells. Double immunolabeling for 5-HT and CGRP revealed that CGRP-immunoreactive nerve fibers attached to urethral endocrine cells with 5-HT immunoreactivity in the prostatic part. These results suggest that urethral endocrine cells may release 5-HT in response to luminal stimuli, and that these cells and CGRP-immunoreactive nerves may regulate each other by an axon reflex mechanism.

  3. Variation of plasma levels of endothelin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y B; Wang, Y Z; Yue, Y H; Zhao, W C; Feng, G X

    2015-05-25

    We examined the variation in plasma levels of endothelin (ET), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model. Seventy rabbits were randomly assigned into 3 groups. Open-chest surgery (OCS) was performed for all rabbits. Group A (N = 20) received sham-surgery, group B (N = 25) was the reperfusion group, and group C (N = 25) was the infarction group. At 12 h after chest clo-sure, plasma ET levels in groups B and C were clearly increased, while CGRP levels were clearly decreased, particularly in group B. At 24 h after chest closure, ET levels were higher than before OCS, while there was no significant difference between groups B and C. ET in group B was decreased, while that in group C was increased at 12 h. No significant difference in CGRP was observed between 12 and 24 h after chest closure. NO levels in groups B and C at 12 h after chest closure were significantly decreased compared to those before OCS. NO levels in group B at 24, 48, and 72 h were significantly lower than those at 12 h, while those of group C were not significantly changed after 12 h. Dynamic monitoring and comparison of plasma levels of ET, CGRP, NO, and MDA as well as SOD activity revealed that appropriate intervention of these factors may reduce reperfusion injury.

  4. Developmental localization of calcitonin gene-related peptide in dorsal sensory axons and ventral motor neurons of mouse cervical spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongtae; Sunagawa, Masanobu; Kobayashi, Shiori; Shin, Taekyun; Takayama, Chitoshi

    2016-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide, synthesized by alternative splicing of calcitonin gene mRNA. CGRP is characteristically distributed in the nervous system, and its function varies depending on where it is expressed. To reveal developmental formation of the CGRP network and its function in neuronal maturation, we examined the immunohistochemical localization of CGRP in the developing mouse cervical spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion. CGRP immunolabeling (IL) was first detected in motor neurons on E13, and in ascending axons of the posterior funiculus and DRG neurons on E14. CGRP-positive sensory axon fibers entered Laminae I and II on E16, and Laminae I through IV on E18. The intensity of the CGRP-IL gradually increased in both ventral and dorsal horns during embryonic development, but markedly decreased in the ventral horn after birth. These results suggest that CGRP is expressed several days after neuronal settling and entry of sensory fibers, and that the CGRP network is formed in chronological and sequential order. Furthermore, because CGRP is markedly expressed in motor neurons when axons are vastly extending and innervating targets, CGRP may also be involved in axonal elongation and synapse formation during normal development.

  5. Antidromic effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide containing nerves on cerebral arteries in rats--a possible role of sensory nerves on cerebral circulatio.

    PubMed

    Asari, J; Suzuki, K; Matsumoto, M; Sasaki, T; Kodama, N

    2001-12-01

    It has generally been thought that the neurogenic control of cerebral circulation is decided mainly by the autonomic nervous system. Recent studies, however, indicate that sensory nerves rich in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are also distributed on cerebral arteries. CGRP is one of neuropeptides that has strong vasodilative effect. This indicates that sensory nerves may antidromically dilate cerebral arteries mediated by CGRP. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the CGRP containing nerves and cerebral circulation. Firstly, we developed a selective denervation model of CGRP containing nerves. The denervation was performed with intrathecal administration of capsaicin in rats. Secondly, we measured the change of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during the occlusion of bilateral common carotid artery or systemic hypotension. CGRP immunoreactivity around cerebral arteries disappeared after capsaicin treatment. The rCBF during the occlusion of bilateral common carotid artery decreased more in the capsaicin group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in the changes of rCBF during systemic hypotension. These results showed that CGRP containing nerves would participate in the vascular response of cerebral arteries. It is likely that sensory nerves with CGRP should have antidromic effect on cerebral circulation.

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive neurons innervating the soft palate, the root of tongue, and the pharynx in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tetsu; Kuwahara, Sachi; Maeda, Seishi; Tanaka, Koichi; Seki, Makoto

    2010-07-01

    We have examined whether calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) neurons in the glossopharyngeal ganglia innervate the soft palate, the root of tongue, and the pharynx of the rat. Immunohistochemical observations revealed that numerous CGRP-ir neurons are located in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion located ventrolateral to the medulla oblongata in the cranial cavity, and that CGRP-ir neurons are also located in the inferior glossopharyngeal ganglion at the jugular foramen. When Fluorogold was injected into the soft palate, the root of tongue, or the pharyngeal constrictor muscles, many retrogradely Fluorogold-labeled neurons were found in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion and the nodose ganglion, and several Fluorogold-labeled neurons were found in the inferior glossopharyngeal ganglion. Double labeling with immunohistochemistry for CGRP and Fluorogold showed that in every case of injections of Fluorogold into the soft palate, the root of tongue, or the pharynx, about 30% of the Fluorogold-labeled neurons in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion expressed CGRP-like immunoreactivity, while no double-labeled neurons were found in the inferior glossopharyngeal ganglion or the nodose ganglion. These results indicate that nociceptive sensory information from the soft palate, the root of tongue, and the pharynx might be conveyed by the neurons in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion to the nucleus tractus solitarii.

  7. Effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide on canine cerebral artery strips and the in-vivo vertebral blood flow in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, I; Suzuki, Y; Satoh, S; Asano, T; Shibuya, M; Sugita, K

    1989-10-01

    The effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on canine cerebral arteries and on vertebral blood flow were investigated in-vivo and in-vitro and the findings compared with the effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P. Administration of CGRP into the vertebral artery caused a dose-dependent and long-lasting increase in blood flow. The in-vivo vasodilatory effects of substance P and VIP were short-lasting. CGRP (0.1 to 100 nmol/l) elicited a concentration-dependent relaxation of the isolated middle cerebral and basilar arteries when the tissues were precontracted by exposure to prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha). This effect was not antagonized by propranolol, atropine, tetrodotoxin, (N-Ac-Tyr1, D-Phe2)-growth hormone-releasing factor(1-29)-NH2 or (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9) substance P. CGRP also reduced concentration-dependently the contraction of cerebral arteries induced by KCl or 9,11-epithio-11,12-metano-thromboxane A2 (STXA2). Mechanical removal of the endothelium did not abolish the vasodilatory response to CGRP. In PGF2 alpha-contracted canine cerebral arteries, VIP (0.1 to 100 nmol/l) was less potent a vasodilator than CGRP. At low concentrations (0.01 to 1 nmol/l) substance P elicited a rapid and short-lasting relaxation, and in the absence of endothelium this relaxation disappeared. These findings are clear evidence that CGRP modulates vascular tone.

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide protects rats from cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via a mechanism of action in the MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SI; YUAN, YONGJIE; JIAO, SHAN; LUO, QI; YU, JINLU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective function and underlying mechanism of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion damage in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were selected for the establishment of an ischemia/reperfusion injury model through the application of a middle cerebral artery occlusion. Animals were randomly divided into 6 groups of 24 animals. Drugs were administered according to the design of each group; animals were administered CGRP, CGRP8–37, PD98059 and SB20358. The neurobehavioral scores of the rat cerebral ischemia model in each group were calculated. The infarction range of the rat brain tissues was observed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The expression levels of three proteins, phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/JNK, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)/ERK and p-p38/p38, in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in the brain tissues was detected by western blotting. The results showed that CGRP could improve the neurobehavioral function of the ischemic rats and reduce the infarction range. Western blotting results confirmed that the function of the CGRP was mediated mainly through the reduction of the JNK and p38 phosphorylation and the promotion of ERK phosphorylation. Therefore, the present study confirmed that an increase in the exogenous CRGP could effectively improve ischemia/reperfusion injury of the brain tissue. The mechanisms of action were achieved through a reduction in JNK and p38 phosphorylation and an increase in ERL phosphorylation in the MAPK pathway. These mechanisms were interdependent. PMID:27284409

  9. A potent and selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, MK-8825, inhibits responses to nociceptive trigeminal activation: Role of CGRP in orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Pardi, Vanessa; Akerman, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are orofacial pains within the trigeminal distribution, which involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint or both. Their pathophysiology remains unclear, as inflammatory mediators are thought to be involved, and clinically TMD presents pain and sometimes limitation of function, but often appears without gross indications of local inflammation, such as visible edema, redness and increase in temperature. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in other pain disorders with trigeminal distribution, such as migraine, of which TMD shares a significant co-morbidity. CGRP causes activation and sensitization of trigeminal primary afferent neurons, independent of any inflammatory mechanisms, and thus may also be involved in TMD. Here we used a small molecule, selective CGRP receptor antagonist, MK-8825, to dissect the role of CGRP in inducing spontaneous nociceptive facial grooming behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a mouse model of acute orofacial masseteric muscle pain that we have developed, as a surrogate of acute TMD. We show that CFA masseteric injection causes significant spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In mice pre-treated with MK-8825 there is a significant reduction in these spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors. Also, at 2 and 24h after CFA injection the level of Fos immunoreactivity in the trigeminal nucleus, used as a marker of neuronal activation, was much lower on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides after pre-treatment with MK-8825. There was no effect of MK-8825 on the release of IL-6. These data suggest that CGRP may be involved in TMD pathophysiology, but not via inflammatory mechanisms, at least in the acute stage. Furthermore, CGRP receptor antagonists may have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of TMD, as they

  10. An ongoing role of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide as part of a protective network against hypertension, vascular hypertrophy, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Sarah-Jane; King, Ross; Kodji, Xenia; Outzen, Emilie; Pozsgai, Gabor; Fernandes, Elizabeth; Marshall, Nichola; de Winter, Patricia; Heads, Richard J; Dessapt-Baradez, Cecile; Gnudi, Luigi; Sams, Anette; Shah, Ajay M; Siow, Richard C; Brain, Susan D

    2014-05-01

    α-Calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) is a vasodilator, but there is limited knowledge of its long-term cardiovascular protective influence. We hypothesized that αCGRP protects against the onset and development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and have identified protective mechanisms at the vascular level. Wild-type and αCGRP knockout mice that have similar baseline blood pressure were investigated in the angiotensin II hypertension model for 14 and 28 days. αCGRP knockout mice exhibited enhanced hypertension and aortic hypertrophy. αCGRP gene expression was increased in dorsal root ganglia and at the conduit and resistance vessel level of wild-type mice at both time points. βCGRP gene expression was also observed and shown to be linked to plasma levels of CGRP. Mesenteric artery contractile and relaxant responses in vitro and endothelial NO synthase expression were similar in all groups. The aorta exhibited vascular hypertrophy, increased collagen formation, and oxidant stress markers in response to angiotensin II, with highest effects observed in αCGRP knockout mice. Gene and protein expression of endothelial NO synthase was lacking in the aortae after angiotensin II treatment, especially in αCGRP knockout mice. These results demonstrate the ongoing upregulation of αCGRP at the levels of both conduit and resistance vessels in vascular tissue in a model of hypertension and the direct association of this with protection against aortic vascular hypertrophy and fibrosis. This upregulation is maintained at a time when expression of aortic endothelial NO synthase and antioxidant defense genes have subsided, in keeping with the concept that the protective influence of αCGRP in hypertension may have been previously underestimated.

  11. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Mi-Jung; Hwang, Se Jin; Cho, Yun Woo

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments.

  12. Sensitization of Primary Afferent Nociceptors Induced by Intradermal Capsaicin Involves the Peripheral Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Driven by Dorsal Root Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dingge; Ren, Yong; Xu, Xijin; Zou, Xiaoju; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides released from axons of primary afferent nociceptive neurons are the key elements for the incidence of neurogenic inflammation and their release is associated with dorsal root reflexes (DRRs). However, whether the release is due to the triggering of DRRs and plays a role in inflammation-induced pain still remain to be determined. The present study assessed the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) following intradermal injection of capsaicin and determined if this release is due to activation of primary afferent neurons antidromically by triggering of DRRs. Under dorsal root intact conditions, primary afferent nociceptive fibers recorded in anesthetized rats could be sensitized by capsaicin injection, as shown by an increase in afferent responses and lowering of the response threshold to mechanical stimuli. After DRRs were removed by dorsal rhizotomy, the capsaicin-evoked sensitization was significantly reduced. In dorsal root intact rats, peripheral pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist could dose-dependently reduce the capsaicin-induced sensitization. Peripheral post-treatment with CGRP could dose-dependently restore the capsaicin-induced sensitization under dorsal rhizotomized conditions. Capsaicin injection evoked increases in numbers of single and double labeled TRPV1 and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). After dorsal rhizotomy, these evoked expressions were significantly inhibited. Perspective These data indicate that the DRR-mediated neurogenic inflammation enhances sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by capsaicin injection. The underlying mechanism involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors whereby CGRP is released peripherally. PMID:18701354

  13. Distribution and morphology of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunoreactive axons in the whole-mount atria of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Hatcher, Jeffrey T; Hoover, Donald B; Gu, He; Wurster, Robert D; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2014-04-01

    The murine model has been used to investigate the role of cardiac sensory axons in various disease states. However, the distribution and morphological structures of cardiac nociceptive axons in normal murine tissues have not yet been well characterized. In this study, whole-mount atria from FVB mice were processed with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) primary antibodies followed by secondary antibodies, and then examined using confocal microscopy. We found: 1) Large CGRP-IR axon bundles entered the atria with the major veins, and these large bundles bifurcated into small bundles and single axons that formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the epicardium. Varicose CGRP-IR axons had close contacts with muscle fibers, and some CGRP-IR axons formed varicosities around principle neurons (PNs) within intrinsic cardiac ganglia (ICGs). 2) SP-IR axons also were found in the same regions of the atria, attached to veins, and within cardiac ganglia. Similar to CGRP-IR axons, these SP-IR axons formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the atrial epicardium and myocardium. Within ICGs, SP-IR axons formed varicose endings around PNs. However, SP-IR nerve fibers were less abundant than CGRP-IR fibers in the atria. 3) None of the PNs were CGRP-IR or SP-IR. 4) CGRP-IR and SP-IR often colocalized in terminal varicosities around PNs. Collectively, our data document the distribution pattern and morphology of CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons and terminals in different regions of the atria. This knowledge provides useful information for CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons that can be referred to in future studies of pathological remodeling.

  14. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments. PMID:26713069

  15. Enhancement by calcitonin gene-related peptide of nicotinic receptor-operated noncontractile Ca2+ mobilization at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, I.; Tsuneki, H.; Dezaki, K.; Kimura, M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the mechanism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-operated noncontractile Ca2+ mobilization (not accompanied by twitch tension) was investigated by measuring Ca(2+)-aequorin luminescence at the neuromuscular junction of mouse diaphragm muscle treated with neostigmine. 2. Noncontractile Ca2+ transients were enhanced by 4-aminopyridine (100 microM), a K+ channel blocker, and inhibited by botulinum toxin (1-100 micrograms, i.p.) and hexamethonium (10-100 microM), a neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonist. 3. Noncontractile Ca2+ transients were diminished by CGRP8-37 (10-20 microM), a CGRP antagonist. CGRP (0.3-10 nM) prolonged the duration of noncontractile Ca2+ transients. The effect of CGRP was suppressed by CGRP8-37 (0.1 microM). 4. Noncontractile Ca2+ transients were inhibited by H-89 (0.1-1 microM), a protein kinase-A inhibitor. The catalytic subunit of protein kinase-A and AA373 (300 microM), a protein kinase-A activator, prolonged the duration of noncontractile transients. The prolongations either by CGRP or by AA373 were not observed in the presence of H-89 (0.1 microM). 5. Contractile (accompanied by twitch tension) but not noncontractile Ca2+ transients were decreased by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA, 0.3-1 microM), a protein kinase-C activator. Phospholipase A2 increased only contractile Ca2+ transients. Calmodulin-related agents affected neither type of Ca2+ transients. 6. These results provide the first evidence that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-operated noncontractile Ca2+ mobilization is promoted by nerve-released CGRP activating protein kinase-A, and is dependent on the accumulated amounts of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction where desensitization might readily develop. PMID:8242236

  16. Role of peptidergic nerve terminals in the skin: reversal of thermal sensation by calcitonin gene-related peptide in TRPV1-depleted neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chiang, Hao; Fu, Yaw-Syan; Lue, June-Horng; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of peptidergic intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) to nociceptive responses after depletion of the thermal-sensitive receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), we took advantage of a resiniferatoxin (RTX)-induced neuropathy which specifically affected small-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and their corresponding nerve terminals in the skin. Thermal hypoalgesia (p<0.001) developed from RTX-treatment day 7 (RTXd7) and became normalized from RTXd56 to RTXd84. Substance P (SP)(+) and TRPV1(+) neurons were completely depleted (p = 0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively), but RTX had a relatively minor effect on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)(+) neurons (p = 0.029). Accordingly, SP(+) (p<0.0001) and TRPV1(+) (p = 0.0008) IENFs were permanently depleted, but CGRP(+) IENFs (p = 0.012) were only transiently reduced and had recovered by RTXd84 (p = 0.83). The different effects of RTX on peptidergic neurons were attributed to the higher co-localization ratio of TRPV1/SP than of TRPV1/CGRP (p = 0.029). Thermal hypoalgesia (p = 0.0018) reappeared with an intraplantar injection of botulinum toxin type A (botox), and the temporal course of withdrawal latencies in the hot-plate test paralleled the innervation of CGRP(+) IENFs (p = 0.0003) and CGRP contents in skin (p = 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated the preferential effects of RTX on depletion of SP(+) IENFs which caused thermal hypoalgesia. In contrast, the skin was reinnervated by CGRP(+) IENFs, which resulted in a normalization of nociceptive functions.

  17. Co-expression of Achaete-Scute Homologue-1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide during NNK-Induced Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Hyperplasia and Carcinogenesis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Naizhen, Xu; Linnoila, R. Ilona; Kimura, Shioko

    2016-01-01

    Achaete-scute homologue-1 or ASCL1 (MASH1, hASH1) plays roles in neural development and pulmonary neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation, and it is expressed in certain lung cancers. This study was aimed to assess whether and/or how ASCL1 plays a role in 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced pulmonary NE hyperplasia and carcinogenesis in hamsters. Hamsters were injected 3 times weekly with either NNK or solvent alone (control) for treatment periods of 6 and 24 weeks, both without and with 6-week recovery. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out to examine the expressions of ASCL1, CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide), secretoglobin SCGB1A1 (club [Clara] cell specific 10 kD protein, CC10, CCSP), synaptophysin (SYP), and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen). The number of ASCL1-expressing NE foci per airway increased from 0.8 in controls to 1.6 and 2.0 during NNK exposure for 6 and 24 weeks, respectively, and the number of cells per foci doubled after NNK exposure. Most ASCL1-expressing cells in NEBs (neuroepithelial bodies) were also CGRP immunoreactive; NNK enhanced this co-expression with CGRP, a NE marker with known proliferation-promoting properties. NNK also increased PCNA expression within NE foci. NNK-induced tumors showed no immunoreactivity for NE markers. This study confirms ASCL1 as an excellent marker for pulmonary NE cells and demonstrates CGRP co-expression in ASCL1-positive NEB cells participating in NNK-induced NE hyperplasia. PMID:27877229

  18. CALCITONIN GENE-RELATED PEPTIDE IN THE BED NUCLEUS OF THE STRIA TERMINALIS PRODUCES AN ANXIETY-LIKE PATTERN OF BEHAVIOR AND INCREASES NEURAL ACTIVATION IN ANXIETY-RELATED STRUCTURES

    PubMed Central

    Sink, KS; Walker, DL; Yang, Y; Davis, M

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) evokes anxiety-like responses when infused into the lateral ventricle of rats. Because the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) lies immediately adjacent to the lateral ventricle, is rich in CGRP receptors, and has itself been implicated in anxiety, we evaluated the hypothesis that these effects are attributable to stimulation of CGRP receptors within the BNST itself. Bilateral intra-BNST, but not dorsal, CGRP infusions (0, 200, 400, 800 ng/side) dose-dependently enhanced startle amplitude, and produced an anxiety-like response on the elevated plus maze. Intra-BNST infusion of the CGRP antagonist, αCGRP8-37, blocked the effect of CGRP on startle, and also blocked startle potentiation produced by exposure to trimethylthiazoline (TMT – a component of fox feces that induces anxiety-like behavior in rats). Intra-BNST, but not dorsal, CGRP infusions also increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in a number of anxiety-related brain areas (central nucleus of the amygdala, locus coeruleus, ventrolateral septal nucleus, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, lateral hypothalamus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, and nucleus accumbens shell), all of which receive direct projections from the BNST. Together, the results indicate that the activation of BNST CGRP receptors is both necessary and sufficient for some anxiety responses and that these effects may be mediated by activation of a wider network of BNST efferent structures. If so, inhibition of CGRP receptors may be a clinically useful strategy for anxiety reduction. PMID:21289190

  19. The effect of 17β-estradiol on gene expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and some pro-inflammatory mediators in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with pure menstrual migraine

    PubMed Central

    Karkhaneh, Azam; Ansari, Mohammad; Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Rafiee, Mohammad Hessam

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has long been postulated to play an integral role in the pathophysiology of migraine. Earlier studies showed that CGRP can stimulate the synthesis and release of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines from trigeminal ganglion glial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 17β-estradiol in regulation of CGRP expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, and NO and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release in cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with pure menstrual migraine and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on twelve patients with pure menstrual migraine and twelve age-and sex-matched healthy individuals. PBMCs treated with 17β-estradiol for 24 hr at physiological and pharmacological doses. Gene expression was evaluated by real time-PCR. CGRP and IL-1β proteins in culture supernatant were determined by ELISA method. Activity of iNOS in PBMCs and total nitrite in the culture supernatant were measured by colorimetric assays. Results: Treatment with 17β-estradiol had a biphasic effect on expression of CGRP. We found that 17β-estradiol treatment at pharmacological dose significantly increases mRNA expression of CGRP in both groups (P<0.001), whereas at physiological dose it could significantly decrease CGRP mRNA expression (P<0.001), CGRP protein levels, IL-1β release, NO production and iNOS activity only in patient groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: Collectively, it appears that 17β-estradiol can exert protective effect on decrease of inflammation in migraine via decrease in levels of CGRP, IL-1β and iNOS activity; however, more studies are necessary in this regard. PMID:26526225

  20. Activation of TRPV1 mediates calcitonin gene-related peptide release, which excites trigeminal sensory neurons and is attenuated by a retargeted botulinum toxin with anti-nociceptive potential.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Ovsepian, Saak V; Wang, Jiafu; Pickering, Mark; Sasse, Astrid; Aoki, K Roger; Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2009-04-15

    Excessive release of inflammatory/pain mediators from peripheral sensory afferents renders nerve endings hyper-responsive, causing central sensitization and chronic pain. Herein, the basal release of proinflammatory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was shown to increase the excitability of trigeminal sensory neurons in brainstem slices via CGRP1 receptors because the effect was negated by an antagonist, CGRP8-37. This excitatory action could be prevented by cleaving synaptosomal-associated protein of M(r) 25,000 (SNAP-25) with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A, a potent inhibitor of exocytosis. Strikingly, BoNT/A proved unable to abolish the CGRP1 receptor-mediated effect of capsaicin, a nociceptive TRPV1 stimulant, or its elevation of CGRP release from trigeminal ganglionic neurons (TGNs) in culture. Although the latter was also not susceptible to BoNT/E, apparently attributable to a paucity of its acceptors (glycosylated synaptic vesicle protein 2 A/B), this was overcome by using a recombinant chimera (EA) of BoNT/A and BoNT/E. It bound effectively to the C isoform of SV2 abundantly expressed in TGNs and cleaved SNAP-25, indicating that its /A binding domain (H(C)) mediated uptake of the active /E protease. The efficacy of /EA is attributable to removal of 26 C-terminal residues from SNAP-25, precluding formation of SDS-resistant SNARE complexes. In contrast, exocytosis could be evoked after deleting nine of the SNAP-25 residues with /A but only on prolonged elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) with capsaicin. This successful targeting of /EA to nociceptive neurons and inhibition of CGRP release in vitro and in situ highlight its potential as a new therapy for sensory dysmodulation and chronic pain.

  1. The Influence of Low Doses of Zearalenone and T-2 Toxin on Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide-Like Immunoreactive (CGRP-LI) Neurons in the ENS of the Porcine Descending Colon

    PubMed Central

    Makowska, Krystyna; Obremski, Kazimierz; Zielonka, Lukasz; Gonkowski, Slawomir

    2017-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) can undergo adaptive and reparative changes in response to physiological and pathological stimuli. These manifest primarily as alterations in the levels of active substances expressed by the enteric neuron. While it is known that mycotoxins can affect the function of the central and peripheral nervous systems, knowledge about their influence on the ENS is limited. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of low doses of zearalenone (ZEN) and T-2 toxin on calcitonin gene related peptide-like immunoreactive (CGRP-LI) neurons in the ENS of the porcine descending colon using a double immunofluorescence technique. Both mycotoxins led to an increase in the percentage of CGRP-LI neurons in all types of enteric plexuses and changed the degree of co-localization of CGRP with other neuronal active substances, such as substance P, galanin, nitric oxide synthase, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide. The obtained results demonstrate that even low doses of ZEN and T-2 can affect living organisms and cause changes in the neurochemical profile of enteric neurons. PMID:28287437

  2. The effect of combined regulation of the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and calcitonin gene-related peptide on alcohol-induced adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Yisheng; Li, Yuebai; Sun, Junkui; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2014-07-01

    Studies have shown that alcohol can upregulate the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) gene in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). High expression of PPARγ can promote adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and reduce their osteogenic differentiation. Abnormal proliferation of adipocytes and fatty accumulation in osteocytes can result in high intraosseous pressure and disturbance of blood circulation in the femoral head, which induces osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Downregulation of PPARγ is efficient in inhibiting adipogenesis and maintaining osteogenesis of BMSCs, which might potentially reduce the incidence of ONFH. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide gene which has been closely associated with bone regeneration. In this study, we aimed to observe the effect of combined regulation of the expression of PPARγ and CGRP genes on alcohol-induced adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Our results demonstrated that simultaneous downregulation of PPARγ and upregulation of CGRP was efficient in suppressing adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs and promoting their osteogenic differentiation. These findings might enlighten a novel approach for the prevention of ONFH.

  3. Comparison of the effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in a number of in vivo and in vitro tests

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.P.; Brase, D.; Cooper, C.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    sCT and CGRP have been shown previously to have multiple activities in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work has shown that CGRP (15 ..mu..g) intraventricularly (IVT) produces a naloxone reversible 37% inhibition in the p-phenylquinone test (PPQ) accompanied by severe diarrhea. The ED50 of sCT in the PPQ test is 362 ng and this effect is not reversed totally by naloxone. The onset of CGRP is more rapid than that of sCT. sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/M) both produce naloxone reversible inhibition of the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (GPI) (25% and 50% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/ M) produce contracture (15% and 40% respectively) of the non-stimulated GPI that is not blocked by atropine. Both sCT and CGRP block the naloxone-induced contracture of the morphine (MS04) dependent ilea (29% and 68% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP produce biphasic shifts in the MS04 acetylcholine dose-effect curves in the stimulated and nonstimulated GPI, respectively. Neither sCT nor CGRP (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -4/ M) displaces /sup 3/H-naloxone binding to mouse brain membranes. Both sCT and CGRP may produce their effects by modulation of CA/sup +2/ fluxes in the CNS and GPI.

  4. In vivo quantification of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor occupancy by telcagepant in rhesus monkey and human brain using the positron emission tomography tracer [11C]MK-4232.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Eric D; Joshi, Aniket D; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan, Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Purcell, Mona; Gantert, Liza; Riffel, Kerry; Williams, Mangay; O'Malley, Stacey; Miller, Patricia; Selnick, Harold G; Gallicchio, Steven N; Bell, Ian M; Salvatore, Christopher A; Kane, Stefanie A; Li, Chi-Chung; Hargreaves, Richard J; de Groot, Tjibbe; Bormans, Guy; Van Hecken, Anne; Derdelinckx, Inge; de Hoon, Jan; Reynders, Tom; Declercq, Ruben; De Lepeleire, Inge; Kennedy, W P; Blanchard, Rebecca; Marcantonio, Eugene E; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Van Laere, Koen; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L

    2013-11-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent neuropeptide whose agonist interaction with the CGRP receptor (CGRP-R) in the periphery promotes vasodilation, neurogenic inflammation and trigeminovascular sensory activation. This process is implicated in the cause of migraine headaches, and CGRP-R antagonists in clinical development have proven effective in treating migraine-related pain in humans. CGRP-R is expressed on blood vessel smooth muscle and sensory trigeminal neurons and fibers in the periphery as well as in the central nervous system. However, it is not clear what role the inhibition of central CGRP-R plays in migraine pain relief. To this end, the CGRP-R positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(11)C]MK-4232 (2-[(8R)-8-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-6,8-[6-(11)C]dimethyl-10-oxo-6,9-diazaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]-N-[(2R)-2'-oxospiro[1,3-dihydroindene-2,3'-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-5-yl]acetamide) was discovered and developed for use in clinical PET studies. In rhesus monkeys and humans, [(11)C]MK-4232 displayed rapid brain uptake and a regional brain distribution consistent with the known distribution of CGRP-R. Monkey PET studies with [(11)C]MK-4232 after intravenous dosing with CGRP-R antagonists validated the ability of [(11)C]MK-4232 to detect changes in CGRP-R occupancy in proportion to drug plasma concentration. Application of [(11)C]MK-4232 in human PET studies revealed that telcagepant achieved only low receptor occupancy at an efficacious dose (140 mg PO). Therefore, it is unlikely that antagonism of central CGRP-R is required for migraine efficacy. However, it is not known whether high central CGRP-R antagonism may provide additional therapeutic benefit.

  5. [Involvement of the receptor component protein in the regulation of vascular peroxidase-1 expression induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide and angiotensin II in vascular smooth muscle cell].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Mei; Peng, Hong-Yan; Guo, Feng; Quan, Hai-Yan; Luo, Jing-Fei; Qin, Xu-Ping

    2015-04-25

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) play important roles in vascular injury and protection. In order to determine the role of CGRP receptor component protein (RCP) in signal transduction whereby CGRP and Ang II mediate the expression of vascular peroxidase-1 (VPO1) in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC), mouse derived A10 vascular smooth muscle cell line (A10VSMC) was cultured with CGRP or/and Ang II in vitro. RCP-specific small interference RNA (siRNA-RCP) was used to silence oligonucleotide sequence. Western blot and RT-PCR were used to determine the protein and mRNA expressions of RCP and VPO1, respectively. The results showed that the expressions of RCP and VPO1 were increased in the presence of CGRP or Ang II in the quiescent A10VSMC. But the protein expressions of RCP and VPO1 induced by Ang II were decreased by pretreatment of CGRP (P < 0.05). The expressions of VPO1 were decreased in all the groups treated with siRNA-RCP, compared with those of wide-type counterparts. Meanwhile, the expression of VPO1 was significantly induced by CGRP but not Ang II in the siRNA-RCP treated A10VSMCs. Ang II in combination with CGRP increased the protein expression of VPO1 in the siRNA-RCP-transfected cells, compared with Ang II alone, and this effect could be abolished by catalase. The results suggest that RCP may play an important role in the integration of signal transduction whereby CGRP and Ang II receptors jointly regulate VPO1 expression in VSMC.

  6. Source and origin of nerve fibres immunoreactive for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the normal and chronically denervated superior cervical sympathetic ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Z F; Matthews, M R

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemical studies of sympathetic ganglia have indicated that the normal rat superior cervical ganglion contains both SP-IR and CGRP-IR fibres, and CGRP- and SP-immunoreactivity coexist in some fibres. In rat sympathetic ganglia decentralization by preganglionic denervation leads to intraganglionic increase of peptidergic fibres immunoreactive (IR) for substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide. We explored the sources of SP- and CGRP-IR fibres in normal and in chronically decentralized rat SCGs. The distribution of immunoreactivities for CGRP and SP was determined in SCGs of normal rats and of rats following preganglionic denervation followed by sensory denervation. Ganglia were studied after short-term (2-5 days) sensory denervation, and long-term (7-16 months) sympathetic denervation followed by short-term (2 days) sensory denervation. To explore for the production of SP and CGRP by intrinsic neurones within the ganglion, normal and chronically decentralized SCGs were examined following pretreatment by local in vivo application of colchicine. Normal and chronically decentralized ganglia were also injected with fluorescent tracer Fluorogold for retrograde tracing of extrinsic fibres back to their neurones of origin. The observations suggest that in normal SCG in the rat the SP-IR and CGRP-IR nerve fibres are derived via direct links from vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves and the cervical plexus, or from nerve fibres running along the cervical sympathetic trunk, and the external carotid and the internal carotid nerves. Sensory nerve inputs to the rat SCG following decentralization may contribute to the low levels of ganglionic activation observable in the autonomic failure of multiple system atrophy in man.

  7. Discovery of (5S,6S,9R)-5-amino-6-(2,3-difluorophenyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-cyclohepta[b]pyridin-9-yl 4-(2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridin-1-yl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (BMS-927711): an oral calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonist in clinical trials for treating migraine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Conway, Charles M; Denton, Rex; Keavy, Deborah; Signor, Laura; Kostich, Walter; Lentz, Kimberley A; Santone, Kenneth S; Schartman, Richard; Browning, Marc; Tong, Gary; Houston, John G; Dubowchik, Gene M; Macor, John E

    2012-12-13

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute migraine. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and preclinical characterization of a highly potent, oral CGRP receptor antagonist BMS-927711 (8). Compound 8 has good oral bioavailability in rat and cynomolgus monkey, attractive overall preclinical properties, and shows dose-dependent activity in a primate model of CGRP-induced facial blood flow. Compound 8 is presently in phase II clinical trials.

  8. Negative pressure wound therapy-associated tissue trauma and pain: a controlled in vivo study comparing foam and gauze dressing removal by immunohistochemistry for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the wound edge.

    PubMed

    Malmsjö, Malin; Gustafsson, Lotta; Lindstedt, Sandra; Ingemansson, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Pain upon negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing removal has been reported and is believed to be associated with the observation that granulation tissue grows into foam. Wound tissue damage upon removal of the foam may cause the reported pain. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P are neuropeptides that cause inflammation and signal pain and are known to be released when tissue trauma occurs. The aim of this controlled in vivo study was to compare the expression of CGRP and substance P in the wound bed in control wounds and following NPWT and foam or gauze dressing removal. Eight pigs with two wounds each were treated with open-pore structure polyurethane foam or AMD gauze and NPWT of 0 (control) or -80 mm Hg for 72 hours. Following removal of the wound filler, the expression of CGRP and substance P was measured, using arbitrary units, in sections of biopsies from the wound bed using immunofluorescence techniques. Substance P and CGRP were more abundant in the wound edge following the removal of foam than of gauze dressings and least abundant in control wounds. The immunofluorescence staining of the wound edge for CGRP was 52 ± 3 au after the removal of gauze and 97 ± 5 au after the removal of foam (P <0.001). For substance P, the staining was 55 ± 3 au after gauze removal and 95 ± 4 au after foam removal (P <0.001). CGRP and substance P staining was primarily located to nerves and leukocytes. The increase in CGRP and substance P immunofluorescence was especially prominent in the dermis but also was seen in subcutaneous and muscle tissue. Using gauze may be one way of reducing NPWT dressing change-related pain. New wound fillers designed to optimize granulation tissue formation and minimize pain issues presumably will be developed in the near future.

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide released within the amygdala is involved in Pavlovian auditory fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kocorowski, L H; Helmstetter, F J

    2001-03-01

    The effects of CGRP and the CGRP receptor antagonist hCGRP(8-37) injected into the amygdala on both the acquisition and expression of fear behavior to a discrete auditory conditional stimulus (CS) and the training context were assessed. In Experiment 1, pretraining injections of CGRP but not hCGRP(8-37) produced fear-like behavior before any aversive stimuli were presented. While both compounds attenuated freezing to the contextual CS on the test day, neither affected learning about the auditory CS. In Experiment 2, pretesting injections of hCGRP(8-37) (0.63 mM) selectively attenuated freezing to the auditory CS but left freezing to the contextual CS intact. These data suggest that CGRP in the amygdala may selectively contribute to the expression of learning about auditory stimuli during fear conditioning.

  10. Capsaicin, arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction associated with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Di Bella, Gianluca; Cerrito, Marco; Coglitore, Sebastiano

    2009-05-01

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs significantly increase mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. It has also been reported that sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significant risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We present a case of arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction in a 59-year-old Italian man with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers which occurred the day before.

  11. Indole-3-carbinol protects against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity: role of calcitonin gene-related peptide and insulin-like growth factor-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Naga, Reem N.; Mahran, Yasmen F.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity associated with the clinical use of the anticancer drug cisplatin is a limiting problem. Thus, searching for new protective measures is required. Indole-3-carbinol is a powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. The present study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of indole-3-carbinol against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats were pre-treated with 20 mg/kg indole-3-carbinol orally before giving cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity was demonstrated where relative kidney weight, BUN and serum creatinine were significantly increased. Increased oxidative stress was evident in cisplatin group where GSH and SOD tissue levels were significantly depleted. Also, lipid peroxidation and NOX-1 were increased as compared to the control. Additionally, renal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced cell death was shown by increased caspase-3 and decreased expression of EGF, IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor. Nephrotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic effects induced by cisplatin were significantly ameliorated by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment. Besides, the role of CGRP in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was explored. Furthermore, cisplatin cytotoxic activity was significantly enhanced by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment in vitro. In conclusion, indole-3-carbinol provides protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Also, reduced expression of CGRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27417335

  12. Na+-K+ pump stimulation improves contractility in damaged muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Torben

    2005-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a high content of Na+-K+-ATPase, an enzyme that is identical to the Na+-K+ pump, a transport system mediating active extrusion of Na+ from the cells and accumulation of K+ in the cells. The major function of the Na+-K+ pumps is to maintain the concentration gradients for Na+ and K+ across the plasma membrane. This generates the resting membrane potential, allowing the propagation of action potentials, excitation-contraction coupling and force development. Muscles exposed to (1) high extracellular K+ or (2) low extracellular Na+ show a considerable loss of force. A similar force decline is elicited by (3) increasing Na+ permeability or (4) decreasing K+ permeability. Under all of these four conditions, stimulation of the Na+-K+ pumps can restore contractility. Following exposure to electroporation or fatiguing stimulation, muscle cell membranes develop leaks to Na+ and K+ and a partially reversible loss of force. The restoration of force is abolished by blocking the Na+-K+ pumps and markedly improved by stimulating the Na+-K+ pumps with beta 2-agonists, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or dbcAMP. These observations indicate that the Na+-K+ pumps are important for the functional compensation of the commonly occurring loss of muscle cell integrity. Stimulation of the Na+-K+ pumps with beta 2-agonists or other agents may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of muscle cell damage induced by electrical shocks, prolonged exercise, burns, or bruises.

  13. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) Improves the Diabetic Cytopathy (DCP) via Up-Regulation of CGRP and cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n = 15), DM group (n = 15) and control group (n = 15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG. PMID:23468996

  14. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) via up-regulation of CGRP and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liucheng; Song, Tao; Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n=15), DM group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG.

  15. ECL-cell histamine mobilization in conscious rats: effects of locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Bernsand, M; Konagaya, T; Håkanson, R

    2001-12-01

    1. The ECL cells control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to circulating gastrin. In addition, the ECL cells are thought to operate under nervous control and to be influenced by local inflammatory processes. 2. The purpose of the present study was to monitor histamine mobilization from ECL cells in conscious rats in response to locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators. 3. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. Three days later, the agents to be tested were administered via the microdialysis probe and their effects on basal (48 h fast) and stimulated (intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, 3 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)) mobilization of ECL-cell histamine was monitored by continuous measurement of histamine in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). 4. Locally administered gastrin-17 and sulfated cholecystokinin-8 mobilized histamine as did pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27, vasoactive intestinal peptide, peptide YY, met-enkephalin, endothelin and noradrenaline, adrenaline and isoprenaline. 5. While gastrin, sulfated-cholecystokinin-8, met-enkephalin and isoprenaline induced a sustained elevation of the submucosal histamine concentration, endothelin, peptide YY, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, noradrenaline and adrenaline induced a transient elevation. 6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, somatostatin and the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-stimulated histamine mobilization. 7. The gut hormones neurotensin and secretin and the neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide, neuropeptide Y and substance P failed to affect ECL-cell histamine mobilization, while motilin and neuromedin U-25 had weak stimulatory effects. Also acetylcholine, carbachol, serotonin and the amino acid neurotransmitters aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and glycine were inactive or weakly

  16. The Differential Expression of Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide, alpha CGRP mRNA, Choline Acetyltransferase, and Low Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor in Cranial Motoneurons After Hypoglossal Nerve Injury During Postnatal Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-21

    postnatal weeks, produced rapid apoptosis of Schwann cells but the same injury resulted in negligible Schwann ce1110ss in 25 dpn rats (Trachtenberg & Thompson...in rapid apoptosis of’Schwann cells (Trachtenberg and Thompson, 1996). Whether comparable Schwann cell death also occurs 71 after nerve crush in rats...age in rats is not known. It may be relevant that axonal injury during the first two postnatal weeks resulted in rapid apoptosis ofSchwann cells but

  17. Calcitonin Peptide Family Members Are Differentially Regulated by LPS and Inhibit Functions of Rat Alveolar NR8383 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soultanova, Aichurek; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Pfeil, Uwe; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the calcitonin peptide family—calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (AM), and adrenomedullin2/intermedin (IMD)–exert modulatory effects upon monocytes and macrophages of various extrapulmonary origins. Utilizing the rat alveolar macrophage (AMφ) cell line NR8383, we here set out to determine to which extent these three peptides and their receptors are differentially regulated in AMφ and what specific effects they have on AMφ key functions. LPS treatment differentially up-regulated expression of the peptides and receptors. Among the three peptides, IMD mRNA content was lowest both in primary rat AMφ and NR8383 cells, whereas IMD peptide dominated in basal and LPS-stimulated secretion from NR8383 cells. Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis and TNF-α production were inhibited by AM, IMD, and CGRP, whereas pro-IL-1β mRNA was slightly down-regulated exclusively by CGRP. Neither of these peptides affected IL-6 or IL-10 production. None increased intracellular calcium concentration, but AM significantly inhibited store-operated calcium entry. In conclusion, the rat AMφ cell line NR8383 is both a source and a target of the calcitonin peptide family members AM, IMD, and CGRP. Despite sharing proteins of the receptor complexes, AM, IMD, and CGRP each showed a characteristic pattern of effects and regulation, suggesting that these closely related peptides are not just redundant members of one common signaling pathway but act in concert by addressing parallel signaling cascades. Since peptide and receptor expression are up-regulated by LPS, these signaling pathways might act as inhibitory feedback mechanisms in pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27737007

  18. [The central mechanisms of the stimulating influence of intervalic hypoxic conditioning on the endocrine function of the pancreas in rats].

    PubMed

    Abramov, A V

    1997-01-01

    In the investigation of Wistar rats the morpho-functional state of the neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of n. vagus (DVC), locus coeruleus (LC) and peptidergic neurons of medical parvocellular subnuclei of paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVHmp) in the conditions of intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) (6 hours a day on the altitude 6000 m for 21 day) was studied. Immunocytochemical method was used to determine the functional state of peptidergic neurons of PVMmp and of the median eminence of hypothalamus, which are synthesizing neurotensin, cholecystokinin, bombesin, leu- and met-enkephalins, calcitonin-gene-related peptide and vasointestinal peptide. It was established that IHT leads to the activation of peptidergic neurons of PVHmp, neurons of DVC and to the lesser restrain of LC. It is demonstrated that these structures may take part in realisation of IHT's stimulating effect on the state of pancreatic beta-cells. In consists of insulin-stimulating and insulocyteprotective effects, that can be realised by the hypothalamic and neuroconducting ways of regulation of endocrine pancreas, with direct participation of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

  19. The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on tissue repair: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Santana, Eduardo Ferreira; Tacani, Pascale Mutti; Liebano, Richard Eloin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) consists of a generic application of low-frequency, pulsed electrical currents transmitted by electrodes through the skin surface. It is a therapeutic modality that is nonpharmacological, noninvasive, inexpensive, easy to use and widely applied in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To narratively review the scientific evidence of the effects of TENS on tissue repair with respect to wound healing, skin flap viability and tendinous repair. METHODS: The study was conducted using the MEDLINE, Lilacs and Scielo databases, without limit to the period of publication, and was completed in November 2011. Inclusion criteria were randomized or nonrandomized, controlled or noncontrolled clinical trials, and experimental trials involving rats subjected to TENS for tissue repair. RESULTS: Thirty articles on tissue repair were found and, among these, 14 reported on wound healing, 14 reported on skin flaps and two analyzed tedinous repair. DISCUSSION: It was suggested that TENS stimulates skin wound healing and tendon repair, as well as the viability of random skin flaps. Such effects may be due to the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, which would increase blood flow and, consequently, hasten the events leading to tissue repair. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the scientific evidence regarding the effects of TENS on tissue repair, the findings of the present literature review were inconclusive because data from the randomized controlled clinical trials were insufficient to confirm such effects. PMID:24294017

  20. C-type natriuretic peptide stimulates ovarian follicle development.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yorino; Cheng, Yuan; Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Takae, Seido; Hsueh, Aaron J W

    2012-07-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) encoded by the NPPC (Natriuretic Peptide Precursor C) gene expressed in ovarian granulosa cells inhibits oocyte maturation by activating the natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)B (NPRB) in cumulus cells. RT-PCR analyses indicated increased NPPC and NPRB expression during ovarian development and follicle growth, associated with increases in ovarian CNP peptides in mice. In cultured somatic cells from infantile ovaries and granulosa cells from prepubertal animals, treatment with CNP stimulated cGMP production. Also, treatment of cultured preantral follicles with CNP stimulated follicle growth whereas treatment of cultured ovarian explants from infantile mice with CNP, similar to FSH, increased ovarian weight gain that was associated with the development of primary and early secondary follicles to the late secondary stage. Of interest, treatment with FSH increased levels of NPPC, but not NPRB, transcripts in ovarian explants. In vivo studies further indicated that daily injections of infantile mice with CNP for 4 d promoted ovarian growth, allowing successful ovulation induction by gonadotropins. In prepubertal mice, CNP treatment alone also promoted early antral follicle growth to the preovulatory stage, leading to efficient ovulation induction by LH/human chorionic gonadotropin. Mature oocytes retrieved after CNP treatment could be fertilized in vitro and developed into blastocysts, allowing the delivery of viable offspring. Thus, CNP secreted by growing follicles is capable of stimulating preantral and antral follicle growth. In place of FSH, CNP treatment could provide an alternative therapy for female infertility.

  1. Gastrin-releasing peptide stimulates glycoconjugate release from feline trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, J.D.; Baraniuk, J.N.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Kaliner, M.A.; Shelhamer, J.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) on respiratory glycoconjugate (RGC) secretion was investigated in a feline tracheal organ culture model. RGC secretion was stimulated by GRP in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-5) M (range 15-38% increase above control) with a peak effect within 0.5-1 h of incubation. GRP-(14-27), the receptor binding portion of GRP, and the related molecule, bombesin, also stimulated RGC secretion by approximately 20% above control. Acetyl-GRP-(20-27) stimulated RGC release by 10%, whereas GRP-(1-16) was inactive. Autoradiographic studies with 125I-GRP revealed that specific binding was restricted to the submucosal glands and the surface epithelium. A specific radioimmunoassay showed the content of GRP in feline trachea after extraction with ethanol-acetic acid to be 156 +/- 91 fmol/g wet wt. Indirect immunohistochemistry indicated that ganglion cells located just outside the cartilage contained GRP-immunoreactive materials. GRP is a novel mucus secretagogue that may participate in regulating airway mucosal gland secretion.

  2. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  3. GLP-1 Receptor Stimulation of the Lateral Parabrachial Nucleus Reduces Food Intake: Neuroanatomical, Electrophysiological, and Behavioral Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jennifer E.; Farkas, Imre; Anesten, Fredrik; Anderberg, Rozita H.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Jansson, John-Olov; Liposits, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is a key nucleus for the regulation of feeding behavior. Inhibitory inputs from the hypothalamus to the PBN play a crucial role in the normal maintenance of feeding behavior, because their loss leads to starvation. Viscerosensory stimuli result in neuronal activation of the PBN. However, the origin and neurochemical identity of the excitatory neuronal input to the PBN remain largely unexplored. Here, we hypothesize that hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons provide excitatory inputs to the PBN, activation of which may lead to a reduction in feeding behavior. Our data, obtained from mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in GLP-1-producing neurons, revealed that hindbrain GLP-1-producing neurons project to the lateral PBN (lPBN). Stimulation of lPBN GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduced the intake of chow and palatable food and decreased body weight in rats. It also activated lPBN neurons, reflected by an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in this region. Further support for an excitatory role of GLP-1 in the PBN is provided by electrophysiological studies showing a remarkable increase in firing of lPBN neurons after Exendin-4 application. We show that within the PBN, GLP-1R activation increased gene expression of 2 energy balance regulating peptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and IL-6. Moreover, nearly 70% of the lPBN GLP-1 fibers innervated lPBN CGRP neurons. Direct intra-lPBN CGRP application resulted in anorexia. Collectively, our molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral data provide evidence for a functional role of the GLP-1R for feeding control in the PBN. PMID:25116706

  4. Helical synthetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Natarajan, Pradeep

    2010-04-06

    The present invention provides peptides comprising at least one amphipathic alpha helix and having an cholesterol mediating activity and a ABCA stabilization activity. The invention further provides methods of using such peptides.

  5. Peptide portions may hold key to amplifying bone against porosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, P.

    1990-02-02

    Pieces of peptides that are encoded in the calcitonin gene may explain enigmas in treatment of bone disease. Amplification of bone formation by two peptides with similar amino acid sequences was reported at the Third International Conference on the Fundamentals of Bone Growth at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), schools of medicine and dentistry. One treatment enigma is that calcitonin regulates normal bone resorption but does not work as well when administered for the treatment of osteoporosis. While hormone therapy does work, it has wide-ranging effects like the potential for an increased risk of breast cancer. Bone-growth promotion by a better-known peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), was described. The CGRP is usually processed in the nervous system and has a wide range of activity.

  6. CGRP, a vasodilator neuropeptide that stimulates neuromuscular transmission and EC coupling.

    PubMed

    Vega, Ana Victoria; Avila, Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) is a vasodilator; its plasma levels are altered in several human diseases, including migraine, hypertension and diabetes. CGRP is locally released by motor neurons, and is overexpressed in response to surgical or pharmacological blockage of neuromuscular transmission. Additionally to a brief discussion with regard to the clinical relevance of CGRP, this review focuses on the effects of CGRP on skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, as well as the corresponding pathophysiological consequences. EC coupling involves activation of 2 different types of calcium channels: dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) located at the sarcolemma, and ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) located at the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In response to electrical depolarization, DHPRs activate nearby and physically bound RyR1s, allowing Ca(2+) from the SR to move into the cytosol (termed voltage-gated Ca(2+) release, or VGCR). We recently found that CGRP stimulates VGCR by 350 % in as short as 1h. This effect, which lasts for at least 48 h, is due to activation of the CGRP receptor, and requires activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. CGRP also increases the amplitude of caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release (400 %); suggesting increased SR Ca(2+) content underlies stimulation of VGCR. Interestingly, in the long-term CGRP also increases the density of sarcolemmal DHPRs (up to 30%, within 24-48 h). We propose that these CGRP effects may contribute to prevent and/or restore symptoms in central core disease (CCD); a congenital myopathy that is linked to mutations in the gene encoding RyR1.

  7. Natriuretic peptides stimulate oocyte meiotic resumption in bovine.

    PubMed

    De Cesaro, Matheus P; Macedo, Mariana P; Santos, Joabel T; Rosa, Paulo R A; Ludke, Charles A; Rissi, Vitor B; Gasperin, Bernardo G; Gonçalves, Paulo B D

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of mRNA encoding natriuretic peptides (NPs) and their receptors in the cumulus-oocyte complex in cattle, a monovular mammalian species, and also to investigate the role of NPs in oocyte meiotic resumption in vitro. mRNA was observed for the NP precursor type-A (NPPA), type-C (NPPC), NP receptor-1 (NPR-1), receptor-2 (NPR-2) and receptor-3 (NPR-3) in bovine cumulus cells, and NPR-2 mRNA was observed in oocytes. These results are different from those obtained in mouse and pig models. The effects of NPPA, NP precursor type-B (NPPB) and NPPC on the resumption of arrested meiosis maintained by forskolin were studied at three different doses (10, 100 and 1000nM) with a 12h culture system. The germinal vesicle breakdown rates were greater (P≤0.05) in oocytes that were cultured in the presence of one or a combination of NPs (from 44% to 73%) than the negative control (from 24% to 27%). Additionally, it was demonstrated that the concentration of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) is increased by NPPA and NPPC in oocytes and cumulus cells after 3h of in vitro maturation. However, in both groups, the concentration of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in the oocyte did not increase between 3 and 6h of culture, even when forskolin was used. In summary, we observed the presence of mRNA for NPs and their receptors in the bovine cumulus-oocyte complex and demonstrated that, in vitro, NPPA, NPPB and NPPC stimulate oocyte meiotic resumption in a monovular species.

  8. Sensory nerves contribute to cutaneous vasodilator response to cathodal stimulation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Gohin, Stéphanie; Decorps, Johanna; Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique; Fromy, Bérengère

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous current-induced vasodilation (CIV) in response to galvanic current application is an integrative model of neurovascular interaction that relies on capsaicin-sensitive fiber activation. The upstream and downstream mechanisms related to the activation of the capsaicin-sensitive fibers involved in CIV are not elucidated. In particular, the activation of cutaneous transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels and/or acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) (activators mechanisms) and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) (effector mechanisms) have been tested. To assess cathodal CIV, we measured cutaneous blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry for 20min following cathodal current application (240s, 100μA) on the skin of the thigh in anesthetized healthy rats for 20min. CIV was studied in rats treated with capsazepine and amiloride to inhibit TRPV1 and ASIC channels, respectively; CGRP8-37 and SR140333 to antagonize CGRP and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors, respectively; compared to their respective controls. Cathodal CIV was attenuated by capsazepine (12±2% vs 54±6%, P<0.001), amiloride (19±8% vs 61±6%, P<0.01), CGRP8-37 (15±6% vs 61±6%, P<0.001) and SR140333 (9±5% vs 54±6%, P<0.001) without changing local acidification. This is the first integrative study performed in healthy rats showing that cutaneous vasodilation in response to cathodal stimulation is initiated by activation of cutaneous TRPV1 and ASIC channels likely through local acidification. The involvement of CGRP and NK1 receptors suggests that cathodal CIV is the result of CGRP and SP released through activated capsaicin-sensitive fibers. Therefore cathodal CIV could be a valuable method to assess sensory neurovascular function in the skin, which would be particularly relevant to evaluate the presence of small nerve fiber disorders and the effectiveness of treatments.

  9. Cupric-amyloid beta peptide complex stimulates oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Vitek, Michael P; Mason, Ronald P

    2004-02-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an important role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, a number of papers have shown a synergistic neurotoxicity of amyloid beta peptide and cupric ions. We hypothesized that complexes of cupric ions with neurotoxic amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) can stimulate copper-mediated free radical formation. We found that neurotoxic Abeta (1-42), Abeta (1-40), and Abeta (25-35) stimulated copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate, whereas nontoxic Abeta (40-1) did not. Formation of ascorbate free radical was significantly increased by Abeta (1-42) in the presence of ceruloplasmin. Once cupric ion is reduced to cuprous ion, it can be oxidized by oxygen to generate superoxide radical or it can react with hydrogen peroxide to form hydroxyl radical. Hydrogen peroxide greatly increased the oxidation of cyclic hydroxylamines and ascorbate by cupric-amyloid beta peptide complexes, implying redox cycling of copper ions. Using the spin-trapping technique, we have shown that toxic amyloid beta peptides led to a 4-fold increase in copper-mediated hydroxyl radical formation. We conclude that toxic Abeta peptides do indeed stimulate copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, cupric-amyloid beta peptide-stimulated free radical generation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113- 130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  12. Amphipathic polyproline peptides stimulate cholesterol efflux by the ABCA1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Sviridov, D O; Drake, S K; Freeman, L A; Remaley, A T

    2016-03-18

    ApoA-I mimetics are short synthetic peptides that contain an amphipathic α-helix and stimulate cholesterol efflux by the ABCA1 transporter in a detergent-like extraction mechanism. We investigated the use of amphipathic peptides with a polypro helix for stimulating cholesterol efflux by ABCA1. Polypro peptides were synthesized with modified prolines, containing either a hydrophobic phenyl group (Prop) or a polar N-acetylgalactosamine (Prog) attached to the pyrrolidine ring and were designated as either PP-2, 3, 4, or 5, depending on the number of 3 amino acid repeat units (Prop-Prog-Prop). Based on molecular modeling, these peptides were predicted to be relatively rigid and to bind to a phospholipid bilayer. By CD spectroscopy, PP peptides formed a Type-II polypro helix in an aqueous solution. PP-2 was inactive in promoting cholesterol efflux, but peptides with more than 2 repeat units were active. PP-4 showed a similar Vmax as a much longer amphipathic α-helical peptide, containing 37 amino acids, but had a Km that was approximately 20-fold lower. PP peptides were specific in that they did not stimulate cholesterol efflux from cells not expressing ABCA1 and were also non-cytotoxic. Addition of PP-3, 4 and 5 to serum promoted the formation of smaller size HDL species (7 nM) and increased its capacity for ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux by approximately 20-35% (p < 0.05). Because of their relatively small size and increased potency, amphipathic peptides with a polypro helix may represent an alternative structural motif for the development of apoA-I mimetic peptides.

  13. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells.

  14. Peptides having reduced toxicity that stimulate cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan; Danho, Waleed

    2016-08-16

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABCA1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. Further, the peptides of the invention have little or no toxicity when administered at therapeutic and higher doses. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  15. Melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides inhibit TNF-alpha signaling in human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Hill, R P; MacNeil, S; Haycock, J W

    2006-02-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) has been identified as a potent anti-inflammatory in various tissues including the skin. It has previously been shown in skin cell keratinocytes and melanocytes/melanoma cells that MSH peptides inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) upregulation. However, the precise anti-inflammatory role of MSH peptides in dermal fibroblasts is unclear. Some studies report on pro-inflammatory responses, while others on anti-inflammatory responses. The present study confirms MC1R expression in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and reports that the MSH peptides alpha-MSH and KP(-D-)V inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity and ICAM-1 upregulation, consistent with an anti-inflammatory role. However, involvement of IkappaB-alpha regulation by either peptide was not confirmed, supporting a mechanism independent of the NF-kappaB inhibitor. In conclusion, alpha-MSH and KP(-D-)V peptides have an anti-inflammatory action on dermal fibroblast signaling by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF-alpha in vitro.

  16. Biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius favored by a competence-stimulating signaling peptide.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Fernanda C; Pecharki, Daniele; Scheie, Anne A

    2004-09-01

    Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate population behavior. In several streptococci, quorum sensing mediated by competence-stimulating peptides (CSP) is associated with development of competence for transformation. We show here that a synthetic CSP favored the biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius without affecting the rate of culture growth.

  17. The immune-stimulating peptide WKYMVm has therapeutic effects against ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Doo; Kwon, Soonil; Lee, Sung Kyun; Kook, Minsoo; Lee, Ha Young; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Park, Chan Bae; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the therapeutic effects of an immune-stimulating peptide, WKYMVm, in ulcerative colitis. The administration of WKYMVm to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated mice reversed decreases in body weight, bleeding score and stool score in addition to reversing DSS-induced mucosa destruction and shortened colon. The WKYMVm-induced therapeutic effect against ulcerative colitis was strongly inhibited by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 2 antagonist, WRWWWW, indicating the crucial role of FPR2 in this effect. Mechanistically, WKYMVm effectively decreases intestinal permeability by stimulating colon epithelial cell proliferation. WKYMVm also strongly decreases interleukin-23 and transforming growth factor-β production in the colon of DSS-treated mice. We suggest that the potent immune-modulating peptide WKYMVm and its receptor FPR2 may be useful in the development of efficient therapeutic agents against chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:24030327

  18. GPR54 peptide agonists stimulate insulin secretion from murine, porcine and human islets.

    PubMed

    Bowe, James E; Foot, Victoria L; Amiel, Stephanie A; Huang, Gao Cai; Lamb, Morgan W; Lakey, Jonathan; Jones, Peter M; Persaud, Shanta J

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of 10 and 13 amino acid forms of kisspeptin on dynamic insulin secretion from mammalian islets since it is not clear from published data whether the shorter peptide is stimulatory while the longer peptide inhibits insulin release. Insulin secretion was measured by radioimmunoassay following perifusion of human, pig, rat and mouse isolated islets with kisspeptin-10 or kisspeptin-13 in the presence of 20 mM glucose. Both peptides stimulated rapid, reversible potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from islets of all species tested. These data indicate that both kisspeptin-10 and kisspeptin-13, which is an extension of kisspeptin-10 by three amino acids, act directly at islet β-cells of various species to potentiate insulin secretion, and suggest that inhibitory effects reported in earlier studies may reflect differences in experimental protocols.

  19. Stimulation of rat cranial dura mater with potassium chloride causes CGRP release into the cerebrospinal fluid and increases medullary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Dux, Mária; Will, Christine; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Fischer, Michael J M; Messlinger, Karl

    2017-02-10

    Primary headaches may be accompanied by increased intracranial blood flow induced by the release of the potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from activated meningeal afferents. We aimed to record meningeal and medullary blood flow simultaneously and to localize the sites of CGRP release in rodent preparations in vivo and ex vivo. Blood flow in the exposed rat parietal dura mater and the medulla oblongata was recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry, while the dura was stimulated by topical application of 60mM potassium chloride (KCl). Samples of jugular venous plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the cisterna magna were analysed for CGRP concentrations using an enzyme immunoassay. In a hemisected rat skull preparation lined with dura mater the CGRP releasing effect of KCl superfusion was examined. Superfusion of the dura mater with KCl decreased meningeal blood flow unless alpha-adrenoceptors were blocked by phentolamine, whereas the medullary blood flow was increased. The same treatment caused increased CGRP concentrations in jugular plasma and CSF and induced significant CGRP release in the hemisected rat skull preparation. Anaesthesia of the trigeminal ganglion by injection of lidocaine reduced increases in medullary blood flow and CGRP concentration in the CSF upon meningeal KCl application. CGRP release evoked by depolarisation of meningeal afferents is accompanied by increased blood flow in the medulla oblongata but not the dura mater. This discrepancy can be explained by the smooth muscle depolarising effect of KCl and the activation of sympathetic vasoconstrictor mechanisms. The medullary blood flow response is most likely mediated by CGRP released from activated central terminals of trigeminal afferents. Increased blood supply of the medulla oblongata and CGRP release into the CSF may also occur in headaches accompanying vigorous activation of meningeal afferents.

  20. alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone and oxytocin: a peptide signalling cascade in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, N

    2006-09-01

    alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and oxytocin share remarkable similarities of effects on behaviour in rats; in particular, they both inhibit feeding behaviour and stimulate sexual behaviour. Recently, we showed that alpha-MSH interacts with the magnocellular oxytocin system in the supraoptic nucleus; alpha-MSH induces the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of magnocellular neurones but it inhibits the secretion of oxytocin from their nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary. This effect of alpha-MSH on supraoptic nucleus oxytocin neurones is remarkable for two reasons. First, it illustrates the capacity of magnocellular neurones to differentially regulate peptide release from dendrites and axons and, second, it emphasises the putative role of magnocellular neurones as a major source of central oxytocin release, and as a likely substrate of some oxytocin-mediated behaviours. The ability of peptides to differentially control secretion from different compartments of their targets indicates one way by which peptide signals might have a particularly significant effect on neuronal circuitry. This suggests a possible explanation for the striking way in which some peptides can influence specific, complex behaviours.

  1. Enterococcus faecium stimulates human neutrophils via the formyl-peptide receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Bloes, Dominik Alexander; Otto, Michael; Peschel, Andreas; Kretschmer, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    The human formyl-peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX) senses phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptide toxins produced by pathogenic staphylococcal species and plays a crucial role in directing neutrophil influx during staphylococcal infection. However, it has remained unclear if FPR2 responds also to molecules from other bacterial pathogens. Here we analyzed a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens and found that apart from staphylococci only certain enterococcal strains have the capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX. Most of the analyzed Enterococcus faecium but only sporadic Enterococcus faecalis strains released FPR2/ALX-stimulating molecules leading to neutrophil calcium ion fluxes, chemotaxis, and complement receptor upregulation. Among ten test strains vancomycin-resistant E. faecium had a significantly higher capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX than vancomycin-susceptible strains, suggesting an association of strong FPR2/ALX activation with health-care associated strains. The enterococcal FPR2/ALX agonists were found to be peptides or proteins, which appear, however, to be unrelated to staphylococcal PSMs in sequence and physicochemical properties. Enterococci are among the most frequent invasive bacterial pathogens but the basis of enterococcal virulence and immune activation has remained incompletely understood. Our study indicates that previously unrecognized proteinaceous agonists contribute to Enterococcus-host interaction and underscores the importance of FPR2/ALX in host defense against major endogenous bacterial pathogens.

  2. Targeted Melanoma Imaging and Therapy with Radiolabeled Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Thomas; Zhang, Xiuli; Miao, Yubin

    2010-01-01

    Radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) analogues have been used to define the expression, affinity and function of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R). The MC1-R is one of a family of five G-protein linker receptors, which is primarily involved in regulation of skin pigmentation. Over-expression of the MC1-R on melanoma tumor cells has made it an attractive target for the development of α-MSH peptide based imaging and therapeutic agents. Initially, the native α-MSH peptide was radiolabeled directly, but it suffered from low specific activity and poor stability. The addition of non-natural amino acids yielded α-MSH analogues with greater MC-1R affinity and stability. Furthermore, peptide cyclization via disulfide and lactam bond formation as well as site-specific metal coordination resulted in additional gains in receptor affinity and peptide stability in vitro and in vivo. Radiochemical stability of the α-MSH analogues was improved through the conjugation of metal chelators to the peptide’s N-terminus or lysine residues for radionuclide coordination. In vitro cell binding studies demonstrated that the radiolabeled α-MSH analogues had low to subnanomolar affinities for the MC1-R. Biodistribution and imaging studies in the B16 mouse melanoma modeled showed rapid tumor uptake of the radiolabeled peptides, with the cyclic peptides demonstrating prolonged tumor retention. Cyclic α-MSH analogues labeled with beta and alpha emitting radionuclides demonstrated melanoma therapeutic efficacy in the B16 melanoma mouse model. Strong pre-clinical imaging and therapy data highlight the clinical potential use of radiolabeled α-MSH peptides for melanoma imaging and treatment of disseminated disease. PMID:20467398

  3. C-peptide exhibits a late induction effect on matrix metallopeptidase-9 in high glucose-stimulated rat mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junxia; Li, Yanning; Xu, Mingzhi; Li, Dandan; Wang, Yu; Qi, Jinsheng; He, Kunyu

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 is considered to be a contributor of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). C-peptide can reverse fibrosis, thus exerting a beneficial effect on DN. Whether C-peptide induces MMP-9 and MMP-2 to reverse ECM accumulation is not clear. In the present study, in order to determine ECM metabolism, rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (HG) and C-peptide intervention, then the early and late effects of C-peptide on HG-affected MMP-9 and MMP-2 were evaluated. Firstly, it was confirmed that HG mainly suppressed MMP-9 expression levels. Furthermore, C-peptide treatment induced MMP-9 expression at 6 h and suppressed it at 24 h, revealing the early dual effects of C-peptide on MMP-9 expression. Subsequently, significant increase in MMP-9 expression at 72, 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment was observed. These changes in MMP-9 protein content confirmed its expression changes following late C-peptide treatment. Furthermore, at 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment reversed the HG-inhibited MMP-9 secretion, further indicating the late induction effect of C-peptide on MMP-9. The present results demonstrated that C-peptide exerted a late induction effect on MMP-9 in HG-stimulated rat mesangial cells, which may be associated with the underlying mechanism of C-peptide's reversal effects on DN. PMID:28101192

  4. Novel alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues with high candidacidal activity.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Paolo; Rossi, Claudia; Colombo, Gualtiero; Gatti, Stefano; Novellino, Ettore; Lipton, James M; Catania, Anna

    2003-02-27

    alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is an endogenous linear tridecapeptide with potent antiinflammatory effects. We recently demonstrated that alpha-MSH and its C-terminal sequence Lys-Pro-Val (alpha-MSH (11-13)) have antimicrobial effects against two major and representative pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. In an attempt to improve the candidacidal activity of alpha-MSH and to better understand the peptide structure-antifungal activity relations, we designed and synthesized novel peptide analogues. Because previous data suggested that antimicrobial effects of alpha-MSH were receptor-mediated, we chose to focus on the sequence alpha-MSH (6-13), which contains the invariant core sequence His-Phe-Arg-Trp (6-9) that is important for binding to the known melanocortin receptors and also contains the sequence Lys-Pro-Val (11-13) that is known to be important for antimicrobial activity. In this structure-activity study, we discovered several compounds that have greater candidacidal activity than alpha-MSH. The peptide [d-Nal-7,Phe-12]-alpha-MSH (6-13) was the most potent of the analogues tested. The present results are very encouraging because they show the great potential of these peptides as a truly novel class of candidacidal compounds.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides trigger a division block in Escherichia coli through stimulation of a signalling system

    PubMed Central

    Yadavalli, Srujana S.; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Leibman, Rachel S.; Chen, Annie I.; Stern, Andrew M.; Roggiani, Manuela; Lippa, Andrew M.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the molecular arsenal employed by hosts against bacteria. Many bacteria in turn possess pathways that provide protection against these compounds. In Escherichia coli and related bacteria, the PhoQ/PhoP signalling system is a key regulator of this antimicrobial peptide defence. Here we show that treating E. coli with sublethal concentrations of antimicrobial peptides causes cells to filament, and that this division block is controlled by the PhoQ/PhoP system. The filamentation results from increased expression of QueE, an enzyme that is part of a tRNA modification pathway but that, as we show here, also affects cell division. We also find that a functional YFP–QueE fusion localizes to the division septum in filamentous cells, suggesting QueE blocks septation through interaction with the divisome. Regulation of septation by PhoQ/PhoP may protect cells from antimicrobial peptide-induced stress or other conditions associated with high-level stimulation of this signalling system. PMID:27471053

  6. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  7. CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV-infected patients express multiple negative immune checkpoints following stimulation with HCV peptides.

    PubMed

    Barathan, Muttiah; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Chang, Li Yen; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Sigamani, Panneer; Saeidi, Alireza; Ram, M Ravishankar; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie; Shankar, Esaki M

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are key to successful viral clearance in HCV disease. Accumulation of exhausted HCV-specific T cells during chronic infection results in considerable loss of protective functional immune responses. The role of T-cell exhaustion in chronic HCV disease remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the frequency of HCV peptide-stimulated T cells expressing negative immune checkpoints (PD-1, CTLA-4, TRAIL, TIM-3 and BTLA) by flow cytometry, and measured the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines secreted by T cells by a commercial Multi-Analyte ELISArray™ following in vitro stimulation of T cells using HCV peptides and phytohemagglutinin (PHA). HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV (CHC) patients showed significant increase of CTLA-4. Furthermore, HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ T cells of CHC patients also displayed relatively higher levels of PD-1 and TRAIL, whereas TIM-3 was up-regulated on HCV peptide-stimulated CD8+ T cells. Whereas the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 were significantly increased, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 were markedly decreased in the T cell cultures of CHC patients. Chronic HCV infection results in functional exhaustion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells likely contributing to viral persistence.

  8. Vasodilatation in hyperalgesic rat skin evoked by stimulation of afferent A beta-fibers: further evidence for a role of dorsal root reflexes in allodynia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Nicas, E; Laird, J M; Cervero, F

    2001-12-01

    In areas of secondary hyperalgesia, innocuous mechanical stimuli evoke pain (allodynia). We have proposed that this is produced by a central pre-synaptic interaction whereby A beta-fibers evoke spike activity (dorsal root reflexes) in nociceptive afferents (Pain, 68 (1996) 13). This activity should conduct centrally, evoking allodynia, and peripherally, evoking neurogenic vasodilatation. Here we tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of electrical stimulation of A beta-fibers on cutaneous blood flow before and after producing secondary hyperalgesia in anesthetized rats. Cutaneous blood flow was recorded in the hind paw skin innervated by the sural nerve using a laser Doppler flowmeter. The sural nerve was prepared for electrical stimulation, and the evoked activity was recorded from the sciatic nerve in continuity. Electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 4 x 0.2 ms pulses, 20 s) was applied to the sural nerve at 2T (A beta-fibers only) and 4T and 6T (A beta + A delta-fibers). Flux was recorded at baseline and after capsaicin or mustard oil application outside the sural nerve territory. The effects of intravenous administration of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, alpha-CGRP(8-37), or of section of the sciatic nerve or of the L4-L6 dorsal roots were examined. Selective activation of the sural nerve A beta-fibers reliably evoked increases in cutaneous blood flow close to areas of chemical irritation or skin damage. A beta-fiber-evoked vasodilatation was abolished by sciatic nerve or dorsal root section and had a spatial arrangement and optimal stimulation pattern suggesting a central synaptic interaction similar to that responsible for dorsal root reflexes. The flux increases were dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited by alpha-CGRP(8-37), indicating that the A beta-fiber-evoked vasodilatation resulted from the antidromic activation of nociceptive cutaneous afferent fibers. These results support our hypothesis by showing activation of

  9. Flavonoids stimulate cholecystokinin peptide secretion from the enteroendocrine STC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Ravallec, Rozenn; Van Camp, John; Raes, Katleen; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Animal experiments showed that flavonoids might have the potential for an anti-obesity effect by reducing weight and food intake. However, the exact mechanisms that could be involved in these proposed effects are still under investigation. The complex process of food intake is partially regulated by gastrointestinal hormones. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is the best known gastrointestinal hormone to induce satiety signal that plays a key role in food intake regulation. It is released from the endocrine cells (I cell) in response to the ingestion of nutrients into the small intestine. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, apigenin, rutin and baicalein) on stimulation of CCK release in vitro using enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. In comparison with the control, quercetin, kaempferol and apigenin resulted in a significant increase in CCK secretion with quercetin showing the highest activity. On the other hand, no significant effect was seen by rutin and baicalein. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study the stimulation of CCK peptide hormone secretion from STC-1 cells by quercetin and kaempferol, rutin, apigenin and baicalein. Based on the cell-based results in this work, it can be suggested that the reported activity of flavonoids against food intake and weight could be mediated by stimulation of CCK signal which in turn is responsible for food intake reduction, but future animal and human studies are needed to confirm this conclusion at organism level.

  10. Apelin stimulates both cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1 secretions in vitro and in vivo in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wattez, Jean-Sébastien; Ravallec, Rozenn; Cudennec, Benoit; Knauf, Claude; Dhulster, Pascal; Valet, Philippe; Breton, Christophe; Vieau, Didier; Lesage, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Apelin is an enteric peptide that exerts several digestive functions such as stimulation of cell proliferation and cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion. We investigated using murine enteroendocrine cell line (STC-1) and rats if apelin-13 stimulates both CCK and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretions. We demonstrated that, in vitro and in vivo, apelin-13 increases the release of these two hormones in a dose-dependent manner. Present data suggest that apelin may modulate digestive functions, food intake behavior and glucose homoeostasis via apelin-induced release of enteric CCK but also through a new incretin-releasing activity on enteric GLP-1.

  11. Mating and sex peptide stimulate the accumulation of yolk in oocytes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Soller, M; Bownes, M; Kubli, E

    1997-02-01

    Mating elicits two reactions in many insect females: egg deposition is increased and receptivity to males is reduced. Central to the control of receptivity and oviposition in Drosophila melanogaster is the sex peptide (SP), a 36-amino-acid peptide sex pheromone synthesized in the male accessory glands and transferred to the female during copulation. To identify regulatory mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the oviposition response, we have compared the effects of mating and SP application with respect to oogenesis. The distribution of the various stages of oogenesis in the ovary, yolk protein (YP) synthesis by the fat body, as well as YP content, uptake and synthesis by the ovary were investigated. Transcripts of the yolk protein genes (yp) were quantified by Northern blotting. Based on our results, we conclude that mating and SP injection into virgin females stimulate yp gene transcription in the fat body only moderately above the background level. However, uptake into the ovary and transcription of the yp genes in the ovary is strongly enhanced after either mating or SP injection. These data are supported by the finding that the abundance of the vitellogenic stage 10 oocytes is also increased. In contrast, early vitellogenic stages 8 and 9 of oogenesis are present in the same numbers in virgin, mated, and SP-injected females, which suggests a control point at about stage 9 determining vitellogenic oocyte progression. The finding that SP can elicit equally all changes observed after copulation suggests that in the sexually mature female it is the major component controlling and stimulating oogenesis after mating.

  12. Adrenomedullin - new perspectives of a potent peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Ria; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2017-02-02

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a 52-amino acid multifunctional peptide, which belongs to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) superfamily of vasoactive peptide hormones. ADM exhibits a significant vasodilatory potential and plays a key role in various regulatory mechanisms, predominantly in the cardiovascular and lymphatic system. It exerts its effects by activation of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor associated with one of the receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 or 3. ADM was first isolated from human phaeochromocytoma in 1993. Numerous studies revealed a widespread distribution in various tissues and organs, which is reflected by its multiple physiological roles in health and disease. Because of its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and proliferative properties, ADM exhibits potent protective functions under diverse pathological conditions, but it is also critically involved in tumor progression. ADM has therefore raised great interest in therapeutic applications and several clinical trials already revealed promising results. However, because the receptor activation mode has not yet been fully elucidated, a rational design of potent and selective ligands is still challenging. Detailed information on the binding mode of ADM from a recently reported crystal structure as well as efforts to improve its plasma stability and bioavailability may help to overcome these limitations in the future. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mastoparan, a wasp venom peptide, stimulates release of prolactin from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Mau, S E; Witt, M R; Vilhardt, H

    1994-07-01

    Studies have shown that mastoparan and other amphiphilic peptides induce exocytosis of hormones from anterior pituitary cells. We have studied the effect of mastoparan on the secretion of prolactin from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells and on the concomitant functional status of signal-transducing pathways in lactotroph-enriched cell cultures. Mastoparan stimulation of prolactin secretion was dose-dependent, time-dependent, reversible and required the presence of calcium. Pretreatment of pituitary cell cultures with cholera and pertussis toxin had no effect on the secretory response, whereas encapsulation of guanosine 5-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP-beta-S) by reversible electropermeabilization inhibited mastoparan-stimulated secretion. Incubation of mastoparan with myo-[3H]inositol-labelled lactotroph-enriched anterior pituitary cell cultures resulted in increased formation of inositol phosphates compared with control cells, and encapsulation of GDP-beta-S blocked mastoparan-induced inositol lipid hydrolysis. Mastoparan caused translocation of protein kinase C activity from a soluble to a membrane-attached form. Mastoparan was able to increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in Fura-2-loaded individual lactotrophs. Omission of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium did not change the Ca2+ response in lactotrophs when stimulated with mastoparan. On the basis of these results it is concluded that mastoparan-induced release of prolactin is preceded by activation of the inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate/diacylglycerol pathway with resulting translocation of protein kinase activity and increment in intracellular Ca2+. However, other signal-transducing pathways may be involved in the secretory process.

  14. The effect of discrete stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors on atrial natriuretic peptide in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    al-Obaidi, M; Whitaker, E M; Karim, F

    1991-01-01

    1. In seven chloralose-anaesthetized and artificially ventilated beagles, the carotid sinus regions were vascularly isolated and perfused with either arterial or mixed (arterial and venous) blood (PO2 46.4 +/- 1.5 mmHg, mean +/- S.E.M.) to stimulate the chemoreceptors at constant flow and pressure. Cervical vagosympathetic trunks were ligated in all dogs, and gallamine triethiodide (2.0 mg kg-1 h-1, I.V.) was given in five dogs. Right atrial pressure was measured in all dogs, and left atrial pressure in four dogs. Mean aortic pressure was held constant (91.0 +/- 3.0 mmHg) by means of a reservoir connected to the animal via the common carotid and femoral arteries. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was measured by radioimmunoassay and urinary sodium by flame photometry. 2. In seven dogs with mean carotid sinus pressure maintained at 96.0 +/- 4.3 mmHg, stimulation of the carotid chemoreceptors for 25 min produced significant increases in left atrial pressure of 41.2 +/- 3.3% (n = 4; P less than 0.005) from 5.4 +/- 0.6 cmH2O and of 30.9 +/- 4.5% (n = 7; P less than 0.002) in ANP from 31.6 +/- 2.1 pg ml-1. However, chemoreceptor stimulation produced significant decreases in urine flow rate of 26.1 +/- 1.9% (n = 9; P less than 0.001) from 0.29 +/- 0.03 ml min-1 (100 g kidney weight)-1 and sodium excretion of 29.0 +/- 2.3% (P less than 0.001) from 8.5 +/- 1.7 mumol min-1 (100 g kidney weight)-1 but right atrial pressure and heart rate did not change significantly. In three of the dogs, beta-adrenoceptor blockade by atenolol (2 mg kg-1, I.V.) greatly reduced the effects of chemoreceptor stimulation on plasma levels of ANP. 3. The results show, for the first time, that discrete stimulation of the carotid chemoreceptors caused an increase in plasma ANP levels, probably due to the reflex increase in atrial pressure that results from an inhibition of the cardiac sympathetic nerves, and an increase in venous return from a reduction of peripheral vascular capacitance. PMID

  15. Microfluidic Device for the Selective Chemical Stimulation of Neurons and Characterization of Peptide Release with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides are synthesized in and released from neurons and are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including temperature homeostasis, learning, memory, and disease. When working with sparse neuronal networks, the ability to collect and characterize small sample volumes is important as neurons often release only a small proportion of their mass-limited content. Microfluidic systems are well suited for the study of neuropeptides. They offer the ability to control and manipulate the extracellular environment and small sample volumes, thereby reducing the dilution of peptides following release. We present an approach for the culture and stimulation of a neuronal network within a microfluidic device, subsequent collection of the released peptides, and their detection via mass spectrometry. The system employs microvalve-controlled stimulation channels to selectively stimulate a low-density neuronal culture, allowing us to determine the temporal onset of peptide release. Released peptides from the well-characterized, peptidergic bag cell neurons of Aplysia californica were collected and their temporal pattern of release was characterized with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We show a robust difference in the timing of release for chemical solutions containing elevated K+ (7 ± 3 min), when compared to insulin (19 ± 7 min) (p < 0.000 01). PMID:23004687

  16. Complement peptide C3a stimulates neural plasticity after experimental brain ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Stokowska, Anna; Atkins, Alison L; Morán, Javier; Pekny, Tulen; Bulmer, Linda; Pascoe, Michaela C; Barnum, Scott R; Wetsel, Rick A; Nilsson, Jonas A; Dragunow, Mike; Pekna, Marcela

    2017-02-01

    Ischaemic stroke induces endogenous repair processes that include proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells and extensive rewiring of the remaining neural connections, yet about 50% of stroke survivors live with severe long-term disability. There is an unmet need for drug therapies to improve recovery by promoting brain plasticity in the subacute to chronic phase after ischaemic stroke. We previously showed that complement-derived peptide C3a regulates neural progenitor cell migration and differentiation in vitro and that C3a receptor signalling stimulates neurogenesis in unchallenged adult mice. To determine the role of C3a-C3a receptor signalling in ischaemia-induced neural plasticity, we subjected C3a receptor-deficient mice, GFAP-C3a transgenic mice expressing biologically active C3a in the central nervous system, and their respective wild-type controls to photothrombotic stroke. We found that C3a overexpression increased, whereas C3a receptor deficiency decreased post-stroke expression of GAP43 (P < 0.01), a marker of axonal sprouting and plasticity, in the peri-infarct cortex. To verify the translational potential of these findings, we used a pharmacological approach. Daily intranasal treatment of wild-type mice with C3a beginning 7 days after stroke induction robustly increased synaptic density (P < 0.01) and expression of GAP43 in peri-infarct cortex (P < 0.05). Importantly, the C3a treatment led to faster and more complete recovery of forepaw motor function (P < 0.05). We conclude that C3a-C3a receptor signalling stimulates post-ischaemic neural plasticity and intranasal treatment with C3a receptor agonists is an attractive approach to improve functional recovery after ischaemic brain injury.

  17. An optimized B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) antagonist peptide inhibits the interaction of BLyS with BCMA.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Feng; Wu, Zhen; Feng, Jian-Nan; Li, Yan; Shen, Bei-Fen; Sun, Jian

    2013-04-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) antagonists are new therapeutic reagents for treating the autoimmune diseases. Peptibodies can inhibit the bioactivity of BLyS, the same as other BLyS antagonists: decoyed BLyS receptors and anti-BLyS antibodies. In this study, a new optimized BLyS antagonist peptide was designed according to our previous work by the computer-aided homology modeling. Competitive ELISA showed that the peptide at 100 μg/ml could inhibit 54 % of the BCMA-Fc binding to BLyS. To maintain its stability and spatial conformation, the peptide was fused to human IgG1 Fc to form a peptide-Fc fusion protein-a novel peptibody by gene engineering. ELISA indicated that the peptibody could bind with BLyS in dosage-dependent manner as BCMA-Fc did. This study highlights the possibility of designing and optimizing BLyS antagonist peptides with high biopotency by the computer-aided design. Thus, these peptides could neutralize BLyS activity and be potential antagonists to treat autoimmune diseases related with BLyS overexpression.

  18. Analysis of the proteolysis of bioactive peptides using a peptidomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun-Gon; Lone, Anna Mari; Saghatelian, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the peptidases that inactivate bioactive peptides (e.g. peptide hormones and neuropeptides) in mammals is an important unmet challenge. This protocol describes a recent approach that combines liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry peptidomics to identify endogenous cleavage sites of a bioactive peptide, the subsequent biochemical purification of a candidate peptidase based on these cleavage sites, and validation of the candidate peptidase’s role in the physiological regulation of the bioactive peptide by examining a peptidase knockout mouse. We highlight successful application of this protocol to discover that insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) regulates physiological calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels and detail the key stages and steps in this approach. This protocol requires 7 days of work; however, the total time for this protocol is highly variable because of its dependence on the availability of biological reagents, namely purified enzymes and knockout mice. The protocol is valuable because it expedites the characterization of mammalian peptidases, such as IDE, which in certain instances can be used to develop novel therapeutics. PMID:23949379

  19. Targeting of follicle stimulating hormone peptide-conjugated dendrimers to ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Dimple A.; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Bugno, Jason; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Hong, Seungpyo; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side effects. To address these issues, we have designed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to selectively target the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), which is overexpressed by tumorigenic ovarian cancer cells but not by immature primordial follicles and other non-tumorigenic cells. Fluorescein-labeled generation 5 (G5) PAMAM dendrimers were conjugated with the binding peptide domain of FSH (FSH33) that has a high affinity to FSHR. The targeted dendrimers exhibited high receptor selectivity to FSHR-expressing OVCAR-3 cells, resulting in significant uptake and downregulation of an anti-apoptotic protein survivin, while showing minimal interactions with SKOV-3 cells that do not express FSHR. The selectivity of the FSH33-targeted dendrimers was further validated in 3D organ cultures of normal mouse ovaries. Immunostaining of the conjugates revealed their selective binding and uptake by ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells that express FSHR, while sparing the immature primordial follicles. In addition, an in vivo study monitoring tissue accumulation following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the conjugates showed significantly higher accumulation of FSH33-targeted dendrimers in the ovary and oviduct compared to the non-targeted conjugates. These proof-of-concept findings highlight the potential of these FSH33-targeted dendrimers to serve as a delivery platform for anti-ovarian cancer drugs, while reducing their systemic side effects by preventing nonspecific uptake by the primordial follicles.Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side

  20. Radioimmunoassay of relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide in the starfish Patiria (=Asterina) pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Kiyomoto, Masato; Katayama, Hidekazu; Mita, Masatoshi

    2017-03-01

    A relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) from starfish Patiria (=Asterina) pectinifera is the first identified invertebrate gonadotropin for final gamete maturation. An antiserum against P. pectinifera RGP (PpeRGP) was produced by immunizing rabbits with a PpeRGP sulfanyl-polyethylene glycol derivative conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) as the antigen. The antiserum was used for the development of a specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of RGP. In binding experiments using radioiodinated PpeRGP and antiserum against PpeRGP, a displacement curve was obtained using radioinert PpeRGP. The sensitivity of the RIA, defined as the amount of PpeRGP that significantly decreased the counts by 2 SD from the 100% bound point, averaged 0.040±0.002pmol PpeRGP per 100μl assay buffer (0.40±0.02nM) in 10 assays. Intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 6.1% and 2.7%, respectively. Serial dilution of whole homogenates from the radial nerve cords and circumoral nerve-rings of P. pectinifera produced displacement curves parallel to the PpeRGP standard. Thus, the amounts of PpeRGP were determined as 1.54±0.09pmol/mg wet weight of radial nerves and 0.87±0.04pmol/mg wet weight of nerve-rings, respectively. On contrary, pyloric stomach, pyloric caeca, tube-feet, ovaries, testes, and ovarian follicle cells did not react in the RIA system. Furthermore, the A- and B-chains of PpeRGP, Asterias amurensis RGP, bovine insulin, and human relaxin did not show cross-reactivity in the RIA. These results strongly suggest that the RIA system is a highly specific and sensitive with respect to PpeRGP.

  1. Subpopulation-Specific Transcriptome Analysis of Competence-Stimulating-Peptide-Induced Streptococcus mutans▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lemme, André; Gröbe, Lothar; Reck, Michael; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Competence-stimulating-peptide (CSP)-mediated competence development in Streptococcus mutans is a transient and biphasic process, since only a subpopulation induces the expression of ComX in the presence of CSP, and the activation of the DNA uptake machinery in this fraction shuts down ∼3 to 4 h postinduction. Here, we combine for the first time, to our knowledge, the bacterial flow-cytometric sorting of cells and subpopulation-specific transcriptome analysis of both the competent and noncompetent fraction of CSP-treated S. mutans cells. Sorting was guided by a ComX-green fluorescent protein (ComX-GFP) reporter, and the transcriptome analysis demonstrated the successful combination of both methods, because a strong enrichment of transcripts for comX and its downstream genes was achieved. Three two-component systems were expressed in the competent fraction, and among them was ComDE. Moreover, the recently identified regulator system ComR/S was expressed exclusively in the competent fraction. In contrast, the expression of bacteriocin-related genes was at the same level in all cells. GFP reporter strains for ComE and CipB (mutacin V) confirmed this expression pattern on the single-cell level. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that some ComX-expressing cells committed autolysis in an early stage of competence initiation. In viable ComX-expressing cells, the uptake of DNA could be shown on the single-cell level. This study demonstrates that all cells in the population respond to CSP through the activation of bacteriocin-related genes. Some of these cells start to activate ComX expression but then segregate into two subpopulations, one becoming competent and another one that lyses, resulting in intrapopulation diversity. PMID:21317319

  2. Characterization of desmoglein-3 epitope region peptides as synthetic antigens: analysis of their in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy, cytotoxicity, stability, and their conformational features.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Hajnalka; Uray, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Silló, Pálma; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-09-01

    Desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) adhesion protein is the main target of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoimmune skin disorder. Several mapping studies of Dsg3 T cell epitope regions were performed, and based on those data, we designed and synthesized four peptide series corresponding to Dsg3 T cell epitope regions. Each peptide series consists of a 17mer full-length peptide (Dsg3/189-205, Dsg3/206-222, Dsg3/342-358, and Dsg3/761-777) and its N-terminally truncated derivatives, resulting in 15 peptides altogether. The peptides were prepared on solid phase and were chemically characterized. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the solution conformation of the synthetic peptides has been investigated using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy of the peptides has been determined on peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from whole blood of PV patients and also from healthy donors. After 20 h of stimulation, the interferon (IFN)-γ content of the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro conditions, peptides were stable and non-cytotoxic. The in vitro IFN-γ production profile of healthy donors and PV patients, induced by peptides as synthetic antigens, was markedly different. The most unambiguous differences were observed after stimulation with 17mer peptide Dsg3/342-358, and three truncated derivatives from two other peptide series, namely, peptides Dsg3/192-205, Dsg3/763-777, and Dsg3/764-777. Comparative analysis of in vitro activity and the capability of oligopeptides to form ordered or unordered secondary structure showed that peptides bearing high solvent sensibility and backbone flexibility were the most capable to distinguish between healthy and PV donors.

  3. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  4. Molecular and functional characterization of amylin, a peptide associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, A.N.; Leighton, B.; Todd, J.A.; Schofield, P.N.; Sutton, R.; Day, A.J.; Foot, E.A.; Willis, A.C.; Reid, K.B.M.; Cooper, H.J.S. ); Holt, S.; Boyd, Y. Medical Research Council Radiobiology Unit, Chilton )

    1989-12-01

    The 37-amino acid peptide called amylin is a major component of the islet amyloid deposited in the pancreases of persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The authors report the isolation of a partial cDNA clone and a phage {lambda} genomic clone of the coding region of the amylin gene. The DNA sequence encodes a protein sequences identical to that of amylin isolated from the amyloid found in the diabetic pancreas and shows that amylin is likely to be synthesized as a precursor peptide, now named proamylin. They have demonstrated that the amylin gene is present on chromosome 12 and that it is probably transcribed in the islets of Langerhans. The sequences of the genes for amyli and the calcitonin gene-related peptides (CGRPs) show strong similarity, especially over their 5{prime} coding regions, where both peptides have a conserved intramolecular disulfide bridge, and also over their 3{prime} coding regions, where the presence of a glycine codon strongly suggests that the carboxylterminal residue of amylin, like that of CGRP, is amidated. To examine the functional relevance of these posttranslational modifications, the biological activity of amylin synthesized with or without the disulfide bridge and/or amidation was measured. It was found that both features are necessary for full biological activity, thereby confirming the functional importance of those regions of the molecule whose sequences are conserved at both protein and genetic levels.

  5. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Avdic, Vanja; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Voronova, Anastassia; Skerjanc, Ilona; Couture, Jean-Francois

    2011-08-24

    The SET1 family of methyltransferases carries out the bulk of histone H3 Lys-4 methylation in vivo. One of the common features of this family is the regulation of their methyltransferase activity by a tripartite complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L. To selectively probe the role of the SET1 family of methyltransferases, we have developed a library of histone H3 peptide mimetics and report herein the characterization of an N{alpha} acetylated form of histone H3 peptide (N{alpha}H3). Binding and inhibition studies reveal that the addition of an acetyl moiety to the N terminus of histone H3 significantly enhances its binding to WDR5 and prevents the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by the WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L complex. The crystal structure of N{alpha}H3 in complex with WDR5 reveals that a high-affinity hydrophobic pocket accommodates the binding of the acetyl moiety. These results provide the structural basis to control WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L-MLL1 activity and a tool to manipulate stem cell differentiation programs.-Avdic, V., Zhang, P., Lanouette, S., Voronova, A., Skerjanc, I., Couture, J.-F. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic.

  6. Melanoma Therapy with Rhenium-Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas P Quinn

    2005-11-22

    Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with {sup 188}Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, {sup 188}Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The {sup 177}Lu

  7. Fat digestion is required for suppression of ghrelin and stimulation of peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide secretion by intraduodenal lipid.

    PubMed

    Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Patterson, Michael; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Horowitz, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Stimulation of cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by fat is mediated by the products of fat digestion. Ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) appear to play an important role in appetite regulation, and their release is modulated by food ingestion, including fat. It is unknown whether fat digestion is a prerequisite for their suppression (ghrelin) or release (PYY, PP). Moreover, it is not known whether small intestinal exposure to fat is sufficient to suppress ghrelin secretion. Our study aimed to resolve these issues. Sixteen healthy young males received, on two separate occasions, 120-min intraduodenal infusions of a long-chain triglyceride emulsion (2.8 kcal/min) 1) without (condition FAT) or 2) with (FAT-THL) 120 mg of tetrahydrolipstatin (THL, lipase inhibitor), followed by a standard buffet-style meal. Blood samples for ghrelin, PYY, and PP were taken throughout. FAT infusion was associated with a marked, and progressive, suppression of plasma ghrelin from t = 60 min (P < 0.001) and stimulation of PYY from t = 30 min (P < 0.01). FAT infusion also stimulated plasma PP (P < or = 0.01), and the release was immediate. FAT-THL completely abolished the FAT-induced changes in ghrelin, PYY, and PP. In response to the meal, plasma ghrelin was further suppressed, and PYY and PP stimulated, during both FAT and FAT-THL infusions. In conclusion, in healthy humans, 1) the presence of fat in the small intestine suppresses ghrelin secretion, and 2) fat-induced suppression of ghrelin and stimulation of PYY and PP is dependent on fat digestion.

  8. Peptidomics approach to elucidate the proteolytic regulation of bioactive peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun-Gon; Lone, Anna Mari; Nolte, Whitney M.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Peptide hormones and neuropeptides have important roles in physiology and therefore the regulation of these bioactive peptides is of great interest. In some cases proteolysis controls the concentrations and signaling of bioactive peptides, and the peptidases that mediate this biochemistry have proven to be extremely successful drug targets. Due to the lack of any general method to identify these peptidases, however, the role of proteolysis in the regulation of most neuropeptides and peptide hormones is unknown. This limitation prompted us to develop an advanced peptidomics-based strategy to identify the peptidases responsible for the proteolysis of significant bioactive peptides. The application of this approach to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide associated with blood pressure and migraine, revealed the endogenous CGRP cleavage sites. This information was then used to biochemically purify the peptidase capable of proteolysis of CGRP at those cleavage sites, which led to the identification of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) as a candidate CGRP-degrading enzyme. CGRP had not been identified as an IDE substrate before and we tested the physiological relevance of this interaction by quantitative measurements of CGRP using IDE null (IDE−/−) mice. In the absence of IDE, full-length CGRP levels are elevated in vivo, confirming IDE as an endogenous CGRP-degrading enzyme. By linking CGRP and IDE, this strategy uncovers a previously unknown pathway for CGRP regulation and characterizes an additional role for IDE. More generally, this work suggests that this may be an effective general strategy for characterizing these pathways and peptidases moving forward. PMID:22586115

  9. Purification and identification of a growth-stimulating peptide for Bifidobacterium bifidum from natural rubber serum powder.

    PubMed

    Etoh, S; Asamura, K; Obu, A; Sonomoto, K; Ishizaki, A

    2000-10-01

    Natural rubber serum powder, which is a by-product obtained in the production of latex rubber, has a strong growth-stimulating activity for Bifidobacterium bifidum JCM 1254. The retained fraction obtained by ultrafiltration (molecular weight cutoff 1000) showed a growth-stimulating activity in a dose-dependent manner on B12 assay medium with ammonium sulfate. One of the growth stimulators was purified from the retained fraction by acetone precipitation, solid-phase extraction with a hydrophobic pretreatment column, and multistage reversed-phase HPLC. An increase of 53-fold in the specific activity, and a recovery of 1.3% were obtained. The amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence analysis of this growth stimulator provided the structure of Ala-Thr-Pro-Glu-Lys-Glu-Glu-Pro-Thr-Ala. The molecular mass was 1075 by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. These results showed that this growth stimulator was a decapeptide with the sequence shown above. This is the first report that clarified the structure of an active peptide for the growth of Bifidobacterium.

  10. Use of the Photo-Electromyogram to Objectively Diagnose and Monitor Treatment of Post-TBI Light Sensitivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    14. ABSTRACT Purpose: to test the whether photosensitivity (photophobia) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is due to increased sensitivity of the...and in a mouse strain genetically engineered to be hypersensitive to calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), the neurotransmitter modulating...photodynia, photosensitivity, light sensitivity, traumatic brain injury , electromyogram, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), trigeminal 16. SECURITY

  11. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-03

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway.

  12. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Martina M; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E; Sachs, Matthew S; Atkins, John F

    2015-07-17

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3' end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5' and 3' of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5' of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5' part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3' part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3' of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting.

  13. Differential roles of calcitonin family peptides in the dendrite formation and spinogenesis of the cerebral cortex in vitro.

    PubMed

    Harigai, Yuichi; Natsume, Masaki; Li, Fei; Ohtani, Akiko; Senzaki, Kouji; Shiga, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    We examined roles of calcitonin family peptides in the initial stages of dendrite formation and the maturation of dendritic spines in the rat cerebral cortex in vitro. Embryonic day 18 cortical neurons were dissociated and cultured for 2-3days in the presence of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), calcitonin, amylin or adrenomedullin. The treatment of cortical neurons with CGRP promoted the formation of primary dendrites of non-GABAergic neurons. In contrast, the treatment with amylin and adrenomedullin for 3days inhibited the dendritic elongation of non-GABAergic neurons. Calcitonin had no effect on the initial dendrite formation. Next, we examined roles of the peptides in the spine formation. Embryonic day 16 cortical neurons were cultured for 14days and then treated acutely with CGRP, amylin or adrenomedullin for 24h. The density of filopodia, puncta/stubby spines and spines were increased by the CGRP treatment, whereas decreased by amylin. Therefore, CGRP and amylin showed opposite effects on the formation of dendritic filopodia, puncta and spines. Adrenomedullin had no effects on the spine formation. In conclusion, the present study showed that calcitonin family peptides have differential effects both in the dendrite formation during the initial stages and the spine formation of cortical neurons in vitro.

  14. A method for identification of the peptides that bind to a clone of thyroid-stimulating antibodies in the serum of Graves' disease patients.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Cho, Bo Youn; Chae, Chi-Bom

    2003-04-01

    A method was developed for identification of the peptide sequences that bind to thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) clones from phage-displayed peptide library. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified from the serum of a Graves' disease patient that stimulates the synthesis of cAMP in the cells that express TSH receptor (TSHR). The IgG that binds to TSHR was purified by an affinity column packed with the resin cross-linked with the extracellular domain of human TSHR. The receptor-binding IgG was then mixed with phages that display linear or cyclic peptides at the end of tail protein pIII. The bound phages were eluted with acidic glycine after extensive washing. From sequencing of the pIII gene of the bound phages, one can deduce the sequences of the peptides that bind to the receptor-binding IgG. Each peptide sequence was then tested for inhibition of the synthesis of cAMP from thyroid cells induced by the serum of a Graves' patient. In this way, one can obtain the peptides that bind to a clone of TSAb. We obtained a peptide sequence that inhibits the action of TSAb at an extremely low concentration (<10(-14) M). Such a peptide will be useful for various studies on TSAb.

  15. Cell adhesive peptides functionalized on CoCr alloy stimulate endothelialization and prevent thrombogenesis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Isabel; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Díaz-Ricart, Maribel; Escolar, Ginés; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Gil, Francisco Javier; Pegueroles, Marta; Manero, Jose María

    2017-04-01

    Immobilization of bioactive peptide sequences on CoCr surfaces is an effective route to improve endothelialization, which is of great interest for cardiovascular stents. In this work, we explored the effect of physical and covalent immoblization of RGDS, YIGSR and their equimolar combination peptides on endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion and on thrombogenicity. We extensively investigated using RT-qPCR, the expression by ECs cultured on functionalised CoCr surfaces of different genes. Genes relevant for adhesion (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1), vascularization (VEGFA, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) and anti-thrombogenicity (tPA and eNOS) were over-expressed in the ECs grown to covalently functionalized CoCr surfaces compared to physisorbed and control surfaces. Pro-thrombogenic genes expression (PAI-1 and vWF) decreased over time. Cell co-cultures of ECs/SMCs found that functionalization increased the amount of adhered ECs onto modified surfaces compared to plain CoCr, independently of the used peptide and the strategy of immobilization. SMCs adhered less compared to ECs in all surfaces. All studied peptides showed a lower platelet cell adhesion compared to TCPS. Covalent functionalization of CoCr surfaces with an equimolar combination of RGDS and YIGSR represented prevailing strategy to enhance the early stages of ECs adhesion and proliferation, while preventing SMCs and platelet adhesion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 973-983, 2017.

  16. Hypergravity differentially modulates cGMP efflux in human melanocytic cells stimulated by nitric oxide and natriuretic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, K.; Stieber, C.; Lambers, B.; Block, I.; Krieg, R.; Wellmann, A.; Gerzer, R.

    Nitric oxide NO plays a key role in many patho physiologic processes including inflammation and skin cancer The diverse cellular effects of NO are mainly mediated by activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase sGC isoform that leads to increases in intracellular cGMP levels whereas the membrane-bound isoforms serve as receptors for natriuretic peptides e g ANP In human skin epidermal melanocytes represent the principal cells for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress as a result of potentially harmful effects of the environment In previous studies we found that long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulated cGMP efflux in normal human melanocytes NHMs and non-metastatic melanoma cells at least partly by an enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance proteins MRP and cGMP transporters MRP4 5 The present study investigated whether hypergravity generated by centrifugal acceleration may modulate the cGMP efflux in NO-stimulated NHMs and melanoma cells MCs with different metastatic potential The NONOates PAPA-NO and DETA-NO were used as direct NO donors for cell stimulation In the presence of 0 1 mM DETA-NO t 1 2 sim 20 h long-term application of hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h reduced intracellular cGMP levels by stimulating cGMP efflux in NHMs and non-metastatic MCs in comparison to 1 g whereas exposure to 5 g for 6 h in the presence of 0 1 mM PAPA-NO t 1 2 sim 30 min was not effective The hypergravity-stimulated

  17. Repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide as a cell-stimulating agent on electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chaisri, Pacharaporn; Chingsungnoen, Artit; Siri, Sineenat

    2013-11-01

    Electrospun scaffolds derived from poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL), a well known biodegradable material, have an architecture that is suitable for hosting cells. However, their biomedical applications are restricted because these scaffolds lack the bioactivity necessary to stimulate cell responses. In this work, a repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp (rRGD) peptide was produced as a cell-stimulating agent to provide the PCL scaffold with bioactivity. DNA encoding rRGD was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using overlap primers without a DNA template, and cloned into a protein expression vector to produce a His-tag fusion peptide. In an in vitro cell adhesion assay, the purified rRGD peptide, comprising 30 RGD repeats, promoted a 1.5-fold greater cell adhesion than the commercial tripeptide RGD. The rRGD peptide was immobilized onto an electrospun PCL scaffold that had been pretreated with argon plasma and graft-polymerized with acrylic acid. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicated that covalently linked rRGD peptide was present on the scaffold. The PCL scaffold with immobilized rRGD showed significantly changed hydrophilic properties and an enhanced adhesion and proliferation of mouse fibroblast cells by 2.3- and 2.9-fold, respectively, compared to the PCL scaffold alone. Through its ability to promote cell adhesion and proliferation, the rRGD peptide has great potential as a stimulant for improving the suboptimal cell-matrix interaction of polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  18. Extracellular Life Cycle of ComS, the Competence-Stimulating Peptide of Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Besset, Colette; Gitton, Christophe; Guillot, Alain; Fontaine, Laetitia; Hols, Pascal; Monnet, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    In streptococci, ComX is the alternative sigma factor controlling the transcription of the genes encoding the genetic transformation machinery. In Streptococcus thermophilus, comX transcription is controlled by a complex consisting of a transcriptional regulator of the Rgg family, ComR, and a signaling peptide, ComS, which controls ComR activity. Following its initial production, ComS is processed, secreted, and imported back into the cell by the Ami oligopeptide transporter. We characterized these steps and the partners interacting with ComS during its extracellular circuit in more detail. We identified the mature form of ComS and demonstrated the involvement of the membrane protease Eep in ComS processing. We found that ComS was secreted but probably not released into the extracellular medium. Natural competence was first discovered in a chemically defined medium without peptides. We show here that the presence of a high concentration of nutritional peptides in the medium prevents the triggering of competence. In milk, the ecological niche of S. thermophilus, competence was found to be functional, suggesting that the concentration of nutritional peptides was too low to interfere with ComR activation. The kinetics of expression of the comS, comR, and comX genes and of a late competence gene, dprA, in cultures inoculated at different initial densities revealed that the activation mechanism of ComR by ComS is more a timing device than a quorum-sensing mechanism sensu stricto. We concluded that the ComS extracellular circuit facilitates tight control over the triggering of competence in S. thermophilus. PMID:23396911

  19. Activation of TRPM3 by a potent synthetic ligand reveals a role in peptide release.

    PubMed

    Held, Katharina; Kichko, Tatjana; De Clercq, Katrien; Klaassen, Hugo; Van Bree, Rieta; Vanherck, Jean-Christophe; Marchand, Arnaud; Reeh, Peter W; Chaltin, Patrick; Voets, Thomas; Vriens, Joris

    2015-03-17

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel subfamily M member 3 (TRPM3), a member of the TRP channel superfamily, was recently identified as a nociceptor channel in the somatosensory system, where it is involved in the detection of noxious heat; however, owing to the lack of potent and selective agonists, little is known about other potential physiological consequences of the opening of TRPM3. Here we identify and characterize a synthetic TRPM3 activator, CIM0216, whose potency and apparent affinity greatly exceeds that of the canonical TRPM3 agonist, pregnenolone sulfate (PS). In particular, a single application of CIM0216 causes opening of both the central calcium-conducting pore and the alternative cation permeation pathway in a membrane-delimited manner. CIM0216 evoked robust calcium influx in TRPM3-expressing somatosensory neurons, and intradermal injection of the compound induced a TRPM3-dependent nocifensive behavior. Moreover, CIM0216 elicited the release of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory nerve terminals and insulin from isolated pancreatic islets in a TRPM3-dependent manner. These experiments identify CIM0216 as a powerful tool for use in investigating the physiological roles of TRPM3, and indicate that TRPM3 activation in sensory nerve endings can contribute to neurogenic inflammation.

  20. Nesfatin-1 stimulates cholecystokinin and suppresses peptide YY expression and secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mortazavi, Sima; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-25

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid secreted peptide encoded in the precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). It is an insulinotropic anorexigen abundantly expressed in the stomach and hypothalamus. Post-prandial insulin secretion is predominantly regulated by incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Nesfatin-1 was previously reported to modulate GLP-1 and GIP secretion in vitro in an enteroendocrine (STC-1) cell line. Intestine is a source of additional hormones including cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) that regulate metabolism. We hypothesized that nesfatin-1 modulates CCK and PYY secretion. Immunofluorescence histochemistry showed NUCB2/nesfatin-1 co-localizing CCK and PYY in the intestinal mucosa of mice. Static incubation of STC-1 cells with nesfatin-1 upregulated both CCK mRNA expression (1 and 10 nM) and secretion (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) at 1 h post-incubation. In contrast, nesfatin-1 treatment for 1 h downregulated PYY mRNA expression (all doses tested) and secretion (0.01 and 0.1 nM) in STC-1 cells. Continuous infusion of nesfatin-1 using osmotic mini-pumps for 12 h upregulated CCK mRNA expression in large intestine, and downregulated PYY mRNA expression in both large and small intestines of male C57BL/6J mice. In these tissues, Western blot analysis found a corresponding increase in CCK and a decrease in PYY content. Collectively, we provide new information on the cell specific localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the intestinal mucosa, and a novel function for nesfatin-1 in modulating intestinal CCK and PYY expression and secretion in mice.

  1. GH-releasing peptide-2 does not stimulate arginine vasopressin secretion in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Kamoi, Kyuzi; Minagawa, Shinichi; Kimura, Keita; Ishizawa, Masahiro; Ohara, Nobumasa; Uemura, Yasuyuki; Tsuchiya, Junpei

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin has a stimulating effect on arginine vasopressin (AVP). However, it is not known whether GHRP-2, a synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, also has a stimulating effect on AVP release in men. To determine whether the GHRP-2 test is useful for assessing AVP secretion, blood ACTH, GH, FSH, LH, PRL, TSH and AVP levels, as well as glucose, osmolality, sodium and hematocrit, were measured before and 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after an intravenous bolus of 100 microg GHRP-2 in 10 healthy men with and without fasting. Blood pressure was measured at 15-min intervals. AVP secretion was not stimulated by the GHRP-2 test with and without fasting. There were no significant differences in hematocrit, blood pressure and plasma osmolality before and after GFRP-2 injection, although significant (p<0.001) peak blood GH, and ACTH and PRL levels were observed 30 and 15 min after GHRP-2 injection with and without fasting, respectively, and the maximal peaks were significantly (p<0.05) higher with fasting than without fasting. These results suggest that AVP secretion is not stimulated by the GHRP-2 test both with and without fasting, though GH, ACTH and PRL levels were higher with than without fasting.

  2. Reducing renal uptake of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Fisher, Darrell R.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to improve the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-[1,2,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-Re-Cys,D-Phe,Arg]alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH), through coupling a negatively charged glutamic acid (Glu) to the peptide sequence. A new peptide of DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH was designed, synthesized and labeled with 90Y and 177Lu. Pharmacokinetics of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Glu,Arg)CCNSH were determined in B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Both exhibited significantly less renal uptake than 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH at 30 min and at 2, 3, and 24 h after dose administration. The renal uptake values of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH were 28.16% and 28.81% of those of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 hr post-injection. We also showed higher tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios 2.28 and 1.69 times that of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 h post-injection. The90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH activity accumulation was low in normal organs except for kidneys. Coupling a negatively charged amino acid (Glu) to the CCMSH peptide sequence dramatically reduced the renal uptake values and increased the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH, facilitating their potential applications as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  3. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  4. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Martina M.; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Atkins, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3′ end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5′ and 3′ of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5′ of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5′ part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3′ part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3′ of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. PMID:25998126

  5. The HtrA protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae digests both denatured proteins and the competence-stimulating peptide.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Marco; Gagne, Alyssa L; Spruce, Lynn A; Seeholzer, Steven H; Sebert, Michael E

    2012-11-09

    The HtrA protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae functions both in a general stress response role and as an error sensor that specifically represses genetic competence when the overall level of biosynthetic errors in cellular proteins is low. However, the mechanism through which HtrA inhibits development of competence has been unknown. We found that HtrA digested the pneumococcal competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) and constituted the primary extracytoplasmic CSP-degrading activity in cultures of S. pneumoniae. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that cleavage predominantly followed residue Phe-8 of the CSP-1 isoform of the peptide within its central hydrophobic patch, and in competition assays, both CSP-1 and CSP-2 interacted with HtrA with similar efficiencies. More generally, analysis of β-casein digestion and of digestion within HtrA itself revealed a preference for substrates with non-polar residues at the P1 site. Consistent with a specificity for exposed hydrophobic residues, competition from native BSA only weakly inhibited digestion of CSP, but denaturation converted BSA into a strong competitive inhibitor of such proteolysis. Together these findings support a model in which digestion of CSP by HtrA is reduced in the presence of other unfolded proteins that serve as alternative targets for degradation. Such competition may provide a mechanism by which HtrA functions in a quality control capacity to monitor the frequency of biosynthetic errors that result in protein misfolding.

  6. Biphasic peptide amphiphile nanomatrix embedded with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for stimulated osteoinductive response.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel M; Patterson, Jessica L; Vines, Jeremy B; Javed, Amjad; Gilbert, Shawn R; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2011-12-27

    Formation of the native bone extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an attractive template for bone tissue engineering. The structural support and biological complexity of bone ECM are provided within a composite microenvironment that consists of an organic fibrous network reinforced by inorganic hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. Recreating this biphasic assembly, a bone ECM analogous scaffold comprising self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers and interspersed HA nanoparticles was investigated. PAs were endowed with biomolecular ligand signaling using a synthetically inscribed peptide sequence (i.e., RGDS) and integrated with HA nanoparticles to form a biphasic nanomatrix hydrogel. It was hypothesized the biphasic hydrogel would induce osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and improve bone healing as mediated by RGDS ligand signaling within PA nanofibers and embedded HA mineralization source. Viscoelastic stability of the biphasic PA hydrogels was evaluated with different weight concentrations of HA for improved gelation. After demonstrating initial viability, long-term cellularity and osteoinduction of encapsulated hMSCs in different PA hydrogels were studied in vitro. Temporal progression of osteogenic maturation was assessed by gene expression of key markers. A preliminary animal study demonstrated bone healing capacity of the biphasic PA nanomatrix under physiological conditions using a critical size femoral defect rat model. The combination of RGDS ligand signaling and HA nanoparticles within the biphasic PA nanomatrix hydrogel demonstrated the most effective osteoinduction and comparative bone healing response. Therefore, the biphasic PA nanomatrix establishes a well-organized scaffold with increased similarity to natural bone ECM with the prospect for improved bone tissue regeneration.

  7. Speract, a sea urchin egg peptide that regulates sperm motility, also stimulates sperm mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    García-Rincón, Juan; Darszon, Alberto; Beltrán, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Sea urchin sperm have only one mitochondrion, that in addition to being the main source of energy, may modulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to regulate their motility and possibly the acrosome reaction. Speract is a decapeptide from the outer jelly layer of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus egg that upon binding to its receptor in the sperm, stimulates sperm motility, respiration and ion fluxes, among other physiological events. Altering the sea urchin sperm mitochondrial function with specific inhibitors of this organelle, increases [Ca(2+)]i in an external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext)-dependent manner (Ardón, et al., 2009. BBActa 1787: 15), suggesting that the mitochondrion is involved in sperm [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis. To further understand the interrelationship between the mitochondrion and the speract responses, we measured mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) and NADH levels. We found that the stimulation of sperm with speract depolarizes the mitochondrion and increases the levels of NADH. Surprisingly, these responses are independent of external Ca(2+) and are due to the increase in intracellular pH (pHi) induced by speract. Our findings indicate that speract, by regulating pHi, in addition to [Ca(2+)]i, may finely modulate mitochondrial metabolism to control motility and ensure that sperm reach the egg and fertilize it.

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulates DNA synthesis in mouse 3T3 cells: Role of cAMP, Ca sup 2+ , and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Zurier, B.B.; Kozma, M.; Sinnett-Smith, J.; Rozengurt, E. )

    1988-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulated initiation of DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. The peptide stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin and either forskolin or an inhibitor of cAMP phosphodiesterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effect was obtained at 1 nM. At mitogenic concentrations, VIP stimulated a marked accumulation (eightfold) of cAMP. In contrast to other growth-promoting neuropeptides, VIP did not induce an increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} or the activation of protein kinase C. The authors conclude that neuropeptides can modulate long-term cell proliferation through multiple signaling pathways.

  9. The opioid peptide beta-endorphin stimulates acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Urizar-Arenaza, I; Estomba, H; Muñoa-Hoyos, I; Matorras, R; Esposito, A; Candenas, L; Pinto, F M; Valdivia, A; Irazusta, J; Subirán, N

    2016-01-01

    The acrosome reaction occurs in vivo following sperm capacitation and is essential for the acquisition of sperm fertilization ability. However, little is known about the molecular identity of the physiological acrosome reaction regulators. In addition to progesterone, which is produced by cumulus oophorus cells and known to regulate acrosome reaction by activating the specific calcium channel CatSper, endogenous opioid peptides such as beta-endorphin and met-enkephalin are present at high concentrations in the follicular fluid suggesting that the opioid system may be involved in the mechanisms regulating the acrosome reaction in humans. By using Reverse Transcription-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence approaches, we described the presence and localization of the beta-endorphin precursor, pro-opiomelanocortinin the middle section and in flagellum of human spermatozoa, and inside the seminiferous tubules of human testis. Flow cytometry and intracellular calcium analyses showed that beta-endorphin causes an inversely dose-dependent increase in the percentage of acrosome-reacted sperm cells by a calcium-independent protein kinase C pathway. These findings are important for future studies of sperm physiology and provide new insight into the function of the opioid system as a target of fertility management.

  10. The dietary ingredient, genistein, stimulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression through a novel S1P-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Kim, Young-Il; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Jong Youl; Mann, Taj; Oda, Yuko; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M; Elias, Peter M; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2014-07-01

    We recently discovered that a signaling lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), generated by sphingosine kinase 1, regulates a major epidermal antimicrobial peptide's [cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP)] expression via an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent pathway, independent of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in epithelial cells. Activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by either estrogens or phytoestrogens also is known to stimulate S1P production, but it is unknown whether ER activation increases CAMP production. We investigated whether a phytoestrogen, genistein, simulates CAMP expression in keratinocytes, a model of epithelial cells, by either a S1P-dependent mechanism(s) or the alternate VDR-regulated pathway. Exogenous genistein, as well as an ER-β ligand, WAY-200070, increased CAMP mRNA and protein expression in cultured human keratinocytes, while ER-β antagonist, ICI182780, attenuated the expected genistein- and WAY-200070-induced increase in CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Genistein treatment increased acidic and alkaline ceramidase expression and cellular S1P levels in parallel with increased S1P lyase inhibition, accounting for increased CAMP production. In contrast, siRNA against VDR did not alter genistein-mediated up-regulation of CAMP. Taken together, genistein induces CAMP production via an ER-β→S1P→NF-κB→C/EBPα- rather than a VDR-dependent mechanism, illuminating a new role for estrogens in the regulation of epithelial innate immunity and pointing to potential additional benefits of dietary genistein in enhancing cutaneous antimicrobial defense.

  11. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  12. SKPDT is a signaling peptide that stimulates sporulation and cry1Aa expression in Bacillus thuringiensis but not in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Diez, Angel E; Robles-Burgueño, Refugio; de la Torre, Mayra

    2007-08-01

    We have identified and characterized in the supernatant of the transition phase of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki the peptide SKPDT. This peptide was previously identified by in silico analysis by Pottathil and Lazazzera (Front Biosci 8:32-45 2003) as a putative signaling peptide (NprRB) of the Phr family in B. thuringiensis. The chemically synthesized NprRB did not affect the growth kinetics of B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki but stimulated the sporulation, spore release, and transcription of cry1Aa when added to cultures during the transition phase. In fact, when the peptide (100 nM) was added to a culture in transition phase, the transcription of cry1Aa was stimulated almost threefold, mainly from the late promoter BtII, which requires the late-stage sporulation-specific transcription factor sigma (K). On the other hand, NprRB did not have any effect on B. subtilis. Thus, SKPDT seems to be a signaling peptide specific for B. thuringiensis.

  13. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide stimulates thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells: role of endothelin-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Ke-Hong; Zhong, Qing; Isales, Carlos M.; Iscules, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have previously characterized the receptor for glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) in vascular endothelial cells (EC). Different EC types were found to contain distinct GIPR splice variants. To determine whether activation of the GIPR splice variants resulted in different cellular responses, we examined GIP effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), which contain two GIPR splice variants, and compared them with a spontaneously transformed human umbilical vein EC line, ECV 304, which contains four GIPR splice variants. GIP dose-dependently stimulated HUVEC and ECV 304 proliferation as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. GIP increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion from HUVEC but not from ECV 304. Use of the endothelin B receptor blocker BQ-788 resulted in an inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation in HUVEC but not in ECV 304. These findings suggest that, although GIP increases [3H]thymidine incorporation in both HUVEC and ECV 304, this proliferative response is mediated by ET-1 only in HUVEC. These differences in cellular response to GIP may be related to differences in activation of GIPR splice variants.

  14. Localization of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Immunoreactivity in Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Abdelalim, Essam M.; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exerts its functions through NP receptors. Recently, BNP has been shown to be involved in a wide range of functions. Previous studies reported BNP expression in the sensory afferent fibers in the dorsal horn (DH) of the spinal cord. However, BNP expression and function in the neurons of the central nervous system are still controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated BNP expression in the rat spinal cord in detail using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR analysis showed that BNP mRNA was present in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). BNP immunoreactivity was observed in different structures of the spinal cord, including the neuronal cell bodies and neuronal processes. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in the DH of the spinal cord and in the neurons of the intermediate column (IC) and ventral horn (VH). Double-immunolabeling showed a high level of BNP expression in the afferent fibers (laminae I–II) labeled with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), suggesting BNP involvement in sensory function. In addition, BNP was co-localized with CGRP and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the motor neurons of the VH. Together, these results indicate that BNP is expressed in sensory and motor systems of the spinal cord, suggesting its involvement in several biological actions on sensory and motor neurons via its binding to NP receptor-A (NPR-A) and/or NP receptor-B (NPR-B) at the spinal cord level. PMID:27994541

  15. Immunosuppressive activity of a novel peptide analog of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Edling, Andrea E; Gomes, Danilo; Weeden, Timothy; Dzuris, John; Stefano, Jim; Pan, Clark; Williams, John; Kaplan, Johanne; Perricone, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an inflammatory disorder of the eye that can lead to pain and vision loss. Steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are currently the only therapeutics for uveitis and have serious ocular and systemic toxicities. Therefore, safer alternative therapeutics are desired. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide that suppresses effector T cell functions, induces regulatory T cells and has beneficial effects in certain autoimmune and transplant models. A novel d-amino acid peptide analog of native α-MSH (dRI-α-MSH) was produced that was protected from protease digestion and had increased selectivity for the melanocortin-1 receptor. Systemic delivery of the dRI-α-MSH analog dramatically suppressed disease progression and retained retinal architecture in the experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) model. Local delivery by periorbital injection was equally effective. Importantly, treatment with the novel dRI-α-MSH analog suppressed uveitis with a similar magnitude to the corticosteroid, dexamethasone. Data indicate that the novel dRI-α-MSH analogs show anti-inflammatory activities and have potential therapeutic use in uveitis and other autoimmune diseases.

  16. Vasoactive intestinal peptide enhanced aromatase activity in the neonatal rat ovary before development of primary follicles or responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    George, F.W.; Ojeda, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have investigated the factors that regulate aromatase activity in fetal-neonatal rat ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity (assessed by measuring the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed from (1..beta..-/sup 3/H)testosterone) is low prior to birth and increases to values greater than 30 pmol/hr per mg of protein between days 8 and 12 after birth. The appearance of ovarian aromatase coincides with the development of primordial follicles. Fetal-neonatal ovaries maintained in serum-free organ culture do not develop aromatase activity at the expected time. Ovine follicle-stimulating hormone, ovine luteinizing hormone, or their combination failed to induce the enzyme activity in cultured fetal ovaries, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone is effective in preventing the decline in aromatase activity when postnatal day 8 ovaries are placed in culture. In contrast to follicle-stimulating hormone, dibutyryl-cAMP markedly enhances ovarian aromatase in cultured fetal ovaries. Likewise, enhancement of endogenouse cAMP formation with forskolin or cholera toxin caused an increase in enzyme activity within 24 hr. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a peptide known to occur in ovarian nerves, caused a dose-dependent increase in aromatase activity in fetal ovaries prior to folliculogenesis. Of related peptides tested, only the peptide having N-terminal histidine and C-terminal isoleucine amide was capable of inducing aromatase activity in fetal ovaries. The fact that VIP can induce aromatase activity in fetal rat ovaries prior to follicle formation and prior to responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone suggests that this neuropeptide may play a critical role in ovarian differentiation.

  17. Increased Litter Size and Suckling Intensity Stimulate mRNA of RFamide-related Peptide in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Atefeh; Jafarzadeh Shirazi, Mohammad Reza; Tamadon, Amin; Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) inhibits gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in rats. This study evaluates the effects of litter size and suckling intensity on RFRP mRNA expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) of rats. Materials and Methods A total of 32 pregnant and 4 non-lactating ovariectomized (control group) Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experimental study. Lactating rats were allotted to 8 equal groups. In 3 groups, the litter size was adjusted to 5, 10, or 15 pups upon parturition. Dams were allowed to suckle their pups continuously until 8 days postpartum. In the other 3 groups, the litter size was adjusted to 5 pups following birth. These pups were separated from the dams for 6 hours on day 8 postpartum, after which the pups were allowed to suckle for 2.5, 5, or 7.5 minutes prior to killing the dams. In 2 groups, lactating rats with 10 and 15 pups were separated from their pups for 6 hours on day 8 postpartum. In these groups, the pups were allowed to suckle their dams for 5 minutes before the dams were killed. All rats were killed on day 8 postpartum and the DMH was removed from each rat. We evaluated RFRP mRNA expression using realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The expression of RFRP mRNA in the DMH increased with increased litter size and suckling intensity compared to the controls. The effect of suckling intensity on the expression of RFRP mRNA was more pronounced compared to the litter size. Conclusion Increased litter size and suckling intensity stimulated RFRP mRNA expression in the DMH which might contribute to lactation anestrus in rats. PMID:26644862

  18. The dietary ingredient, genistein, stimulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression through a novel S1P-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Kim, Young-Il; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Jong Youl; Mann, Taj; Oda, Yuko; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M.; Elias, Peter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered that a signaling lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), generated by sphingosine kinase 1, regulates a major epidermal antimicrobial peptide’s [cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP)] expression via an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent pathway, independent of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in epithelial cells. Activation of estrogen receptors (ER) by either estrogens or phytoestrogens also is known to stimulate S1P production, but it is unknown whether ER activation increases CAMP production. We investigated whether a phytoestrogen, genistein, simulates CAMP expression in keratinocytes, a model of epithelial cells, by either a S1P-dependent mechanism(s) or the alternate VDR-regulated pathway. Exogenous genistein, as well as a ER-β ligand, WAY-200070, increased CAMP mRNA and protein expression in cultured human keratinocytes, while ER-β antagonist, ICI182780, attenuated the expected genistein- and WAY-200070-induced increase in CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Genistein treatment increased acidic and alkaline ceramidase expression and cellular S1P levels in parallel with increased S1P lyase inhibition, accounting for increased CAMP production. In contrast, siRNA against VDR did not alter genistein-mediated upregulation of CAMP. Taken together, genistein induces CAMP production via an ER-β→S1P→NF-κB→C/EBPα-rather than a VDR-dependent mechanism, illuminating a new role for estrogens in the regulation of epithelial innate immunity and pointing to potential additional benefits of dietary genistein in enhancing cutaneous antimicrobial defense. PMID:24768661

  19. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  20. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Vicentini, Geraldo E.; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R. G.; Martins, Heber A.; Guarnier, Flávia A.; Zanoni, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  1. An immunodominant epitope in a functional domain near the N-terminus of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor identified by cross-reaction of synthetic peptides with neutralizing anti-protein and anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Beffy, P; Rovero, P; Di Bartolo, V; Laricchia Robbio, L; Dané, A; Pegoraro, S; Bertolero, F; Revoltella, R P

    1994-12-01

    We produced polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and performed studies of epitope mapping by ELISA, using five synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences along this molecule. Additionally, anti-peptide MAbs were generated. The antibody ability to inhibit rhGM-CSF activity was determined using as bioassay the MO7e cell line, which is dependent on hGM-CSF for growth in vitro. An immunodominant epitope able to induce the highest neutralization antibody titers was identified near the N terminus of hGM-CSF. A synthetic peptide 14-24, homologous to a sequence including part of the first alpha-helix of the molecule, was recognized by neutralizing anti-protein antibodies. Similarly, MAbs anti- 14-24 cross-reacted with rhGM-CSF and specifically blocked its function. Replacement of Val16 or Asn17 with alanine greatly reduced the antibody-binding capacity to peptide 14-24, whereas substitution of Gln20 or Glu21 was less critical. Monoclonal antibodies generated against residues 30-41 (corresponding to an intrahelical loop) and 79-91 (homologous to a sequence including part of the third alpha-helix) or its analog [Ala88](79-91)beta Ala-Cys, were conformation dependent and nonneutralizing: they failed to react or bound poorly to rhGM-CSF in ELISA, but readily recognized the homologous sequence in the denatured protein, by Western blotting.

  2. 203Pb-Labeled Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide as an Imaging Probe for Melanoma Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yubin, Miao; Figueroa, Said D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Moore, Herbert A.; Testa, Richard F.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2008-05-01

    Abbreviations: a-MSH; alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone, DOTA; 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid, Re(Arg11)CCMSH; DOTA-[Cys3,4,10, D-Phe7, Arg11]a-MSH3-13, NDP; [Nle4,d-Phe7] a-MSH3-13. Abstract Peptide-targeted alpha therapy with 200 mCi of 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH cured 45% of B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice in a 120-day study, highlighting its melanoma treatment potential. However, there is a need to develop an imaging surrogate for patient specific dosimetry and to monitor the tumor response to 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH as a matched-pair SPECT imaging agent for 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH. Method: DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was labeled with 203Pb in 0.5 M NH4OAc buffer at pH 5.4. The internalization and efflux of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were examined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. A micro-SPECT/CT imaging study was performed with 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in a B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mouse at 2 h post-injection. Results: 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was easily prepared in NH4OAc buffer and completely separated from the excess non-radiolabeled peptide by RP-HPLC. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH displayed fast internalization and extended retention in B16/F1 cells. Approximately 73% of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH activity internalized after a 20-min incubation at 25C. After incubating the cells in culture media for 20 min, 78% of internalized activity remained in the cells. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited similar biodistribution pattern with 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor uptake of 12.00 +/- 3.20 %ID/g at 1 h post-injection. The tumor uptake gradually decreased to 3.43 +/- 1.12 %ID/g at 48 h post-injection. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor to kidney

  3. Multifunctional cyclic D,L-α-peptide architectures stimulate non-insulin dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells and protect them against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Renana; Rudnick, Safra; Daniel, Bareket; Viskind, Olga; Aisha, Vered; Richman, Michal; Ayasolla, Kamesh R; Perelman, Alex; Chill, Jordan H; Gruzman, Arie; Rahimipour, Shai

    2013-09-12

    Oxidative stress directly correlates with the early onset of vascular complications and the progression of peripheral insulin resistance in diabetes. Accordingly, exogenous antioxidants augment insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic patients and ameliorate its clinical signs. Herein, we explored the unique structural and functional properties of the abiotic cyclic D,L-α-peptide architecture as a new scaffold for developing multifunctional agents to catalytically decompose ROS and stimulate glucose uptake. We showed that His-rich cyclic D,L-α-peptide 1 is very stable under high H2O2 concentrations, effectively self-assembles to peptide nanotubes, and increases the uptake of glucose by increasing the translocation of GLUT1 and GLUT4. It also penetrates cells and protects them against oxidative stress induced under hyperglycemic conditions at a much lower concentration than α-lipoic acid (ALA). In vivo studies are now required to probe the mode of action and efficacy of these abiotic cyclic D,L-α-peptides as a novel class of antihyperglycemic compounds.

  4. Chronic preclinical safety evaluation of EPO-018B, a pegylated peptidic erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in monkeys and rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue-Lian; Gu, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Yong-Chun; Zhu, Hai; Xia, Zhen-Na; Li, Jian-Zhong; Lu, Guo-Cai

    2016-09-15

    EPO-018B, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA), is mainly designed for treatment of anemia caused by chronic renal failure and chemotherapy against cancer. It overcomes the deficiencies of currently approved ESA, including the frequent administration of temperature-sensitive recombinant protein and anti-EPO antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). This study was designed to evaluate the potential chronic toxicity of EPO-018B. Subcutaneous administration doses were designed as 0, 0.2, 1 and 10mg/kg for six months for 160 rats (20/gender/group) and 0, 0.3, 3 and 20mg/kg for nine months for 32 monkeys (4/gender/group) once every three weeks. The vehicles received the same volume of physiological saline injection. All animals survived to the scheduled necropsies after six weeks (for rats) and fourteen weeks (for monkeys) recovery period, except for the two high-dose female rats and two high-dose male monkeys, which were considered related to the increased RBCs, chronic blood hyperviscosity and chronic cardiac injury. EPO-018B is supposed to be subcutaneously injected once every month and the intended human therapeutic dose is 0.025mg/kg. The study findings at 0.2mg/kg for rats and 0.3mg/kg for monkeys were considered to be the study NOAEL (the no observed adverse effect level), which were more than ten times the intended human therapeutic dose. Higher doses caused adverse effects related to the liver toxicity, cardiotoxicity, appearance of neutralizing antibodies of EPO-018B and the decrease of serum glucose and cholesterol. Most treatment-induced effects were reversible or revealed ongoing recovery upon the discontinuation of treatment. The sequelae occurred in rats and monkeys were considered secondary to exaggerated pharmacology and would less likely occur in the intended patient population. As to the differences between human beings and animals, the safety of EPO-018B need to be further confirmed in the future clinical studies.

  5. LPXRFamide peptide stimulates growth hormone and prolactin gene expression during the spawning period in the grass puffer, a semi-lunar synchronized spawner.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2016-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) plays as a multifunctional neurohormone that controls reproduction in birds and mammals. LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) peptide, the fish ortholog of GnIH, has been shown to regulate the secretion of not only gonadotropin (GTH) but also growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), which are potentially important for gonadal function. To investigate the role of LPXRFa peptide on reproduction of the grass puffer, which spawns in semilunar cycles, we examined changes in the levels of gh and prl expression over the several months during the reproductive cycle, and the effects of goldfish LPXRFa peptide-1 (gfLPXRFa-1) on their expression were examined using primary pituitary cultures. The expression levels of both gh and prl showed significant changes during the reproductive cycle in both sexes with one peak in the spawning and pre-spawning periods for gh and prl, respectively. Particularly, gh showed substantial increase in expression in the spawning and post-spawning periods, indicative of its essentiality in the advanced stage of reproduction. gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated the expression of both gh and prl but there was a marked difference in response between them: gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated gh expression at a relatively low dose but little effect was observed on prl. Combined with the previous results of daily and circadian oscillations of lpxrfa expression, the present results suggest that LPXRFa peptide is important in the control of the cyclic reproduction by serving as a multifunctional hypophysiotropic factor that regulates the expression of gh and prl as well as GTH subunit genes.

  6. Graphene oxide-stimulated myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells on PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y. C.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Hong, S. W.; Oh, J.-W.; Kim, C.-S.; Kim, B.; Hyun, J. K.; Kim, Y.-J.; Han, D.-W.

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade, much attention has been paid to graphene-based nanomaterials because they are considered as potential candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds for tissue engineering and substrates for the differentiation of stem cells. Until now, electrospun matrices composed of various biodegradable copolymers have been extensively developed for tissue engineering and regeneration; however, their use in combination with graphene oxide (GO) is novel and challenging. In this study, nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 phage with RGD peptide displayed on its surface (RGD peptide-M13 phage) were prepared as extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking substrates. RGD peptide is a tripeptide (Arg-Gly-Asp) found on ECM proteins that promotes various cellular behaviors. The physicochemical properties of PLGA and RGD peptide-M13 phage (PLGA/RGD peptide) nanofiber matrices were characterized by atomic force microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, the growth of C2C12 mouse myoblasts on the PLGA/RGD peptide matrices was examined by measuring the metabolic activity. Moreover, the differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts on the matrices when treated with GO was evaluated. The cellular behaviors, including growth and differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts, were substantially enhanced on the PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices when treated with GO. Overall, these findings suggest that the PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices can be used in combination with GO as a novel strategy for skeletal tissue regeneration.

  7. An extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaves and purified gymnemic acid inhibits glucose-stimulated gastric inhibitory peptide secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fushiki, T; Kojima, A; Imoto, T; Inoue, K; Sugimoto, E

    1992-12-01

    Gastric inhibitory peptide release into the portal vein in response to duodenal infusion of D-glucose was studied in the presence of a leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and inhibitors of some putative glucose sensors and carriers in the intestinal lumen. Intraduodenal infusion of D-glucose significantly increased the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentration in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide induced by glucose was significantly depressed by concomitantly infused leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin but not by cytochalasin B. Mannoheptulose, which inhibits glycolysis, and procaine and lidocaine, which inhibit the vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen, did not affect portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentrations. These results suggest that a glucose receptor, which interacts with the leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin, exists for the release of immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide and that the glucose receptor for gastric inhibitory peptide release is not likely to be identical with a glucose transporter or a vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen.

  8. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  9. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1.

  10. Effects of amino acids on melanoma targeting and clearance properties of Tc-99m-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2013-11-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of amino acids on melanoma targeting and clearance properties of new (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-DTyr-Asp]-Lys-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RNleD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, RPheD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, and RdPheD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin-1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, (99m)Tc-RFD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, and (99m)Tc-RfD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of Gly with Ser, Phe, and dPhe increased the MC1 receptor binding affinities of the peptides, whereas the substitution of Gly with Nle decreased the MC1 receptor binding affinity of the peptide. (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (18.01 ± 4.22% ID/g) and the lowest kidney and liver uptake among these (99m)Tc-peptides. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by SPECT/CT using (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH as an imaging probe. It is desirable to reduce the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH to facilitate its potential therapeutic application.

  11. Campylobacter jejuni carbon starvation protein A (CstA) is involved in peptide utilization, motility and agglutination, and has a role in stimulation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, J J; Vegge, C S; Frøkiær, H; Howlett, R M; Krogfelt, K A; Kelly, D J; Ingmer, H

    2013-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of severe gastroenteritis in the developed world. The major symptom of campylobacteriosis is inflammatory diarrhoea. The molecular mechanisms of this infection are poorly understood compared to those of less frequent disease-causing pathogens. In a previous study, we identified C. jejuni proteins that antibodies in human campylobacteriosis patients reacted with. One of the immunogenic proteins identified (Cj0917) displays homology to carbon starvation protein A (CstA) from Escherichia coli, where this protein is involved in the starvation response and peptide uptake. In contrast to many bacteria, C. jejuni relies on amino acids and organic acids for energy, but in vivo it is highly likely that peptides are also utilized, although their mechanisms of uptake are unknown. In this study, Biolog phenotype microarrays have been used to show that a ΔcstA mutant has a reduced ability to utilize a number of di- and tri-peptides as nitrogen sources. This phenotype was restored through genetic complementation, suggesting CstA is a peptide uptake system in C. jejuni. Furthermore, the ΔcstA mutant also displayed reduced motility and reduced agglutination compared to WT bacteria; these phenotypes were also restored through complementation. Murine dendritic cells exposed to UV-killed bacteria showed a reduced IL-12 production, but the same IL-10 response when encountering C. jejuni ΔcstA compared to the WT strain. The greater Th1 stimulation elicited by the WT as compared to ΔcstA mutant cells indicates an altered antigenic presentation on the surface, and thus an altered recognition of the mutant. Thus, we conclude that C. jejuni CstA is important not only for peptide utilization, but also it may influence host-pathogen interactions.

  12. Statins promote the degradation of extracellular amyloid {beta}-peptide by microglia via stimulation of exosome-associated insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) secretion.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Irfan Y; Barth, Esther; Christian, Leonie; Siepmann, Martin; Kumar, Sathish; Singh, Sandesh; Tolksdorf, Karen; Heneka, Michael T; Lütjohann, Dieter; Wunderlich, Patrick; Walter, Jochen

    2010-11-26

    Epidemiological studies indicate that intake of statins decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer disease. Cellular and in vivo studies suggested that statins might decrease the generation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) from the β-amyloid precursor protein. Here, we show that statins potently stimulate the degradation of extracellular Aβ by microglia. The statin-dependent clearance of extracellular Aβ is mainly exerted by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) that is secreted in a nonconventional pathway in association with exosomes. Stimulated IDE secretion and Aβ degradation were also observed in blood of mice upon peripheral treatment with lovastatin. Importantly, increased IDE secretion upon lovastatin treatment was dependent on protein isoprenylation and up-regulation of exosome secretion by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. These data demonstrate a novel pathway for the nonconventional secretion of IDE via exosomes. The modulation of this pathway could provide a new strategy to enhance the extracellular clearance of Aβ.

  13. The Anorexigenic Peptide Neuromedin U (NMU) Attenuates Amphetamine-Induced Locomotor Stimulation, Accumbal Dopamine Release and Expression of Conditioned Place Preference in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallöf, Daniel; Vestlund, Jesper; Engel, Jörgen A.; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine dependence, besides its substantial economical consequence, is a serious cause of mortality and morbidity. By investigations of the neurochemical correlates through which addictive drugs, such as amphetamine, activate the mesoaccumbal dopamine system unique targets for treatment of drug addiction can be identified. This reward link consists of a dopamine projection from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) suggesting that these brain areas are important for reward. The physiological function of gut-brain peptides has expanded beyond food intake modulation and involves regulation of drug reinforcement. A novel candidate for reward regulation is the anorexigenic peptide neuromedin U (NMU). We therefore investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of NMU on amphetamine’s well-documented effects on the mesoaccumbal dopamine system, i.e. locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release in mice. In addition, the effect of accumbal NMU administration on locomotor activity was examined. The effect of NMU, icv or intra-NAc, on the expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) was elucidated. Firstly, we showed that icv administration of NMU attenuate the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation, accumbal dopamine release and expression of CPP in mice. Secondly, we found that a lower dose of NMU (icv) reduce the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice. Thirdly, we demonstrated that NMU administration into the NAc block the ability of amphetamine to cause a locomotor stimulation in mice. However, accumbal NMU administration did not attenuate the amphetamine-induced expression of CPP in mice. Our novel data suggest that central NMU signalling is involved in development of amphetamine dependence. PMID:27139195

  14. Free fatty acids stimulate the polymerization of tau and amyloid beta peptides. In vitro evidence for a common effector of pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D. M.; Binder, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by the concomitant deposition of extracellular filaments composed of beta-amyloid peptides and intracellular filaments composed of the microtubule-associated protein tau. We have discovered that free fatty acids (FFAs) stimulate the assembly of both amyloid and tau filaments in vitro. The minimal concentration of arachidonic acid observed to stimulate tau assembly ranged from 10 to 20 mumol/L, depending on the source of the purified tau. Tau preparations that do not exhibit spontaneous assembly were among those induced to polymerize by arachidonic acid. All long-chain FFAs tested enhanced assembly to some extent, although greater stimulation was usually associated with unsaturated forms. Utilizing fluorescence spectroscopy, unsaturated FFAs were also demonstrated to induce beta-amyloid assembly. The minimal concentration of oleic or linoleic acid observed to stimulate the assembly of amyloid was 40 mumol/L. The filamentous nature of these thioflavin-binding amyloid polymers was verified by electron microscopy. These data define a new set of tools for examining the polymerization of amyloid and tau proteins and suggest that cortical elevations of FFAs may constitute a unifying stimulatory event driving the formation of two of the obvious pathogenetic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9176408

  15. Pregnancy Increases Relaxation in Human Omental Arteries to the CGRP Family of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanlin; Betancourt, Ancizar; Chauhan, Madhu; Balakrishnan, Meena; Lugo, Fernando; Anderson, Matthew L; Espinoza, Jimmy; Fox, Karin; Belfort, Michael; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2015-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CALCB) and its family members adrenomedullin (ADM) and intermedin (ADM2) play important roles in maintaining vascular adaptations during pregnancy in animal models. The present study was designed to evaluate the responses of omental arteries to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 in pregnant and nonpregnant women, and to determine the mechanisms involved. By using resistance omental arteries collected from nonpregnant women (n = 15) during laparotomy and from term pregnant women (n = 15) at cesarean delivery, this study shows that the receptor components--calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CALCRL) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1, 2 and 3--are localized to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in omental arteries, with increased expressions of both mRNA and protein in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. The myography study demonstrated that CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 (0.1-100 nM) dose dependently relax U46619 (1 muM) precontracted omental artery segments, and the maximum possible effects to CALCB and ADM2, but not to ADM, are significantly enhanced in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. Further, the vasodilatory responses to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 are reduced by inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NAME), adenylyl cyclase (SQ22536), voltage-activated potassium channels (4-aminopyrodin and tetrabutylammonium), Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel (charybdotoxin), and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin). In conclusion, the CALCB family of peptides, CALCB and ADM2, increase human omental artery relaxation during pregnancy through diverse mechanisms, including NO, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) and prostaglandins, and thus could contribute to the vascular adaptations during pregnancy in the human.

  16. Pregnancy Increases Relaxation in Human Omental Arteries to the CGRP Family of Peptides1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Betancourt, Ancizar; Chauhan, Madhu; Balakrishnan, Meena; Lugo, Fernando; Anderson, Matthew L.; Espinoza, Jimmy; Fox, Karin; Belfort, Michael; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CALCB) and its family members adrenomedullin (ADM) and intermedin (ADM2) play important roles in maintaining vascular adaptations during pregnancy in animal models. The present study was designed to evaluate the responses of omental arteries to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 in pregnant and nonpregnant women, and to determine the mechanisms involved. By using resistance omental arteries collected from nonpregnant women (n = 15) during laparotomy and from term pregnant women (n = 15) at cesarean delivery, this study shows that the receptor components—calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CALCRL) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1, 2 and 3—are localized to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in omental arteries, with increased expressions of both mRNA and protein in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. The myography study demonstrated that CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 (0.1–100 nM) dose dependently relax U46619 (1 muM) precontracted omental artery segments, and the maximum possible effects to CALCB and ADM2, but not to ADM, are significantly enhanced in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. Further, the vasodilatory responses to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 are reduced by inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NAME), adenylyl cyclase (SQ22536), voltage-activated potassium channels (4-aminopyrodin and tetrabutylammonium), Ca2+-activated potassium channel (charybdotoxin), and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin). In conclusion, the CALCB family of peptides, CALCB and ADM2, increase human omental artery relaxation during pregnancy through diverse mechanisms, including NO, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) and prostaglandins, and thus could contribute to the vascular adaptations during pregnancy in the human. PMID:26510864

  17. Brevinin-2-related peptide and its [D4K] analogue stimulate insulin release in vitro and improve glucose tolerance in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Y H A; Patterson, S; Flatt, P R; Conlon, J M

    2010-08-01

    The cationic, alpha-helical frog skin antimicrobial peptide B2RP (brevinin-2-related peptide) shows sequence similarity to antimicrobial peptides belonging to the brevinin-2 family, but lacks the C-terminal cyclic heptapeptide domain (Cys-Lys-Xaa (4)-Cys). Synthetic B2RP produced a significant (p<0.05) stimulation of insulin release (148% of basal rate at a concentration of 1 muM with a maximum response of 222% of basal rate at a concentration of 3 muM) from BRIN-BD11 clonal beta-cells without increasing the release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. Increasing cationicity of B2RP while maintaining amphipathicity by the substitution Asp (4) --> Lys enhanced the insulin-releasing potency (137% of basal rate at a concentration of 0.3 muM; p<0.05) with no stimulation of lactate dehydrogenase release. In contrast, the L18K, and D4K, L18K analogues were toxic to the cells, and the K16A analogue, with increased amphipathicity and hydrophobicity, showed reduced potency. Administration of [D4K]B2RP (100 nmol/kg body weight) to mice fed a high fat diet to induce obesity and insulin-resistance significantly (p<0.05) enhanced insulin release and improved glucose tolerance during the 60-minute period following an intraperitoneal glucose load (18 mmol/kg body weight). B2RP shows potential for development into an agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Melanoma targeting with [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogs: Effects of cyclization on the radiopharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Carta, Davide; Salvarese, Nicola; Morellato, Nicolò; Gao, Feng; Sihver, Wiebke; Pietzsch, Hans Jurgen; Biondi, Barbara; Ruzza, Paolo; Refosco, Fiorenzo; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio; Bolzati, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of cyclization on the biological profile of a [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analog. A lactam bridge-cyclized H-Cys-Ahx-βAla(3)-c[Lys(4)-Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Glu(10)]-Arg(11)-Pro-Val-NH2 (NAP-NS2) and the corresponding linear H-Cys-Ahx-βAla-Nle-Asp-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-NH2 (NAP-NS1) peptide were synthetized, characterized by ESI-MS spectroscopy and their melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) binding affinity was determined in B16/F10 melanoma cells. The consistent [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled compounds were readily obtained in high specific activity and their stability and biological properties were assessed. As an example, the chemical identity of [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) was confirmed by carrier added experiments supported by radio/UV HPLC analysis combined with ESI(+)-MS. Compared with the linear peptide, cyclization negatively affected the biological properties of NAP-NS2 peptide by reducing its binding affinity for MC1R and by decreasing the overall excretion rate of the corresponding [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled peptide from the body as well as its in vivo stability. [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) was evaluated for its potential as melanoma imaging probe in murine melanoma model. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies on B16/F10 melanoma model of [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) clearly evidenced that the radiolabeled linear peptide keeps its biological properties up on the conjugation to the [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-building block. The progressive increase of the tumor-to-nontarget ratios over the time indicates a quite stable interaction between the radio-complex and the MC1R.

  19. The 'headache tree' via umbellulone and TRPA1 activates the trigeminovascular system.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Vriens, Joris; Prenen, Jean; Benemei, Silvia; De Siena, Gaetano; la Marca, Giancarlo; Andrè, Eunice; Preti, Delia; Avonto, Cristina; Sadofsky, Laura; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Dussor, Greg; Porreca, Frank; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Appendino, Giovanni; Nilius, Bernd; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2012-02-01

    The California bay laurel or Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt., is known as the 'headache tree' because the inhalation of its vapours can cause severe headache crises. However, the underlying mechanism of the headache precipitating properties of Umbellularia californica is unknown. The monoterpene ketone umbellulone, the major volatile constituent of the leaves of Umbellularia californica, has irritating properties, and is a reactive molecule that rapidly binds thiols. Thus, we hypothesized that umbellulone stimulates the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel in a subset of peptidergic, nocioceptive neurons, activating the trigeminovascular system via this mechanism. Umbellulone, from µM to sub-mM concentrations, selectively stimulated transient receptor potential ankyrin 1-expressing HEK293 cells and rat trigeminal ganglion neurons, but not untransfected cells or neurons in the presence of the selective transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonist, HC-030031. Umbellulone evoked a calcium-dependent release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from rodent trigeminal nerve terminals in the dura mater. In wild-type mice, umbellulone elicited excitation of trigeminal neurons and released calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerve terminals. These two responses were absent in transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 deficient mice. Umbellulone caused nocioceptive behaviour after stimulation of trigeminal nerve terminals in wild-type, but not transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 deficient mice. Intranasal application or intravenous injection of umbellulone increased rat meningeal blood flow in a dose-dependent manner; a response selectively inhibited by systemic administration of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 or calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists. These data indicate that umbellulone activates, through a transient receptor potential ankyrin 1-dependent mechanism, the trigeminovascular system, thereby causing

  20. Involvement of neurokinins in antidromic vasodilatation in hairy and hairless skin of the rat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Häbler, H J; Timmermann, L; Stegmann, J U; Jänig, W

    1999-01-01

    By intravenous application of the specific neurokininl receptor antagonist SR 140333 and the specific calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist CGRP8-37 we tested to what extent neurokinins (substance P, neurokinin A) and calcitonin gene-related peptide are involved in mediating antidromic vasodilatation in skin of anaesthetized Wistar rats. The lumbar sympathetic chain was sectioned bilaterally between ganglia L2 and L3 to remove ongoing vasoconstrictor activity to the hindquarter. The left dorsal root L5 was stimulated electrically at 1 Hz with 20 pulses supramaximal for activating C-fibres to evoke antidromic vasodilatation which was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry on the glabrous plantar skin and the hairy skin of the lower hindlimb within the left L5 territory. Stimulation-induced vasodilatation was tested after applying SR 140333 (0.1 mg/kg) and CGRP8-37 (0.3 mg/kg) alone or in combination. SR 140333 delayed the onset of the vasodilatation, but did not change its amplitude. CGRP8-37 reduced the amplitude and duration of the vasodilatation, but did not affect the latency of its onset. In combination, SR 140333 potentiated the effect of CGRP8-37 on the amplitude of the vasodilatation in glabrous but not in hairy skin and CGRP8-37 potentiated the delayed onset produced by SR 140333 in both cutaneous tissues. Antidromic vasodilatation in glabrous skin was almost totally blocked by SR 140333 (0.1 mg/kg) in combination with CGRP8-37 (0.45 mg/kg), but a substantial dilatation remained in hairy skin. It is concluded that in rat glabrous skin the vasodilatation evoked by a low level of activity in small-diameter primary afferents is likely to result from the release and synergistic action of neurokinins (substance P and/or neurokinin A) and calcitonin gene-related peptide, while in hairy skin neurokinins are involved to a minor extent only.

  1. Prenatal exposure to ethanol stimulates hypothalamic CCR2 chemokine receptor system: Possible relation to increased density of orexigenic peptide neurons and ethanol drinking in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    Chang, G-Q; Karatayev, O; Leibowitz, S F

    2015-12-03

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that maternal consumption of ethanol during pregnancy increases alcohol drinking in the offspring. Possible underlying mechanisms may involve orexigenic peptides, which are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure and themselves promote drinking. Building on evidence that ethanol stimulates neuroimmune factors such as the chemokine CCL2 that in adult rats is shown to colocalize with the orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the present study sought to investigate the possibility that CCL2 or its receptor CCR2 in LH is stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure, perhaps specifically within MCH neurons. Our paradigm of intraoral administration of ethanol to pregnant rats, at low-to-moderate doses (1 or 3g/kg/day) during peak hypothalamic neurogenesis, caused in adolescent male offspring twofold increase in drinking of and preference for ethanol and reinstatement of ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice paradigm under an intermittent access schedule. This effect of prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with an increased expression of MCH and density of MCH(+) neurons in LH of preadolescent offspring. Whereas CCL2(+) cells at this age were low in density and unaffected by ethanol, CCR2(+) cells were dense in LH and increased by prenatal ethanol, with a large percentage (83-87%) identified as neurons and found to colocalize MCH. Prenatal ethanol also stimulated the genesis of CCR2(+) and MCH(+) neurons in the embryo, which co-labeled the proliferation marker, BrdU. Ethanol also increased the genesis and density of neurons that co-expressed CCR2 and MCH in LH, with triple-labeled CCR2(+)/MCH(+)/BrdU(+) neurons that were absent in control rats accounting for 35% of newly generated neurons in ethanol-exposed rats. With both the chemokine and MCH systems believed to promote ethanol consumption, this greater density of CCR2(+)/MCH(+) neurons in the LH of preadolescent rats suggests that

  2. Stimulus-evoked release of neuropeptides is enhanced in sensory neurons from mice with a heterozygous mutation of the Nf1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hingtgen, C M; Roy, S L; Clapp, D W

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I is a common autosomal dominant disease characterized by formation of multiple benign and malignant tumors. People with this disorder also experience chronic pain, which can be disabling. Neurofibrinomin, the protein product of the NF1 gene (neurofibromin gene (human)), is a guanosine triphosphate activating protein for p21(ras). Loss of NF1 results in an increase in activity of the p21(ras) transduction cascade. Because of the growing evidence suggesting involvement of downstream components of the p21(ras) transduction cascade in the sensitization of nociceptive sensory neurons, we examined the stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, from primary sensory neurons of mice with a mutation of the Nf1 gene (neurofibromin gene (mouse)) (Nf1+/-). Measuring immunoreactive substance P and immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide by radioimmunoassay, we demonstrated that capsaicin-stimulated release of neuropeptides is three to five-fold higher in spinal cord slices from Nf1+/- mice than from wildtype mouse tissue. In addition, the potassium and capsaicin-stimulated release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide from cultures of sensory neurons isolated from Nf1+/- mice was more than double that from cultures of wildtype neurons. Treatment of wildtype sensory neurons with nerve growth factor for 5-7 days mimicked the enhanced stimulus-evoked release observed from the Nf1+/- neurons. When nerve growth factor was removed 48 h before conducting release experiments, nerve growth factor-induced augmentation of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide release from Nf1+/- neurons was more pronounced than in Nf1+/- sensory neurons that were treated with nerve growth factor continuously for 5-7 days. Thus, sensory neurons from mice with a heterozygous mutation of the Nf1 gene that is analogous to the human disease neurofibromatosis type I, exhibit increased sensitivity to chemical

  3. Supra-molecular assembly of a lumican-derived peptide amphiphile enhances its collagen-stimulating activity.

    PubMed

    Walter, Merlin N M; Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Hamley, Ian W; Connon, Che J

    2016-02-01

    C16-YEALRVANEVTLN, a peptide amphiphile (PA) incorporating a biologically active amino acid sequence found in lumican, has been examined for its influence upon collagen synthesis by human corneal fibroblasts in vitro, and the roles of supra-molecular assembly and activin receptor-like kinase ALK receptor signaling in this effect were assessed. Cell viability was monitored using the Alamar blue assay, and collagen synthesis was assessed using Sirius red. The role of ALK signaling was studied by receptor inhibition. Cultured human corneal fibroblasts synthesized significantly greater amounts of collagen in the presence of the PA over both 7-day and 21-day periods. The aggregation of the PA to form nanotapes resulted in a notable enhancement in this activity, with an approximately two-fold increase in collagen production per cell. This increase was reduced by the addition of an ALK inhibitor. The data presented reveal a stimulatory effect upon collagen synthesis by the primary cells of the corneal stroma, and demonstrate a direct influence of supra-molecular assembly of the PA upon the cellular response observed. The effects of PA upon fibroblasts were dependent upon ALK receptor function. These findings elucidate the role of self-assembled nanostructures in the biological activity of peptide amphiphiles, and support the potential use of a self-assembling lumican derived PA as a novel biomaterial, intended to promote collagen deposition for wound repair and tissue engineering purposes.

  4. Upregulation of pronociceptive mediators and downregulation of opioid peptide by adrenomedullin following chronic exposure to morphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Li, J; Chen, P; Hong, Y

    2014-11-07

    Adrenomedullin (AM) belongs to a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family and has been demonstrated to recruit CGRP following chronic use of morphine and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in inflammation. The present study investigated the possibility that AM initiates the changes of other molecules contributing to the development of morphine tolerance in its chronic use. Intrathecal (i.t.) co-administration of the AM receptor antagonist AM22-52 (35.8 μg) inhibited tolerance to morphine-induced analgesia while a daily injection of the AM receptor agonist AM1-50 (8 μg, i.t., bolus) for 9 days induced a decrease in the potency of morphine analgesia and thermal hyperalgesia. Persistent exposure of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants to morphine (3.3 μM) for 4 days resulted in an increase in AM and CGRP mRNA levels. However, morphine failed to produce these effects in the presence of AM22-52 (2 μM). The i.t. administration of morphine for 6 days increased the expression of nNOS in the spinal dorsal horn and DRG neurons but decreased expression of the endogenous opioid peptide bovine adrenal medulla 22 (BAM22) in small- and medium-sized neurons in DRG. Particularly, the co-administration of AM22-52 (35.8 μg) inhibited the morphine-induced alterations in nNOS and BAM22. These results indicated that the increase in nNOS and CGRP expressions and the decrease in BAM22 were attributed to the increased AM receptor signaling induced by chronic morphine. The present study supports the hypothesis that the enhancement of AM bioactivity triggered upregulation of pronociceptive mediators and downregulation of pain-inhibiting molecule in a cascade contributing to the development of morphine tolerance.

  5. Cardiovascular effects of newly discovered peptide intermedin/adrenomedullin 2.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chun-Shui; Yang, Jing-Hui; Cai, Da-Yong; Zhao, Jing; Gerns, Helen; Yang, Jun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Tang, Chao-Shu; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2005-09-01

    Intermedin (IMD) is a novel member of the calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The present study aimed to investigate the cardiovascular effects of IMDs (IMD1-47 and IMD8-47) in rats. Intravenous administration of 150 nmol IMDs continuously decreased mean arterial pressure and inhibited cardiac function. Administration with IMDs decreased left ventricular end-systolic pressure (LVESP) and maximal rate of left-ventricle pressure development (+/-LVdp/dt(max)), and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). Changes with IMD1-47 treatment were close to that with IMD8-47 (P>0.05). Perfusion of isolated rat hearts in vitro with IMD8-47 (10(-8) and 10(-7)mol/L) resulted in lower LVSP, by 40 and 56% (P<0.01); lower +LVdp/dt (max), by 33 and 47% (P<0.01); lower -LVdp/dt(max), by 25 and 39% (P<0.01); but higher coronary perfusion flow (CPF), by 25% (P<0.05) and 33% (P<0.01), respectively, than controls. However, both IMD8-47 and IMD1-47 (from 10(-13) to 10(-7)mol/L) relaxed preconstricted aortic rings in a dose-dependent manner. Intravenous administration of IMD1-47 and IMD8-47 (10(-7)mol/L) in vivo increased the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) content by 68 and 150% (both P<0.01), respectively, in myocardia and 320 and 281% (both P<0.01), respectively, in aortas, compared with controls. Perfusion of isolated hearts with IMD1-47 and IMD8-47 (10(-7)mol/L) enhanced cAMP content by 24% (P<0.05) and 73% (P<0.01), respectively, compared with controls. IMDs inhibited 3H-Leucine incorporation in cardiomyocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. IMD1-47 and IMD8-47 (10(-7) and 10(-8)mol/L) decreased 3H-Leucine incorporation by 12-25% (P<0.01) and 14-18% (P<0.01), respectively. IMD mRNA was detected in cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes and isoproterenol-induced hypertrophic myocardia but not normal myocardia of adult rats. These results suggest that IMD might be a regulatory factor for cardiovascular function and myocardial hypertrophy as a

  6. Subchronic safety evaluation of EPO-018B, a pegylated peptidic erythropoiesis stimulating agent, after 5-week subcutaneous injection in Cynomolgus monkeys and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue-Lian; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Li, Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Zong, Ying; Lu, Guo-Cai; Yuan, Bo-Jun

    2013-10-01

    EPO-018B, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA), is coupled to polyethylene glycol (PEG) and designed to specifically bind and activate the erythropoietin (EPO) receptor to result in production of red blood cells. This study was designed to evaluate the potential subchronic toxicity of EPO-018B for Cynomolgus monkeys and Sprague-Dawley rats both at 0, 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg every week for 5 weeks, followed by 6-week recovery for rats and 12-week recovery for monkeys. The No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) for rats and monkeys were both considered to be at least 0.5 mg/kg/day, the minimum toxic dose to be 5.0 mg/kg/day and the severe toxic dose to be more than 50.0 mg/kg/day. The toxicological effects included the exaggerated pharmacology and secondary sequelae that resulted from an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment to healthy animals. Most treatment induced effects were reversible or showed ongoing recovery upon discontinuation of treatment. The anticipated patient population for EPO-018B treatment is targeted to be the anemia patients caused by chronic renal failure or chemotherapy against to cancer and is expected to have an ideal clinical application prospect.

  7. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 501-506] PMID:25644636

  8. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition.

  9. Alpha(1)- and beta-adrenoceptor stimulation differentially activate p38-MAPK and atrial natriuretic peptide production in the perfused amphibian heart.

    PubMed

    Aggeli, Ioanna-Katerina S; Gaitanaki, Catherine; Lazou, Antigone; Beis, Isidoros

    2002-08-01

    We investigated the activation of p38-MAPK by various adrenergic agents in the perfused Rana ridibunda heart. Phenylephrine (50 micromol l(-1)) rapidly induced the differential activation of all three mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies (ERK, JNKs and p38-MAPK) in this experimental system. Focusing on p38-MAPK response to phenylephrine, we found that the kinase phosphorylation reached maximal values at 30 s, declining thereafter to basal values at 15 min. p38-MAPK activation by phenylephrine was verified as exclusively alpha(1)-AR-mediated. Furthermore, SB203580 (1 micromol l(-1)) abolished the kinase phosphorylation by phenylephrine. Isoproterenol (50 micromol l(-1)) was also shown to activate p38-MAPK in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. A marked, sustained p38-MAPK activation profile was observed at 25 degrees C, while at 18 degrees C the kinase response to isoproterenol was modest. Isoproterenol effect on p38-MAPK stimulation was beta-AR-mediated. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the enhanced presence of phosphorylated p38-MAPK and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in both phenylephrine- and isoproterenol-stimulated hearts, a reaction completely blocked by the respective specific antagonists, or the specific p38-MAPK inhibitor SB203580. These findings indicate a functional correlation between p38-MAPK activation and ANP accumulation in the perfused amphibian heart.

  10. Differential induction of innate defense antimicrobial peptides in primary nasal epithelial cells upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines, Th17 cytokines or bacterial conditioned medium from Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Burgey, Christine; Kern, Winfried V; Römer, Winfried; Rieg, Siegbert

    2016-01-01

    To date it is incompletely understood why half of the human population is intrinsically resistant to Staphylococcus aureus colonization whereas the other half is intermittently or permanently colonized. Nasal colonization represents the primary niche for S. aureus. We therefore investigated whether primary nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) express antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) upon stimulation by inflammatory cytokines or bacterial conditioned medium (BCM) of different colonizing and invasive staphylococci. Stimulation with classical cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ) potently induced hBD-3 and RNase7 in HNEC. Th17 cytokines (IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22) yielded comparably weak hBD-3 and RNase7 induction and no synergistic effects with classical cytokines. BCM of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates moderately induced hBD3 and RNase7 mRNA expression without significant differences when comparing colonizing vs. invasive isolates. Our results indicate that HNEC contribute to the innate defense by secretion of an AMP-containing chemical defense shield along the nasal mucosa i.e. within the primary colonization niche of S. aureus. Further studies are needed to investigate whether a deficient AMP expression in the nasal mucosa may be related to different S. aureus carrier states. AMPs or AMP-inducing agents may be promising candidates for future topical decolonization regimens that aim to prevent invasive S. aureus infections.

  11. ER stress stimulates production of the key antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin, by forming a previously unidentified intracellular S1P signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Ikushiro, Hiroko; Seo, Ho Seong; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yano, Takato; Holleran, Walter M; Elias, Peter; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2016-03-08

    We recently identified a previously unidentified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling mechanism that stimulates production of a key innate immune element, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), in mammalian cells exposed to external perturbations, such as UVB irradiation and other oxidative stressors that provoke subapoptotic levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, independent of the well-known vitamin D receptor-dependent mechanism. ER stress increases cellular ceramide and one of its distal metabolites, S1P, which activates NF-κB followed by C/EBPα activation, leading to CAMP production, but in a S1P receptor-independent fashion. We now show that S1P activates NF-κB through formation of a previously unidentified signaling complex, consisting of S1P, TRAF2, and RIP1 that further associates with three stress-responsive proteins; i.e., heat shock proteins (GRP94 and HSP90α) and IRE1α. S1P specifically interacts with the N-terminal domain of heat shock proteins. Because this ER stress-initiated mechanism is operative in both epithelial cells and macrophages, it appears to be a universal, highly conserved response, broadly protective against diverse external perturbations that lead to increased ER stress. Finally, these studies further illuminate how ER stress and S1P orchestrate critical stress-specific signals that regulate production of one protective response by stimulating production of the key innate immune element, CAMP.

  12. Minocycline inhibits the enhancement of antidromic primary afferent stimulation-evoked vasodilation following intradermal capsaicin injection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Yue, Yue; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Lin, Qing

    2010-09-27

    Neurogenic inflammation is induced by inflammatory mediators released in peripheral tissue from primary afferent nociceptors. Our previous studies suggest that neurogenic inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin results from the enhancement of dorsal root reflexes (DRRs), which involve antidromic activation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Numerous studies have reported the important role of glial modulation in pain. However, it remains unclear whether glial cells participate in the process of neurogenic inflammation-induced pain. Here we tested the role of DRG satellite glial cells (SGCs) in this process in anesthetized rats by administration of a glial inhibitor, minocycline. Electrical stimuli (ES, frequency 10 Hz; duration 1 ms; strength 3 mA) were applied to the cut distal ends of the L4-5 dorsal roots. The stimuli evoked antidromic action potentials designed to mimic DRRs. Local cutaneous blood flow in the hindpaw was measured using a Doppler flow meter. Antidromic ES for 10 min evoked a significant vasodilation that could be inhibited dose-dependently by local administration of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, CGRP8-37. Pretreatment with capsaicin intradermally injected into the hindpaw 2h before the ES enhanced greatly the vasodilation evoked by antidromic ES, and this enhancement could be reversed by minocycline pretreatment. Our findings support the view that neurogenic inflammation following capsaicin injection involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via the generation of DRRs. Inhibition of neurogenic inflammation by minocycline is suggested to be associated with its inhibitory effect on SGCs that are possibly activated following capsaicin injection.

  13. Noxious mechanical stimulation evokes the segmental release of opioid peptides that induce μ-opioid receptor internalization in the presence of peptidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Lijun; Song, Bingbing; Chen, Wenling; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides an ideal way to locate areas of opioid peptide release. We used this method to study opioid release in the spinal cord evoked by noxious stimuli in anesthetized rats. Previous studies have shown that opioids released in the spinal cord produce MOR internalization only when they are protected from peptidase degradation. Accordingly, rats were implanted with chronic intrathecal catheters that were used to inject a mixture of peptidase inhibitors (amastatin, captopril and phosphoramidon) onto the lumbar spinal cord. Five minutes later, a noxious stimulus was delivered to the paw. Lumbar spinal segments were double-stained with antibodies against MORs and neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) using immunofluorescence. Mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw consisted of repeated 10 sec clamps with a hemostat for 10 min. In the ipsilateral dorsal horn, the stimulus produced abundant NK1R internalization in segments L3–L6, and a more modest but significant MOR internalization in segments L5 and L6. In the contralateral dorsal horn, NK1R was substantially lower and MOR internalization was negligible. The same mechanical stimulus applied to a forepaw did not produce NK1R or MOR internalization in the lumbar spinal cord. Thermal stimulation consisted of immersing a hindpaw in water at 52 °C for 2 min. It produced substantial NK1R internalization ipsilaterally in segment L6, but no MOR internalization. These results show that mechanical stimulation induces segmental opioid release, i.e., in the dorsal horn receiving the noxious signals and not in other spinal segments. PMID:18207137

  14. Solid-phase peptide head-to-side chain cyclodimerization: discovery of C(2)-symmetric cyclic lactam hybrid α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)/agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) analogues with potent activities at the human melanocortin receptors.

    PubMed

    Mayorov, Alexander V; Cai, Minying; Palmer, Erin S; Liu, Zhihua; Cain, James P; Vagner, Josef; Trivedi, Dev; Hruby, Victor J

    2010-10-01

    A novel hybrid melanocortin pharmacophore was designed based on the pharmacophores of the agouti-signaling protein (ASIP), an endogenous melanocortin antagonist, and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), an endogenous melanocortin agonist. The designed hybrid ASIP/MSH pharmacophore was explored in monomeric cyclic, and cyclodimeric templates. The monomeric cyclic disulfide series yielded peptides with hMC3R-selective non-competitive binding affinities. The direct on-resin peptide lactam cyclodimerization yielded nanomolar range (25-120 nM) hMC1R-selective full and partial agonists in the cyclodimeric lactam series which demonstrates an improvement over the previous attempts at hybridization of MSH and agouti protein sequences. The secondary structure-oriented pharmacophore hybridization strategy will prove useful in development of unique allosteric and orthosteric melanocortin receptor modulators. This report also illustrates the utility of peptide cyclodimerization for the development of novel GPCR peptide ligands.

  15. A nutritional supplement containing lactoferrin stimulates the immune system, extends lifespan, and reduces amyloid β peptide toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Patricia; Llopis, Silvia; Gonzalez, Nuria; Ramón, Daniel; Serrano, Gabriel; Torrens, Ana; Serrano, Juan M; Navarro, Maria; Genovés, Salvador

    2017-03-01

    Lactoferrin is a highly multifunctional glycoprotein involved in many physiological functions, including regulation of iron absorption and immune responses. Moreover, there is increasing evidence for neuroprotective effects of lactoferrin. We used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to test the protective effects, both on phenotype and transcriptome, of a nutraceutical product based on lactoferrin liposomes. In a dose-dependent manner, the lactoferrin-based product protected against acute oxidative stress and extended lifespan of C. elegans N2. Furthermore, Paralysis of the transgenic C. elegans strain CL4176, caused by Aβ1-42 aggregates, was clearly ameliorated by treatment. Transcriptome analysis in treated nematodes indicated immune system stimulation, together with enhancement of processes involved in the oxidative stress response. The lactoferrin-based product also improved the protein homeostasis processes, cellular adhesion processes, and neurogenesis in the nematode. In summary, the tested product exerts protection against aging and neurodegeneration, modulating processes involved in oxidative stress response, protein homeostasis, synaptic function, and xenobiotic metabolism. This lactoferrin-based product is also able to stimulate the immune system, as well as improving reproductive status and energy metabolism. These findings suggest that oral supplementation with this lactoferrin-based product could improve the immune system and antioxidant capacity. Further studies to understand the molecular mechanisms related with neuronal function would be of interest.

  16. Stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion downstream of the ligand-gated ion channel TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Edward C.; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Gentry, Clive; Psichas, Arianna; Habib, Abdella M.; Bevan, Stuart; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus-coupled incretin secretion from enteroendocrine cells plays a fundamental role in glucose homeostasis, and could be targeted for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Here, we investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in enteroendocrine L-cells producing glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). By microarray and qPCR analysis we identified trpa1 as an L-cell enriched transcript in the small intestine. Calcium imaging of primary L-cells and the model cell line GLUTag revealed responses triggered by the TRPA1 agonists allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC, mustard oil), carvacrol and polyunsaturated fatty acids, that were blocked by TRPA1 antagonists. Electrophysiology in GLUTag cells showed that carvacrol induced a current with characteristics typical of TRPA1 and triggered the firing of action potentials. TRPA1 activation caused an increase in GLP-1 secretion from primary murine intestinal cultures and GLUTag cells; an effect that was abolished in cultures from trpa1−/− mice or by pharmacological TRPA1 inhibition. These findings present TRPA1 as a novel sensory mechanism in enteroendocrine L-cells, coupled to the facilitation of GLP-1 release, which may be exploitable as a target for treating diabetes. PMID:25325736

  17. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  18. Stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptor C attenuates accumulation of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide synthesis in ammonia-treated astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska, Marta; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2010-11-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress contribute to ammonia-induced astrocytic dysfunction in hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of cultured astrocytes with 5 mmol/L ammonium chloride ('ammonia') increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the toxic NADPH oxidase reaction product, •O(2)(-). Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), natriuretic peptide C and a selective natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-C ligand, cANP((4-23),) each decreased the total ROS content both in control cells and cells treated with ammonia. However, attenuation of •O(2)(-) accumulation by ANP and cANP((4-23),) was observed in ammonia-treated cells only and the effect of cANP((4-23)) was decreased when the NADPH oxidase-regulatory protein G(iα-2) was blocked with a specific anti-G(iα-2) antibody. Although in contrast to ANP, cANP((4-23)) did not elevate the cGMP content in control astrocytes, it decreased cAMP content and reduced the expression of G(iα-2), the NADPH oxidase-regulatory protein. The results show the presence of functional NPR-C in astrocytes, activation of which (i) attenuates basal ROS production, and (ii) prevents excessive accumulation of the toxic ROS species, •O(2)(-) by ammonia. Ammonia, ANP and cANP((4-23)) added separately, each stimulated formation of NO(x) (nitrates + nitrites) which was associated with up-regulation of the activity [cANP((4-23))] or/and expression (ammonia) of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase. However, the ammonia-induced increase of NO(x) was not augmented by co-addition of ANP, and was reduced to the control level by co-addition of cANP((4-23)) , indicating that activation of NPR-C may also reduce nitrosative stress. Future hepatic encephalopathy therapy might include the use of cANP((4-23)) or other NPR-C agonists to control oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by ammonia.

  19. Single-chain bifunctional vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-C-terminal peptide (CTP) is superior to the combination therapy of recombinant VEGF plus FSH-CTP in stimulating angiogenesis during ovarian folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trousdale, Rhonda K; Pollak, Susan V; Klein, Jeffrey; Lobel, Leslie; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Feirt, Nikki; Lustbader, Joyce W

    2007-03-01

    Infertility technologies often employ exogenous gonadotropin therapy to increase antral follicle production. In an effort to enhance ovarian response, several long-acting FSH therapies have been developed including an FSH-C-terminal peptide (CTP), where the FSH subunits are linked by the CTP moiety from human chorionic gonadotropin, which is responsible for the increased half-life of human chorionic gonadotropin. We found that administration of FSH-CTP for ovarian hyperstimulation in rats blunted ovarian follicle vascular development. In women, reduced ovarian vasculature has been associated with lower pregnancy rates. We were interested in determining whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy could enhance ovarian angiogenesis in FSH-CTP-treated rats. Coadministration of systemic FSH-CTP plus recombinant VEGF was compared with treatment with a novel, single-chain bifunctional VEGF-FSH-CTP (VFC) analog. For VFC, the FSH portion targets the protein to the ovary and stimulates follicle growth, whereas VEGF enhances local vascular development. Both in vitro and in vivo studies confirm the dual FSH and VEGF action of the VFC protein. Evaluation of ovarian follicle development demonstrates that administration of combination therapy using VEGF and FSH-CTP failed to increase follicle vasculature above levels seen with FSH-CTP monotherapy. However, treatment with VFC significantly increased follicle vascular development while concurrently increasing the number of large antral follicles produced. In conclusion, we report the production and characterization of a long-acting, bifunctional VEGF-FSH-CTP protein that is superior to combination therapy for enhancing VEGF activity in the ovary and stimulating follicular angiogenesis in rats.

  20. Expression of cholecystokinin2-receptor in rat and human L cells and the stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by gastrin treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Cao, Xun; Liu, Xiao-Min

    2015-03-01

    Gastrin is a gastrointestinal hormone secreted by G cells. Hypergastrinemia can improve blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. These positive effects are primarily due to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells. In recent years, many receptors that regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) have been identified in enteroendocrine L cell lines. This led us to hypothesize that, in addition to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells, L cells also express cholecystokinin2-receptor (CCK2R), which may regulate GLP-1 secretion and have synergistic effects on glucose homeostasis. Our research provides a preliminary analysis of CCK2R expression and the stimulating effect of gastrin treatment on GLP-1 secretion in a human endocrine L cell line, using RT-PCR, Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and ELISA analyses. The expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3, which regulate GLP-1 biosynthesis, were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Double immunofluorescence labeling was utilized to assess the intracellular localization of CCK2R and GLP-1 in L cells harvested from rat colon tissue. Our results showed that CCK2R was expressed in both the human L cell line and the rat L cells. We also showed that treatment with gastrin, a CCK2R agonist, stimulated the secretion of GLP-1, and that this effect was likely due to increased expression of proglucagon and PCSK1 (also known as prohormone convertase 3 (PC3 gene)). These results not only provide a basis for the role gastrin may play in intestinal L cells, and may also provide the basis for the development of a method of gastrin-mediated glycemic regulation.

  1. Differential gene expression of RAW 264.7 macrophages in response to the RGD peptide lunasin with and without lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2011-10-01

    Lunasin is a novel peptide from soybean with demonstrated chemopreventive property. We compared the effect of lunasin on gene expression of RAW 264.7 macrophages with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulation. Our hypothesis was that lunasin will have a differential effect in RAW 264.7 gene expression in a normal and challenged state. Analysis of the microarray data using False Discovery Rate (FDR) method resulted in the identification of 340 up-regulated and 162 down-regulated genes (FDR p-value <0.05) associated with simultaneous treatment of lunasin and LPS for 24h. Treatment of lunasin with no LPS for 24h resulted in the up-regulation of 855 genes and down-regulation of 397 genes. Pre-treatment of lunasin for 24h resulted in the up-regulation of 35 genes and down-regulation of 65 genes in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. GeneVenn analysis of these three sets of genes showed that there are 66 genes common among the three groups which are mostly associated with regulation of cell death, ion binding and transcription as datamined by DAVID. Analysis of the 838 genes unique to lunasin alone by functional annotation clustering tool showed that lunasin mostly affected genes associated with RNA processing, apoptosis and protein kinase activity. Further datamining of these genes by ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) showed that lunasin affected genes involved in cellular growth and proliferation, cellular function and maintenance, and cell to cell signaling and interaction. These findings support the potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic use of lunasin against cancer.

  2. Intermedin in rat uterus: changes in gene expression and peptide levels across the estrous cycle and its effects on uterine contraction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study demonstrates the expression of intermedin (IMD) and its receptor components in the uterus of the female rat during the estrous cycle and its effect on uterine contraction. Methods The gene expression level of intermedin and its receptor components and the peptide level of intermedin were studied by real-time RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) respectively. The separation of precursor and mature IMD was studied by gel filtration chromatography and EIA. The localization of IMD in the uterus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. The effect of IMD on in vitro uterine contraction was studied by organ bath technique. Results Uterine mRNAs of Imd and its receptor components and IMD levels displayed cyclic changes across the estrous cycle. Imd mRNA level was the highest at proestrus while the IMD level was the highest at diestrus. IMD was found in the luminal and glandular epithelia and IMD treatment significantly reduced the amplitude and frequency of uterine contraction but not the basal tone. Both calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist hCGRP8-37 and adrenomedullin (ADM) receptor antagonist hADM22-52 partially abolished the inhibitory effect of IMD on uterine contraction while the specific IMD receptor antagonist hIMD17-47 completely blocked the actions. The enzyme inhibitors of NO (L-NAME) and PI3K (Wortmannin) pathways diminished the IMD effects on uterine contraction while the cAMP/PKA blocker, KT5720, had no effect, indicating an involvement of NO and PI3K/Akt but not PKA. Conclusions IMD and the gene expression of its receptor components are differentially regulated in the uterus during the estrous cycle and IMD inhibits uterine contraction by decreasing the amplitude and frequency. PMID:23442365

  3. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  4. A peptide from Porphyra yezoensis stimulates the proliferation of IEC-6 cells by activating the insulin-like growth factor I receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Kyeong; Kim, In-Hye; Choi, Youn-Hee; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-02-01

    Porphyra yezoensis (P. yezoensis) is the most noteworthy red alga and is mainly consumed in China, Japan and Korea. In the present study, the effects of a P. yezoensis peptide (PY‑PE) on cell proliferation and the associated signaling pathways were examined in IEC‑6 rat intestinal epithelial cells. First, the MTS assay showed that PY‑PE induced cell proliferation in a dose‑dependent manner. Subsequently, the mechanism behind the proliferative activity induced by PY‑PE was determined. The insulin‑like growth factor‑I receptor (IGF‑IR) signaling pathway was the main focus as it plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. PY‑PE increased the protein and mRNA expression of IGF‑IR, insulin receptor substrate‑1, Shc and PY‑99. In addition, PY‑PE stimulated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase phosphorylation and phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase/Akt activation but inhibited p38 and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase phosphorylation. Furthermore, PY‑PE treatment increased protein and mRNA expression levels of activator protein‑1, which regulates cell proliferation and survival, in the nuclear fraction. These results have significant implications for understanding the role of cell proliferation signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

  5. Fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma peptide-YY levels are elevated in critical illness and associated with feed intolerance: an observational, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Fraser, Robert JL; Chapman, Marianne; Bryant, Laura K; Wishart, Judith; Holloway, Richard H; Horowitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Delayed gastric emptying and feed intolerance occur frequently in the critically ill. In these patients, gastric motor responses to nutrients are disturbed. Peptide YY (PYY) slows gastric emptying. The aim of this study was to determine fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma PYY concentrations and their relationship to cholecystokinin (CCK) in critically ill patients. Methods Studies were performed in 19 unselected mechanically ventilated critically ill patients (12 males; 48 ± 7 years old) in a randomised, single-blind fashion. Subjects received a 60-minute duodenal infusion of Ensure® at either 1 or 2 kcal/minute. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 20, 40, 60, and 180 minutes following commencement of the nutrient infusion for the measurement of plasma PYY and CCK concentrations (using radioimmunoassay). Patient data were compared to 24 healthy subjects (17 males; 43 ± 2 years old). Results Fasting PYY concentration was higher in patients (P < 0.05), particularly in those with feed intolerance (P < 0.05). Plasma PYY concentrations were higher in patients during nutrient infusion (area under the curve [AUC] at 1 kcal/minute: 2,265 ± 718 versus 1,125 ± 138 pmol/l.min, P < 0.05; at 2 kcal/minute: 2,276 ± 303 versus 1,378 ± 210 pmol/l.min, P = 0.01) compared to healthy subjects. The magnitude of PYY elevation was greater in patients during the 1 kcal/minute infusion (AUC: 441 ± 153 versus 186 ± 58 pmol/l.min, P < 0.05), but not the 2 kcal/minute infusion. Fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma CCK concentrations were higher in patients (P < 0.05). There was a relationship between plasma PYY and CCK concentrations during fasting (r = 0.52, P < 0.05) and nutrient infusion (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Conclusion In critical illness, both fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma PYY concentrations are elevated, particularly in patients with feed intolerance, in conjunction with increased CCK concentrations. PMID:17173662

  6. Isolation and characterization of a resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); confirmation of the GM-CSF amino acid sequence by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsarbopoulos, A.; Pramanik, B. N.; Labdon, J. E.; Reichert, P.; Gitlin, G.; Patel, S.; Sardana, V.; Nagabhushan, T. L.; Trotta, P. P.

    1993-01-01

    A trypsin-resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was isolated and analyzed by high-energy Cs+ liquid secondary-ion (LSI) mass spectrometric analysis. This analysis provided successful detection of the high-mass disulfide-linked core peptide as well as information confirming the existence of disulfide pairing. Similarly, LSI mass spectrometric analysis of the peptide fragments isolated chromatographically from a Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digest of rhGM-CSF provided rapid confirmation of the cDNA-derived sequence and determination of the existing disulfide bonds between cysteine residues 54-96 and 88-121. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to measure the molecular weight of the intact protein and to determine the number of the disulfide bonds in the protein molecule by comparative analysis of the protein before and after reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol. PMID:8268804

  7. Evaluation of new Tc-99m-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides for melanoma imaging.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2013-09-03

    The purpose of this study was to examine the melanoma targeting and imaging properties of two new (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH {c[Asp-Arg-Thr-Asp-DTyr]-Lys-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2} and RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH peptides were synthesized, and their melanocortin-1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution and melanoma imaging properties of (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The IC50 values of RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH were 0.7 ± 0.07 and 1.0 ± 0.3 nM in B16/F1 melanoma cells. Both (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH displayed high melanoma uptake. (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH exhibited the highest tumor uptake of 18.77 ± 5.13% ID/g at 2 h postinjection, whereas (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH reached the highest tumor uptake of 19.63 ± 4.68% ID/g at 4 h postinjection. Both (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH showed low accumulation in normal organs (<1.7% ID/g) except for the kidneys at 2 h postinjection. The renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH was 135.14 ± 23.62 and 94.01 ± 18.31% ID/g at 2 h postinjection, respectively. The melanoma lesions were clearly visualized by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT using either (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH or (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH as an imaging probe at 2 h postinjection. Overall, the introduction of Thr or Val residue retained high melanoma uptake of (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH. However, high renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH need to be reduced to facilitate their future applications.

  8. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  9. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139 is activated by the peptides: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-, and β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH, and β-MSH), and the conserved core motif HFRW.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Shehata, Mohamed A; Hauser, Alexander S; Isberg, Vignir; Mokrosinski, Jacek; Andersen, Kirsten B; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Gloriam, David E; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that is expressed primarily in the brain. Not much is known regarding the function of GPR139. Recently we have shown that GPR139 is activated by the amino acids l-tryptophan and l-phenylalanine (EC50 values of 220 μM and 320 μM, respectively), as well as di-peptides comprised of aromatic amino acids. This led us to hypothesize that GPR139 may be activated by peptides. Sequence alignment of the binding cavities of all class A GPCRs, revealed that the binding pocket of the melanocortin 4 receptor is similar to that of GPR139. Based on the chemogenomics principle "similar targets bind similar ligands", we tested three known endogenous melanocortin 4 receptor agonists; adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and α- and β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH and β-MSH) on CHO-k1 cells stably expressing the human GPR139 in a Fluo-4 Ca(2+)-assay. All three peptides, as well as their conserved core motif HFRW, were found to activate GPR139 in the low micromolar range. Moreover, we found that peptides consisting of nine or ten N-terminal residues of α-MSH activate GPR139 in the submicromolar range. α-MSH1-9 was found to correspond to the product of a predicted cleavage site in the pre-pro-protein pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). Our results demonstrate that GPR139 is a peptide receptor, activated by ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, the conserved core motif HFRW as well as a potential endogenous peptide α-MSH1-9. Further studies are needed to determine the functional relevance of GPR139 mediated signaling by these peptides.

  10. Reinnervation of hind limb extremity after lumbar dorsal root ganglion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Bréjot, Thomas; Cressant, Arnaud; Bacci, Josette; Saïd, Gérard; Tadié, Marc; Heard, Jean Michel

    2005-12-01

    Loss of dorsal root ganglion neuron, or injury to dorsal roots, induces permanent somatosensory defect without therapeutic option. We explored an approach to restoring hind limb somatosensory innervation after elimination of L4, L5 and L6 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats. Somatosensory pathways were reconstructed by connecting L4, L5 and L6 lumbar dorsal roots to T10, T11 and T12 intercostal nerves, respectively, thus allowing elongation of thoracic ganglion neuron peripheral axons into the sciatic nerve. Connection of thoracic dorsal root ganglion neurons to peripheral tissues was documented 4 and 7 months after injury. Myelinated and unmyelinated fibers regrew in the sciatic nerve. Nerve terminations expressing calcitonin-gene-related-peptide colonized the footpad skin. Retrograde tracing showed that T10, T11 and T12 dorsal root ganglion neurons expressing calcitonin-gene-related-peptide or the neurofilament RT97 projected axons to the sciatic nerve and the footpad skin. Recording of somatosensory evoked potentials in the upper spinal cord indicated connection between the sciatic nerve and the central nervous system. Hind limb retraction in response to nociceptive stimulation of the reinnervated footpads and reversion of skin lesions suggested partial recovery of sensory function. Proprioceptive defects persisted. Delayed somatosensory reinnervation of the hind limb after destruction of lumbar dorsal root neurons in rats indicates potential approaches to reduce chronic disability after severe injury to somatosensory pathways.

  11. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an endogenous aldehyde, causes pain and neurogenic inflammation through activation of the irritant receptor TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Trevisani, Marcello; Siemens, Jan; Materazzi, Serena; Bautista, Diana M; Nassini, Romina; Campi, Barbara; Imamachi, Noritaka; Andrè, Eunice; Patacchini, Riccardo; Cottrell, Graeme S; Gatti, Raffaele; Basbaum, Allan I; Bunnett, Nigel W; Julius, David; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2007-08-14

    TRPA1 is an excitatory ion channel expressed by a subpopulation of primary afferent somatosensory neurons that contain substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Environmental irritants such as mustard oil, allicin, and acrolein activate TRPA1, causing acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Genetic studies indicate that TRPA1 is also activated downstream of one or more proalgesic agents that stimulate phospholipase C signaling pathways, thereby implicating this channel in peripheral mechanisms controlling pain hypersensitivity. However, it is not known whether tissue injury also produces endogenous proalgesic factors that activate TRPA1 directly to augment inflammatory pain. Here, we report that recombinant or native TRPA1 channels are activated by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde that is produced when reactive oxygen species peroxidate membrane phospholipids in response to tissue injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress. HNE provokes release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide from central (spinal cord) and peripheral (esophagus) nerve endings, resulting in neurogenic plasma protein extravasation in peripheral tissues. Moreover, injection of HNE into the rodent hind paw elicits pain-related behaviors that are inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists and absent in animals lacking functional TRPA1 channels. These findings demonstrate that HNE activates TRPA1 on nociceptive neurons to promote acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Our results also provide a mechanism-based rationale for developing novel analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents that target HNE production or TRPA1 activation.

  12. Role of capsaicin sensitive nerves in epidermal growth factor effects on gastric mucosal injury and blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J; Teng, C; Chen, F; Wee, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and capsaicin protect against experimental gastric mucosal injury. Capsaicin exerts its gastroprotective effect by stimulating afferent neurones leading to release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) which causes gastric hyperaemia. EGF also causes gastric hyperaemia but whether it acts via capsaicin sensitive neurones is unknown. 
Aims—To assess the influence of: (1) capsaicin desensitisation on EGF effects on gastric mucosal injury and gastric mucosal blood flow; and (2) close arterial infusion of hCGRP8-37, a CGRP antagonist, on EGF effects on gastric mucosal blood flow. 
Methods—The absolute ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury model in the rat was used. Gastric mucosal damage was assessed by planimetry and light microscopy. Gastric mucosal blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry in a gastric chamber preparation. 
Results—Capsaicin desensitisation abolished the gastroprotective and gastric hyperaemic effects of EGF. Close arterial infusion of hCGRP8-37 antagonised the hyperaemic effect of both capsaicin and EGF. 
Conclusion—Results show that EGF may exert its gastroprotective and gastric hyperaemic effects via capsaicin sensitive afferent neurones. 

 Keywords: capsaicin; epidermal growth factor; gastric mucosal injury; gastric mucosal blood flow; calcitonin gene related peptide antagonist; rat PMID:9577339

  13. Development of peptide-containing nerves in the human fetal prostate gland.

    PubMed Central

    Jen, P Y; Dixon, J S

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical methods were used to study the developing peptidergic innervation of the human fetal prostate gland in a series of specimens ranging in gestational age from 13 to 30 wk. The overall innervation of each specimen was visualised using protein gene product 9.5 (PGP), a general nerve marker. The onset and development of specific neuropeptide-containing subpopulations were investigated using antisera to neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), bombesin (BOM), somatostatin (SOM), leu-enkephalin (l-ENK) and met-enkephalin (m-ENK). In addition the occurrence and distribution of presumptive noradrenergic nerves was studied using antisera to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). At 13 wk numerous branching PGP-immunoreactive (-IR) nerves were observed in the capsule of the developing prostate gland and surrounding the preprostatic urethra but the remainder of the gland was devoid of nerves. The majority of nerves in the capsule contained D beta H and TH and were presumed to be noradrenergic in type while other nerves (in decreasing numbers) contained NPY, l-ENK, SP and CGRP. Nerves associated with the preprostatic urethra did not contain any of the neuropeptides under investigation. At 17 wk the density of nerves in the capsule had increased and occasional m-ENK-, VIP- and BOM-IR nerve fibres were also observed. In addition PGP, D beta H-, TH-, NPY- and l-ENK-IR nerves occurred in association with smooth muscle bundles which at 17 wk were present in the outer part of the gland. Occasional PGP-IR nerves were also present at the base of the epithelium forming some of the prostatic glands. At 23 wk some of the subepithelial nerves showed immunoreactivity for NPY, VIP or l-ENK. At 26 wk smooth muscle bundles occurred throughout the gland and were richly innervated by PGP, D beta H and TH-IR nerves while a less dense plexus was formed by NPY- and l

  14. Increases in transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 mRNA and protein in primary afferent neurons stimulated by protein kinase C and their possible role in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by our group demonstrates pharmacologically that the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to initiate neurogenic inflammation by the release of neuropeptides in the periphery. In this study, expression of TRPV1, phosphorylated protein kinase C (p-PKC) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were visualized using immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blots to examine whether increases in TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels evoked by capsaicin injection are subject to modulation by the activation of PKC and to analyze the role of this process in the pathogenesis of neurogenic inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the hindpaw skin of anesthetized rats evoked increases in the expression of TRPV1, CGRP and p-PKC in mRNA and/or protein levels and in the number of single labeled TRPV1, p-PKC and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral L4–5 DRGs. Co-expressions of TRPV1 with p-PKC and/or CGRP in DRG neurons were also significantly increased after CAP injection. These evoked expressions both at molecular and cellular levels were significantly inhibited after TRPV1 receptors were blocked by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (5 μg) or PKC was inhibited by chelerythrine chloride (5 μg). Taken together, these results provide evidence that up-regulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels under inflammatory conditions evoked by capsaicin injection is subject to modulation by the PKC cascade in which increased CGRP level in DRG neurons may be related to the initiation of neurogenic inflammation. Thus, up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons seems critical for initiating acute neurogenic inflammation. PMID:18752301

  15. A rhesus monkey model to characterize the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in lung development. Evidence for stimulation of airway growth.

    PubMed Central

    Li, K; Nagalla, S R; Spindel, E R

    1994-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is developmentally expressed in human fetal lung and is a growth factor for normal and neoplastic lung but its role in normal lung development has yet to be clearly defined. In this study we have characterized the expression of GRP and its receptor in fetal rhesus monkey lung and determined the effects of bombesin on fetal lung development in vitro. By RNA blot analysis, GRP mRNA was first detectable in fetal monkey lung at 63 days gestation, reached highest levels at 80 days gestation, and then declined to near adult levels by 120 days gestation; a pattern closely paralleling GRP expression in human fetal lung. As in human lung, in situ hybridization localized GRP mRNA to neuroendocrine cells though during the canalicular phase of development (between 63-80 days gestation) GRP mRNA was present not only in classic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, but also in cells of budding airways. Immunohistochemistry showed that bombesin-like immunoreactivity was present in neuroendocrine cells, but not in budding airways, suggesting that in budding airways either the GRP mRNA is not translated, is rapidly secreted, or a related, but different RNA is present. RNase protection analysis using a probe to the monkey GRP receptor demonstrated that the time course of receptor RNA expression closely paralleled the time course of GRP RNA expression. In situ hybridization showed that GRP receptors were primarily expressed in epithelial cells of the developing airways. Thus GRP would appear to be secreted from neuroendocrine cells to act on target cells in developing airways. This hypothesis was confirmed by organ culture of fetal monkey lung in the presence of bombesin and bombesin antagonists. Bombesin treatment at 1 and 10 nM significantly increased DNA synthesis in airway epithelial cells and significantly increased the number and size of airways in cultured fetal lung. In fact, culturing 60 d fetal lung for 5 d with 10 nM bombesin increased airway size

  16. Antisecretory Factor Peptide AF-16 Inhibits the Secreted Autotransporter Toxin-Stimulated Transcellular and Paracellular Passages of Fluid in Cultured Human Enterocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Both the endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) protein and peptide AF-16, which has a sequence that matches that of the active N-terminal region of AF, inhibit the increase in the epithelial transport of fluid and electrolytes induced by bacterial toxins in animal and ex vivo models. We conducted a study to investigate the inhibitory effect of peptide AF-16 against the increase of transcellular passage and paracellular permeability promoted by the secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) in a cultured cellular model of the human intestinal epithelial barrier. Peptide AF-16 produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the Sat-induced increase in the formation of fluid domes, in the mucosal-to-serosal passage of d-[1-14C]mannitol, and in the rearrangements in the distribution and protein expression of the tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins ZO-1 and occludin in cultured human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. In addition, we show that peptide AF-16 also inhibits the cholera toxin-induced increase of transcellular passage and the Clostridium difficile toxin-induced effects on paracellular permeability and TJ protein organization in Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. Treatment of cell monolayers by the lipid raft disorganizer methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished the inhibitory activity of peptide AF-16 at the transcellular passage level and did not modify the effect of the peptide at the paracellular level. PMID:25534938

  17. Neuropeptide receptors as potential drug targets in the treatment of inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Erika; Pozsgai, Gábor; Hajna, Zsófia; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Szolcsányi, János

    2014-01-01

    Cross-talk between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems exists via regulator molecules, such as neuropeptides, hormones and cytokines. A number of neuropeptides have been implicated in the genesis of inflammation, such as tachykinins and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Development of their receptor antagonists could be a promising approach to anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy. Anti-inflammatory neuropeptides, such as vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, urocortin, adrenomedullin, somatostatin, cortistatin, ghrelin, galanin and opioid peptides, are also released and act on their own receptors on the neurons as well as on different inflammatory and immune cells. The aim of the present review is to summarize the most prominent data of preclinical animal studies concerning the main pharmacological effects of ligands acting on the neuropeptide receptors. Promising therapeutic impacts of these compounds as potential candidates for the development of novel types of anti-inflammatory drugs are also discussed. PMID:23432438

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-2 intracellularly stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and specifically induces submucosal arteriole vasodilation via a sheer stress-independent, local neural mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-responsive neuropeptide that exerts diverse actions in the gastrointestinal tract, including enhancing mucosal cell survival and proliferation, mucosal blood flow, luminal nutrient uptake, and suppressing gastric motility and secretion. We have shown th...

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  20. Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have direct access to and effects on pro-opiomelanocortin/cocaine- and amphetamine-stimulated transcript neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Secher, Anna; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Pyke, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides lowering blood glucose, liraglutide reduces bodyweight, and has recently also been approved for the obesity indication. Acutely, GLP-1 markedly reduces gastric emptying, and this effect was previously believed to at least partly explain the effect on bodyweight loss. However, recent studies in both humans and animals have shown that GLP-1R agonists, such as liraglutide, that lead to pharmacological concentrations for 24 h/day only have a minor effect on gastric emptying; such an effect is unlikely to have lasting effects on appetite reduction. Liraglutide has been shown to have direct effects in the arcuate nucleus of the rodent brain, activating pro-opiomelanocortin neurons and increasing levels of the cocaine- and amphetamine-stimulated transcript neuropeptide messenger ribonucleic acid, which correlate nicely to clinical studies where liraglutide was shown to increase feelings of satiety. However, despite the lack of a GLP-1R on agouti-related peptide/neuropeptide Y neurons, liraglutide also was able to prevent a hunger associated increase in agouti-related peptide and neuropeptide Y neuropeptide messenger ribonucleic acid, again with a strong correlation to clinical studies that document reduced hunger feelings in patients while taking liraglutide. Studies using fluorescent labeled liraglutide, as well as other GLP-1R agonists, and analysis using single-plane illumination microscopy show that such medium-sized peptide-based compounds can directly access not only circumventricular organs of the brain, but also directly access discrete regions in the hypothalamus. The direct effects of long-acting GLP-1R agonists in the hypothalamus are likely to be an important new pathway in understanding GLP-1R agonist mediated weight loss.

  1. Substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala linker dramatically decreased the renal uptake of 99mTc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala could reduce the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (1) {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-dTyr-Asp]-β-Ala-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RTD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (2), RVD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (3), RAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (4), NAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (5), and EAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (6) peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin 1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of their (99m)Tc-conjugates were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of the Lys linker with β-Ala linker dramatically reduced the renal uptake of all six (99m)Tc-peptides. (99m)Tc-4 exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (15.66 ± 6.19% ID/g) and the lowest kidney uptake (20.18 ± 3.86% ID/g) among these (99m)Tc-peptides at 2 h postinjection. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT using (99m)Tc-4 as an imaging probe.

  2. Interactions between opioid-peptides-containing pathways and GABA(A)-receptors-mediated systems modulate panic-like-induced behaviors elicited by electric and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Fabrício; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2006-08-09

    Aiming to clarify the effect of interactive interconnections between the endogenous opioid peptides-neural links and GABAergic pathways on panic-like responses, in the present work, the effect of the peripheral and central administration of morphine or the non-specific opioid receptors antagonist naloxone was evaluated on the fear-induced responses (defensive attention, defensive immobility and escape behavior) elicited by electric and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus. Central microinjections of opioid drugs in the inferior colliculus were also performed followed by local administration of the GABA(A)-receptor antagonist bicuculline. The defensive behavior elicited by the blockade of GABAergic receptors in the inferior colliculus had been quantitatively analyzed, recording the number of crossing, jump, rotation and rearing, in each minute, during 30 min, in the open-field test. The opioid receptors stimulation with morphine decreased the defensive attention, the defensive immobility and escape behavior thresholds, and the non-specific opioid receptors blockade caused opposite effects, enhancing the defensive behavior thresholds. These effects were corroborated by either the stimulation or the inhibition of opioid receptors followed by the GABA(A) receptor blockade with bicuculline, microinjected into the inferior colliculus. There was a significant increase in the diverse fear-induced responses caused by bicuculline with the pretreatment of the inferior colliculus with morphine, and the opposite effect was recorded after the pretreatment of the inferior colliculus nuclei with naloxone followed by bicuculline local administration. These findings suggest an interaction between endogenous opioid-peptides-containing connections and GABA(A)-receptor-mediated system with direct influence on the organization of the panic-like or fear-induced responses elaborated in the inferior colliculus during critical emotional states.

  3. Peptide IDR-1002 Inhibits NF-κB Nuclear Translocation by Inhibition of IκBα Degradation and Activates p38/ERK1/2–MSK1-Dependent CREB Phosphorylation in Macrophages Stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Huante-Mendoza, Alejandro; Silva-García, Octavio; Oviedo-Boyso, Javier; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Baizabal-Aguirre, Víctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a critical molecular defense mechanism of the innate immune system that mediates the elimination of disease-causing bacteria. Repair of the damaged tissue, and the reestablishment of homeostasis, must be accomplished after elimination of the pathogen. The innate defense regulators (IDRs) are short cationic peptides that mimic natural host defense peptides and are effective in eliminating pathogens by enhancing the activity of the immune system while controlling the inflammatory response. Although the role of different IDRs as modulators of inflammation has been reported, there have been only limited studies of the signaling molecules regulated by this type of peptide. The present study investigated the effect of IDR-1002 on nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors that are responsible for triggering and controlling inflammation, respectively, in macrophages. We found that TNF-α and COX-2 expression, IκBα phosphorylation, and NF-κB nuclear translocation were strongly inhibited in macrophages pre-incubated with IDR-1002 and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). IDR-1002 also increased CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 via activation of the p38/ERK1/2–MSK1 signaling pathways without detectable expression of the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 involved is suppressing inflammation or alternative activation. Transcriptional activation of NF-κB and CREB is known to require interaction with the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). To test for CBP–NF-κB and CBP–CREB complex formation, we performed co-immunoprecipitation assays. These assays showed that IDR-1002 inhibited the interaction between CBP and NF-κB in macrophages stimulated with LPS, which might explain the inhibition of TNF-α and COX-2 expression. Furthermore, the complex between CBP and CREB in macrophages stimulated with IDR-1002 was also inhibited, which might explain why IDR-1002 did

  4. Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Min Bum; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Jin Ku; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Ik Hwan; Seok, Heon; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Ho

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CopA3 peptide isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial activity. •Our study reported that CopA3 has anticancer and immunosuppressive effects. •We here demonstrated that CopA3 has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. •CopA3 degrades p27Kip1 protein and this mediates effects of CopA3 on neuronal cells. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimer’s disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects.

  5. Inhibition of phospholipase D activation by CYL-26z in formyl peptide-stimulated neutrophils involves the blockade of RhoA activation.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Chen, Yeh-Long; Tzeng, Cherng-Chyi; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-09-15

    5-[4-Acridin-9-ylamino]phenyl]-5-methyl-3-methylenedihydrofuran-2-one (CYL-26z) inhibited the formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)-stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) activity, which was assessed by the production of phosphatidylethanol (PEt) in the presence of ethanol, in rat neutrophils (IC50 1.2+/-0.2 microM). CYL-26z caused a slight but significant attenuation of the global protein tyrosine phosphorylation stimulated by fMLP only at concentrations of CYL-26z up to 30 microM. CYL-26z blocked the membrane recruitment of protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha) at concentrations of CYL-26z > or =3 microM, but failed to affect the membrane association of PKC-betaI and -betaII. The translocation of RhoA to the membrane was attenuated by CYL-26z (IC50 3.8+/-0.8 microM) in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils, whereas CYL-26z caused no significant inhibition of the membrane recruitment of ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf). CYL-26z inhibited the activation of RhoA and dissociation of the RhoA-Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complex in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils (IC50 1.8+/-1.0 microM and 1.8+/-0.9 microM, respectively). In a cell-free system, CYL-26z effectively attenuated the membrane association of RhoA in response to GTPgammaS (IC50 1.3+/-0.5 microM). In contrast, the GTPgammaS-stimulated translocation of Arf to membrane was suppressed only at concentrations of CYL-26z up to 30 microM. CYL-26z inhibited the fMLP-stimulated membrane expression of CD11b, CD45 and CD63, and the release of lysozyme and beta-glucuronidase. These results indicate that CYL-26z inhibited the fMLP-stimulated PLD activity, mainly through the blockade of RhoA activation, and degranulation in rat neutrophils.

  6. Helicobacter pylori HP(2-20) induces eosinophil activation and accumulation in superficial gastric mucosa and stimulates VEGF-alpha and TGF-beta release by interacting with formyl-peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Prevete, N; Rossi, F W; Rivellese, F; Lamacchia, D; Pelosi, C; Lobasso, A; Necchi, V; Solcia, E; Fiocca, R; Ceppa, P; Staibano, S; Mascolo, M; D'Argenio, G; Romano, M; Ricci, V; Marone, G; De Paulis, A

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils participate in the immune response against Helicobacter pylori, but little is known about their role in the gastritis associated to the infection. We recently demonstrated that the Hp(2-20) peptide derived from H. pylori accelerates wound healing of gastric mucosa by interacting with N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) expressed on gastric epithelial cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether eosinophils play a role in the repair of gastric mucosa tissue during H. pylori infection. Immuno-histochemistry and transmission electron microscopy were used to detect eosinophils in gastric mucosal biopsies. Eosinophil re-distribution occurred in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected patients: their density did not change in the deep mucosal layer, whereas it increased in the superficial lamina propria just below the foveolar epithelium; eosinophils entered the epithelium itself as well as the lumen of foveolae located close to the area harboring bacteria, which in turn were also engulfed by eosinophils. The H. pylori-derived peptide Hp(2-20) stimulated eosinophil migration through the engagement of FPR2 and FPR3, and also induced production of VEGF-A and TGF-beta, two key mediators of tissue remodelling. We also demonstrate that Hp(2-20) in vivo induced eosinophil infiltration in rat gastric mucosa after injury brought about by indomethacin. This study suggests that eosinophil infiltrate could modulate the capacity of gastric mucosa to maintain or recover its integrity thereby shedding light on the role of eosinophils in H. pylori infection.

  7. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients.

  8. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Competence Stimulating Peptides (CSPs) in Streptococcus pneumoniae Reveal Motifs Critical for Intra-group and Cross-group ComD Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifang; Koirala, Bimal; Sanchez, Lucia A; Phillips, Naiya R; Hamry, Sally R; Tal-Gan, Yftah

    2017-03-10

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a highly recombinogenic human pathogen that utilizes the competence stimulating peptide (CSP)-based quorum sensing (QS) circuitry to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from the environment and initiate its attack on the human host. Modulation of QS in this bacterium, either inhibition or activation, can therefore be used to attenuate S. pneumoniae infectivity and slow down pneumococcal resistance development. In this study, we set to determine the molecular mechanism that drives CSP:receptor binding and identify CSP-based QS modulators with distinct activity profiles. To this end, we conducted systematic replacement of the amino acid residues in the two major CSP signals (CSP1 and CSP2) and assessed the ability of the mutated analogs to modulate QS against both cognate and noncognate ComD receptors. We then evaluated the overall 3D structures of these analogs using circular dichroism (CD) to correlate between the structure and function of these peptides. Our CD analysis revealed a strong correlation between α-helicity and bioactivity for both specificity groups (CSP1 and CSP2). Furthermore, we identified the first pan-group QS activator and the most potent group-II QS inhibitor to date. These chemical probes can be used to study the role of QS in S. pneumoniae and as scaffolds for the design of QS-based anti-infective therapeutics against S. pneumoniae infections.

  9. When the leader gets loose: in vivo biosynthesis of a leaderless prenisin is stimulated by a trans-acting leader peptide.

    PubMed

    Khusainov, Rustem; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2012-11-05

    The nisin leader is believed to be crucial for nisin biosynthesis. Here, by using a construct completely lacking the leader peptide, we show that an up to fivefold-dehydrated leaderless prenisin can be obtained, as judged by MALDI-TOF MS, and that some of these species are biologically active, thus suggesting that at least three lanthionine rings are present. Notably, by expressing the leader peptide in trans together with the leaderless prenisin, we were able to increase the dehydration/cyclization efficiency of both NisB and NisC, but still with limited efficiency until the fifth dehydratable residue (Thr13) was processed, thereby enabling three rings to form. This, for the first time, demonstrates that 1) the leader is not absolutely necessary for the dehydration reaction of class I lantibiotics to occur in vivo; 2) the leader acts in trans in vivo; 3) the leader increases the efficiency of modification. Based on previous work and our current study, a model for the interactions of NisB and NisC with prenisin is proposed, in which the leader induces a more active conformation and/or productive complex formation of the biosynthetic machinery, and, when covalently bound, is involved in increasing the efficiency of dehydration to the C-terminal end of the prenisin substrate molecule.

  10. Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Min Bum; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Jin Ku; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Ik Hwan; Seok, Heon; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Ho

    2013-07-19

    We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimer's disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects.

  11. Endotoxin-Binding Peptides Derived from Casein Glycomacropeptide Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Inflammatory Responses via Blockade of NF-κB activation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xue; Gao, Dongxiao; Chen, Bin; Mao, Xueying

    2015-01-01

    Systemic low-grade inflammation and increased circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contribute to metabolic dysfunction. The inhibitory effects and underlying molecular mechanisms of casein glycomacropeptide (GMP) hydrolysate on the inflammatory response of LPS-stimulated macrophages were investigated. Results showed that the inhibitory effect of GMP hydrolysates obtained with papain on nitric oxide (NO) production were obviously higher than that of GMP hydrolysates obtained with pepsin, alcalase and trypsin (p < 0.05), and the hydrolysate obtained with papain for 1 h hydrolysis (GHP) exhibited the highest inhibitory effect. Compared with native GMP, GHP markedly inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner with decreased mRNA level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). GHP blocked toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway activation, accompanied by downregulation of LPS-triggered significant upregulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β gene expression. Furthermore, GHP could neutralize LPS not only by direct binding to LPS, but also by inhibiting the engagement of LPS with the TLR4/MD2 complex, making it a potential LPS inhibitor. In conclusion, these findings suggest that GHP negatively regulates TLR4-mediated inflammatory response in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, and therefore may hold potential to ameliorate inflammation-related issues. PMID:25923657

  12. The natriuretic peptides BNP and CNP increase heart rate and electrical conduction by stimulating ionic currents in the sinoatrial node and atrial myocardium following activation of guanylyl cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jeremy; Azer, John; Hua, Rui; Robbins, Courtney; Adamczyk, Andrew; McBoyle, Sarah; Bissell, Mary Beth; Rose, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are best known for their ability to regulate blood vessel tone and kidney function whereas their electrophysiological effects on the heart are less clear. Here, we measured the effects of BNP and CNP on sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrial electrophysiology in isolated hearts as well as isolated SAN and right atrial myocytes from mice. BNP and CNP dose-dependently increased heart rate and conduction through the heart as indicated by reductions in R-R interval, P wave duration and P-R interval on ECGs. In conjunction with these ECG changes BNP and CNP (100 nM) increased spontaneous action potential frequency in isolated SAN myocytes by increasing L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) and the hyperpolarization-activated current (I(f)). BNP had no effect on right atrial myocyte APs in basal conditions; however, in the presence of isoproterenol (10nM), BNP increased atrial AP duration and I(Ca,L). Quantitative gene expression and immunocytochemistry data show that all three NP receptors (NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C) are expressed in the SAN and atrium. The effects of BNP and CNP on SAN and right atrial myocytes were maintained in mutant mice lacking functional NPR-C receptors and blocked by the NPR-A antagonist A71915 indicating that BNP and CNP function through their guanylyl cyclase-linked receptors. Our data also show that the effects of BNP and CNP are completely absent in the presence of the phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor milrinone. Based on these data we conclude that NPs can increase heart rate and electrical conduction by activating the guanylyl cyclase-linked NPR-A and NPR-B receptors and inhibiting PDE3 activity.

  13. Substitution of Gly with Ala enhanced the melanoma uptake of technetium-99m-labeled Arg-Ala-Asp-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the melanoma targeting property of (99m)Tc-RAD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice and compare with (99m)Tc-RGD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH we previously reported. (99m)Tc-RAD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH exhibited rapid and high tumor uptake (19.91±4.02% ID/g at 2h post-injection) in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The tumor uptake of (99m)Tc-RAD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH was 1.51, 1.34 and 1.43 times the tumor uptake of (99m)Tc-RGD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH at 0.5, 2 and 4h post-injection, respectively. Flank B16/F1 melanoma lesions were clearly imaged at 2h post-injection using (99m)Tc-RAD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH as an imaging probe. The substitution of Gly with Ala significantly enhanced the melanoma uptake of (99m)Tc-RAD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH compared to (99m)Tc-RGD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice, providing a new insight into the design of α-MSH peptides for melanoma targeting.

  14. TLR2 ligand-synthetic long peptide conjugates effectively stimulate tumor-draining lymph node T cells of cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zom, Gijs G.; Welters, Marij J.P.; Loof, Nikki M.; Goedemans, Renske; Lougheed, Sinéad; Valentijn, Rob R.P.M.; Zandvliet, Maarten L.; Meeuwenoord, Nico J.; Melief, Cornelis J.M.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Van der Marel, Gijsbert A.; Filippov, Dmitri V.

    2016-01-01

    The potency of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16)-encoded synthetic long peptides (SLP), conjugated to an optimized Toll-like receptor 2 ligand (TLR2-L), was assessed in ex vivo activation of HPV16+ cancer patient-derived T cells. Two highly immunogenic SLP sequences derived from the oncogenic E6 protein of HPV16 were selected and conjugated to a Pam3CSK4-based TLR2-L under GMP conditions. Both conjugates were able to mature human DCs in vitro and to activate human skin-derived antigen-presenting cells (APCs) upon intradermal injection in an ex vivo skin model, associated with induction of a favorable chemokine profile to attract and activate T cells. The conjugated SLPs were efficiently processed by APCs, since HPV16-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones isolated from HPV16+ cervical tumors proliferated in response to both conjugates. The TLR2-L SLP conjugates significantly enhanced ex vivo T helper type 1 T-cell activation in cell suspensions obtained from tumor-draining lymph nodes (LN) resected during hysterectomy of HPV16+ cervical cancer patients. These results show that TLR2-L SLP conjugates can activate circulating or LN-derived tumor-specific T cells, a promising outcome for studying these two conjugates in a phase I/II clinical safety and immunogenicity trial. PMID:27564262

  15. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells through activation of activator protein-1 and up-regulation of the heparin affin regulatory peptide gene.

    PubMed

    Polytarchou, Christos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2005-12-09

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that hydrogen peroxide (HP) plays a role in cell proliferation and migration. In the present study we found that exogenous HP significantly induced human prostate cancer LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) seems to be involved in the stimulatory effect of HP, because the latter had no effect on stably transfected LNCaP cells that did not express HARP. Moreover, HP significantly increased HARP mRNA and protein amounts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Curcumin and activator protein-1 (AP-1) decoy oligonucleotides abrogated both HP-induced HARP expression and LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. HP increased luciferase activity of the 5'-flanking region of the HARP gene introduced in a reporter gene vector, an effect that was abolished when even one of the two putative AP-1 binding sites of the HARP promoter was mutated. The effect of HP seems to be due to the binding of Fra-1, JunD, and phospho-c-Jun to the HARP promoter. These results support the notion that HARP is important for human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration, establish the role of AP-1 in the up-regulation of HARP expression by low concentrations of HP, and characterize the AP-1 dimers involved.

  16. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) and neuroepithelial bodies (NEB): chemoreceptors and regulators of lung development.

    PubMed

    Van Lommel, A

    2001-06-01

    The airway and alveolar epithelia contain pulmonary neuroendocrine cells whose structure indicates an endocrine function. They are also in contact with sensory nerve fibres. These cells often aggregate into distinct corpuscles-neuroepithelial bodies-and carry membrane receptors sensitive to a number of stimuli, including hypoxia and nicotine. They synthesise, store and release a number of bioactive substances such as serotonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide and the mitogen bombesin. When these are released they contribute to redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, regulation of bronchomotor tone, modulation of the immune response, stimulation of sensory nerve fibres and regulation of lung growth and development. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells and neuroepithelial bodies seem to be most important in the fetal and neonatal lung as regulators of airway development and hypoxia-sensitive chemoreceptors. There is a link between these cells and specific types of lung cancer and their involvement in lung and paediatric pathology may be profound.

  17. Analysis of differentially expressed genes in response to bacterial stimulation in hemocytes of the carpet-shell clam Ruditapes decussatus: identification of new antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Gestal, Camino; Costa, Marímar; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2007-12-30

    Suppression subtractive hybridization was used to identify differentially expressed genes in hemocytes from carpet-shell clam Ruditapes decussatus stimulated with a mixture of dead bacterial strains. Putative function could be assigned to 100 of the 253 sequenced cDNAs. Based on sequence homologies, 3.16% of the total identified genes were possibly related to immune functions. Clam myticin isoforms 1, 2 and 3, and clam mytilin, with similarity with myticins and mytilins previously reported on Mytilus galloprovincialis were identified and characterized for the first time in clams. The analysis of their expression levels by quantitative PCR showed that they were induced by bacterial challenge. The results obtained in this work could be the first step leading to the understanding of molecular mechanisms by which these economically important marine bivalves respond to pathogens.

  18. Stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor through exendin-4 preserves myocardial performance and prevents cardiac remodeling in infarcted myocardium

    PubMed Central

    DeNicola, Megan; Du, Jianfeng; Wang, Zhengke; Yano, Naohiro; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yigang; Qin, Gangjian; Zhuang, Shougang

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that GLP-1 improved myocardial functional recovery in acute myocardial ischemic injury. However, whether stimulation of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) with exendin-4, a selective GLP-1R agonist, could initiate a protective effect in the heart remains to be determined. Mouse myocardial infarction (MI) was created by ligation of the left descending artery. After 48 h of MI, animals were divided into the following groups (n = 5–7/group): 1) sham (animals that underwent thoracotomy without ligation), 2) MI [animals that underwent MI and received a daily dose of intraperitoneal injection (ip) of saline]; and 3) MI + exendin-4 [infarcted mice that received injections of exendin-4 (0.1 mg/kg ip)]. Two weeks later, cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and an isovolumetrically perfused heart. Compared with control MI hearts, stimulation of GLP-1R improved cardiac function, which was associated with attenuation of myocardial hypertrophy, the mitigation of interstitial fibrosis, and an increase in survival rate in post-MI hearts. Furthermore, H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were preconditioned with exendin-4 at a dose of 100 nmol/l and then subjected to hydrogen peroxide exposure at concentrations of 50 and 100 μmol/l. The exendin-4 treatment decreased lactate dehydrogenase leakage and increased cell survival. Notably, this event was also associated with the reduction of cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 and attenuation of reactive oxygen species production. Exendin-4 treatments improved mitochondrial respiration and suppressed the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and protected mitochondria function. Our results indicate that GLP-1R serves as a novel approach to eliciting cardioprotection and mitigating oxidative stress-induced injury. PMID:25117407

  19. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  20. Therapeutic Efficacy of a {sup 188}Re-Labeled {alpha}-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analog in Murine and Human Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Models

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Owen, Nellie K.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic efficacy of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH in the B16/F1 murine melanoma and TXM13 human melanoma bearing mouse models. Method: (Arg11)CCMSH was synthesized and labeled with {sup 188}Re to form {sup 188}Re-(Agr{sup 11})CCMSH. B16/F1 melanoma tumor bearing mice were administrated with 200 Ci, 600 Ci and 2x400 Ci of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH via the tail vein, respectively. TXM13 melanoma tumor hearing mice were separately injected with 600 Ci, 2x400 Ci and 1000 Ci of 100Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH through the tail vein. Two groups of 10 mice bearing either B16/F1 or TXM13 tumors were injected with saline as untreated controls. Results: In contrast to the untreated control group, {sup 188}Re(Arg11)CCMSH yielded rapid and lasting therapeutic effects in the treatment groups with either B16/F1 or TXM13 tumors. The tumor growth rate was reduced and the survival rate was prolonged in the treatment groups. Treatment with 2x400 Ci of {sup 188}Re-Arg{sup 11}CCMSH significantly extended the mean life of B16/F1 tumor mice (p<0.05), while the mean life of TXm13 tumor mice was significantly prolonged after treatment with 600 Ci and 1000 Ci doses of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH (p<0.05 High-dose {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11}))CCMSH produced no observed normal-tissue toxicity. Conclusions: The therapy study results revealed that {sup 188}Re-Arg11 CCMSH yielded significant therapeutic effects in both B16/F1 murine melanoma and TXM13 human melanoma bearing mouse models. {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH appears to be a promising radiolabeled peptide for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  1. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker resulting in improved melanoma uptake and reduced renal uptake of Tc-99m-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone hybrid peptide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianquan; Guo, Haixun; Padilla, R Steve; Berwick, Marianne; Miao, Yubin

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the non-specific renal uptake of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) hybrid peptide through structural modification or L-lysine co-injection. The RGD motif {cyclic(Arg-Gly-Asp-DTyr-Asp)} was coupled to [Cys(3,4,10), D-Phe7, Arg11] alpha-MSH3-13 {(Arg11)CCMSH} through the Arg linker (substituting the Lys linker) to generate a novel RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH hybrid peptide. The melanoma targeting and pharmacokinetic properties of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The effect of L-lysine co-injection on the renal uptake was determined through the co-injection of L-lysine with 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH or 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker exhibited a profound effect in reducing the non-specific renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, as well as increasing the tumor uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH compared to 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited high tumor uptake (21.41+/-3.74% ID/g at 2 h post-injection) and prolonged tumor retention (6.81+/-3.71% ID/g at 24 h post-injection) in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. The renal uptake values of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were 40.14-64.08% of those of 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH (p<0.05) at 0.5, 2, 4 and 24 h post-injection. Co-injection of L-lysine was effective in decreasing the renal uptakes of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH by 27.7% and 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH by 52.1% at 2 h post-injection. Substitution of the Lys linker with an Arg linker dramatically improved the melanoma uptake and reduced the renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, warranting the further evaluation of 188Re-labeled RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH as a novel MC1 receptor-targeting therapeutic peptide for melanoma treatment in the future.

  2. Potent and selective peptide agonists of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH) action at human melanocortin receptor 5; their synthesis and biological evaluation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Maria A; MacNeil, Tanya; Tang, Rui; Fong, Tung M; Angeles Cabello, M; Maroto, Marta; Teran, Ana

    2007-05-01

    Melanocortin receptors (MC1-5R) and their endogenous ligands (melanocyte-stimulating hormones and adrenocorticotropic hormone) are involved in many physiological processes in humans. Of those receptors, the actions of MC5R are the least understood despite its broad presence in the numerous peripheral tissues and brain. In this study, we describe synthesis and pharmacological properties in vitro (receptor-binding affinity and agonist activity) of several cyclic analogs of alphaMSH which are potent agonists at hMC5R (EC(50) below 1 nM) and of enhanced receptor subtype selectivity (more than 2000-fold versus hMC1b,3R and about 70- to 200-fold versus hMC4R). These compounds are analogs of Ac-Nle(4)-cyclo[Asp(5)-His(6)-D-Nal(2')(7)-Pip(8)-Trp(9)-Lys(10)]-NH(2) (Pip: pipecolic acid) in which His(6) has been replaced with sterically hindered amino acids. They may be useful tools in the elucidation of the MC5R role in skin disorders and in immunomodulatory and in anti-inflammatory actions of alphaMSH.

  3. The non-peptide neurokinin-1 antagonist, RPR 100893, decreases c-fos expression in trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious chemical meningeal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutrer, F M; Moussaoui, S; Garret, C; Moskowitz, M A

    1995-02-01

    The effect of RPR 100893, a selective and specific neurokinin-1 antagonist, or its enantiomer RPR 103253 was examined on c-fos antigen expression in brain stem and upper cervical cord 2 h after intracisternal capsaicin injection (30.5 micrograms/ml) in pentobarbital-anesthetized Hartley guinea-pigs. Positive cells were counted at three levels corresponding to obex, -2.25 mm and -6.75 mm in 18 sections (50 microns). Immunoreactivity was strongly expressed within laminae I and IIo of trigeminal nucleus caudalis, area postrema and the leptomeninges. Moderate labeling was present in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the medullary lateral reticular nucleus, whereas few positive cells were found in the ventral portion of the medullary reticular nucleus and Rexed laminae III-V and X. The distribution of labeled cells was consistent with previously reported results following subarachnoid placement of the noxious agents, blood or carrageenin. Pretreatment with RPR 100893 (1, 10 and 100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) but not its enantiomer (100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) 30 min prior to capsaicin injection significantly reduced the number of positive cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner, but not within area postrema or nucleus of the solitary tract. These results indicate that (i) the instillation of capsaicin into the subarachnoid space is an effective stimulus for the induction of c-fos antigen within trigeminal nucleus caudalis, presumably through activation of trigeminovascular afferents, and (ii) the neurokinin-1 antagonist RPR 100893 reduces the number of positive cells selectively within this nucleus. The findings are significant because drugs which alleviate vascular headaches decrease the number of c-fos-positive cells within trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious meningeal stimulation. Hence, strategies aimed at blocking the neurokinin-1 receptor may be useful for treating migraine and cluster headache.

  4. CGRP Antagonist Infused into the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Impairs the Acquisition and Expression of Context but Not Discretely Cued Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, Kelly S.; Davis, Michael; Walker, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) infusions into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) evoke increases in startle amplitude and increases in anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze. Conversely, intra-BNST infusions of the CGRP antagonist CGRP[subscript 8-37] block unconditioned startle increases produced by fox odor. Here we evaluate…

  5. A 21-amino acid peptide from the cysteine cluster II of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii stimulates its nuclease activity which is Mre11-like and prefers manganese ion as the cofactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yulong; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a new type of DNA polymerase possessing polymerization and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. Here we report the characterization of the nuclease activity of PolD from Pyrococcus horikoshii. By site-directed mutagenesis, we verified that the putative Mre11-like nuclease domain in the small subunit (DP1), predicted according to computer analysis and structure inference reported previously, is the catalytic domain. We show that D363, H365 and H454 are the essential residues, while D407, N453, H500, H563 and H565 are critical residues for the activity. We provide experimental evidence demonstrating that manganese, rather than magnesium, is the preferable metal ion for the nuclease activity of PolD. We also show that DP1 alone is insufficient to perform full catalysis, which additionally requires the formation of the PolD complex and manganese ion. We found that a 21 amino acid, subunit-interacting peptide of the sequence from cysteine cluster II of the large subunit (DP2) stimulates the exonuclease activity of DP1 and the internal deletion mutants of PolD lacking the 21-aa sequence. This indicates that the putative zinc finger motif of the cysteine cluster II is deeply involved in the nucleolytic catalysis.

  6. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  7. Peptide Seems to Boost Human Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    This article discusses recent studies which have shown that the peptide hormone vasopressin apparently can stimulate memory and learning in healthy human volunteers and in certain mentally disturbed patients. (ECO)

  8. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  9. Transduction of aminergic and peptidergic signals in enteric neurones of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J M; Wood, J D; Zafirov, D H

    1987-01-01

    1. The biogenic amines 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and histamine, and the peptides bombesin, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), cholecystokinin (CCK), substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) each mimicked slow synaptic excitation (slow e.p.s.p.) when applied to myenteric neurones of the guinea-pig small intestine. 2. Stimulation of the catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and intraneuronal elevation of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) also mimicked the slow e.p.s.p. and the actions of the aminergic and peptidergic messengers. 3. Adenosine prevented stimulation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and abolished the slow e.p.s.p.-like actions of forskolin. 4. Exposure of the neurones to adenosine prior to or during application of bombesin, GRP, VIP, CCK or histamine blocked the actions of these substances. 5. Pre-treatment with adenosine did not suppress the slow e.p.s.p.-like actions of substance P, CGRP or 5-HT. 6. The results suggest that signal transduction for bombesin, GRP, VIP, CCK and histamine involves stimulation of adenylate cyclase and second messenger function of cyclic AMP. Transduction mechanisms for 5-HT, substance P and CGRP appear not to involve second messenger function of cyclic AMP. PMID:3656177

  10. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  11. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  12. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  13. Peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells by recombinant plate bound MHC/peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Esben G W; Buus, Søren; Thorn, Mette; Stryhn, Anette; Leisner, Christian; Claesson, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    Development of methods for efficient in vitro stimulation and expansion of peptide specific CD8(+) T cells is compelling not only with respect to adoptive T cell therapy but also regarding analysis of T cell responses and search for new immunogenic peptides. In the present study, a new approach to in vitro T cell stimulation was investigated. By use of an antigenic peptide derived from the cytomegalovirus (CMVp) we tested the stimulatory efficacy of recombinant plate bound MHC molecules (PB-MHC), being immobilized in culture plates. A single stimulation of non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (NA-PBMCs) with PB-MHC/CMVp resulted in significant expansion of CMVp specific CD8(+) T cells, which was comparable to that achieved by CMVp pulsed mature dendritic cells (DCs). By repeated exposure of NA-PBMCs to PB-MHC/CMVp more than 60% CMVp specific CD8(+) T cells, representing a 240-fold expansion, were reached after only two stimulations. Although stimulation with PB-MHC/CMVp clearly demonstrated efficient peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells, there was a tendency to proliferative exhaustion of the cells after 3-4 stimulations. Thus, it will be of interest to examine the effect of new stimulatory cocktails, e.g. cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules, by use of the present rapid and easy-to-use method of expanding peptide specific T cells.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  15. Calcitonin and calcitonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Calcitonin (CT) is a polypeptide hormone with 32 aminoacids syntetized primarily by the thyroid. Several evidences support the existence of nonthyroidal CT like peptide. The CT gene transcript also encodes a distinct peptide known as calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) which is a potent vasodilator and responsible for the stimulation of the glomerular filtration rate. In addition, a 37 aminoacid peptide amylin has been originally isolated by pancreatic β-cells. Amylin is able to inhibit insulin secretion, glucose transport into the skeletal musculature and gluconeogenesis. It is also able to inhibit gastric emptying. In the kidney it is able to modulate Calcium (Ca2+) excretion and increases renin activity. Finally, high affinity amylin receptors have been identified in the brain of the rat. The calcitonin receptor (CTR) is a member of a subfamily of the seven-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled receptor super family that includes several peptides. Members of this family have a similar structure with other seven-membrane-spanning domain G-protein coupled receptors. The genetic contribution to osteoporosis susceptibility is well documented and many studies demonstrated that genetic factors play important roles in the regulation of bone metabolism. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) for the CTR gene have been described in the literature with a positive association with the lumbar bone mineral density (BMD), femoral neck BMD and with a lower incidence of vertebral fractures. PMID:22461211

  16. T-cell epitope peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Elsawa, Sherine F; Rodeberg, David A; Celis, Esteban

    2004-10-01

    T-cell immunotherapy is a promising treatment option for cancer. The identification of tumor antigens that are recognized by the immune system has allowed for the generation of vaccines for various malignancies. Due to the ease of manufacturing and characterizating peptide-based vaccines they have been used to stimulate antitumor T-cells. This article will review the use of peptide-based vaccines for the treatment of cancer by inducing antitumor T-lymphocyte responses.

  17. Human Responses to Exercise-Heat Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    rectal temperature is a good index to assess body core heat storage (177.225). Oral ( sublingual ) temperature is widely used clinically, but less...that immunohistochemical analyses of skin biopsies from these subjects showed that VIP innervation was sparse, while calcitonin gene-related peptide ...proposed that release of one or both of the other peptides , CGRP and substance P, may be the mechanism responsible for active cutaneous vasodilation

  18. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of quorum sensing peptides and Peptide analogues against oral biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    LoVetri, Karen; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance is a major incentive for the investigation of novel ways to treat or prevent infections. Much effort has been put into the discovery of peptides in nature accompanied by manipulation of natural peptides to improve activity and decrease toxicity. The ever increasing knowledge about bacteria and the discovery of quorum sensing have presented itself as another mechanism to disrupt the infection process. We have shown that the natural quorum sensing (QS) peptide, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), used by the caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans when used in higher than normally present concentrations can actually contribute to cell death in S. mutans. Using an analogue of this quorum sensing peptide (KBI-3221), we have shown it to be beneficial at decreasing biofilm of various Streptococcus species. This chapter looks at a number of assay methods to test the inhibitory effects of quorum sensing peptides and their analogues on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria.

  19. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  20. Peptides Regulate Cortical Thymocytes Differentiation, Proliferation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Khavinson, V. Kh.; Polyakova, V. O.; Linkova, N. S.; Dudkov, A. V.; Kvetnoy, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala) and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp). Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells. PMID:22312461

  1. Hydrophobic peptide auxotrophy in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Brãnes, L V; Somers, J M; Kay, W W

    1981-01-01

    The growth of a pleiotropic membrane mutant of Salmonella typhimurium with modified lipopolysaccharide composition was found to be strictly dependent on the peptone component of complex media. Nutritional Shiftdown into minimal media allowed growth for three to four generations. Of 20 commercial peptones, only enzymatic digests supported growth to varying degrees. Neither trace cations, amino acids, vitamins, carbohydrates, lipids, glutathione, polyamines, carbodimides, nor synthetic peptides stimulated growth; however, cells still metabolized carbohydrates, and amino acid transport systems were shown to be functional. A tryptic digest of casein was fractionated into four electrophoretically different peptide fractions of 1,000 to 1,200 molecular weight which supported growth to varying degrees. The best of these was further fractionated to two highly hydrophopic peptides. N-terminal modifications eliminated biological activity. Fluorescein-conjugated goat antibody to rabbit immunoglobulin G was used as a probe to detect antipeptide antibody-peptide complexes on membrane preparations. Cells grown on peptone distributed the peptide into both inner and outer membranes. The peptide could be removed with chaotropic agents, and cells had to be pregrown in peptone-containing media to bind the hydrophobic peptide. The gene (hyp) responsible for peptide auxotrophy was mapped at 44 to 45 units by conjugation. Images PMID:7024254

  2. Biologically active peptides: prospects for drug development.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J

    1980-08-11

    Biologically active peptides aree typified by their unbiquity of distribution, their high receptor affinity and an almost infinite diversity of structure. For these reasons, considerable effort is now being expended to elucidate the possible role of peptides in brain function. This effort has been stimulated by the discovery of a number of new endogenous peptides, such as the enkephalins, endorphins, vasoactive intestinal peptide and neurotensin. At present, there is no clearly defined role for these peptides, although they may form an important basis for the chemical coding of various brain functions, including pain, mood and memory. At present, the potential for drug development of peptide agonists remains in fairly circumscribed areas such as analgesia, pituitary hormone control, and gastrointestinal motor and secretory control. Peptide antagonists may provide a vast field for future development, although only one area, that of antifertility drugs based on LHRH antagonists, shows any promise of immediate success. Industrial research approaches to new peptide agonists and antagonists mainly rely at present on rational drug design through structural analogies. Other fruitful approaches to be considered are the screening of natural microbial and plant products and the possible application of genetic engineering techniques.

  3. Gastrin response to candidate messengers in intact conscious rats monitored by antrum microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Peter; Håkanson, Rolf; Norlén, Per

    2010-08-09

    We monitored gastrin release in response to locally applied candidate messengers in intact conscious rats. Earlier studies have been performed on anaesthetized animals, isolated pieces of antrum, or purified preparations of gastrin cells. In this study we created an experimental situation to resemble physiological conditions, using reverse microdialysis to administer regulatory peptides and amines that might affect gastrin secretion. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the antrum of the rat stomach. Three days later, putative messenger compounds were administered via the probe. Their effects on basal (24 h fast) and omeprazole-stimulated (400 micromol/kg/day, 4 days peroral administration) gastrin release were monitored by continuous measurement (3 h) of gastrin in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). Fasted rats (low microdialysate gastrin, 2.1+/-0.1 pmol l(-1)) were used to study stimulation of gastrin release. Omeprazole-treated rats (high microdialysate gastrin, 95.8+/-6.7 pmol l(-1)) were used to study suppression of gastrin release. The following agents raised the concentration of microdialysate gastrin (peak response): gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) (11-fold increase at a near-maximal dose), carbachol (5-fold increase), serotonin (2-fold increase) and isoprenaline (20-fold increase). Adrenaline and noradrenaline induced transient but powerful elevation (40- and 20-fold increase). Somatostatin, galanin and bradykinin (at near-maximal doses) suppressed omeprazole-stimulated gastrin release (50% decrease). Calcitonin gene-related peptide, ghrelin, gastric inhibitory peptide, motilin, neurotensin, neuromedin U-25, peptide YY and vasoactive intestinal peptide were without effect on gastrin release, as were aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, glycine, dopamine and histamine. The results support the view that G cells operate under neurocrine/paracrine control. They were stimulated by agents present in enteric neurons (GRP, galanin

  4. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  5. Host defense peptides from Lithobates forreri, Hylarana luctuosa, and Hylarana signata (Ranidae): phylogenetic relationships inferred from primary structures of ranatuerin-2 and brevinin-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nielsen, Per F; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2014-03-01

    The primary structures of host-defense peptides present in frog skin secretions constitute useful molecular markers for establishing taxonomic classifications and investigating phylogenetic relationships between species within a particular genus. Peptidomic analysis has led to the characterization of multiple host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of three species of frogs from the family Ranidae: Lithobates forreri (Boulenger, 1883), Hylarana luctuosa (Peters, 1871), and Hylarana signata (Günther, 1872). The L. forreri secretions contain ranatuerin-2 (2 peptides), brevinin-1 (4 peptides), and temporin (1 peptide). The H. luctuosa secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), esculentin-1 (1 peptide), esculentin-2 (1 peptide), palustrin-2 (2 peptides), and temporin (2 peptides). The H. signata secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), brevinin-1 (5 peptides), palustrin-2 (1 peptide), and temporin (2 peptides). Cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 44 ranatuerin-2 peptides from 20 Lithobates species indicates a close phylogenetic relationship between L. forreri, Lithobates onca, and Lithobates yavapaiensis. A similar cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 27 brevinin-2 peptides from 8 Hylarana species provides support for a close phylogenetic relationship between H. signata and Hylarana picturata, while showing that the species are not conspecific, with H. luctuosa more distantly related.

  6. [The role of sensory nerves in the development of inflammation of oral tissues].

    PubMed

    Olgart, L

    1998-01-01

    Experimental stimulation and clinical procedures applied on the tooth crown cause vascular reactions in the dental pulp of cats and rats. These reactions depend on the activation of trigeminal afferent nerves and release of neuropeptides. A brief stimulation causes vasodilation, which is mainly mediated by calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). A longer stimulation results in plasma extravasation which is mediated mainly by substance P (SP) and prostaglandins in the pulp. In adjacent oral tissues the mechanisms following stimulation or local irritation are more complex and other mediators are also involved. Nitric oxide (NO) which is instantly produced in the tissues is such a novel mediator. The chemosensitive nature of the nerves involved (capsaicin sensitive) may lead to their activation also by inflammatory mediators released in the tissues. Thus, sensory nerves may modulate the progress of inflammation. Since sensory nerves in oral tissues are often the first structures to be activated during clinical procedures, tissue reactions that occur can be assumed to be initiated and perpetuated by the sensory neuropeptides. Much work is now made to modulate the sensory nerveinduced cascade of events in oral tissues to find new treatment strategies.

  7. Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    increases production of MCP-1 in vitro. INTRODUCTION: Host defense peptides represent a promising new approach to inhibit infection. The anti...vitro effects of the host defense peptides. We have found that the host defense peptide IDR-1018 stimulates production of MCP-1 (Fig. 1). IDR-1018...also inhibits the ability of LPS to stimulate production of TNFα and MCP-1 (Fig. 2). Thus, the effects of IDR-1018 are similar to what has been

  8. Mechanical Loading for Peripheral Nerve Stabilization and Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    sectioning of tissue for analysis in Milestone 1.4 1.4. Comparison of nerve outgrowth, cytoskeletal stability, organelle accumulation, and myelination ...stability, organelle accumulation, and myelination between 10 mm (no device), 10 mm (device), and 15 mm (device) groups at all four time points. The...mitochondrial or Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) staining in stump ending. d. Comparison of myelination : nerve fiber diameter and myelin diameter

  9. Role of voltage-gated cation channels and axon reflexes in the release of sensory neuropeptides by capsaicin from isolated rat trachea.

    PubMed

    Németh, József; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Oroszi, Gábor; Jakab, Balázs; Pintér, Erika; Szilvássy, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János

    2003-01-05

    In order to reveal the role of axon reflexes and sensory receptors in sensory neuropeptide release in response to capsaicin, liberation of substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and somatostatin from isolated rat tracheae was investigated in the presence of voltage-sensitive Na(+) and Ca(2+) channel blocking agents. Neuropeptide release induced by capsaicin (10 nM) remained unchanged in the presence of 25 mM lidocaine, 1 microM tetrodotoxin or the N-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, omega-conotoxin GVIA (100-300 nM). Peptide release by 100 pulses of 2 Hz field stimulation was prevented by lidocaine or tetrodotoxin. Omega-agatoxin TK (250 nM) significantly inhibited and Cd(2+) (200 microM) prevented capsaicin-induced neuropeptide release. These results suggest that chemical stimulation-induced neuropeptide release does not involve activation of fast Na(+) channels or N- and P-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, but contribution of Q-type Ca(2+) channels is possible. Sensory neuropeptides are released by capsaicin from sensory receptors without axon reflexes.

  10. Chemotactic peptide receptor modulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The binding of the chemotactic peptide N- formylnorleucylleucylphenylalanine (FNLLP) to its receptor on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) modulates the number of available peptide receptors. Incubation with FNLLP decreases subsequent binding capacity, a phenomenon that has been termed receptor down regulation. Down regulation of the chemotactic peptide receptor is concentration dependent in both the rate and extent of receptor loss. The dose response parallels that of FNLLP binding to the recptor. The time- course is rapid; even at concentrations of FNLLP as low as 3 x 10(-9) M, the new equilibrium concentration of receptors is reached within 15 min. Down regulation is temperature dependent, but does occur even at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with down regulation, some of the peptide becomes irreversibly cell associated. At 4 degrees C, there is a small accumulation of nondissociable peptide that rapidly reaches a plateau. At higher temperatures, accumulation of nondissociable peptide continues after the rceptor number has reached equilibrium, and the amount accumulated can exceed the initial number of receptors by as much as 300%. The dose response of peptide uptake at 37 degrees C reflects that of binding, suggesting that it is receptor mediated. This uptake may occur via a pinocytosis mechanism. Although PMNs have not been considered to be pinocytic, the addition of FNLLP causes a fourfold stimulation of the rate of pinocytosis as measured by the uptake of [3H]sucrose. PMID:7391138

  11. A novel retro-inverso peptide inhibitor reduces amyloid deposition, oxidation and inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parthsarathy, Vadivel; McClean, Paula L; Hölscher, Christian; Taylor, Mark; Tinker, Claire; Jones, Glynn; Kolosov, Oleg; Salvati, Elisa; Gregori, Maria; Masserini, Massimo; Allsop, David

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have developed a retro-inverso peptide inhibitor (RI-OR2, rGffvlkGr) that blocks the in vitro formation and toxicity of the Aβ oligomers which are thought to be a cause of neurodegeneration and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease. We have now attached a retro-inverted version of the HIV protein transduction domain 'TAT' to RI-OR2 to target this new inhibitor (RI-OR2-TAT, Ac-rGffvlkGrrrrqrrkkrGy-NH(2)) into the brain. Following its peripheral injection, a fluorescein-labelled version of RI-OR2-TAT was found to cross the blood brain barrier and bind to the amyloid plaques and activated microglial cells present in the cerebral cortex of 17-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. Daily intraperitoneal injection of RI-OR2-TAT (at 100 nmol/kg) for 21 days into 10-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice resulted in a 25% reduction (p<0.01) in the cerebral cortex of Aβ oligomer levels, a 32% reduction (p<0.0001) of β-amyloid plaque count, a 44% reduction (p<0.0001) in the numbers of activated microglial cells, and a 25% reduction (p<0.0001) in oxidative damage, while the number of young neurons in the dentate gyrus was increased by 210% (p<0.0001), all compared to control APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice injected with vehicle (saline) alone. Our data suggest that oxidative damage, inflammation, and inhibition of neurogenesis are all a downstream consequence of Aβ aggregation, and identify a novel brain-penetrant retro-inverso peptide inhibitor of Aβ oligomer formation for further testing in humans as a potential disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

  12. A novel trimeric peptide, Neuropep-1-stimulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in rat brain improves spatial learning and memory as measured by the Y-maze and Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min Kyoo; Kim, Hong Gi; Kim, Kil Lyong

    2011-01-01

    Abundant studies have shown possible links between low levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and depression, as well as stress and anxiety; therefore, BDNF could be a therapeutic target for neurological disorders. In the present study, a positional scanning-synthetic peptide combinatorial library was utilized to identify a peptide modulator of BDNF expression in the hippocampal neuronal cell line, H19-7. A novel tripeptide (Neuropep-1) induced a significant increase of BDNF mRNA and protein levels in H19-7 cells. Pre-treatment of TrkB inhibitor (K252a) did not block Neuropep-1-induced BDNF up-regulation. These results indicate that Neuropep-1 may up-regulate BDNF expression that might be independent of the TrkB receptor pathway. Tail vein injection of Neuropep-1 significantly up-regulated BDNF expression, TrkB phosphorylation, and its downstream signals including activation of Akt, ERK, and cAMP response element binding in the rat hippocampus. To evaluate improvement of spatial learning and memory (SLM) by Neuropep-1-induced BDNF up-regulation, the Y-maze and Morris water maze tests were performed. These results showed Neuropep-1 injection improved SLM performance with increase of BDNF and TrkB expression, activation of TrkB downstream signals in rat hippocampus compared with the control group. However, phosphorylation levels of TrkB were not changed when it was normalized to the level of TrkB expression. The difference on TrkB phosphorylation in Neuropep-1-injected rats may be affected by behavioral tests. These results suggest that Neuropep-1 may improve SLM via activation of the BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway in the rat hippocampus. Therefore, our findings represent that Neuropep-1 might be a potential candidate for treatment of learning and memory disorders as well as neurological diseases involving the abnormal expression of BDNF.

  13. Cloning and expression profiling of four antibacterial peptide genes from the bumblebee Bombus ignitus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Soo; Choo, Young Moo; Lee, Kwang Sik; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Kim, Iksoo; Je, Yeon Ho; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2008-06-01

    Four antibacterial peptide genes (apidaecin, hymenoptaecin, abaecin, and defensin) were cloned from the bumblebee Bombus ignitus, and cDNAs and their genomic structures were sequenced and characterized. Comparative analysis revealed that the four antibacterial peptides of B. ignitus had similar characteristics to other bee antibacterial peptides identified to date. The transcriptional expression profiles of the four antibacterial peptide genes in the fat body of B. ignitus workers revealed that all four antibacterial peptide genes were acutely induced in a similar manner by PBS injection or LPS stimulation, indicating that antibacterial peptides from various classes are simultaneously expressed in a single insect upon infection or injury.

  14. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  15. Parthenolide inhibits nociception and neurogenic vasodilatation in the trigeminovascular system by targeting TRPA1 channel

    PubMed Central

    Materazzi, Serena; Benemei, Silvia; Fusi, Camilla; Gualdani, Roberta; De Siena, Gaetano; Vastani, Nisha; Andersson, David A.; Trevisan, Gabriela; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Wei, Xiaomei; Dussor, Gregory; Pollastro, Federica; Patacchini, Riccardo; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Nassini, Romina

    2013-01-01

    While feverfew has been used for centuries to treat pain and headaches and is recommended for migraine treatment, the mechanism for its protective action remains unknown. Migraine is triggered by calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from trigeminal neurons. Peptidergic sensory neurons, express a series of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, including the ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel. Recent findings have identified agents either inhaled from the environment or produced endogenously, which are known to trigger migraine or cluster headache attacks, as TRPA1 simulants. A major constituent of feverfew, parthenolide, may interact with TRPA1 nucleophilic sites, suggesting that feverfew antimigraine effect derives from its ability to target TRPA1. We found that parthenolide stimulates recombinant (transfected cells) or natively expressed (rat/mouse trigeminal neurons) TRPA1, where it, however, behaves as a partial agonist. Furthermore, in rodents, after initial stimulation, parthenolide desensitizes the TRPA1 channel, and renders peptidergic, TRPA1-expressing nerve terminals unresponsive to any stimulus. This effect of parthenolide abrogates nociceptive responses evoked by stimulation of peripheral trigeminal endings. TRPA1 targeting and neuronal desensitization by parthenolide inhibits CGRP release from trigeminal neurons and CGRP-mediated meningeal vasodilatation, evoked by either TRPA1 agonists or other unspecific stimuli. TRPA1 partial agonism, together with desensitization and nociceptor defunctionalization, ultimately resulting in inhibition of CGRP release within the trigeminovascular system, may contribute to the antimigraine effect of parthenolide. PMID:23933184

  16. Regulation of intracellular cyclic AMP in skeletal muscle cells involves the efflux of cyclic nucleotide to the extracellular compartment

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Rosely Oliveira; Costa-Jr, Valter Luiz

    2003-01-01

    This report analyses the intracellular and extracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP in primary rat skeletal muscle cultures, after direct and receptor-dependent stimulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC). Isoprenaline, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and forskolin induced a transient increase in the intracellular cyclic AMP that peaked 5 min after onset stimulation. Under stimulation with isoprenaline or CGRP, the intracellular cyclic AMP initial rise was followed by an exponential decline, reaching 46 and 52% of peak levels in 10 min, respectively. Conversely, the forskolin-dependent accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP decreased slowly and linearly, reaching 49% of the peak level in 30 min. The loss of intracellular cyclic AMP from peak levels, induced by direct or receptor-induced activation of AC, was followed by an increase in the extracellular cyclic AMP. This effect was independent on PDEs, since it was obtained in the presence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Besides, in isoprenaline treated cells, the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol reduced both intra- and extracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP, whereas the organic anion transporter inhibitor probenecid reduced exclusively the extracellular accumulation. Together our data show that direct or receptor-dependent activation of skeletal muscle AC results in a transient increase in the intracellular cyclic AMP, despite the continuous presence of the stimulus. The temporal declining of intracellular cyclic AMP was not dependent on the cyclic AMP breakdown but associated to the efflux of cyclic nucleotide to the extracellular compartment, by an active transport since it was prevented by probenecid. PMID:12642402

  17. Parthenolide inhibits nociception and neurogenic vasodilatation in the trigeminovascular system by targeting the TRPA1 channel.

    PubMed

    Materazzi, Serena; Benemei, Silvia; Fusi, Camilla; Gualdani, Roberta; De Siena, Gaetano; Vastani, Nisha; Andersson, David A; Trevisan, Gabriela; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Wei, Xiaomei; Dussor, Gregory; Pollastro, Federica; Patacchini, Riccardo; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Nassini, Romina

    2013-12-01

    Although feverfew has been used for centuries to treat pain and headaches and is recommended for migraine treatment, the mechanism for its protective action remains unknown. Migraine is triggered by calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from trigeminal neurons. Peptidergic sensory neurons express a series of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, including the ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel. Recent findings have identified agents either inhaled from the environment or produced endogenously that are known to trigger migraine or cluster headache attacks, such as TRPA1 simulants. A major constituent of feverfew, parthenolide, may interact with TRPA1 nucleophilic sites, suggesting that feverfew's antimigraine effect derives from its ability to target TRPA1. We found that parthenolide stimulates recombinant (transfected cells) or natively expressed (rat/mouse trigeminal neurons) TRPA1, where it, however, behaves as a partial agonist. Furthermore, in rodents, after initial stimulation, parthenolide desensitizes the TRPA1 channel and renders peptidergic TRPA1-expressing nerve terminals unresponsive to any stimulus. This effect of parthenolide abrogates nociceptive responses evoked by stimulation of peripheral trigeminal endings. TRPA1 targeting and neuronal desensitization by parthenolide inhibits CGRP release from trigeminal neurons and CGRP-mediated meningeal vasodilatation, evoked by either TRPA1 agonists or other unspecific stimuli. TRPA1 partial agonism, together with desensitization and nociceptor defunctionalization, ultimately resulting in inhibition of CGRP release within the trigeminovascular system, may contribute to the antimigraine effect of parthenolide.

  18. Mitogenic effects of vasoactive neuropeptides on cultured smooth muscle cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhashi, M.; Payan, D.G.

    1987-03-02

    In order to investigate the relationship between the biochemical pathways that characterize contraction and cell growth, the authors have studied both contraction, mitogenesis and protein synthesis induced by the vasoactive neuropeptides, substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on four different established vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle cell lines. Contraction in vitro was evaluated by light microscopy and recorded photographically. Mitogenesis and protein synthesis were evaluated by (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into cells and (/sup 3/H)-amino acid incorporation into trichloroacetic acid precipitated materials, respectively. SP stimulated mitogenesis of A7r5 cells (embryonic rat aorta), but failed to induce significant contraction of these cells, whereas, SP induced contraction of cultured adult rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), but failed to stimulate mitogenesis. CGRP and VIP stimulated mitogenesis and protein synthesis, respectively, of DDT/sub 1/MF-2 cells (hamster vas deferens), but neither induced contraction of this cell line. All three neuropeptides showed no effect on BC/sub 3/H1 (mouse smooth muscle-like) cells. These results suggest that neuropeptides with vasoactive properties modulate different stages of cellular mitogenic responses which may be regulated by the degree of maturation of smooth muscle cell. 22 references, 5 figures.

  19. Role of 5-HT7 receptors in the inhibition of the vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic outflow in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Cristina; García-Pedraza, José Ángel; García, Mónica; Villalón, Carlos M; Morán, Asunción

    2014-10-01

    The role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the modulation of vascular tone has been widely documented. Indeed, electrical stimulation of the perivascular sensory outflow in pithed rats induces vasodepressor responses by activation of CGRP receptors. This study investigated the role of 5-HT7 receptors in the inhibition of the rat vasodepressor sensory outflow. Male Wistar pithed rats were pretreated with i.v. continuous infusions of hexamethonium and methoxamine, followed by physiological saline or AS-19 (a 5-HT7 receptor agonist). Then, electrical stimulation of the spinal cord resulted in frequency-dependent decreases in DBP. The infusions of AS-19, as compared to those of saline, inhibited the vasodepressor responses induced by electrical stimulation without affecting those to i.v. bolus injections of exogenous α-CGRP. This inhibition by AS-19 was abolished by the antagonists pimozide (5-HT7) or sulfisoxazole (ETA), but not by indomethacin (COX1/2) or losartan (AT1), at doses that did not affect per se the electrically-induced vasodepressor responses. Interestingly, glibenclamide (an ATP-dependent K(+) channel blocker) attenuated these vasodepressor responses. The present results suggest that AS-19-induced inhibition of the rat vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic outflow is mainly mediated by 5-HT7 receptors via endothelin release, with the possible involvement of ATP-dependent K(+) channels.

  20. Host-defense and trefoil factor family peptides in skin secretions of the Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Leprince, Jérôme; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2015-10-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from the octoploid Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis Loumont, 1983 led to the identification and characterization of 15 host-defense peptides belonging to the magainin (two peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; three peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; three peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; two peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; five peptides) families. In addition, caerulein and three peptides with structural similarity to the trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides, xP2 and xP4 from Xenopus laevis were also present in the secretions. Consistent with data from comparisons of the nucleotides sequence of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the primary structures of the peptides suggest a close phylogenetic relationship between X. boumbaensis and the octoploid frogs Xenopus amieti and Xenopus andrei. As the three species occupy disjunct ranges within Cameroon, it is suggested that they diverged from a common ancestor by allopatric speciation.

  1. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  2. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  3. Effects of opioid peptides on thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a given species, injected opioid peptides usually cause changes in temperature similar to those caused by nonpeptide opioids. The main effect in those species most studied, the cat, rat, and mouse, is an increase in the level about which body temperature is regulated; there is a coordinated change in the activity of thermoregulatory effectors such that hyperthermia is produced in both hot and cold environments. Larger doses may depress thermoregulation, thereby causing body temperature to decrease in the cold. Elicitation of different patterns of response over a range of environmental temperatures and studies with naloxone and naltrexone indicate that stimulation of a number of different receptors by both peptide and nonpeptide opioids can evoke thermoregulatory responses. ..beta..-Endorphin is readily antagonized by naloxone whereas methionine-enkephalin can act on naloxone-insensitive receptors. Moreover, synthetic peptide analogs do not necessarily evoke the same response as does the related endogenous peptide. The lack of effect of naloxone on body temperature of subjects housed at usual laboratory temperature or on pyrogen-induced increases in body temperature indicates that an action of endogenous peptides on naloxone-sensitive receptors plays little, if any, role in normal thermoregulation or in fever. However, there is some evidence that such an action may be involved in responses to restraint or ambient temperature-induced stress. Further evaluation of possible physiological roles of endogenous opioid peptides will be facilitated when specific antagonists at other types of opioid receptors become available.

  4. Precision targeted ruthenium(ii) luminophores; highly effective probes for cell imaging by stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed synthesis and characterisation of metal complexes and peptides. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc02588a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Aisling; Burke, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has undergone a dramatic evolution over the past two decades with development of super-resolution far-field microscopy methods that break the light diffraction limited resolution of conventional microscopy, offering unprecedented opportunity to interrogate cellular processes at the nanoscale. However, these methods make special demands of the luminescent agents used for contrast and development of probes suited to super-resolution fluorescent methods is still relatively in its infancy. In spite of their many photophysical advantages, metal complex luminophores have not yet been considered as probes in this regard, where to date, only organic fluorophores have been applied. Here, we report the first examples of metal complex luminophores applied as probes for use in stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. Exemplified with endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear targeting complexes we demonstrate that luminescent Ru(ii) polypyridyl complexes can, through signal peptide targeting, be precisely and selectively delivered to key cell organelles without the need for membrane permeabilization, to give high quality STED images of these organelles. Detailed features of the tubular ER structure are revealed and in the case of the nuclear targeting probe we exploit the molecular light switch properties of a dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine containing complex which emits only on DNA/RNA binding to give outstanding STED contrast and resolution of the chromosomes within the nucleus. Comparing performance with a member of the AlexaFluor family commonly recommended for STED, we find that the performance of the ruthenium complexes is superior across both CW and gated STED microscopy methods in terms of image resolution and photostability. The large Stokes shifts of the Ru probes permit excellent matching of the stimulating depletion laser with their emission whilst avoiding anti-Stokes excitation. Their long lifetimes make them particularly amenable to

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  6. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  7. Expression of natriuretic peptide receptor mRNA and functional response to atrial natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) head kidney leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Powell, M D; McWilliam, H; McLeod, J; Nankervis, S; Butler, R; Toop, T

    2008-04-01

    The stimulatory effect of vasomodulatory natriuretic peptide hormones on macrophages and peripheral blood leucocytes in mammals is well-established. However, the relationship in lower vertebrates has not been characterised. Expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, ventricular natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide-1, and the guanylyl cyclase-linked (GC) natriuretic peptide receptor-A and -B-type receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B, respectively) was determined by PCR from the mRNA of rainbow trout head kidney leucocytes yielding gene fragments with 100% homology to the same respective natriuretic peptide and NPR-A and -B sequences obtained from other rainbow trout tissues. A mixed population of isolated rainbow trout head kidney leucocytes was stimulated in vitro with trout atrial natriuretic peptide (specific NPR-A agonist) and trout C-type natriuretic peptide (NPR-A and -B agonist) as well as the cGMP agonist 8-bromo-cGMP or the GC inhibitor 8-bromo-phenyl-eutheno-cGMP. Respiratory burst was stimulated by trout atrial natriuretic peptide, trout C-type natriuretic peptide-1 and 8-bromo-cGMP in a dose dependant manner with the highest activity as a result of stimulation with trout C-type natriuretic peptide-1 in excess of that achieved by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Equimolar concentrations of the inhibitor, inhibited the respiratory burst caused by the natriuretic peptides and 8-bromo-cGMP. The natriuretic peptide receptors on rainbow trout head kidney leucocytes appear to have a stimulatory function with regard to respiratory burst that is activated through a cGMP second messenger pathway and the natriuretic peptides expressed in the head kidney leucocytes may well act in a paracrine/autocrine manner.

  8. The effects of intra-articular resiniferatoxin on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngkyung; Kim, Eun-hye; Lee, Kyu Sang; Lee, Koeun; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Sook Hyun; Ko, Cheolwoong; Yooon, Young Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether an intra-articular injection of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor agonist, resiniferatoxin (RTX) would alleviate behavioral signs of arthritic pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). We also sought to determine the effect of RTX treatment on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the spinal cord. Knee joint inflammation was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 8 mg/50 µl) and weight bearing percentage on right and left hindpaws during walking, paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation, and paw withdrawal latency to heat were measured to evaluate pain behavior. Intra-articular administration of RTX (0.03, 0.003 and 0.0003%) at 2 weeks after the induction of knee joint inflammation significantly improved reduction of weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindlimb and increased paw withdrawal sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli. The reduction of pain behavior persisted for 3~10 days according to each behavioral test. The MIA-induced increase in CGRP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord was decreased by RTX treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The present study demonstrated that a single intra-articular administration of RTX reduced pain behaviors for a relatively long time in an experimental model of OA and could normalize OA-associated changes in peptide expression in the spinal cord. PMID:26807032

  9. Saturable brain-to-blood transport of endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Kastin, A J; Fasold, M B; Smith, R R; Horner, K A; Zadina, J E

    2001-07-01

    Opiate-modulating tetrapeptides such as tyrosine-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-release inhibiting factor-1 (Tyr-MIF-1; Tyr-Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2) and Tyr-W-MIF-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Gly-NH2) are saturably transported from brain to blood. We examined whether two recently described endogenous opiate tetrapeptides with similar structures, the mu-specific endomorphins, also are transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We found that the efflux rates of endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2) were each self-inhibited by an excess of the respective endomorphin, thereby defining saturable transport. Cross-inhibition of the transport of each endomorphin by the other indicated shared transport. By contrast, no inhibition of the efflux of either endomorphin resulted from coadministration of Tyr-MIF-1, indicating that peptide transport system-1 (PTS-1) was not involved. Tyr-W-MIF-1, which is partially transported by PTS-1, significantly (P<0.01) decreased the transport of endomorphin-1 and tended (P=0.051) to decrease the transport of endomorphin-2, consistent with its role as both an opiate and antiopiate. Although involved in modulation of pain, coinjection of calcitonin gene-related peptide or constriction of the sciatic nerve did not appear to inhibit endomorphin efflux. Thus, the results demonstrate the existence of a new efflux system across the BBB which saturably transports endomorphins from brain to blood.

  10. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  11. Antinociceptive effects of dexmedetomidine via spinal substance P and CGRP.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruiqin; Qi, Feng; Zhang, Junlong; Ji, Yong; Zhang, Dengxin; Shen, Zhiyun; Lei, Weifu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role played by substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in engagement of antinociception evoked by dexmedetomidine (DEX). Paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimulation was determined after chronic intrathecal infusion of DEX and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to examine the levels of spinal substance P and CGRP. Our results show that PWT was significantly increased by intrathecal administration of DEX in rats (P < 0.05 vs. vehicle control, n = 20 in each group). Also, intrathecal infusion of DEX significantly decreased the concentrations of substance P and CGRP as compared with vehicle control (P < 0.05 DEX vs. vehicle control, n = 20 in each group). Blocking α2-adrenoreceptors (α2-AR) blunted the decreases of substance P and CGRP levels and the enhancement of PWT evoked by DEX. Additionally, a linear relationship was observed between PWT and the levels of spinal substance P (r = 0.87; P < 0.005) and CGRP (r = 0.85; P < 0.005). Moreover, blocking individual substance P and CGRP receptors amplified PWT without altering substance P and CGRP levels. Thus, DEX plays a role in stimulating α2-AR receptors, which thereby decreases substance P and CGRP levels within the dorsal horn. This contributes to DEX-evoked antinociception.

  12. Lutein inhibits the function of the transient receptor potential A1 ion channel in different in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Györgyi; Szoke, Éva; Kemény, Ágnes; Bagoly, Teréz; Deli, József; Szente, Lajos; Pál, Szilárd; Sándor, Katalin; Szolcsányi, János; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, such as TRP vanilloid 1 and ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1), are expressed on primary sensory neurons. Lutein, a natural tetraterpene carotenoid, can be incorporated into membranes and might modulate TRP channels. Therefore, the effects of the water-soluble randomly methylated-β-cyclodextrin (RAMEB) complex of lutein were investigated on TRPV1 and TRPA1 activation. RAMEB-lutein (100 μM) significantly diminished Ca(2+) influx to cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by TRPA1 activation with mustard oil, but not by TRPV1 stimulation with capsaicin, as determined with microfluorimetry. Calcitonin gene-related peptide release from afferents of isolated tracheae evoked by mustard oil, but not by capsaicin, was inhibited by RAMEB-lutein. Mustard oil-induced neurogenic mouse ear swelling was also significantly decreased by 100 μg/ml s.c. RAMEB-lutein pretreatment, while capsaicin-evoked edema was not altered. Myeloperoxidase activity indicating non-neurogenic granulocyte accumulation in the ear was not influenced by RAMEB-lutein in either case. It is concluded that lutein inhibits TRPA1, but not TRPV1 stimulation-induced responses on cell bodies and peripheral terminals of sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo. Based on these distinct actions and the carotenoid structure, the ability of lutein to modulate lipid rafts in the membrane around TRP channels can be suggested.

  13. Chemosensory Functions for Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaoling; Karp, Philip H.; Brody, Steven L.; Pierce, Richard A.; Welsh, Michael J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian airways are sensitive to inhaled stimuli, and airway diseases are characterized by hypersensitivity to volatile stimuli, such as perfumes, industrial solvents, and others. However, the identity and function of the cells in the airway that can sense volatile chemicals remain uncertain, particularly in humans. Here, we show that solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which are morphologically distinct and physiologically undefined, might serve as chemosensory cells in human airways. This conclusion is based on our finding that some human PNECs expressed members of the olfactory receptor (OR) family in vivo and in primary cell culture, and are anatomically positioned in the airway epithelium to respond to inhaled volatile chemicals. Furthermore, apical exposure of primary-culture human airway epithelial cells to volatile chemicals decreased levels of serotonin in PNECs, and the led to the release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to the basal medium. These data suggest that volatile stimulation of PNECs can lead to the secretion of factors that are capable of stimulating the corresponding receptors in the lung epithelium. We also found that the distribution of serotonin and neuropeptide receptors may change in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting that increased PNEC-dependent chemoresponsiveness might contribute to the altered sensitivity to volatile stimuli in this disease. Together, these data indicate that human airway epithelia harbor specialized cells that respond to volatile chemical stimuli, and may help to explain clinical observations of odorant-induced airway reactions. PMID:24134460

  14. The presence of mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors in human heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Sobanski, Piotr; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Shaqura, Mohammed; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elzbieta; Schäfer, Michael; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2014-11-01

    Functional evidence suggests that the stimulation of peripheral and central opioid receptors (ORs) is able to modulate heart function. Moreover, selective stimulation of either cardiac or central ORs evokes preconditioning and, therefore, protects the heart against ischemic injury. However, anatomic evidence for OR subtypes in the human heart is scarce. Human heart tissue obtained during autopsy after sudden death was examined immunohistochemically for mu- (MOR), kappa- (KOR), and delta- (DOR) OR subtypes. MOR and DOR immunoreactivity was found mainly in myocardial cells, as well as on sparse individual nerve fibers. KOR immunoreactivity was identified predominantly in myocardial cells and on intrinsic cardiac adrenergic (ICA) cell-like structures. Double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed that DOR colocalized with the neuronal marker PGP9.5, as well as with the sensory neuron marker calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP-immunoreactive (IR) fibers were detected either in nerve bundles or as sparse individual fibers containing varicose-like structures. Our findings offer the first hint of an anatomic basis for the existence of OR subtypes in the human heart by demonstrating their presence in CGRP-IR sensory nerve fibers, small cells with an eccentric nucleus resembling ICA cells, and myocardial cells. Taken together, this suggests the role of opioids in both the neural transmission and regulation of myocardial cell function.

  15. Gold Ion-Angiotensin Peptide Interaction by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jenny; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P.; Gupta, Shalini; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Lee, Bao-Shiang

    2012-05-01

    Stimulated by the interest in developing gold compounds for treating cancer, gold ion-angiotensin peptide interactions are investigated by mass spectrometry. Under the experimental conditions used, the majority of gold ion-angiotensin peptide complexes contain gold in the oxidation states I and III. Both ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF MS detect singly/multiply charged ions for mononuclear/multinuclear gold-attached peptides, which are represented as [peptide + a Au(I) + b Au(III) + (e - a -3b) H]e+, where a,b ≥ 0 and e is charge. ESI-MS data shows singly/multiply charged ions of Au(I)-peptide and Au(III)-peptide complexes. This study reveals that MALDI-TOF MS mainly detects singly charged Au(I)-peptide complexes, presumably due to the ionization process. The electrons in the MALDI plume seem to efficiently reduce Au(III) to Au(I). MALDI also tends to enhance the higher polymeric forms of gold-peptide complexes regardless of the laser power used. Collision-induced dissociation experiments of the mononuclear and dinuclear gold-attached peptide ions for angiotensin peptides show that the gold ion (a soft acid) binding sites are in the vicinity of Cys (a soft ligand), His (a major anchor of peptide for metal ion chelation), and the basic residue Arg. Data also suggests that the abundance of gold-attached peptides increases with higher gold concentration until saturation, after which an increase in gold ion concentration leads to the aggregation and/or precipitation of gold-bound peptides.

  16. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  17. Bioactivity of food peptides: biological response of rats to bovine milk whey peptides following acute exercise

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Carolina Soares; Lollo, Pablo Christiano Barboza; Morato, Priscila Neder; Risso, Eder Muller; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Several physiologically beneficial effects of consuming a whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) have been attributed to the greater availability of bioactive peptides. Aims: The aim was to investigate the effect of four branched-chain amino acid- (BCAA-)containing dipeptides, present in WPH, on immune modulation, stimulation of HSP expression, muscle protein synthesis, glycogen content, satiety signals and the impact of these peptides on the plasma free amino acid profiles. Methods: The animals were divided in groups: control (rest, without gavage), vehicle (water), L-isoleucyl-L-leucine (lle-Leu), L-leucyl-L-isoleucine (Leu-lle), L-valyl-Lleucine (Val-Leu), L-leucyl-L-valine (Leu-Val) and WPH. All animals were submitted to acute exercise, except for control. Results: lle-Leu stimulated immune response, hepatic and muscle glycogen and HSP60 expression, whereas Leu-Val enhanced HSP90 expression. All dipeptides reduced glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, no changes were observed on leptin. All peptides inhibited NF-kB expression. The plasma amino acid time-course showed peptide-specific and isomer-specific metabolic features, including increases of the BCAAs. Conclusion: The data indicate that lle-Leu was effective to attenuate immune-suppression exercise-induced, promoted glycogen content and stimulated anti-stress effect (HSP). Furthermore, Leu-Val increased HSP90, p-4EBP1, p-mTOR and p-AMPK expression. The data suggest the involvement of these peptides in various beneficial functions of WPH consumption. PMID:28326005

  18. Formyl peptides and ATP stimulate Ca2+ and Na+ inward currents through non-selective cation channels via G-proteins in dibutyryl cyclic AMP-differentiated HL-60 cells. Involvement of Ca2+ and Na+ in the activation of beta-glucuronidase release and superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Krautwurst, D; Seifert, R; Hescheler, J; Schultz, G

    1992-12-15

    In human neutrophils, the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP) induces increases in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) with subsequent activation of beta-glucuronidase release and superoxide (O2-) production. Results from several laboratories suggest that the increase in [Ca2+]i is due to activation of non-selective cation (NSC) channels. We studied the biophysical characteristics, pharmacological modulation and functional role of NSC channels in dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP)-differentiated HL-60 cells. fMLP increased [Ca2+]i by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular space. fMLP also induced Mn2+ influx. Ca2+ and Mn2+ influxes were inhibited by 1-(beta-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl)-1H-imidazole hydrochloride (SK&F 96365). Under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions, fMLP and ATP (a purinoceptor agonist) activated inward currents characterized by a linear current-voltage relationship and a reversal potential near 0 mV. NSC channels were substantially more permeable to Na+ than to Ca2+. SK&F 96365 inhibited fMLP- and ATP-stimulated currents with a half-maximal effect at about 3 microM. Pertussis toxin prevented stimulation by fMLP of NSC currents and reduced ATP-stimulated currents by about 80%. Intracellular application of the stable GDP analogue, guanosine 5'-O-[2-thio]diphosphate, completely blocked stimulation by agonists of NSC currents. In excised inside-out patches, single channel openings with an amplitude of 0.24 pA were observed in the presence of fMLP and the GTP analogue, guanosine 5'-O-[3-thio]triphosphate. The bath solution contained neither Ca2+ nor ATP. The current/voltage relationship was linear with a conductance of 4-5 pS and reversed at about 0 mV. fMLP-induced beta-glucuronidase release and O2- production were substantially reduced by replacement of extracellular CaCl2 or NaCl by ethylenebis(oxyethylenenitrilo)tetra-acetic acid and

  19. Interactions of gastrointestinal peptides: ghrelin and its anorexigenic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite.

  20. Interactions of Gastrointestinal Peptides: Ghrelin and Its Anorexigenic Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite. PMID:20798884

  1. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies.

  2. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Yeast-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Versus Peptide Vaccination Versus GM-CSF Plus Peptide Vaccination Versus Placebo in Patients With No Evidence of Disease After Complete Surgical Resection of Locally Advanced and/or Stage IV Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group–American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E4697)

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, David H.; Lee, Sandra; Zhao, Fengmin; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Margolin, Kim A.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Atkins, Michael B.; Cohen, Gary I.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and peptide vaccination (PV) on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with resected high-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients with completely resected stage IV or high-risk stage III melanoma were grouped by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -A2 status. HLA-A2–positive patients were randomly assigned to receive GM-CSF, PV, both, or placebo; HLA-A2–negative patients, GM-CSF or placebo. Treatment lasted for 1 year or until recurrence. Efficacy analyses were conducted in the intent-to-treat population. Results A total of 815 patients were enrolled. There were no significant improvements in OS (stratified log-rank P = .528; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% repeated CI, 0.77 to 1.15) or RFS (P = .131; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.04) in the patients assigned to GM-CSF (n = 408) versus those assigned to placebo (n = 407). The median OS times with GM-CSF versus placebo treatments were 69.6 months (95% CI, 53.4 to 83.5 months) versus 59.3 months (95% CI, 44.4 to 77.3 months); the 5-year OS probability rates were 52.3% (95% CI, 47.3% to 57.1%) versus 49.4% (95% CI, 44.3% to 54.3%), respectively. The median RFS times with GM-CSF versus placebo were 11.4 months (95% CI, 9.4 to 14.8 months) versus 8.8 months (95% CI, 7.5 to 11.2 months); the 5-year RFS probability rates were 31.2% (95% CI, 26.7% to 35.9%) versus 27.0% (95% CI, 22.7% to 31.5%), respectively. Exploratory analyses showed a trend toward improved OS in GM-CSF–treated patients with resected visceral metastases. When survival in HLA-A2–positive patients who received PV versus placebo was compared, RFS and OS were not significantly different. Treatment-related grade 3 or greater adverse events were similar between GM-CSF and placebo groups. Conclusion Neither adjuvant GM-CSF nor PV significantly improved RFS or OS in patients with high

  3. BT cationic peptides: small peptides that modulate innate immune responses of chicken heterophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Genovese, Kenneth J; He, Haiqi; Swaggerty, Christina L; Jiang, Yi Wei

    2012-01-15

    Neonatal poultry exhibit a transient susceptibility to infectious diseases during the first week of life that stems from inefficient host defense mechanisms. Yet, the initial host immune response to pathogens is a critical determinant of disease resistance and susceptibility. With this context in mind, novel ways to stimulate or modulate the hosts' natural immune response is emerging as an important area of interest for food animal producers including the poultry industry. Specifically, we have been investigating new modulation strategies tailored around the selective stimulation of the host's immune system, and particularly rapid acting innate immunity, as an alternative to direct targeting of microbial pathogens. One such approach that we have been investigating is the use of a group of cationic peptides produced by a Gram-positive soil bacterium, Brevibacillus texasporus (BT peptides). We have previously shown that, provided as a feed additive, BT peptides significantly induced a concentration-dependent protection against cecal colonization and extraintestinal colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE). This protection is not the result of direct antibacterial activity of the BT peptides on the SE since the concentrations used were below the minimum inhibitory concentration for SE. We also found that BT are not absorbed in the intestine, but still induce a significant up-regulation in the functional efficiency of peripheral blood heterophils and monocytes. The mechanisms of this immune modulation are unknown. Here, using in vitro models for measuring: (1) leukocyte oxidative burst, (2) changes in leukocyte cytokine and chemokines gene expression profiles, and (3) phosphorylation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in leukocytes, we evaluated the role of BT peptides as priming mediators for heterophil and monocyte responses at the level of cell function, gene transcription/expression, and cell phosphorylation following stimulation

  4. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  6. The natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gary F

    2004-03-01

    The natriuretic peptides are a family of widely distributed, but evolutionarily conserved, polypeptide mediators that exert a range of actions throughout the body. In cardiovascular homeostasis, the endocrine roles of the cardiac-derived atrial and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) in regulating central fluid volume and blood pressure have been recognised for two decades. However, there is a growing realisation that natriuretic peptide actions go far beyond their volume regulating effects. These pleiotropic actions include local (autocrine/paracrine) regulatory actions of ANP and BNP within the heart, and of another natriuretic peptide, CNP, within the vessel wall. Effects on function and growth of the local tissue environment are likely to be of great importance, especially in disease states where tissue and circulating levels of ANP and BNP rise markedly. At present, the relevance of other natriuretic peptides (notably uroguanylin and DNP) to human physiology and pathology remain uncertain. Other articles in this issue of Basic Research in Cardiology review the molecular physiology of natriuretic peptide signalling, with a particular emphasis on the lessons from genetically targetted mice; the vascular activity of natriuretic peptides; the regulation and roles of natriuretic peptides in ischaemic myocardium; and the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic roles of natriuretic peptides in heart failure.

  7. Modulation for antigen presentation in tuberculosis by using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, P; Jiménez-Zamudio, L

    1991-01-01

    Competition assay technology has been a very useful tool in the study of parasite antigens and has been inferred but never proven that this approach can be applied to select T-cell epitopes by using another microorganisms. In this study, HLA-restricted T-cell clones specific to synthetic peptides derived from the 65 kDa mycobacterial protein were used to investigate whether these peptides are able to compete with each other at the level of MHC-binding sites in tuberculosis. Fixed APCs were pulsed with suboptimal concentration of stimulator peptide in the presence of various concentrations of competitor peptide. The results showed that two peptides from this protein were able to compete with each other inducing a significant inhibition in the proliferation assays while there was no competition by using a control peptide. The amount of cross-reactivity was influenced by the peptide concentrations. More important was the observation that these peptides were able to bind to the same HLA-class II molecules therefore blocking the binding of each other. The fact that these peptides have not an identical amino acid sequence support the idea that the MHC-peptide interaction must have a broad specificity to be able to bind a large number of peptides. These results demonstrate that it is possible to modulate the antigen presentation by blocking the peptide MHC-class II interaction in tuberculosis and support the idea that this approach facilitates the selection of appropriate T-cell epitopes to be incorporated in a vaccine.

  8. Radioimmunoassay for. gamma. -melanocyte stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Shibasaki, T.; Ling, N.; Guillemin, R.

    1980-05-26

    A specific radioimmunoassay for ..gamma..-melanocyte stimulating hormone-like peptides was developed. An antiserum raised in rabbit to synthetic bovine ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH, one of the possible ..gamma..-MSH peptides, specifically recognizes the portion between His/sup 5/ and Arg/sup 14/ of ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH without significant cross-reaction with other synthetic ..gamma..-MSH-like peptides, ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-MSH, adrenocorticotropin, and ..beta..-endorphin. The usable range of this RIA is 10 pg to 600 pg of synthetic ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH. Three immunoreactive ..gamma..-MSH peaks were thus found in gel permeation chromatography of the whole bovine pituitary extract.

  9. A novel method to identify and characterise peptide mimotopes of heat shock protein 70-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Blanca; Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Todryk, Stephen; James, Tharappel C; Doherty, Derek G; Bond, Ursula

    2006-04-08

    The heat shock protein, Hsp70, has been shown to play an important role in tumour immunity. Vaccination with Hsp70-peptide complexes (Hsp70-PCs), isolated from autologous tumour cells, can induce protective immune responses. We have developed a novel method to identify synthetic mimic peptides of Hsp70-PCs and to test their ability to activate T-cells. Peptides (referred to as "recognisers") that bind to Hsp70-PCs from the human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, were identified by bio-panning a random peptide M13 phage display library. Synthetic recogniser peptides were subsequently used as bait in a reverse bio-panning experiment to identify potential Hsp70-PC mimic peptides. The ability of the recogniser and mimic peptides to prime human lymphocyte responses against tumour cell antigens was tested by stimulating lymphocytes with autologous peptide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Priming and subsequent stimulation with either the recogniser or mimic peptide resulted in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion by the lymphocytes. Furthermore, DCs loaded with Hsp70, Hsp70-PC or the recogniser or the mimic peptide primed the lymphocytes to respond to soluble extracts from breast cells. These results highlight the potential application of synthetic peptide-mimics of Hsp70-PCs, as modulators of the immune response against tumours.

  10. Reduced expression of pain mediators and pain sensitivity in amyloid precursor protein over-expressing CRND8 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Shukla, M; Quirion, R; Ma, W

    2013-10-10

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) peptides are derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). They are enriched in plaques present in Alzheimer's brains and thus play important roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. APP is also known to be expressed in the neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and contributes to neuronal survival and axonal growth during development. However, whether APP and Aβ peptides are involved in nociception and pathological pain states is mostly unknown. In the present study, we have used behavioral, biochemical and morphological approaches to address this issue in both adult rats and APP over-expressing CRND8 transgenic mice. We observed that the Aβ peptide (17-24) was predominantly expressed in small-sized DRG neurons of rats. Following intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of complete Freud's adjuvant (CFA), the levels of APP and Aβ peptides were significantly reduced in the ipsilateral lumbar 4-6 rat DRG. In 3-, 12- and 24-month-old CRND8 mice, pain sensitivity in response to heat and mechanical stimulation was significantly dampened compared to their age-matched wild-type littermates. In parallel with reduced pain sensitivity, the expression of pain mediators such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 was significantly reduced in L4-6 DRG of CRND8 mice. Although i.pl. injection of CFA induced a rather similar pattern of inflammatory pain in 3-month-old CRND8 mice and their wild-type littermates, recovery from inflammatory pain seemed faster in 12-month-old CRND8 mice than wild-type mice. These findings suggest that APP and Aβ peptides suppress both nociception and inflammatory pain and are likely involved in blunt pain perception of Alzheimer's patients in clinical settings.

  11. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  12. Activation of sensory nerves in guinea-pig isolated basilar artery by nicotine: evidence for inhibition of trigeminal sensory neurotransmission by sumatriptan.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, C T; Connor, H E

    1994-06-23

    Nicotine (100 microM), but not electrical field stimulation or potassium chloride (0.1-3 microM), caused capsaicin (1 microM)- and tetrodotoxin (1 microM)-sensitive relaxations of guinea-pig isolated basilar artery precontracted with prostaglandin F2 alpha. Nicotine-induced responses were blocked by the neurokinin NK1 receptor antagonist, GR82334 (10 microM), but were unaffected by the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, CGRP-(8-37) (1 microM). This suggests that nicotine activates capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in guinea-pig basilar artery to cause relaxation predominantly via substance P release. The vascular 5-HT1 receptor agonist, sumatriptan (0.3 and 3 microM), inhibited nicotine-induced relaxation (by 50 and 80% respectively); the inhibitory effect of sumatriptan (0.3 microM) was attenuated in the presence of the non-selective 5-HT1 receptor antagonist, methiothepin (0.1 microM). These data suggest that sumatriptan can inhibit sensory neurotransmission in guinea-pig basilar artery via activation of inhibitory prejunctional 5-HT1 receptors on sensory nerve terminals.

  13. Can migraine aura be provoked experimentally? A systematic review of potential methods for the provocation of migraine aura.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Marianne; Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    Background The nature of the migraine aura and its role in migraine pathophysiology is incompletely understood. In particular, the mechanisms underlying aura initiation and the causal relation between aura and headache are unknown. The scientific investigation of aura in patients is only possible if aura can be triggered. This paper reviews potential methods for the experimental provocation of migraine aura. Methods We systematically searched PubMed for studies of experimental migraine provocation, including case reports of patients with aura and reports of the occurrence of aura following exposure to any kind of suspected trigger. Results We identified 21 provocation studies, using 13 different prospective provocation methods, and 34 case reports. In the prospective studies, aura were reported following the administration of intravenous and sublingual glyceryl trinitrate, visual stimulation, physical activity, calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion, chocolate ingestion, and the intravenous injection of insulin. In addition, carotid artery puncture has consistently been reported as a trigger of aura. Conclusions No safe and efficient method for aura provocation exists at present, but several approaches could prove useful for this purpose.

  14. Decompensated liver cirrhosis and neural regulation of mesenteric vascular tone in rats: role of sympathetic, nitrergic and sensory innervations

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Esther; Caracuel, Laura; Prieto, Isabel; Llévenes, Pablo; Aller, M. Ángeles; Arias, Jaime; Balfagón, Gloria; Blanco-Rivero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the possible alterations produced by liver cholestasis (LC), a model of decompensated liver cirrhosis in sympathetic, sensory and nitrergic nerve function in rat superior mesenteric arteries (SMA). The vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) was greater in LC animals. Alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine and P2 purinoceptor antagonist suramin decreased this response in LC animals more than in control animals. Both non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) L-NAME and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) (8-37) increased the vasoconstrictor response to EFS more strongly in LC than in control segments. Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA) or CGRP were greater in LC segments, while NO analogue DEA-NO induced a similar vasodilation in both experimental groups. The release of NA was not modified, while those of ATP, nitrite and CGRP were increased in segments from LC. Alpha 1 adrenoceptor, Rho kinase (ROCK) 1 and 2 and total myosin phosphatase (MYPT) expressions were not modified, while alpha 2B adrenoceptor, nNOS expression and nNOS and MYPT phosphorylation were increased by LC. Together, these alterations might counteract the increased splanchnic vasodilation observed in the last phases of decompensated liver cirrhosis. PMID:27484028

  15. Melatonin treatment reverts age-related changes in Guinea pig gallbladder neuromuscular transmission and contractility.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Camello-Almaraz, Cristina; Moreno, Rosario; Camello, Pedro J; Pozo, María J

    2006-11-01

    The incidence of gallbladder illness increases with age, but the altered mechanisms leading to gallbladder dysfunction are poorly understood. Here we determine the age-related alterations in gallbladder contractility and the impact of melatonin treatment. Isometric tension changes in response to electrical field stimulation and to agonists were recorded from guinea pig gallbladder muscle strips. [Ca(2+)](i) was determined by epifluorescence microscopy in fura-2 loaded isolated gallbladder smooth muscle cells, and F-actin content was quantified by confocal microscopy. Aging reduced neurogenic contractions, which was associated with the impairment of nitrergic innervation and with increased responsiveness of capsaicin-sensitive relaxant nerves, possibly involving calcitonin gene-related peptide. Melatonin treatment for 4 weeks restored neurogenic responses to normal values, with an associated recovery of nitrergic function and the disappearance of the capsaicin-sensitive component. Aging also reduced the contractile responses to cholecystokinin and Ca(2+) influx. The impaired contractility only correlated with diminished Ca(2+) mobilization in response to activation of Ca(2+) influx. Melatonin improved contractility and increased smooth muscle F-actin content without changing Ca(2+) homeostasis. In conclusion, aging impairs gallbladder function as the result of changes in the inhibitory neuromodulation of smooth muscle contractility and the reduction in the myogenic response to contractile agonists. Impaired contractility seems to be related to decreased Ca(2+) influx and damage of contractile proteins. Melatonin significantly ameliorated these age-related changes.

  16. The distribution of transient receptor potential melastatin-8 in the rat soft palate, epiglottis, and pharynx.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tadasu; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Kondo, Teruyoshi; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kasahara, Eriko; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry for transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8), the cold and menthol receptor, was performed on the rat soft palate, epiglottis and pharynx. TRPM8-immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were located beneath the mucous epithelium, and occasionally penetrated the epithelium. These nerve fibers were abundant in the posterior portion of the soft palate and at the border region of naso-oral and laryngeal parts of the pharynx. The epiglottis was free from such nerve fibers. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that TRPM8-IR nerve fibers in the pharynx and soft palate were mostly devoid of calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactivity (CGRP-IR). The retrograde tracing method also demonstrated that 30.1 and 8.7 % of sensory neurons in the jugular and petrosal ganglia innervating the pharynx contained TRPM8-IR, respectively. Among these neurons, the co-expression of TRPM8 and CGRP-IR was very rare. In the nodose ganglion, however, pharyngeal neurons were devoid of TRPM8-IR. Taste bud-like structures in the soft palate and pharynx contained 4-9 TRPM8-IR cells. In the epiglottis, the mucous epithelium on the laryngeal side had numerous TRPM8-IR cells. The present study suggests that TRPM8 can respond to cold stimulation when food and drinks pass through oral and pharyngeal cavities.

  17. Laryngeal endocrine cells: topographic distribution and adaptation to chronic hypercapnic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Kusakabe, T; Hayashida, Y; Yoshida, T; Matsuda, H; Atoji, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2000-10-01

    The morphology, topographic distribution, effects of denervation, and exposure to hypercapnic hypoxia of endocrine cells were examined in rat larynx. The endocrine cells, which were immunoreactive for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), were observed within the epithelial layer of the laryngeal cavity and in the laryngeal gland, while solitary endocrine cells with apical and/or basal cytoplasmic processes appeared near the glottis. After denervation of the left cervical vagosympathetic trunk and the superior laryngeal nerve, the number of mucosal endocrine cells in the denervated side was not significantly different from that in the intact side. After exposure to hypercapnic hypoxia for 3 months, the number of endocrine cells with PGP 9.5 and CGRP was markedly increased. In conclusion, the secretion of laryngeal endocrine cells may be stimulated by CO2 rather than O2. Furthermore, the endocrine cells and the sensory and autonomic nervous system may regulate each other by an axon reflex mechanism. Endocrine cells appear to play a very important role in the local regulation of the laryngeal mucosa.

  18. Pathophysiology of itching and sneezing in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Pfaar, Oliver; Raap, U; Holz, M; Hörmann, K; Klimek, L

    2009-01-24

    Itching and sneezing represent two of the main bothersome symptoms, apart from nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea in allergic rhinitis. Apparently, activation of the central and peripheral nervous system plays a major role in the pathophysiology of this process. Sensory nerves of the afferent trigeminal system including myelinated Adelta-fibres and thin, non-myelinated C-fibres of the nasal mucosa transmit signals generating sensations, including itching and motor reflexes, such as sneezing. These nerves can be stimulated by products of allergic reactions and by external physical and chemical irritants. Via axon reflex inflammatory neuropeptides including the tachykinins substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) and the calcitonin gene related peptide are released, leading to vasodilatation, increased vascular permeability (concept of "neurogenic inflammation"), glandular activation, leukocyte recruitment and differentiation of immune cells including mast cells, eosinophils, lymphocytes and macrophages. The present paper describes nasal (micro-) anatomy and innervation and explains the central and peripheral mechanisms initiating itching and sneezing in allergic rhinitis. Further, the role of neuropeptides and neurotrophins with regard to neuronal and immune cell activation which might play a key role in the future treatment of allergic rhinitis are discussed.

  19. Intermittent pneumatic compression enhances neurovascular ingrowth and tissue proliferation during connective tissue healing: a study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Johan; Li, Jian; Bring, Daniel K-I; Renström, Per; Ackermann, Paul W

    2007-09-01

    Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) is a treatment method to decrease venous stasis and stimulate blood flow. Recently, it was hypothesized that IPC may exert positive effects on tissue healing, a process highly dependent upon adequate circulation. In this study, we investigated the effects of daily 1-h IPC treatment during 2 and 4 weeks post-rat Achilles tendon rupture. The tendons were subjectively and semiquantitatively analyzed for collagen organization, fibroblast density, angiogenesis, and the occurrence of sensory neuropeptides, substance P (SP) and calcitonine gene related peptide (CGRP), as well as for a nerve regeneration marker, growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43). After 2 weeks of treatment, fibroblast density increased by 53% (p = 0.0004), vessel density by 64% (p = 0.022), and the occurrence of SP by 110% (p = 0.047) and CGRP by 47% (p = 0.0163) compared to untreated controls. Following 4 weeks of treatment, both the occurrence of sensory neuropeptides and the vessel density remained significantly higher (p < 0.05), whereas fibroblast density returned to normal. However, at 4 weeks the treated tendons displayed a higher degree of organized parallel collagen fibers, a sign of increased maturation. Daily IPC treatment improves neurovascular ingrowth and fibroblast proliferation in the healing tendon and may accelerate the repair process.

  20. Capsaicin-induced, capsazepine-insensitive relaxation of the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Seigo; Mori, Mayumi; Tsushima, Hiromi; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi

    2006-01-13

    The mechanisms underlying transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1)-independent relaxation elicited by capsaicin were studied by measuring isometric force and phosphorylation of 20-kDa regulatory light chain subunit of myosin (MLC(20)) in ileum longitudinal smooth muscles of guinea-pigs. In acetylcholine-stimulated tissues, capsaicin (1-100 microM) and resiniferatoxin (10 nM-1 microM) produced a concentration-dependent relaxation. The relaxant response was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine and high-KCl solution, but not by capsazepine, tetraethylammonium, Ba(2+), glibenclamide, charybdotoxin plus apamin nor antagonists of cannabinoid receptor type 1 and calcitonin-gene related peptide. A RhoA kinase inhibitor reduced the relaxant effect of capsaicin at 30 microM. Capsaicin and resiniferatoxin reduced acetylcholine- and caffeine-induced transient contractions in a Ca(2+)-free, EGTA solution. Capsaicin at 30 microM for 20 min did not alter basal levels of MLC(20) phosphorylation, but abolished an increase by acetylcholine in MLC(20) phosphorylation. It is suggested that the relaxant effect of capsaicin at concentrations used is not mediated by TRPV1, but by 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channels, and that capsaicin inhibits contractile mechanisms involving Ca(2+) release from intracellular storage sites. The relaxation could be explained by a decrease in phosphorylation of MLC(20).

  1. Sensitizing effects of lafutidine on CGRP-containing afferent nerves in the rat stomach

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Katsushi; Nozawa, Yoshihisa; Nakano, Motoko; Ajioka, Hirofusa; Matsuura, Naosuke

    2002-01-01

    Capsaicin sensitive afferent nerves play an important role in gastric mucosal defensive mechanisms. Capsaicin stimulates afferent nerves and enhances the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which seems to be the predominant neurotransmitter of spinal afferents in the rat stomach, exerting many pharmacological effects by a direct mechanism or indirectly through second messengers such as nitric oxide (NO). Lafutidine is a new type of anti-ulcer drug, possessing both an antisecretory effect, exerted via histamine H2 receptor blockade, and gastroprotective activities. Studies with certain antagonists or chemical deafferentation techniques suggest the gastroprotective actions of lafutidine to be mediated by capsaicin sensitive afferent nerves, but this is an assumption based on indirect techniques. In order to explain the direct relation of lafutidine to afferent nerves, we conducted the following studies. We determined CGRP and NO release from rat stomach and specific [3H]-resiniferatoxin (RTX) binding to gastric vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (VR1), which binds capsaicin, using EIA, a microdialysis system and a radioreceptor assay, respectively. Lafutidine enhanced both CGRP and NO release from the rat stomach induced by a submaximal dose of capsaicin, but had no effect on specific [3H]-RTX and capsaicin binding to VR1. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that lafutidine modulates the activity of capsaicin sensitive afferent nerves in the rat stomach, which may be a key mechanism involved in its gastroprotective action. PMID:11906962

  2. Occurrence of a CGRP-like molecule in siki (Centroscymnus coelolepsis) hydrolysate of industrial origin.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Guimas, Laurence; Delannoy, Charles; Fouchereau-Peron, Martine

    2007-07-11

    Fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) may have potential as bioactive components in functional foods as nutraceuticals. This study focused on the identification of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) molecules in FPH. CGRP is a neuropeptide belonging to the calcitonin/CGRP family and is known as potent arterial and venous vasodilator in humans. Hydrolysates of industrial origin were prepared from siki (Centroscymnus coelolepsis) heads and were analyzed for the presence of CGRP-like molecules using specific radioimmunoassays and radioreceptorassays. The biological activity of the CGRP-related molecules was assessed by their ability to stimulate the adenylate cyclase activity in rat liver membranes. They were finally purified using gel exclusion chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These molecules presented a molecular weight around 1500-2500 Da and were obtained with a purification factor of 79. The incorporation of FPH with CGRP-like molecules in functional foods could lead to the development of new useful products for health and nutrition markets.

  3. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  4. Further identification of bioactive peptides in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus: two contractile and three inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Y; Takahashi, T; Ikeda, T; Muneoka, Y; Kubota, I; Minakata, H; Nomoto, K; Nose, T; Miki, W

    1993-09-01

    1. Two contractile and three inhibitory peptides were newly isolated from the anterior byssus retractor muscles (ABRMs) of the bivalve mollusc Mytilus edulis by using the muscle as the bioassay system. 2. The structures of the two contractile peptides were GPFGTHIKamide (GPFG-8) and GPFGLNKHGamide (GPFG-9). The contractile response of the ABRM to the first-time application of GPFG-8 or GPFG-9 was of considerable size. The threshold concentrations of the peptides were around 10(-9) M. However, the contractile response to the second-time application was far smaller than that to the first-time application in both cases. Namely, the muscle showed tachyphylaxis to the peptides. 3. Two of the three inhibitory peptides were members of the Mytilus-inhibitory-peptide (MIP) family. Their structures were RAPLFIamide (MIP6) and RSPMFVamide (MIP7). The peptides, as well as the other MIPs previously identified, showed a potent inhibitory effect on phasic contraction of the ABRM in response to repetitive electrical stimulation. The remaining one was an MIP-related peptide (MIP-RP) having the sequence of MRYFVamide. The MIP-RP was less potent than the two MIPs in inhibiting the contraction of the ABRM.

  5. Immobilized alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone 10-13 (GKPV) inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J M; Moir, A J G; Carlson, K; Yang, Y; MacNeil, S; Haycock, J W

    2006-02-01

    alpha-MSH is an anti-inflammatory peptide which signals by binding to the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) and elevating cyclic AMP in several different cells and tissues. The carboxyl terminal peptides of alpha-MSH (KPV/GKPV) are the smallest minimal sequences that prevent inflammation, but it is not known if they operate via MC1R or cyclic AMP. The aim of this study was to examine the intracellular signaling potential of the GKPV peptide sequence when immobilized to polystyrene beads via a polyethylene glycol moiety. Beads containing an immobilized GKPV peptide were investigated for their ability to inhibit proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulated activation of NF-kappaB in HBL cells stably transfected with an NF-kappaB-luciferase reporter construct. Peptide functionalized beads were compared with the ability of soluble peptide alone (alpha-MSH or GKPV) or non-functionalized beads to inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated activation of NF-kappaB. GKPV peptide functionalized beads significantly inhibited NF-kappaB-luciferase activity in comparison to beads containing no peptide moiety in one of two growths conditions investigated. Soluble alpha-MSH and GKPV peptides were also confirmed to inhibit NF-kappaB-luciferase. The present study suggests that the carboxyl terminal MSH peptide acts via a cell receptor-based mechanism and furthermore may support the potential use of such immobilized ligands for anti-inflammatory therapeutic use.

  6. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  7. Antiproliferative and GH-inhibitory activity of chimeric peptides consisting of GHRP-6 and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, P; Singh, A T; Mukherjee, R

    1999-06-07

    Chimeric peptides consisting of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP-6) linked to somatostatin (6-11) via an amide bond to provide the effector parts of both the peptides were synthesized. The anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, and GH-inhibitory activities of these chimeric peptides were determined in vitro in the rat pituitary adenoma cell line GH3. One of the chimeric peptides, GSD, exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.001) anti-neoplastic and GH-inhibitory activity, as compared to RC-160. The hybrid peptides displayed high affinity binding to somatostatin receptors on GH3 cells. The bioactivity of GSD was found to be mediated by the stimulation of tyrosine phosphatase, involving a cGMP-dependent pathway, through pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. Such potent GH-inhibitory chimeric peptides may be of potential importance in the therapy of acromegaly, as well as provide novel tools to study the regulation of GH secretion by GHRP and somatostatin.

  8. A biologically active peptide mimetic of N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycosylated proteins and lipids are important regulatory factors whose functions can be altered by addition or removal of sugars to the glycan structure. The glycans are recognized by sugar-binding lectins that serve as receptors on the surface of many cells and facilitate initiation of an intracellular signal that changes the properties of the cells. We identified a peptide that mimics the ligand of an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectin and asked whether the peptide would express specific biological activity. Findings A 12-mer phage display library was screened with a GalNAc-specific lectin to identify an amino acid sequence that binds to the lectin. Phage particles that were eluted from the lectin with free GalNAc were considered to have been bound to a GalNAc-binding site. Peptides were synthesized with the selected sequence as a quadravalent structure to facilitate receptor crosslinking. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 24 h with the peptide stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but not of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The secretion of IL-21 was stimulated as strongly with the peptide as with interferon-γ. Conclusion The data indicate that the quadravalent peptide has biological activity with a degree of specificity. These effects occurred at concentrations in the nanomolar range, in contrast to free sugars that generally bind to proteins in the micro- to millimolar range. PMID:19284521

  9. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  10. A peptide probe for targeted brown adipose tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Azhdarinia, Ali; Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Ghosh, Sukhen C; Ghosh, Pradip; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-01-01

    The presence of brown adipose tissue responsible for thermogenic energy dissipation has been revealed in adult humans and has high clinical importance. Owing to limitations of current methods for brown adipose tissue detection, analysing the abundance and localization of brown adipose tissue in the body has remained challenging. Here we screen a combinatorial peptide library in mice and characterize a peptide (with the sequence CPATAERPC) that selectively binds to the vascular endothelium of brown adipose tissue, but not of intraperitoneal white adipose tissue. We show that in addition to brown adipose tissue, this peptide probe also recognizes the vasculature of brown adipose tissue-like depots of subcutaneous white adipose tissue. Our results indicate that the CPATAERPC peptide localizes to brown adipose tissue even in the absence of sympathetic nervous system stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate that this probe can be used to identify brown adipose tissue depots in mice by whole-body near-infrared fluorescence imaging.

  11. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.

  13. Local cutaneous nerve terminal and mast cell responses to manual acupuncture in acupoint LI4 area of the rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mei-Ling; Xu, Dong-Sheng; Bai, Wan-Zhu; Cui, Jing-Jing; Shu, Hong-Ming; He, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Shi, Hong; Su, Yang-Shuai; Hu, Ling; Zhu, Bing; Jing, Xiang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the effects of manual acupuncture (MA) are contributed by collagen fibers and mast cells in local acupoints, at which acupuncture stimulation causes various afferent fiber groups to be excited. However what happens in local nerve fibers and mast cells after MA remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the response of cutaneous nerve fibers and mast cells to MA stimulation in acupoint Hegu (LI4). The contralateral LI4 of the same rat was used as a non-stimulated control. Immnohistochemistry analysis were carried out to observe the expression of histamine (HA), serotonin (5-HT) and nociceptive neuropeptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP), in the LI4 area. Mast cells were labeled with anti-mast cell tryptase antibody and simultaneously with HA or 5-HT primary antibodies to observe their co-expression. Our results showed that SP and CGRP were expressed more highly on the cutaneous nerve fibers of LI4 after MA stimulation than that of the control. Mast cells aggregated in close proximity to the blood vessels in intra-epidermis and dermis and some of them with degranulation in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissue of LI4. Both mast cells and their granules appeared with HA (+) and 5-HT (+) expression at stimulated L14 sites, while a few intact mast cells with a little expression of 5-HT and HA were distributed in areas of non-stimulated L14. The results indicated that local cutaneous nerve terminals and mast cells responded to MA with higher expression of SP and CGRP in nerve fibers, as well as with aggregation and degranulation of mast cells with HA and 5-HT granules at acupoint LI4. These neuroactive substances may convey signals to certain pathways that contribute to the effects of acupuncture.

  14. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca2+ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals. PMID:25147231

  15. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  16. Role of amphipathicity and hydrophobicity in the balance between hemolysis and peptide-membrane interactions of three related antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Axel; Martínez, Melina; Noguera, Martín E; Augusto, Marcelo T; Disalvo, Anibal; Santos, Nuno C; Semorile, Liliana; Maffía, Paulo C

    2016-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) represent important self defense molecules in many organisms, including humans. These peptides have a broad spectrum of activities, killing or neutralizing many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The emergence of multidrug resistant microbes has stimulated research on the development of alternative antibiotics. In the search for new antibiotics, cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) offer a viable alternative to conventional antibiotics, as they physically disrupt the bacterial membranes, leading to lysis of microbial membranes and eventually cell death. In particular, the group of linear α-helical cationic peptides has attracted increasing interest from clinical as well as basic research during the last decade. In this work, we studied the biophysical and microbiological characteristics of three new designed CAMPs. We modified a previously studied CAMP sequence, in order to increase or diminish the hydrophobic face, changing the position of two lysines or replacing three leucines, respectively. These mutations modified the hydrophobic moment of the resulting peptides and allowed us to study the importance of this parameter in the membrane interactions of the peptides. The structural properties of the peptides were also correlated with their membrane-disruptive abilities, antimicrobial activities and hemolysis of human red blood cells.

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  18. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  19. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  20. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  1. ACTH (cosyntropin) stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The ACTH stimulation test measures how well the adrenal glands respond to adrenocorticotropic hormone ( ACTH ). ACTH is a ... produced in the pituitary gland that stimulates the adrenal glands to release a hormone called cortisol. How the ...

  2. T-cell receptors: tugging on the anchor for a tighter hold on the tumor-associated peptide.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Julian

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been shown that human tumor-associated, HLA anchor residue modified "heteroclitic" peptides may induce stronger immune responses than wild-type peptides in cancer vaccine trials, it has also been shown that some T cells primed with these heteroclitic peptides subsequently fail to recognize the natural, tumor-expressed peptide efficiently. This may provide a molecular reason for why clinical trials of these peptides have been thus far unsuccessful. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Madura et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 584-591] highlight a novel twist on T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of HLA-peptide complexes. Tumor-associated peptides often lack canonical anchor residues, which can be substituted for the optimal residue to improve their antigenicity. T-cell cross-reactivity between the natural and modified (heteroclitic) peptides is essential for this approach to work and depends on whether the anchor residue substitution influences peptide conformation. The Melan-A/MART-126-35 peptide epitope is an example where T cells can make this distinction, with the natural peptide stimulating higher affinity CD8(+) T cells than the heteroclitic peptide, despite the heteroclitic peptide's more stable association with HLA-A2. The molecular basis for peptide discrimination is identified through the structure of the TCR bound to the natural peptide; TCR engagement of the natural peptide "lifts" its amino-terminus partly away from the HLA peptide binding groove, forming a higher affinity interface with the TCR than is formed with the anchor residue "optimized" heteroclitic peptide, which cannot be "pulled" from the HLA groove.

  3. Stapled Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) Derivatives Improve VPAC2 Agonism and Glucose-Dependent Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Revell, Jefferson D; Knerr, Laurent; Hostettler, Marie; Paunovic, Amalia; Priest, Claire; Janefeldt, Annika; Gill, Adrian

    2013-12-12

    Agonists of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VPAC2) stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion, making them attractive candidates for the treatment of hyperglycaemia and type-II diabetes. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is an endogenous peptide hormone that potently agonizes VPAC2. However, VIP has a short serum half-life and poor pharmacokinetics in vivo and is susceptible to proteolytic degradation, making its development as a therapeutic agent challenging. Here, we investigated two peptide cyclization strategies, lactamisation and olefin-metathesis stapling, and their effects on VPAC2 agonism, peptide secondary structure, protease stability, and cell membrane permeability. VIP analogues showing significantly enhanced VPAC2 agonist potency, glucose-dependent insulin secretion activity, and increased helical content were discovered; however, neither cyclization strategy appeared to effect proteolytic stability or cell permeability of the resulting peptides.

  4. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  5. VGF Changes during the Estrous Cycle: A Novel Endocrine Role for TLQP Peptides?

    PubMed Central

    Noli, Barbara; Brancia, Carla; D’Amato, Filomena; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Cocco, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Although the VGF derived peptide TLQP-21 stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin secretion, available data on VGF peptides and reproduction are limited. We used antibodies specific for the two ends of the VGF precursor, and for two VGF derived peptides namely TLQP and PGH, to be used in immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay complemented with gel chromatography. In cycling female rats, VGF C-/N-terminus and PGH peptide antibodies selectively labelled neurones containing either GnRH, or kisspeptin (VGF N-terminus only), pituitary gonadotrophs and lactotrophs, or oocytes (PGH peptides only). Conversely, TLQP peptides were restricted to somatostatin neurones, gonadotrophs, and ovarian granulosa, interstitial and theca cells. TLQP levels were highest, especially in plasma and ovary, with several molecular forms shown in chromatography including one compatible with TLQP-21. Among the cycle phases, TLQP levels were higher during metestrus-diestrus in median eminence and pituitary, while increased in the ovary and decreased in plasma during proestrus. VGF N- and C-terminus peptides also showed modulations over the estrous cycle, in median eminence, pituitary and plasma, while PGH peptides did not. In ovariectomised rats, plasmatic TLQP peptide levels showed distinct reduction suggestive of a major origin from the ovary, while the estrogen-progesterone treatment modulated VGF C-terminus and TLQP peptides in the hypothalamus-pituitary complex. In in vitro hypothalamus, TLQP-21 stimulated release of growth hormone releasing hormone but not of somatostatin. In conclusion, various VGF peptides may regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary complex via specific neuroendocrine mechanisms while TLQP peptides may act at further, multiple levels via endocrine mechanisms involving the ovary. PMID:25280008

  6. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Ha Young; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Koo, JaeHyung; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525] PMID:27502013

  7. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525].

  8. Related impurities in peptide medicines.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Taevernier, Lien; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of pharmaceuticals, positioned between classic small organic molecules and larger bio-molecules such as proteins. Currently, the peptide drug market is growing twice as fast as other drug markets, illustrating the increasing clinical as well as economical impact of this medicine group. Most peptides today are manufactured by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This review will provide a structured overview of the most commonly observed peptide-related impurities in peptide medicines, encompassing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API or drug substance) as well as the finished drug products. Not only is control of these peptide-related impurities and degradants critical for the already approved and clinically used peptide-drugs, these impurities also possess the capability of greatly influencing initial functionality studies during early drug discovery phases, possibly resulting in erroneous conclusions. The first group of peptide-related impurities is SPPS-related: deletion and insertion of amino acids are related to inefficient Fmoc-deprotection and excess use of amino acid reagents, respectively. Fmoc-deprotection can cause racemization of amino acid residues and thus diastereomeric impurities. Inefficient deprotection of amino acid side chains results into peptide-protection adducts. Furthermore, unprotected side chains can react with a variety of reagents used in the synthesis. Oxidation of amino acid side chains and dimeric-to-oligomeric impurities were also observed. Unwanted peptide counter ions such as trifluoroacetate, originating from the SPPS itself or from additional purification treatments, may also be present in the final peptide product. Contamination of the desired peptide product by other unrelated peptides was also seen, pointing out the lack of appropriate GMP. The second impurity group results from typical peptide degradation mechanisms such as β-elimination, diketopiperazine, pyroglutamate

  9. The development of non-peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho-Sang; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Son, Moon-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is the main member of the incretin family and stimulates insulin secretion by binding with its specific receptor on pancreatic β-cells. In addition, GLP-1 exerts broad beneficial effects on the glucose regulation by suppressing food intake and delaying stomach emptying. Now, long acting GLP-1 analogs including exenatide and liraglutide have been approved for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, however long-term injection can limit their use for these chronic patients. In this report, the authors provide a review on the development of non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonists and introduce a novel agonist DA-15864.

  10. Production of bioactive peptides in an in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Cai, Yang; Lindberg, Iris

    2007-07-15

    An in vitro system for the preparation of bioactive peptides is described. This system couples three different posttranslational modification enzymes, prohormone convertases (PCs), carboxypeptidase E, and peptidyl alpha-amidating enzyme, to transform recombinant precursors into bioactive peptides. Three different precursors, mouse proopiomelanocortin (mPOMC), rat proenkephalin (rPE), and human proghrelin, were used as model systems. The conversion of mPOMC and rPE to smaller peptide products was measured by radioimmunoassay. After optimization of the system, excellent efficiency was obtained: about 85% of starting mPOMC was converted to des-acetyl alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH). For proenkephalin, 75 and 96% yields were obtained for the opioid peptides Met-RGL and Met-enk, respectively. Cell-based assays demonstrated that in-vitro-generated des-acetyl alpha-MSH successfully activated the melanocortin 4 receptor. Proghrelin digestion was used to screen the specificity of PC cleavage and to confirm the cleavage site by mass spectroscopy. Mature ghrelin was produced by human furin, mouse prohormone convertase 1, and human prohormone convertase 7 but not by mouse prohormone convertase 2. These results demonstrate that our in vitro system (1) can produce peptides in quantities sufficient to carry out functional analyses, (2) can be used to determine the specificity of proprotein convertases on recombinant precursors, and (3) has the potential to identify novel peptide functions on both known and orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

  11. Design and Engineering Strategies for Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossi, Alessandro

    Thousands of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of prokaryotic, fungal, plant, or animal origin have been identified, and their potential as lead compounds for the design of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of infection, for stimulating the immune system, or in countering septic shock has been widely recognized. Added to this is their possible use in prophylaxis of infectious diseases for animal or plant protection, for disinfection of surgical instruments or industrial surfaces, and for food preservation among other commercially important applications. Since the early eighties, AMPs have been subject to a vast number of studies aimed at understanding what determines their potency and spectrum of activities against bacterial or fungal pathogens, and at maximizing these while limiting cytotoxic activities toward host cells. Much research has also been directed toward understanding specific mechanisms of action underlying the antimicrobial activity and selectivity, to be able to redesign the peptides for optimal performance. A central theme in the mode of action of many AMPs is their dynamic interaction with biological membranes, which involves various properties of these peptides such as, among others, surface hydrophobicity and polarity, charge, structure, and induced conformational variations. These features are often intimately interconnected so that engineering peptides to independently adjust any one property in particular is not an easy task. However, solid-phase peptide synthesis allows the use of a large repertoire of nonproteinogenic amino acids that can be used in the rational design of peptides to finely tune structural and physicochemical properties and precisely probe structure-function relationships.

  12. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  13. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  14. Peptide Nanofilament Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    This laboratory studied four systems involving molecular self-assembly during this project period. Each system will open a new avenue of research in developing novel applications for use in biomedical engineering and materials science. These systems include self-assembling oligopeptides that form stable beta sheets in water, peptides that form inter- and

  15. Brain Stimulation in Addiction.

    PubMed

    Salling, Michael C; Martinez, Diana

    2016-11-01

    Localized stimulation of the human brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders has been in place for over 20 years. Although these methods have been used to a greater extent for mood and movement disorders, recent work has explored brain stimulation methods as potential treatments for addiction. The rationale behind stimulation therapy in addiction involves reestablishing normal brain function in target regions in an effort to dampen addictive behaviors. In this review, we present the rationale and studies investigating brain stimulation in addiction, including transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. Overall, these studies indicate that brain stimulation has an acute effect on craving for drugs and alcohol, but few studies have investigated the effect of brain stimulation on actual drug and alcohol use or relapse. Stimulation therapies may achieve their effect through direct or indirect modulation of brain regions involved in addiction, either acutely or through plastic changes in neuronal transmission. Although these mechanisms are not well understood, further identification of the underlying neurobiology of addiction and rigorous evaluation of brain stimulation methods has the potential for unlocking an effective, long-term treatment of addiction.

  16. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  17. Reinnervation of renal afferent and efferent nerves at 5.5 and 11 months after catheter-based radiofrequency renal denervation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Booth, Lindsea C; Nishi, Erika E; Yao, Song T; Ramchandra, Rohit; Lambert, Gavin W; Schlaich, Markus P; May, Clive N

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies indicate that catheter-based renal denervation reduces blood pressure and renal norepinephrine spillover in human resistant hypertension. The effects of this procedure on afferent sensory and efferent sympathetic renal nerves, and the subsequent degree of reinnervation, have not been investigated. We therefore examined the level of functional and anatomic reinnervation at 5.5 and 11 months after renal denervation using the Symplicity Flex catheter. In normotensive anesthetized sheep (n=6), electric stimulation of intact renal nerves increased arterial pressure from 99±3 to 107±3 mm Hg (afferent response) and reduced renal blood flow from 198±16 to 85±20 mL/min (efferent response). In a further group (n=6), immediately after denervation, renal sympathetic nerve activity was absent and the responses to electric stimulation were abolished. At 11 months after denervation (n=5), renal sympathetic nerve activity and the responses to electric stimulation were at normal levels. Immunohistochemical staining for renal efferent (tyrosine hydroxylase) and renal afferent nerves (calcitonin gene-related peptide), as well as renal norepinephrine levels, was normal 11 months after denervation. Findings at 5.5 months after denervation were similar (n=5). In summary, catheter-based renal denervation effectively ablated the renal afferent and efferent nerves in normotensive sheep. By 11 months after denervation the functional afferent and efferent responses to electric stimulation were normal. Reinnervation at 11 months after denervation was supported by normal anatomic distribution of afferent and efferent renal nerves. In view of this evidence, the mechanisms underlying the prolonged hypotensive effect of catheter-based renal denervation in human resistant hypertension need to be reassessed.

  18. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, KY; Gupta, S; de Vries, R; Danser, AHJ; Villalón, CM; Muñoz-Islas, E; Maassen Van Den Brink, A

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation in rats, using intravital microscopy. Experimental approach: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized and the overlying bone was thinned to visualize the dural artery. Then, vasodilator responses to exogenous (i.v. α-CGRP) and endogenous (released by i.v. capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation) CGRP were elicited in the absence or presence of the above antagonists. Key results: α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation increased dural artery diameter. Ketamine and MK801 inhibited the vasodilator responses to capsaicin and electrical stimulation, while only ketamine attenuated those to α-CGRP. In contrast, GYKI52466 only attenuated the vasodilatation to exogenous α-CGRP, while LY466195 did not affect the vasodilator responses to endogenous or exogenous CGRP. Conclusions and implications: Although GYKI52466 has not been tested clinically, our data suggest that it would not inhibit migraine via vascular mechanisms. Similarly, the antimigraine efficacy of LY466195 seems unrelated to vascular CGRP-mediated pathways and/or receptors. In contrast, the cranial vascular effects of ketamine and MK801 may represent a therapeutic mechanism, although the same mechanism might contribute, peripherally, to cardiovascular side effects. PMID:20590623

  19. Neurogenically mediated leakage of plasma protein occurs from blood vessels in dura mater but not brain

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, S.; Saito, K.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1987-12-01

    Utilizing /sup 125/I-BSA administered intravenously, a simple, reliable, and sensitive method was established for the detection of plasma protein extravasation in the dura of rats and guinea pigs following chemical, electrical, or immunological stimulation. Extravasated /sup 125/I-BSA or Evans blue was noted in the dura and conjunctiva but not in the temporalis muscle of saline-perfused rats following intravenous capsaicin, 1 mumol/kg. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was mediated by unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers since leakage did not develop in adult animals in whom these fibers were destroyed by capsaicin pretreatment (50 mg/kg) as neonates. An ipsilateral increase in Evans blue and /sup 125/I-BSA was found in the dura, eyelids, lips and gingival mucosa, and snout following electrical stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion. This increase was also C-fiber dependent. Among those peptides contained in perivascular afferent fibers and administered intravenously, substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, caused a dose-dependent extravasation in the dura and conjunctiva of rats. Neonatal capsaicin pretreatment did not attenuate SP- nor NKA-induced effects in the dura and actually increased extravasation in the conjunctiva. Intravenous administration of 5-HT or bradykinin to normal adult rats or adult rats pretreated as neonates with capsaicin increased levels of /sup 125/I-BSA in both the dura and the conjunctiva. Histamine and prostaglandin E2, on the other hand, caused protein leakage in the conjunctiva but not in the dura of rats; however, histamine did induce extravasation in the dura of guinea pigs.

  20. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  1. Synthesis and biological activities of some pseudo-peptide analogues of tetragastrin: the importance of the peptide backbone.

    PubMed

    Martinez, J; Bali, J P; Rodriguez, M; Castro, B; Magous, R; Laur, J; Lignon, M F

    1985-12-01

    Pseudo-peptide analogues of the C-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin, in which a peptide bond has been replaced by a CH2-NH bond, i.e. (tert-butyloxycarbonyl)-L-tryptophyl-psi (CH2-NH)-L-leucyl-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine amide (8), (tert-butyloxycarbonyl)-L-tryptophyl-L-leucyl-psi (CH2-NH)-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine amide (13), (tert-butyloxycarbonyl)-L-tryptophyl-L-leucyl-L-aspartyl-psi (CH2NH)-L-phenylalanine amide (20), were synthesized. The pseudo-peptides 8 and 13 were shown to have the same affinity as (tert-butyloxycarbonyl)-L-tryptophyl-L-leucyl-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine amide (21) for the gastrin receptor on isolated mucosal cells. The pseudo-peptide 20 exhibited lower affinity (IC50 congruent to 10(-5) M). The biological activity of these pseudo-peptides was studied on acid secretion in the anesthetized rat. Compound 8 stimulated acid secretion, identically with that of 21. Compound 13 did not exhibit any agonist activity but was able to antagonize the action of gastrin (ED50 = 0.3 mg/kg). Compound 20 did not show any agonist activity but was able to inhibit gastrin-induced acid secretion, with lower potency (ED50 = 15 mg/kg). The importance of the peptide bonds in the mode of action of gastrin is discussed, and a hypothetical approach of the mechanism of action is presented.

  2. Signalling processes involved in C-peptide-induced chemotaxis of CD4-positive lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, M; Walcher, D; Giehl, K; Bach, H; Grüb, M; Durst, R; Hombach, V; Marx, N

    2009-06-01

    Previous data from our group demonstrated that C-peptide induces chemotaxis of CD4-positive lymphocytes in-vitro, mediated by activation of G-protein and PI 3-kinase gamma, but additional signalling pathways involved in this process remained unexplored. In the present study we further analyze intracellular signalling pathways which lead to C-peptide-induced CD4-positive lymphocyte migration. We provide evidence that C-peptide-induced chemotaxis of CD4-positive lymphocytes is critically dependent on activation of Src-kinase and RhoA, Rac-1 and Cdc42 GTPases. Furthermore, C-peptide stimulates phosphorylation of PAK, LIMK and cofilin downstream of Rac-1 and Cdc42, leading to cofilin inactivation and actin filament stabilization. In addition, C-peptide induces ROCK kinase activity and MLC phosphorylation downstream of RhoA, thereby stimulating myosin mediated cell contraction. In contrast, C-peptide does not activate ERK1/2, p38 or Akt in CD4-positive lymphocytes. Our data support an active role of C-peptide in CD4-positive lymphocyte chemotaxis and elucidate molecular mechanisms in C-peptide-induced cell migration.

  3. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  4. Bombesin stimulates insulin secretion by a pancreatic islet cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Swope, S L; Schonbrunn, A

    1984-01-01

    The amphibian tetradecapeptide, bombesin (BBS) has been shown to stimulate insulin secretion both in vivo and by pancreatic islet cells in vitro. To determine whether BBS can act directly on pancreatic beta cells, we examined its effects on insulin secretion by HIT-T15 cells (HIT cells), a clonal islet cell line. Addition of 100 nM BBS to HIT cells stimulated insulin release 25-fold within 30 sec. The rapid stimulatory effect of BBS on insulin release was short-lived: the secretory rate returned to basal levels after 90 min of BBS treatment. The decrease in the rate of insulin release in the continued presence of BBS was due not to depletion of intracellular insulin stores but to specific desensitization to this peptide. Stimulation of insulin secretion by BBS was dose dependent with an ED50 value (0.51 +/- 0.15 nM) similar to the concentration of BBS-like immunoreactive material in rat plasma. Five BBS analogs, including porcine gastrin-releasing peptide, were as powerful as BBS in stimulating insulin release. The relative potencies of the analogs tested indicated that the COOH-terminal octapeptide sequence in BBS was sufficient for stimulation of release. In contrast, 14 peptides structurally unrelated to BBS did not alter insulin secretion. BBS action was synergistic with that of glucagon; insulin secretion in the presence of maximal concentrations of both peptides was greater than the additive effects of the two peptides added individually. Somatostatin inhibited BBS-stimulated release by 69 +/- 1% with an ID50 value of 3.2 +/- 0.3 nM. These results show that BBS stimulation of insulin secretion by a clonal pancreatic cell line closely parallels its effects in vivo and support the hypothesis that BBS stimulates insulin secretion by a direct effect on the pancreatic beta cell. The clonal HIT cell line provides a homogeneous cell preparation amenable for studies on the biochemical mechanisms of BBS action in the endocrine pancreas. PMID:6143320

  5. Diuresis and natriuresis caused by activation of VR1-positive sensory nerves in renal pelvis of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Wang, Youping; Wang, Donna H

    2005-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that activation of the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1) expressed in sensory nerves innervating the renal pelvis leads to diuresis and natriuresis, a selective VR1 receptor agonist, capsaicin (2.4 nmol), or vehicle was perfused intravenously or into the left renal pelvis of anesthetized rats at a rate without changing renal perfusion pressure. Mean arterial pressure was not altered by capsaicin administered intravenously or into the renal pelvis. Capsaicin perfusion into the left renal pelvis but not intravenously caused significant increases in urine flow rate and urinary sodium excretion bilaterally in a dose-dependent manner, which were abolished by capsazepine, a selective VR1 receptor antagonist, given ipsilaterally to the renal pelvis or by ipsilateral renal denervation. Capsaicin given intravenously or into the left renal pelvis increased plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide levels to the same extent. Increased plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide levels induced by capsaicin (68.9+/-2.8 pg/mL) perfusion into the renal pelvis was prevented either by capsazepine (22.5+/-10.1 pg/mL) given ipsilaterally into the renal pelvis or by ipsilateral renal denervation (25.9+/-2.3 pg/mL). Taken together, our data show that unilateral activation of VR1-positive sensory nerves innervating the renal pelvis leads to bilateral diuresis and natriuresis via a mechanism that is independent of plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide levels. These data suggest that VR1-positive sensory nerves in the kidney enhance renal excretory function, a mechanism that may be critically involved in sodium and fluid homeostasis.

  6. Evaluation of Histological Changes in Back Muscle Injuries in Rats over Time

    PubMed Central

    Inage, Kazuhide; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Animal model study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histological variation in the injured muscle and production of calcitonin gene-related peptide in rats over time. Overview of Literature Vertebral surgery has been reported to cause atrophy of the back muscles, which may result in pain. However, few reports have described the time series histological variation in the injured muscle and changes in the dominant nerve. Methods We used 30 male, 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The right and left sides of the paravertebral muscle were considered as the injured and uninjured sides, respectively. A 115 g weight was dropped from a height of 1 m on the right paravertebral muscle. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of the muscle was performed 1–3 weeks after injury for histological evaluation. Fluoro-Gold (FG) was injected into the paravertebral muscle. The L2 dorsal root ganglia on both sides were resected 1, 2, and 3 weeks after injury, and immunohistochemical staining for calcitonin gene-related peptide was performed. Results H&E staining of the paravertebral muscle showed infiltration of inflammatory cells and the presence of granulation tissue in the injured part on the ipsilateral side 1 week after injury. Muscle atrophy occurred 3 weeks after injury, but was repaired via spontaneous replacement of muscle cells/fibers. In contrast, compared with the uninjured side, the percentage of cells double-labeled with FG and calcitonin gene-related peptide in FG-positive cells in the dorsal root ganglia of the injured side was significantly increased at each time point throughout the study period. Conclusions These results suggest that sensitization of the dominant nerve in the dorsal root ganglia, which may be caused by cicatrix formation, can protract injured muscle pain. This information may be helpful in elucidating the underlying mechanism of persistent pain after back muscle injury. PMID:28243375

  7. [New regulatory peptides in rat stomach secretion (amylin, PGP, semax)].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Dicheva, D T

    2003-01-01

    We showed antisecretory effects of peptides of PGP, semax and a new pancreatic hormone, amylin, on the model of continuous stomach perfusion with the registration of pH, PCO2 as well as the determination of the amount of pepsinogen in the stomach perfusate. The intraperitoneal introduction of these peptides in the doses that proved to have an apparent anti-ulcer effect caused a decrease of both basal production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach and production caused by the irritation of the vagus nerve. Semax and amylin also decreased basal and stimulated secretion of pepsinogen. Amylin and PGP did not have any effect on basal bicarbonate secretion of the stomach, and semax caused its short-time increase 35 minutes after the introduction. We made a conclusion that the decrease of aggressive factors in gastric juices can be a mechanism of the anti-ulcer action of all three peptides under study.

  8. Factors stimulating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lind, M; Bünger, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review is to describe major approaches for stimulating bone healing and to review other factors affecting bone healing. Spinal bone fusion after surgery is a demanding process requiring optimal conditions for clinical success. Bone formation and healing can be enhanced through various methods. Experimental studies have revealed an array of stimulative measures. These include biochemical stimulation by use of hormones and growth factors, physical stimulation through mechanical and electromagnetic measures, and bone grafting by use of bone tissue or bone substitutes. Newer biological techniques such as stem cell transplantation and gene therapy can also be used to stimulate bone healing. Apart from bone transplantation, clinical experience with the many stimulation modalities is limited. Possible areas for clinical use of these novel methods are discussed.

  9. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  10. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  11. Identification of oligomerizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, A; Rodgers, M E; Schleif, R

    2001-06-08

    The AraC DNA binding domain is inactive in a monomeric form but can activate transcription from the arabinose operon promoters upon its dimerization. We used this property to identify plasmids encoding peptide additions to the AraC DNA binding domain that could dimerize the domain. We generated a high diversity library of plasmids by inserting 90-base oligonucleotides of random sequence ahead of DNA coding for the AraC DNA binding domain in an expression vector, transforming, and selecting colonies containing functional oligomeric peptide-AraC DNA binding domain chimeric proteins by their growth on minimal arabinose medium. Six of seven Ara(+) candidates were partially characterized, and one was purified. Equilibrium analytical centrifugation experiments showed that it dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 2 micrometer.

  12. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  14. Relative distribution of gastrin-, CCK-8-, NPY- and CGRP-immunoreactive cells in the digestive tract of dorado (Salminus brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Pereira, R T; Costa, L S; Oliveira, I R C; Araújo, J C; Aerts, M; Vigliano, F A; Rosa, P V

    2015-04-01

    The endocrine cells (ECs) of the gastrointestinal mucosa form the largest endocrine system in the body, not only in terms of cell numbers but also in terms of the different produced substances. Data describing the association between the relative distributions of the peptide-specific ECs in relation to feeding habits can be useful tools that enable the creation of a general expected pattern of EC distribution. We aimed to investigate the distribution of ECs immunoreactive for the peptides gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in different segments of the digestive tract of carnivorous fish dorado (Salminus brasiliensis) by using immunohistochemistry procedures. The distribution of endocrine cells immunoreactive for gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in digestive tract of dorado S. brasiliensis was examined by immunohistochemistry. The results describe the association between the distribution of the peptide-specific endocrine cells and feeding habits in different carnivorous fish. The largest number of endocrine cells immunoreactive for GAS, CCK-8, and CGRP were found in the pyloric stomach region and the pyloric caeca. However, NPY-immunoreactive endocrine cells were markedly restricted to the midgut. The distribution pattern of endocrine cells identified in S. brasiliensis is similar to that found in other carnivorous fishes.

  15. Neurohumoral regulation of spontaneous constrictions in suburothelial venules of the rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuki; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Mitsui, Retsu; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2014-02-01

    Venules of the bladder suburothelium develop spontaneous phasic constrictions that may play a critical role in maintaining venular drainage of tissue metabolites. We aimed to investigate neurohumoral regulation of the spontaneous venular constrictions (SVCs). Changes in venular diameter of the rat bladder suburothelium were monitored using a video tracking system, whilst the effects of electrical field stimulation (EFS) and bath-applied bioactive substances were investigated. The innervation of the suburothelial microvasculature was examined by immunohistochemistry. EFS (10Hz for 30s) induced an increase in the frequency of SVCs that was prevented by phentolamine (1μM). In phentolamine-pretreated venules, EFS suppressed SVCs with a venular dilatation in a manner attenuated by propranolol (1μM) or l-nitro arginine (LNA, 10μM). BRL37344 (1μM), a β3 adrenoceptor agonist, dilated venules and reduced the frequency of SVCs in an LNA-sensitive manner. ACh (1-10μM) increased the frequency of SVCs. ATP (1μM) transiently constricted venules and then caused LNA-sensitive cessation of SVCs associated with a dilatation. Substance P (100nM) caused a venular constriction, whilst calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, 100nM) caused a dilatation of venules and suppression of SVCs that were not inhibited by LNA. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated sympathetic as well as substance P- and CGRP-containing nerves running along the venules. Spontaneous constrictions of suburothelial venules are accelerated by sympathetic α-adrenergic stimulation, but suppressed upon β-adrenergic stimulation. In addition, suburothelial venular constrictions appear to be modulated by several bioactive substances that could be released from urothelium or suburothelial sensory nerves.

  16. Spinal astrocytic activation contributes to both induction and maintenance of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor-induced long-lasting mechanical allodynia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokai, Masafumi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia, suggesting an important role of PACAP–PACAP receptors signaling system in the modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission. We have previously reported that a single intrathecal injection of PACAP or a PACAP specific (PAC1) receptor selective agonist, maxadilan, in mice induced dose-dependent aversive behaviors, which lasted more than 30 min, and suggested that the maintenance of the nociceptive behaviors was associated with the spinal astrocytic activation. Results We found that a single intrathecal administration of PACAP or maxadilan also produced long-lasting hind paw mechanical allodynia, which persisted at least 84 days without affecting thermal nociceptive threshold. In contrast, intrathecal application of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide did not change mechanical threshold, and substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or N-methyl-D-aspartate induced only transient mechanical allodynia, which disappeared within 21 days. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses with an astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein, revealed that the spinal PAC1 receptor stimulation caused sustained astrocytic activation, which also lasted more than 84 days. Intrathecal co-administration of L-α-aminoadipate, an astroglial toxin, with PACAP or maxadilan almost completely prevented the induction of the mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, intrathecal treatment of L-α-aminoadipate at 84 days after the PAC1 stimulation transiently reversed the mechanical allodynia accompanied by the reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression level. Conclusion Our data suggest that spinal astrocytic activation triggered by the PAC1 receptor stimulation contributes to both induction and maintenance of the long-term mechanical allodynia. PMID:27175011

  17. Potassium, Na+,K+-pumps and fatigue in rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Torben; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2007-10-01

    During contractile activity, skeletal muscles undergo a net loss of cytoplasmic K(+) to the interstitial space. During intense exercise, plasma K(+) in human arterial blood may reach 8 mm, and interstitial K(+) 10-12 mm. This leads to depolarization, loss of excitability and contractile force. However, little is known about the effects of these physiological increases in extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) on contractile endurance. Soleus muscles from 4-week-old rats were mounted on transducers for isometric contractions in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 4-10 mm K(+), and endurance assessed by recording the rate of force decline during continuous stimulation at 60 Hz. Increasing [K(+)](o) from 4 to 8 or 10 mm and equilibrating the muscles for 40 or 20 min augmented the rate of force decline 2.4-fold and 7.2-fold, respectively (P < 0.001). The marked loss of endurance elicited by exposure to 8 or 10 mm K(+) was alleviated or significantly reduced by stimulating the Na(+),K(+)-pumps by intracellular Na(+) loading, the beta(2)-agonist salbutamol, adrenaline, calcitonin gene related peptide, insulin or repeated excitation. In conclusion, excitation-induced increase in [K(+)](o) is an important cause of high-frequency fatigue, and the Na(+),K(+)-pumps are essential for the maintenance of contractile force in the physiological range of [K(+)](o). Recordings of contractile force during continuous stimulation at 8-10 mm K(+) may be used to analyse the effects of agents or conditions influencing the excitability of working isolated muscles.

  18. CGRP receptor antagonists: A new frontier of anti-migraine medications

    PubMed Central

    de Prado, Blanca Marquez; Russo, Andrew F.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a chronic pain condition that affects 12% of the population. Currently, the most effective treatments are the triptans, but they are limited in their efficacy and have potentially deleterious cardiovascular complications. Based on basic science studies over the past decade, a new generation of anti-migraine drugs is now being developed. At the forefront of these studies is a new calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist that is as effective as triptans in the acute treatment of migraines, without the cardiovascular effects. This review will address the likely mechanisms and therapeutic potential of CGRP receptor antagonists. PMID:19784396

  19. [Expression of AIF and CGRP markers in pineal gland and thymus during aging].

    PubMed

    Lin'kova, N S; Katanugina, A S; Khavinson, V Kh

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the expression of AIF (apoptotic inducing factor) and CGRP (calcitonin gene related peptide) at autopsy material of pineal gland and thymus of people after 60 years old. The expression of AIF and CGRP was identified in both organs, but it did not change with age, which demonstrates the probable safety of functional activity of neuroimmunoendocrine system at aging. We found correlation between expression AIF and CGRP at pineal gland, but the correlation at thymus wasn't found. It is possible that pineal gland can express unidentified signal molecule controlling the expression of AIF and CGRP.

  20. Discovery of (R)-N-(3-(7-methyl-1H-indazol-5-yl)-1-(4-(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)-1-oxopropan-2-yl)-4-(2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-3-yl)piperidine-1-carboxamide (BMS-742413): a potent human CGRP antagonist with superior safety profile for the treatment of migraine through intranasal delivery.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedula, Prasad V; Mercer, Stephen E; Pin, Sokhom S; Thalody, George; Xu, Cen; Conway, Charlie M; Keavy, Deborah; Signor, Laura; Cantor, Glenn H; Mathias, Neil; Moench, Paul; Denton, Rex; Macci, Robert; Schartman, Richard; Whiterock, Valerie; Davis, Carl; Macor, John E; Dubowchik, Gene M

    2013-06-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have been shown to be efficacious as abortive migraine therapeutics with the absence of cardiovascular liabilities that are associated with triptans. Herein, we report the discovery of a highly potent CGRP receptor antagonist, BMS-742413, with the potential to provide rapid onset of action through intranasal delivery. The compound displays excellent aqueous solubility, oxidative stability, and toxicological profile. BMS-742413 has good intranasal bioavailability in the rabbit and shows a robust, dose-dependent inhibition of CGRP-induced increases in marmoset facial blood flow.

  1. Botulinum toxin, Quo Vadis?

    PubMed

    Lim, Erle C H; Seet, Raymond C S

    2007-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX), derived from the exotoxin of Clostridium botulinum, cleaves Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-Attachment protein REceptor (SNARE) proteins, causing chemodenervation of cholinergic neurons. BTX also inhibits exocytosis of vesicles containing norepinephrine, glutamate, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and inhibits expression of the vanilloid receptor. Clinical applications of BTX, which include the treatment of overactive skeletal and smooth muscles, hypersecretory and painful disorders, have increased exponentially since it was first used clinically to treat strabismus more than two decades ago. In this editorial, we discuss reports of new therapeutic indications of BTX, and propose new areas for research.

  2. CGRP as a neuropeptide in migraine: lessons from mice

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that is far more than just a bad headache. A hallmark of migraine is altered sensory perception. A likely contributor to this altered perception is the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Over the past decade, CGRP has become firmly established as a key player in migraine. Although the mechanisms and sites of action by which CGRP might trigger migraine remain speculative, recent advances with mouse models provide some hints. This brief review focuses on how CGRP might act as both a central and peripheral neuromodulator to contribute to the migraine-like symptom of light aversive behaviour in mice. PMID:26032833

  3. Control of Food Intake by Gastrointestinal Peptides: Mechanisms of Action and Possible Modulation in the Treatment of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Philip; Stengel, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on the control of appetite by food intake-regulatory peptides secreted from the gastrointestinal tract, namely cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1, peptide YY, ghrelin, and the recently discovered nesfatin-1 via the gut-brain axis. Additionally, we describe the impact of external factors such as intake of different nutrients or stress on the secretion of gastrointestinal peptides. Finally, we highlight possible conservative—physical activity and pharmacotherapy—treatment strategies for obesity as well as surgical techniques such as deep brain stimulation and bariatric surgery also altering these peptidergic pathways. PMID:28096522

  4. An analogue peptide from the Cancer/Testis antigen PASD1 induces CD8+ T cell responses against naturally processed peptide.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Nicola; Buchan, Sarah; Ingram, Wendy; Khan, Ghazala; Vittes, Gisella; Rice, Jason; Pulford, Karen; Mufti, Ghulam; Stevenson, Freda; Guinn, Barbara-ann

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified the novel Cancer/Testis antigen PASD1 by immunoscreening a testis library with pooled acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient sera. To develop a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-inducing vaccine, we have now investigated the carboxy-terminal region, known to contain serological determinants, for MHC class I (HLA-A⋆0201)-binding peptides. Algorithm-selected natural peptides failed to show detectable HLA-A⋆0201 binding in T2 assays. However, anchor-modified analogue peptides showed enhanced binding, with decreased off-rates. Analogue peptide-loaded antigen-presenting cells (APCs) induced IFN-γ production by T cells from normal donors and patients. In addition, peptide-specific T cells could be expanded from cancer patients by stimulation with the PASD1 analogue peptide Pa14. For clinical application, a DNA fusion gene vaccine encoding Pa14 was designed and tested in "humanized" mice. Splenocytes from vaccinated mice showed in vitro cytotoxicity against tumour cells, either exogenously loaded with the corresponding wild-type peptide (Pw8) or expressing endogenously processed PASD1 protein. We show for the first time that a DNA vaccine encoding an altered PASD1 epitope can induce CTLs to target the natural peptide expressed by human tumour cells.

  5. Conservation of capa peptide-induced nitric oxide signalling in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Valerie P; McGettigan, James; Cabrero, Pablo; Maudlin, Ian M; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2004-11-01

    In D. melanogaster Malpighian (renal) tubules, the capa peptides stimulate production of nitric oxide (NO) and guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), resulting in increased fluid transport. The roles of NO synthase (NOS), NO and cGMP in capa peptide signalling were tested in several other insect species of medical relevance within the Diptera (Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Glossina morsitans) and in one orthopteran out-group, Schistocerca gregaria. NOS immunoreactivity was detectable by immunocytochemistry in tubules from all species studied. D. melanogaster, A. aegypti and A. stephensi express NOS in only principal cells, whereas G. morsitans and S. gregaria show more general NOS expression in the tubule. Measurement of associated NOS activity (NADPH diaphorase) shows that both D. melanogaster capa-1 and the two capa peptides encoded in the A. gambiae genome, QGLVPFPRVamide (AngCAPA-QGL) and GPTVGLFAFPRVamide (AngCAPA-GPT), all stimulate NOS activity in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but not in S. gregaria. Furthermore, capa-stimulated NOS activity in all the Diptera was inhibited by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME. All capa peptides stimulate an increase in cGMP content across the dipteran species, but not in the orthopteran S. gregaria. Similarly, all capa peptides tested stimulate fluid secretion in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but are either without effect or are inhibitory on S. gregaria. Consistent with these results, the Drosophila capa receptor was shown to be expressed in Drosophila tubules, and its closest Anopheles homologue was shown to be expressed in Anopheles tubules. Thus, we provide the first demonstration of physiological roles for two putative A. gambiae neuropeptides. We also demonstrate neuropeptide modulation of fluid secretion in tsetse tubule for the first time. Finally, we show the generality of capa peptide action, to stimulate NO/cGMP signalling and

  6. The Use of an IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Peptide to Control Inflammation in the Treatment of Corneal Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fok, E.; Guildford, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) may be treated using ex vivo limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) derived from cadaveric donor tissue. However, continuing challenges exist around tissue availability, inflammation, and transplant rejection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or recombinant human IL-1β stimulated primary human keratocyte and LESC models were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of a short chain, IL-1 receptor antagonist peptide for use in LESC sheet growth to control inflammation. The peptide was characterized using mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Peptide cytotoxicity, patterns of cell cytokine expression in response to LPS or IL-1β stimulation, and peptide suppression of this response were investigated by MTS/LDH assays, ELISA, and q-PCR. Cell differences in LPS stimulated toll-like receptor 4 expression were investigated using immunocytochemistry. A significant reduction in rIL-1β stimulated inflammatory cytokine production occurred following LESC and keratocyte incubation with anti-inflammatory peptide and in LPS stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 production following keratocyte incubation with peptide (1 mg/mL) (P < 0.05). LESCs produced no cytokine response to LPS stimulation and showed no TLR4 expression. The peptide supported LESC growth when adhered to a silicone hydrogel contact lens indicating potential use in improved LESC grafting through suppression of inflammation. PMID:25705668

  7. Multiple Factors Related to the Secretion of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XingChun; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 is secreted by intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. It regulates the secretion and sensitivity of insulin while suppressing glucagon secretion and decreasing postprandial glucose levels. It also improves beta-cell proliferation and prevents beta-cell apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents. Additionally, glucagon-like peptide-1 delays gastric emptying and suppresses appetite. The impaired secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 has negative influence on diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance related diseases. Thus, glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) are now well accepted in the management of type 2 diabetes. The levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 are influenced by multiple factors including a variety of nutrients. The component of a meal acts as potent stimulants of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. The levels of its secretion change with the intake of different nutrients. Some drugs also have influence on GLP-1 secretion. Bariatric surgery may improve metabolism through the action on GLP-1 levels. In recent years, there has been a great interest in developing effective methods to regulate glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. This review summarizes the literature on glucagon-like peptide-1 and related factors affecting its levels. PMID:26366173

  8. Mechanistic understanding and significance of small peptides interaction with MHC class II molecules for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Saifullah; Hoessli, Daniel C; Hameed, Muhammad Waqar

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are expressed by antigen-presenting cells and stimulate CD4(+) T cells, which initiate humoral immune responses. Over the past decade, interest has developed to therapeutically impact the peptides to be exposed to CD4(+) T cells. Structurally diverse small molecules have been discovered that act on the endogenous peptide exchanger HLA-DM by different mechanisms. Exogenously delivered peptides are highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage in vivo; however, it is only when successfully incorporated into stable MHC II-peptide complexes that these peptides can induce an immune response. Many of the small molecules so far discovered have highlighted the molecular interactions mediating the formation of MHC II-peptide complexes. As potential drugs, these small molecules open new therapeutic approaches to modulate MHC II antigen presentation pathways and influence the quality and specificity of immune responses. This review briefly introduces how CD4(+) T cells recognize antigen when displayed by MHC class II molecules, as well as MHC class II-peptide-loading pathways, structural basis of peptide binding and stabilization of the peptide-MHC complexes. We discuss the concept of MHC-loading enhancers, how they could modulate immune responses and how these molecules have been identified. Finally, we suggest mechanisms whereby MHC-loading enhancers could act upon MHC class II molecules.

  9. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  10. Glucagonlike Peptide 2 Analogue Teduglutide

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S.; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Short bowel syndrome occurs when a shortened intestine cannot absorb sufficient nutrients or fluids. Teduglutide is a recombinant analogue of human glucagonlike peptide 2 that reduces dependence on parenteral nutrition in patients with short bowel syndrome by promoting enterocytic proliferation, increasing the absorptive surface area. However, enterocyte function depends not only on the number of cells that are present but also on differentiated features that facilitate nutrient absorption and digestion. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that teduglutide impairs human intestinal epithelial differentiation. DESIGN AND SETTING We investigated the effects of teduglutide in the modulation of proliferation and differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells at a basic science laboratory. This was an in vitro study using Caco-2 cells, a human-derived intestinal epithelial cell line commonly used to model enterocytic biology. EXPOSURE Cells were exposed to teduglutide or vehicle control. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES We analyzed the cell cycle by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation or propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. We used quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to assay the expression of the enterocytic differentiation markers villin, sucrase-isomaltase, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as well as that of the putative differentiation signals schlafen 12 (SLFN12) and caudal-related homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor (Cdx2). Villin promoter activity was measured by a luciferase-based assay. RESULTS The MTS assay demonstrated that teduglutide increased cell numbers by a mean (SD) of 10% (2%) over untreated controls at a maximal 500nM (n = 6, P < .05). Teduglutide increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells vs untreated controls by a mean (SD

  11. Comparative Effect of ACTH and Related Peptides on Proliferation and Growth of Rat Adrenal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Claudimara Ferini Pacicco; de Mendonca, Pedro O. R.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) is a polypeptide precursor known to yield biologically active peptides related to a range of functions. These active peptides include the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which is essential for maintenance of adrenal growth and steroidogenesis, and the alpha-melanocyte stimulation hormone, which plays a key role in energy homeostasis. However, the role of the highly conserved N-terminal region of POMC peptide fragments has begun to be unraveled only recently. Here, we review the cascade of events involved in regulation of proliferation and growth of murine adrenal cortex triggered by ACTH and other POMC-derived peptides. Key findings regarding signaling pathways and modulation of genes and proteins required for the regulation of adrenal growth are summarized. We have outlined the known mechanisms as well as future challenges for research on the regulation of adrenal proliferation and growth triggered by these peptides. PMID:27242663

  12. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  13. Directed evolution of FLS2 towards novel flagellin peptide recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Helft, Laura; Thompson, Mikayla; Bent, Andrew F.

    2016-06-06

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wildtype Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targeted approachmore » generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets.« less

  14. Directed Evolution of FLS2 towards Novel Flagellin Peptide Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Helft, Laura; Thompson, Mikayla

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wild-type Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targeted approach generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. These studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets. PMID:27270917

  15. Immune response to synthetic peptides representing antigenic sites on the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Huang, C.; LaPatra, S.; Winton, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Summary ― Monoclonal antibodies against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus have been used to react with recombinant expression products in immunoblots and to select neutralization-resistant mutants for sequence analysis. These strategies identified neutralizing and non-neutralizing antigenic sites on the viral glycoprotein. Synthetic peptides based upon the amino acid sequences of these antigenic sites were synthesized and were injected together with an adjuvant into rainbow trout. The constructs generally failed to stimulate neutralizing antibodies in the fish. These results indicate that we need to understand more about the ability of peptide antigens to stimulate fish immune systems.

  16. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  17. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the self- sustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...removal. An eCPX peptide display library was grown and induced as described in the paragraph above. After rinsing samples briefly in PBS, the aluminum

  18. Bradykinin Induces TRPV1 Exocytotic Recruitment in Peptidergic Nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Mathivanan, Sakthikumar; Devesa, Isabel; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid I (TRPV1) sensitization in peripheral nociceptors is a prominent phenomenon that occurs in inflammatory pain conditions. Pro-algesic agents can potentiate TRPV1 activity in nociceptors through both stimulation of its channel gating and mobilization of channels to the neuronal surface in a context dependent manner. A recent study reported that ATP-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors involves the exocytotic release of channels trafficked by large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) that cargo alpha-calcitonin gene related peptide alpha (αCGRP). We hypothesized that, similar to ATP, bradykinin may also use different mechanisms to sensitize TRPV1 channels in peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptors. We found that bradykinin notably enhances the excitability of peptidergic nociceptors, and sensitizes TRPV1, primarily through the bradykinin receptor 2 pathway. Notably, bradykinin sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors was significantly blocked by inhibiting Ca(2+)-dependent neuronal exocytosis. In addition, silencing αCGRP gene expression, but not substance P, drastically reduced bradykinin-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors. Taken together, these findings indicate that bradykinin-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors is partially mediated by the exocytotic mobilization of new channels trafficked by αCGRP-loaded LDCVs to the neuronal membrane. Our findings further imply a central role of αCGRP peptidergic nociceptors in peripheral algesic sensitization, and substantiate that inhibition of LDCVs exocytosis is a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat pain, as it concurrently reduces the release of pro-inflammatory peptides and the membrane recruitment of thermoTRP channels.

  19. Bradykinin Induces TRPV1 Exocytotic Recruitment in Peptidergic Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mathivanan, Sakthikumar; Devesa, Isabel; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid I (TRPV1) sensitization in peripheral nociceptors is a prominent phenomenon that occurs in inflammatory pain conditions. Pro-algesic agents can potentiate TRPV1 activity in nociceptors through both stimulation of its channel gating and mobilization of channels to the neuronal surface in a context dependent manner. A recent study reported that ATP-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors involves the exocytotic release of channels trafficked by large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) that cargo alpha-calcitonin gene related peptide alpha (αCGRP). We hypothesized that, similar to ATP, bradykinin may also use different mechanisms to sensitize TRPV1 channels in peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptors. We found that bradykinin notably enhances the excitability of peptidergic nociceptors, and sensitizes TRPV1, primarily through the bradykinin receptor 2 pathway. Notably, bradykinin sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors was significantly blocked by inhibiting Ca2+-dependent neuronal exocytosis. In addition, silencing αCGRP gene expression, but not substance P, drastically reduced bradykinin-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors. Taken together, these findings indicate that bradykinin-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors is partially mediated by the exocytotic mobilization of new channels trafficked by αCGRP-loaded LDCVs to the neuronal membrane. Our findings further imply a central role of αCGRP peptidergic nociceptors in peripheral algesic sensitization, and substantiate that inhibition of LDCVs exocytosis is a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat pain, as it concurrently reduces the release of pro-inflammatory peptides and the membrane recruitment of thermoTRP channels. PMID:27445816

  20. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment