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Sample records for calcitonin-gene-related peptide stimulates

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide stimulates proliferation of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haegerstrand, A.; Larsson, O. ); Dalsgaard, C.J. Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm ); Jonzon, B. ); Nilsson, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of the vasoactive perivascular neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on proliferation of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated. CGRP was shown to increase both cell number and DNA synthesis, whereas NKA, NPY, and VIP were ineffective. {sup 125}I-labeled CGRP was shown to bind to HUVECs and this binding was displaced by addition of unlabeled CGRP, suggesting the existence of specific CGRP receptors. The effect of CGRP on formation of adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and inositol phosphates (InsP), two intracellular messengers known to be involved in regulation of cell proliferation, was investigated. CGRP stimulated cAMP formation but was without effect on the formation of InsP. Proliferation, as well as cAMP formation, was also stimulated by cholera toxin. Basic fibroblast growth factor stimulated growth without affecting cAMP or InsP formation, whereas thrombin, which increased InsP formation, did not stimulate proliferation. The authors thus suggest that CGRP may act as a local factor stimulating proliferation of endothelial cells; that the mechanism of action is associated with cAMP formation; and that this effect of CGRP may be important for formation of new vessels during physicological and pathophysiological events such as ischemia, inflammation, and wound healing.

  2. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that manifests as a debilitating headache associated with altered sensory perception. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is now firmly established as a key player in migraine. Clinical trials carried out during the past decade have proved that CGRP receptor antagonists are effective for treating migraine, and antibodies to the receptor and CGRP are currently under investigation. Despite this progress in the clinical arena, the mechanisms by which CGRP triggers migraine remain uncertain. This review discusses mechanisms whereby CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Future studies on epistatic and epigenetic regulators of CGRP actions are expected to shed further light on CGRP actions in migraine. In conclusion, targeting CGRP represents an approachable therapeutic strategy for migraine. PMID:25340934

  3. Non-excitatory electrical stimulation attenuates myocardial infarction via homeostasis of calcitonin gene-related peptide in myocardium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Jia; Guo, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown protection of brain, retina, optic nerves and pancreatic β-cells but the effect on cardio-protection is still unknown. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in the pathology of injury and protection of myocardium but whether or not electrical stimulation modulates endogenous CGRP is not clear. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, without any treatment. (2) I/R group, animals were subjected to 30 min of myocardial ischemia followed by 60 min reperfusion. (3) NES+I/R group, non-excitatory electrical stimulation (NES) was commenced from 15 min before coronary artery occlusion till the end of reperfusion. (4) I/R+CGRP8-37 group, animals were given with CGRP8-37 (an antagonist of CGRP receptor, 10(-7) mol/L, 0.3 ml, i.v.) at 5 min before reperfusion without any electrical stimulation. The hemodynamics and electrocardiogram were monitored and recorded. Infarct size and troponin I were examined and CGRP expression in the myocardium and serum was analyzed. It was found that the infarct size and TnI were significantly reduced in NES+I/R group, by 45% and 58% respectively, accompanied by an obvious fall back of CGRP in myocardium, compared to I/R group (all p<0.05). Treatment with CGRP8-37 resulted in the same protection on myocardium as NES did. No significant difference in hemodynamics or ventricular tachycardia was detected among the groups (all p>0.05). It can be concluded that NES reduced the infarction size after acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, for which the underlying mechanism may be associated with modulation of endogenous CGRP in myocardium.

  4. Activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases by recombinant calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, N; Disa, J; Spielman, W S; Brooks, D P; Nambi, P; Aiyar, N

    2000-02-18

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide and a potent vasodilator. Although calcitonin gene-related peptide has been shown to have a number of effects in a variety of systems, the mechanisms of action and the intracellular signaling pathways, especially the regulation of mitogen-activated protien kinase (MAPK) pathway, is not known. In the present study we investigated the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the regulation of MAPKs in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells stably transfected with a recombinant porcine calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Calcitonin gene-related peptide caused a significant dose-dependent increase in cAMP response and the effect was inhibited by calcitonin gene-related peptide(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor antagonist. Calcitonin gene-related peptide also caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK) activities, with apparently no significant change in cjun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase also stimulated ERK and P38 activities in these cells suggesting the invovement of cAMP in this process. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-stimulated ERK and P38 MAPK activities were inhibited significantly by calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, calcitonin gene-related peptide-(8-37) suggesting the involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Preincubation of the cells with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, H89 [¿N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, hydrochloride¿] inhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide-mediated activation of ERK and p38 kinases. On the other hand, preincubation of the cells with wortmannin ¿[1S-(1alpha,6balpha,9abeta,11alpha, 11bbeta)]-11-(acetyloxy)-1,6b,7,8,9a,10,11, 11b-octahydro-1-(methoxymethyl)-9a,11b-dimethyl-3H-furo[4,3, 2-de]indeno[4,5-h]-2

  5. Inflammatory mediators release calcitonin gene-related peptide from dorsal root ganglion neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, B; Izydorczyk, I; Kress, M

    2000-01-01

    The interactions between the inflammatory mediators bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2) and acid pH were studied in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. For this purpose, the cultures were stimulated by inflammatory mediators (bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2), 10(-5)M each) or acid solution (pH 6.1) for 5 min and the content of calcitonin gene-related peptide was determined in the supernatant before, during and after stimulation, using an enzyme immunoassay. Acid solution resulted in a threefold increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was entirely dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. The release could not be blocked by the addition of the capsaicin antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M). Bradykinin (10(-5)M) caused a 50% increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was again dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium, whereas serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) were each ineffective at 10(-5)M concentration. The combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) led to a fivefold increase of the calcitonin gene-related peptide release which could not be further enhanced by acidification. The competitive capsaicin receptor antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M) significantly reduced the release induced by the combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2). It is suggested that the inflammatory mediators co-operate and together may act as endogenous agonists at the capsaicin receptor to cause calcium influx and consecutive neuropeptide release. PMID:10858619

  6. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  7. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kyani, Anahita; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Jenssen, Håvard

    2012-02-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression. The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model resulted in an extremely robust and highly predictive model with calibration, leave-one-out and leave-20-out validation R(2) of 0.9194, 0.9103, and 0.9214, respectively. We performed docking of the most potent calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor and demonstrated that peptide antagonists act by blocking access to the peptide-binding cleft. We also demonstrated the direct contact of residues 28-37 of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the receptor. These results are in agreement with the conclusions drawn from the quantitative structure-activity relationship model, indicating that both electrostatic and steric factors should be taken into account when designing novel calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists. PMID:21974743

  8. Activities of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and related peptides at the CGRP receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Pradhan, T.; Zhou, Z.C.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T. )

    1990-05-01

    In guinea pig pancreatic acini rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased amylase release 2-fold, salmon calcitonin had an efficacy of only 44% of that of CGRP and (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) and human calcitonin had no actions. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37), but not human calcitonin, antagonized the actions of CGRP in pancreatic acini with an IC50 of 3 microM. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for CGRP-stimulated amylase secretion. The inhibition was specific for CGRP and was reversible. Studies with 125I-CGRP demonstrated that CGRP, salmon calcitonin and (Tyr0)CGRP, but not human calcitonin, interacted with CGRP receptors on pancreatic acini. These results indicate that various CGRP-related peptides demonstrate different relationships between their abilities to occupy the CGRP receptor and to affect biologic activity, with CGRP itself being a full agonist, salmon calcitonin a partial agonist, (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) a competitive antagonist, and human calcitonin having no actions.

  9. Depletion of substance P, neurokinin A and calcitonin gene-related peptide from the contralateral and ipsilateral caudal trigeminal nucleus following unilateral electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion; a possible neurophysiological and neuroanatomical link to generalized head pain.

    PubMed

    Samsam, M; Coveñas, R; Csillik, B; Ahangari, R; Yajeya, J; Riquelme, R; Narváez, J A; Tramu, G

    2001-03-01

    Primary trigeminal neurons of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) innervate major parts of the face and head, including the dura. Electrical stimulation of the TG at specific parameters, can activate its nociceptive neurons and may serve as an experimental pain model. Markowitz [J. Neurosci. 7 (1987) 4129] reported that electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) causes extravasation of plasma proteins from venules of the trigeminally innervated domain possibly due to the release of vasoactive substances. Neurogenic inflammation (vasodilatation, plasma protein extravasation, release of vasoactive peptides) in dura may serve as one of the possible pathomechanisms underlying vascular head pain [Moskowitz, Ann. Neurol. 16 (1984) 157]. We performed a unilateral electrical stimulation (7.5 Hz, 5 ms, 0.8-1.4 mA for 5 min) of the TG in rat, to induce a neurogenic inflammation in the peripheral trigeminal domain including the dura, looking for calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) immunoreactivity (IR) in the caudal trigeminal nucleus (CTN) into which massive central trigeminal processes terminate. Here, we show patchy depletion(s) of CGRP-, SP- and NKA-IRs in the contralateral CTN of the rat in addition to their ipsilateral depletion. Such depletion is due to the release of these neuropeptides in the CTN leading to the activation of bilateral trigeminal nociceptive pathway. These data afford the possibility that under specific frequencies (which may roughly correlate to the intensity of the painful stimulus) and/or specific intensities (may correlate to specific areas of the peripheral trigeminal domain) of stimulation, activation of one side of the TG may activate bilateral trigeminal nociceptive pathway leading to the perception of an ill localized/generalized pain or headache rather than a unilateral one.

  10. Superior Cervical Ganglia Neurons Induce Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells via Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Szklany, Kirsten; Ruiter, Evelyn; Mian, Firoz; Kunze, Wolfgang; Bienenstock, John; Forsythe, Paul; Karimi, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems communicate bidirectionally, utilizing diverse molecular signals including cytokines and neurotransmitters to provide an integrated response to changes in the body’s internal and external environment. Although, neuro-immune interactions are becoming better understood under inflammatory circumstances and it has been evidenced that interaction between neurons and T cells results in the conversion of encephalitogenic T cells to T regulatory cells, relatively little is known about the communication between neurons and naïve T cells. Here, we demonstrate that following co-culture of naïve CD4+ T cells with superior cervical ganglion neurons, the percentage of Foxp3 expressing CD4+CD25+ cells significantly increased. This was mediated in part by immune-regulatory cytokines TGF-β and IL-10, as well as the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide while vasoactive intestinal peptide was shown to play no role in generation of T regulatory cells. Additionally, T cells co-cultured with neurons showed a decrease in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ released upon in vitro stimulation. These findings suggest that the generation of Tregs may be promoted by naïve CD4+ T cell: neuron interaction through the release of neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27022966

  11. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from nerve terminals in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, M; Inaishi, Y; Kashihara, Y; Kuno, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The amount of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from the isolated rat soleus muscle was measured by enzyme immunoassay. 2. When the soleus muscle was exposed to a solution containing high K+ (20-100 mM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin, the amount of CGRP released into the bathing medium increased with an increase in the K+ concentration. 3. The exposure to 100 mM-K+ did not increase CGRP release from chronically denervated soleus muscles or from pieces of the soleus nerve separated from the muscle. 4. The amount of CGRP released from the isolated muscle by 100 mM-K+ depended on the external Ca2+ concentration. The slope of the relation between the amount of CGRP release and the Ca2+ concentration was less than one on double logarithmic co-ordinates. 5. Following chronic section of the lumbar ventral roots, the mean amount of CGRP released from the soleus muscle by 100 mM-K+ was reduced by 28%, compared with that observed in normal muscle. 6. Antidromic stimulation of the lumbar dorsal roots at an intensity three times the threshold for most excitable sensory fibres failed to induce CGRP release from the soleus muscle, whereas stimulation at intensities 50-100 times the threshold increased significantly the amount of CGRP release from the muscle. 7. Stimulation of the muscle nerve at an intensity sufficient to activate the alpha-motor fibres did not release CGRP from the soleus muscle or from the diaphragm. 8. It is concluded that the major source of CGRP released from skeletal muscle is A delta- and/or C sensory terminals and that the Ca2+ dependence of CGRP release is less steep than that reported for acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:2023119

  12. Autoradiographic mapping of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in human and guinea pig hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Coupe, M.O.; Mak, J.C.; Yacoub, M.; Oldershaw, P.J.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid peptide that is a potent coronary vasodilator. Although CGRP is found in high concentrations around coronary arteries, its precise function in the control of coronary vasomotor tone remains unclear. We studied the distribution of specific receptors for CGRP in guinea pig and human hearts and found that the highest concentration of specific receptors for CGRP was in the major coronary arteries, which is consistent with the hypothesis that CGRP is implicated in control of coronary vasomotor tone. Areas of coronary artery with atheroma contained significantly decreased (158 +/- 35 grains/1,000 microns 2 tissue, n = 3) binding sites compared with binding sites in normal arteries (266 +/- 10 grains/1,000 microns 2 tissue, n = 11; p less than 0.001, t test). The decrease in receptors for CGRP around atheroma may predispose these vessels to coronary spasm.

  13. Inhibition of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Function: A Promising Strategy for Treating Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine. Serum levels of CGRP, which are elevated during a migraine attack, have been reported to return to normal with alleviation of pain. In addition, CGRP administration has been shown to cause a migraine-like headache in susceptible individuals. Importantly, CGRP receptors are found on many cell types within the trigeminovascular system that are thought to play important roles in controlling inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Based on these findings, it was proposed that blockage of CGRP receptor function and, hence, the physiological effects of CGRP would be effective in aborting a migraine attack. This review will summarize key preclinical data that support the therapeutic potential of using CGRP receptor antagonists or molecules that bind CGRP within the context of current neurovascular theories on migraine pathology. PMID:18808507

  14. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Receptor Blocker Inhibits Spontaneous Activity of Human Ureter.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Slobodan M; Jankovic, Snezana V; Stojadinovic, Dobrivoje; Stojadinovic, Miroslav; Djuric, Janko M; Stojic, Isidora

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is present in nerve fibers that innervate the human ureter and may have important influence on the motility of this organ. The aim of our study was to investigate whether CGRP could affect the motility of an isolated human ureter. The tension and intraluminal pressure of the isolated ureteral segments were recorded and registered on a personal computer. Both phasic and tonic contractions of the isolated preparations were measured as area under the tension or pressure recordings. CGRP and CGRP fragment 8-37 were separately added to the organ baths in a cumulative way, thereby gradually increasing their concentration in the baths' solution. Alpha-CGRP did not affect either phasic, spontaneous activity or tone of isolated ureteral segments, as measured by both tension and intraluminal pressure. On the other hand, CGRP 8-37 caused concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous contractions of the isolated ureteral segments. PMID:26305057

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP): a new target for migraine.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that manifests as a debilitating headache associated with altered sensory perception. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is now firmly established as a key player in migraine. Clinical trials carried out during the past decade have proved that CGRP receptor antagonists are effective for treating migraine, and antibodies to the receptor and CGRP are currently under investigation. Despite this progress in the clinical arena, the mechanisms by which CGRP triggers migraine remain uncertain. This review discusses mechanisms whereby CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Future studies on epistatic and epigenetic regulators of CGRP actions are expected to shed further light on CGRP actions in migraine. In conclusion, targeting CGRP represents an approachable therapeutic strategy for migraine.

  16. Peripheral amplification of sweating – a role for calcitonin gene-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Schlereth, Tanja; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Seewald, Bianca; Birklein, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Neuropeptides are the mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Some pain disorders, e.g. complex regional pain syndromes, are characterized by increased neurogenic inflammation and by exaggerated sudomotor function. The aim of this study was to explore whether neuropeptides have a peripheral effect on human sweating. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) on acetylcholine-induced axon reflex sweating in healthy subjects (total n = 18). All substances were applied via dermal microdialysis. The experiments were done in a parallel setting: ACh alone and ACh combined with CGRP, VIP or SP in various concentrations were applied. Acetylcholine (10−2m) always elicited a sweating response, neuropeptides alone did not. However, CGRP significantly enhanced ACh-induced sweating (P < 0.01). Post hoc tests revealed that CGRP in physiological concentrations of 10−7–10−9m was most effective. VIP at any concentration had no significant effect on axon reflex sweating. The duration of the sweating response (P < 0.01), but not the amount of sweat, was reduced by SP. ACh-induced skin blood flow was significantly increased by CGRP (P < 0.01), but unaltered by VIP and SP. The results indicate that CGRP amplifies axon reflex sweating in human skin. PMID:16931551

  17. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: intersection of peripheral inflammation and central modulation

    PubMed Central

    Raddant, Ann C.; Russo, Andrew F.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a convergence of basic and clinical evidence has established the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) as a key player in migraine. Although CGRP is a recognised neuromodulator of nociception, its mechanism of action in migraine remains elusive. In this review, we present evidence that led us to propose that CGRP is well poised to enhance neurotransmission in migraine by both peripheral and central mechanisms. In the periphery, it is thought that local release of CGRP from the nerve endings of meningeal nociceptors following their initial activation by cortical spreading depression is critical for the induction of vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, neurogenic inflammation and the consequential sensitisation of meningeal nociceptors. Mechanistically, we propose that CGRP release can give rise to a positive-feedback loop involved in localised increased synthesis and release of CGRP from neurons and a CGRP-like peptide called procalcitonin from trigeminal ganglion glia. Within the brain, the wide distribution of CGRP and CGRP receptors provides numerous possible targets for CGRP to act as a neuromodulator. PMID:22123247

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in the joint: contributions to pain and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, David A; Mapp, Paul I; Kelly, Sara

    2015-11-01

    Arthritis is the commonest cause of disabling chronic pain, and both osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain major burdens on both individuals and society. Peripheral release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) contributes to the vasodilation of acute neurogenic inflammation. Contributions of CGRP to the pain and inflammation of chronic arthritis, however, are only recently being elucidated. Animal models of arthritis are revealing the molecular and pathophysiological events that accompany and lead to progression of both arthritis and pain. Peripheral actions of CGRP in the joint might contribute to both inflammation and joint afferent sensitization. CGRP and its specific receptors are expressed in joint afferents and up-regulated following arthritis induction. Peripheral CGRP release results in activation of synovial vascular cells, through which acute vasodilatation is followed by endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis, key features of chronic inflammation. Local administration of CGRP to the knee also increases mechanosensitivity of joint afferents, mimicking peripheral sensitization seen in arthritic joints. Increased mechanosensitivity in OA knees and pain behaviour can be reduced by peripherally acting CGRP receptor antagonists. Effects of CGRP pathway blockade on arthritic joint afferents, but not in normal joints, suggest contributions to sensitization rather than normal joint nociception. CGRP therefore might make key contributions to the transition from normal to persistent synovitis, and the progression from nociception to sensitization. Targeting CGRP or its receptors within joint tissues to prevent these undesirable transitions during early arthritis, or suppress them in established disease, might prevent persistent inflammation and relieve arthritis pain.

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a key neurotransmitter in the neuro-immune axis

    PubMed Central

    Assas, Bakri M.; Pennock, Joanne I.; Miyan, Jaleel A.

    2014-01-01

    The question of how the neural and immune systems interact in host defense is important, integrating a system that senses the whole body with one that protects. Understanding the mechanisms and routes of control could produce novel and powerful ways of promoting and enhancing normal functions as well as preventing or treating abnormal functions. Fragmentation of biological research into specialities has resulted in some failures in recognizing and understanding interactions across different systems and this is most striking across immunology, hematology, and neuroscience. This reductionist approach does not allow understanding of the in vivo orchestrated response generated through integration of all systems. However, many factors make the understanding of multisystem cross-talk in response to a threat difficult, for instance the nervous and immune systems share communication molecules and receptors for a wide range of physiological signals. But, it is clear that physical, hard-wired connections exist between the two systems, with the key link involving sensory, unmyelinated nerve fibers (c fibers) containing the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and modified macrophages, mast cells and other immune and host defense cells in various locations throughout the body. In this review we will therefore focus on the induction of CGRP and its key role in the neuroimmune axis. PMID:24592205

  20. Calcitonin gene-related peptide pre-administration acts as a novel antidepressant in stressed mice

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Matsuo, Yumi; Ogawa, Mami; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide that has potent vasodilator properties and is involved in various behavioral disorders. The relationship between CGRP and depression-like behavior is unclear. In this study, we used chronically stressed mice to investigate whether CGRP is involved in depression-like behavior. Each mouse was exposed to restraint and water immersion stress for 15 days. After stress exposure, mice were assessed using behavioral tests: open field test, forced swim test and sucrose preference test. Serum corticosterone levels, hippocampal proliferation and mRNA expression of neurotrophins were measured. After stress exposure, mice exhibited depression-like behavior and decreased CGRP mRNA levels in the hippocampus. Although intracerebroventricular CGRP administration (0.5 nmol) did not alter depression-like behavior after 15-day stress exposure, a single CGRP administration into the brain, before the beginning of the 15-day stress exposure, normalized the behavioral dysfunctions and increased nerve growth factor (Ngf) mRNA levels in stressed mice. Furthermore, in the mouse E14 hippocampal cell line, CGRP treatment induced increased expression of Ngf mRNA. The NGF receptor inhibitor K252a inhibited CGRP’s antidepressant-like effects in stressed mice. These results suggest that CGRP expression in the mouse hippocampus is associated with depression-like behavior and changes in Ngf mRNA levels. PMID:26251188

  1. Critical role of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in cortical spreading depression

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Costa, Cinzia; Caproni, Stefano; Pisani, Antonio; Bonsi, Paola; Picconi, Barbara; Cupini, Letizia M.; Materazzi, Serena; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Sarchielli, Paola; Calabresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a key pathogenetic step in migraine with aura. Dysfunctions of voltage-dependent and receptor-operated channels have been implicated in the generation of CSD and in the pathophysiology of migraine. Although a known correlation exists between migraine and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), the possibility that CGRP is involved in CSD has not been examined in detail. We analyzed the pharmacological mechanisms underlying CSD and investigated the possibility that endogenous CGRP contributes to this phenomenon. CSD was analyzed in rat neocortical slices by imaging of the intrinsic optical signal. CSD was measured as the percentage of the maximal surface of a cortical slice covered by the propagation of intrinsic optical signal changes during an induction episode. Reproducible CSD episodes were induced through repetitive elevations of extracellular potassium concentration. AMPA glutamate receptor antagonism did not inhibit CSD, whereas NMDA receptor antagonism did inhibit CSD. Blockade of voltage-dependent sodium channels by TTX also reduced CSD. CSD was also decreased by the antiepileptic drug topiramate, but not by carbamazepine. Interestingly, endogenous CGRP was released in the cortical tissue in a calcium-dependent manner during CSD, and three different CGRP receptor antagonists had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on CSD, suggesting a critical role of CGRP in this phenomenon. Our findings show that both glutamate NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent sodium channels play roles in CSD. They also demonstrate that CGRP antagonism reduces CSD, supporting the possible use of drugs targeting central CGRP receptors as antimigraine agents. PMID:23112192

  2. Pathway-specific effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide on irideal arterioles of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C E; Gould, D J

    1997-01-01

    1. Arteriolar diameter and membrane voltage have been measured to investigate the actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in rat irideal arterioles. 2. Activation of sensory nerves inhibited sympathetic vasoconstriction, reduced the accompanying 40-50 mV depolarization by 90% and caused a 4 mV hyperpolarization. 3. The inhibition of vasoconstriction was prevented by either preincubation in L-NAME (10 microM), to inhibit nitric oxide production, by preincubation in the cell-permeant adenylate cyclase inhibitor dideoxyadenosine (1 mM) or by preincubation in the ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker glibenclamide (10 microM). The subsequent addition of a nitric oxide donor to the glibenclamide solution inhibited nerve-mediated vasoconstriction, suggesting that the potassium channel involvement preceded the production of nitric oxide. The small hyperpolarization was not affected by L-NAME. 4. Nerve-mediated vasodilatation persisted in the presence of L-NAME (10 microM) but was abolished with the CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRPS-37. 5. In arterioles preconstricted with the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK-14304 (100 nM), exogenous CGRP caused a hyperpolarization and a dose-dependent vasodilatation, neither of which was affected by L-NAME (10 microM). 6. In arterioles preconstricted with 30 mM KCl, CGRP (10 nM) caused vasodilatation but not hyperpolarization, suggesting that the hyperpolarization was not causal to the vasodilatation. 7. Forskolin (30 nM), in the presence of L-NAME to present effects due to nitric oxide, caused vasodilatation. 8. These results suggest that CGRP inhibits sympathetic nerve-mediated vasoconstriction through sequential increases in cyclic AMP and nitric oxide, while vasodilatation results from increases in cyclic AMP alone. The production of nitric oxide, but not its mechanism of action, appears to be dependent on the activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. The possible sites of action of these two pathways are discussed

  3. Endosomal proteolysis regulates calcitonin gene-related peptide responses in mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    McNeish, AJ; Roux, BT; Aylett, S-B; Van Den Brink, AM; Cottrell, GS

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator, implicated in the pathogenesis of migraine. CGRP activates a receptor complex comprising, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). In vitro studies indicate recycling of CLR•RAMP1 is regulated by degradation of CGRP in early endosomes by endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1). However, it is not known if ECE-1 regulates the resensitization of CGRP-induced responses in functional arterial tissue. Experimental Approach CLR, ECE-1a-d and RAMP1 expression in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells (RMA-SMCs) and mesenteric arteries was analysed by RT-PCR and by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. CGRP-induced signalling in cells was examined by measuring cAMP production and ERK activation. CGRP-induced relaxation of arteries was measured by isometric wire myography. ECE-1 was inhibited using the specific inhibitor, SM-19712. Key Results RMA-SMCs and arteries contained mRNA for CLR, ECE-1a-d and RAMP1. ECE-1 was present in early endosomes of RMA-SMCs and in the smooth muscle layer of arteries. CGRP induced endothelium-independent relaxation of arteries. ECE-1 inhibition had no effect on initial CGRP-induced responses but reduced cAMP generation in RMA-SMCs and vasodilation in mesenteric arteries responses to subsequent CGRP challenges. Conclusions And Implications ECE-1 regulated the resensitization of responses to CGRP in RMA-SMCs and mesenteric arteries. CGRP-induced relaxation did not involve endothelium-derived pathways. This is the first report of ECE-1 regulating CGRP responses in SMCs and arteries. ECE-1 inhibitors may attenuate an important vasodilatory pathway, implicated in primary headaches and may represent a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of migraine. PMID:22881710

  4. Role of spinal afferents and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the postoperative gastric ileus in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Zittel, T T; Reddy, S N; Plourde, V; Raybould, H E

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The object of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of postoperative gastric ileus in an experimental model of abdominal surgery in anesthetized rats. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Sensory neurons partly mediate postoperative gastric ileus. Among other neuropeptides, sensory neurons contain calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and release CGRP in response to noxious stimulation. Because CGRP inhibits gastric motility, it was hypothesized that abdominal surgery stimulates sensory neurons, which then releases CGRP, thereby inhibiting gastric motility. METHODS: Postoperative ileus was induced by abdominal surgery. Gastric corpus motility was measured by an intragastric catheter. CGRP action was blocked by CGRP immunoneutralization or by a CGRP receptor antagonist. Spinal sensory neurons were ablated by application of a sensory neurotoxin (capsaicin) to the celiac and superior mesenteric ganglia. RESULTS: Abdominal surgery decreased gastric corpus motility in the first 5 minutes after abdominal surgery by 59 +/- 5% and by 24 +/- 4% during the 1st postoperative hour. Capsaicin pretreatment of the celiac and superior mesenteric ganglia, CGRP immunoneutralization, or CGRP receptor antagonism reversed the postoperative decrease in gastric corpus motility during the 1st postoperative hour by 50%, 100%, and 59%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that spinal sensory neurons and CGRP partly mediate postoperative gastric ileus. CGRP may be released from spinal sensory neuron terminals in the celiac and superior mesenteric ganglia as part of an extraspinal intestinogastric inhibitory reflex activated by abdominal surgery. PMID:8297181

  5. Phospholipase C gamma mediates endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor-regulated calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in colitis-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Fiza; Liu, Miao; Shen, Shanwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a complex pathophysiological paradigm with unclear mechanisms. Primary afferent neuronal plasticity marked by alterations in neuroactive compounds such as calcitonin gene-related peptide is suggested to underlie the heightened sensory responses. Signal transduction that leads to calcitonin gene-related peptide expression thereby sensory neuroplasticity during colitis remains to be elucidated. Results In a rat model with colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, we found that endogenously elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor elicited an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the lumbar L1 dorsal root ganglia. At seven days of colitis, neutralization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor with a specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody reversed calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia. Colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide transcription was also inhibited by brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody treatment. Signal transduction studies with dorsal root ganglia explants showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression was mediated by the phospholipase C gamma, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt or the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway. Application of PLC inhibitor U73122 in vivo confirmed that colitis-induced and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia was regulated by the phospholipase C gamma pathway. In contrast, suppression of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in vivo had no effect on colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression. During colitis, calcitonin gene-related peptide also co-expressed with phospholipase C gamma but not with p-Akt. Calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation during colitis correlated to the activation

  6. Skin-bacteria communication: Involvement of the neurohormone Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) in the regulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence

    PubMed Central

    N’Diaye, Awa R.; Leclerc, Camille; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Poc, Cecile Duclairoir; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci can sense Substance P (SP) in skin, but this molecule is generally released by nerve terminals along with another neuropeptide, Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP). In this study, we investigated the effects of αCGRP on Staphylococci. CGRP induced a strong stimulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence with a low threshold (<10−12 M) whereas Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to CGRP. We observed that CGRP-treated S. epidermidis induced interleukin 8 release by keratinocytes. This effect was associated with an increase in cathelicidin LL37 secretion. S. epidermidis displayed no change in virulence factors secretion but showed marked differences in surface properties. After exposure to CGRP, the adherence of S. epidermidis to keratinocytes increased, whereas its internalization and biofilm formation activity were reduced. These effects were correlated with an increase in surface hydrophobicity. The DnaK chaperone was identified as the S. epidermidis CGRP-binding protein. We further showed that the effects of CGRP were blocked by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), an inhibitor of MscL mechanosensitive channels. In addition, GdCl3 inhibited the membrane translocation of EfTu, the Substance P sensor. This work reveals that through interaction with specific sensors S. epidermidis integrates different skin signals and consequently adapts its virulence. PMID:27739485

  7. G-protein βγ subunits in vasorelaxing and anti-endothelinergic effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Meens, MJPMT; Mattheij, NJA; van Loenen, PB; Spijkers, LJA; Lemkens, P; Nelissen, J; Compeer, MG; Alewijnse, AE; De Mey, JGR

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been proposed to relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) via cAMP and can promote dissociation of endothelin-1 (ET-1) from ETA receptors. The latter is not mimicked by other stimuli of adenylate cyclases. Therefore, we evaluated the involvement of G-protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) in the arterial effects of CGRP receptor stimulation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To test the hypothesis that instead of α subunits of G-proteins (Gαs), Gβγ mediates the effects of CGRP receptor activation, we used (i) rat isolated mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA), (ii) pharmacological modulators of cyclic nucleotides; and (iii) low molecular weight inhibitors of the functions of Gβγ, gallein and M119. To validate these tools with respect to CGRP receptor function, we performed organ bath studies with rat isolated MRA, radioligand binding on membranes from CHO cells expressing human CGRP receptors and cAMP production assays in rat cultured VSMC. KEY RESULTS In isolated arteries contracted with K+ or ET-1, IBMX (PDE inhibitor) increased sodium nitroprusside (SNP)- and isoprenaline (ISO)- but not CGRP-induced relaxations. While fluorescein (negative control) was without effects, gallein increased binding of [125I]-CGRP in the absence and presence of GTPγS. Gallein also increased CGRP-induced cAMP production in VSMC. Despite these stimulating effects, gallein and M119 selectively inhibited the relaxing and anti-endothelinergic effects of CGRP in isolated arteries while not altering contractile responses to K+ or ET-1 or relaxing responses to ISO or SNP. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Activated CGRP receptors induce cyclic nucleotide-independent relaxation of VSMC and terminate arterial effects of ET-1 via Gβγ. PMID:22074193

  8. Characterization of the prostanoid receptor types involved in mediating calcitonin gene-related peptide release from cultured rat trigeminal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, David W; Feniuk, Wasyl; Humphrey, Patrick P A

    2001-01-01

    Prostaglandins and the vasodilator neuropeptide, calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of migraine headache. We have used primary cultures of adult rat trigeminal neurones to examine the effects of prostanoids on CGRP release in vitro.CGRP release was stimulated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the IP receptor agonist, carbaprostacyclin (cPGI2). These responses were extracellular calcium-dependent, and the PGE2-induced CGRP release was unaltered by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), ATP receptor blockade, or the addition of adenosine deaminase.Increases in CGRP levels were also observed in response to prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), and the EP2 receptor selective agonist, butaprost. No increases in CGRP release were observed in response to prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) or the TP receptor selective agonist, U46619, or the EP3 receptor selective agonist, GR63799X.The selective DP receptor antagonist, BWA868C, antagonized the PGD2-, but not PGE2- or cPGI2-induced release. Furthermore, the EP1 selective antagonist, ZM325802, failed to antagonize the PGE2-induced CGRP release from these cells.These data indicate that activation of DP, EP and IP receptors can each cause CGRP release from trigeminal neurones, and suggest that the predominant EP receptor subtype involved may be the EP2 receptor. Together with evidence that the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, aspirin, particularly when administered intravenously is effective in treating acute migraine, these findings further suggest a role for prostaglandins in migraine pathophysiology. PMID:11704650

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100 μg kg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation. PMID:26718975

  10. Changes in the Expression of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide After Exposure to Injurious Stretch-Shortening Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C.; Miller, G.R.; Baker, B.A.; Hollander, M.; Kashon, M.L.; Waugh, S; Krajnak, K.

    2016-01-01

    One of the factors that can result in musculoskeletal injuries, and time off work, is exposure to repetitive motion. The goal of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle injury induced by exposure to injurious stretch-shortening cycles (iSSCs), resulted in hyperalgesia in the hind limb and changes in calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) immunolabeling in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in young and old male rats. Methods Young (3 mo) and old (30 mo) male Fisher 344 × BN F1 rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and the left hind limbs were exposed to 15 sets of 10 SSCs. Control animals were exposed to a single bout of SSCs of equal intensity. Sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was assessed using von Frey filaments prior to beginning the experiment, and on days 2 and 9 following exposure to iSSCs. Rats were euthanized one, 3 or 10 days after the exposure. The ipsilateral DRG were dissected from the L4-5 region of the spine, along with the left tibialis anterior (LTA) muscle. Results Rats exposed to iSSCs were more sensitive to mechanical stimulation than control rats 2 days after the exposure, and showed a reduction in peak force 3 days after exposure. Changes in sensitivity to pressure were not associated with increases in CGRP labeling in the DRG at 3 days. However, 9 days after exposure to iSSCs, old rats still displayed an increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation, and this hyperalgesia was associated with an increase in CGRP immunolabeling in the DRG. Young rats exposed to iSSC did not display a change in CGRP immunolabeling and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation returned to control levels at 10 days. Conclusions These findings suggest that hyperalgesia seen shortly after exposure to iSSC is not influenced by CGRP levels. However, in cases where recovery from injury may be slower, as it is in older rats, CGRP may contribute to the maintenance of hyperalgesia. PMID:26972633

  11. Effect of +Gz on plasma levels of calcitonin gene related peptide, endothelin and renal function in pilots.

    PubMed

    Dai, Y; Ji, G; Dai, D; Wang, X; Xiao, L

    1998-02-01

    The effect of positive acceleration on plasma levels of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), and endothelin as well as renal function in pilots were observed in this study. 20 pilots were exposed to +2.5 Gz 10 s and +3.0 Gz 10 s with an interval of 5 min without anti-G suits. Samples of plasma and serum were taken 2Omin before and after exposure. Plasma levels of CGRP and endothelin after the exposure were significantly increased (P<0.01), but alkaline phosphatase(AKP), blood levels of beta 2-microglobulin(beta 2-MG), Ca2+ in serum showed no significant change (P>0.05) as compared with those before exposure. There was a correlation between CGRP and endothlin (r=0.772, P<0.01). It is concluded that positive acceleration(+2.5, +3.0Gz) could increase plasma levels of CGRP and endothlin but did not affect renal function.

  12. Flurbiprofen inhibits capsaicin induced calcitonin gene related peptide release from rat spinal cord via an endocannabinoid dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Kay; Hamza, May; Ates, Mehmet; Gühring, Hans

    2003-02-27

    Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) is involved in nociceptive transmission and modulation at the spinal level. In the spinal superperfusion model, Delta(9) tetrahydrocannabinol inhibited capsaicin induced CGRP release in a concentration dependent manner. Similarly, flurbiprofen (3 microM) inhibited spinal CGRP release. This inhibition was reversed by the CB(1) antagonist AM-251 (1 microM), but not by co-administration of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2); 285 nM). AM-251 had no modulatory effect on flurbiprofen-induced cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibiting capacity as shown by PGE(2) levels. Furthermore, the phospholipase A(2) inhibitor palmityl trifluromethyl ketone (15 microM) reversed flurbiprofen's inhibitory effect. In conclusion the present work provides evidence on the shift of arachidonic acid metabolism towards endocannabinoids formation in response to COX inhibition as a mechanism for flurbiprofen inhibitory effect on spinal CGRP release.

  13. Expression of Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide in Rat Pulp and Periodontal Tissues by Indirect Immunofluorescence Method

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Zhang, Mengjie; Cao, Xue; Wang, Hong; Xue, Lufeng; Wu, Meng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nerve fibers immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in pulp and periodontal tissues of rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 6 weeks, were sacrificed, and the jaws were excised, demineralized, and processed for indirect immunofluorescence staining. A considerably higher density of nerve fibers immunoreactive to CGRP was found in the dental pulp and gingiva than in periodontal ligament. The majority of pulpal CGRP immunopositive fibers that were located followed blood vessels parallel to the long axis of the root. A subodontoblastic network of fibers IR to CGRP was found in the coronal pulp in rat molars. In the periodontium, CGRP immunopositive fibers were mainly located in the periapical area and close to the alveolar bone. Gingiva was also well supplied with CGRP-IR nerves. PMID:24328744

  14. Effects of Voluntary Locomotion and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide on the Dynamics of Single Dural Vessels in Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The dura mater is a vascularized membrane surrounding the brain and is heavily innervated by sensory nerves. Our knowledge of the dural vasculature has been limited to pathological conditions, such as headaches, but little is known about the dural blood flow regulation during behavior. To better understand the dynamics of dural vessels during behavior, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) to measure the diameter changes of single dural and pial vessels in the awake mouse during voluntary locomotion. Surprisingly, we found that voluntary locomotion drove the constriction of dural vessels, and the dynamics of these constrictions could be captured with a linear convolution model. Dural vessel constrictions did not mirror the large increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) during locomotion, indicating that dural vessel constriction was not caused passively by compression. To study how behaviorally driven dynamics of dural vessels might be altered in pathological states, we injected the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which induces headache in humans. CGRP dilated dural, but not pial, vessels and significantly reduced spontaneous locomotion but did not block locomotion-induced constrictions in dural vessels. Sumatriptan, a drug commonly used to treat headaches, blocked the vascular and behavioral the effects of CGRP. These findings suggest that, in the awake animal, the diameters of dural vessels are regulated dynamically during behavior and during drug-induced pathological states. SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT The vasculature of the dura has been implicated in the pathophysiology of headaches, but how individual dural vessels respond during behavior, both under normal conditions and after treatment with the headache-inducing peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is poorly understood. To address these issues, we imaged individual dural vessels in awake mice and found that dural vessels constricted during voluntary locomotion, and

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels during glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-induced headache in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kruuse, C; Iversen, H K; Jansen-Olesen, I; Edvinsson, L; Olesen, J

    2010-04-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in migraine has been studied in the experimental glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-infusion headache model. We hypothesized that GTN-induced headache may activate the trigeminovascular system and be associated with increased levels of sensory neuropeptides, including calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin plasma levels were measured before and after placebo/sumatriptan injection and during GTN-induced headache. Following a double-blind randomized cross-over design, 10 healthy volunteers received subcutaneous sumatriptan 6 mg or placebo. This was succeeded by 20 min of GTN (0.12 µg kg(-1) min(-1)) infusion. At baseline no subject reported headache (using verbal rating scale from 0 to 10) and the jugular CGRP-like immunoreactivity (-LI) level was 18.6 ± 2.5 pmol/l. After a 20-min intravenous infusion of GTN 0.12 µg kg(-1) min(-1), median peak headache intensity was 4 (range 2-6) (P < 0.05), while jugular CGRP-LI levels were unchanged (19.0 ± 2.8 pmol/l; P > 0.05). There were no changes in VIP-, NPY- or somatostatin-LI. In conclusion, the NO donor GTN appears not to induce headache via immediate CGRP release.

  16. Studies on rat and human thymus to demonstrate immunoreactivity of calcitonin gene-related peptide, tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    KRANZ, ANDREA; KENDALL, MARION D.; VON GAUDECKER, BRITA

    1997-01-01

    The peptidergic and noradrenergic innervation of rat and human thymus was investigated by immunohistochemistry at the light and electron microscopical level (avidin-biotin-complex, sucrose-phosphate-glyoxylic-acid, and immunogold techniques). The distribution of noradrenergic neural profiles, and positive immunoreactivity for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) is described in female rats during ageing, and in human children. In the neonatal rat thymus, the arteries and septa are well supplied by fine varicose nerves. In older animals (2 wk–1 y) the number of septa and blood vessels increase and consequently also the innervation. No nerves were found in the cortex. Apart from the innervation of the septal areas, immunoreactivity for CGRP and TH was present in thymic cells. Except for the young rats (neonatal–14 d), all rats showed CGRP positivity in subcapsular/perivascular epithelial cells (type 1 cells). All rat thymuses also contained a few TH positive cells in the medulla, which could only be confirmed as epithelial cells (type 6 cells) in children. Type 1 cells in the human thymus were not CGRP positive, but as in the rat, there were similar TH positive cells in the medulla. It was concluded that in addition to nerves containing CGRP, noradrenaline or dopamine, epithelial cells also contain these transmitters. They could therefore act on different cells (compared with neural targets) in a paracrine manner. PMID:9419001

  17. Expression pattern of sonic hedgehog signaling and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the socket healing process after tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Pang, Pai; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Yoshioka, Norie; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Sasaki, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), a neural development inducer, plays a significant role in the bone healing process. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide marker of sensory nerves, has been demonstrated to affect bone formation. The roles of SHH signaling and CGRP-positive sensory nerves in the alveolar bone formation process have been unknown. Here we examined the expression patterns of SHH signaling and CGRP in mouse socket by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. We found that the expression level of SHH peaked at day 3 and was then decreased at 5 days after tooth extraction. CGRP, PTCH1 and GLI2 were each expressed in a similar pattern with their highest expression levels at day 5 and day 7 after tooth extraction. CGRP and GLI2 were co-expressed in some inflammatory cells and bone forming cells. In some areas, CGRP-positive neurons expressed GLI2. In conclusion, SHH may affect alveolar bone healing by interacting with CGRP-positive sensory neurons and thus regulate the socket's healing process after tooth extraction. PMID:26427874

  18. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Modulates Heat Nociception in the Human Brain - An fMRI Study in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Borsook, David; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we recorded blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the brain by functional MRI after infusion of CGRP in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 27 healthy volunteers. BOLD-signals were recorded in response to noxious heat stimuli in the V1-area of the trigeminal nerve. In addition, we measured BOLD-signals after injection of sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D antagonist). Results Brain activation to noxious heat stimuli following CGRP infusion compared to baseline resulted in increased BOLD-signal in insula and brainstem, and decreased BOLD-signal in the caudate nuclei, thalamus and cingulate cortex. Sumatriptan injection reversed these changes. Conclusion The changes in BOLD-signals in the brain after CGRP infusion suggests that systemic CGRP modulates nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal pain pathways in response to noxious heat stimuli. PMID:26990646

  19. Cells showing immunoreactivity for calcitonin or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the central nervous system of some invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Y; Katoh, A; Oguro, C; Kambegawa, A; Yoshizawa, H

    1991-09-01

    In the central nervous system of some species of several invertebrate phyla, including land planarians (Platyhelminthes), ribbon worms (Nemertina), slugs (Mollusca), polychaetes, earthworms and leeches (Annelida), pill bugs (Arthropoda), and beard worms (Pogonophora), salmon calcitonin-immunoreactive cells and rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive cells were found by immunohistochemistry. These immunoreactive cells were located in the region surrounding the neuropile, although the sizes of the cells varied according to species. Some of them were round or polygonal and regarded as apolar nerve cells because of their lack of cytoplasmic processes, whereas others were spindle-shaped or elongated, being comparable with unipolar nerve cells because of extension of their cytoplasmic processes in the direction of the neuropile. In some cases, it was noted that the cytoplasmic processes had complicated branches or formed loop-like structures at their ends. These observations suggest that a calcitonin-like or CGRP-like substance is extensively present in invertebrates as well as vertebrates.

  20. Calcitonin gene-related peptide regulation of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor in differentiated rat myotubes.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Elyse; Cha, Jieun; Bain, James R; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is the most potent trophic factor for motoneuron survival and neuromuscular junction formation. GDNF is upregulated in injured or denervated skeletal muscle and returns to normal levels following reinnervation. However, the mechanism by which GDNF is regulated in denervated muscle is not well understood. The nerve-derived neurotransmitter calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is upregulated following neuromuscular injury and is subsequently released from motoneurons at the neuromuscular junction. CGRP also promotes nerve regeneration, but the mechanism is not well understood. The current study investigates whether this increase in CGRP regulates GDNF, thus playing a key role in promoting regeneration of injured nerves. This study demonstrates that CGRP increases GDNF secretion without affecting its transcription or translation. Rat L6 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and subsequently treated with CGRP. GDNF mRNA expression levels were quantified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and secreted GDNF was quantified in the conditioned medium by ELISA. CGRP treatment increased secreted GDNF protein without altering GDNF mRNA levels. The translational inhibitor cycloheximide did not affect CGRP-induced GDNF secreted protein levels, whereas the secretional inhibitor brefeldin A blocked the CGRP-induced increase in GDNF. This study highlights the importance of injury-induced upregulation of CGRP by exposing its ability to increase GDNF levels and demonstrates a secretional mechanism for regulation of this key regeneration-promoting neurotrophic factor.

  1. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in cerebral vasospasm, and as a therapeutic approach to subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kokkoris, Stelios; Andrews, Peter; Webb, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is one of the most potent microvascular vasodilators identified to date. Vascular relaxation and vasodilation is mediated via activation of the CGRP receptor. This atypical receptor is made up of a G protein-coupled receptor called calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a single transmembrane protein called receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP), and an additional protein that is required for Gas coupling, known as receptor component protein (RCP). Several mechanisms involved in CGRP-mediated relaxation have been identified. These include nitric oxide (NO)-dependent endothelium-dependent mechanisms or cAMP-mediated endothelium-independent pathways; the latter being more common. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with cerebral vasoconstriction that occurs several days after the hemorrhage and is often fatal. The vasospasm occurs in 30–40% of patients and is the major cause of death from this condition. The vasoconstriction is associated with a decrease in CGRP levels in nerves and an increase in CGRP levels in draining blood, suggesting that CGRP is released from nerves to oppose the vasoconstriction. This evidence has led to the concept that exogenous CGRP may be beneficial in a condition that has proven hard to treat. The present article reviews: (a) the pathophysiology of delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after SAH (b) the basics of the CGRP receptor structure, signal transduction, and vasodilatation mechanisms and (c) the studies that have been conducted so far using CGRP in both animals and humans with SAH. PMID:23162536

  2. Autoradiographic localization of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) binding sites in human and guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J.

    1988-09-01

    /sup 125/I-Human calcitonin gene-related peptide (hCGRP) binding sites were localized in human and guinea pig lungs by an autoradiographic method. Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments from slide-mounted sections of guinea pig lung displayed specific /sup 125/I-hCGRP binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.72 +/- 0.05 nM (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3) and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 133.4 +/- 5.6 fmol/mg protein. In both human and guinea pig lung, autoradiography revealed that CGRP binding sites were widely distributed, with particularly dense labeling over bronchial and pulmonary blood vessels of all sizes and alveolar walls. Airway smooth muscle and epithelium of large airways was sparsely labeled but no labeling was found over submucosal glands. This localization corresponds well to the reported pattern of CGRP-like immunoreactive innervation. The findings of localization of CGRP binding sites on bronchial and pulmonary blood vessels indicate that CGRP may be important in the regulation of airway and pulmonary blood flow.

  3. Amylin-induced relaxation of the perfused mesenteric arterial bed: meditation by calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Westfall, T C; Curfman-Falvey, M

    1995-12-01

    Amylin is a 37-amino acid peptide that shares considerable homology with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Both peptides exert glycoregulatory actions and produce vasodilation of the cardiovascular system. We wished to determine if amylin exerts vasodilatory action in the perfused mesenteric arterial bed in a manner similar to that of CGRP and if so, to determine if amylin and CGRP share a common mechanism of action. Amylin 10(-8), 10(-7), and 10(-6)M produced significant decreases in perfusion pressure by 18, 34, and 45 mm Hg, respectively, of the perfused mesenteric arterial bed pretreated with guanethidine (7 x 10(-6)M) and precontracted with methoxamine (10(-6)-10(-5)M). Amylin was approximately 10 times less potent than CGRP. This vasodilatory effect was not antagonized by atropine in a concentration (10(-6)M) that blocked the vasodilatory action of acetylcholine (ACh) or of nadolol in a concentration that blocked the response to isoproterenol (ISO 10(-6)M). In contrast, the CGRP receptor antagonist [8-37]hCGRP blocked the response of both amylin and CGRP while failing to block the effect of ISO. The depressor effects of CGRP (10(-8)M), amylin (10(-6)M), and ISO (10(-5)M) were 38, 43, and 42 mm Hg without and 5, 12, and 44 mm Hg with [8-37]hCGRP (10(-7)M), respectively. Simultaneous administration of CGRP and amylin failed to produce an additive effect. The depressor effects of CGRP (10(-8)M), amylin (10(-7)M), and CGRP (10(-8)M) plus amylin (10(-7)M) were 50, 32, and 45 mm Hg, respectively. We conclude that amylin exerts a vasodilator action in the perfused mesenteric arterial bed by acting on CGRP1 receptors and suggest that this glycoregulatory hormone may also exert regulatory actions in the vasculature in a manner similar to that of CGRP.

  4. Reciprocal sympatho-sensory control: functional role of nucleotides and calcitonin gene-related peptide in a peripheral neuroeffector junction.

    PubMed

    Donoso, M V; Hermosilla, D; Navarrete, C; Álvarez, P; Lillo, J G; Huidobro-Toro, J P

    2012-02-17

    The rat vas deferens has scattered sensory afferens plus a dense network of sympathetic motor efferens; these fibers are not known to interact functionally. We ascertained whether sensory fibers modulate the release of sympathetic transmitters through the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and reciprocally assessed whether sympathetic transmitters modulate the overflow of ir-CGRP from sensory fibers. The tissue overflow of electrically evoked sympathetic co-transmitters (ATP/metabolites, noradrenaline (NA), and immunoreactive neuropeptide tyrosine (ir-NPY)) and the motor responses elicited were quantified following either exogenous CGRP or capsaicin application to elicit peptide release. Conversely, the outflow of ir-CGRP was examined in the presence of sympathetic transmitters. Exogenous CGRP reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the electrically evoked outflow of ATP/metabolites, NA, and ir-NPY with EC(50) values of 1.3, 0.18, and 1.9 nM, respectively. CGRP also reduced the basal NA overflow. The CGRP-evoked modulation was blocked by CGRP8-37 or H-89. Release of endogenous CGRP by capsaicin significantly reduced the basal overflow of NA, ir-NPY, and the electrically evoked sympathetic transmitter release. ADP, 2-methylthioadenosine-5'-O-diphosphate (2-MeSADP), or UTP decreased the electrically evoked ir-CGRP overflow, whereas clonidine, α,β-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (α,β-mATP), or adenosine (ADO) were inactive. CGRP acting postjunctionally also reduced the motor responses elicited by exogenous NA, ATP, or electrically evoked contractions. We conclude that CGRP exerts a presynaptic modulator role on sympathetic nerve endings and reciprocally ATP or related nucleotides influence the release of ir-CGRP from sensory fibers, highlighting a dynamic sympatho-sensory control between sensory fibers and sympathetic nerve ending. Postjunctional CGRP receptors further contribute to reduce the tissue sympathetic motor tone implying a pre and

  5. Nitric oxide-dependent and -independent hyperaemia due to calcitonin gene-related peptide in the rat stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, P.; Lippe, I. T.; Jocic, M.; Wachter, C.; Erb, R.; Heinemann, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) potently enhances mucosal blood flow in the rat stomach. The aim of this study was to examine whether CGRP also dilates extramural arteries supplying the stomach and whether the vasodilator action of CGRP involves nitric oxide (NO). 2. Rat CGRP-alpha (0.03-1 nmol kg-1, i.v.) produced a dose-dependent increase in blood flow through the left gastric artery (LGA) as determined by an ultrasonic transit time technique in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Blockade of NO synthesis by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 20 and 60 mumol kg-1, i.v.) significantly reduced basal blood flow (BF) in the LGA and attenuated the hyperaemic activity of CGRP by a factor of 2.8-4. D-NAME tended to enhance basal BF in the LGA but had no influence on the dilator activity of CGRP. The ability of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide to increase left gastric arterial blood flow remained unaltered by L-NAME. 3. L-NAME (20 and 60 mumol kg-1, i.v.) evoked a prompt and sustained rise of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and caused a slight decrease in the hypotensive activity of CGRP. In contrast, D-NAME induced a delayed and moderate increase in MAP and did not influence the hypotensive activity of CGRP. 4. Rat CGRP-alpha dilated the isolated perfused bed of the rat LGA precontracted with methoxamine and was 3 times more potent in this respect than rat CGRP-beta. The dilator action of rat CGRP-alpha in this preparation was not affected by L-NAME or D-NAME (40 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220901

  6. Immunohistochemical localization of the calcitonin gene-related peptide binding site in the primate trigeminovascular system using functional antagonist antibodies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Silke; Liu, Hantao; Warfvinge, Karin; Shi, Licheng; Dovlatyan, Mary; Xu, Cen; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-07-22

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator and a neuromodulator implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. It binds to the extracellular domains of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 that together form the CGRP receptor. Antagonist antibodies against CGRP and its binding site at the receptor are clinically effective in preventing migraine attacks. The blood-brain barrier penetration of these antagonist antibodies is limited, suggesting that a potential peripheral site of action is sufficient to prevent migraine attacks. To further understand the sites of CGRP-mediated signaling in migraine, we used immunohistochemical staining with recently developed antagonist antibodies specifically recognizing a fusion protein of the extracellular domains of RAMP1 and CLR that comprise the CGRP binding pocket at the CGRP receptor in monkey and man. We confirmed binding of the antagonist antibodies to human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of dural meningeal arteries and neurons in the trigeminal ganglion, both of which are likely sites of action for therapeutic antibodies in migraine patients. We further used one of these antibodies for detailed mapping on cynomolgus monkey tissue and found antagonist antibody binding sites at multiple levels in the trigeminovascular system: in the dura mater VSMCs, in neurons and satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, and in neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis. These data reinforce and clarify our understanding of CGRP receptor localization in a pattern consistent with a role for CGRP receptors in trigeminal sensitization and migraine pathology. PMID:27155150

  7. Gestational environment programs adult depression-like behavior through methylation of the calcitonin gene-related peptide gene

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jianwei; Opal, Mark D.; Dulawa, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Early life exposure to specific environmental factors can increase risk for developing psychopathology including major depression in adulthood. However, the molecular pathways and epigenetic mechanisms that mediate the effects of early environments on adult mood remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of different gestational and rearing conditions on adult anxiety- and depression-like behavior using a combined reciprocal out-crossing and cross-fostering design in Balb/cJ (cJ) and C57BL/6J (B6) mouse strains. First filial (F1) hybrid offspring, which were gestated by B6 or cJ dams and then reared by either strain, were evaluated for behavior and whole-genome hippocampal gene expression during adulthood. Adult hybrid mice gestated by B6 dams showed increased depression-like behavior in the forced swim and sucrose preference tests, increased hippocampal expression of alpha calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) transcripts, and decreased methylation of the αCGRP promoter compared to those gestated by cJ dams. Differential expression of αCGRP in adulthood did not result from genomic imprinting, and differences between B6 and cJ mitochondrial DNA were not responsible for behavioral phenotypes observed. Lastly, central administration of αCGRP to adult hybrid mice increased depression-like behavior, while the CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRP8–37 reduced depression-like behavior in the FST. Our findings suggest that gestational factors influence adult depression-like behavior through methylation of the αCGRP gene. PMID:23044705

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in the spinal cord of man and of eight other species.

    PubMed

    Gibson, S J; Polak, J M; Bloom, S R; Sabate, I M; Mulderry, P M; Ghatei, M A; McGregor, G P; Morrison, J F; Kelly, J S; Evans, R M

    1984-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity was found throughout the entire spinal cord of man, marmoset, horse, pig, cat, guinea pig, mouse, rat, and frog. CGRP-immunoreactive fibers were most concentrated in the dorsal horn. In the ventral horn of some species large immunoreactive cells, tentatively characterized as motoneurons, were present. Pretreatment of rats with colchicine enhanced staining of these large cells but did not reveal CGRP-immunoreactive cell bodies in the dorsal horn. In the dorsal root ganglia, CGRP immunoreactivity was observed in most of the small and some of the intermediate sized cells. Substance P immunoreactivity, where present, was co-localized with CGRP to a proportion of the small cells. In the cat the ratio of substance P-immunoreactive to CGRP-immunoreactive ganglion cells was 1:2.7 (p less than 0.001). The concentration of CGRP-immunoreactive material in tissue extracts was determined by radioimmunoassay. In the dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord the levels of peptide were found to range from 225.7 +/- 30.0 pmol/gm of wet weight in the cervical region to 340.6 +/- 74.6 pmol/gm in the sacral spinal cord. In the rat ventral spinal cord, levels of 15.7 +/- 2.7 to 35.1 +/- 10.6 pmol/gm were found. The concentration in dorsal root ganglia of the lumbar region was 225.4 +/- 46.9 pmol/gm. Gel permeation chromatography of this extractable CGRP-like immunoreactivity revealed three distinct immunoreactive peaks, one eluting at the position of synthetic CGRP and the others, of smaller size, eluting later. In cats and rats, rhizotomy induced a marked loss of CGRP-immunoreactive fibers from the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. In the cat, unilateral lumbosacral dorsal rhizotomy resulted in a significant (p less than 0.05) reduction of extractable CGRP from the ipsilateral lumbar dorsal horn (5.6 +/- 1.2 pmol/gm of wet weight) compared to the contralateral side (105.0 +/- 36.0 pmol/gm of wet weight). We conclude that the major origin

  9. Role of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, calcitonin gene-related peptide and cyclooxygenase-2 in experimental rat models of migraine.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaomeng; Hu, Yaozhi; Jing, Long; Chen, Jinbo

    2015-08-01

    Although migraine is a common neurological condition, the pathomechanism is not yet fully understood. Activation of the trigeminovascular system (TVS) has an important function in this disorder and neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization are important mechanisms underlying this condition. Nitroglycerin (NTG) infusion in rats closely mimics a universally accepted human model of migraine. Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (ESTG) of rats can also activate TVS during a migraine attack. Numerous studies have revealed that phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are involved in pain and nociceptive pathways. However, few studies have examined whether p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2 are involved in neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization. In the present study, the expression of p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2 was detected in the dura mater, trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis in NTG-induced rats and ESTG models by immunohistochemistry. The three areas considered were crucial components of the TVS. The selective COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide was used in ESTG rats to examine the association between p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2. The results demonstrated that p‑ERK, CGRP and COX-2 mediated neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization in migraine. In addition, the expression of p-ERK and CGRP was attenuated by the COX-2 inhibitor.

  10. Action of calcitonin gene-related peptide upon bovine vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells grown in isolation and co-culture.

    PubMed Central

    Crossman, D. C.; Dashwood, M. R.; Brain, S. D.; McEwan, J.; Pearson, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    1. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAE) and smooth muscle cells (BASM) were grown separately and in co-culture. 2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) caused dose-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase in each cell type when grown in isolation. The concentration of CGRP causing half-maximal activation in BAE and BASM was 200 nM and 310 nM, respectively. 3. In cells grown in co-culture exposure to bradykinin produced dose-dependent elevations in cyclic GMP content which were maximal 1 min after application of the agonist. 4. CGRP (1 nM-1 microM) did not stimulate a rise in cyclic GMP in co-cultures. 5. Displaceable CGRP binding was identified throughout the wall of the bovine aorta. 6. We conclude that CGRP receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase are present on BAE and BASM, but there is no coupling of these receptors to the release of any agent (such as endothelium-derived relaxing factor) that activates guanylate cyclase. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2184911

  11. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  12. The effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide on tracheal smooth muscle of guinea-pigs in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, H.; Uchida, Y.; Endo, T.; Ohtsuka, M.; Nomura, A.; Saotome, M.; Hasegawa, S.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on airway smooth muscle is controversial. The aim of this study was to determine whether the action of CGRP on tracheal strips of guinea-pigs is modulated by epithelium and whether this peptide-induced action involves other mediators including nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET)-1. 2. CGRP produced a weak dose-dependent increase in guinea-pig tracheal tension in vitro (-logEC50 = 8.5 +/- 0.1, maximum contraction = 8.3 +/- 1.2% of 50 mM KCl-induced contraction, n = 6). In epithelium-depleted preparations, CGRP (10(-7) M)-induced contraction was significantly potentiated from 9.0 +/- 1.9% to 41.1 +/- 6.0% (n = 6). 3. L-NG-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10(-4) M), which inhibits NO synthesis, enhanced the contractile response to CGRP from 9.0 +/- 1.9% to 31.2 +/- 1.1% (n = 6). Indomethacin (10(-5) M) also enhanced the response to CGRP, although the effect was weak (13.4 +/- 3.2%, n = 6). 4. Anti-ET-1 serum changed the CGRP-induced contraction into a relaxation. After incubation of the trachea with ET-1 (10(-7) M) to attenuate ET-1-induced responses, the CGRP-induced contraction also changed into a relaxation. BQ-123 (an ETA receptor antagonist) and BQ-788 (an ETB receptor antagonist) caused the same conversion of the CGRP response, from contraction to relaxation, although the relaxing effect elicited by BQ-788 was more potent than that by BQ-123. Maximum inhibitory responses were -31.0 +/- 3.3% and -13.0 +/- 2.3% of 50 mM KCl-induced contraction, respectively (n = 6). 5. In primary culture, guinea-pig tracheal epithelial cells released ET-1, and CGRP (10(-5) M) significantly increased the release of ET-1. 6. These data suggest that the action of CGRP is modulated by airway epithelium and this mechanism involves the release of NO and ET-1. Especially, the majority of contractile action elicited by CGRP consists of an action of ET-1 via the predominant ETB receptor. PMID:8968541

  13. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion—A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further. PMID:27376323

  14. Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide, adenosine A2a receptor and adenosine A1 receptor in experiment rat migraine models

    PubMed Central

    LU, WENXIAN; LI, BIN; CHEN, JINBO; SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; SU, XINYANG; GAO, LIXIANG

    2016-01-01

    A migraine is a disabling neurovascular disorder characterized by a unilateral throbbing headache that lasts from 4 to 72 h. The headache is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, phonophobia and photophobia, and may be worsened by physical exercise. The trigeminovascular system (TVS) is speculated to have an important role in migraines, although the pathophysiology of this disorder remains to be elucidated. Trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) are important components of the TVS. Several clinical cases have provided evidence for the involvement of the brainstem in migraine initiation. Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (ESTG) in rats can activate TVS during a migraine attack. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is an important vasoactive compound produced following TVS activation. Numerous studies have revealed that adenosine and its receptors have an important role in pain transmission and regulation process. However, only a few studies have examined whether adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) and adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) are involved in migraine and nociceptive pathways. In the present study, CGRP, A2aR and A1R expression levels were detected in the TG and TNC of ESTG models through reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Tianshu capsule (TSC), a type of Chinese medicine, was also used in the ESTG rat models to examine its influence on the three proteins. Results demonstrated that CGRP, A2aR and A1R mediated pain transmission and the regulation process during migraine and the expression of the three proteins was regulated by TSC. PMID:26998280

  15. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion-A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further. PMID:27376323

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes the expression of osteoblastic genes and activates the WNT signal transduction pathway in bone marrow stromal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RI; YUAN, ZHI; LIU, JIERONG; LIU, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to induce osteoblastic differentiation and alkaline phosphatase activity in bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it has remained elusive whether this effect is mediated by CGRP receptors directly or whether other signaling pathways are involved. The present study assessed the possible involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the activation of CGRP signaling during the differentiation of BMSCs. First, the differentiation of BMSCs was induced in vitro and the expression of CGRP receptors was examined by western blot analysis. The effects of exogenous CGRP and LiCl, a stimulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, on the osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs were assessed; furthermore, the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was assessed using quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. The results revealed that CGRP receptors were expressed throughout the differentiation of BMSCs, at days 7 and 14. Incubation with CGRP and LiCl led to the upregulation of the expression of osteoblastic genes associated with the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, including the mRNA of c-myc, cyclin D1, Lef1, Tcf7 and β-catenin as well as β-catenin protein. However, the upregulation of these genes and β-catenin protein was inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonist or secreted frizzled-related protein, an antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results of the present study therefore suggested that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in CGRP- and LiCl-promoted osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:27082317

  17. Identification of the epitopes of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) for two anti-CGRP monoclonal antibodies by 2D NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, J. A.; Raleigh, D. P.; Bonnerjea, J. R.; Dobson, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    The interactions between calcitonin gene-related peptide and FAB fragments prepared from two different high-affinity anti-CGRP monoclonal antibodies (CB3 and CD1) have been studied at physiological pH using the ability of 1H NMR to detect selectively regions of dynamic flexibility. The 37-residue peptide retains considerable flexibility in regions of its sequence when bound to both antibodies; in each case, more than half of the residues can be seen to have linewidths little perturbed from those of the free peptide. However the regions where substantial broadening of resonances occur, attributed to substantially reduced motional freedom of the peptide resulting from interactions within the antibody combining site, differ greatly in the two cases. In the complex with CB3 the results indicate that the restricted residues lie exclusively within the C-terminal half of the peptide, and include residues 25 to 32 and the terminal two residues (36 and 37). By contrast, in the complex with CD1, the conformationally restricted residues appear to lie predominantly within the N-terminal half of the CGRP molecule, particularly residues 4-16, although several residues in the middle section of the sequence (22-31) have reduced conformational freedom. These findings, consistent with the results from immunological assays, add considerably to our knowledge of the epitopes. PMID:9300494

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-induced suppression of luteinizing hormone pulses in the rat: the role of endogenous opioid peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, JE; Li, XF; Kinsey-Jones, JS; Paterson, S; Brain, SD; Lightman, SL; O'Byrne, KT

    2005-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is involved in a variety of stress responses in the rat. Central administration of CGRP activates the hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenal axis resulting in increased corticosterone secretion. We have previously shown that central CGRP suppresses the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator, specifically LH pulses. Endogenous opioid peptides (EOPs) have been shown to play an important role in stress-induced suppression of the reproductive axis. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that EOPs mediate CGRP-induced suppression of pulsatile LH secretion. Ovariectomized rats were implanted with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and i.v. cannulae. Intravenous administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone (250 μg) completely blocked the suppression of LH pulses induced by 1.5 μg i.c.v. CGRP and significantly attenuated the suppression of pulsatile LH secretion induced by 5 μg i.c.v. CGRP. Furthermore, intravenous administration of naloxone was found to immediately restore normal LH pulse frequency in animals treated 90 min earlier with 1.5 μg i.c.v. CGRP. Co-administration (i.c.v.) of CGRP (1.5 μg) with the μ and κ opioid receptor-specific antagonists naloxone (10 μg) and norbinaltorphimine (5 μg), respectively, blocked the CGRP-induced suppression of LH pulses, whilst i.c.v. co-administration of CGRP (1.5 μg) with the δ opioid receptor-specific antagonist naltrindole (5 μg) did not. These data provide evidence that EOPs play a pivotal role in mediating the inhibitory effects of CGRP on pulsatile LH secretion in the rat. They also suggest that the μ and κ, but not the δ, opioid receptors may be responsible for mediating the effects of CGRP on LH pulses. PMID:15905218

  19. Effects of rizatriptan on the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and cholecystokinin in the periaqueductal gray of a rat migraine model.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Han, Ximei; Hao, Tingting; Huang, Qian; Yu, Tingmin

    2015-02-01

    Triptans are serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1B/D agonists that are highly effective in the treatment of migraine. We previously found that rizatriptan can reduce the expression of proenkephalin and P substance in the rat midbrain, suggesting that rizatriptan may exert its analgesic effects by influencing the endogenous pain modulatory system. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are mainly responsible for antagonizing the analgesic effects of opioid peptides in the endogenous pain modulatory system. In this study, we investigated the effects of rizatriptan on the expression of CGRP and CCK in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a key structure of the endogenous pain modulatory system, in a rat migraine model induced by nitroglycerin. We found that the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and CCK in the PAG of migraine rats were significantly increased compared to those in control rats, and these levels were significantly reduced upon treatment with rizatriptan in migraine rats (P<0.05). Our results suggest that the expression of CGRP and CCK in the endogenous pain modulatory system may be increased during migraine attacks, which further antagonizes the analgesic effects of endogenous opioid peptides and induces sustained migraine. Rizatriptan, however, significantly reduces the levels of CGRP and CCK to enhance the inhibition of pain signals via the endogenous pain modulatory system, resulting in effective treatment of migraine. PMID:25524408

  20. Calcitonin gene-related peptide erases the fear memory and facilitates long-term potentiation in the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Liu, Jue; Yang, Si; Chen, Tao; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37 amino acid neuropeptide, which plays a critical role in the central nervous system. CGRP binds to G protein-coupled receptors, including CGRP1, which couples positively to adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. CGRP and CGRP1 receptors are enriched in central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the main part of the amygdala, which regulates conditioned fear memories. Here, we reported the importance of CGRP and CGRP1 receptor for synaptic plasticity in the CeA and the extinction of fear memory in rats. Our electrophysiological and behavioral in vitro and in vivo results showed exogenous application of CGRP induced an immediate and lasting long-term potentiation in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, but not in the lateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, while bilateral intra-CeA infusion CGRP (0, 5, 13 and 21 μM/side) dose dependently enhanced fear memory extinction. The effects were blocked by CGRP1 receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 ), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors antagonist MK801 and PKA inhibitor H89. These results demonstrate that CGRP can lead to long-term potentiation of basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway through a PKA-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and enhance the extinction of fear memory in rats. Together, the results strongly support a pivotal role of CGRP in the synaptic plasticity of CeA and extinction of fear memory. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays an essential role in synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and fear memory. We found that CGRP-induced chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) in a dose-dependent way in the BLA-CeA (basolateral and central nucleus of amygdala, respectively) pathway and enhanced fear memory extinction in rats through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved NMDA receptors. These results support a pivotal role of CGRP in amygdala.

  1. Modulatory effect of the renin-angiotensin system on the plasma levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide in normal man.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, F; Vergnani, L; Margutti, A; Ambrosio, M R; Bondanelli, M; Trasforini, G; Rossi, R; Degli Uberti, E C

    1993-09-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has positive chronotropic and inotropic effects in animals and humans, and produces the most potent vasodilation known for an endogenous peptide. Yet, a physiological role for CGRP in the regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure has not been demonstrated. We studied the effects of 1) assumption of the upright position and 2) iv infusion of angiotensin-II (sequential doses of 8, 16, and 32 ng/kg.min, each dose for 20 min) in eight normal subjects (four men). Serial venous blood samples were taken to determine the plasma CGRP, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and aldosterone levels and PRA. Blood pressure and heart rate were continuously monitored at the finger with a Finapres 2300 instrument. After assumption of the upright posture, a quick rise in plasma CGRP levels was observed together with the expected increases in plasma norepinephrine and aldosterone and PRA. A transient increment was also observed for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. Angiotensin-II infusion caused dose-dependent increases in plasma CGRP and aldosterone concentrations, already significant at the lowest infusion rate and parallel with the blood pressure rise. Plasma catecholamines significantly increased only at higher infusion rates. Our data demonstrate that modifications of plasma CGRP concentrations are part of the normal response to postural and vasomotor changes. These findings suggest a physiological role for CGRP in regulation of the peripheral vascular tone and possibly blood pressure in man.

  2. Loss of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) reduces the efficacy of the Vestibulo-ocular Reflex (VOR).

    PubMed

    Luebke, Anne E; Holt, Joseph C; Jordan, Paivi M; Wong, Yi Shan; Caldwell, Jillian S; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-07-30

    The neuroactive peptide calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) is known to act at efferent synapses and their targets in hair cell organs, including the cochlea and lateral line. CGRP is also expressed in vestibular efferent neurons as well as a number of central vestibular neurons. Although CGRP-null (-/-) mice demonstrate a significant reduction in cochlear nerve sound-evoked activity compared with wild-type mice, it is unknown whether and how the loss of CGRP influence vestibular system function. Vestibular function was assessed by quantifying the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in alert mice. The loss of CGRP in (-/-) mice was associated with a reduction of the VOR gain of ≈50% without a concomitant change in phase. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that, although CGRP staining was absent in the vestibular end-organs of null (-/-) mice, cholinergic staining appeared normal, suggesting that the overall gross development of vestibular efferent innervation was unaltered. We further confirmed that the observed deficit in vestibular function of null (-/-) mice was not the result of nontargeted effects at the level of the extraocular motor neurons and/or their innervation of extraocular muscles. Analysis of the relationship between vestibular quick phase amplitude and peak velocity revealed that extraocular motor function was unchanged, and immunohistochemistry revealed no abnormalities in motor endplates. Together, our findings show that the neurotransmitter CGRP plays a key role in ensuring VOR efficacy.

  3. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a key factor in the homing of transplanted human MSCs to sites of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jinhua; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jianwei; Fan, Zhihai; Shen, Yixin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used to treat many diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment relies mostly on the precise navigation of cells to the injury site for rebuilding the damaged spinal cord. However, the key factors guiding MSCs to the epicenter of SCI remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neural peptide synthesized in spinal cord, can dramatically aid the homing of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in spinal cord-transected SCI rats. First, HUMSCs exhibited chemotactic responses in vitro to CGRP. By time-lapse video analysis, increased chemotactic index (CMI), forward migration index (FMI) and speed contributed to this observed migration. Then, through enzyme immunoassay, higher CGRP concentrations at the lesion site were observed after injury. The release of CGRP directed HUMSCs to the injury site, which was suppressed by CGRP 8-37, a CGRP antagonist. We also verified that the PI3K/Akt and p38MAPK signaling pathways played a critical role in the CGRP-induced chemotactic migration of HUMSCs. Collectively, our data reveal that CGRP is a key chemokine that helps HUMSCs migrate to the lesion site and thereby can be used as a model molecule to study MSCs homing after SCI. PMID:27296555

  4. Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-directed G Protein Signaling Specificity for the Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Family of Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Winfield, Ian; Harris, Matthew; Hodgson, Rose; Shah, Archna; Dowell, Simon J.; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Woodlock, David A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Poyner, David R.; Watkins, Harriet A.; Ladds, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is formed through the association of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Binding of one of the three peptide ligands, CGRP, adrenomedullin (AM), and intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 (AM2), is well known to result in a Gαs-mediated increase in cAMP. Here we used modified yeast strains that couple receptor activation to cell growth, via chimeric yeast/Gα subunits, and HEK-293 cells to characterize the effect of different RAMP and ligand combinations on this pathway. We not only demonstrate functional couplings to both Gαs and Gαq but also identify a Gαi component to CLR signaling in both yeast and HEK-293 cells, which is absent in HEK-293S cells. We show that the CGRP family of receptors displays both ligand- and RAMP-dependent signaling bias among the Gαs, Gαi, and Gαq/11 pathways. The results are discussed in the context of RAMP interactions probed through molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of the RAMP-GPCR-G protein complexes. This study further highlights the importance of RAMPs to CLR pharmacology and to bias in general, as well as identifying the importance of choosing an appropriate model system for the study of GPCR pharmacology. PMID:27566546

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a key factor in the homing of transplanted human MSCs to sites of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jinhua; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jianwei; Fan, Zhihai; Shen, Yixin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used to treat many diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment relies mostly on the precise navigation of cells to the injury site for rebuilding the damaged spinal cord. However, the key factors guiding MSCs to the epicenter of SCI remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neural peptide synthesized in spinal cord, can dramatically aid the homing of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in spinal cord-transected SCI rats. First, HUMSCs exhibited chemotactic responses in vitro to CGRP. By time-lapse video analysis, increased chemotactic index (CMI), forward migration index (FMI) and speed contributed to this observed migration. Then, through enzyme immunoassay, higher CGRP concentrations at the lesion site were observed after injury. The release of CGRP directed HUMSCs to the injury site, which was suppressed by CGRP 8–37, a CGRP antagonist. We also verified that the PI3K/Akt and p38MAPK signaling pathways played a critical role in the CGRP-induced chemotactic migration of HUMSCs. Collectively, our data reveal that CGRP is a key chemokine that helps HUMSCs migrate to the lesion site and thereby can be used as a model molecule to study MSCs homing after SCI. PMID:27296555

  6. Loss of α-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (αCGRP) Reduces the Efficacy of the Vestibulo-ocular Reflex (VOR)

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Joseph C.; Jordan, Paivi M.; Wong, Yi Shan; Caldwell, Jillian S.; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    The neuroactive peptide calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) is known to act at efferent synapses and their targets in hair cell organs, including the cochlea and lateral line. CGRP is also expressed in vestibular efferent neurons as well as a number of central vestibular neurons. Although CGRP-null (−/−) mice demonstrate a significant reduction in cochlear nerve sound-evoked activity compared with wild-type mice, it is unknown whether and how the loss of CGRP influence vestibular system function. Vestibular function was assessed by quantifying the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in alert mice. The loss of CGRP in (−/−) mice was associated with a reduction of the VOR gain of ≈50% without a concomitant change in phase. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that, although CGRP staining was absent in the vestibular end-organs of null (−/−) mice, cholinergic staining appeared normal, suggesting that the overall gross development of vestibular efferent innervation was unaltered. We further confirmed that the observed deficit in vestibular function of null (−/−) mice was not the result of nontargeted effects at the level of the extraocular motor neurons and/or their innervation of extraocular muscles. Analysis of the relationship between vestibular quick phase amplitude and peak velocity revealed that extraocular motor function was unchanged, and immunohistochemistry revealed no abnormalities in motor endplates. Together, our findings show that the neurotransmitter CGRP plays a key role in ensuring VOR efficacy. PMID:25080603

  7. Dynamics of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like cells changes in the lungs of two-kidney, one-clip rats

    PubMed Central

    Kasacka, I.; Arciszewska, E.

    2012-01-01

    Taking into consideration renal hypertension-induced homeostatic disorders and the key role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in many, systemic functions regulating systems, a question arises as to what an extent arterial hypertension affects the morphology and dynamics of pulmonary CGRP-immunopositive cell changes. The aim of the present study was to examine the distribution, morphology and dynamics of changes of CGRP-containing cells in the lungs of rats in the two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) renovascular hypertension model. The studies were carried out on the lungs of rats after 3, 14, 28, 42, and 91 days long period from the renal artery clipping procedure. In order to identify neuroendocrine cells, immunohistochemical reaction was performed with the use of a specific antibody against CGRP. It was revealed that renovascular hypertension caused changes in the neuroendocrine, CGRP-containing cells in the lungs of rats. The changes, observed in the neuroendocrine cells, depended on time periods from experimentally induced hypertension. The highest intensity of changes in the neuroendocrine cells was observed in the lungs of rats after 14 days from the surgery. PMID:22472888

  8. [Suppressing effect of the serotonin 5HT1B/D receptor agonist rizatriptan on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentration in migraine attacks].

    PubMed

    Stepień, Adam; Jagustyn, Piotr; Trafny, Elzbieta Anna; Widerkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is one of the neuropeptides most abundant in the nervous tissue. Recent studies indicate that local cranial release of CGRP from the trigeminal nerve perivascular endings within arachnoidea plays an important role in the pathophysiology of migraine attacks and cluster headaches. Elevated CGRP levels in cranial venous blood (in the jugular vein) during an acute spontaneous migraine attack have been reported in rather few studies so far. Sumatriptan--a selective serotonin 5HT1B/D receptor agonist, highly effective in terminating migraine attacks, decreases the elevated CGRP level back to normal. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of rizatriptan (a drug from a new generation of triptans) on CGRP release in migraine attacks. In 45 patients suffering from migraine attacks with and without aura, plasma CGRP levels were assessed during an attack twice: before treatment and two hours after rizatriptan administration. In the group under study the plasma CGRP level before treatment was significantly higher than that measured two hours after rizatriptan administration. The decrease in CGRP levels was associated with subsidence of the migraine attack. There was no difference between migraine patients with and without aura. These results suggest that triptans as serotonin 5HT1B/D receptor agonists decrease CGRP plasma concentration in migraine attacks. PMID:15174248

  9. Translational Pharmacodynamics of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Monoclonal Antibody LY2951742 in a Capsaicin-Induced Dermal Blood Flow Model.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, Steve; Benschop, Robert J; Van Hecken, Anne; Monteith, David; Wroblewski, Victor J; Grayzel, David; de Hoon, Jan; Collins, Emily C

    2015-09-01

    LY2951742, a monoclonal antibody targeting calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is being developed for migraine prevention and osteoarthritis pain. To support the clinical development of LY2951742, capsaicin-induced dermal blood flow (DBF) was used as a target engagement biomarker to assess CGRP activity in nonhuman primates and healthy volunteers. Inhibition of capsaicin-induced DBF in nonhuman primates, measured with laser Doppler imaging, was dose dependent and sustained for at least 29 days after a single intravenous injection of the CGRP antibody. This information was used to generate a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model, which correctly predicted inhibition of capsaicin-induced DBF in humans starting at a single subcutaneous 5-mg dose. As expected, the degree of inhibition in capsaicin-induced DBF increased with higher LY2951742 plasma concentrations. Utilization of this pharmacodynamic biomarker with pharmacokinetic data collected in phase I studies provided the dose-response relationship that assisted in dose selection for the phase II clinical development of LY2951742.

  10. Immunoelectron microscopic studies on protein gene product 9.5 and calcitonin gene-related peptide in vallate taste cells and related nerves in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Jen; Wu, Yu-Hung; Lu, Kuo-Shyan

    2003-12-01

    On the basis of our previous report that protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5)-immunoreactive nerve fibers and taste cells and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers are found in guinea pig vallate papillae [Huang and Lu (1996b) Arch. Histol. Cytol. 59:433-441]. We speculated that PGP 9.5 might be a marker for taste receptor cells and that CGRP might play an important role in taste transmission. We, therefore, performed an immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis of taste cells and related nerves in guinea pig vallate papillae. In the connective tissue of the vallate papilla, the ultrastructural data revealed that the PGP 9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibers were both myelinated and unmyelinated. The CGRP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were unmyelinated and surrounded by the cytoplasm of Schwann cells as were the non-immunoreactive fibers. In the vallate taste buds, only type III cells, which make synaptic contacts with intragemmal nerves, were PGP 9.5-immunoreactive, while the nerve terminals making synaptic contact with the underlying type III cells were CGRP-immunoreactive. From these observations, we conclude that: (1) PGP 9.5 might be a useful specific marker for type III cells in guinea pig vallate taste buds; and (2) CGRP-containing nerve fibers might be primarily involved in the neural transmission of taste stimuli. PMID:14601144

  11. Effects of substance P, neurokinin A and calcitonin gene-related peptide in human skin and their involvement in sensory nerve-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Wallengren, J; Håkanson, R

    1987-11-10

    The effects evoked by intradermal injections of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were studied in 51 non-atopic subjects. SP and NKA produced flare and weal, and CGRP produced an indurated erythema. The reactions to SP were strong, the flare being maximal 3-5 min after injection and the weal after 10-15 min. NKA evoked a much weaker flare and a slightly weaker weal than did SP. CGRP produced a prominent long-lasting, indurated erythema with pseudopodia surrounded by a pallor edge. The mode of action of the three peptides was studied by pretreatment of the skin with the histamine-releasing compound 48/80, the H1-antagonist mepyramine or the local anesthetic xylocaine. The results suggest that mast-cell histamine and an intact sensory nerve supply are essential for the flare response to both SP and NKA. The weal response to SP was somewhat reduced by pretreatment with either 48/80 or xylocaine. The weal response to NKA, however, did not seem to depend upon either mast cells or sensory nerve fibres. The erythema evoked by CGRP was not suppressed by pretreatment with xylocaine, compound 48/80 or mepyramine, suggesting a direct action of CGRP on the blood vessels. The interaction between SP and CGRP was studied in subjects receiving a low dose of CGRP and increasing doses of SP or a low dose of SP and increasing doses of CGRP. CGRP did not potentiate the SP-evoked flare and weal and SP did not seem to enhance the response to CGRP.

  12. Rapid nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-dependent release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) triggered by endotoxin in rat mesenteric arterial bed.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.; Wu, Z.; Tang, Y.; Fiscus, R. R.; Han, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. Our objective was to determine whether endotoxin (ETX) could directly trigger the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from perivascular sensory nerves in the isolated mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) of the rat and to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs) are involved. 2. ETX caused time- and concentration-dependent release of CGRP, and as much as a 17 fold increase in CGRP levels in the perfusate at 10-15 min after the administration of ETX (50 micrograms ml-1). 3. CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the perfusate was shown to co-elute with synthetic rat CGRP by reverse-phase h.p.l.c. 4. Pretreatment of MAB with capsaicin or ruthenium red inhibited ETX-induced CGRP release by 90% and 71%, respectively. ETX-evoked CGRP release was decreased by 84% during Ca2(+)-free perfusion. 5. The release of CGRP evoked by ETX was enhanced by L-arginine by 43% and inhibited by N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) and methylene blue by 37% and 38%, respectively. L-Arginine reversed the effect of L-NOARG. 6. Indomethacin and ibuprofen also inhibited the ETX-induced CGRP release by 34% and 44%, respectively. No additive inhibition could be found when L-NOARG and indomethacin were concomitantly incubated. 7. The data suggest that ETX triggers the release of CGRP from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves innervating blood vessels. The ETX-induced CGRP release is dependent on extracellular Ca2+ influx and involves a ruthenium red-sensitive mechanism. Both NO and PGs appear to be involved in the ETX-induced release of CGRP in the rat mesenteric arterial bed. PMID:8864557

  13. Somatostatin, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive intramural nerve structures of the human large intestine affected by carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Janusz; Kaleczyc, Jerzy

    2010-09-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the arrangement and chemical coding of enteric nerve structures in the human large intestine affected by cancer. Tissue samples comprising all layers of the intestinal wall were collected during surgery form both morphologically unchanged and pathologically altered segments of the intestine (n=15), and fixed by immersion in buffered paraformaldehyde solution. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5) and their chemical coding using antibodies against somatostatin (SOM), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The microscopic observations revealed distinct morphological differences in the enteric nerve system structure between the region adjacent to the cancer invaded area and the intact part of the intestine. In general, infiltration of the cancer tissue resulted in the gradual (depending on the grade of invasion) first decomposition and reduction to final partial or complete destruction and absence of the neuronal elements. A comparative analysis of immunohistochemically labeled sections (from the unchanged and pathologically altered areas) revealed a statistically significant decrease in the number of CGRP-positive neurons and nerve fibres in both submucous and myenteric plexuses in the transitional zone between morphologically unchanged and cancer-invaded areas. In this zone, a decrease was also observed in the density of SP-positive nerve fibres in all intramural plexuses. Conversely, the investigations demonstrated statistically insignificant differences in number of SP- and SOM-positive neurons and a similar density of SOM-positive nerve fibres in the plexuses of the intact and pathologically changed areas. The differentiation between the potential adaptive changes in ENS or destruction of its elements by cancer invasion should be a subject of

  14. Distribution and morphology of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunoreactive axons in the whole-mount atria of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Hatcher, Jeffrey T; Hoover, Donald B; Gu, He; Wurster, Robert D; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2014-04-01

    The murine model has been used to investigate the role of cardiac sensory axons in various disease states. However, the distribution and morphological structures of cardiac nociceptive axons in normal murine tissues have not yet been well characterized. In this study, whole-mount atria from FVB mice were processed with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) primary antibodies followed by secondary antibodies, and then examined using confocal microscopy. We found: 1) Large CGRP-IR axon bundles entered the atria with the major veins, and these large bundles bifurcated into small bundles and single axons that formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the epicardium. Varicose CGRP-IR axons had close contacts with muscle fibers, and some CGRP-IR axons formed varicosities around principle neurons (PNs) within intrinsic cardiac ganglia (ICGs). 2) SP-IR axons also were found in the same regions of the atria, attached to veins, and within cardiac ganglia. Similar to CGRP-IR axons, these SP-IR axons formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the atrial epicardium and myocardium. Within ICGs, SP-IR axons formed varicose endings around PNs. However, SP-IR nerve fibers were less abundant than CGRP-IR fibers in the atria. 3) None of the PNs were CGRP-IR or SP-IR. 4) CGRP-IR and SP-IR often colocalized in terminal varicosities around PNs. Collectively, our data document the distribution pattern and morphology of CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons and terminals in different regions of the atria. This knowledge provides useful information for CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons that can be referred to in future studies of pathological remodeling.

  15. Characterizing the PK/PD relationship for inhibition of capsaicin-induced dermal vasodilatation by MK-3207, an oral calcitonin gene related peptide receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chi-Chung; Vermeersch, Steve; Denney, William S; Kennedy, William P; Palcza, John; Gipson, Adrianna; Han, Tae H; Blanchard, Rebecca; De Lepeleire, Inge; Depré, Marleen; Murphy, M Gail; Van Dyck, Kristien; de Hoon, Jan N

    2015-01-01

    Aims Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists are effective acute migraine treatments. A capsaicin-induced dermal vasodilatation (CIDV) model has been developed to provide target-engagement information in healthy volunteers. In the model, CGRP release is provoked after dermal capsaicin application, by activating transient receptor potential vanilloid-type-1 (TRPV1) receptors at peripheral sensory nerves. Laser Doppler imaging is used to quantify CIDV and subsequent inhibition by CGRP receptor antagonists. We sought to evaluate a CGRP receptor antagonist, MK-3207, in the biomarker model and to assess the predictability of the CIDV response to migraine clinical efficacy. Methods An integrated population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed to describe the exposure−response relationship for CIDV inhibition by CGRP and TRPV1 receptor antagonists. MK-3207 dose−response predictions were made based on estimated potency from the PK/PD model and mean plasma concentrations observed at the doses investigated. Results The results suggested that a 20 mg dose of MK-3207 (EC50 of 1.59 nm) would be required to attain the peripheral CIDV response at a target level that was shown previously to correlate with 2 h clinical efficacy based on phase 3 telcagepant clinical data, and that a plateau of the dose−response would be reached around 40–100 mg. These predictions provided a quantitative rationale for dose selection in a phase 2 clinical trial of MK-3207 and helped with interpretation of the efficacy results from the trial. Conclusions The integrated CIDV PK/PD model provides a useful platform for characterization of PK/PD relationships and predictions of dose−response relationships to aid in future development of CGRP and TRPV1 receptor antagonists. PMID:25377933

  16. An ongoing role of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide as part of a protective network against hypertension, vascular hypertrophy, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Sarah-Jane; King, Ross; Kodji, Xenia; Outzen, Emilie; Pozsgai, Gabor; Fernandes, Elizabeth; Marshall, Nichola; de Winter, Patricia; Heads, Richard J; Dessapt-Baradez, Cecile; Gnudi, Luigi; Sams, Anette; Shah, Ajay M; Siow, Richard C; Brain, Susan D

    2014-05-01

    α-Calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) is a vasodilator, but there is limited knowledge of its long-term cardiovascular protective influence. We hypothesized that αCGRP protects against the onset and development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and have identified protective mechanisms at the vascular level. Wild-type and αCGRP knockout mice that have similar baseline blood pressure were investigated in the angiotensin II hypertension model for 14 and 28 days. αCGRP knockout mice exhibited enhanced hypertension and aortic hypertrophy. αCGRP gene expression was increased in dorsal root ganglia and at the conduit and resistance vessel level of wild-type mice at both time points. βCGRP gene expression was also observed and shown to be linked to plasma levels of CGRP. Mesenteric artery contractile and relaxant responses in vitro and endothelial NO synthase expression were similar in all groups. The aorta exhibited vascular hypertrophy, increased collagen formation, and oxidant stress markers in response to angiotensin II, with highest effects observed in αCGRP knockout mice. Gene and protein expression of endothelial NO synthase was lacking in the aortae after angiotensin II treatment, especially in αCGRP knockout mice. These results demonstrate the ongoing upregulation of αCGRP at the levels of both conduit and resistance vessels in vascular tissue in a model of hypertension and the direct association of this with protection against aortic vascular hypertrophy and fibrosis. This upregulation is maintained at a time when expression of aortic endothelial NO synthase and antioxidant defense genes have subsided, in keeping with the concept that the protective influence of αCGRP in hypertension may have been previously underestimated.

  17. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments. PMID:26713069

  18. Crocin improved locomotor function and mechanical behavior in the rat model of contused spinal cord injury through decreasing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP).

    PubMed

    Karami, Masoume; Bathaie, S Zahra; Tiraihi, Taqi; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Arabkheradmand, Jalil; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2013-12-15

    Various approaches have been offered to alleviate chronic pain resulting from spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Application of herbs and natural products, with potentially lower adverse effects, to cure diseases has been recommended in both traditional and modern medicines. Here, the effect of crocin on chronic pain induced by spinal cord contusion was investigated in an animal model. Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups (5 rats in each); three groups were contused at the L1 level. One group was treated with crocin (150mg/kg) two weeks after spinal cord injury; the second group, control, was treated with vehicle only; and the third group was treated with ketoprofen. Two normal groups were also considered with or without crocin treatment. The mechanical behavioral test, the locomotor recovery test and the thermal behavioral test were applied weekly to evaluate the injury and recovery of rats. Significant improvements (p<0.05) in mechanical behavioral and locomotor recovery tests were seen in the rats treated with crocin. Thermal behavioral test did not show any significant changes due to crocin treatment. Plasma concentration of calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) changed from 780.2±2.3 to 1140.3±4.5pg/ml due to SCI and reached 789.1±2.7pg/ml after crocin treatment. These changes were significant at the level of p<0.05. The present study shows the beneficial effects of crocin treatment on chronic pain induced by SCI, through decreasing CGRP as an important mediator of inflammation and pain.

  19. Exogenous asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion-induced gastric lesions: interaction with protective nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP).

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Marcin; Jasnos, Katarzyna; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Surmiak, Marcin; Krzysiek-Maczka, Gracjana; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2014-03-20

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibitor and pro-inflammatory factor. We investigated the role of ADMA in rat gastric mucosa compromised through 30 min of gastric ischemia (I) and 3 h of reperfusion (R). These I/R animals were pretreated with ADMA with or without the combination of L-arginine, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or a small dose of capsaicin, all of which are known to afford protection against gastric lesions, or with a farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist, GW 4064, to increase the metabolism of ADMA. In the second series, ADMA was administered to capsaicin-denervated rats. The area of gastric damage was measured with planimetry, gastric blood flow (GBF) was determined by H2-gas clearance, and plasma ADMA and CGRP levels were determined using ELISA and RIA. ADMA significantly increased I/R-induced gastric injury while significantly decreasing GBF, the luminal NO content, and the plasma level of CGRP. This effect of ADMA was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with CGRP, L-arginine, capsaicin, or a PGE2 analogue. In GW4064 pretreated animals, the I/R injury was significantly reduced and this effect was abolished by co-treatment with ADMA. I/R damage potentiated by ADMA was exacerbated in capsaicin-denervated animals with a further reduction of CGRP. Plasma levels of IL-10 were significantly decreased while malonylodialdehyde (MDA) and plasma TNF-α contents were significantly increased by ADMA. In conclusion, ADMA aggravates I/R-induced gastric lesions due to a decrease of GBF, which is mediated by a fall in NO and CGRP release, and the enhancement of lipid peroxidation and its pro-inflammatory properties.

  20. Nitric oxide and sensory nerves are involved in the vasodilator response to acetylcholine but not calcitonin gene-related peptide in rat skin microvasculature.

    PubMed Central

    Ralevic, V.; Khalil, Z.; Dusting, G. J.; Helme, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    1. The contributions of sensory nerves and nitric oxide (NO) to vasodilator responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were examined in rat skin microvasculature with a laser Doppler flowmeter to monitor relative blood flow. 2. Perfusion of ACh (100 microM; for 30 min) over a blister base on the rat hind footpad elicited microvascular vasodilatation and this response was not sustained. CGRP (1 microM; 10 min perfusion) also elicited vasodilatation and this response was maintained even when CGRP was no longer in contact with the blister base. 3. The vasodilator response to ACh was significantly smaller in rats pretreated as neonates with capsaicin to destroy primary sensory afferents than it was in age-matched controls. The vasodilator response to CGRP was unaffected by capsaicin pretreatment. 4. Selective inhibitors of NO synthase, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (both at 100 microM) attenuated the vasodilator response to ACh in control rats, but had no effect on the vasodilator response to CGRP. There was a significant L-NOARG-resistant component in control rats while in capsaicin-treated rats the vasodilator response to ACh was virtually abolished by L-NOARG. The inactive stereoisomer NG-monomethyl-D-arginine (100 microM) did not affect the vasodilator response to ACh. 5. The efficacy of L-NOARG and L-NMMA as inhibitors of endothelium-dependent responses was confirmed by use of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, the calcium ionophore A23187 (100 microM; 10 min perfusion). Vasodilatation to A23187 was strongly attenuated by both L-NOARG and L-NMMA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1504748

  1. Phenotypic alterations of neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing neurons innervating the rat temporomandibular joint during carrageenan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Damico, J.P.; Ervolino, E.; Torres, K.R.; Batagello, D.S.; Cruz-Rizzolo, R.J.; Casatti, C.A.; Bauer, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) neurons in the autonomic and sensory ganglia, specifically neurons that innervate the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A possible variation between the percentages of these neurons in acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis was examined. Retrograde neuronal tracing was combined with indirect immunofluorescence to identify NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR) and CGRP- immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) neurons that send nerve fibers to the normal and arthritic temporomandibular joint. In normal joints, NPY-IR neurons constitute 78±3%, 77±6% and 10±4% of double-labeled nucleated neuronal profile originated from the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia, respectively. These percentages in the sympathetic ganglia were significantly decreased in acute (58±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 58±8% for stellate ganglion) and chronic (60±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 59±15% for stellate ganglion) phases of arthritis, while in the otic ganglion these percentages were significantly increased to 19±5% and 13±3%, respectively. In the trigeminal ganglion, CGRP-IR neurons innervating the joint significantly increased from 31±3% in normal animals to 54±2% and 49±3% in the acute and chronic phases of arthritis, respectively. It can be concluded that NPY neurons that send nerve fibers to the rat temporomandibular joint are located mainly in the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia. Acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis lead to an increase in the percentage of NPY-IR parasympathetic and CGRP-IR sensory neurons and to a decrease in the percentage of NPY-IR sympathetic neurons related to TMJ innervation. PMID:23027347

  2. Influence of calcitonin gene-related peptide release on pH-induced mechanical depression in rat atria.

    PubMed

    Alvis, A G; Milesi, V; Rebolledo, A; Raingo, J; Grassi de Gende, A O

    2001-07-01

    Rat atria is richly innervated by sensory nerve fibers that release CGRP when stimulated either by capsaicin or acid pH. We studied the physiological relevance of acid pH-induced CGRP release on changes in atrial contractility and relaxation produced by lowering the pH. Isolated atria electrically paced at 2.77 Hz were exposed to a 10-minute period of metabolic acidosis (pH=6.73+/-0.01, n=28) after: 1) CGRP release induced by capsaicin 0.5 microM; 2) blockage of CGRP release with ruthenium red (RR) 5 microM; 3) no pretreatment; and 4) CGRP receptor blockage with CGRP(8-37) 1 microM. Contractility and relaxation were significantly less depressed by acid pH when CGRP release was prevented by RR or CGRP receptor activation was blocked by CGRP(8-37). The results suggest that CGRP release and the activation of CGRP receptors may be physiologically involved in contributing to the depression of contractility and relaxation induced by acid pH in rat atria. PMID:11693286

  3. Acid activation of Trpv1 leads to an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons via the CaMK-CREB cascade: a potential mechanism of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masako; Hata, Kenji; Nagayama, Tomotaka; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Hiraga, Toru; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2010-08-01

    Increased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensory neurons is implicated in inflammatory pain. The inflammatory site is acidic due to proton release from infiltrating inflammatory cells. Acid activation of peripheral nociceptors relays pain signals to the CNS. Here, we examined whether acid activated the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (Trpv1), a widely recognized acid-sensing nociceptor and subsequently increased CGRP expression. Chemically induced inflammation was associated with thermal hyperalgesia and increased CGRP expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats. In organ cultures of DRG, acid (pH 5.5) elevated CGRP expression and the selective Trpv1 antagonist 5'-Iodoresiniferatoxin decreased it. Trpv1-deficient DRG showed reduced CGRP increase by acid. Of note, many of CGRP/Trpv1-positive DRG neurons exhibited the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a nociceptive transcription factor. Knockdown of CREB by small interfering RNA or a dominant-negative form of CREB diminished acid-elevated CGRP expression. Acid elevated the transcriptional activity of CREB, which in turn stimulated CGRP gene promoter activity. These effects were inhibited by a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) inhibitor KN-93. In conclusion, our results suggest that inflammatory acidic environments activate Trpv1, leading to an up-regulation of CGRP expression via CaMK-CREB cascade, a series of events that may be associated with inflammatory pain.

  4. Activation of TRPV1 mediates calcitonin gene-related peptide release, which excites trigeminal sensory neurons and is attenuated by a retargeted botulinum toxin with anti-nociceptive potential.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Ovsepian, Saak V; Wang, Jiafu; Pickering, Mark; Sasse, Astrid; Aoki, K Roger; Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2009-04-15

    Excessive release of inflammatory/pain mediators from peripheral sensory afferents renders nerve endings hyper-responsive, causing central sensitization and chronic pain. Herein, the basal release of proinflammatory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was shown to increase the excitability of trigeminal sensory neurons in brainstem slices via CGRP1 receptors because the effect was negated by an antagonist, CGRP8-37. This excitatory action could be prevented by cleaving synaptosomal-associated protein of M(r) 25,000 (SNAP-25) with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A, a potent inhibitor of exocytosis. Strikingly, BoNT/A proved unable to abolish the CGRP1 receptor-mediated effect of capsaicin, a nociceptive TRPV1 stimulant, or its elevation of CGRP release from trigeminal ganglionic neurons (TGNs) in culture. Although the latter was also not susceptible to BoNT/E, apparently attributable to a paucity of its acceptors (glycosylated synaptic vesicle protein 2 A/B), this was overcome by using a recombinant chimera (EA) of BoNT/A and BoNT/E. It bound effectively to the C isoform of SV2 abundantly expressed in TGNs and cleaved SNAP-25, indicating that its /A binding domain (H(C)) mediated uptake of the active /E protease. The efficacy of /EA is attributable to removal of 26 C-terminal residues from SNAP-25, precluding formation of SDS-resistant SNARE complexes. In contrast, exocytosis could be evoked after deleting nine of the SNAP-25 residues with /A but only on prolonged elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) with capsaicin. This successful targeting of /EA to nociceptive neurons and inhibition of CGRP release in vitro and in situ highlight its potential as a new therapy for sensory dysmodulation and chronic pain.

  5. Comparison of the effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in a number of in vivo and in vitro tests

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.P.; Brase, D.; Cooper, C.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    sCT and CGRP have been shown previously to have multiple activities in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work has shown that CGRP (15 ..mu..g) intraventricularly (IVT) produces a naloxone reversible 37% inhibition in the p-phenylquinone test (PPQ) accompanied by severe diarrhea. The ED50 of sCT in the PPQ test is 362 ng and this effect is not reversed totally by naloxone. The onset of CGRP is more rapid than that of sCT. sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/M) both produce naloxone reversible inhibition of the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (GPI) (25% and 50% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/ M) produce contracture (15% and 40% respectively) of the non-stimulated GPI that is not blocked by atropine. Both sCT and CGRP block the naloxone-induced contracture of the morphine (MS04) dependent ilea (29% and 68% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP produce biphasic shifts in the MS04 acetylcholine dose-effect curves in the stimulated and nonstimulated GPI, respectively. Neither sCT nor CGRP (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -4/ M) displaces /sup 3/H-naloxone binding to mouse brain membranes. Both sCT and CGRP may produce their effects by modulation of CA/sup +2/ fluxes in the CNS and GPI.

  6. Emotional stress and orthodontic tooth movement: effects on apical root resorption, tooth movement, and dental tissue expression of interleukin-1 alpha and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive nerve fibres in rats.

    PubMed

    Vandevska-Radunovic, Vaska; Murison, Robert

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of emotional stress on apical root resorption (ARR) and tooth displacement during orthodontic tooth movement in rats. A further area of interest was to evaluate if the expression of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha) as well as the density and distribution of peptidergic nerve fibres immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the periodontal ligament (PDL) are associated with possible stress-induced changes in root resorption and tooth movement. A total of 52 male Wistar rats, aged 6 weeks, were divided in three experimental and one control group (n = 4). Group 1 had orthodontic tooth movement and received foot shocks (OTMS; n = 16), group 2 had orthodontic tooth movement but received no foot shocks (OTMNS; n = 16), and group 3 had no orthodontic tooth movement and received foot shocks (NOTMS; n = 16). Each group was further divided into four subgroups (n = 4), corresponding to the period of the experiment, i.e. 3, 7, 13, and 21 days. At the end of each experimental period, the blood samples were taken, the animals were sacrificed, and the jaws excised, deminerialized, and processed for immunocytochemistry. One-way analysis of variance was used to detect inter-group differences for all investigated variables. CGRP immunopositive nerve fibres were evaluated qualitatively. All the experimental groups demonstrated higher corticosterone levels than the control group, suggesting a stress-induced experience by orthodontic treatment per se. The OTMS group had the least amount of cellular cementum throughout the experimental periods and showed significant reduction in tooth displacement, especially at 3 and 7 days. No obvious changes were observed in the dental tissue expression of IL-1alpha and CGRP immunoreactive nerve fibres between the stressed and non-stressed orthodontically treated groups.

  7. Substance P-, calcitonin gene-related peptide, growth-associated protein-43, and neurotrophin receptor-like immunoreactivity associated with unmyelinated axons in feline ventral roots and pia mater.

    PubMed

    Risling, M; Dalsgaard, C J; Frisén, J; Sjögren, A M; Fried, K

    1994-01-15

    The spinal pia mater receives a rich innervation of small sensory axons via the ventral roots. Other sensory axons enter the ventral roots but end blindly or turn abruptly in hairpin loop-like formations and continue in a distal direction. In the present study, the content of substance P (SP)-, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-, growth-associated protein (GAP-43)-, and low-affinity neurotrophin receptor protein (p75NGFr)-like immunoreactivity (-LI) associated with these different types of sensory axons was assessed with light and electron microscopic immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, the binding of antibodies against synthetic peptides representing unique sequences of residues in the products of the trk and trkB protooncogenes was analyzed. These genes encode membrane spanning proteins, which have been shown to constitute specific high affinity binding sites for several members of the nerve growth factor family of neurotrophic factors. The results of the present study imply that the ventral root afferents comprise several different types of sensory axons, which all contain SP-, CGRP-, GAP-43-, and p75NGFr-like immunoreactivities. In addition, at least some of the presumed sensory fiber bundles in ventral roots and the pia mater were immunoreactive for the trkB gene product. Moreover, leptomeningeal cells and nonneuronal cells of the ventral roots were shown to bind antibodies to both the trk and trkB gene products. The ventral root afferents seem to share their immunohistochemical pattern with pain-transducing axons at some other locations, such as the tooth pulp. The contents of SP- and CGRP-LI in sensory axons that reach the central nervous system (CNS) through the ventral root indicate that ventral root afferents may be involved in sensory mechanisms, such as the ventral root pain reaction, as well as in the control of the pial blood vessels. The demonstration of GAP-43 and neurotrophin receptor-immunoreactivities associated with unmyelinated

  8. Autoradiographic distribution of 125I calcitonin gene-related peptide binding sites in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Skofitsch, G; Jacobowitz, D M

    1985-01-01

    Using autoradiographic method and 125I-Tyro rat CGRP as a ligand, receptor binding sites were demonstrated in the rat central nervous system. Saturation studies and Scatchard analysis of CGRP-binding to slide mounted tissue sections containing primarily cerebellum showed a single class of receptors with a dissociation constant of 0.96 nM and a Bmax of 76.4 fmol/mg protein. 125I-Tyro rat CGRP binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the telencephalon (medial prefrontal, insular and outer layers of the temporal cortex, nucleus accumbens, fundus striatum, central and inferior lateral amygdaloid nuclei, most caudal caudate putamen, organum vasculosum laminae terminalis, subfornical organ), the diencephalon (anterior hypothalamic, suprachiasmatic, arcuate, paraventricular, dorsomedial, periventricular, reuniens, rhomboid, lateral thalamic pretectalis and habenula nuclei, zona incerta), in the mesencephalon (superficial layers of the superior colliculus, central nucleus of the geniculate body, inferior colliculus, nucleus of the fifth nerve, locus coeruleus, nucleus of the mesencephalic tract, the dorsal tegmental nucleus, superior olive), in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, in the medulla oblongata (inferior olive, nucleus tractus solitarii, nucleus commissuralis, nuclei of the tenth and twelfth nerves, the prepositus hypoglossal and the gracilis nuclei, dorsomedial part of the spinal trigeminal tract), in the dorsal gray matter of the spinal cord (laminae I-VI) and the confines of the central canal. Moderate receptor densities were found in the septal area, the "head" of the anterior caudate nucleus, medial amygdaloid and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the pyramidal layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyri, medial preoptic area, ventromedial nucleus, lateral hypothalamic and ventrolateral thalamic area, central gray, reticular part of the substantia nigra, parvocellular reticular nucleus. Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum, nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract and gracile fasciculus of the spinal cord. The discrete distribution of CGRP-like binding sites in a variety of sensory systems of the brain and spinal cord as well as in thalamic and hypothalamic areas suggests a widespread involvement of CGRP in a variety of brain functions.

  9. Plasma levels of vasoactive regulatory peptides in patients receiving regular hemodialysis treatment.

    PubMed

    Hegbrant, J; Thysell, H; Ekman, R

    1992-01-01

    The fasting plasma levels of 10 vasoactive regulatory peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay in 23 stable patients with chronic renal failure receiving regular hemodialysis treatment (RDT) and compared with those of healthy controls. The plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin, atrial natriuretic peptide, beta-endorphin, methionine-enkephalin, motilin, neuropeptide Y, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were increased. The plasma level of calcitonin gene-related peptide was not statistically different from that of the controls. The plasma concentration of gamma 2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone was lowered in the RDT-patients. The arterial blood pressure correlated with the plasma levels of motilin and neuropeptide Y. We conclude that patients with chronic renal failure receiving RDT have increased concentrations of 8 out of 10 measured vasoactive regulatory peptides. The elevated levels of vasoactive peptides may contribute to the adaptation of the cardiovascular system to impaired renal function.

  10. Indole-3-carbinol protects against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity: role of calcitonin gene-related peptide and insulin-like growth factor-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Naga, Reem N.; Mahran, Yasmen F.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity associated with the clinical use of the anticancer drug cisplatin is a limiting problem. Thus, searching for new protective measures is required. Indole-3-carbinol is a powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. The present study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of indole-3-carbinol against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats were pre-treated with 20 mg/kg indole-3-carbinol orally before giving cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity was demonstrated where relative kidney weight, BUN and serum creatinine were significantly increased. Increased oxidative stress was evident in cisplatin group where GSH and SOD tissue levels were significantly depleted. Also, lipid peroxidation and NOX-1 were increased as compared to the control. Additionally, renal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced cell death was shown by increased caspase-3 and decreased expression of EGF, IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor. Nephrotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic effects induced by cisplatin were significantly ameliorated by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment. Besides, the role of CGRP in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was explored. Furthermore, cisplatin cytotoxic activity was significantly enhanced by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment in vitro. In conclusion, indole-3-carbinol provides protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Also, reduced expression of CGRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27417335

  11. CGRP stimulates gill carbonic anhydrase activity in molluscs via a common CT/CGRP receptor.

    PubMed

    Cudennec, Benoit; Rousseau, Marthe; Lopez, Evelyne; Fouchereau-Peron, Martine

    2006-11-01

    The physiological significance of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) during biomineralization was investigated by assessing the effect of human CGRP on the carbonic anhydrase activity in gill membranes of the pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera. Salmon CT and human CGRP were able to induce a 150% increase of the basal activity. No additive effect was observed suggesting that both activities are mediated by the same receptor. The CGRP-stimulated effect was specific as demonstrated by the inhibition produced by the CGRP antagonist, hCGRP8-37. So, CGRP by its specific action on gill carbonic anhydrase controls the calcification process, an ancient role both in invertebrates and non-mammalian vertebrates.

  12. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) via up-regulation of CGRP and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liucheng; Song, Tao; Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n=15), DM group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG.

  13. Calcitonin Peptide Family Members Are Differentially Regulated by LPS and Inhibit Functions of Rat Alveolar NR8383 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soultanova, Aichurek; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Pfeil, Uwe; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the calcitonin peptide family—calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (AM), and adrenomedullin2/intermedin (IMD)–exert modulatory effects upon monocytes and macrophages of various extrapulmonary origins. Utilizing the rat alveolar macrophage (AMφ) cell line NR8383, we here set out to determine to which extent these three peptides and their receptors are differentially regulated in AMφ and what specific effects they have on AMφ key functions. LPS treatment differentially up-regulated expression of the peptides and receptors. Among the three peptides, IMD mRNA content was lowest both in primary rat AMφ and NR8383 cells, whereas IMD peptide dominated in basal and LPS-stimulated secretion from NR8383 cells. Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis and TNF-α production were inhibited by AM, IMD, and CGRP, whereas pro-IL-1β mRNA was slightly down-regulated exclusively by CGRP. Neither of these peptides affected IL-6 or IL-10 production. None increased intracellular calcium concentration, but AM significantly inhibited store-operated calcium entry. In conclusion, the rat AMφ cell line NR8383 is both a source and a target of the calcitonin peptide family members AM, IMD, and CGRP. Despite sharing proteins of the receptor complexes, AM, IMD, and CGRP each showed a characteristic pattern of effects and regulation, suggesting that these closely related peptides are not just redundant members of one common signaling pathway but act in concert by addressing parallel signaling cascades. Since peptide and receptor expression are up-regulated by LPS, these signaling pathways might act as inhibitory feedback mechanisms in pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27737007

  14. The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on tissue repair: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Santana, Eduardo Ferreira; Tacani, Pascale Mutti; Liebano, Richard Eloin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) consists of a generic application of low-frequency, pulsed electrical currents transmitted by electrodes through the skin surface. It is a therapeutic modality that is nonpharmacological, noninvasive, inexpensive, easy to use and widely applied in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To narratively review the scientific evidence of the effects of TENS on tissue repair with respect to wound healing, skin flap viability and tendinous repair. METHODS: The study was conducted using the MEDLINE, Lilacs and Scielo databases, without limit to the period of publication, and was completed in November 2011. Inclusion criteria were randomized or nonrandomized, controlled or noncontrolled clinical trials, and experimental trials involving rats subjected to TENS for tissue repair. RESULTS: Thirty articles on tissue repair were found and, among these, 14 reported on wound healing, 14 reported on skin flaps and two analyzed tedinous repair. DISCUSSION: It was suggested that TENS stimulates skin wound healing and tendon repair, as well as the viability of random skin flaps. Such effects may be due to the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, which would increase blood flow and, consequently, hasten the events leading to tissue repair. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the scientific evidence regarding the effects of TENS on tissue repair, the findings of the present literature review were inconclusive because data from the randomized controlled clinical trials were insufficient to confirm such effects. PMID:24294017

  15. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  16. Local cooling alters neural mechanisms producing changes in peripheral blood flow by spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Barron, Kirk W; Chandler, Margaret J; Linderoth, Bengt; Foreman, Robert D

    2003-03-28

    This study was performed to investigate the respective role of sensory afferent and sympathetic fibers in peripheral vasodilatation induced by spinal cord stimulation at different hindpaw skin temperatures. Cooling the skin was used as a strategy to enhance sympathetic activity [Am. J. Physiol.: Heart Circ. Physiol. 263 (1992) H1197]. Cutaneous blood flow in the footpad of anesthetized rats was recorded using laser Doppler flowmetry. Local cooling (<25 degrees C) or moderate local cooling (25-28 degrees C) of the hindpaw was produced with a cooling copper coil. Spinal cord stimulation delivered at clinically relevant parameters and with 30%, 60%, and 90% of motor threshold induced the early phase of vasodilatation in the cooled and the moderately cooled hindpaw. In addition, spinal cord stimulation at 90% of motor threshold produced the late phase of vasodilatation only in the cooled hindpaw, which was possible to block by the autonomic ganglion-blocking agent, hexamethonium. The early responses to spinal cord stimulation in the moderately cooled hindpaw were not affected by hexamethonium. In contrast, both the early and the late phase responses were eliminated by CGRP (8-37), an antagonist of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor. After dorsal rhizotomy, spinal cord stimulation at 90% of motor threshold elicited hexamethonium-sensitive vasodilatation in the cooled hindpaw (late phase). These results suggest that spinal cord stimulation-induced vasodilatation in the cooled hindpaw (<25 degrees C) is mediated via both the sensory afferent (early phase of vasodilatation) and via suppression of the sympathetic efferent activity (late phase) although the threshold for vasodilatation via the sympathetic efferent fibers is higher than that via sensory nerves. In contrast, vasodilatation via sensory afferent fibers may predominate with moderate temperatures (25-28 degrees C). Thus, two complementary mechanisms for spinal cord stimulation-induced vasodilatation may

  17. Changes in plasma levels of vasoactive peptides during sequential bicarbonate hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hegbrant, J; Thysell, H; Mårtensson, L; Ekman, R; Boberg, U

    1993-01-01

    The hemodynamic response to isolated ultrafiltration (IUF) is characterized by a vasoconstriction, while there is no significant change in peripheral vascular resistance during isovolemic bicarbonate hemodialysis (IVHD). The present investigation was designed to study the plasma levels of vasoactive regulatory peptides together with noradrenaline (NA) and plasma renin activity (PRA) in 11 patients during sequential hemodialysis (SQHD) - IUF for 60 min, followed by IVHD for 210 min. During IUF, the vasoconstrictors arginine vasopressin (AVP), gamma 2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma 2-MSH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), NA and PRA increased. During IVHD, NPY and PRA remained unchanged on a higher level. A decrease in AVP below the baseline and in gamma 2-MSH and NA to the baseline levels occurred during IVHD. In the case of vasodilators, there were no changes in calcitonin gene-related peptide or motilin during SQHD. An increase in beta-endorphin (beta-END) occurred during IUF, followed by a decrease during IVHD. Substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide were unchanged during IUF but decreased during IVHD. We conclude that SQHD is characterized by an increase in all the measured vasoconstrictors during IUF in response to loss of fluid, and by a decrease in some vasoconstrictors (AVP, gamma 2-MSH, NA) during IVHD. With the exception of beta-END, there were no changes or only minor ones in vasodilators during SQHD. There are changes in plasma levels of vasoactive substances during SQHD but the importance of these changes for the hemodynamic adaptation to ultrafiltration and dialysis needs to be studied further.

  18. Gastrin-releasing peptide stimulates glycoconjugate release from feline trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, J.D.; Baraniuk, J.N.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Kaliner, M.A.; Shelhamer, J.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) on respiratory glycoconjugate (RGC) secretion was investigated in a feline tracheal organ culture model. RGC secretion was stimulated by GRP in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-5) M (range 15-38% increase above control) with a peak effect within 0.5-1 h of incubation. GRP-(14-27), the receptor binding portion of GRP, and the related molecule, bombesin, also stimulated RGC secretion by approximately 20% above control. Acetyl-GRP-(20-27) stimulated RGC release by 10%, whereas GRP-(1-16) was inactive. Autoradiographic studies with 125I-GRP revealed that specific binding was restricted to the submucosal glands and the surface epithelium. A specific radioimmunoassay showed the content of GRP in feline trachea after extraction with ethanol-acetic acid to be 156 +/- 91 fmol/g wet wt. Indirect immunohistochemistry indicated that ganglion cells located just outside the cartilage contained GRP-immunoreactive materials. GRP is a novel mucus secretagogue that may participate in regulating airway mucosal gland secretion.

  19. Inefficient constitutive inhibition of P2X3 receptors by brain natriuretic peptide system contributes to sensitization of trigeminal sensory neurons in a genetic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Marchenkova, Anna; Vilotti, Sandra; Ntamati, Niels; van den Maagdenberg, Arn MJM

    2016-01-01

    Background On trigeminal ganglion neurons, pain-sensing P2X3 receptors are constitutively inhibited by brain natriuretic peptide via its natriuretic peptide receptor-A. This inhibition is associated with increased P2X3 serine phosphorylation and receptor redistribution to non-lipid raft membrane compartments. The natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist anantin reverses these effects. We studied whether P2X3 inhibition is dysfunctional in a genetic familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 model produced by introduction of the human pathogenic R192Q missense mutation into the mouse CACNA1A gene (knock-in phenotype). This model faithfully replicates several properties of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1, with gain-of-function of CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels, raised levels of the algogenic peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, and enhanced activity of P2X3 receptors in trigeminal ganglia. Results In knock-in neurons, anantin did not affect P2X3 receptor activity, membrane distribution, or serine phosphorylation level, implying ineffective inhibition by the constitutive brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide receptor-A pathway. However, expression and functional properties of this pathway remained intact together with its ability to downregulate TRPV1 channels. Reversing the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 phenotype with the CaV2.1-specific antagonist, ω-agatoxin IVA restored P2X3 activity to wild-type level and enabled the potentiating effects of anantin again. After blocking calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors, P2X3 receptors exhibited wild-type properties and were again potentiated by anantin. Conclusions P2X3 receptors on mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons are subjected to contrasting modulation by inhibitory brain natriuretic peptide and facilitatory calcitonin gene-related peptide that both operate via complex intracellular signaling. In the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 migraine model, the action of calcitonin gene-related peptide appears to

  20. Neuroimmunological communication via CGRP promotes the development of a regulatory phenotype in TLR4-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Baliu-Piqué, Mariona; Jusek, Gabriela; Holzmann, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    Environmental signals shape the phenotype and function of activated macrophages. Here, we show that the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which is released from sensory nerves, modulates the phenotype of TLR4-activated murine macrophages by enhancing expression of the regulatory macrophage markers IL-10, sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), and LIGHT (lymphotoxin-like, exhibits inducible expression and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for herpesvirus entry mediator, a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes). In contrast, CGRP inhibits production of cytokines characteristic of inflammatory macrophages and does not affect expression of wound-healing macrophage markers upon TLR4 engagement. In IL-4-stimulated macrophages, CGRP increased LIGHT expression, but failed to induce IL-10 and SPHK1. The stimulatory effect of CGRP on IL-10 production required activation of protein kinase A and was linked to prolonged phosphorylation of CREB and sustained nuclear accumulation of CRTC2 and CRTC3 (where CRTC is CREB-regulated transcriptional cofactor). CGRP enhanced expression of regulatory macrophage markers during the early, but not late, phase of LPS-stimulation and this effect was independent of autocrine type-I IFN activity. In contrast, autocrine type-I IFN activity and treatment of macrophages with IFN-β promoted late-phase IL-10 production, but had only minor influence on LIGHT and SPHK1 expression. Together, the results identify neuroimmunological communication through CGRP as a novel costimulatory pathway promoting the development of a regulatory phenotype of TLR4-stimulated macrophages. CGRP appears to act through a mechanism that involves sustained activation of CREB-dependent gene transcription.

  1. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  2. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses. PMID:26129676

  3. Peptide portions may hold key to amplifying bone against porosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, P.

    1990-02-02

    Pieces of peptides that are encoded in the calcitonin gene may explain enigmas in treatment of bone disease. Amplification of bone formation by two peptides with similar amino acid sequences was reported at the Third International Conference on the Fundamentals of Bone Growth at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), schools of medicine and dentistry. One treatment enigma is that calcitonin regulates normal bone resorption but does not work as well when administered for the treatment of osteoporosis. While hormone therapy does work, it has wide-ranging effects like the potential for an increased risk of breast cancer. Bone-growth promotion by a better-known peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), was described. The CGRP is usually processed in the nervous system and has a wide range of activity.

  4. Helical synthetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Bielicki, John K.; Natarajan, Pradeep

    2010-04-06

    The present invention provides peptides comprising at least one amphipathic alpha helix and having an cholesterol mediating activity and a ABCA stabilization activity. The invention further provides methods of using such peptides.

  5. Starfish gonadotropic hormone: Relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptides.

    PubMed

    Mita, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) of starfish Patiria (= Asterina) pectinifera is the first identified invertebrate gonadotropin to trigger final gamete maturation. Recently, chemical structures of RGP were identified in several species of starfish. Three kinds of RGP molecules are found in the class Asteroidea. The chemical structure of P. pectinifera RGP (PpeRGP) is conserved among starfish of the order Valvatida beyond species. In contrast, the chemical structures of RGP identified in Asterias amurensis and Aphelasterias japonica of the order Forcipulatida are quite different from that of PpeRGP. The chemical structure of RGP in A. amurensis (AamRGP) is exactly the same as that in Asterias rubens (the order Forcipulatida), Astropecten scoparius (the order Paxillosida), Astropecten polyacanthus (the order Paxillosida), and Echinaster luzonicus (the order Spinulosida). The chemical structure of Coscinasterias acutispina RGP (the order Forcipulatida) is consistent with that of A. japonica RGP (AjaRGP). In cross-experiments using P. pectinifera, A. amurensis, and A. japonica ovaries, AamRGP and AjaRGP can induce each species of ovaries. Neither AamRGP nor AjaRGP induce oocyte maturation and ovulation in the ovary of P. pectinifera, although the PpeRGP is active in ovaries of A. amurensis and A. japonica. This suggests that the AamRGP and AjaRGP partly act species specificity.

  6. Promotion of insulin-like growth factor-I production by sensory neuron stimulation; molecular mechanism(s) and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Kenji; Harada, Naoaki

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays various important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, survival and functions of the cell, thereby contributing to the maintenance of tissue integrity. Although it is well known that growth hormone (GH) increases serum IGF-I levels by stimulating the hepatic production, little is known about the mechanism by which local production of IGF-I in individual tissues is regulated. Stimulation of sensory neurons by capsaicin increases tissue levels of IGF-I and IGF-I mRNA in various organs via increased calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release in mice. This sensory neuron-mediated IGF-I production contributes to reducing reperfusion-induced liver injury through prevention of apoptosis in mice. Isoflavone, a phytoestrogen, increases CGRP production by increasing its transcription in sensory neurons. Administration of capsaicin and isoflavone increases IGF-I production in hair follicles, thereby promoting hair growth in mice and in volunteers with alopecia. Topical application of capsaicin increases dermal levels of IGF-I by stimulating sensory neurons in mice and increases facial skin elasticity in humans. Plasma and tissue levels of CGRP and IGF-I in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are lower than those in normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), contributing to the development of hypertension, heart failure and insulin resistance in SHR. Administration of capsaicin increases CGRP and IGF-I levels in plasma, kidneys and the heart in SHR to WKY levels, and normalizes mean arterial blood pressure in SHR. Since administration of GH or IGF-I has some deleterious effects, pharmacological stimulation of sensory neurons leading to increased tissue IGF-I levels might be a novel therapeutic strategy for various pathologic conditions.

  7. Current research on calcium-regulating hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 selections. Some of the titles are: Expression of the human parathyroid gene; Calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide: Homoglogous structures, distinct receptors, and overlapping biological functions; characteristics of the interaction of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) with its receptors; Calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide: Credentials as neurotransmitters; and Central effects of calcitonon and calcitonin gene-related peptide.

  8. Oxaliplatin elicits mechanical and cold allodynia in rodents via TRPA1 receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Gees, Maarten; Harrison, Selena; De Siena, Gaetano; Materazzi, Serena; Moretto, Nadia; Failli, Paola; Preti, Delia; Marchetti, Nicola; Cavazzini, Alberto; Mancini, Francesca; Pedretti, Pamela; Nilius, Bernd; Patacchini, Riccardo; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2011-07-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause neurotoxicity. In particular, oxaliplatin produces early-developing, painful, and cold-exacerbated paresthesias. However, the mechanism underlying these bothersome and dose-limiting adverse effects is unknown. We hypothesized that the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a cation channel activated by oxidative stress and cold temperature, contributes to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity caused by oxaliplatin and cisplatin. Oxaliplatin and cisplatin evoked glutathione-sensitive relaxation, mediated by TRPA1 stimulation and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerve terminals in isolated guinea pig pulmonary arteries. No calcium response was observed in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons or in naïve Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to oxaliplatin or cisplatin. However, oxaliplatin, and with lower potency, cisplatin, evoked a glutathione-sensitive calcium response in CHO cells expressing mouse TRPA1. One single administration of oxaliplatin produced mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in rats, an effect selectively abated by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Oxaliplatin administration caused mechanical and cold allodynia in mice. Both responses were absent in TRPA1-deficient mice. Administration of cisplatin evoked mechanical allodynia, an effect that was reduced in TRPA1-deficient mice. TRPA1 is therefore required for oxaliplatin-evoked mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, and contributes to cisplatin-evoked mechanical allodynia. Channel activation is most likely caused by glutathione-sensitive molecules, including reactive oxygen species and their byproducts, which are generated after tissue exposure to platinum-based drugs from cells surrounding nociceptive nerve terminals.

  9. Sensory nerves contribute to cutaneous vasodilator response to cathodal stimulation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Gohin, Stéphanie; Decorps, Johanna; Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique; Fromy, Bérengère

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous current-induced vasodilation (CIV) in response to galvanic current application is an integrative model of neurovascular interaction that relies on capsaicin-sensitive fiber activation. The upstream and downstream mechanisms related to the activation of the capsaicin-sensitive fibers involved in CIV are not elucidated. In particular, the activation of cutaneous transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels and/or acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) (activators mechanisms) and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) (effector mechanisms) have been tested. To assess cathodal CIV, we measured cutaneous blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry for 20min following cathodal current application (240s, 100μA) on the skin of the thigh in anesthetized healthy rats for 20min. CIV was studied in rats treated with capsazepine and amiloride to inhibit TRPV1 and ASIC channels, respectively; CGRP8-37 and SR140333 to antagonize CGRP and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors, respectively; compared to their respective controls. Cathodal CIV was attenuated by capsazepine (12±2% vs 54±6%, P<0.001), amiloride (19±8% vs 61±6%, P<0.01), CGRP8-37 (15±6% vs 61±6%, P<0.001) and SR140333 (9±5% vs 54±6%, P<0.001) without changing local acidification. This is the first integrative study performed in healthy rats showing that cutaneous vasodilation in response to cathodal stimulation is initiated by activation of cutaneous TRPV1 and ASIC channels likely through local acidification. The involvement of CGRP and NK1 receptors suggests that cathodal CIV is the result of CGRP and SP released through activated capsaicin-sensitive fibers. Therefore cathodal CIV could be a valuable method to assess sensory neurovascular function in the skin, which would be particularly relevant to evaluate the presence of small nerve fiber disorders and the effectiveness of treatments.

  10. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lane, T F; Iruela-Arispe, M L; Johnson, R S; Sage, E H

    1994-05-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113-130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  11. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113- 130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  12. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  13. Amphipathic polyproline peptides stimulate cholesterol efflux by the ABCA1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Sviridov, D O; Drake, S K; Freeman, L A; Remaley, A T

    2016-03-18

    ApoA-I mimetics are short synthetic peptides that contain an amphipathic α-helix and stimulate cholesterol efflux by the ABCA1 transporter in a detergent-like extraction mechanism. We investigated the use of amphipathic peptides with a polypro helix for stimulating cholesterol efflux by ABCA1. Polypro peptides were synthesized with modified prolines, containing either a hydrophobic phenyl group (Prop) or a polar N-acetylgalactosamine (Prog) attached to the pyrrolidine ring and were designated as either PP-2, 3, 4, or 5, depending on the number of 3 amino acid repeat units (Prop-Prog-Prop). Based on molecular modeling, these peptides were predicted to be relatively rigid and to bind to a phospholipid bilayer. By CD spectroscopy, PP peptides formed a Type-II polypro helix in an aqueous solution. PP-2 was inactive in promoting cholesterol efflux, but peptides with more than 2 repeat units were active. PP-4 showed a similar Vmax as a much longer amphipathic α-helical peptide, containing 37 amino acids, but had a Km that was approximately 20-fold lower. PP peptides were specific in that they did not stimulate cholesterol efflux from cells not expressing ABCA1 and were also non-cytotoxic. Addition of PP-3, 4 and 5 to serum promoted the formation of smaller size HDL species (7 nM) and increased its capacity for ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux by approximately 20-35% (p < 0.05). Because of their relatively small size and increased potency, amphipathic peptides with a polypro helix may represent an alternative structural motif for the development of apoA-I mimetic peptides.

  14. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells. PMID:25890221

  15. Peptides having reduced toxicity that stimulate cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan; Danho, Waleed

    2016-08-16

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABCA1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. Further, the peptides of the invention have little or no toxicity when administered at therapeutic and higher doses. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  16. Peptide YY antagonizes beta-adrenergic-stimulated release of insulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley, G.H. Jr.; Lluis, F.; Gomex, G.; Ishizuka, J.; Holland, B.; Thompson, J.C. )

    1988-04-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are peptides of 36 amino acids that share structural homologies with pancreatic polypeptide (PP). PP is predominantly found in the endocrine pancreas. PYY is primarily found in mucosal endocrine cells of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum, whereas NPY is found in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Previous studies indicate that these peptides can interact with the autonomic nervous system. The objective of the present experiments was to study the effect of PYY on neurally stimulated insulin release in conscious dogs. Intravenous administration of PYY (100, 200, and 400 pmol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1} {center dot}h{sup {minus}1}) reduced 2-DG-stimulated insulin release in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.05) without affecting plasma glucose levels. Administration of NPY, but not PP, reduced 2-DG-stimulated release of insulin. The inhibitory action of PYY on 2-DG-stimulated insulin release persisted in the presence of atropine or phentolamine treatment; however, hexamethonium alone or phentolamine plus propranolol treatment blocked the inhibitory action of PYY. Release of insulin stimulated by the {beta}-agonist isoproterenol was also inhibited by PYY. These results indicate that PYY can inhibit autonomic neurotransmission by a mechanism that may involve ganglionic or postganglionic inhibition of {beta}-adrenergic stimulation. The findings suggest a role for PYY and NPY in the autonomic regulation of insulin release.

  17. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization.

  18. Transient expression of somatostatin messenger RNA and peptide in the hypoglossal nucleus of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Seroogy, K B; Bayliss, D A; Szymeczek, C L; Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D E

    1991-06-21

    The postnatal developmental expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in the rat hypoglossal nucleus was analyzed using immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. Both the neuropeptide and its cognate mRNA were found to be transiently present within a subpopulation of hypoglossal motoneurons during the neonatal period. At the day of birth, a large population of perikarya situated in caudal, ventral regions of the hypoglossal nucleus expressed somatostatin. By postnatal day 7, the number of hypoglossal somata which expressed somatostatin had diminished considerably, and by 2 weeks postnatal, only few such cell bodies were found. By 3-4 weeks postnatal, somatostatin peptide- and mRNA-containing hypoglossal motoneurons were rarely observed, and in the adult, they were never detected, despite the use of colchicine. A double-labeling co-localization technique was used to demonstrate that somatostatin, when present perinatally, always coexisted with calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypoglossal motoneurons. The latter peptide, in contrast to somatostatin, was expressed in large numbers of somata throughout the entire hypoglossal nucleus and persisted within the motoneurons throughout development into adulthood. These results demonstrate that somatostatin is transiently expressed in motoneurons of the caudal, ventral tier of the hypoglossal nucleus in the neonatal rat. The developmental disappearance of somatostatin is most likely not due to cell death; hypoglossal somata continue to express calcitonin gene-related peptide, with which somatostatin coexisted perinatally, a high levels throughout development. Thus, it appears that the regulation of somatostatin expression in hypoglossal neurons occurs at the level of gene transcription or mRNA stability/degradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1680035

  19. Expression of messenger RNAs for peptides and tyrosine hydroxylase in primary sensory neurons that innervate arterial baroreceptors and chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1991-08-01

    Retrograde fiber tracing and in situ hybridization were used to determine expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin A (ppTA), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), preproenkephalin A (ENK), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) as well as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the petrosal ganglia primary sensory neurons which innervate carotid sinus baroreceptors and carotid body chemoreceptors. Perfusion of the carotid sinus with the retrogradely transported dye (Fluoro-Gold) labeled primary sensory neurons in petrosal ganglion. Numerous somata in the petrosal ganglion labeled with dye contained mRNAs for all the above peptides, except SOM. Moreover, TH mRNA was found in a substantial number of retrogradely labeled cells in the petrosal ganglion. This study provides information concerning which of the numerous peptides identified in sensory neurons of petrosal ganglion may be involved in modulation of the arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. PMID:1681484

  20. Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone: An Emerging Anti-Inflammatory Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Madhuri; Mukhopadhyay, Kasturi

    2014-01-01

    The alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide belonging to the melanocortin family. It is well known for its anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects and shares several characteristics with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). There have been some recent reports about the direct antimicrobial activity of α-MSH against various microbes belonging to both fungal and bacterial pathogens. Similar to α-MSH's anti-inflammatory properties, its C-terminal residues also exhibit antimicrobial activity parallel to that of the entire peptide. This review is focused on the current findings regarding the direct antimicrobial potential and immunomodulatory mechanism of α-MSH and its C-terminal fragments, with particular emphasis on the prospects of α-MSH based peptides as a strong anti-infective agent. PMID:25140322

  1. Replacement of the Disulfide Bridge in a KLK3-Stimulating Peptide Using Orthogonally Protected Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Peptide “B-2”, which is one of the most potent kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3)-stimulating compounds, consists of 12 amino acids and is cyclized by a disulfide bridge between the N- and C-terminal cysteines. Orthogonally protected building blocks were used in the peptide synthesis to introduce a disulfide bridge mimetic consisting of four carbon atoms. The resulting pseudopeptides with alkane and E-alkene linkers doubled the proteolytic activity of KLK3 at a concentration of 14 μM. They were almost as potent as the parent “B-2” peptide, which gives a 3.6-fold increase in the proteolytic activity of KLK3 at the same concentration. PMID:24900791

  2. Zinc specifically stimulates the selective binding of a peptide analog of bindin to sulfated fucans.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, P L; Glabe, C G

    1990-01-01

    A synthetic nonapeptide (Leu-Arg-His-Leu-Arg-His-His-Ser-Asn) derived from the sequence of the sea urchin sperm adhesive protein, bindin, has been shown to bind sulfated fucans in high ionic strength (seawater) conditions. The binding is enhanced by approximately 100-fold in the presence of zinc ions, and no other transition metal tested demonstrates any enhancement. Bindin isolated from sperm contains zinc ion at roughly equimolar concentrations. In the presence of Zn++, the synthetic nonapeptide binds to eggs and inhibits fertilization with a half-maximal effective concentration of 300 microM. The polysaccharide binding selectivity of the peptide/Zn++ complex is similar to bindin but less stringent. Although the order of effectiveness of the inhibitory polysaccharides is the same for bindin and the synthetic peptide, polysaccharides that are only weak inhibitors of fucan binding to bindin show greater effectiveness against the peptide. The effect of chemical modification, pH, and amino acid substitution on the binding properties of the peptide suggest that arginine guanido moieties interact with the sulfated fucans, while histidine groups chelate zinc ions. Although the mechanism of zinc-specific stimulation of fucan binding is not yet clear, one potential explanation is that zinc may stabilize a peptide secondary structure that has a high affinity for fucans.

  3. Stimulation of cytolytic T cells by isolated viral peptides and HN protein coupled to agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Guertin, D P; Fan, D P

    1980-01-17

    Sendai virus-infected mouse cells can be lysed by mouse cytolytic thymus-dependent lymphocytes (CTL) directed specifically against the infected cells. The CTL is known to recognise the H-2 antigens on the target cells together with structure(s) including at least the two viral surface glycoproteins also found on purified virus. We report here that anti-Sendai CTL can be stimulated in vitro by detergent-solubilised viral haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), either as the isolated protein or coupled to agarose beads. We further show stimulation by the hydrophilic portion of a protein removed from the virus by the protease subtilisin BPN', and we demonstrate that cyanogen bromide- (CNBr-) cleaved viral peptides also produce such stimulation.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides trigger a division block in Escherichia coli through stimulation of a signalling system.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Carey, Jeffrey N; Leibman, Rachel S; Chen, Annie I; Stern, Andrew M; Roggiani, Manuela; Lippa, Andrew M; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the molecular arsenal employed by hosts against bacteria. Many bacteria in turn possess pathways that provide protection against these compounds. In Escherichia coli and related bacteria, the PhoQ/PhoP signalling system is a key regulator of this antimicrobial peptide defence. Here we show that treating E. coli with sublethal concentrations of antimicrobial peptides causes cells to filament, and that this division block is controlled by the PhoQ/PhoP system. The filamentation results from increased expression of QueE, an enzyme that is part of a tRNA modification pathway but that, as we show here, also affects cell division. We also find that a functional YFP-QueE fusion localizes to the division septum in filamentous cells, suggesting QueE blocks septation through interaction with the divisome. Regulation of septation by PhoQ/PhoP may protect cells from antimicrobial peptide-induced stress or other conditions associated with high-level stimulation of this signalling system. PMID:27471053

  5. Antimicrobial peptides trigger a division block in Escherichia coli through stimulation of a signalling system

    PubMed Central

    Yadavalli, Srujana S.; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Leibman, Rachel S.; Chen, Annie I.; Stern, Andrew M.; Roggiani, Manuela; Lippa, Andrew M.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the molecular arsenal employed by hosts against bacteria. Many bacteria in turn possess pathways that provide protection against these compounds. In Escherichia coli and related bacteria, the PhoQ/PhoP signalling system is a key regulator of this antimicrobial peptide defence. Here we show that treating E. coli with sublethal concentrations of antimicrobial peptides causes cells to filament, and that this division block is controlled by the PhoQ/PhoP system. The filamentation results from increased expression of QueE, an enzyme that is part of a tRNA modification pathway but that, as we show here, also affects cell division. We also find that a functional YFP–QueE fusion localizes to the division septum in filamentous cells, suggesting QueE blocks septation through interaction with the divisome. Regulation of septation by PhoQ/PhoP may protect cells from antimicrobial peptide-induced stress or other conditions associated with high-level stimulation of this signalling system. PMID:27471053

  6. Identification and biological activity of ovine and caprine calcitonin receptor-stimulating peptides 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher J; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Yandle, Timothy G; Minamino, Naoto

    2008-08-01

    We have recently reported the isolation of three new members of the calcitonin (CT) gene-related peptide family of peptides, the CT receptor (CT-R)-stimulating peptides (CRSPs). We now report the sequencing and characterization of ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2. Mature ovine and caprine CRSP-1 are identical and have strong structural homology to CRSP-1s identified to date from other species. As with other CRSP-1s, ovine/caprine CRSP-1 binds to and activates the CT-R but not the CT-like receptor (CL-R) in combination with the receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 does not activate any of these receptor-RAMP complexes. Intravenous infusions of ovine CRSP-1 to normal conscious sheep induced dose-dependent reduction in plasma total Ca levels (P=0.02) and corrected Ca levels (P=0.017) associated with increases in plasma cAMP (P=0.002). CRSP-1 reduced both plasma amino-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.006) and plasma renin activity (P=0.028). There were no significant effects observed on hemodynamic or renal indices measured. In conclusion, we have sequenced ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2 precursors. This newly identified CRSP-1 has been shown to share the structural and biological features of CRSP-1s known to date. In vivo studies confirm that ovine CRSP-1 reduces plasma Ca levels in sheep, presumably via a cAMP-mediated mechanism. By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 did not stimulate any combination of CT-R, CL-R, and RAMPs. Accession numbers of cDNA determined in this study are caprine CRSP-1, AB364646; caprine CRSP-2, AB364647; and ovine CRSP-1, AB364648.

  7. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  8. THE BIOSYNTHESIS, INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT, AND PACKAGING OF MELANOCYTE-STIMULATING PEPTIDES IN THE AMPHIBIAN PARS INTERMEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments in which glycine-3H has been introduced into excised neurointermediate lobes of Xenopus laevis incubated in a modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate medium have shown that ∼ 50% of the incorporated radioactivity is present in small peptides which have an electrophoretic mobility characteristic of the melanocyte-stimulating (MSH) peptides shown to be elaborated within the tissue. Based on these results and the demonstration that a discrete ∼ 7 min pulse of the label can be introduced into the tissue, electron microscope radioautography has been employed to follow the subcellular events concerned with the synthesis, intracellular transport, and packaging of the labeled secretory product. Together, these studies indicate that the newly synthesized material arises in peptide form, rather than as part of a larger prohormone molecule, on the ribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum within the parenchymal cells of the intermediate portion of the lobe. A proportion is then incorporated into and remains for an extended period within the intracisternal granules which are a feature of the rough endoplasmic reticulum within these cells in vitro Most (∼ 60%) of the labeled secretory product, however, is transferred to the Golgi complex within 30 min and, within a further 10 min, becomes packaged into small (∼ 200 mµ) electron-opaque secretory granules. It is probable that under the conditions employed these granules represent the final intracellular location of secretory product before it is released PMID:5028257

  9. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides stimulate the production and secretion of C-type natriuretic peptide from bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nazario, B; Hu, R M; Pedram, A; Prins, B; Levin, E R

    1995-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a member of the natriuretic peptide family which is produced in vascular endothelial cells and may play an important paracrine role in the vasaculature. We sought to determine the regulation of CNP production by other vasoactive peptides from cultured aortic endothelial cells. The vasoconstrictors endothelin-1 and angiotensin II had little effect on the basal secretion of CNP. In contrast, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) strongly stimulated the secretion of CNP. BNP caused as much as a 400-fold enhancement above the basal accumulated secretion of CNP over 24 h at a concentration of 1 microM; this was 20 times greater than the stimulatory effect of ANP, BNP and ANP also significantly enhanced the production of new CNP protein (translation) and mRNA expressed in the BAEC. In contrast, C-ANP-4-23, a truncated form of ANP which selectively binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor, did not stimulate CNP secretion. The enhanced production and secretion of CNP, caused by either ANP or BNP, was significantly prevented by LY 83583, an inhibitor of cGMP generation, and was also attenuated by KT 5823, an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Our results indicate that ANP and BNP can stimulate CNP production through a guanylate cyclase receptor on endothelial cells. BNP is a much more potent stimulator of CNP secretion, compared to ANP. Our findings suggest that the vasodilatory, and anti-mitogenic effects of ANP and BNP in the vasculature could occur in part through CNP production and subsequent action if these interactions occur in vivo. Images PMID:7883964

  10. Prenatal Exposure to Nicotine Stimulates Neurogenesis of Orexigenic Peptide-Expressing Neurons in Hypothalamus and Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Guo-Qing; Karatayev, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies show that gestational exposure to nicotine increases the propensity of offspring to consume nicotine, but the precise mechanism mediating this behavioral phenomenon is unclear. The present study in Sprague Dawley rats examined the possibility that the orexigenic peptide systems, enkephalin (ENK) and orexin (OX), which are stimulated by nicotine in adult animals and promote consummatory behavior, may be similarly responsive to nicotine's stimulatory effect in utero while having long-term behavioral consequences. The results demonstrated that nicotine exposure during gestation at low doses (0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/d) significantly increased mRNA levels and density of neurons that express ENK in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and central nucleus of the amygdala, OX, and another orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone, in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus in preweanling offspring. These effects persisted in the absence of nicotine, at least until puberty. Colabeling of the cell proliferation marker BrdU with the neuronal marker NeuN and peptides revealed a marked stimulatory effect of prenatal nicotine on neurogenesis, but not gliogenesis, and also on the number of newly generated neurons expressing ENK, OX, or melanin-concentrating hormone. During adolescence, offspring also exhibited significant behavioral changes, increased consumption of nicotine and other substances of abuse, ethanol and a fat-rich diet, with no changes in chow and water intake or body weight. These findings reveal a marked sensitivity during gestation of the orexigenic peptide neurons to low nicotine doses that may increase the offspring's propensity to overconsume substances of abuse during adolescence. PMID:23966683

  11. Stimulation of murine peritoneal macrophage functions by neuropeptide Y and peptide YY. Involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, M; Bernaez, I; Del Rio, M; Hernanz, A

    1993-01-01

    The peptides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) at concentrations from 10(-12) M to 10(-8) M have been shown in this study to stimulate significantly, in vitro, several functions of resting peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of inert particles (latex beads) and foreign cells (Candida albicans), and production of superoxide anion measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. A dose-response relationship was observed, with a maximal stimulation of the macrophage functions studied at 10(-10) M. These effects seem to be produced by specific receptors for the neuropeptides studied in peritoneal macrophages. Whereas the two peptides induced no change of intracellular cyclic AMP, they caused a significant stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) in murine macrophages. These results suggest that NPY and PYY produce their effects on macrophage function through PKC activation. PMID:8262554

  12. Stimulation of sexual behavior in the male rat by galanin-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Fraley, G S; Thomas-Smith, S E; Acohido, B V; Steiner, R A; Clifton, D K

    2004-12-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is a recently described neuropeptide, which shares a partial sequence identity with galanin but is derived from a separate gene. Central injections of GALP stimulate the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) and induce the expression of Fos in several brain areas known to regulate male sexual behavior in the rat. We postulated that GALP may also stimulate sexual behavior in concert with its stimulatory effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. To test this hypothesis, we administered GALP, galanin, or the vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid, aCSF) alone to sexually experienced male rats and assessed the effects of these agents on sexual behavior. We observed that compared to aCSF alone, GALP significantly increased all aspects of male-typical sexual behavior, whereas galanin inhibited all of these same behaviors. To examine whether the stimulatory effects of GALP on sexual behavior were mediated by GALP's stimulatory effects on the HPG axis, we castrated the same male rats and repeated the behavioral experiment. We found that GALP maintained its inductive action on male-typical sexual behaviors in the castrated animals, suggesting that the effects of GALP on sexual behavior are not the result of GALP's ability to stimulate testosterone secretion. These observations suggest that GALP neurons are part of the hypothalamic circuitry controlling sexual behavior in the male rat.

  13. Flavonoids stimulate cholecystokinin peptide secretion from the enteroendocrine STC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Ravallec, Rozenn; Van Camp, John; Raes, Katleen; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Animal experiments showed that flavonoids might have the potential for an anti-obesity effect by reducing weight and food intake. However, the exact mechanisms that could be involved in these proposed effects are still under investigation. The complex process of food intake is partially regulated by gastrointestinal hormones. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is the best known gastrointestinal hormone to induce satiety signal that plays a key role in food intake regulation. It is released from the endocrine cells (I cell) in response to the ingestion of nutrients into the small intestine. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, apigenin, rutin and baicalein) on stimulation of CCK release in vitro using enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. In comparison with the control, quercetin, kaempferol and apigenin resulted in a significant increase in CCK secretion with quercetin showing the highest activity. On the other hand, no significant effect was seen by rutin and baicalein. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study the stimulation of CCK peptide hormone secretion from STC-1 cells by quercetin and kaempferol, rutin, apigenin and baicalein. Based on the cell-based results in this work, it can be suggested that the reported activity of flavonoids against food intake and weight could be mediated by stimulation of CCK signal which in turn is responsible for food intake reduction, but future animal and human studies are needed to confirm this conclusion at organism level. PMID:27496247

  14. Mechanisms of interaction of peptide and nonpeptide vascular neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1987-01-01

    The vascular neuromuscular junction is described and the terms neuromodulation and cotransmission defined. Two main types of interaction between peptide and nonpeptide neurotransmitter substances during the local control of blood flow are distinguished. The first concerns the interacting roles of peptides and nonpeptides that coexist in, and are released from, perivascular nerve varicosities. Examples include the interactions of neuropeptide Y (NPY) with noradrenaline (NA) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) released from some sympathetic nerves; vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) with acetylcholine (ACh) released from some parasympathetic nerves; and NPY and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) released from intracardiac neurones supplying coronary vessels. Possible interactions of substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) with ATP released from some primary afferent sensory nerves are also considered. The second type of interaction concerns vascular neurotransmitters and locally released agents such as histamine, prostanoids, and bradykinin. Finally, a hypothesis is put forward in which it is suggested that peptides and nonpeptides released from endothelial cells during hypoxia lead to protective vasodilatation via receptors on the endothelium, while these substances released from perivascular nerves during different physiological circumstances usually constrict the blood vessel via receptors on the smooth muscle cells.

  15. Treatment of adjuvant arthritis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and peptide derived from heat shock protein 65.

    PubMed

    Brendolan, Andrea; Higuchi, Masanori; Sibley, Richard; Strober, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats is induced by the subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil, and the predominant T cell immune reactivity is against the heat shock protein 65 derived peptide 176-190. We treated Lewis rats with human recombinant G-CSF followed by (i.v) administration of peptide 176-190 after induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA), and observed decreased disease severity, joint destruction, new bone formation and joint ankylosis. Treatment with G-CSF alone was also effective, but to a lesser extent. In addition, we found that splenocytes from rats treated with G-CSF had reduced antigen presenting capacity compared with splenocytes from vehicle treated rats. Primed lymph node cells from G-CSF plus peptide treated rats showed a marked reduction in proliferation and secretion of IFN-gamma after stimulation with the heat shock protein peptide in vitro as compared to controls.

  16. Stimulating Myocardial Regeneration with Periostin Peptide in Large Mammals Improves Function Post-Myocardial Infarction but Increases Myocardial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ladage, Dennis; Yaniz-Galende, Elisa; Rapti, Kleopatra; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Tilemann, Lisa; Shapiro, Scott; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Muller-Ehmsen, Jochen; Schwarz, Martin; Garcia, Mario J.; Sanz, Javier; Hajjar, Roger J.; Kawase, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Aims Mammalian myocardium has a finite but limited capacity to regenerate. Experimentally stimulating proliferation of cardiomyocytes with extracellular regeneration factors like periostin enhances cardiac repair in rodents. The aim of this study was to develop a safe method for delivering regeneration factors to the heart and to test the functional and structural effects of periostin peptide treatment in a large animal model of myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and Results We developed a controlled release system to deliver recombinant periostin peptide into the pericardial space. A single application of this method was performed two days after experimental MI in swine. Animals were randomly assigned to receive either saline or periostin peptide. Experimental groups were compared at baseline, day 2, 1 month and 3 months. Treatment with periostin peptide increased the EF from 31% to 41% and decreased by 22% the infarct size within 12 weeks. Periostin peptide-treated animals had newly formed myocardium strips within the infarct scar, leading to locally improved myocardial function. In addition the capillary density was increased in animals receiving periostin. However, periostin peptide treatment increased myocardial fibrosis in the remote region at one week and 12 weeks post-treatment. Conclusion Our study shows that myocardial regeneration through targeted peptides is possible. However, in the case of periostin the effects on cardiac fibrosis may limit its clinical application as a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:23700403

  17. PD-L1 peptide co-stimulation increases immunogenicity of a dendritic cell-based cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Martinenaite, Evelina; Hansen, Morten; Junker, Niels; Borch, Troels Holz; Met, Özcan; Donia, Marco; Svane, Inge Marie; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2016-08-01

    We recently described naturally occurring PD-L1-specific T cells that recognize PD-L1-expressing immune cells as well as malignant cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the immunogenicity of a dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine could be influenced by co-stimulation with a known PD-L1-derived epitope. We incubated a PD-L1-derived peptide epitope (19 amino acids long) or a control peptide (an irrelevant HIV epitope) with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with malignant melanoma who had received a DC-based vaccine. We observed a significantly higher number of T cells that reacted to the vaccine in cultures that had been co-stimulated with the PD-L1 peptide epitope compared to cultures incubated with control peptide. Next, we characterized a novel PD-L1-derived epitope (23 amino acids long) and found that co-stimulation with both PD-L1 epitopes boosted the immune response elicited by the DC vaccine even further. Consequently, we observed a significant increase in the number of vaccine-reacting T cells in vitro. In conclusion, activation of PD-L1-specific T cells may directly modulate immunogenicity of DC vaccines. Addition of PD-L1 epitopes may thus be an easily applicable and attractive option to augment the effectiveness of cancer vaccines and other immunotherapeutic agents. PMID:27622072

  18. Soybean beta 51-63 peptide stimulates cholecystokinin secretion via a calcium-sensing receptor in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shingo; Hira, Tohru; Eto, Yuzuru; Asano, Kozo; Hara, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that intraduodenal administration of an arginine-rich beta 51-63 peptide in soybean beta-conglycinin suppresses food intake via cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion in rats. However, the cellular mechanisms by which the beta 51-63 peptide induces CCK secretion remain to be clarified. In the present study, we examined whether the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) mediates beta 51-63-induced CCK secretion in murine CCK-producing enteroendocrine cell line STC-1. CCK secretion and changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in response to beta 51-63 peptide were measured in STC-1 cells under various extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and after treatment with a CaR antagonist. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in response to beta 51-63 peptide and extracellular Ca(2+) were also measured in CaR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. The beta 51-63 peptide induced CCK secretion and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in STC-1 cells under normal (1.2mM) extracellular Ca(2+) conditions in a dose-dependent manner. These responses to beta 51-63 peptide were reduced by the removal of intra- or extracellular Ca(2+) but enhanced by increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. Intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization induced by extracellular Ca(2+) was also increased by the pretreatment with beta 51-63 peptide. Treatment with a specific CaR antagonist (NPS2143) inhibited beta 51-63-induced CCK secretion and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. In addition, HEK-293 cells transfected with CaR acquired sensitivity to the beta 51-63 peptide. From these results, we conclude that CaR is the beta 51-63 peptide sensor responsible for the stimulation of CCK secretion in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells.

  19. Phospholipase D catalyzes phospholipid metabolism in chemotactic peptide-stimulated HL-60 granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, J.K.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Billah, M.M.

    1988-09-05

    There exists circumstantial evidence for activation of phospholipase D (PLD) in intact cells. However, because of the complexity of phospholipid remodeling processes, it is essential to distinguish PLD clearly from other phospholipases and phospholipid remodeling enzymes. Therefore, to establish unequivocally PLD activity in dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 granulocytes, to demonstrate the relative contribution of PLD to phospholipid turnover, and to validate the hypothesis that the formation of phosphatidylethanol is an expression of PLD-catalyzed transphosphatidylation, we have developed methodologies to label HL-60 granulocytes in 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-PC) with 32P without labeling cellular ATP. These methodologies involve (a) synthesis of alkyl-lysoPC containing 32P by a combination of enzymatic and chemical procedures and (b) incubation of HL-60 granulocytes with this alkyl-(32P) lysoPC which enters the cell and becomes acylated into membrane-associated alkyl-(32P)PC. Upon stimulation of these 32P-labeled cells with the chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), alkyl-(32P)phosphatidic acid (alkyl-(32P)PA) is formed rapidly. Because, under these conditions, cellular ATP has not been labeled with 32P, alkyl-(32P)PA must be formed via PLD-catalyzed hydrolysis of alkyl-(32P)PC at the terminal phosphodiester bond. This result conclusively demonstrates fMLP-induced activation of PLD in HL-60 granulocytes. These 32P-labeled HL-60 granulocytes have also been stimulated in the presence of ethanol to produce alkyl-(32P)phosphatidylethanol (alkyl-(32P)PEt). Formation of alkyl-(32P)PEt parallels that of alkyl-(32P)PA with respect to time course, fMLP concentration, inhibition by a specific fMLP antagonist (t-butoxycarbonyl-Met-Leu-Phe), and Ca2+ concentration.

  20. Oral administration of osteocalcin improves glucose utilization by stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Akiko; Yasutake, Yu; Higashi, Sen; Kawakubo-Yasukochi, Tomoyo; Chishaki, Sakura; Takahashi, Ichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masato

    2014-12-01

    Uncarboxylated osteocalcin (GluOC), a bone-derived hormone, regulates energy metabolism by stimulating insulin secretion and pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We previously showed that the effect of GluOC on insulin secretion is mediated largely by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secreted from the intestine in response to GluOC exposure. We have now examined the effect of oral administration of GluOC on glucose utilization as well as the fate of such administered GluOC in mice. Long-term intermittent or daily oral administration of GluOC reduced the fasting blood glucose level and improved glucose tolerance in mice without affecting insulin sensitivity. It also increased the fasting serum insulin concentration as well as the β-cell area in the pancreas. A small proportion of orally administered GluOC reached the small intestine and remained there for at least 24h. GluOC also entered the general circulation, and the serum GLP-1 concentration was increased in association with the presence of GluOC in the intestine and systemic circulation. The putative GluOC receptor, GPRC6A was detected in intestinal cells, and was colocalized with GLP-1 in some of these cells. Our results suggest that orally administered GluOC improved glucose handling likely by acting from both the intestinal lumen and the general circulation, with this effect being mediated in part by stimulation of GLP-1 secretion. Oral administration of GluOC warrants further study as a safe and convenient option for the treatment or prevention of metabolic disorders. PMID:25230237

  1. Synthetic peptides derived from the melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor MC1R can stimulate HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes that recognize naturally processed peptides on human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Onfray, F; Nakazawa, T; Chhajlani, V; Petersson, M; Kärre, K; Masucci, G; Celis, E; Sette, A; Southwood, S; Appella, E; Kiessling, R

    1997-10-01

    Human melanoma-specific HLA-A2 restricted CTLs have recently been shown to recognize antigens expressed by melanoma lines and normal melanocytes, including Melan-A/Mart-1, gp100, gp75, and tyrosinase. Herein, we define HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes from a recently cloned melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), which belongs to a new subfamily of the G-protein-coupled receptors expressed on melanomas and melanocytes. Thirty-one MC1R-derived peptides were selected on the basis of HLA-A2-specific motifs and tested for their HLA-A2 binding capacity. Of a group of 12 high or intermediate HLA-A2 binding peptides, three nonamers, MC1R244 (TILLGIFFL), MC1R283 (FLALIICNA), and MC1R291 (AIIDPLIYA), were found to induce peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy HLA-A2+ donors after repeated in vitro stimulation with peptide-pulsed antigen-presenting cells. The CTLs raised against these three HLA-A2+-restricted peptides could recognize naturally processed peptides from HLA-A2+ melanomas and from Cos7 cells cotransfected with MC1R and HLA-A2. CTLs induced by the MC1R291 peptide (but not induced or induced only to a very low extent by the other two MCR1 peptide epitopes) showed cross-reactions with two other members of the melanocortin receptor family, which are more broadly expressed on other tissues. Taken together, our findings have implications in relation both to autoimmunity and immunotherapy of malignant melanomas. PMID:9331097

  2. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Booe, Jason M.; Walker, Christopher S.; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A.; Warner, Margaret L.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Harris, Paul W.; Brimble, Margaret A.; Poyner, David R.; Hay, Debbie L.; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. PMID:25982113

  3. Targeting of follicle stimulating hormone peptide-conjugated dendrimers to ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Dimple A.; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Bugno, Jason; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Hong, Seungpyo; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side effects. To address these issues, we have designed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to selectively target the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), which is overexpressed by tumorigenic ovarian cancer cells but not by immature primordial follicles and other non-tumorigenic cells. Fluorescein-labeled generation 5 (G5) PAMAM dendrimers were conjugated with the binding peptide domain of FSH (FSH33) that has a high affinity to FSHR. The targeted dendrimers exhibited high receptor selectivity to FSHR-expressing OVCAR-3 cells, resulting in significant uptake and downregulation of an anti-apoptotic protein survivin, while showing minimal interactions with SKOV-3 cells that do not express FSHR. The selectivity of the FSH33-targeted dendrimers was further validated in 3D organ cultures of normal mouse ovaries. Immunostaining of the conjugates revealed their selective binding and uptake by ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells that express FSHR, while sparing the immature primordial follicles. In addition, an in vivo study monitoring tissue accumulation following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the conjugates showed significantly higher accumulation of FSH33-targeted dendrimers in the ovary and oviduct compared to the non-targeted conjugates. These proof-of-concept findings highlight the potential of these FSH33-targeted dendrimers to serve as a delivery platform for anti-ovarian cancer drugs, while reducing their systemic side effects by preventing nonspecific uptake by the primordial follicles.Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side

  4. Thrombin receptor agonist Peptide immobilized in microspheres stimulates reparative processes in rats with gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Rusanova, A V; Makarova, A M; Strukova, S M; Markvicheva, E A; Gorbachyova, L R; Stashevskaya, K S; Vasil'eva, T V; Sidorova, E I; Bespalova, Zh D; Grandfils, Ch

    2006-07-01

    The effect of synthetic thrombin receptor (PAR1) agonist peptide encapsulated in microspheres made of lactic and glycolic acid copolymer on tissue reparation was studied in rats with acetate-induced ulcer. PAR1 agonist peptide was immobilized in biodegraded lactic and glycolic acid microspheres by double emulgation, the kinetics of peptide release was analyzed, and the dynamics of ulcer healing was studied in experimental (administration of microspheres with the peptide into the stomach) and two control groups (administration of saline or spheres without peptide). Thrombin receptor agonist peptide gradually released from lactic and glycolic acid microspheres into the stomach shortened the inflammation phase and shifted the proliferation phase to the earlier period, thus accelerating healing of experimental ulcers in rats. PMID:17369897

  5. Molecular and functional characterization of amylin, a peptide associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, A.N.; Leighton, B.; Todd, J.A.; Schofield, P.N.; Sutton, R.; Day, A.J.; Foot, E.A.; Willis, A.C.; Reid, K.B.M.; Cooper, H.J.S. ); Holt, S.; Boyd, Y. Medical Research Council Radiobiology Unit, Chilton )

    1989-12-01

    The 37-amino acid peptide called amylin is a major component of the islet amyloid deposited in the pancreases of persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The authors report the isolation of a partial cDNA clone and a phage {lambda} genomic clone of the coding region of the amylin gene. The DNA sequence encodes a protein sequences identical to that of amylin isolated from the amyloid found in the diabetic pancreas and shows that amylin is likely to be synthesized as a precursor peptide, now named proamylin. They have demonstrated that the amylin gene is present on chromosome 12 and that it is probably transcribed in the islets of Langerhans. The sequences of the genes for amyli and the calcitonin gene-related peptides (CGRPs) show strong similarity, especially over their 5{prime} coding regions, where both peptides have a conserved intramolecular disulfide bridge, and also over their 3{prime} coding regions, where the presence of a glycine codon strongly suggests that the carboxylterminal residue of amylin, like that of CGRP, is amidated. To examine the functional relevance of these posttranslational modifications, the biological activity of amylin synthesized with or without the disulfide bridge and/or amidation was measured. It was found that both features are necessary for full biological activity, thereby confirming the functional importance of those regions of the molecule whose sequences are conserved at both protein and genetic levels.

  6. Isolation and structural characterization of a novel peptide related to gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone from the brain of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum.

    PubMed

    Salzet, M; Wattez, C; Bulet, P; Malecha, J

    1994-07-01

    This paper reports the purification of a novel pro-opiomelanocortin derivative peptide (a gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone-like (gamma-MSH-like) molecule) from the brain of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum. After reverse-phase HPLC purification, the sequence of the gamma-MSH-like peptide (YVMGHFRWDKFamide) was established by a combination of automated Edman degradation, electrospray mass spectrometry measurement, enzymatic treatment and co-elution experiments in reverse-phase HPLC with synthetic peptides.

  7. Characterization of desmoglein-3 epitope region peptides as synthetic antigens: analysis of their in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy, cytotoxicity, stability, and their conformational features.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Hajnalka; Uray, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Silló, Pálma; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-09-01

    Desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) adhesion protein is the main target of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoimmune skin disorder. Several mapping studies of Dsg3 T cell epitope regions were performed, and based on those data, we designed and synthesized four peptide series corresponding to Dsg3 T cell epitope regions. Each peptide series consists of a 17mer full-length peptide (Dsg3/189-205, Dsg3/206-222, Dsg3/342-358, and Dsg3/761-777) and its N-terminally truncated derivatives, resulting in 15 peptides altogether. The peptides were prepared on solid phase and were chemically characterized. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the solution conformation of the synthetic peptides has been investigated using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy of the peptides has been determined on peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from whole blood of PV patients and also from healthy donors. After 20 h of stimulation, the interferon (IFN)-γ content of the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro conditions, peptides were stable and non-cytotoxic. The in vitro IFN-γ production profile of healthy donors and PV patients, induced by peptides as synthetic antigens, was markedly different. The most unambiguous differences were observed after stimulation with 17mer peptide Dsg3/342-358, and three truncated derivatives from two other peptide series, namely, peptides Dsg3/192-205, Dsg3/763-777, and Dsg3/764-777. Comparative analysis of in vitro activity and the capability of oligopeptides to form ordered or unordered secondary structure showed that peptides bearing high solvent sensibility and backbone flexibility were the most capable to distinguish between healthy and PV donors. PMID:26250896

  8. Stimulants

    MedlinePlus

    Stimulants are drugs that increase your heart rate, breathing rate, and brain function. Some stimulants affect only a specific organ, such as the heart, lungs, brain, or nervous system. Epinephrine is a stimulant. It ...

  9. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  10. Melanoma Therapy with Rhenium-Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas P Quinn

    2005-11-22

    Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with {sup 188}Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, {sup 188}Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The {sup 177}Lu

  11. The significance of functional receptor heterogeneity in the biological responses of the rabbit neutrophil to stimulation by chemotactic formyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, J C; Freer, R J; Becker, E L

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of binding to the chemotactic receptors on rabbit peritoneal neutrophils were examined for seven formyl peptide analogues. These receptor-binding characteristics were compared with the abilities of the analogues to induce the biological responses of degranulation and chemotaxis. Five of the analogues showed distinct functional heterogeneity in their receptor-binding patterns, whereas the two most potent compounds displayed homogeneous binding patterns. The relative potencies of the formyl peptide analogues for stimulation of degranulation correlated well with their relative potencies for high-affinity, but not low-affinity, binding. The biphasic patterns for stimulation of chemotactic migration were similar for the less potent analogues, and their potencies paralleled those for both degranulation and receptor binding. In contrast, the most potent analogues induced a greater maximal extent of chemotactic migration than the other compounds, but displayed a lower than expected potency (i.e. they required higher than expected concentrations). These anomalies in the patterns of the chemotactic response cannot be reconciled with a simple receptor model comprising two independent classes of receptors. Instead, a model comprising interconvertible states of different affinities is proposed. The state of higher affinity appears to play a central role in initiation of both degranulation and chemotaxis. The more potent formyl peptide analogues are thought to stabilize an activated, higher-affinity, state of the receptor; this can explain their greater efficacy in stimulating chemotaxis. The proposed model may also be applicable to other receptors that are coupled by a guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein to their associated effector. PMID:2064609

  12. Nucleobindin-1 encodes a nesfatin-1-like peptide that stimulates insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mohan, Haneesha; Unniappan, Suraj

    2015-05-15

    Nesfatin-1 (82 amino acid) is an anorexigenic and insulinotropic peptide encoded in a secreted precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). Nucleobindin-1 (NUCB1) is a protein with very high sequence similarity to NUCB2. We hypothesized that a nesfatin-1 like peptide (NLP) is encoded in NUCB1, and this peptide is biologically active. In silico analysis found a signal peptide cleavage site at position 25 (Arginine) and 26 (Valine) preceding the NLP region in NUCB1 sequence, and potential proprotein convertase cleavage sites at Lys-Arg (KR), forming a 77 amino acid NLP. RT-PCR studies found NUCB1 mRNA in both pancreas and MIN6 cells. NUCB1-like immunoreactivity was detected in mouse insulinoma (MIN6) cells, and pancreatic islet beta cells of mice. In order to determine the biological activity of NLP, MIN6 cells were incubated with synthetic rat NLP. NLP (10nM and 100nM) upregulated preproinsulin mRNA expression and insulin secretion at 1h post-incubation. In identical experiments using MIN6 cells, a scrambled peptide based on the NLP sequence did not elicit any effects on preproinsulin mRNA expression or insulin secretion. From this result, it is clear that an intact NLP sequence is required for its biological activity. NLP appears as another endogenous insulinotropic peptide encoded in NUCB1.

  13. Frog skin peptides (tigerinin-1R, magainin-AM1, -AM2, CPF-AM1, and PGla-AM1) stimulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) by GLUTag cells.

    PubMed

    Ojo, O O; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2013-02-01

    Skin secretions of several frog species contain host-defense peptides with multiple biological activities including in vitro and in vivo insulin-releasing actions. This study investigates the effects of tigerinin-1R from Hoplobatrachus rugulosus (Dicroglossidae) and magainin-AM1, magainin-AM2, caerulein precursor fragment (CPF-AM1) and peptide glycine leucine amide (PGLa-AM1) from Xenopus amieti (Pipidae) on GLP-1 secretion from GLUTag cells. Tigerinin-1R showed the highest potency producing a significant (P<0.05) increase in GLP-1 release at a concentration of 0.1nM for the cyclic peptide and 0.3nM for the reduced form. All peptides from X. amieti significantly (P<0.05) stimulated GLP-1 release at concentrations ⩾300nM with magainin-AM2 exhibiting the greatest potency (minimum concentration producing a significant stimulation=1nM). The maximum stimulatory response (3.2-fold of basal rate, P<0.001) was produced by CPF-AM1 at a concentration of 3μM. No peptide stimulated release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase from GLUTag cells at concentrations up to 3μM indicating that the integrity of the plasma membrane had been preserved. The data indicate that frog skin peptides, by stimulating GLP-1 release as well as direct effects on insulin secretion, show therapeutic potential as agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Proteolytic degradation and deactivation of amphibian skin peptides obtained by electrical stimulation of their dorsal glands.

    PubMed

    Samgina, Tatiana Yu; Tolpina, Miriam I; Hakalehto, Elias; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Bergquist, Jonas; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-05-01

    Amphibians are among the oldest creatures on our planet. Their only defensive weapon efficient against microorganisms and predators involves their skin secretion. The wide range of biological activities of the peptides in the skin secretion of amphibians makes these compounds rather interesting for generation of prospective pharmaceuticals. The first step in studying these molecules requires their structures to be established. Mass spectrometry is the most powerful tool for this purpose. The sampling and sample preparation stages preceding mass spectrometry experiments appear to be rather crucial. The results obtained here demonstrate that these preparation procedures might lead to partial or complete loss of the bioactive peptides in the secretion. Five minutes in water was enough to completely destroy all of the bioactive peptides in the skin secretion of the marsh frog (Rana ridibunda); even immediate addition of methanol to the water solution of the peptides did not prevent partial destruction. Concerted effort should be directed towards development of the most efficient procedure to keep the secreted peptides intact. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26975184

  15. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway. PMID:26463554

  16. Enhancing of anti-viral activity against HIV-1 by stimulation of CD8+ T cells with thymic peptides

    PubMed Central

    MÜLLER, H; MAYER, G; BEHNKE, B; HEIMÜLLER, E; HAMSCHER, G; IMMLER, D; SIETHOFF, C; MEYER, HE; SCHREIBER, M

    1999-01-01

    HIV-1 can be neutralized by soluble factors produced and secreted by activated CD8+ T cells. Production of such anti-viral CD8 factors (including chemokines) can be induced with IL-2 or phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). In addition to PHA or IL-2, we have co-stimulated CD8+ T cells with PHA/IL-2 and a mixture of thymic peptides (TP) of molecular weights below 10 kD. For the activation, CD8+ T cells were purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1− individuals and any resultant anti-viral activity was monitored using an HIV-1 neutralization assay. Using HIV-1 isolates highly resistant to chemokine inhibition we detected significantly higher levels of HIV-1 neutralizing activity in CD8+ T cell culture supernatants which had been co-activated with TP. When the TP-induced anti-viral activity was monitored, neutralization of both non-syncytia-inducing (NSI) and syncytia-inducing (SI) patient isolates was enhanced by 38% (NSI, PHA +/− TP), 66% (SI, PHA +/− TP), 28% (NSI, IL-2 +/− TP), and 57% (SI, IL-2 +/− TP) compared with the anti-viral activity present in supernatants from CD8+ T cell cultures stimulated only with PHA or IL-2. Peptide sequence analysis of purified TP showed that the TP mixture predominantly contains peptides with homology to human histone and collagen sequences. Our data demonstrate that CD8+ T cells are additionally activated by a mixture of TP. In this way, the production of HIV-1 neutralizing CD8 factors can be enhanced. PMID:10403919

  17. Structure and function of a peptide pheromone family that stimulate the vomeronasal sensory system in mice.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takayuki; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-08-01

    Mammals use pheromones to communicate with other animals of the same species. In mice, the VNO (vomeronasal organ) has a pivotal role in pheromone detection. We discovered a 7 kDa peptide, ESP1 (exocrine-gland-secreting peptide 1), in tear fluids from male mice that enhances the sexual behaviour of female mice via the VNO. NMR studies demonstrate that ESP1 adopts a compact structure with a helical fold stabilized by an intramolecular disulfide bridge. Functional analysis in combination with docking simulation indicates that ESP1 is recognized by a specific G-protein-coupled vomeronasal receptor, V2Rp5, via charge-charge interactions in the large extracellular region of the receptor. ESP1 is a member of the ESP family, which comprises 38 homologous genes in mice, and some of these genes are expressed in a sex- or age-dependent manner. Most recently, ESP22 was found to be released specifically in juvenile tear fluids and to inhibit the sexual behaviour of adult male mice. These studies demonstrate that peptide pheromones are used for chemical communication in mice, and they indicate a structural basis for the narrowly tuned perception of mammalian peptide pheromones by vomeronasal receptors.

  18. Hypergravity differentially modulates cGMP efflux in human melanocytic cells stimulated by nitric oxide and natriuretic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, K.; Stieber, C.; Lambers, B.; Block, I.; Krieg, R.; Wellmann, A.; Gerzer, R.

    Nitric oxide NO plays a key role in many patho physiologic processes including inflammation and skin cancer The diverse cellular effects of NO are mainly mediated by activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase sGC isoform that leads to increases in intracellular cGMP levels whereas the membrane-bound isoforms serve as receptors for natriuretic peptides e g ANP In human skin epidermal melanocytes represent the principal cells for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress as a result of potentially harmful effects of the environment In previous studies we found that long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulated cGMP efflux in normal human melanocytes NHMs and non-metastatic melanoma cells at least partly by an enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance proteins MRP and cGMP transporters MRP4 5 The present study investigated whether hypergravity generated by centrifugal acceleration may modulate the cGMP efflux in NO-stimulated NHMs and melanoma cells MCs with different metastatic potential The NONOates PAPA-NO and DETA-NO were used as direct NO donors for cell stimulation In the presence of 0 1 mM DETA-NO t 1 2 sim 20 h long-term application of hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h reduced intracellular cGMP levels by stimulating cGMP efflux in NHMs and non-metastatic MCs in comparison to 1 g whereas exposure to 5 g for 6 h in the presence of 0 1 mM PAPA-NO t 1 2 sim 30 min was not effective The hypergravity-stimulated

  19. Subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation counteracts glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Pan, Minglin; Yang, Guang; Cui, Xiuli; Yang, Shao-Nian

    2011-01-01

    The pancreatic β cell harbors α₂-adrenergic and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors on its plasma membrane to sense the corresponding ligands adrenaline/noradrenaline and GLP-1 to govern glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether these two signaling systems interact to gain the adequate and timely control of insulin release in response to glucose. The present work shows that the α₂-adrenergic agonist clonidine concentration-dependently depresses glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. On the contrary, GLP-1 concentration-dependently potentiates insulin secretory response to glucose. Importantly, the present work reveals that subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation with clonidine counteracts GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. This counteractory process relies on pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive Gi proteins since it no longer occurs following PTX-mediated inactivation of Gi proteins. The counteraction of GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation is likely to serve as a molecular mechanism for the delicate regulation of insulin release.

  20. Proinsulin C-peptide stimulates a PKC/IkappaB/NF-kappaB signaling pathway to activate COX-2 gene transcription in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Shibata, Yasutaka; Hashimoto, Seiichi; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2006-06-01

    Proinsulin C-peptide causes multiple molecular and physiological effects, and improves renal and neuronal dysfunction in patients with diabetes. However, whether C-peptide controls the inhibitor kappaB (IkappaB)/NF-kappaB-dependent transcription of genes, including inflammatory genes is unknown. Here we showed that 1 nM C-peptide increased the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and its protein in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. Consistently, C-peptide enhanced COX-2 gene promoter-activity, which was inhibited by GF109203X and Go6976, specific PKC inhibitors, and BAY11-7082, a specific nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, accompanied by increased phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB. These results suggest that C-peptide stimulates the transcription of inflammatory genes via activation of a PKC/IkappaB/NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

  1. Perlecan domain IV peptide stimulates salivary gland cell assembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Swati; Zhang, Chu; Jia, Xinqiao; Carson, Daniel D; Witt, Robert; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2009-11-01

    Treatment of xerostomia would benefit from development of a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. Salivary gland tissue from surgical patients was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Ductal and acinar cells were identified in tissue and cultured cells from dispersed tissue. High levels of laminin and perlecan/HSPG2 (heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2) were noted in basement membranes, and perlecan also was secreted and organized by cultured acinar populations, which formed lobular structures that mimicked intact glands when cultured on Matrigel or a bioactive peptide derived from domain IV of perlecan. On either matrix, large acini-like lobular structures grew and formed connections between the lobes. alpha-Amylase secretion was confirmed by staining and activity assay. Biomarkers, including tight junction protein E-cadherin and water channel protein aquaporin 5 found in tissue, were expressed in cultured acinar cells. Cells cultured on Matrigel or domain IV of perlecan peptide organized stress fibers and activated focal adhesion kinase. We report a novel technique to isolate acinar cells from human salivary gland and identify a human peptide sequence in perlecan that triggers differentiation of salivary gland cells into self-assembling acini-like structures that express essential biomarkers and which secrete alpha-amylase.

  2. Nesfatin-1 stimulates cholecystokinin and suppresses peptide YY expression and secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mortazavi, Sima; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-25

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid secreted peptide encoded in the precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). It is an insulinotropic anorexigen abundantly expressed in the stomach and hypothalamus. Post-prandial insulin secretion is predominantly regulated by incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Nesfatin-1 was previously reported to modulate GLP-1 and GIP secretion in vitro in an enteroendocrine (STC-1) cell line. Intestine is a source of additional hormones including cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) that regulate metabolism. We hypothesized that nesfatin-1 modulates CCK and PYY secretion. Immunofluorescence histochemistry showed NUCB2/nesfatin-1 co-localizing CCK and PYY in the intestinal mucosa of mice. Static incubation of STC-1 cells with nesfatin-1 upregulated both CCK mRNA expression (1 and 10 nM) and secretion (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) at 1 h post-incubation. In contrast, nesfatin-1 treatment for 1 h downregulated PYY mRNA expression (all doses tested) and secretion (0.01 and 0.1 nM) in STC-1 cells. Continuous infusion of nesfatin-1 using osmotic mini-pumps for 12 h upregulated CCK mRNA expression in large intestine, and downregulated PYY mRNA expression in both large and small intestines of male C57BL/6J mice. In these tissues, Western blot analysis found a corresponding increase in CCK and a decrease in PYY content. Collectively, we provide new information on the cell specific localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the intestinal mucosa, and a novel function for nesfatin-1 in modulating intestinal CCK and PYY expression and secretion in mice.

  3. Reducing renal uptake of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Fisher, Darrell R.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to improve the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-[1,2,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-Re-Cys,D-Phe,Arg]alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH), through coupling a negatively charged glutamic acid (Glu) to the peptide sequence. A new peptide of DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH was designed, synthesized and labeled with 90Y and 177Lu. Pharmacokinetics of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Glu,Arg)CCNSH were determined in B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Both exhibited significantly less renal uptake than 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH at 30 min and at 2, 3, and 24 h after dose administration. The renal uptake values of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH were 28.16% and 28.81% of those of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 hr post-injection. We also showed higher tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios 2.28 and 1.69 times that of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 h post-injection. The90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH activity accumulation was low in normal organs except for kidneys. Coupling a negatively charged amino acid (Glu) to the CCMSH peptide sequence dramatically reduced the renal uptake values and increased the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH, facilitating their potential applications as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  4. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Martina M.; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Atkins, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3′ end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5′ and 3′ of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5′ of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5′ part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3′ part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3′ of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. PMID:25998126

  5. Induction of determinant spreading and of Th1 responses by in vitro stimulation with HER-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B W; Kudelka, A P; Honda, T; Pollack, M S; Gershenson, D M; Gillogly, M A; Murray, J L; Ioannides, C G

    2000-11-01

    Immunization with tumor antigens induces cellular and humoral immune responses. These responses by T cells are specific for defined epitopes (determinants) in the molecule of the immunizing tumor antigen. Extension of such responses to self-antigens requires induction of autoimmunity to the tumor. As with systems of autoimmune disease, expression of T cell autoimmunity is charaterized by diversification of responses from the inducer determinant to other responder (cryptic) determinants. Since similar strategies may be useful for therapy of human cancers, we investigated whether the induction of response to a HER-2 peptide F7 (776-789) induces enhanced reactivity of other HER-2 peptides. We found that stimulation with F7 can expand a response to another epitope F13 (884-899) in both an ovarian cancer patient with progressive disease and a healthy donor who shared HLA-DR11. This response was characterized mainly by increased interferon gamma secretion, and proliferation, but was not observed with another donor who shared HLA-DR14 and HLA-DQ5 with the patient. Since repeated vaccination with the same epitope may lead to a decline of primary cell reactivity caused by apoptosis spreading the response to other epitopes, the tumor antigen may provide an approach for maintaining an inflammatory Th1 response during cancer vaccination.

  6. Immobilization of a bone and cartilage stimulating peptide to a synthetic bone graft.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vivian; Misra, Gauri; Amsden, Brian

    2008-05-01

    A synthetic peptide fragment of human collagen type I (BCSP-1) was linked to the surface of a commercially available ceramic in an effort to improve the properties of the bone graft substitute to accelerate local healing. BCSP-1 was covalently immobilized on the surface of the ceramic via the linkers 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) and suberic acid bis-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (DSS). The chosen chemistry was non-cytotoxic. A rat calvaria cell assay using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as an osteoblast differentiation marker, showed that modifying the surface of the ceramic was enough to enhance ALP activity, although the total cell population on the surface decreased. A significant increase in ALP activity/cell was noted with serum albumin bound to the surface, however, the BCSP-1 bound surface exhibited an even greater ALP activity that showed a surface concentration dependent trend. An optimal BCSP-1 surface density in the range of 0.87-2.24 nmol/cm2 elicited the maximum ALP activity/cell at day 6 of culture. The peptide bound ceramic generated an ALP activity/cell that was roughly 3-fold higher than the non-modified ceramic and 2-fold higher than the APTES-grafted ceramic. PMID:18030432

  7. Pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide 43 stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via gonadotropin-releasing hormone in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sejal R; Murphy, Kevin G; Thompson, Emily L; Patterson, Michael; Curtis, Annette E; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2008-09-01

    Although it is established that other members of the RFamide family stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the influence of the novel pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide 43 (QRFP43) is not known. We show intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of QRFP43 (2 nmol) to male rats increased plasma LH and FSH levels at 40 min after injection. icv administration of 3 nmol QRFP43 did not affect food intake in ad-libitum-fed male rats. The icv administration of 2 nmol QRFP43 did not significantly influence behavior in male rats. Intraperitoneal administration of doses up to 1200 nmol/kg QRFP43 in male rats did not significantly influence circulating gonadotropin or sex steroid levels. In vitro, QRFP43 stimulated GnRH release from hypothalamic explants from male rats and from GT1-7 cells. Pretreatment with a GnRH receptor antagonist, cetrorelix, blocked the increase in plasma LH levels after icv administration of QRFP43 (2 nmol). These results suggest that icv QRFP43 activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via GnRH.

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulates DNA synthesis in mouse 3T3 cells: Role of cAMP, Ca sup 2+ , and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Zurier, B.B.; Kozma, M.; Sinnett-Smith, J.; Rozengurt, E. )

    1988-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulated initiation of DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. The peptide stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin and either forskolin or an inhibitor of cAMP phosphodiesterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effect was obtained at 1 nM. At mitogenic concentrations, VIP stimulated a marked accumulation (eightfold) of cAMP. In contrast to other growth-promoting neuropeptides, VIP did not induce an increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} or the activation of protein kinase C. The authors conclude that neuropeptides can modulate long-term cell proliferation through multiple signaling pathways.

  9. Speract, a sea urchin egg peptide that regulates sperm motility, also stimulates sperm mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    García-Rincón, Juan; Darszon, Alberto; Beltrán, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Sea urchin sperm have only one mitochondrion, that in addition to being the main source of energy, may modulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to regulate their motility and possibly the acrosome reaction. Speract is a decapeptide from the outer jelly layer of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus egg that upon binding to its receptor in the sperm, stimulates sperm motility, respiration and ion fluxes, among other physiological events. Altering the sea urchin sperm mitochondrial function with specific inhibitors of this organelle, increases [Ca(2+)]i in an external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext)-dependent manner (Ardón, et al., 2009. BBActa 1787: 15), suggesting that the mitochondrion is involved in sperm [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis. To further understand the interrelationship between the mitochondrion and the speract responses, we measured mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) and NADH levels. We found that the stimulation of sperm with speract depolarizes the mitochondrion and increases the levels of NADH. Surprisingly, these responses are independent of external Ca(2+) and are due to the increase in intracellular pH (pHi) induced by speract. Our findings indicate that speract, by regulating pHi, in addition to [Ca(2+)]i, may finely modulate mitochondrial metabolism to control motility and ensure that sperm reach the egg and fertilize it. PMID:26772728

  10. Gene expression for peptides in neurons of the petrosal and nodose ganglia in rat.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Seroogy, K B; Millhorn, D E

    1991-01-01

    In situ hybridization was used to determine whether genes for neuropeptides [substance P/neurokinin A (SP/NKA), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), somatostatin (SOM), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK)] are expressed in inferior ganglia of the vagus (nodose) and glossopharyngeal (petrosal) nerves. Synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides, complementary to the cognate, mRNAs were labeled with [32P] or [35S], and hybridized to 10 microns thick sections of unperfused tissue which were then processed for film and emulsion autoradiography. We found numerous, clustered neuronal perikarya throughout the nodose and petrosal ganglia that expressed preprotachykinin A (SP/NKA) and CGRP mRNAs to varying degrees. Neurons expressing preproSOM mRNA were less abundant and more scattered throughout both ganglia. Notably, we found mRNA for NPY in cells (usually 5-10 per section) in both ganglia. To our knowledge, this is first evidence for NPY in these sensory ganglia. In contrast to previous immunohistochemical findings, we found no evidence for expression of preproCCK in either the nodose or petrosal ganglia. The present findings demonstrate that cells of the nodose and petrosal ganglia express the genes for a number of neuropeptides that are presumably involved with transmission of visceral sensory afferent information to higher order neurons of the central nervous system. PMID:1708726

  11. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  12. Interferon-gamma released by gluten-stimulated celiac disease-specific intestinal T cells enhances the transepithelial flux of gluten peptides.

    PubMed

    Bethune, Michael T; Siegel, Matthew; Howles-Banerji, Samuel; Khosla, Chaitan

    2009-05-01

    Celiac sprue is a T-cell-mediated enteropathy elicited in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary gluten proteins. To initiate and propagate inflammation, proteolytically resistant gluten peptides must be translocated across the small intestinal epithelium and presented to DQ2-restricted T cells, but the effectors enabling this translocation under normal and inflammatory conditions are not well understood. We demonstrate that a fluorescently labeled antigenic 33-mer gluten peptide is translocated intact across a T84 cultured epithelial cell monolayer and that preincubation of the monolayer with media from gluten-stimulated, celiac patient-derived intestinal T cells enhances the apical-to-basolateral flux of this peptide in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The permeability-enhancing activity of activated T-cell media is inhibited by blocking antibodies against either interferon-gamma or its receptor and is recapitulated using recombinant interferon-gamma. At saturating levels of interferon-gamma, activated T-cell media does not further increase transepithelial peptide flux, indicating the primacy of interferon-gamma as an effector of increased epithelial permeability during inflammation. Reducing the assay temperature to 4 degrees C reverses the effect of interferon-gamma but does not reduce basal peptide flux occurring in the absence of interferon-gamma, suggesting active transcellular transport of intact peptides is increased during inflammation. A panel of disease-relevant gluten peptides exhibited an inverse correlation between size and transepithelial flux but no apparent sequence constraints. Anti-interferon-gamma therapy may mitigate the vicious cycle of gluten-induced interferon-gamma secretion and interferon-gamma-mediated enhancement of gluten peptide flux but is unlikely to prevent translocation of gluten peptides in the absence of inflammatory conditions.

  13. Neuropeptides stimulate human osteoblast activity and promote gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenhui; Zhang, Xuemin; Shi, Shushan; Zhang, Yingze

    2013-06-01

    Neuropeptides released from the skeletal nerve fibers have neurotransmitter and immunoregulatory roles; they exert paracrine biological effects on bone cells present close to the nerve endings expressing these signaling molecules. The aims of this study were a systematic investigation of the effects of the neuropeptides substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) on the cell viability and function of the human osteoblasts, and comparing their difference in the role of regulating bone formation. Cultures of normal human osteoblasts were treated with SP, CGRP, VIP, NPY or TH at three concentrations. We found that each of the five neuropeptides induced increases in cell viability of human osteoblasts. The stimulatory action of NPY was the highest, followed by VIP, SP and TH, while CGRP had the lowest stimulatory effect. The viability index of osteoblasts was inversely associated with the concentration of neuropeptides, and positively with the time of exposure. Moreover, the five neuropeptides increased the ALP activity and osteocalcin to different extents in a dose-dependent manner. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly promoted by neuropeptides. The results demonstrated that neuropeptides released from skeletal nerve endings after a stimulus appeared to be able to induce the proliferation and activity of osteoblasts via enhancing GJIC between cells, and further influence the bone formation. These findings may contribute toward a better understanding of the neural influence on bone remodeling and improving treatments related to bone diseases.

  14. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide stimulates thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells: role of endothelin-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Ke-Hong; Zhong, Qing; Isales, Carlos M.; Iscules, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have previously characterized the receptor for glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) in vascular endothelial cells (EC). Different EC types were found to contain distinct GIPR splice variants. To determine whether activation of the GIPR splice variants resulted in different cellular responses, we examined GIP effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), which contain two GIPR splice variants, and compared them with a spontaneously transformed human umbilical vein EC line, ECV 304, which contains four GIPR splice variants. GIP dose-dependently stimulated HUVEC and ECV 304 proliferation as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. GIP increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion from HUVEC but not from ECV 304. Use of the endothelin B receptor blocker BQ-788 resulted in an inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation in HUVEC but not in ECV 304. These findings suggest that, although GIP increases [3H]thymidine incorporation in both HUVEC and ECV 304, this proliferative response is mediated by ET-1 only in HUVEC. These differences in cellular response to GIP may be related to differences in activation of GIPR splice variants.

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation increases blood pressure and heart rate and activates autonomic regulatory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Lee, Charlotte E.; Marcus, Jacob N.; Williams, Todd D.; Overton, J. Michael; Lopez, Marisol E.; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Baggio, Laurie; Saper, Clifford B.; Drucker, Daniel J.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) released from the gut functions as an incretin that stimulates insulin secretion. GLP-1 is also a brain neuropeptide that controls feeding and drinking behavior and gastric emptying and elicits neuroendocrine responses including development of conditioned taste aversion. Although GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are under development for the treatment of diabetes, GLP-1 administration may increase blood pressure and heart rate in vivo. We report here that centrally and peripherally administered GLP-1R agonists dose-dependently increased blood pressure and heart rate. GLP-1R activation induced c-fos expression in the adrenal medulla and neurons in autonomic control sites in the rat brain, including medullary catecholamine neurons providing input to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Furthermore, GLP-1R agonists rapidly activated tyrosine hydroxylase transcription in brainstem catecholamine neurons. These findings suggest that the central GLP-1 system represents a regulator of sympathetic outflow leading to downstream activation of cardiovascular responses in vivo. PMID:12093887

  16. Efficient in vitro Expansion of JC virus-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Responses by JCV peptide-stimulated Dendritic Cells from patients with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Marzocchetti, Angela; Lima, Marco; Tompkins, Troy; Kavanagh, Daniel.G.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; O'Neill, David W.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2009-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the brain caused by JC virus (JCV) for which there is no cure. PML patients who have JCV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in their blood have a better clinical outcome. We compared JCV-specific CTL responses in vitro elicited either by JCV peptide-loaded dendritic cells (DC) or by direct peptide stimulation of lymphocytes from 20 HLA A*0201+ healthy controls, HIV+ and PML patients. JCV peptide-loaded DC elicited a stronger CTL expansion in 13/15 responders. DC can induce potent JCV-specific CTL response in vitro, and may constitute a promising approach for PML immunotherapy. PMID:19062062

  17. Vasoactive intestinal peptide enhanced aromatase activity in the neonatal rat ovary before development of primary follicles or responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    George, F.W.; Ojeda, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have investigated the factors that regulate aromatase activity in fetal-neonatal rat ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity (assessed by measuring the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed from (1..beta..-/sup 3/H)testosterone) is low prior to birth and increases to values greater than 30 pmol/hr per mg of protein between days 8 and 12 after birth. The appearance of ovarian aromatase coincides with the development of primordial follicles. Fetal-neonatal ovaries maintained in serum-free organ culture do not develop aromatase activity at the expected time. Ovine follicle-stimulating hormone, ovine luteinizing hormone, or their combination failed to induce the enzyme activity in cultured fetal ovaries, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone is effective in preventing the decline in aromatase activity when postnatal day 8 ovaries are placed in culture. In contrast to follicle-stimulating hormone, dibutyryl-cAMP markedly enhances ovarian aromatase in cultured fetal ovaries. Likewise, enhancement of endogenouse cAMP formation with forskolin or cholera toxin caused an increase in enzyme activity within 24 hr. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a peptide known to occur in ovarian nerves, caused a dose-dependent increase in aromatase activity in fetal ovaries prior to folliculogenesis. Of related peptides tested, only the peptide having N-terminal histidine and C-terminal isoleucine amide was capable of inducing aromatase activity in fetal ovaries. The fact that VIP can induce aromatase activity in fetal rat ovaries prior to follicle formation and prior to responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone suggests that this neuropeptide may play a critical role in ovarian differentiation.

  18. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Geraldo E; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R G; Martins, Heber A; Guarnier, Flávia A; Zanoni, Jacqueline N

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  19. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Vicentini, Geraldo E.; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R. G.; Martins, Heber A.; Guarnier, Flávia A.; Zanoni, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  20. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Geraldo E; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R G; Martins, Heber A; Guarnier, Flávia A; Zanoni, Jacqueline N

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress.

  1. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor stimulation reverses key deficits in distinct rodent models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Harkavyi, Alexander; Abuirmeileh, Amjad; Lever, Rebecca; Kingsbury, Ann E; Biggs, Christopher S; Whitton, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Background It has recently become apparent that neuroinflammation may play a significant role in Parkinson's disease (PD). This is also the case in animal paradigms of the disease. The potential neuroprotective action of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist exendin-4 (EX-4), which is protective against cytokine mediated apoptosis and may stimulate neurogenesis, was investigated In paradigms of PD. Methods Two rodent 'models' of PD, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and lipopolysaccaride (LPS), were used to test the effects of EX-4. Rats were then investigated in vivo and ex vivo with a wide range of behavioural, neurochemical and histological tests to measure integrity of the nigrostriatal system. Results EX-4 (0.1 and 0.5 μg/kg) was given seven days after intracerebral toxin injection. Seven days later circling behaviour was measured following apomorphine challenge. Circling was significantly lower in rats given EX-4 at both doses compared to animals given 6-OHDA/LPS and vehicle. Consistent with these observations, striatal tissue DA concentrations were markedly higher in 6-OHDA/LPS + EX-4 treated rats versus 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle groups, whilst assay of L-DOPA production by tyrosine hydroxylase was greatly reduced in the striata of 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle rats, but this was not the case in rats co-administered EX-4. Furthermore nigral TH staining recorded in 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle treated animals was markedly lower than in sham-operated or EX-4 treated rats. Finally, EX-4 clearly reversed the loss of extracellular DA in the striata of toxin lesioned freely moving rats. Conclusion The apparent ability of EX-4 to arrest progression of, or even reverse nigral lesions once established, suggests that pharmacological manipulation of the GLP-1 receptor system could have substantial therapeutic utility in PD. Critically, in contrast to other peptide agents that have been demonstrated to possess neuroprotective properties in pre-clinical models of PD, EX-4 is in

  2. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  3. Effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on potassium-stimulated aldosterone secretion: potential relevance to hypoaldosteronism in man.

    PubMed

    Clark, B A; Brown, R S; Epstein, F H

    1992-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to suppress aldosterone secretion under certain circumstances, although the physiological significance of this is uncertain. We wondered if ANP would suppress potassium-stimulated aldosterone secretion in man and, if so, whether we might find high circulating levels of ANP in patients with the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism. We studied seven healthy young subjects under two conditions: 1) infusion of KCl (0.5 mmol/kg) over 45 min, and 2) KCl infused with ANP (0.01 microgram/kg.min) for 60 min. We also evaluated ANP levels in eight elderly subjects with the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism, as defined by hyperkalemia (mean serum K+, 5.3 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) associated with inappropriately low aldosterone levels (216 +/- 50 pmol/L). In the normal subjects, ANP almost completely suppressed the aldosterone response to KCl infusion (P less than 0.001, by analysis of variance) despite a similar rise in the serum potassium level with KCl alone (0.70 +/- 0.07 mmol/L) and KCl plus ANP (0.75 +/- 0.09 mmol/L). PRA fell slightly during KCl plus ANP treatment, but did not change during the infusion of KCl alone. ANP levels were approximately 800 pmol/L during the ANP infusion studies. Endogenous ANP levels in the hyperkalemic patients with hypoaldosteronism were markedly elevated at 1186 +/- 340 pmol/L (compared to 93 +/- 10 pmol/L in healthy elderly controls), a level that would be capable of suppressing the potassium-mediated aldosterone response. Exogenous infusion of ANP suppressed the aldosterone response to hyperkalemia, and ANP levels were found to be markedly elevated in a group of patients with hyperkalemia and hypoaldosteronism. We suggest that ANP may contribute to clinically significant hypoaldosteronism and hyperkalemia in the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism.

  4. Vasoactive intestinal peptide: A potent stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate accumulation in gut carcinoma cell lines in culture*

    PubMed Central

    Laburthe, M.; Rousset, M.; Boissard, C.; Chevalier, G.; Zweibaum, A.; Rosselin, G.

    1978-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent and efficient stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in a human colon carcinoma cell line, HT 29. cAMP accumulation is sensitive to a concentration of VIP as low as 3×10-12 M. Maximum VIP-induced cAMP levels were observed with 10-9 M VIP and are about 200 times above the basal levels. Half-maximum cAMP production was obtained at 3×10-10 M VIP. 125I-Labeled VIP was found to bind to HT 29 cells; this binding was competitively inhibited by concentrations of unlabeled VIP between 10-10 and 10-7 M. Half-maximum inhibition of binding was observed with 2×10-9 M VIP. Secretin also stimulated cAMP accumulation in HT 29 cells, but its effectiveness was 1/1000 that of VIP. The other peptides tested at 10-7 M, such as insulin, glucagon, bovine pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, octapeptide of cholecystokinin, neurotensin, and substance P, did not stimulate cAMP accumulation. Prostaglandin E1 and catecholamines stimulated cAMP production but were 1/2.3 and 1/5.5 as efficient as VIP, respectively. Another malignant cell line from the gut, the human rectal tumor cell line HRT 18, is also sensitive to VIP. In HRT 18 cells, VIP stimulated cAMP accumulation with a maximal effect at 10-8 M; half-maximum stimulation was observed at about 10-9 M. These results demonstrate the presence of VIP receptors in two malignant human intestinal cell lines (HT 29 and HRT 18) in culture and provide a model for studying the action of VIP on cell proliferation. PMID:208077

  5. The novel anti-migraine agent rizatriptan inhibits neurogenic dural vasodilation and extravasation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D J; Shepheard, S L; Hill, R G; Hargreaves, R J

    1997-06-01

    These studies in anaesthetised rats showed, using intravital microscopy, that the novel anti-migraine agent, rizatriptan, significantly reduced electrically stimulated dural vasodilation but had no effect on increases in dural vessel diameter produced by exogenous substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Rizatriptan also significantly inhibited dural plasma protein extravasation produced by high intensity electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion. We suggest that rizatriptan inhibits the release of sensory neuropeptides from perivascular trigeminal nerves to prevent neurogenic vasodilation and extravasation in the dura mater. These prejunctional inhibitory effects may be involved in the anti-migraine action of rizatriptan. PMID:9203569

  6. 203Pb-Labeled Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide as an Imaging Probe for Melanoma Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yubin, Miao; Figueroa, Said D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Moore, Herbert A.; Testa, Richard F.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2008-05-01

    Abbreviations: a-MSH; alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone, DOTA; 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid, Re(Arg11)CCMSH; DOTA-[Cys3,4,10, D-Phe7, Arg11]a-MSH3-13, NDP; [Nle4,d-Phe7] a-MSH3-13. Abstract Peptide-targeted alpha therapy with 200 mCi of 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH cured 45% of B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice in a 120-day study, highlighting its melanoma treatment potential. However, there is a need to develop an imaging surrogate for patient specific dosimetry and to monitor the tumor response to 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH as a matched-pair SPECT imaging agent for 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH. Method: DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was labeled with 203Pb in 0.5 M NH4OAc buffer at pH 5.4. The internalization and efflux of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were examined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. A micro-SPECT/CT imaging study was performed with 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in a B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mouse at 2 h post-injection. Results: 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was easily prepared in NH4OAc buffer and completely separated from the excess non-radiolabeled peptide by RP-HPLC. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH displayed fast internalization and extended retention in B16/F1 cells. Approximately 73% of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH activity internalized after a 20-min incubation at 25C. After incubating the cells in culture media for 20 min, 78% of internalized activity remained in the cells. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited similar biodistribution pattern with 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor uptake of 12.00 +/- 3.20 %ID/g at 1 h post-injection. The tumor uptake gradually decreased to 3.43 +/- 1.12 %ID/g at 48 h post-injection. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor to kidney

  7. Melanoma-targeting properties of (99m)technetium-labeled cyclic alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Cheng, Z; Hoffman, T J; Jurisson, S S; Quinn, T P

    2000-10-15

    Preliminary reports have demonstrated that (99m)technetium (Tc)-labeled cyclic [Cys(3,4,10), D-Phe7]alpha-MSH(3-13) (CCMSH) exhibits high tumor uptake and retention values in a murine melanoma mouse model. In this report, the tumor targeting mechanism of 99mTc-CCMSH was studied and compared with four other radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) peptide analogues: 125I-(Tyr2)-[Nle4, D-Phe7]alpha-MSH [125I-(Tyr2)-NDP]; 99mTc-CGCG-NDP; 99mTc-Gly11-CCMSH; and 99mTc-Nle11-CCMSH. In vitro receptor binding, internalization, and cellular retention of radiolabeled alpha-MSH analogues in B16/F1 murine cell line demonstrated that >70% of the receptor-bound radiolabeled analogues were internalized together with the receptor. Ninety % of the internalized 125I-(Tyr2)-NDP, whereas only 36% of internalized 99mTc-CCMSH, was released from the cells into the medium during a 4-h incubation at 37 degrees C. Two mouse models, C57 mice and severe combined immunodeficient (Scid) mice, inoculated s.c. with B16/F1 murine and TXM-13 human melanoma cells were used for the in vivo studies. Tumor uptake values of 11.32 and 2.39 [% injected dose (ID)/g] for 99mTc-CCMSH at 4 h after injection, resulted in an uptake ratio of tumor:blood of 39.0 and 11.5 in murine melanoma-C57 and human melanoma-Scid mouse models, respectively. Two strategies for decreasing the nonspecific kidney uptake of 99mTc-CCMSH, substitution of Lys11 in CCMSH with Gly11 or Nle11, and lysine coinjection, were evaluated. The biodistribution data for the modified peptides showed that Lys11 replacement dramatically decreased the kidney uptake, whereas the tumor uptakes of 99mTc-Nle11- and 99mTc-Gly11-CCMSH were significantly lower than that of 99mTc-CCMSH. Lysine coinjection significantly decreased the kidney uptake (e.g., from 14.6% ID/g to 4.5% ID/g at 4 h after injection in murine melanoma-C57 mice) without significantly changing the value of tumor uptake of 99mTc-CCMSH. In conclusion, the compact

  8. Chronic preclinical safety evaluation of EPO-018B, a pegylated peptidic erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in monkeys and rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue-Lian; Gu, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Yong-Chun; Zhu, Hai; Xia, Zhen-Na; Li, Jian-Zhong; Lu, Guo-Cai

    2016-09-15

    EPO-018B, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA), is mainly designed for treatment of anemia caused by chronic renal failure and chemotherapy against cancer. It overcomes the deficiencies of currently approved ESA, including the frequent administration of temperature-sensitive recombinant protein and anti-EPO antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). This study was designed to evaluate the potential chronic toxicity of EPO-018B. Subcutaneous administration doses were designed as 0, 0.2, 1 and 10mg/kg for six months for 160 rats (20/gender/group) and 0, 0.3, 3 and 20mg/kg for nine months for 32 monkeys (4/gender/group) once every three weeks. The vehicles received the same volume of physiological saline injection. All animals survived to the scheduled necropsies after six weeks (for rats) and fourteen weeks (for monkeys) recovery period, except for the two high-dose female rats and two high-dose male monkeys, which were considered related to the increased RBCs, chronic blood hyperviscosity and chronic cardiac injury. EPO-018B is supposed to be subcutaneously injected once every month and the intended human therapeutic dose is 0.025mg/kg. The study findings at 0.2mg/kg for rats and 0.3mg/kg for monkeys were considered to be the study NOAEL (the no observed adverse effect level), which were more than ten times the intended human therapeutic dose. Higher doses caused adverse effects related to the liver toxicity, cardiotoxicity, appearance of neutralizing antibodies of EPO-018B and the decrease of serum glucose and cholesterol. Most treatment-induced effects were reversible or revealed ongoing recovery upon the discontinuation of treatment. The sequelae occurred in rats and monkeys were considered secondary to exaggerated pharmacology and would less likely occur in the intended patient population. As to the differences between human beings and animals, the safety of EPO-018B need to be further confirmed in the future clinical studies

  9. LPXRFamide peptide stimulates growth hormone and prolactin gene expression during the spawning period in the grass puffer, a semi-lunar synchronized spawner.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2016-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) plays as a multifunctional neurohormone that controls reproduction in birds and mammals. LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) peptide, the fish ortholog of GnIH, has been shown to regulate the secretion of not only gonadotropin (GTH) but also growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), which are potentially important for gonadal function. To investigate the role of LPXRFa peptide on reproduction of the grass puffer, which spawns in semilunar cycles, we examined changes in the levels of gh and prl expression over the several months during the reproductive cycle, and the effects of goldfish LPXRFa peptide-1 (gfLPXRFa-1) on their expression were examined using primary pituitary cultures. The expression levels of both gh and prl showed significant changes during the reproductive cycle in both sexes with one peak in the spawning and pre-spawning periods for gh and prl, respectively. Particularly, gh showed substantial increase in expression in the spawning and post-spawning periods, indicative of its essentiality in the advanced stage of reproduction. gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated the expression of both gh and prl but there was a marked difference in response between them: gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated gh expression at a relatively low dose but little effect was observed on prl. Combined with the previous results of daily and circadian oscillations of lpxrfa expression, the present results suggest that LPXRFa peptide is important in the control of the cyclic reproduction by serving as a multifunctional hypophysiotropic factor that regulates the expression of gh and prl as well as GTH subunit genes.

  10. Graphene oxide-stimulated myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells on PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y. C.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Hong, S. W.; Oh, J.-W.; Kim, C.-S.; Kim, B.; Hyun, J. K.; Kim, Y.-J.; Han, D.-W.

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade, much attention has been paid to graphene-based nanomaterials because they are considered as potential candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds for tissue engineering and substrates for the differentiation of stem cells. Until now, electrospun matrices composed of various biodegradable copolymers have been extensively developed for tissue engineering and regeneration; however, their use in combination with graphene oxide (GO) is novel and challenging. In this study, nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 phage with RGD peptide displayed on its surface (RGD peptide-M13 phage) were prepared as extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking substrates. RGD peptide is a tripeptide (Arg-Gly-Asp) found on ECM proteins that promotes various cellular behaviors. The physicochemical properties of PLGA and RGD peptide-M13 phage (PLGA/RGD peptide) nanofiber matrices were characterized by atomic force microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, the growth of C2C12 mouse myoblasts on the PLGA/RGD peptide matrices was examined by measuring the metabolic activity. Moreover, the differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts on the matrices when treated with GO was evaluated. The cellular behaviors, including growth and differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts, were substantially enhanced on the PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices when treated with GO. Overall, these findings suggest that the PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices can be used in combination with GO as a novel strategy for skeletal tissue regeneration.

  11. Campylobacter jejuni carbon starvation protein A (CstA) is involved in peptide utilization, motility and agglutination, and has a role in stimulation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, J J; Vegge, C S; Frøkiær, H; Howlett, R M; Krogfelt, K A; Kelly, D J; Ingmer, H

    2013-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of severe gastroenteritis in the developed world. The major symptom of campylobacteriosis is inflammatory diarrhoea. The molecular mechanisms of this infection are poorly understood compared to those of less frequent disease-causing pathogens. In a previous study, we identified C. jejuni proteins that antibodies in human campylobacteriosis patients reacted with. One of the immunogenic proteins identified (Cj0917) displays homology to carbon starvation protein A (CstA) from Escherichia coli, where this protein is involved in the starvation response and peptide uptake. In contrast to many bacteria, C. jejuni relies on amino acids and organic acids for energy, but in vivo it is highly likely that peptides are also utilized, although their mechanisms of uptake are unknown. In this study, Biolog phenotype microarrays have been used to show that a ΔcstA mutant has a reduced ability to utilize a number of di- and tri-peptides as nitrogen sources. This phenotype was restored through genetic complementation, suggesting CstA is a peptide uptake system in C. jejuni. Furthermore, the ΔcstA mutant also displayed reduced motility and reduced agglutination compared to WT bacteria; these phenotypes were also restored through complementation. Murine dendritic cells exposed to UV-killed bacteria showed a reduced IL-12 production, but the same IL-10 response when encountering C. jejuni ΔcstA compared to the WT strain. The greater Th1 stimulation elicited by the WT as compared to ΔcstA mutant cells indicates an altered antigenic presentation on the surface, and thus an altered recognition of the mutant. Thus, we conclude that C. jejuni CstA is important not only for peptide utilization, but also it may influence host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23682166

  12. Pregnancy Increases Relaxation in Human Omental Arteries to the CGRP Family of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanlin; Betancourt, Ancizar; Chauhan, Madhu; Balakrishnan, Meena; Lugo, Fernando; Anderson, Matthew L; Espinoza, Jimmy; Fox, Karin; Belfort, Michael; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2015-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CALCB) and its family members adrenomedullin (ADM) and intermedin (ADM2) play important roles in maintaining vascular adaptations during pregnancy in animal models. The present study was designed to evaluate the responses of omental arteries to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 in pregnant and nonpregnant women, and to determine the mechanisms involved. By using resistance omental arteries collected from nonpregnant women (n = 15) during laparotomy and from term pregnant women (n = 15) at cesarean delivery, this study shows that the receptor components--calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CALCRL) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1, 2 and 3--are localized to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in omental arteries, with increased expressions of both mRNA and protein in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. The myography study demonstrated that CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 (0.1-100 nM) dose dependently relax U46619 (1 muM) precontracted omental artery segments, and the maximum possible effects to CALCB and ADM2, but not to ADM, are significantly enhanced in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. Further, the vasodilatory responses to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 are reduced by inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NAME), adenylyl cyclase (SQ22536), voltage-activated potassium channels (4-aminopyrodin and tetrabutylammonium), Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel (charybdotoxin), and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin). In conclusion, the CALCB family of peptides, CALCB and ADM2, increase human omental artery relaxation during pregnancy through diverse mechanisms, including NO, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) and prostaglandins, and thus could contribute to the vascular adaptations during pregnancy in the human.

  13. The Anorexigenic Peptide Neuromedin U (NMU) Attenuates Amphetamine-Induced Locomotor Stimulation, Accumbal Dopamine Release and Expression of Conditioned Place Preference in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallöf, Daniel; Vestlund, Jesper; Engel, Jörgen A.; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine dependence, besides its substantial economical consequence, is a serious cause of mortality and morbidity. By investigations of the neurochemical correlates through which addictive drugs, such as amphetamine, activate the mesoaccumbal dopamine system unique targets for treatment of drug addiction can be identified. This reward link consists of a dopamine projection from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) suggesting that these brain areas are important for reward. The physiological function of gut-brain peptides has expanded beyond food intake modulation and involves regulation of drug reinforcement. A novel candidate for reward regulation is the anorexigenic peptide neuromedin U (NMU). We therefore investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of NMU on amphetamine’s well-documented effects on the mesoaccumbal dopamine system, i.e. locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release in mice. In addition, the effect of accumbal NMU administration on locomotor activity was examined. The effect of NMU, icv or intra-NAc, on the expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) was elucidated. Firstly, we showed that icv administration of NMU attenuate the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation, accumbal dopamine release and expression of CPP in mice. Secondly, we found that a lower dose of NMU (icv) reduce the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice. Thirdly, we demonstrated that NMU administration into the NAc block the ability of amphetamine to cause a locomotor stimulation in mice. However, accumbal NMU administration did not attenuate the amphetamine-induced expression of CPP in mice. Our novel data suggest that central NMU signalling is involved in development of amphetamine dependence. PMID:27139195

  14. The 'headache tree' via umbellulone and TRPA1 activates the trigeminovascular system.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Vriens, Joris; Prenen, Jean; Benemei, Silvia; De Siena, Gaetano; la Marca, Giancarlo; Andrè, Eunice; Preti, Delia; Avonto, Cristina; Sadofsky, Laura; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Dussor, Greg; Porreca, Frank; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Appendino, Giovanni; Nilius, Bernd; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2012-02-01

    The California bay laurel or Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt., is known as the 'headache tree' because the inhalation of its vapours can cause severe headache crises. However, the underlying mechanism of the headache precipitating properties of Umbellularia californica is unknown. The monoterpene ketone umbellulone, the major volatile constituent of the leaves of Umbellularia californica, has irritating properties, and is a reactive molecule that rapidly binds thiols. Thus, we hypothesized that umbellulone stimulates the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel in a subset of peptidergic, nocioceptive neurons, activating the trigeminovascular system via this mechanism. Umbellulone, from µM to sub-mM concentrations, selectively stimulated transient receptor potential ankyrin 1-expressing HEK293 cells and rat trigeminal ganglion neurons, but not untransfected cells or neurons in the presence of the selective transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonist, HC-030031. Umbellulone evoked a calcium-dependent release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from rodent trigeminal nerve terminals in the dura mater. In wild-type mice, umbellulone elicited excitation of trigeminal neurons and released calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerve terminals. These two responses were absent in transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 deficient mice. Umbellulone caused nocioceptive behaviour after stimulation of trigeminal nerve terminals in wild-type, but not transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 deficient mice. Intranasal application or intravenous injection of umbellulone increased rat meningeal blood flow in a dose-dependent manner; a response selectively inhibited by systemic administration of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 or calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists. These data indicate that umbellulone activates, through a transient receptor potential ankyrin 1-dependent mechanism, the trigeminovascular system, thereby causing

  15. Selective cleavage of SNAREs in sensory neurons unveils protein complexes mediating peptide exocytosis triggered by different stimuli.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Dolly, J Oliver; Wang, Jiafu

    2014-10-01

    Oligomerisation of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes is required for synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release. How these regulate the release of pain peptides elicited by different stimuli from sensory neurons has not been established. Herein, K(+) depolarization was found to induce multiple sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant SNARE complexes in sensory neurons exposed to botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), with molecular weights ranging from 104-288 k (large) to 38-104 k (small). Isoform 1 of vesicle-associated membrane protein 1 (VAMP 1) assembled into stable complexes upon depolarisation and was required for the participation of intact synaptosome-associated protein of relative molecular mass 25 k (SNAP-25) or BoNT/A-truncated form (SNAP-25A) in the large functional and small inactive SDS-resistant SNARE complexes. Cleaving VAMP 1 decreased SNAP-25A in the functional complexes to a much greater extent than the remaining intact SNAP-25. Syntaxin 1 proved essential for the incorporation of intact and SNAP-25A into the large complexes. Truncation of syntaxin 1 by BoNT/C1 caused /A- and/or /C1-truncated SNAP-25 to appear in non-functional complexes and blocked the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) elicited by capsaicin, ionomycin, thapsigargin or K(+) depolarization. Only the latter two were susceptible to /A. Inhibition of CGRP release by BoNT/A was reversed by capsaicin and/or ionomycin, an effect overcome by BoNT/C1. Unlike BoNT/B, BoNT/D cleaved VAMP 1 in addition to 2 and 3 in rat sensory neurons and blocked both CGRP and substance P release. Thus, unlike SNAP-25, syntaxin 1 and VAMP 1 are more suitable targets to abolish functional SNARE complexes and pain peptide release evoked by any stimuli.

  16. Electrophysiological and neurochemical techniques to investigate sensory neurons in analgesia research.

    PubMed

    Babes, Alexandru; Fischer, Michael J M; Reid, Gordon; Sauer, Susanne K; Zimmermann, Katharina; Reeh, Peter W

    2010-01-01

    The primary afferent nociceptive neuron has recently attracted major research interest because of the cloning of very selectively expressed and well-conserved ion channel genes. All parts of the neuron, sensory terminals, axon and cell body, are accessible to validated research techniques in vitro using various isolated tissues or cells taken from laboratory animals. Single-unit recording and measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release as well as patch-clamping and calcium imaging of cultured sensory neurons provide different kinds of information, and no model alone answers all questions. In combination, however, consistent results and complementary evidence form a solid basis for translational research to follow. PMID:20336427

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Dietary Fat Induces Changes in the Transcriptional Factors,TEF and YAP, Which May Stimulate Differentiation of Peptide Neurons in Rat Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kinning; Mandava, Sushma; Chen, Karen; Barson, Jessica R.; Buschlen, Sylvie; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2013-01-01

    Gestational exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) stimulates the differentiation of orexigenic peptide-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus of offspring. To examine possible mechanisms that mediate this phenomenon, this study investigated the transcriptional factor, transcription enhancer factor-1 (TEF), and co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP), which when inactivated stimulate neuronal differentiation. In rat embryos and postnatal offspring prenatally exposed to a HFD compared to chow, changes in hypothalamic TEF and YAP and their relationship to the orexigenic peptide, enkephalin (ENK), were measured. The HFD offspring at postnatal day 15 (P15) exhibited in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus a significant reduction in YAP mRNA and protein, and increased levels of inactive and total TEF protein, with no change in mRNA. Similarly, HFD-exposed embryos at embryonic day 19 (E19) showed in whole hypothalamus significantly decreased levels of YAP mRNA and protein and TEF mRNA, and increased levels of inactive TEF protein, suggesting that HFD inactivates TEF and YAP. This was accompanied by increased density and fluorescence intensity of ENK neurons. A close relationship between TEF and ENK was suggested by the finding that TEF co-localizes with this peptide in hypothalamic neurons and HFD reduced the density of TEF/ENK co-labeled neurons, even while the number and fluorescence intensity of single-labeled TEF neurons were increased. Increased YAP inactivity by HFD was further evidenced by a decrease in number and fluorescence intensity of YAP-containing neurons, although the density of YAP/ENK co-labeled neurons was unaltered. Genetic knockdown of TEF or YAP stimulated ENK expression in hypothalamic neurons, supporting a close relationship between these transcription factors and neuropeptide. These findings suggest that prenatal HFD exposure inactivates both hypothalamic TEF and YAP, by either decreasing their levels or increasing their inactive form, and that

  18. Effects of KiSS-1 peptide, the natural ligand of GPR54, on follicle-stimulating hormone secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Navarro, V M; Castellano, J M; Fernández-Fernández, R; Tovar, S; Roa, J; Mayen, A; Barreiro, M L; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E; Dieguez, C; Pinilla, L; Tena-Sempere, M

    2005-04-01

    KiSS-1 was originally identified as a metastasis suppressor gene encoding an array of structurally related peptides, namely kisspeptins, which acting through the G protein-coupled receptor GPR54 are able to inhibit tumor progression. Unexpectedly, a reproductive facet of this newly discovered system has recently arisen, and characterization of the role of the KiSS-1/GPR54 system in the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin secretion has been initiated. However, such studies have been so far mostly restricted to LH, and very little is known about the actual contribution of this system in the regulation of FSH release. To address this issue, the effects of KiSS-1 peptide on FSH secretion were monitored in vivo and in vitro under different experimental conditions. Intracerebroventricular administration of KiSS-1 peptide significantly stimulated FSH secretion in prepubertal and adult rats. Yet, dose-response analyses in vivo demonstrated an ED(50) value for the FSH-releasing effects of KiSS-1 of 400 pmol, i.e. approximately 100-fold higher than that of LH. In addition, systemic (ip and iv) injection of KiSS-1 significantly stimulated FSH secretion in vivo. However, KiSS-1 failed to elicit basal FSH release directly at the pituitary level, although it moderately enhanced GnRH-stimulated FSH secretion in vitro. Finally, mechanistic studies revealed that the ability of KiSS-1 to elicit FSH secretion was abolished by the blockade of endogenous GnRH actions, but it was persistently observed in different models of leptin insufficiency and after blockade of endogenous excitatory amino acid and nitric oxide pathways, i.e. relevant signals in the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin secretion. In summary, our results extend previous recent observations on the role of KiSS-1 in the control of LH secretion and provide solid evidence for a stimulatory effect of KiSS-1 on FSH release, acting at central level. Overall, it is proposed that the KiSS-1/GPR54 system is a novel

  19. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors underlies microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity following stimulation with chromogranin A, a peptide up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D L; Diemel, L T; Cuzner, M L; Pocock, J M

    2002-09-01

    Regulation of microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity is critical for neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we report that microglia possess functional group II metabotropic glutamate receptors, expressing mRNA and receptor protein for mGlu2 and mGlu3, negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase. Two different agonists of these receptors were able to induce a neurotoxic microglial phenotype which was attenuated by a specific antagonist. Chromogranin A, a secretory peptide expressed in amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease, activates microglia to a reactive neurotoxic phenotype. Chromogranin A-induced microglial activation and subsequent neurotoxicity may also involve an underlying stimulation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors since their inhibition reduced chromogranin A-induced microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity. These results show that selective inhibition of microglial group II metabotropic glutamate receptors has a positive impact on neuronal survival, and may prove a therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:12358765

  20. Prenatal exposure to ethanol stimulates hypothalamic CCR2 chemokine receptor system: Possible relation to increased density of orexigenic peptide neurons and ethanol drinking in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    Chang, G-Q; Karatayev, O; Leibowitz, S F

    2015-12-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that maternal consumption of ethanol during pregnancy increases alcohol drinking in the offspring. Possible underlying mechanisms may involve orexigenic peptides, which are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure and themselves promote drinking. Building on evidence that ethanol stimulates neuroimmune factors such as the chemokine CCL2 that in adult rats is shown to colocalize with the orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the present study sought to investigate the possibility that CCL2 or its receptor CCR2 in LH is stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure, perhaps specifically within MCH neurons. Our paradigm of intraoral administration of ethanol to pregnant rats, at low-to-moderate doses (1 or 3g/kg/day) during peak hypothalamic neurogenesis, caused in adolescent male offspring twofold increase in drinking of and preference for ethanol and reinstatement of ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice paradigm under an intermittent access schedule. This effect of prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with an increased expression of MCH and density of MCH(+) neurons in LH of preadolescent offspring. Whereas CCL2(+) cells at this age were low in density and unaffected by ethanol, CCR2(+) cells were dense in LH and increased by prenatal ethanol, with a large percentage (83-87%) identified as neurons and found to colocalize MCH. Prenatal ethanol also stimulated the genesis of CCR2(+) and MCH(+) neurons in the embryo, which co-labeled the proliferation marker, BrdU. Ethanol also increased the genesis and density of neurons that co-expressed CCR2 and MCH in LH, with triple-labeled CCR2(+)/MCH(+)/BrdU(+) neurons that were absent in control rats accounting for 35% of newly generated neurons in ethanol-exposed rats. With both the chemokine and MCH systems believed to promote ethanol consumption, this greater density of CCR2(+)/MCH(+) neurons in the LH of preadolescent rats suggests that

  1. The non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonist WB4-24 blocks inflammatory nociception by stimulating β-endorphin release from spinal microglia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hui; Gong, Nian; Li, Teng-Fei; Ma, Ai-Niu; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Two peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, exenatide and GLP-1 itself, exert anti-hypersensitive effects in neuropathic, cancer and diabetic pain. In this study, we have assessed the anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of the non-peptide agonist WB4-24 in inflammatory nociception and the possible involvement of microglial β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used rat models of inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), to test mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Expression of β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines was measured using real-time quantitative PCR and fluorescent immunoassays. KEY RESULTS WB4-24 displaced the specific binding of exendin (9–39) in microglia. Single intrathecal injection of WB4-24 (0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 μg) exerted dose-dependent, specific, anti-hypersensitive effects in acute and chronic inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan and CFA, with a maximal inhibition of 60–80%. Spinal WB4-24 was not effective in altering nociceptive pain. Subcutaneous injection of WB4-24 was also antinociceptive in CFA-treated rats. WB4-24 evoked β-endorphin release but did not inhibit expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in either the spinal cord of CFA-treated rats or cultured microglia stimulated by LPS. WB4-24 anti-allodynia was prevented by a microglial inhibitor, β-endorphin antiserum and a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results suggest that WB4-24 inhibits inflammatory nociception by releasing analgesic β-endorphin rather than inhibiting the expression of proalgesic pro-inflammatory cytokines in spinal microglia, and that the spinal GLP-1 receptor is a potential target molecule for the treatment of pain hypersensitivity including inflammatory nociception. PMID:25176008

  2. Effect of genetic SSTR4 ablation on inflammatory peptide and receptor expression in the non-inflamed and inflamed murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Van Op den Bosch, Joeri; Torfs, Pascal; De Winter, Benedicte Y; De Man, Joris G; Pelckmans, Paul A; Van Marck, Eric; Grundy, David; Van Nassauw, Luc; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2009-09-01

    The recently suggested pivotal role of somatostatin (SOM) receptor 4 (SSTR4) in inflammation and nociception in several non-intestinal organs and in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, necessitates exploration of the role of SSTR4 in GI pathophysiology. Therefore, the role of SSTR4 in GI activity was explored by investigating the effects of SSTR4 deficiency on intestinal motility, smooth muscle contractility and on the expression of SSTRs and neuropeptides in the healthy and Schistosoma mansoni-infected murine small intestine. Functional experiments revealed no differences in intestinal motility or smooth muscle cell contractility between wild-type and SSTR4 knockout (SSTR4(-/-)) mice in physiological conditions. As revealed by multiple immunofluorescent labellings, RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qPCR), genetic deficiency of SSTR4 considerably altered the expression of SOM and SSTRs in non-inflamed and inflamed conditions, affecting both extrinsic and intrinsic components of the intestinal innervation, along with SSTR expression in several non-neuronal cell types. Moreover, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression were significantly elevated in SSTR4(-/-) mice, confirming the modulatory role of SSTR4 on intestinal pro-inflammatory neuropeptide expression. These data suggest that SSTR4 plays a previously unexpected modulatory role in the regulation of intestinal SSTR expression. Moreover, in addition to the recently described inhibitory effects of SSTR4 on the neuronal release of pro-inflammatory peptides, SSTR4 appears also to be involved in the neuronal expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory peptides in the murine small intestine.

  3. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 501-506] PMID:25644636

  4. Differential induction of innate defense antimicrobial peptides in primary nasal epithelial cells upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines, Th17 cytokines or bacterial conditioned medium from Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Burgey, Christine; Kern, Winfried V; Römer, Winfried; Rieg, Siegbert

    2016-01-01

    To date it is incompletely understood why half of the human population is intrinsically resistant to Staphylococcus aureus colonization whereas the other half is intermittently or permanently colonized. Nasal colonization represents the primary niche for S. aureus. We therefore investigated whether primary nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) express antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) upon stimulation by inflammatory cytokines or bacterial conditioned medium (BCM) of different colonizing and invasive staphylococci. Stimulation with classical cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ) potently induced hBD-3 and RNase7 in HNEC. Th17 cytokines (IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22) yielded comparably weak hBD-3 and RNase7 induction and no synergistic effects with classical cytokines. BCM of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates moderately induced hBD3 and RNase7 mRNA expression without significant differences when comparing colonizing vs. invasive isolates. Our results indicate that HNEC contribute to the innate defense by secretion of an AMP-containing chemical defense shield along the nasal mucosa i.e. within the primary colonization niche of S. aureus. Further studies are needed to investigate whether a deficient AMP expression in the nasal mucosa may be related to different S. aureus carrier states. AMPs or AMP-inducing agents may be promising candidates for future topical decolonization regimens that aim to prevent invasive S. aureus infections.

  5. ER stress stimulates production of the key antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin, by forming a previously unidentified intracellular S1P signaling complex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Ikushiro, Hiroko; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Kim, Young il; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yano, Takato; Holleran, Walter M.; Elias, Peter; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    We recently identified a previously unidentified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling mechanism that stimulates production of a key innate immune element, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), in mammalian cells exposed to external perturbations, such as UVB irradiation and other oxidative stressors that provoke subapoptotic levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, independent of the well-known vitamin D receptor-dependent mechanism. ER stress increases cellular ceramide and one of its distal metabolites, S1P, which activates NF-κB followed by C/EBPα activation, leading to CAMP production, but in a S1P receptor-independent fashion. We now show that S1P activates NF-κB through formation of a previously unidentified signaling complex, consisting of S1P, TRAF2, and RIP1 that further associates with three stress-responsive proteins; i.e., heat shock proteins (GRP94 and HSP90α) and IRE1α. S1P specifically interacts with the N-terminal domain of heat shock proteins. Because this ER stress-initiated mechanism is operative in both epithelial cells and macrophages, it appears to be a universal, highly conserved response, broadly protective against diverse external perturbations that lead to increased ER stress. Finally, these studies further illuminate how ER stress and S1P orchestrate critical stress-specific signals that regulate production of one protective response by stimulating production of the key innate immune element, CAMP. PMID:26903652

  6. Stimulation of Synthesis and Release of Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) from Intestinal Smooth Muscle Cells by Substance P and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide (PACAP)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qudah, M.; Alkahtani, R.; Akbarali, H.I.; Murthy, K.S.; Grider, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin present in the intestine where it participates in survival and growth of enteric neurons, augmentation of enteric circuits, and stimulation of intestinal peristalsis and propulsion. Previous studies largely focused on the role of neural and mucosal BDNF. The expression and release of BDNF from intestinal smooth muscle and the interaction with enteric neuropeptides has not been studied in gut. Methods The expression and secretion of BDNF from smooth muscle cultured from rabbit longitudinal intestinal muscle in response to substance P and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) was measured by western blot and ELISA. BDNF mRNA was measured by rt-PCR. Key Results The expression of BNDF protein and mRNA was greater in smooth muscle cells from the longitudinal muscle than from circular muscle layer. PACAP and substance P increased the expression of BDNF protein and mRNA in cultured longitudinal smooth muscle cells. PACAP and substance P also stimulated the secretion of BDNF from cultured longitudinal smooth muscle cells. Chelation of intracellular calcium with BAPTA prevented substance P-induced increase in BDNF mRNA and protein expression as well as substance P-induced secretion of BDNF. Conclusions & Inferences Neuropeptides known to be present in enteric neurons innervating the longitudinal layer increase the expression of BDNF mRNA and protein in smooth muscle cells and stimulate the release of BDNF. Considering the ability of BDNF to enhance smooth muscle contraction, this autocrine loop may partially explain the characteristic hypercontractility of longitudinal muscle in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26088546

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ and stimulates mitochondrial ATP synthesis in pancreatic MIN6 beta-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Takashi; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Holz, George G; Jouaville, Laurence S; Thomas, Andrew P; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion whose mechanisms of action are only partly understood. In the present paper, we show that at low (3 mM) glucose concentrations, GLP-1 increases the free intramitochondrial concentrations of both Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](m)), and ATP ([ATP](m)) in clonal MIN6 beta-cells. Suggesting that cAMP-mediated release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores is responsible for these effects, increases in [ATP](m) that were induced by GLP-1 were completely blocked by the Rp isomer of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS), or by chelation of intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, inhibition of Ins(1,4,5) P (3) (IP(3)) receptors with xestospongin C, or application of ryanodine, partially inhibited GLP-1-induced [ATP](m) increases, and the simultaneous blockade of both IP(3) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) completely eliminated the rise in [ATP](m). GLP-1 appeared to prompt Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release through IP(3) receptors via a protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation event, since ryanodine-insensitive [ATP](m) increases were abrogated with the PKA inhibitor, H89. In contrast, the effects of GLP-1 on RyR-mediated [ATP](m) increases were apparently mediated by the cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor cAMP-GEFII, since xestospongin C-insensitive [ATP](m) increases were blocked by a dominant-negative form of cAMP-GEFII (G114E,G422D). Taken together, these results demonstrate that GLP-1 potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin release in part via the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), and the stimulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. PMID:12410638

  8. The immunocytochemical distribution of seven peptides in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia of horse and pig.

    PubMed

    Merighi, A; Kar, S; Gibson, S J; Ghidella, S; Gobetto, A; Peirone, S M; Polak, J M

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), enkephalin, galanin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), somatostatin, tachykinins and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) was compared in cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral segmental levels of spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia of horse and pig. In both species, immunoreactivity for the peptides under study was observed at all segmental levels of the spinal cord. Peptide-immunoreactive fibres were generally concentrated in laminae I-III, the region around the central canal, and in the autonomic nuclei. A general increase in the number of immunoreactive nerve fibres was noted in the lumbosacral segments of the spinal cord, which was particularly exaggerated in the case of VIP immunoreactivity. In the horse, some CGRP-, somatostatin- or tachykinin-immunoreactive cell bodies were present in the dorsal horn. In the pig, cells immunoreactive for somatostatin, enkephalin or NPY were noted in a similar location. In the ventral horn most motoneurones were CGRP-immunoreactive in both species. However, in pig many other cell types were CGRP-immunoreactive not only in the ventral horn, but also in laminae V-VI of the dorsal horn. With the exception of enkephalin and NPY immunoreactivity, which was not seen in pig dorsal root ganglia, all peptides studied were localised to neuronal cell bodies and/or fibres in the dorsal root ganglia. In both species, immunolabeled cell bodies were observed in ganglia from cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral levels, with the exception of VIP-immunoreactive cells that were detected only in the lumbosacral ganglia. Numerous CGRP- and tachykinin-immunoreactive cell bodies were visualised in both species, while the cells immunolabeled with other peptide antisera were much lower in number. In both species, immunostaining of serial sections revealed that a subset of CGRP-immunoreactive cells co-expressed tachykinin, galanin or somatostatin immunoreactivity. In the horse some enkephalin

  9. Vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells via CREB/MITF/tyrosinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xing-Hua; Yao, Cheng; Oh, Jang-Hee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Tian, Yu-Dan; Han, Mira; Kim, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ho; Jin, Zhe-Hu; Lee, Dong Hun

    2016-08-26

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), one of the major skin neuropeptides, has been suggested to have active roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which can commonly cause post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. However, the effect of VIP on melanogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we showed that the melanin contents, tyrosinase activity, and gene expression of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) were significantly increased by treatment with VIP in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells and the stimulatory melanogenic effect was further examined in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMns). In addition, phosphorylated levels of CRE-binding protein (CREB) and protein kinase A (PKA) were markedly increased after VIP treatment, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), or Akt, indicating the possible PKA-CREB signaling pathway involved in VIP-induced melanogenesis. This result was further verified by the fact that VIP induced increased melanin synthesis, and protein levels of phosphorylated CREB, MITF, tyrosinase were significantly attenuated by H89 (a specific PKA inhibitor). These data suggest that VIP-induced upregulation of tyrosinase through the CREB-MITF signaling pathway plays an important role in finding new treatment strategy for skin inflammatory diseases related pigmentation disorders. PMID:27343558

  10. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  11. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D; Kelly, Martin J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1(ARH)) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1(ARH) neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1(ARH) neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1(ARH) neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1(ARH) neurons. We propose that Kiss1(ARH) neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. PMID:27549338

  12. Na+ transport across rumen epithelium of hay-fed sheep is acutely stimulated by the peptide IGF-1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zanming; Martens, Holger; Schweigel-Röntgen, Monika

    2012-04-01

    An energy-rich diet leads to enhanced ruminal Na(+) absorption, which is associated with elevated plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels and an increased number of IGF-1 receptors in rumen papillae. This study examined the in vitro effect of IGF-1 on Na(+) transport across the rumen epithelium of hay-fed sheep, in which the IGF-1 concentration in plasma is lower than in concentrate-fed animals. At concentrations ranging from 20 to 100 μg l(-1), serosal LR3-IGF-1, a recombinant analogue of IGF-1, rapidly (within 30 min) stimulated the mucosal-to-serosal Na(+) flux (J(ms)Na) and consequently the net Na(+) flux (J(net)Na). Compared with controls, J(net)Na increased by about 60% (P < 0.05) following the serosal application of LR3-IGF-1 (20 μg l(-1)). The IGF-1-induced increment of J(ms)Na and J(net)Na was inhibited by mucosal amiloride (1 mmol l(-1)). Neither IGF-1 nor amiloride altered tissue conductance or the short-circuit current of the isolated rumen epithelium. These data support the assumption that the stimulating effect of serosally applied IGF-1 on Na(+) transport across the rumen epithelium is mediated by Na(+)-H(+) exchange (NHE). A further study was performed with cultured rumen epithelial cells and a fluorescent probe (BCECF) to estimate the rate of pH(i) recovery after acid loading. The pH(i) of isolated rumen epithelial cells was 6.43 ± 0.15 after butyrate loading and recovered by 0.26 ± 0.02 pH units (15 min)(-1). Application of LR3-IGF-1 (20 μg l(-1)) significantly increased the rate of pH(i) recovery to 0.33 ± 0.02 pH units (15 min)(-1). Amiloride administration reduced the recovery rate in both control and IGF-1-stimulated cells. These results show, for the first time, that an acute effect of IGF-1 on Na(+) absorption across rumen epithelium results from increased NHE activity. Insulin-like growth factor 1 is thus important for the fast functional adaptation of ruminal Na(+) transport via NHE.

  13. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  14. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); confirmation of the GM-CSF amino acid sequence by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsarbopoulos, A.; Pramanik, B. N.; Labdon, J. E.; Reichert, P.; Gitlin, G.; Patel, S.; Sardana, V.; Nagabhushan, T. L.; Trotta, P. P.

    1993-01-01

    A trypsin-resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was isolated and analyzed by high-energy Cs+ liquid secondary-ion (LSI) mass spectrometric analysis. This analysis provided successful detection of the high-mass disulfide-linked core peptide as well as information confirming the existence of disulfide pairing. Similarly, LSI mass spectrometric analysis of the peptide fragments isolated chromatographically from a Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digest of rhGM-CSF provided rapid confirmation of the cDNA-derived sequence and determination of the existing disulfide bonds between cysteine residues 54-96 and 88-121. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to measure the molecular weight of the intact protein and to determine the number of the disulfide bonds in the protein molecule by comparative analysis of the protein before and after reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol. PMID:8268804

  16. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Action of an Antimicrobial Model Peptide That Suppresses the TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathway via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Endocytosis in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Do-Wan; Heo, Kang-Hyuck; Kim, Young-Kyu; Sim, Eun-Jeong; Kang, Tae-Bong; Choi, Jae-Wan; Sim, Dae-Won; Cheong, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hong; Bang, Jeong-Kyu; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also called host defense peptides, particularly those with amphipathic helical structures, are emerging as target molecules for therapeutic development due to their immunomodulatory properties. Although the antimicrobial activity of AMPs is known to be exerted primarily by permeation of the bacterial membrane, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity remains to be elucidated. We report potent anti-inflammatory activity of WALK11.3, an antimicrobial model peptide with an amphipathic helical conformation, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. This peptide inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, INF-β, and TNF-α. Although WALK11.3 did not exert a major effect on all downstream signaling in the MyD88-dependent pathway, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- mediated pro-inflammatory signals were markedly attenuated in the TRIF-dependent pathway due to inhibition of the phosphorylation of STAT1 by attenuation of IRF3 phosphorylation. WALK11.3 specifically inhibited the endocytosis of TLR4, which is essential for triggering TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophage cells. Hence, we suggest that specific interference with TLR4 endocytosis could be one of the major modes of the anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. Our designed WALK11 peptides, which possess both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, may be promising molecules for the development of therapies for infectious inflammation. PMID:26017270

  18. Development of peptide-containing nerves in the human fetal prostate gland.

    PubMed Central

    Jen, P Y; Dixon, J S

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical methods were used to study the developing peptidergic innervation of the human fetal prostate gland in a series of specimens ranging in gestational age from 13 to 30 wk. The overall innervation of each specimen was visualised using protein gene product 9.5 (PGP), a general nerve marker. The onset and development of specific neuropeptide-containing subpopulations were investigated using antisera to neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), bombesin (BOM), somatostatin (SOM), leu-enkephalin (l-ENK) and met-enkephalin (m-ENK). In addition the occurrence and distribution of presumptive noradrenergic nerves was studied using antisera to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). At 13 wk numerous branching PGP-immunoreactive (-IR) nerves were observed in the capsule of the developing prostate gland and surrounding the preprostatic urethra but the remainder of the gland was devoid of nerves. The majority of nerves in the capsule contained D beta H and TH and were presumed to be noradrenergic in type while other nerves (in decreasing numbers) contained NPY, l-ENK, SP and CGRP. Nerves associated with the preprostatic urethra did not contain any of the neuropeptides under investigation. At 17 wk the density of nerves in the capsule had increased and occasional m-ENK-, VIP- and BOM-IR nerve fibres were also observed. In addition PGP, D beta H-, TH-, NPY- and l-ENK-IR nerves occurred in association with smooth muscle bundles which at 17 wk were present in the outer part of the gland. Occasional PGP-IR nerves were also present at the base of the epithelium forming some of the prostatic glands. At 23 wk some of the subepithelial nerves showed immunoreactivity for NPY, VIP or l-ENK. At 26 wk smooth muscle bundles occurred throughout the gland and were richly innervated by PGP, D beta H and TH-IR nerves while a less dense plexus was formed by NPY- and l

  19. Sensory and autonomic innervation of the rat eyelid: neuronal origins and peptide phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Simons, E; Smith, P G

    1994-07-01

    Neuronal origins, peptide phenotypes and target distributions were determined for sensory and autonomic nerves projecting to the eyelid. The retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Ruby, was injected into the superior tarsal muscle and meibomian gland of Sprague-Dawley rats. Labelled neurons were observed within the pterygopalatine (31 +/- 6 of a total of 8238 +/- 1610 ganglion neurons), trigeminal (173 +/- 43 of 62,082 +/- 5869) and superior cervical ganglia (184 +/- 35 of 21,900 +/- 1741). Immunostaining revealed vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity (VIP-ir) in nearly all Fluoro-Ruby-labelled pterygopalatine ganglion neurons (86 +/- 5%) but only rarely in trigeminal (0.3 +/- 0.3%) or superior cervical (1.4 +/- 1.4%) ganglion neurons. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-ir was not observed in pterygopalatine or superior cervical ganglion somata, but was present in 24 +/- 4% of trigeminal neurons. Bright dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) immunofluorescence was observed in the majority of eyelid-projecting neurons within the superior cervical ganglia (65 +/- 5%) and lighter staining was detected in pterygopalatine neurons (63 +/- 3%), but no DBH-ir was observed in trigeminal neurons. Examination of eyelid sections revealed dense VIP-ir innervation of meibomian gland acini and vasculature and modest distribution within tarsal muscle. CGRP-ir fibers surrounded ductal and vascular elements of the meibomian gland and the perimeter of tarsal muscle. DBH-ir fibers were associated with meibomian gland blood vessels and acini, and were more densely distributed within tarsal muscle. This study provides evidence for prominent meibomian gland innervation by parasympathetic pterygopalatine ganglion VIP-ir neurons, with more restricted innervation by sensory trigeminal CGRP-ir and sympathetic neurons. Tarsal muscle receives abundant sympathetic innervation, as well as moderate parasympathetic and sensory CGRP-ir projections. The eyelid contains substantial non-CGRP-ir sensory

  20. Neuropeptide receptors as potential drug targets in the treatment of inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Erika; Pozsgai, Gábor; Hajna, Zsófia; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Szolcsányi, János

    2014-01-01

    Cross-talk between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems exists via regulator molecules, such as neuropeptides, hormones and cytokines. A number of neuropeptides have been implicated in the genesis of inflammation, such as tachykinins and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Development of their receptor antagonists could be a promising approach to anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy. Anti-inflammatory neuropeptides, such as vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, urocortin, adrenomedullin, somatostatin, cortistatin, ghrelin, galanin and opioid peptides, are also released and act on their own receptors on the neurons as well as on different inflammatory and immune cells. The aim of the present review is to summarize the most prominent data of preclinical animal studies concerning the main pharmacological effects of ligands acting on the neuropeptide receptors. Promising therapeutic impacts of these compounds as potential candidates for the development of novel types of anti-inflammatory drugs are also discussed. PMID:23432438

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-2 intracellularly stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and specifically induces submucosal arteriole vasodilation via a sheer stress-independent, local neural mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-responsive neuropeptide that exerts diverse actions in the gastrointestinal tract, including enhancing mucosal cell survival and proliferation, mucosal blood flow, luminal nutrient uptake, and suppressing gastric motility and secretion. We have shown th...

  2. Immunohistochemical mapping of enkephalins, NPY, CGRP, and GRP in the cat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Marcos, P; Coveñas, R; Narváez, J A; Diaz-Cabiale, Z; Aguirre, J A; Tramu, G; González-Barón, S

    1999-01-01

    This immunohistochemical study shows a wide distribution of neuropeptides in the cat amygdala. Neuropeptide Y is present along the whole amygdaloid complex, and fibers and cell bodies containing neuropeptide Y are observed in all the nuclei studied. Leucine-enkephalin-, gastrin-releasing peptide/bombesin-, and calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive fibers and perikarya are observed only in discrete nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, whereas only fibers -but no cell bodies- containing methionine-enkephalin-Arg6-Gly7-Leu8 have been observed. No immunoreactivity has been found for gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, dynorphin A (1-17), or galanin. These data are compared with those reported in the amygdala of other mammals.

  3. Substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala linker dramatically decreased the renal uptake of 99mTc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala could reduce the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (1) {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-dTyr-Asp]-β-Ala-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RTD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (2), RVD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (3), RAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (4), NAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (5), and EAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (6) peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin 1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of their (99m)Tc-conjugates were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of the Lys linker with β-Ala linker dramatically reduced the renal uptake of all six (99m)Tc-peptides. (99m)Tc-4 exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (15.66 ± 6.19% ID/g) and the lowest kidney uptake (20.18 ± 3.86% ID/g) among these (99m)Tc-peptides at 2 h postinjection. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT using (99m)Tc-4 as an imaging probe.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  5. CGRP receptors mediating CGRP-, adrenomedullin- and amylin-induced relaxation in porcine coronary arteries. Characterization with ‘Compound 1' (WO98/11128), a non-peptide antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Hasbak, Philip; Sams, Anette; Schifter, Søren; Longmore, Jenny; Edvinsson, Lars

    2001-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), amylin and adrenomedullin (AM) belong to the same family of peptides. Accumulating evidence indicate that the calcitonin (CT) receptor, the CT receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) form the basis of all the receptors in this family of peptides. Using reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction the presence of mRNA sequences encoding the CRLR, RAMP1 and RAMP2 were demonstrated in porcine left anterior descending (LAD) coronary arteries, whereas porcine calcitonin (CT) receptor mRNA was not present. The partial porcine mRNA sequences shared 82–92% nucleotide identity with human sequences. The human peptides αCGRP, βCGRP, AM and amylin induced relaxation with pEC50 values of 8.1, 8.1, 6.7 and 6.1 M respectively. The antagonistic properties of a novel non-peptide CGRP antagonist ‘Compound 1' (WO98/11128), βCGRP8–37 and the proposed AM receptor antagonist AM22–52 were compared to the well-known CGRP1 receptor antagonist αCGRP8–37. The αCGRP8–37 and βCGRP8–37 induced concentration-dependent (10−7–10−5 M) rightward shift of both the αCGRP and βCGRP concentration-response curves. βCGRP8–37 (10−6 M) had the same effect as αCGRP8–37 (10−6 M), but with less potent rightward shift of the concentration-response curves for αCGRP, AM and amylin. Preincubation with ‘Compound 1' (10−7–10−5 M) and AM22–52 (10−6 M) had no significant antagonistic effect. In conclusion, the building blocks forming CGRP and AM receptors were present in the porcine LAD, whereas those of the amylin receptor were not. αCGRP, βCGRP, AM and amylin mediated vasorelaxation via the CGRP receptors. No functional response was detected to adrenomedullin via the adrenomedullin receptor. PMID:11498528

  6. Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Min Bum; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Jin Ku; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Ik Hwan; Seok, Heon; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Ho

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CopA3 peptide isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial activity. •Our study reported that CopA3 has anticancer and immunosuppressive effects. •We here demonstrated that CopA3 has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. •CopA3 degrades p27Kip1 protein and this mediates effects of CopA3 on neuronal cells. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimer’s disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects.

  7. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients.

  8. N-Methylation as a Strategy for Enhancing the Affinity and Selectivity of RNA-binding Peptides: Application to the HIV-1 Frameshift-Stimulating RNA.

    PubMed

    Hilimire, Thomas A; Bennett, Ryan P; Stewart, Ryan A; Garcia-Miranda, Pablo; Blume, Alex; Becker, Jordan; Sherer, Nathan; Helms, Eric D; Butcher, Samuel E; Smith, Harold C; Miller, Benjamin L

    2016-01-15

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) type 1 uses a -1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (-1 PRF) event to translate its enzymes from the same transcript used to encode the virus' structural proteins. The frequency of this event is highly regulated, and significant deviation from the normal 5-10% frequency has been demonstrated to decrease viral infectivity. Frameshifting is primarily regulated by the Frameshift Stimulatory Signal RNA (FSS-RNA), a thermodynamically stable, highly conserved stem loop that has been proposed as a therapeutic target. We describe the design, synthesis, and testing of a series of N-methyl peptides able to bind the HIV-1 FSS RNA stem loop with low nanomolar affinity and high selectivity. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data indicates increased affinity is a reflection of a substantially enhanced on rate. Compounds readily penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HIV infectivity in a pseudotyped virus assay. Viral infectivity inhibition correlates with compound-dependent changes in the ratios of Gag and Gag-Pol in virus particles. As the first compounds with both single digit nanomolar affinities for the FSS RNA and an ability to inhibit HIV in cells, these studies support the use of N-methylation for enhancing the affinity, selectivity, and bioactivity of RNA-binding peptides. PMID:26496521

  9. N-Methylation as a Strategy for Enhancing the Affinity and Selectivity of RNA-binding Peptides: Application to the HIV-1 Frameshift-Stimulating RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) type 1 uses a −1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (−1 PRF) event to translate its enzymes from the same transcript used to encode the virus’ structural proteins. The frequency of this event is highly regulated, and significant deviation from the normal 5–10% frequency has been demonstrated to decrease viral infectivity. Frameshifting is primarily regulated by the Frameshift Stimulatory Signal RNA (FSS-RNA), a thermodynamically stable, highly conserved stem loop that has been proposed as a therapeutic target. We describe the design, synthesis, and testing of a series of N-methyl peptides able to bind the HIV-1 FSS RNA stem loop with low nanomolar affinity and high selectivity. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data indicates increased affinity is a reflection of a substantially enhanced on rate. Compounds readily penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HIV infectivity in a pseudotyped virus assay. Viral infectivity inhibition correlates with compound-dependent changes in the ratios of Gag and Gag-Pol in virus particles. As the first compounds with both single digit nanomolar affinities for the FSS RNA and an ability to inhibit HIV in cells, these studies support the use of N-methylation for enhancing the affinity, selectivity, and bioactivity of RNA-binding peptides. PMID:26496521

  10. When the leader gets loose: in vivo biosynthesis of a leaderless prenisin is stimulated by a trans-acting leader peptide.

    PubMed

    Khusainov, Rustem; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2012-11-01

    The nisin leader is believed to be crucial for nisin biosynthesis. Here, by using a construct completely lacking the leader peptide, we show that an up to fivefold-dehydrated leaderless prenisin can be obtained, as judged by MALDI-TOF MS, and that some of these species are biologically active, thus suggesting that at least three lanthionine rings are present. Notably, by expressing the leader peptide in trans together with the leaderless prenisin, we were able to increase the dehydration/cyclization efficiency of both NisB and NisC, but still with limited efficiency until the fifth dehydratable residue (Thr13) was processed, thereby enabling three rings to form. This, for the first time, demonstrates that 1) the leader is not absolutely necessary for the dehydration reaction of class I lantibiotics to occur in vivo; 2) the leader acts in trans in vivo; 3) the leader increases the efficiency of modification. Based on previous work and our current study, a model for the interactions of NisB and NisC with prenisin is proposed, in which the leader induces a more active conformation and/or productive complex formation of the biosynthetic machinery, and, when covalently bound, is involved in increasing the efficiency of dehydration to the C-terminal end of the prenisin substrate molecule.

  11. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  12. A flow cytometric approach for studying alterations in the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium ions in immune cells following stimulation with thymic peptides.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Nikos E; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Samara, Pinelopi; Tsitsilonis, Ourania E

    2016-04-01

    [Ca(2+)]i alterations are vital in signaling pathways of cell activation. We tried to detect such changes, in intracellular signaling pathways downstream TLR4 in immune cells, following stimulation with prothymosin alpha (proTα) and its decapeptide proTα(100-109). Human leukocytes were activated with LPS, proTα or proTα(100-109), directly or after 24h stimulation, while neutrophils were directly challenged. Cells were loaded with Fluo-4 and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) alterations were recorded by flow cytometry. Direct challenge with 20 μg/mL LPS induced a measurable [Ca(2+)]i increase in macrophages and neutrophils. Monocytes and macrophages incubated for 24h with LPS, proTα or proTα(100-109) and challenged with LPS, displayed a robust response. Lymphocytes and iDCs exhibited no alterations. Conclusively, we assessed a flow cytometry-based method for monitoring Ca(2+) ion influx changes in immune cells. Their stimulation with proTα or proTα(100-109) generates an activating background, similar to LPS, allowing for the detection of [Ca(2+)]i alterations induced upon subsequent challenge.

  13. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A Is a Common Mediator of Mechanical Stress- and Neurohumoral Stimulation-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophic Signaling Leading to Activation of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Gene Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Usami, Satoru; Minami, Takeya; Yamada, Yuko; Fujiwara, Masataka; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2010-01-01

    Subjecting cardiomyocytes to mechanical stress or neurohumoral stimulation causes cardiac hypertrophy characterized in part by reactivation of the fetal cardiac gene program. Here we demonstrate a new common mechanism by which these stimuli are transduced to a signal activating the hypertrophic gene program. Mechanically stretching cardiomyocytes induced nuclear accumulation of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A), a coactivator of serum response factor (SRF), in a Rho- and actin dynamics-dependent manner. Expression of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and other SRF-dependent fetal cardiac genes in response to acute mechanical stress was blunted in mice lacking MRTF-A. Hypertrophic responses to chronic pressure overload were also significantly attenuated in mice lacking MRTF-A. Mutation of a newly identified, conserved and functional SRF-binding site within the BNP promoter, or knockdown of MRTF-A, reduced the responsiveness of the BNP promoter to mechanical stretch. Nuclear translocation of MRTF-A was also involved in endothelin-1- and angiotensin-II-induced activation of the BNP promoter. Moreover, mice lacking MRTF-A showed significantly weaker hypertrophic responses to chronic angiotensin II infusion than wild-type mice. Collectively, these findings point to nuclear translocation of MRTF-A as a novel signaling mechanism mediating both mechanical stretch- and neurohumoral stimulation-induced BNP gene expression and hypertrophic responses in cardiac myocytes. PMID:20606005

  14. T Cells Stimulated by an Analog Peptide of Type II Collagen Require FcRγ to Secrete IL-4 and Suppress Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Linda K.; Cullins, David L.; Brand, David D.; Kleinau, Sandra; Stuart, John M.; Kang, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, we explored the characteristics of the T cell population which responds to an analog peptide (A9) of type II collagen (CII) and regulates autoimmunity. Methods A9 is a 26 amino acid peptide analogous to the sequence of a segment of CII (CII 245-270) but with substitutions made at amino acid positions 260 (alanine for isoleucine), 261 (hydroxyproline for alanine), and 263 (asparagine for phenylalanine). We have previously shown that A9 profoundly suppresses immunity to CII and CIA. In order to determine the mechanism of suppression, we used a transgenic mouse whose T cells express a CII specific receptor (TCR) and performed passive cell transfer experiments. Results The results demonstrate that suppression of CIA by the A9 is dependent upon T cells. Using multiparameter flow cytometry, we determined that the cells responsible for suppression were CD4+ and expressed high levels of FcεRIγ(FcRγ). To establish the significance of this finding, we obtained mice genetically deficient in FcRγ to perform passive transfer experiments. The resulting FcRγ-/- CD4+ T cells when primed by culture with A9 could not transfer the suppression of arthritis nor secrete cytokines in response to A9. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that the suppression of arthritis and the Th2 cytokine profile elicited by A9 is dependent upon the presence of FcRγ in the T cells. These findings are novel and may have therapeutic potential for patients with autoimmune arthritis. PMID:21590683

  15. [News in neurology 2014].

    PubMed

    Tsetsou, Spyridoula; Rossetti, Andrea O; Michel, Patrick; Hirt, Lorenz; Wider, Christian; Benninger, David; Kuntzer, Thierry; Nater, Bernard; Démonet, Jean-François; Schluep, Myriam; Du Pasquier, Renaud A; Vingerhoets, François

    2015-01-14

    In 2014, breastfeeding during maternal antiepileptic therapy seems to be safe for the children and can be recommended. Intravenous thrombolysis by Alteplase improves the outcome after a stroke if administered within 4.5 hours and it is also recommended in elderly population over 80 years. ProSavin genic therapy for Parkinson disease is under investigation. The Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) has an analgesic effect in neuropathic pain as well as an antidepressant effect. Antagonists of calcitonin gene-related peptide can have a beneficial role in migraine prevention. Diagnostic biomarker panels for Alzheimer disease are under investigation. Oral teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate (BG-12) for relapsing multiple sclerosis treatment are now available in Switzerland. PMID:25799659

  16. ACS Chemical Neuroscience Molecule Spotlight on Telcagepant (MK-0974)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Telcagepant (MK-0974) is a novel calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist currently undergoing clinical trials for migraine (http://www.merck.com/research/pipeline/home.html). MK-0974 is currently being studied in phase III clinical trials. PMID:22816019

  17. CGRP Antagonist Infused into the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Impairs the Acquisition and Expression of Context but Not Discretely Cued Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, Kelly S.; Davis, Michael; Walker, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) infusions into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) evoke increases in startle amplitude and increases in anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze. Conversely, intra-BNST infusions of the CGRP antagonist CGRP[subscript 8-37] block unconditioned startle increases produced by fox odor. Here we evaluate…

  18. Identification of potent CNS-penetrant thiazolidinones as novel CGRP receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pramod; Anderson, Corey; Binch, Hayley; Hadida, Sabine; Yoo, Sanghee; Bergeron, Danielle; Decker, Caroline; terHaar, Ernst; Moore, Jonathan; Garcia-Guzman, Miguel; Termin, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in acute migraine pathogenesis. In an effort to identify novel CGRP receptor antagonists for the treatment of migraine, we have discovered thiazolidinone 49, a potent (Ki=30 pM, IC50=1 nM), orally bioavailable, CNS-penetrant CGRP antagonist with good pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:24405707

  19. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  20. The human antimicrobial peptide LL-37, but not the mouse ortholog, mCRAMP, can stimulate signaling by poly(I:C) through a FPRL1-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Singh, Divyendu; Qi, Rongsu; Jordan, Jarrat L; San Mateo, Lani; Kao, C Cheng

    2013-03-22

    LL-37 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by human cells that can down-regulate the lipopolysaccharide-induced innate immune responses and up-regulate double-stranded (ds) RNA-induced innate responses through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). The murine LL-37 ortholog, mCRAMP, also inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced responses, but unlike LL-37, it inhibited viral-induced responses in mouse cells. A fluorescence polarization assay showed that LL-37 was able to bind dsRNA better than mCRAMP. In the human lung epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, LL-37, but not mCRAMP, colocalized with TLR3, and the colocalization was increased in the presence of dsRNA. The presence of poly(I:C) increased the accumulation of LL-37 in Rab5 endosomes. Signaling by cells induced with both LL-37 and poly(I:C) was sensitive to inhibitors that affect clathrin-independent trafficking, whereas signaling by poly(I:C) alone was not, suggesting that the LL-37-poly(I:C) complex trafficked to signaling endosomes by a different mechanism than poly(I:C) alone. siRNA knockdown of known LL-37 receptors identified that FPRL1 was responsible for TLR3 signaling induced by LL-37-poly(I:C). These results show that LL-37 and mCRAMP have different activities in TLR3 signaling and that LL-37 can redirect trafficking of poly(I:C) to effect signaling by TLR3 in early endosomes in a mechanism that involves FPRL1.

  1. Therapeutic Efficacy of a {sup 188}Re-Labeled {alpha}-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analog in Murine and Human Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Models

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Owen, Nellie K.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic efficacy of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH in the B16/F1 murine melanoma and TXM13 human melanoma bearing mouse models. Method: (Arg11)CCMSH was synthesized and labeled with {sup 188}Re to form {sup 188}Re-(Agr{sup 11})CCMSH. B16/F1 melanoma tumor bearing mice were administrated with 200 Ci, 600 Ci and 2x400 Ci of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH via the tail vein, respectively. TXM13 melanoma tumor hearing mice were separately injected with 600 Ci, 2x400 Ci and 1000 Ci of 100Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH through the tail vein. Two groups of 10 mice bearing either B16/F1 or TXM13 tumors were injected with saline as untreated controls. Results: In contrast to the untreated control group, {sup 188}Re(Arg11)CCMSH yielded rapid and lasting therapeutic effects in the treatment groups with either B16/F1 or TXM13 tumors. The tumor growth rate was reduced and the survival rate was prolonged in the treatment groups. Treatment with 2x400 Ci of {sup 188}Re-Arg{sup 11}CCMSH significantly extended the mean life of B16/F1 tumor mice (p<0.05), while the mean life of TXm13 tumor mice was significantly prolonged after treatment with 600 Ci and 1000 Ci doses of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH (p<0.05 High-dose {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11}))CCMSH produced no observed normal-tissue toxicity. Conclusions: The therapy study results revealed that {sup 188}Re-Arg11 CCMSH yielded significant therapeutic effects in both B16/F1 murine melanoma and TXM13 human melanoma bearing mouse models. {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH appears to be a promising radiolabeled peptide for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  2. A synthetic peptide corresponding to human FSH. beta. -subunit 33-53 binds to FSH receptor, stimulates basal estradiol biosynthesis, and is a partial antagonist of FSH

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Coloma, T.A.; Dattatreyamurty, B.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1990-02-06

    The authors have previously shown that hFSH-{beta} 34-37 (KTCT) and 49-52 (TRDL) inhibit binding of {sup 125}I-hFSH to FSH receptor in calf testis membranes and that hFSH-{beta} 33-53, which encompasses these tetrapeptides, inhibits binding with increased potency. hFSH-{beta} 33-53 rapidly dimerizes under conditions utilized in the receptor binding assay (pH 7.5) so that the binding inhibition reported earlier was due to the hFSH-{beta} 33-53 dimer rather than the monomer. At pH 6.5, conversion to dimer does not occur, and binding inhibition could be unequivocally attributed to the monomer. Radioiodinated and alkylated hFSH-{beta} 33-53 binds to the FSH receptor. The biological activity of hFSH-{beta} 33-53 was assessed by its ability to affect the conversion of androstenedione to estradiol in rat Sertoli cells cultures. This result demonstrates that the free R-SH group at Cys51 is not responsible for the inhibition. FSH-{beta} 33-53 also significantly stimulated basal levels of estradiol synthesis, but not to maximal levels observed with FSH (partial agonist). Neither the carbohydrate content of hFSH-{beta} nor the {alpha} subunit of FSH appears to be essential for signal transduction and expression of the hormone effect of FSH-{beta} 33-53.

  3. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation and blockade on food consumption and body weight in rats treated with a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2

    PubMed Central

    Radziszewska, Elżbieta; Bojanowska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and endocannabinoids are involved in appetite control. Recently we have demonstrated that cannabinoid (CB)1 receptor antagonist and GLP-1 receptor agonist synergistically suppress food intake in the rat. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of GLP-1 receptor stimulation or blockade on feeding behavior in rats treated with WIN 55,212-2, a CB1 receptor agonist. Material/Methods Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats. In the first experiment the effects of increasing doses (0.5–4.0 mg/kg) of WIN 55,212-2 injected intraperitoneally on 24-hour food consumption were tested. In further experiments a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, exendin (9-39), and WIN 55,212-2 or a GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, and WIN 55,212-2 were injected intraperitoneally at subthreshold doses (that alone did not change food intake and body weight) to investigate whether these agents may interact to affect food intake in rats. Results WIN 55,212-2 administered at low doses (0.5–2 mg/kg) did not markedly change 24-hour food consumption; however, at the highest dose, daily food intake was inhibited. Combined administration of WIN 55,212-2 and exendin (9-39) did not change the amount of food consumed compared to either the control group or to each agent injected alone. Combined injection of WIN 55,212-2 and exendin-4 at subthreshold doses resulted in a significant decrease in food intake and body weight in rats. Conclusions Stimulation of the peripheral CB1 receptor by its agonist WIN 55,212-2 can induce anorexigenic effects or potentiate, even at a subthreshold dose, the effects of exendin-4, a known anorectic agent. Hence, this dual action of the cannabinoid system should be considered in the medical use of CB1 agonists. PMID:23291632

  4. Lipolysis stimulating peptides of potato protein hydrolysate effectively suppresses high-fat-diet-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fibrosis in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wen-Dee; Huang, Chih Yang; Paul, Catherine Reena; Lee, Zong-Yan; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common outcomes of obesity and is characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides, increased tissue apoptosis, and fibrosis. NAFLD is more common among elderly than in younger age groups, and it causes serious hepatic complications. Objective In this study, alcalase treatment derived potato protein hydrolysate (APPH) with lipolysis-stimulating property has been evaluated for its efficiency to provide hepato-protection in a high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed aging rats. Design Twenty-four-month-old SD rats were randomly divided into six groups (n=8): aged rats fed with standard chow, HFD-induced aged obese rats, HFD with low-dose (15 mg/kg/day) APPH treatment, HFD with moderate (45 mg/kg/day) APPH treatment, HFD with high (75 mg/kg/day) APPH treatment, and HFD with probucol. Results APPH was found to reduce the NAFLD-related effects in rat livers induced by HFD and all of the HFD-fed rats exhibited heavier body weight than those with control chow diet. However, the HFD-induced hepatic fat accumulation was effectively attenuated in rats administered with low (15 mg/kg/day), moderate (45 mg/kg/day), and high (75 mg/kg/day) doses of APPH. APPH oral administration also suppressed the hepatic apoptosis- and fibrosis-related proteins induced by HFD. Conclusions Our results thus indicate that APPH potentially attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation and anti-apoptosis and fibrosis effects in HFD-induced rats. APPH may have therapeutic potential in the amelioration of NAFLD liver damage. PMID:27415158

  5. Stimulation of human T cells by an influenza A vector expressing a CTL epitope from the HER-2/neu protooncogene results in higher numbers of antigen-specific TCRhi cells than stimulation with peptide. Divergent roles of IL-2 and IL-15.

    PubMed

    Efferson, Clay L; Kawano, Kouichiro; Tsuda, Naotake; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Ioannides, Constantin G

    2005-01-01

    Development of cancer vaccines requires approaches to induce expansion and functional differentiation of tumor antigen-specific effector and memory cells. The later are particularly relevant for prevention of disease relapse. Efficient induction of memory cells is hindered by the lack of information about the relationship between TCR stimulation and the cytokines required for Ag-specific memory CD8+ cells and proliferation and survival. Since viruses are known to induce memory T cells, an attenuated influenza A/PR8/34 virus with a truncated nonstructural (NS1) gene was generated containing the HER-2 CTL E75 epitope in its neuraminidase protein (KIF-NS virus). Stimulation of PBMC from healthy donors and of tumor-associated lymphocytes (TAL) from ovarian cancer patients with dendritic cells (DC) infected with KIF-NS (KIF-NS-DC), induced higher numbers of immediate memory effector CD8+ CD44hi CD122hi cells, expressing TCR specific for E75 (E75-TCR) than stimulation with peptide E75. Survival of CD44hi CD122hi cells was dependent on the levels of TCR; cells expressing lower levels of E75-TCR (MFI: 10(2)-10(3)) survived better in IL-2 while cells expressing high levels of TCR (MFI: 10(3)-10(4)) survived better in IL-15. This is the first report demonstrating induction of human Ag-specific memory CD8+ cells against a human tumor-antigen using a live attenuated recombinant influenza virus vector. Such vectors may provide a novel approach for preventive immunity in human cancer vaccine development.

  6. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  7. Peptides and Ageing.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, Vladimir Kh

    2002-01-01

    A technology has been developed for manufacturing of biologically active complex peptide preparations from extracts of different tissues. In particular, the pineal preparation (Epithalamin) augments the in vitro outgrowth of explants from the pineal gland but not from other tissues, the latter being stimulated by peptide preparations from respective tissues. Epithalamin increases melatonin production by the pineal gland of rats, improves immunological parameters in rats and mice, produces anticarcinogenic effects in different experimental models, stimulates antioxidant defenses, and restores the reproductive function in old rats. These effects are combined in the ability of Epithalamin to increase the lifespan in rats, mice, and fruit flies. Many of these effects are reproduced in clinical trials, which have demonstrated the geroprotector activity of Epithalamin in humans. Among the effects of the thymic preparation Thymalin, those related to its ability to stimulate immunity are the most prominent. This ability is associated with anticarcinogenic and geroprotector activities. Clinical trials of the peptide preparations obtained from other organs including the prostate, the cerebral cortex, and the eye retina, have demonstrated beneficial effects reflected by the improvement of the conditions of respective organs. Based on the data about the amino acid compositions of the peptide preparations, novel principles of the design of biologically active short peptides possessing tissue-specific activities has been developed. Dipeptides specific for the thymus and tetrapeptides specific for the heart, liver, brain cortex, and pineal glands stimulate the in vitro outgrowth of explants of respective organs. Interestingly, for eye retina and the pineal gland, a common tetrapeptide Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly (Epitalon) has been designed, probably reflecting the common embryonal origin of these two organs. Epitalon reproduces the effects of Epithalamin including those related to its

  8. Peptides and peptidomimetics as immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya S; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance. Knowledge of B- or T-cell epitopes along with conformational constraints is important in the design of peptide-based immunomodulating agents. Work on the conformational aspects of peptides, synthesis and modified amino acid side chains have contributed to the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases and cancer. The design of peptides/peptidomimetics for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and HIV infection is reviewed. In cancer therapy, peptide epitopes are used in such a way that the body is trained to recognize and fight the cancer cells locally as well as systemically. PMID:25186605

  9. Peptide Seems to Boost Human Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    This article discusses recent studies which have shown that the peptide hormone vasopressin apparently can stimulate memory and learning in healthy human volunteers and in certain mentally disturbed patients. (ECO)

  10. Amyloid β-peptide oligomers stimulate RyR-mediated Ca2+ release inducing mitochondrial fragmentation in hippocampal neurons and prevent RyR-mediated dendritic spine remodeling produced by BDNF.

    PubMed

    Paula-Lima, Andrea C; Adasme, Tatiana; SanMartín, Carol; Sebollela, Adriano; Hetz, Claudio; Carrasco, M Angélica; Ferreira, Sergio T; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2011-04-01

    Soluble amyloid β-peptide oligomers (AβOs), increasingly recognized as causative agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), disrupt neuronal Ca(2+) homeostasis and synaptic function. Here, we report that AβOs at sublethal concentrations generate prolonged Ca(2+) signals in primary hippocampal neurons; incubation in Ca(2+)-free solutions, inhibition of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), or preincubation with N-acetyl-l-cysteine abolished these signals. AβOs decreased (6 h) RyR2 and RyR3 mRNA and RyR2 protein, and promoted mitochondrial fragmentation after 24 h. NMDAR inhibition abolished the RyR2 decrease, whereas RyR inhibition prevented significantly the RyR2 protein decrease and mitochondrial fragmentation induced by AβOs. Incubation with AβOs (6 h) eliminated the RyR2 increase induced by brain-derived nerve factor (BDNF) and the dendritic spine remodeling induced within minutes by BDNF or the RyR agonist caffeine. Addition of BDNF to neurons incubated with AβOs for 24 h, which had RyR2 similar to and slightly higher RyR3 protein content than those of controls, induced dendritic spine growth but at slower rates than in controls. These combined effects of sublethal AβOs concentrations (which include redox-sensitive stimulation of RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, decreased RyR2 protein expression, mitochondrial fragmentation, and prevention of RyR-mediated spine remodeling) may contribute to impairing the synaptic plasticity in AD. PMID:20712397

  11. Ultrashort Antimicrobial Peptides with Antiendotoxin Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chih, Ya-Han; Lin, Yen-Shan; Yip, Bak-Sau; Wei, Hsiu-Ju; Chu, Hung-Lun; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Release of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (endotoxin) from bacteria into the bloodstream may cause serious unwanted stimulation of the host immune system. Some but not all antimicrobial peptides can neutralize LPS-stimulated proinflammatory responses. Salt resistance and serum stability of short antimicrobial peptides can be boosted by adding β-naphthylalanine to their termini. Herein, significant antiendotoxin effects were observed in vitro and in vivo with the β-naphthylalanine end-tagged variants of the short antimicrobial peptides S1 and KWWK. PMID:26033727

  12. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  13. Transduction of aminergic and peptidergic signals in enteric neurones of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J M; Wood, J D; Zafirov, D H

    1987-01-01

    1. The biogenic amines 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and histamine, and the peptides bombesin, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), cholecystokinin (CCK), substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) each mimicked slow synaptic excitation (slow e.p.s.p.) when applied to myenteric neurones of the guinea-pig small intestine. 2. Stimulation of the catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and intraneuronal elevation of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) also mimicked the slow e.p.s.p. and the actions of the aminergic and peptidergic messengers. 3. Adenosine prevented stimulation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and abolished the slow e.p.s.p.-like actions of forskolin. 4. Exposure of the neurones to adenosine prior to or during application of bombesin, GRP, VIP, CCK or histamine blocked the actions of these substances. 5. Pre-treatment with adenosine did not suppress the slow e.p.s.p.-like actions of substance P, CGRP or 5-HT. 6. The results suggest that signal transduction for bombesin, GRP, VIP, CCK and histamine involves stimulation of adenylate cyclase and second messenger function of cyclic AMP. Transduction mechanisms for 5-HT, substance P and CGRP appear not to involve second messenger function of cyclic AMP. PMID:3656177

  14. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  15. Neuropeptides and nasal secretion.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, J N; Kaliner, M

    1991-10-01

    The nasal mucosa is innervated by the sensory, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nervous systems. Nociceptive sensory nerves are stimulated by mucosal injury, inhalation of irritants, or mast cell degranulation and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide, the tachykinins substance P and neurokinin A, and other peptides by the axon response mechanism. Sensory nerve stimulation initiates systemic reflexes, such as the sneeze, and central parasympathetic reflexes which release acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and other peptides and lead to glandular secretion. In concert, these proinflammatory neural responses lead to vasodilation, vascular permeability, and glandular secretion. Sympathetic nerves release neuropeptide Y and norepinephrine, potent vasoconstrictors which act to decompress the nasal mucosa and produce nasal patency. The balance between the effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic neurotransmitters may regulate nasal homeostasis, whereas the nociceptive sensory system may be held in reserve as a defense mechanism. Dysfunction of these systems may lead to pathological nasal syndromes. In the future, specific neuropeptide agonists and antagonists may be useful for the treatment of human rhinitic diseases. PMID:1928355

  16. [The effect of neurotensin on the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Osadchiĭ, O E; Pokrovskiĭ, V M

    1998-01-01

    Neurotensin is a peptide involved in regulation of cardiovascular system. Neurotensin immunoreactivity is found in myocardium, conduction system of the heart, intracardiac ganglion cells, coronary vessels. High content of this peptide is also determined in structures of sympathoadrenal system. This creates the possibility of hormonal neurotensin action on the heart following sympathetic activation. Neurotensin accelerates heart rate, increases myocardial contractility, affects central haemodynamics, regional blood flow and coronary circulation. Neurotensin modulates autonomic influences on the heart and plays role in mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmogenesis, especially in dynamics of vagally induced cardiac rhythm disorders. Cardiovascular effects of this peptide may be associated with direct influence on the heart and vessels, stimulating action on release of histamine and catecholamines and activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons which contain calcitonin-gene related peptide and substance P. Cardiovascular action of neurotensin is species dependent and it is followed by pronounced tachyphylaxis. Cellular mechanism of neurotensin action is associated with stimulation of phosphoinositide turnover, elevation of intracellular calcium and cyclic nucleotides level.

  17. STC1 interference on calcitonin family of receptors signaling during osteoblastogenesis via adenylate cyclase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Terra, Silvia R; Cardoso, João Carlos R; Félix, Rute C; Martins, Leo Anderson M; Souza, Diogo Onofre G; Guma, Fatima C R; Canário, Adelino Vicente M; Schein, Vanessa

    2015-03-01

    Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are involved in bone formation/remodeling. Here we investigate the effects of STC1 on functional heterodimer complex CALCRL/RAMP1, expression and activity during osteoblastogenesis. STC1 did not modify CALCRL and ramp1 gene expression during osteoblastogenesis when compared to controls. However, plasma membrane spatial distribution of CALCRL/RAMP1 was modified in 7-day pre-osteoblasts exposed to either CGRP or STC1, and both peptides induced CALCRL and RAMP1 assembly. CGRP, but not STC1 stimulated cAMP accumulation in 7-day osteoblasts and in CALCRL/RAMP1 transfected HEK293 cells. Furthermore, STC1 inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation of HEK293 cells, but not in CALCRL/RAMP1 transfected HEK293 cells. However, STC1 inhibited cAMP accumulation in calcitonin receptor (CTR) HEK293 transfected cells stimulated by calcitonin. In conclusion, STC1 signals through inhibitory G-protein modulates CGRP receptor spatial localization during osteoblastogenesis and may function as a regulatory factor interacting with calcitonin peptide members during bone formation.

  18. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  19. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  20. [Tuftsin-like peptides from a C-reactive protein molecule as regulators of lymphocyte proliferation].

    PubMed

    Polevshchikov, A V; Nazarov, P G

    1994-01-01

    Influence of synthetic peptides from human C-reactive protein (CRP) on proliferation of intact and mitogen stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes was studied. Effect of the tetra-peptides from CRP was similar to that of tuftsin Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg. All the peptides studied did not increase the 3H-thymidine incorporation into the resting lymphocytes but accelerated it after mitogen stimulation. The peptides efficiency depended on T- or B-specificity of mitogens. PMID:8122411

  1. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  3. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-11-28

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill "superbugs" emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics).

  4. Intracellular signalling by C-peptide.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes. PMID:18382618

  5. Histamine H(3) receptor-mediated modulation of perivascular nerve transmission in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengyuan; Takatori, Shingo; Jin, Xin; Koyama, Toshihiro; Tangsucharit, Panot; Li, Simin; Zamami, Yoshito; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2011-03-25

    The rat mesenteric artery has been shown to be innervated by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing (CGRPergic) vasodilator nerves. The present study was designed to investigate the involvement of histamine H(3) receptors in the neurotransmission of perivascular adrenergic and CGRPergic nerves. The mesenteric vascular beds without an endothelium isolated from male Wistar rats were perfused with Krebs solution and perfusion pressure was measured. In preparations with resting tension, the selective H(3) receptor agonist (R)-α-methylhistamine (α-methylhistamine; 10-100nM) significantly reduced periarterial nerve stimulation (2-8Hz)-induced vasoconstriction and noradrenaline release in the perfusate without an effect on the vasoconstriction induced by exogenously injected noradrenaline (0.5, 1.0nmol). In preparations with active tone produced by methoxamine (2μM) and in the presence of guanethidine (5μM), the periarterial nerve stimulation (1, 2Hz)-induced vasodilator response was inhibited by α-methylhistamine (0.1-1μM) perfusion without affecting vasodilation induced by exogenously injected CGRP (5pmol). Clobenpropit (histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, 1μM) canceled the α-methylhistamine-induced decrease in the periarterial nerve stimulation-induced vasoconstriction and noradrenaline release and periarterial nerve stimulation-induced vasodilation. These results suggest that the stimulation of H(3) receptors located in rat perivascular nerves inhibits presynaptically the neurotransmission of not only adrenergic nerves, but also CGRP nerves, by decreasing neurotransmitters.

  6. Peptides regulate cortical thymocytes differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Polyakova, V O; Linkova, N S; Dudkov, A V; Kvetnoy, I M

    2011-01-01

    The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala) and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp). Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells.

  7. Peptides Regulate Cortical Thymocytes Differentiation, Proliferation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Khavinson, V. Kh.; Polyakova, V. O.; Linkova, N. S.; Dudkov, A. V.; Kvetnoy, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala) and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp). Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells. PMID:22312461

  8. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  9. Electrically evoked neuropeptide release and neurogenic inflammation differ between rat and human skin

    PubMed Central

    Sauerstein, Katja; Klede, Monika; Hilliges, Marita; Schmelz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Protein extravasation and vasodilatation can be induced by neuropeptides released from nociceptive afferents (neurogenic inflammation). We measured electrically evoked neuropeptide release and concomitant protein extravasation in human and rat skin using intradermal microdialysis. Plasmapheresis capillaries were inserted intradermally at a length of 1.5 cm in the volar forearm of human subjects or abdominal skin of rats. Capillaries were perfused with Ringer solution at a flow rate of 2.5 or 1.6 μl min−1. After a baseline period of 60 min capillaries were stimulated electrically (1 Hz, 80 mA, 0.5 ms or 4 Hz, 30 mA, 0.5 ms) for 30 min using a surface electrode directly above the capillaries and a stainless-steel wire inserted in the capillaries. Total protein concentration was assessed photometrically and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In rat skin, electrical stimulation increased CGRP and total protein concentration in the dialysate. SP measurements showed a larger variance but only for the 1 Hz stimulation was the increased release significant. In human skin, electrical stimulation provoked a large flare reaction and at a frequency of 4 Hz both CGRP and SP concentrations increased significantly. In spite of the large flare reactions no protein extravasation was induced, which suggests major species differences. It will be of interest to investigate whether the lack of neurogenic protein extravasation is also valid under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11118507

  10. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  11. In vitro stimulation of HDL anti-inflammatory activity and inhibition of LDL pro-inflammatory activity in the plasma of patients with end-stage renal disease by an apoA-1 mimetic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Moradi, Hamid; Pahl, Madeleine V; Fogelman, Alan M; Navab, Mohamad

    2010-01-01

    Features of end-stage renal disease such as oxidative stress, inflammation, hypertension, and dyslipidemia are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease. By inhibiting the formation and increasing the disposal of oxidized lipids, HDL exerts potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. Given that apolipoproteinA-1 can limit atherosclerosis, we hypothesized that an apolipoproteinA-1 mimetic peptide, 4F, may reduce the proinflammatory properties of LDL and enhance the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL in uremic plasma. To test this, plasma from each of 12 stable hemodialysis patients and age-matched control subjects was incubated with 4F or vehicle. The isolated HDL and LDL fractions were added to cultured human aortic endothelial cells to quantify monocyte chemotactic activity, thus measuring their pro- or anti-inflammatory index. The LDL from the hemodialysis patients was more pro-inflammatory and their HDL was less anti-inflammatory than those of the control subjects. Pre-incubation of the plasma from the hemodialysis patients with 4F decreased LDL pro-inflammatory activity and enhanced HDL anti-inflammatory activity. Whether 4F or other apolipoproteinA-1 mimetic peptides will have any therapeutic benefit in end-stage renal disease will have to be examined directly in clinical studies. PMID:19471321

  12. Kisspeptin prevention of amyloid-β peptide neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Milton, Nathaniel G N; Chilumuri, Amrutha; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Nercessian, Amanda N; Ashioti, Maria

    2012-09-19

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset is associated with changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) function. The 54 amino acid kisspeptin (KP) peptide regulates the HPG axis and alters antioxidant enzyme expression. The Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ) is neurotoxic, and this action can be prevented by the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Here, we examined the effects of KP peptides on the neurotoxicity of Aβ, prion protein (PrP), and amylin (IAPP) peptides. The Aβ, PrP, and IAPP peptides stimulated the release of KP and KP 45-54. The KP peptides inhibited the neurotoxicity of Aβ, PrP, and IAPP peptides, via an action that could not be blocked by kisspeptin-receptor (GPR-54) or neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptor antagonists. Knockdown of KiSS-1 gene, which encodes the KP peptides, in human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells with siRNA enhanced the toxicity of amyloid peptides, while KiSS-1 overexpression was neuroprotective. A comparison of the catalase and KP sequences identified a similarity between KP residues 42-51 and the region of catalase that binds Aβ. The KP peptides containing residues 45-50 bound Aβ, PrP, and IAPP, inhibited Congo red binding, and were neuroprotective. These results suggest that KP peptides are neuroprotective against Aβ, IAPP, and PrP peptides via a receptor independent action involving direct binding to the amyloid peptides.

  13. Basic fibroblast growth factor attenuates the degeneration of injured spinal cord motor endplates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianlong; Sun, Jianfeng; Tang, Yongxiang; Guo, Gangwen; Zhou, Xiaozhe; Chen, Yanliang; Shen, Minren

    2013-01-01

    The distal end of the spinal cord and neuromuscular junction may develop secondary degeneration and damage following spinal cord injury because of the loss of neural connections. In this study, a rat model of spinal cord injury, established using a modified Allen's method, was injected with basic fibroblast growth factor solution via subarachnoid catheter. After injection, rats with spinal cord injury displayed higher scores on the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale. Motor function was also well recovered and hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that spinal glial scar hyperplasia was not apparent. Additionally, anterior tibial muscle fibers slowly, but progressively, atrophied. nohistochemical staining showed that the absorbance values of calcitonin gene related peptide and acetylcholinesterase in anterior tibial muscle and spinal cord were similar, and injection of basic broblast growth factor increased this absorbance. Results showed that after spinal cord injury, the distal motor neurons and motor endplate degenerated. Changes in calcitonin gene related peptide and acetylcholinesterase in the spinal cord anterior horn motor neurons and motor endplate then occurred that were consistent with this regeneration. Our findings indicate that basic fibroblast growth factor can protect the endplate through attenuating the decreased expression of calcitonin gene related peptide and acetylcholinesterase in anterior horn motor neurons of the injured spinal cord. PMID:25206531

  14. Host defense peptides from Lithobates forreri, Hylarana luctuosa, and Hylarana signata (Ranidae): phylogenetic relationships inferred from primary structures of ranatuerin-2 and brevinin-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nielsen, Per F; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2014-03-01

    The primary structures of host-defense peptides present in frog skin secretions constitute useful molecular markers for establishing taxonomic classifications and investigating phylogenetic relationships between species within a particular genus. Peptidomic analysis has led to the characterization of multiple host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of three species of frogs from the family Ranidae: Lithobates forreri (Boulenger, 1883), Hylarana luctuosa (Peters, 1871), and Hylarana signata (Günther, 1872). The L. forreri secretions contain ranatuerin-2 (2 peptides), brevinin-1 (4 peptides), and temporin (1 peptide). The H. luctuosa secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), esculentin-1 (1 peptide), esculentin-2 (1 peptide), palustrin-2 (2 peptides), and temporin (2 peptides). The H. signata secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), brevinin-1 (5 peptides), palustrin-2 (1 peptide), and temporin (2 peptides). Cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 44 ranatuerin-2 peptides from 20 Lithobates species indicates a close phylogenetic relationship between L. forreri, Lithobates onca, and Lithobates yavapaiensis. A similar cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 27 brevinin-2 peptides from 8 Hylarana species provides support for a close phylogenetic relationship between H. signata and Hylarana picturata, while showing that the species are not conspecific, with H. luctuosa more distantly related. PMID:24463457

  15. Host defense peptides from Lithobates forreri, Hylarana luctuosa, and Hylarana signata (Ranidae): phylogenetic relationships inferred from primary structures of ranatuerin-2 and brevinin-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nielsen, Per F; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2014-03-01

    The primary structures of host-defense peptides present in frog skin secretions constitute useful molecular markers for establishing taxonomic classifications and investigating phylogenetic relationships between species within a particular genus. Peptidomic analysis has led to the characterization of multiple host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of three species of frogs from the family Ranidae: Lithobates forreri (Boulenger, 1883), Hylarana luctuosa (Peters, 1871), and Hylarana signata (Günther, 1872). The L. forreri secretions contain ranatuerin-2 (2 peptides), brevinin-1 (4 peptides), and temporin (1 peptide). The H. luctuosa secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), esculentin-1 (1 peptide), esculentin-2 (1 peptide), palustrin-2 (2 peptides), and temporin (2 peptides). The H. signata secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), brevinin-1 (5 peptides), palustrin-2 (1 peptide), and temporin (2 peptides). Cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 44 ranatuerin-2 peptides from 20 Lithobates species indicates a close phylogenetic relationship between L. forreri, Lithobates onca, and Lithobates yavapaiensis. A similar cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 27 brevinin-2 peptides from 8 Hylarana species provides support for a close phylogenetic relationship between H. signata and Hylarana picturata, while showing that the species are not conspecific, with H. luctuosa more distantly related.

  16. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  17. A novel retro-inverso peptide inhibitor reduces amyloid deposition, oxidation and inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parthsarathy, Vadivel; McClean, Paula L; Hölscher, Christian; Taylor, Mark; Tinker, Claire; Jones, Glynn; Kolosov, Oleg; Salvati, Elisa; Gregori, Maria; Masserini, Massimo; Allsop, David

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have developed a retro-inverso peptide inhibitor (RI-OR2, rGffvlkGr) that blocks the in vitro formation and toxicity of the Aβ oligomers which are thought to be a cause of neurodegeneration and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease. We have now attached a retro-inverted version of the HIV protein transduction domain 'TAT' to RI-OR2 to target this new inhibitor (RI-OR2-TAT, Ac-rGffvlkGrrrrqrrkkrGy-NH(2)) into the brain. Following its peripheral injection, a fluorescein-labelled version of RI-OR2-TAT was found to cross the blood brain barrier and bind to the amyloid plaques and activated microglial cells present in the cerebral cortex of 17-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. Daily intraperitoneal injection of RI-OR2-TAT (at 100 nmol/kg) for 21 days into 10-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice resulted in a 25% reduction (p<0.01) in the cerebral cortex of Aβ oligomer levels, a 32% reduction (p<0.0001) of β-amyloid plaque count, a 44% reduction (p<0.0001) in the numbers of activated microglial cells, and a 25% reduction (p<0.0001) in oxidative damage, while the number of young neurons in the dentate gyrus was increased by 210% (p<0.0001), all compared to control APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice injected with vehicle (saline) alone. Our data suggest that oxidative damage, inflammation, and inhibition of neurogenesis are all a downstream consequence of Aβ aggregation, and identify a novel brain-penetrant retro-inverso peptide inhibitor of Aβ oligomer formation for further testing in humans as a potential disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Calcitonin inhibits the growth of human gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Yamatani, T; Arima, N; Yamashita, Y; Fujita, T; Chiba, T

    1992-02-18

    Calcitonin has a wide variety of actions on gastrointestinal function. In this study, we investigated the effects of calcitonin on the growth of human gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III in comparison with those of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Calcitonin, but not CGRP, significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the growth of KATO III cells. This inhibition of cell growth was accompanied by an increase in cyclic AMP production. The proliferation of KATO III cells was also inhibited by forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, although agents which do not stimulate cyclic AMP production had no effect. Furthermore, in the presence of GTP, calcitonin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in KATO III cell membranes, and this increase was reduced in the absence of GTP. On the other had, neither calcitonin nor CGRP enhanced the turnover of inositolphospholipid or the intracellular Ca2+ level. In addition, 125I-labeled human calcitonin was specifically bound to KATO III cell membranes, and this binding was dose-dependently displaced by unlabeled calcitonin but not CGRP. Furthermore, the specific binding of 125I-labeled human calcitonin to KATO III cell membranes was significantly reduced by addition of GTP but not ATP. These results suggest that calcitonin inhibits the growth of human gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III by stimulating cyclic AMP production via a GTP-dependent process coupled to specific calcitonin receptors. PMID:1313594

  19. C-Peptide and its intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2009-01-01

    Although long believed to be inert, C-peptide has now been shown to have definite biological effects both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic animals and in patients with type 1 diabetes. These effects point to a protective action of C-peptide against the development of diabetic microvascular complications. Underpinning these observations is undisputed evidence of C-peptide binding to a variety of cell types at physiologically relevant concentrations, and the downstream stimulation of multiple cell signaling pathways and gene transcription via the activation of numerous transcription factors. These pathways affect such fundamental cellular processes as re-absorptive and/or secretory phenotype, migration, growth, and survival. Whilst the receptor remains to be identified, experimental data points strongly to the existence of a specific G-protein-coupled receptor for C-peptide. Of the cell types studied so far, kidney tubular cells express the highest number of C-peptide binding sites. Accordingly, C-peptide exerts major effects on the function of these cells, and in the context of diabetic nephropathy appears to antagonise the pathophysiological effects of major disease mediators such as TGFbeta1 and TNFalpha. Therefore, based on its cellular activity profile C-peptide appears well positioned for development as a therapeutic tool to treat microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes. PMID:20039003

  20. Chemotactic peptide receptor modulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The binding of the chemotactic peptide N- formylnorleucylleucylphenylalanine (FNLLP) to its receptor on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) modulates the number of available peptide receptors. Incubation with FNLLP decreases subsequent binding capacity, a phenomenon that has been termed receptor down regulation. Down regulation of the chemotactic peptide receptor is concentration dependent in both the rate and extent of receptor loss. The dose response parallels that of FNLLP binding to the recptor. The time- course is rapid; even at concentrations of FNLLP as low as 3 x 10(-9) M, the new equilibrium concentration of receptors is reached within 15 min. Down regulation is temperature dependent, but does occur even at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with down regulation, some of the peptide becomes irreversibly cell associated. At 4 degrees C, there is a small accumulation of nondissociable peptide that rapidly reaches a plateau. At higher temperatures, accumulation of nondissociable peptide continues after the rceptor number has reached equilibrium, and the amount accumulated can exceed the initial number of receptors by as much as 300%. The dose response of peptide uptake at 37 degrees C reflects that of binding, suggesting that it is receptor mediated. This uptake may occur via a pinocytosis mechanism. Although PMNs have not been considered to be pinocytic, the addition of FNLLP causes a fourfold stimulation of the rate of pinocytosis as measured by the uptake of [3H]sucrose. PMID:7391138

  1. Inhibition of formyl peptide-stimulated superoxide anion generation by Fal-002-2 occurs mainly through the blockade of the p21-activated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways in ratneutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ya-Ru; Huang, Li-Jiau; Lin, Hui-Yi; Hung, Yun-Jie; Lee, Miau-Rong; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Hsu, Mei-Feng; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2013-02-15

    In formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)-stimulated rat neutrophils, a synthetic compound, 6-chloro-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylate (Fal-002-2), inhibited superoxide anion (O2(•-)) generation with an IC50 value of about 11μM, which was not mediated by scavenging the generated O2(•-) or by a cytotoxic effect on neutrophils. Fal-002-2 effectively attenuated the phosphorylation of Ser residues in p47(phox) and the association between p47(phox) and p22(phox) in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils. The interaction of p47(phox) with protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms (α, βI, βII, δ and ζ) was attenuated by Fal-002-2 with a similar IC50 value to that required for inhibition of O2(•-) generation, whereas Fal-002-2 had no prominent effect on PKC isoform membrane translocation and did not affect the kinase activity. Moreover, Fal-002-2 had no effect on the phosphorylation of Akt and downstream glycogen synthase kinase-3β, only slightly affected the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but effectively attenuated the downstream MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 phosphorylation. The interaction of p21-activated kinase (PAK) 1with p47(phox), phosphorylation of PAK1 (Thr423/Ser144) and the membrane recruitment of PAK1 were effectively inhibited by Fal-002-2. Fal-002-2 also blocked the activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 in a concentration range that effectively inhibited PAK activation. Taken together, these results suggest that Fal-002-2 inhibits fMLP-stimulated O2(•-) generation in neutrophils mainly through the blockade of PKC and PAK signaling pathways and partly through p38 MAPK signaling.

  2. The effects of intra-articular resiniferatoxin on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngkyung; Kim, Eun-hye; Lee, Kyu Sang; Lee, Koeun; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Sook Hyun; Ko, Cheolwoong; Yooon, Young Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether an intra-articular injection of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor agonist, resiniferatoxin (RTX) would alleviate behavioral signs of arthritic pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). We also sought to determine the effect of RTX treatment on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the spinal cord. Knee joint inflammation was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 8 mg/50 µl) and weight bearing percentage on right and left hindpaws during walking, paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation, and paw withdrawal latency to heat were measured to evaluate pain behavior. Intra-articular administration of RTX (0.03, 0.003 and 0.0003%) at 2 weeks after the induction of knee joint inflammation significantly improved reduction of weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindlimb and increased paw withdrawal sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli. The reduction of pain behavior persisted for 3~10 days according to each behavioral test. The MIA-induced increase in CGRP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord was decreased by RTX treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The present study demonstrated that a single intra-articular administration of RTX reduced pain behaviors for a relatively long time in an experimental model of OA and could normalize OA-associated changes in peptide expression in the spinal cord. PMID:26807032

  3. The effects of intra-articular resiniferatoxin on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngkyung; Kim, Eun-Hye; Lee, Kyu Sang; Lee, Koeun; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Sook Hyun; Ko, Cheolwoong; Kim, Junesun; Yooon, Young Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether an intra-articular injection of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor agonist, resiniferatoxin (RTX) would alleviate behavioral signs of arthritic pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). We also sought to determine the effect of RTX treatment on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the spinal cord. Knee joint inflammation was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 8 mg/50 µl) and weight bearing percentage on right and left hindpaws during walking, paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation, and paw withdrawal latency to heat were measured to evaluate pain behavior. Intra-articular administration of RTX (0.03, 0.003 and 0.0003%) at 2 weeks after the induction of knee joint inflammation significantly improved reduction of weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindlimb and increased paw withdrawal sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli. The reduction of pain behavior persisted for 3~10 days according to each behavioral test. The MIA-induced increase in CGRP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord was decreased by RTX treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The present study demonstrated that a single intra-articular administration of RTX reduced pain behaviors for a relatively long time in an experimental model of OA and could normalize OA-associated changes in peptide expression in the spinal cord. PMID:26807032

  4. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  5. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  7. The presence of mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors in human heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Sobanski, Piotr; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Shaqura, Mohammed; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elzbieta; Schäfer, Michael; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2014-11-01

    Functional evidence suggests that the stimulation of peripheral and central opioid receptors (ORs) is able to modulate heart function. Moreover, selective stimulation of either cardiac or central ORs evokes preconditioning and, therefore, protects the heart against ischemic injury. However, anatomic evidence for OR subtypes in the human heart is scarce. Human heart tissue obtained during autopsy after sudden death was examined immunohistochemically for mu- (MOR), kappa- (KOR), and delta- (DOR) OR subtypes. MOR and DOR immunoreactivity was found mainly in myocardial cells, as well as on sparse individual nerve fibers. KOR immunoreactivity was identified predominantly in myocardial cells and on intrinsic cardiac adrenergic (ICA) cell-like structures. Double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed that DOR colocalized with the neuronal marker PGP9.5, as well as with the sensory neuron marker calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP-immunoreactive (IR) fibers were detected either in nerve bundles or as sparse individual fibers containing varicose-like structures. Our findings offer the first hint of an anatomic basis for the existence of OR subtypes in the human heart by demonstrating their presence in CGRP-IR sensory nerve fibers, small cells with an eccentric nucleus resembling ICA cells, and myocardial cells. Taken together, this suggests the role of opioids in both the neural transmission and regulation of myocardial cell function.

  8. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  9. Effects of opioid peptides on thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a given species, injected opioid peptides usually cause changes in temperature similar to those caused by nonpeptide opioids. The main effect in those species most studied, the cat, rat, and mouse, is an increase in the level about which body temperature is regulated; there is a coordinated change in the activity of thermoregulatory effectors such that hyperthermia is produced in both hot and cold environments. Larger doses may depress thermoregulation, thereby causing body temperature to decrease in the cold. Elicitation of different patterns of response over a range of environmental temperatures and studies with naloxone and naltrexone indicate that stimulation of a number of different receptors by both peptide and nonpeptide opioids can evoke thermoregulatory responses. ..beta..-Endorphin is readily antagonized by naloxone whereas methionine-enkephalin can act on naloxone-insensitive receptors. Moreover, synthetic peptide analogs do not necessarily evoke the same response as does the related endogenous peptide. The lack of effect of naloxone on body temperature of subjects housed at usual laboratory temperature or on pyrogen-induced increases in body temperature indicates that an action of endogenous peptides on naloxone-sensitive receptors plays little, if any, role in normal thermoregulation or in fever. However, there is some evidence that such an action may be involved in responses to restraint or ambient temperature-induced stress. Further evaluation of possible physiological roles of endogenous opioid peptides will be facilitated when specific antagonists at other types of opioid receptors become available.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  11. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  12. Computational peptide vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Immunoinformatics focuses on modeling immune responses for better understanding of the immune system and in many cases for proposing agents able to modify the immune system. The most classical of these agents are vaccines derived from living organisms such as smallpox or polio. More modern vaccines comprise recombinant proteins, protein domains, and in some cases peptides. Generating a vaccine from peptides however requires technologies and concepts very different from classical vaccinology. Immunoinformatics therefore provides the computational tools to propose peptides suitable for formulation into vaccines. This chapter introduces the essential biological concepts affecting design and efficacy of peptide vaccines and discusses current methods and workflows applied to design successful peptide vaccines using computers.

  13. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  14. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  15. New peptides players in metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Mierzwicka, Agata; Bolanowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Among new peptides responsible for the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders and carbohydrate metabolism, adipokines are of great importance. Adipokines are substances of hormonal character, secreted by adipose tissue. Apart from the well-known adipokines, adropin and preptin are relatively newly discovered, hence their function is not fully understood. They are peptides not secreted by adipose tissue but their role in the metabolic regulations seems to be significant. Preptin is a 34-amino acid peptide, a derivative of proinsulin growth factor II (pro-IGF-II), secreted by pancreatic β cells, considered to be a physiological enhancer of insulin secretion. Additionally, preptin has a stimulating effect on osteoblasts, inducing their proliferation, differentiation and survival. Adropin is a 76-amino acid peptide, encoded by the energy homeostasis associated gene (Enho), mainly in liver and brain, and its expression is dependent on a diet. Adropin is believed to play an important role in metabolic homeostasis, fatty acids metabolism control, insulin resistance prevention, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. The results of studies conducted so far show that the diseases resulting from metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or cardiovascular disease are accompanied by significant changes in the concentration of these peptides. It is also important to note that preptin has an anabolic effect on bone tissue, which might be preventive in osteoporosis. PMID:27594563

  16. Pharmacological evidence for CGRP uptake into perivascular capsaicin sensitive nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Sams-Nielsen, Anette; Orskov, Cathrine; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2001-01-01

    Specific mechanisms, providing reuptake of cathecholamine and amino acid neurotransmitters (e.g. serotonin and glutamate) into cells of the central nervous system are well known, whereas neuronal uptake of neuropeptide transmitters have not previously been reported. In the present study we present evidence for uptake of the 37 amino acid neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) into perivascular terminals of capsaicin sensitive nerve fibres, innervating the guinea-pig basilar artery. Release of CGRP from perivascular nerve terminals was obtained by capsaicin-induced vanilloid receptor-stimulation and detected as CGRP receptor-mediated dilation of isolated segments of the guinea-pig basilar artery. Following three repeated capsaicin challenges, CGRP-depleted segments were incubated with CGRP. This caused significant reappearance of capsaicin-induced vasodilatory responses. These responses were dependent on duration and concentration of the preceding CGRP incubation and were inhibited by the CGRP receptor antagonist, CGRP8–37. The CGRP-re-depletion was significantly reduced when CGRP8–37 was present during the preceding CGRP incubation. Thus, presynaptic CGRP receptors are likely to be involved in neuronal CGRP uptake. Incubating the artery segments with 125I-CGRP allowed subsequent detection of capsaicin-induced 125I-release. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that only terminal CGRP is subject to capsaicin-induced depletion in vitro, whereas CGRP-immunoreactivity endures in the nerve fibres. PMID:11226146

  17. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor effects on pulpal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, J L; Hargreaves, K M

    2008-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important modulatory neuropeptide that regulates several physiological systems, including the activity of sensory neurons. We evaluated whether activation of the NPY Y1 receptor could modulate the activity of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors in trigeminal ganglia and dental pulp. We tested this hypothesis by measuring capsaicin-stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide release (CGRP) as a measure of nociceptor activity. Capsaicin-evoked CGRP release was inhibited by 50% (p < 0.05) in trigeminal ganglia and by 26% (p < 0.05) in dental pulp when tissues were pre-treated with [Leu(31),Pro(34)]NPY. The Y1 receptor was found to co-localize with the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 in trigeminal ganglia. These results demonstrate that activation of the Y1 receptor results in the inhibition of the activity of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors in the trigeminal ganglia and dental pulp. These findings are relevant to the physiological modulation of dental nociceptors by endogenous NPY and demonstrate an important novel analgesic target for the treatment of dental pain.

  18. CGRP inhibits neurons of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis: implications for the regulation of fear and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Nur Zeynep; Pare, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is thought to generate anxiety-like states via its projections to autonomic and neuroendocrine regulatory structures of the brain. However, because most BNST cells are GABAergic, they are expected to inhibit target neurons. In contrast with this, infusion of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) into BNST was reported to potentiate anxiety while activating BNST targets. The present study aimed to shed light on this paradox. The CGRP innervation of BNST originates in the pontine parabrachial nucleus and targets its anterolateral sector (BNST-AL). Thus, we investigated the effects of CGRP on BNST-AL neurons using patch recordings in vitro in male rats. CGRP did not alter the passive properties of BNST-AL cells but increased the amplitude of IPSPs evoked by stimulation of the stria terminalis (ST). However, IPSP paired-pulse ratios were unchanged by CGRP, and there was no correlation between IPSP potentiation and variance, suggesting that CGRP acts postsynaptically. Consistent with this, CGRP hyperpolarized the GABA-A reversal of BNST-AL cells. These results indicate that CGRP increases ST-evoked GABA-A IPSPs and hyperpolarizes their reversal potential through a postsynaptic change in Cl(-) homeostasis. Overall, our findings suggest that CGRP potentiates anxiety-like behaviors and increases neural activity in BNST targets, by inhibiting BNST-AL cells, supporting the conclusion that BNST-AL exerts anxiolytic effects. PMID:24381268

  19. Improved peripheral nerve regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by oral lumbrokinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Chung; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Ke, Cherng-Jyh; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the therapeutic effects of lumbrokinase, a group of enzymes extracted from the earthworm, on peripheral-nerve regeneration using well-defined sciatic nerve lesion paradigms in diabetic rats induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ). We found that lumbrokinase therapy could improve the rats' circulatory blood flow and promote the regeneration of axons in a silicone rubber conduit after nerve transection. Lumbrokinase treatment could also improve the neuromuscular functions with better nerve conductive performances. Immunohistochemical staining showed that lumbrokinase could dramatically promote calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the lamina I-II regions in the dorsal horn ipsilateral to the injury and cause a marked increase in the number of macrophages recruited within the distal nerve stumps. In addition, the lumbrokinase could stimulate the secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1), nerve growth factor (NGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in dissected diabetic sciatic nerve segments. In conclusion, the administration of lumbrokinase after nerve repair surgery in diabetic rats was found to have remarkable effects on promoting peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25787300

  20. Anti-gastritis and wound healing effects of Momordicae Semen extract and its active component.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kiwon; Chin, Young-Won; Chung, Yoon Hee; Park, Yang Hae; Yoo, Hunseung; Min, Dong Sun; Lee, Bongyong; Kim, Jinwoong

    2013-02-01

    Momordicae Semen, Momordica cochinchinensis Springer (Cucurbitaceae), has long been known to effectively relieve boils, rheumatic pain, and hemorrhoids. In this study, we investigated whether Momordicae Semen extract (MSE) has anti-gastritis effects in various rodent models and also explored possible mechanisms for the gastroprotective effects of MSE. MSE provided remarkable protective effects, comparable to those of rebamipide, in ethanol- and diclofenac-induced acute gastritis. In addition, it has demonstrated protective effect in a Helicobacter pylori-insulted chronic gastritis model. MSE also showed wound healing effect on cutaneous injury of mice and stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide and somatostatin receptors, which may be related to its anti-gastritis effects. In a single oral dose toxicity study, the approximate lethal dose of MSE was determined at >2000 mg/kg/day. The NOAEL was set to be 2000 mg/kg/day from the repeated oral dose toxicity study. Moreover, momordica saponin I, a major ingredient of MSE, treatment decreased gastric mucosa damage indices in the ethanol- and diclofenac-induced acute gastritis models. The results suggest that MSE could be a promising gastroprotective herbal medicine and momordica saponin I might be used as an active marker compound for MSE. PMID:22889079

  1. New players in the preventive treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Rapoport, Alan M

    2015-11-10

    Migraine is a common, chronic disorder of the brain causing much disability, as well as personal, familial and societal impact. Several oral preventive agents are available in different countries for the prevention of migraine, but none have performed better than 50% improvement in 50% of patients in a clinical trial. Additionally, each has various possible adverse events making their tolerability less than optimal. Recently, three monoclonal antibodies targeting the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) ligand (LY2951742, ALD403 and TEV-48125) and one targeting the CGRP receptor (AMG 334) have completed phase 2 trials, and the results have been reported. These early results show them all to be somewhat more effective than placebo, with no serious adverse events. Three have been studied for episodic migraine, and only TEV-48125 has been studied for both high frequency episodic and chronic migraine. Moreover, preliminary data suggests that neurostimulation is effective in migraine treatment, including stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion, transcutaneous supraorbital and supratrochlear nerve, and transcutaneous vagus nerve. In this article, these innovative therapies will be reviewed.

  2. Decompensated liver cirrhosis and neural regulation of mesenteric vascular tone in rats: role of sympathetic, nitrergic and sensory innervations

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Esther; Caracuel, Laura; Prieto, Isabel; Llévenes, Pablo; Aller, M. Ángeles; Arias, Jaime; Balfagón, Gloria; Blanco-Rivero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the possible alterations produced by liver cholestasis (LC), a model of decompensated liver cirrhosis in sympathetic, sensory and nitrergic nerve function in rat superior mesenteric arteries (SMA). The vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) was greater in LC animals. Alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine and P2 purinoceptor antagonist suramin decreased this response in LC animals more than in control animals. Both non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) L-NAME and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) (8-37) increased the vasoconstrictor response to EFS more strongly in LC than in control segments. Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA) or CGRP were greater in LC segments, while NO analogue DEA-NO induced a similar vasodilation in both experimental groups. The release of NA was not modified, while those of ATP, nitrite and CGRP were increased in segments from LC. Alpha 1 adrenoceptor, Rho kinase (ROCK) 1 and 2 and total myosin phosphatase (MYPT) expressions were not modified, while alpha 2B adrenoceptor, nNOS expression and nNOS and MYPT phosphorylation were increased by LC. Together, these alterations might counteract the increased splanchnic vasodilation observed in the last phases of decompensated liver cirrhosis. PMID:27484028

  3. Regulation of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Hutson, John M; Li, Ruili; Southwell, Bridget R; Newgreen, Don; Cousinery, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Testicular descent occurs in two morphologically distinct phases, each under different hormonal control from the testis itself. The first phase occurs between 8 and 15 weeks when insulin-like hormone 3 (Insl3) from the Leydig cells stimulates the gubernaculum to swell, thereby anchoring the testis near the future inguinal canal as the foetus grows. Testosterone causes regression of the cranial suspensory ligament to augment the transabdominal phase. The second, or inguinoscrotal phase, occurs between 25 and 35 weeks, when the gubernaculum bulges out of the external ring and migrates to the scrotum, all under control of testosterone. However, androgen acts mostly indirectly via the genitofemoral nerve (GFN), which produces calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to control the direction of migration. In animal models the androgen receptors are in the inguinoscrotal fat pad, which probably produces a neurotrophin to masculinise the GFN sensory fibres that regulate gubernacular migration. There is little direct evidence that this same process occurs in humans, but CGRP can regulate closure of the processus vaginalis in inguinal hernia, confirming that the GFN probably mediates human testicular descent by a similar mechanism as seen in rodent models. Despite increased understanding about normal testicular descent, the common causes of cryptorchidism remain elusive.

  4. Anti-gastritis and wound healing effects of Momordicae Semen extract and its active component.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kiwon; Chin, Young-Won; Chung, Yoon Hee; Park, Yang Hae; Yoo, Hunseung; Min, Dong Sun; Lee, Bongyong; Kim, Jinwoong

    2013-02-01

    Momordicae Semen, Momordica cochinchinensis Springer (Cucurbitaceae), has long been known to effectively relieve boils, rheumatic pain, and hemorrhoids. In this study, we investigated whether Momordicae Semen extract (MSE) has anti-gastritis effects in various rodent models and also explored possible mechanisms for the gastroprotective effects of MSE. MSE provided remarkable protective effects, comparable to those of rebamipide, in ethanol- and diclofenac-induced acute gastritis. In addition, it has demonstrated protective effect in a Helicobacter pylori-insulted chronic gastritis model. MSE also showed wound healing effect on cutaneous injury of mice and stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide and somatostatin receptors, which may be related to its anti-gastritis effects. In a single oral dose toxicity study, the approximate lethal dose of MSE was determined at >2000 mg/kg/day. The NOAEL was set to be 2000 mg/kg/day from the repeated oral dose toxicity study. Moreover, momordica saponin I, a major ingredient of MSE, treatment decreased gastric mucosa damage indices in the ethanol- and diclofenac-induced acute gastritis models. The results suggest that MSE could be a promising gastroprotective herbal medicine and momordica saponin I might be used as an active marker compound for MSE.

  5. The distribution of transient receptor potential melastatin-8 in the rat soft palate, epiglottis, and pharynx.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tadasu; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Kondo, Teruyoshi; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kasahara, Eriko; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry for transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8), the cold and menthol receptor, was performed on the rat soft palate, epiglottis and pharynx. TRPM8-immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were located beneath the mucous epithelium, and occasionally penetrated the epithelium. These nerve fibers were abundant in the posterior portion of the soft palate and at the border region of naso-oral and laryngeal parts of the pharynx. The epiglottis was free from such nerve fibers. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that TRPM8-IR nerve fibers in the pharynx and soft palate were mostly devoid of calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactivity (CGRP-IR). The retrograde tracing method also demonstrated that 30.1 and 8.7 % of sensory neurons in the jugular and petrosal ganglia innervating the pharynx contained TRPM8-IR, respectively. Among these neurons, the co-expression of TRPM8 and CGRP-IR was very rare. In the nodose ganglion, however, pharyngeal neurons were devoid of TRPM8-IR. Taste bud-like structures in the soft palate and pharynx contained 4-9 TRPM8-IR cells. In the epiglottis, the mucous epithelium on the laryngeal side had numerous TRPM8-IR cells. The present study suggests that TRPM8 can respond to cold stimulation when food and drinks pass through oral and pharyngeal cavities.

  6. Non-calcitonin secretory peptide derived from preprocalcitonin

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, R.S.; O'Neil, J.A.; Muszynski, M.; Aron, D.C.; Roos, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The terminal hexadecapeptide sequence of preprocalcitonin (termed carboxyl-adjacent peptide, CAP, for its position relative to calcitonin) has been synthesized to establish a radioimmunoassay for an investigation of cross-reacting peptides in extracts of normal and neoplastic calcitonin-producing tissues. Gel filtration chromatography of a rat thyroid extract revealed a major peak of immunoreactive peptide of approximately the same molecular weight as synthetic CAP. A minor peak of higher molecular weight immunoreactive material was also observed. The isoelectric point of both the thyroid peptide and synthetic material was about 5.2. Immunoreactive CAP and calcitonin were found in approximately equimolar amounts in normal thyroid and in anaplastic and well differentiated rat medullary thyroid carcinomas. Immunoreactive CAP was not detected in any tissue which did not contain calcitonin. Monolayer cultures of a rat medullary thyroid carcinoma contained and secreted equimolar amounts of immunoreactive CAP and calcitonin under basal (1 mM Ca/sup 2 +/) and stimulated (4 mM Ca/sup 2 +/ and 1 ..mu..M glucagon) conditions. These data indicate that the thyroidal peptide is probably the hexadecapeptide CAP which is derived from the same translation product as calcitonin. The similarity between the processing of precursors to the amidated peptide melanocyte-stimulating hormone and the corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide and processing of calcitonin and CAP suggests that the sequence Gly-Lys-Lys-Arg is one amidation codon in mammalian systems.

  7. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ashutosh; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Pillai, Maroor Raghavan Ambikalmajan; Knapp, Furn F Russ

    2015-03-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a site-directed targeted therapeutic strategy that specifically uses radiolabeled peptides as biological targeting vectors designed to deliver cytotoxic levels of radiation dose to cancer cells, which overexpress specific receptors. Interest in PRRT has steadily grown because of the advantages of targeting cellular receptors in vivo with high sensitivity as well as specificity and treatment at the molecular level. Recent advances in molecular biology have not only stimulated advances in PRRT in a sustainable manner but have also pushed the field significantly forward to several unexplored possibilities. Recent decades have witnessed unprecedented endeavors for developing radiolabeled receptor-binding somatostatin analogs for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors, which have played an important role in the evolution of PRRT and paved the way for the development of other receptor-targeting peptides. Several peptides targeting a variety of receptors have been identified, demonstrating their potential to catalyze breakthroughs in PRRT. In this review, the authors discuss several of these peptides and their analogs with regard to their applications and potential in radionuclide therapy. The advancement in the availability of combinatorial peptide libraries for peptide designing and screening provides the capability of regulating immunogenicity and chemical manipulability. Moreover, the availability of a wide range of bifunctional chelating agents opens up the scope of convenient radiolabeling. For these reasons, it would be possible to envision a future where the scope of PRRT can be tailored for patient-specific application. While PRRT lies at the interface between many disciplines, this technology is inextricably linked to the availability of the therapeutic radionuclides of required quality and activity levels and hence their production is also reviewed.

  8. Immunohistochemical study of the neuropeptides in the stellate ganglion of the water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Nasu, T; De Ocampo, G; Molina, H A; Tateyama, S; Morimoto, M

    2000-05-01

    The localization of some neuropeptides including neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), galanin (Gal), methionine enkephalin (M-ENK), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity was studied in the stellate ganglion (SG) of water buffalo. NPY, SP, Gal and TH immunoreactivities were present in almost all of the ganglion cells. NPY, SP, Gal, SP, CGRP, VIP and M-ENK immunoreactive nerve fibers were also seen in the SG. The localization and pattern of distribution of these peptides in the water buffalo stellate ganglion were compared with those in stellate ganglia of other mammalian species.

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  10. Radioimmunoassay for. gamma. -melanocyte stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Shibasaki, T.; Ling, N.; Guillemin, R.

    1980-05-26

    A specific radioimmunoassay for ..gamma..-melanocyte stimulating hormone-like peptides was developed. An antiserum raised in rabbit to synthetic bovine ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH, one of the possible ..gamma..-MSH peptides, specifically recognizes the portion between His/sup 5/ and Arg/sup 14/ of ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH without significant cross-reaction with other synthetic ..gamma..-MSH-like peptides, ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-MSH, adrenocorticotropin, and ..beta..-endorphin. The usable range of this RIA is 10 pg to 600 pg of synthetic ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH. Three immunoreactive ..gamma..-MSH peaks were thus found in gel permeation chromatography of the whole bovine pituitary extract.

  11. How much of virus-specific CD8 T cell reactivity is detected with a peptide pool when compared to individual peptides?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenji; Moldovan, Ioana; Targoni, Oleg S; Subbramanian, Ramu A; Lehmann, Paul V

    2012-10-29

    Immune monitoring of T cell responses increasingly relies on the use of peptide pools. Peptides, when restricted by the same HLA allele, and presented from within the same peptide pool, can compete for HLA binding sites. What impact such competition has on functional T cell stimulation, however, is not clear. Using a model peptide pool that is comprised of 32 well-defined viral epitopes from Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Influenza viruses (CEF peptide pool), we assessed peptide competition in PBMC from 42 human subjects. The magnitude of the peptide pool-elicited CD8 T cell responses was a mean 79% and a median 77% of the sum of the CD8 T cell responses elicited by the individual peptides. Therefore, while the effect of peptide competition was evident, it was of a relatively minor magnitude. By studying the dose-response curves for individual CEF peptides, we show that several of these peptides are present in the CEF-pool at concentrations that are orders of magnitude in excess of what is needed for the activation threshold of the CD8 T cells. The presence of such T cells with very high functional avidity for the viral antigens can explain why the effect of peptide competition is relatively minor within the CEF-pool.

  12. Microbial cell-wall contaminants in peptides: a potential source of physiological artifacts.

    PubMed

    Majde, J A

    1993-01-01

    Microbial cell-wall products (MCWP) such as endotoxins are easily introduced into peptides produced under standard laboratory conditions. Because these products stimulate the induction of cytokines and other mediators, which, in turn, trigger a broad range of physiological responses. MCWP in peptide preparations are potential sources of artifacts. This brief tutorial outlines the physical/chemical nature of MCWP, some of their sources, their physiological effects, and a simple method to control for them in some peptide preparations.

  13. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  14. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stawikowski, Maciej; Fields, Gregg B

    2012-08-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  15. Evidence that a BCR-ABL fusion peptide does not induce lymphocyte proliferation or cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abu-Eisha, Hazem M; Butt, Nauman M; Clark, Richard E; Christmas, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    The BCR-ABL fusion protein is characteristic of chronic myeloid leukaemia and may be an effective tumour-specific antigen. CD8+ T cell responses to BCR-ABL fusion peptides have been reported in normal subjects and CML patients but CD4+ T cell responses have been less well characterised. Here, the 23-mer e14a2 fusion peptide VHSATGFKQSSKALQRPVASDFE has been used to stimulate T cell responses. Most normal subjects and CML patients showed no proliferative responses to this peptide, with stimulation indices not significantly greater than 1.0. Following a second stimulation with the same peptide, small proliferative responses were obtained in normal subjects but not CML patients. These responses were not improved following a third stimulation with 23-mer peptide, nor by using mature autologous dendritic cells to present the peptide. Intracellular interferon-gamma production by CD4+ T cells was also not induced by the 23-mer e14a2 peptide. Hence, this e14a2 peptide does not stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro in most normal subjects or CML patients. The precise sequence of amino acids may be critical in defining immunogenicity for CD4+ T cell responses against BCR-ABL peptides.

  16. Experimental evidence that mutated-self peptides derived from mitochondrial DNA somatic mutations have the potential to trigger autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lina; Duvvuri, Bhargavi; Grigull, Jörg; Jamnik, Roni; Wither, Joan E; Wu, Gillian E

    2014-08-01

    Autoimmune disease is a critical health concern, whose etiology remains enigmatic. We hypothesized that immune responses to somatically mutated self proteins could have a role in the development of autoimmune disease. IFN-γ secretion by T cells stimulated with mitochondrial peptides encoded by published mitochondrial DNA was monitored to test the hypothesis. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy controls and autoimmune patients were assessed for their responses to the self peptides and mutated-self peptides differing from self by one amino acid. None of the self peptides but some of the mutated-self peptides elicited an immune response in healthy controls. In some autoimmune patients, PBMCs responded not only to some of the mutated-self peptides, but also to some of the self peptides, suggesting that there is a breach of self-tolerance in these patients. Although PBMCs from healthy controls failed to respond to self peptides when stimulated with self, the mutated-self peptide could elicit a response to the self peptide upon re-stimulation in vitro, suggesting that priming with mutated-self peptides elicits a cross-reactive response with self. The data raise the possibility that DNA somatic mutations are one of the events that trigger and/or sustain T cell responses in autoimmune diseases.

  17. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T

    2010-07-27

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity.

  18. A biologically active peptide mimetic of N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycosylated proteins and lipids are important regulatory factors whose functions can be altered by addition or removal of sugars to the glycan structure. The glycans are recognized by sugar-binding lectins that serve as receptors on the surface of many cells and facilitate initiation of an intracellular signal that changes the properties of the cells. We identified a peptide that mimics the ligand of an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectin and asked whether the peptide would express specific biological activity. Findings A 12-mer phage display library was screened with a GalNAc-specific lectin to identify an amino acid sequence that binds to the lectin. Phage particles that were eluted from the lectin with free GalNAc were considered to have been bound to a GalNAc-binding site. Peptides were synthesized with the selected sequence as a quadravalent structure to facilitate receptor crosslinking. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 24 h with the peptide stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but not of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The secretion of IL-21 was stimulated as strongly with the peptide as with interferon-γ. Conclusion The data indicate that the quadravalent peptide has biological activity with a degree of specificity. These effects occurred at concentrations in the nanomolar range, in contrast to free sugars that generally bind to proteins in the micro- to millimolar range. PMID:19284521

  19. Data-driven synthesis of proteolysis-resistant peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Prothiwa, Michaela; Syed, Ismail; Huising, Mark O; van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J; Trauger, Sunia A; Kahn, Barbara B; Saghatelian, Alan

    2014-12-24

    Peptide hormones are key physiological regulators, and many would make terrific drugs; however, the therapeutic use of peptides is limited by poor metabolism including rapid proteolysis. To develop novel proteolysis-resistant peptide hormone analogs, we utilize a strategy that relies on data from simple mass spectrometry experiments to guide the chemical synthesis of proteolysis-resistant analogs (i.e., data-driven synthesis). Application of this strategy to oxyntomodulin (OXM), a peptide hormone that stimulates insulin secretion from islets and lowers blood glucose in vivo, defined the OXM cleavage site in serum, and this information was used to synthesize a proteolysis-resistant OXM analog (prOXM). prOXM and OXM have similar activity in binding and glucose stimulated-insulin secretion assays. Furthermore, prOXM is also active in vivo. prOXM reduces basal glucose levels and improves glucose tolerance in mice. The discovery of prOXM suggests that proteolysis-resistant variants of other important peptide hormones can also be found using this strategy to increase the number of candidate therapeutic peptides. PMID:25496053

  20. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.

  1. Feeding the BT cationic peptides to chickens at hatch reduces cecal colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and primes innate immune cell functional activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BT/TAMUS 2032 (BT) cationic peptides are a group of related cationic peptides produced by a Gram-positive soil bacterium, Brevibacillus texasporus. Cationic amphiphilic peptides produced by host cells have been found to stimulate or prime the innate immune responses in mammals, but little infor...

  2. The effects of BT/TAMUS 2032 cationic peptide on innate immunity and susceptibility of young chickens to extraintestinal Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BT/TAMUS 2032 cationic peptides are a group of related cationic peptides produced by a Gram-positive bacterium. Cationic amphiphilic peptides have been found to stimulate or prime the innate immune responses in mammals. The innate immune system of poultry is functionally inefficient during the ...

  3. Engineering cyclic peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard J; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based toxins have attracted much attention in recent years for their exciting potential applications in drug design and development. This interest has arisen because toxins are highly potent and selectively target a range of physiologically important receptors. However, peptides suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor in vivo stability and poor bioavailability. A number of naturally occurring cyclic peptides have been discovered in plants, animals, and bacteria that have exceptional stability and potentially ameliorate these disadvantages. The lessons learned from studies of the structures, stabilities, and biological activities of these cyclic peptides can be applied to the reengineering of toxins that are not naturally cyclic but are amenable to cyclization. In this chapter, we describe solid-phase chemical synthetic methods for the reengineering of peptide toxins to improve their suitability as therapeutic, diagnostic, or imaging agents. The focus is on small disulfide-rich peptides from the venoms of cone snails and scorpions, but the technology is potentially widely applicable to a number of other peptide-based toxins. PMID:22230565

  4. Glucagon-like peptides activate hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mommsen, T P; Andrews, P C; Plisetskaya, E M

    1987-07-13

    Piscine (anglerfish, catfish, coho salmon) glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), applied at 3.5 nM, stimulate (1.1-1.9-fold) flux through gluconeogenesis above control levels in isolated trout and salmon hepatocytes. Human GLP-1 and GLP-2 also activate gluconeogenesis, but to a lesser degree than their piscine counterparts. Minor increases of substrate oxidation are noticed at times of peak gluconeogenic activation through GLPs. These hormones, which are derived from the same precursor peptide as glucagon are more potent activators of gluconeogenesis than glucagon when applied at equimolar concentrations, and do not appear to employ cAMP or cGMP as the intracellular messenger in hepatic tissue. PMID:3109952

  5. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  6. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-05-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  7. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-02-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  8. Effectiveness of electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST36) on the immunohistochemical density of enteroendocrine cells related to gastrointestinal function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Dae-Keun; Yook, Tae-Han; Sasaki, Motoki; Kitamura, Nobuo

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of electroacupuncture at Zusanli on the immunohistochemical density of enteroendocrine cells related to gastrointestinal function. The authors investigated the histochemical changes of mucous substances and immunohistochemical density of gastrin, serotonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), insulin, and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) secreting cells in rats. Staining density of mucous substances and the enteroendocrine cells of the gastrointestinal tract was observed with histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Stainless steel needles with a diameter of 0.25 mm were inserted into Zusanli (St36, 5mm below the head of the fibula under the knee joint, and 2mm lateral to the anterior tubercle of the tibia) and connected to an electrical stimulator. The electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation was delivered for 30 minutes at 10 mA, 2 Hz in EA stimulation (2EA group) or 4 Hz in EA stimulation (4EA group) in each experimental group. In 4EA stimulation at the Zusanli, staining density of Alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff on mucous substances of the stomach body was stronger than those of the 2EA and control groups. Periodic acid-Schiff staining density of pyloric mucosa in the 4EA group was stronger than that of the 2EA and control groups. The immunohistochemical staining density of gastrin, serotonin, and CGRP-secreting cells of pylorus in the 2EA and 4EA groups was stronger than that of the control group. Immunohistochemical staining density of insulin and PP secreting cells of islets of the pancreas in the 2EA and 4EA groups was stronger than that of the control group. These results suggest that EA stimulus at St36 has the potential to influence gastric mucous substances and enteroendocrine cells (gastrin, serotonin, CGRP, insulin, and PP) that subsequently modulate digestive functions. PMID:22483184

  9. Cancer therapy with alpha-emitters labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2010-05-01

    Actively targeted alpha-particles offer specific tumor cell killing action with less collateral damage to surrounding normal tissues than beta-emitters. During the last decade, radiolabeled peptides that bind to different receptors on the tumors have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents both in the preclinical and clinical settings. Advantages of radiolabeled peptides over antibodies include relatively straightforward chemical synthesis, versatility, easier radiolabeling, rapid clearance from the circulation, faster penetration and more uniform distribution into tissues, and less immunogenicity. Rapid internalization of the radiolabeled peptides with equally rapid re-expression of the cell surface target is a highly desirable property that enhances the total delivery of these radionuclides into malignant sites. Peptides, such as octreotide, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogues, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing peptides, bombesin derivatives, and others may all be feasible for use with alpha-emitters. The on-going preclinical work has primarily concentrated on octreotide and octreotate analogues labeled with Bismuth-213 and Astatine-211. In addition, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogue has been labeled with Lead-212/Bismuth-212 in vivo generator and demonstrated the encouraging therapeutic efficacy in treatment of experimental melanoma. Obstacles that continue to obstruct widespread acceptance of alpha-emitter-labeled peptides are primarily the supply of these radionuclides and concerns about potential kidney toxicity. New sources and methods for production of these medically valuable radionuclides and better understanding of mechanisms related to the peptide renal uptake and clearance should speed up the introduction of alpha-emitter-labeled peptides into the clinic. PMID:20350629

  10. Glucagon-like peptide 1: a potent glycogenic hormone.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Morales, M; Clemente, F; López-Delgado, M I; Delgado, E; Perea, A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1994-08-01

    GLP-1(7-36)amide is an insulinotropic peptide derived from the intestinal post-translational proglucagon process, the release of which is increased mainly after a carbohydrate meal; also, its anti-diabetogenic effect in normal and diabetic states has been reported. In this study, GLP-1(7-36)amide stimulates the formation of glycogen from glucose in isolated rat hepatocytes, such a glycogenic effect being achieved with physiological concentrations of the peptide. The GLP-1(7-36)amide-induced glycogenesis is abolished by glucagon, and it is accompanied by stimulation of the glycogen synthase alpha activity and by a decrease in the basal and glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP content. These findings could explain, at least in part, the GLP-1(7-36)amide insulin-independent plasma glucose lowering effect.

  11. Characterization of antimicrobial peptides from the skin secretions of the Malaysian frogs, Odorrana hosii and Hylarana picturata (Anura:Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Nowotny, Norbert; Leprince, Jérôme; Vaudry, Hubert; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; King, Jay D

    2008-09-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from Hose's rock frog Odorrana hosii (Boulenger, 1891) led to the isolation of 8 peptides with differential antibacterial activities. Structural characterization demonstrated that the peptides belonged to the esculentin-1 (1 peptide), esculentin-2 (1 peptide), brevinin-1 (2 peptides), brevinin-2 (2 peptides), and nigrocin-2 (2 peptides) families of antimicrobial peptides. Similar analysis of skin secretions from the Malaysian fire frog Hylarana picturata (Boulenger, 1920) led to the isolation and characterization of peptides belonging to the brevinin-1 (2 peptides), brevinin-2 (5 peptides), and temporin (1 peptide) families. The differences in antimicrobial activities of paralogous peptides provide insight into structure-activity relationships, emphasizing the importance of cationicity in determining potency. The substitution Lys11-->Gln in brevinin-1HSa (FLPAVLRVAAKIVPTVFCAISKKC) from O. hosii abolishes growth inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli but has no effect on the high potency (MIC = 8 microg/ml) against Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, the substitution (Gly4-->Asp) in brevinin-2PTb (GFKGAFKNVMFGIAKSAGKSALNALACKIDKSC) from H. picturata reduces activity against both E. coli and S. aureus. Cladistic analysis based upon the amino acid sequences of the brevinin-2 peptides from Asian frogs provides evidence for sister taxon relationships between O. hosii and O. livida and between H. picturata and H. güntheri. PMID:18621071

  12. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Sophocleous, Andreas M; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H; Mazzara, J Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2013-12-28

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in a 0.1M HEPES buffer, pH7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37°C for 24h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging, and microtome sectioning techniques were used to examine peptide penetration into the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST+0.02% sodium azide, 37°C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but also can be internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt.% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for >2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides.

  13. Activation of epitope-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses by synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Reali, E; Guerrini, R; Giori, B; Borghi, M; Marastoni, M; Tomatis, R; Traniello, S; Masucci, M G; Gavioli, R

    1996-08-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) recognize antigens as short peptides selected for presentation by their ability to bind to MHC class I molecules. Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific memory CTL responses, reactivated from blood lymphocytes of HLA-A11-positive individuals by stimulation with the autologous EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL), are often dominated by reactivites directed to the peptide epitope IVTDFSVIK (IVT), corresponding to amino acids 416-424 of EBV nuclear antigen-4 (EBNA4). We now report the selective activation of IVT-specific CTL by stimulation of lymphocytes with the corresponding synthetic peptide. A more than 10-fold increase in frequency of CTL clones with this specificity (from 8% to 96%) was obtained when the peptide was presented by HLA-A11-transfected T2 cells (T2/A11). Titration of synthetic peptide in cytotoxic assay demonstrated that clones activated under these conditions are as efficient as clones activated by conventional LCL stimulations. Induction of memory CTL responses required low surface density of MHC: peptide complexes, since reactivation was achieved by stimulation with T2/A11 cells pulsed with concentrations of peptide that are suboptimal for induction of target cell lysis. This protocol of activation revealed the presence of IVT-specific CTL precursors in a donor that failed to mount an IVT-specific response upon stimulation with the autologous B95.8 virus-transformed LCL. The results suggest that stimulation with synthetic peptide epitopes can be efficiently used for induction of memory CTL responses, and may be particularly helpful for the selective expansion of subdominant CTL specificities.

  14. Role of amphipathicity and hydrophobicity in the balance between hemolysis and peptide-membrane interactions of three related antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Axel; Martínez, Melina; Noguera, Martín E; Augusto, Marcelo T; Disalvo, Anibal; Santos, Nuno C; Semorile, Liliana; Maffía, Paulo C

    2016-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) represent important self defense molecules in many organisms, including humans. These peptides have a broad spectrum of activities, killing or neutralizing many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The emergence of multidrug resistant microbes has stimulated research on the development of alternative antibiotics. In the search for new antibiotics, cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) offer a viable alternative to conventional antibiotics, as they physically disrupt the bacterial membranes, leading to lysis of microbial membranes and eventually cell death. In particular, the group of linear α-helical cationic peptides has attracted increasing interest from clinical as well as basic research during the last decade. In this work, we studied the biophysical and microbiological characteristics of three new designed CAMPs. We modified a previously studied CAMP sequence, in order to increase or diminish the hydrophobic face, changing the position of two lysines or replacing three leucines, respectively. These mutations modified the hydrophobic moment of the resulting peptides and allowed us to study the importance of this parameter in the membrane interactions of the peptides. The structural properties of the peptides were also correlated with their membrane-disruptive abilities, antimicrobial activities and hemolysis of human red blood cells. PMID:26896660

  15. Optical Stimulation of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to interface with the nervous system remains overwhelmingly reliant on electrical stimulation devices, such as electrode arrays and cuff electrodes that can stimulate both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, electrical stimulation has to deal with multiple challenges, including selectivity, spatial resolution, mechanical stability, implant-induced injury and the subsequent inflammatory response. Optical stimulation techniques may avoid some of these challenges by providing more selective stimulation, higher spatial resolution and reduced invasiveness of the device, while also avoiding the electrical artefacts that complicate recordings of electrically stimulated neuronal activity. This review explores the current status of optical stimulation techniques, including optogenetic methods, photoactive molecule approaches and infrared neural stimulation, together with emerging techniques such as hybrid optical-electrical stimulation, nanoparticle enhanced stimulation and optoelectric methods. Infrared neural stimulation is particularly emphasised, due to the potential for direct activation of neural tissue by infrared light, as opposed to techniques that rely on the introduction of exogenous light responsive materials. However, infrared neural stimulation remains imperfectly understood, and techniques for accurately delivering light are still under development. While the various techniques reviewed here confirm the overall feasibility of optical stimulation, a number of challenges remain to be overcome before they can deliver their full potential. PMID:26322269

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, James P; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  17. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  19. Discovery of Novel Peptides Regulating Competence Development in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang-Joon; Kaspar, Justin; Kim, Jeong Nam; Seaton, Kinda

    2014-01-01

    A MarR-like transcriptional repressor (RcrR) and two predicted ABC efflux pumps (RcrPQ) encoded by a single operon were recently shown to be dominant regulators of stress tolerance and development of genetic competence in the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Here, we focused on polar (ΔrcrR-P) and nonpolar (ΔrcrR-NP) rcrR mutants, which are hyper- and nontransformable, respectively, to dissect the mechanisms by which these mutations impact competence. We discovered two open reading frames (ORFs) in the 3′ end of the rcrQ gene that encode peptides of 27 and 42 amino acids (aa) which are also dramatically upregulated in the ΔrcrR-NP strain. Deletion of, or start codon mutations in, the ORFs for the peptides in the ΔrcrR-NP background restored competence and sensitivity to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) to levels seen in the ΔrcrR-P strain. Overexpression of the peptides adversely affected competence development. Importantly, overexpression of mutant derivatives of the ABC exporters that lacked the peptides also resulted in impaired competence. FLAG-tagged versions of the peptides could be detected in S. mutans, and FLAG tagging of the peptides impaired their function. The competence phenotypes associated with the various mutations, and with overexpression of the peptides and ABC transporters, were correlated with the levels of ComX protein in cells. Collectively, these studies revealed multiple novel mechanisms for regulation of competence development by the components of the rcrRPQ operon. Given their intimate role in competence and stress tolerance, the rcrRPQ-encoded peptides may prove to be useful targets for therapeutics to diminish the virulence of S. mutans. PMID:25135217

  20. Liposome-entrapped T-cell peptide provides help for a co-entrapped B-cell peptide to overcome genetic restriction in mice and induce immunological memory.

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriadis, G; Wang, Z; Barenholz, Y; Francis, M J

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of a T-cell epitope peptide providing help for a B-cell epitope peptide when both peptides are co-entrapped in the same liposomes. Epitope models used were a 28 amino acid peptide from the S region of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (subtype adw) containing an H-2s Th-cell epitope, and a 33 amino acid peptide from the pre-S1 region of the HBsAg (subtype adw) designed to exclude an adjacent H-2s T-cell epitope, the latter (pre-S1) peptide being recognized by SJL (H-2s) mice as a B-cell epitope. SJL(H-2s) mice were immunized twice intramuscularly with S or pre-S1 peptide alone, co-entrapped in the same liposomes or entrapped in separate liposomes which were mixed before injection. Analysis of sera for anti-peptide IgG1 antibodies revealed that the Th-cell peptide provided help for the pre-S1 peptide only when the two peptides were co-entrapped in the same vesicles. This helper effect was found to correlate with the ability of S peptide (co-entrapped with the pre-S1) to stimulate T-cell proliferation in vitro. There was no IgG1 response against pre-S1 peptide in mice immunized with a mixture of the free peptides or a mixture of separately entrapped peptides. A helper effect, albeit much weaker, was also observed in mice immunized with the two peptides emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Antisera from mice immunized with both peptides co-entrapped in liposomes were found to bind to full length (pre-S1 containing) recombinant HBsAg. Moreover, binding values were much higher than those seen with antisera from animals immunized with the liposomal S peptide above, presumably because of full access of anti-pre-S1 antibodies to the pre-S1 region of the rHBsAg. It is concluded that liposomes could serve not only as an immunological adjuvant for peptides but also as a carrier for Th- and B-cell epitopes thus eliminating the need for covalent linkage to a carrier protein. PMID:7508417

  1. Neuropeptides control the dynamic behavior of airway mucosal dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Voedisch, Sabrina; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Veres, Tibor Z; Spies, Emma; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The airway mucosal epithelium is permanently exposed to airborne particles. A network of immune cells patrols at this interface to the environment. The interplay of immune cells is orchestrated by different mediators. In the current study we investigated the impact of neuronal signals on key functions of dendritic cells (DC). Using two-photon microscopic time-lapse analysis of living lung sections from CD11c-EYFP transgenic mice we studied the influence of neuropeptides on airway DC motility. Additionally, using a confocal microscopic approach, the phagocytotic capacity of CD11c(+) cells after neuropeptide stimulation was determined. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) leads to an unspecific release of neuropeptides from nerves. After EFS and treatment with the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), airway DC in living lung slices showed an altered motility. Furthermore, the EFS-mediated effect could partially be blocked by pre-treatment with the receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37). Additionally, the phagocytotic capacity of bone marrow-derived and whole lung CD11c(+) cells could be inhibited by neuropeptides CGRP, VIP, and Substance P. We then cross-linked these data with the in vivo situation by analyzing DC motility in two different OVA asthma models. Both in the acute and prolonged OVA asthma model altered neuropeptide amounts and DC motility in the airways could be measured. In summary, our data suggest that neuropeptides modulate key features motility and phagocytosis of mouse airway DC. Therefore altered neuropeptide levels in airways during allergic inflammation have impact on regulation of airway immune mechanisms and therefore might contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma.

  2. Neurogenically mediated leakage of plasma protein occurs from blood vessels in dura mater but not brain

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, S.; Saito, K.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1987-12-01

    Utilizing /sup 125/I-BSA administered intravenously, a simple, reliable, and sensitive method was established for the detection of plasma protein extravasation in the dura of rats and guinea pigs following chemical, electrical, or immunological stimulation. Extravasated /sup 125/I-BSA or Evans blue was noted in the dura and conjunctiva but not in the temporalis muscle of saline-perfused rats following intravenous capsaicin, 1 mumol/kg. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was mediated by unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers since leakage did not develop in adult animals in whom these fibers were destroyed by capsaicin pretreatment (50 mg/kg) as neonates. An ipsilateral increase in Evans blue and /sup 125/I-BSA was found in the dura, eyelids, lips and gingival mucosa, and snout following electrical stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion. This increase was also C-fiber dependent. Among those peptides contained in perivascular afferent fibers and administered intravenously, substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, caused a dose-dependent extravasation in the dura and conjunctiva of rats. Neonatal capsaicin pretreatment did not attenuate SP- nor NKA-induced effects in the dura and actually increased extravasation in the conjunctiva. Intravenous administration of 5-HT or bradykinin to normal adult rats or adult rats pretreated as neonates with capsaicin increased levels of /sup 125/I-BSA in both the dura and the conjunctiva. Histamine and prostaglandin E2, on the other hand, caused protein leakage in the conjunctiva but not in the dura of rats; however, histamine did induce extravasation in the dura of guinea pigs.

  3. Signal peptide of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2014-06-01

    Cellulase is an enzyme playing a crucial role in biotechnology industries ranging from textile to biofuel because of tremendous amount of cellulose produced in plant. In order to improve cellulase productivity, huge resource has been spent in search for good cellulases from microorganism in remote areas and in creation of ideal cellulase by engineering. However, not much attention is given to the secretion of cellulases from cell into extracellular space, where a cellulase plays its enzymatic role. In this minireview, the signal peptides, which lead secreted proteins to specific secretion systems and scatter in literature, are reviewed. The patterns of signal peptides are checked against 4,101 cellulases documented in UniProtKB, the largest protein database in the world, to determine how these cellulases are secreted. Simultaneous review on both literature and cellulases from the database not only provides updated knowledge on signal peptides but also indicates the gap in our research.

  4. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  5. Nanoparticle Delivered Human Biliverdin Reductase-Based Peptide Increases Glucose Uptake by Activating IRK/Akt/GSK3 Axis: The Peptide Is Effective in the Cell and Wild-Type and Diabetic Ob/Ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Miralem, Tihomir; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Maines, Mahin D.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin's stimulation of glucose uptake by binding to the IRK extracellular domain is compromised in diabetes. We have recently described an unprecedented approach to stimulating glucose uptake. KYCCSRK (P2) peptide, corresponding to the C-terminal segment of hBVR, was effective in binding to and inducing conformational change in the IRK intracellular kinase domain. Although myristoylated P2, made of L-amino acids, was effective in cell culture, its use for animal studies was unsuitable. We developed a peptidase-resistant formulation of the peptide that was efficient in both mice and cell culture systems. The peptide was constructed of D-amino acids, in reverse order, and blocked at both termini. Delivery of the encapsulated peptide to HepG2 and HSKM cells was confirmed by its prolonged effect on stimulation of glucose uptake (>6 h). The peptide improved glucose clearance in both wild-type and Ob/Ob mice; it lowered blood glucose levels and suppressed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. IRK activity was stimulated in the liver of treated mice and in cultured cells. The peptide potentiated function of IRK's downstream effector, Akt-GSK3-(α, β) axis. Thus, P2-based approach can be used for improving glucose uptake by cells. Also, it allows for screening peptides in vitro and in animal models for treatment of diabetes. PMID:27294151

  6. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  7. Invertebrate FMRFamide related peptides.

    PubMed

    Krajniak, Kevin G

    2013-06-01

    In 1977 the neuropeptide FMRFamide was isolated from the clam, Macrocallista nimbosa. Since then several hundred FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) have been isolated from invertebrate animals. Precursors to the FaRPs likely arose in the cnidarians. With the transition to a bilateral body plan FaRPs became a fixture in the invertebrate phyla. They have come to play a critical role as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. FaRPs regulate a variety of body functions including, feeding, digestion, circulation, reproduction, movement. The evolution of the molecular form and function of these omnipresent peptides will be considered.

  8. Dicyclopropylmethyl peptide backbone protectant.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Louis A; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-08-20

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106-126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit.

  9. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525].

  10. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525]. PMID:27502013

  11. Antihypertensive peptides from food proteins.

    PubMed

    Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are encrypted within the primary structure of food proteins where they remain inactive until released by enzymatic hydrolysis. Once released from the parent protein, certain peptides have the ability to modulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) because they decrease activities of renin or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the two main enzymes that regulate mammalian blood pressure. These antihypertensive peptides can also enhance the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway to increase nitric oxide (NO) levels within vascular walls and promote vasodilation. The peptides can block the interactions between angiotensin II (vasoconstrictor) and angiotensin receptors, which can contribute to reduced blood pressure. This review focuses on the methods that are involved in antihypertensive peptide production from food sources, including fractionation protocols that are used to enrich bioactive peptide content and enhance peptide activity. It also discusses mechanisms that are believed to be involved in the antihypertensive activity of these peptides.

  12. Effects of peptide YY on gallbladder motility

    SciTech Connect

    Conter, R.L.; Roslyn, J.J.; Taylor, I.L.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of peptide YY (PYY) on cholecystokinin-stimulated gallbladder contraction were investigated in the prairie dog model. Twelve animals underwent laparotomy with catheter placement into the gallbladder and common bile duct (vent). The gallbladder was continuously perfused with (/sup 14/C)polyethylene glycol-labeled lactated Ringer at 0.03 ml/min, and vent effluent was collected at 2.5-min intervals. All animals received 20 min of intravenous infusion of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP), 2.5 ng x kg/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/, immediately followed by 60-min infusions of either lactated Ringer (LR) or synthetic PYY, 10 or 50 ng x kg/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/. When LR was infused after CCK-OP, gallbladder filling increased by 15.4 +/- 10.5% with minimal changes in gallbladder pressure. Infusion of PYY/sub 10/ resulted in a significant increase in gallbladder volume and filling with a significant decrease in intragallbladder pressure. Similar findings were noted with PYY/sub 50/. These data indicate that synthetic PYY significantly augments gallbladder filling after CCK-OP-stimulated gallbladder contraction. These finding, coupled with the observation that PYY inhibits pancreatic secretion, suggest that this peptide may be the anti-CCK hormone and may have an important role in regulating biliary activity postprandially.

  13. Design and Engineering Strategies for Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossi, Alessandro

    Thousands of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of prokaryotic, fungal, plant, or animal origin have been identified, and their potential as lead compounds for the design of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of infection, for stimulating the immune system, or in countering septic shock has been widely recognized. Added to this is their possible use in prophylaxis of infectious diseases for animal or plant protection, for disinfection of surgical instruments or industrial surfaces, and for food preservation among other commercially important applications. Since the early eighties, AMPs have been subject to a vast number of studies aimed at understanding what determines their potency and spectrum of activities against bacterial or fungal pathogens, and at maximizing these while limiting cytotoxic activities toward host cells. Much research has also been directed toward understanding specific mechanisms of action underlying the antimicrobial activity and selectivity, to be able to redesign the peptides for optimal performance. A central theme in the mode of action of many AMPs is their dynamic interaction with biological membranes, which involves various properties of these peptides such as, among others, surface hydrophobicity and polarity, charge, structure, and induced conformational variations. These features are often intimately interconnected so that engineering peptides to independently adjust any one property in particular is not an easy task. However, solid-phase peptide synthesis allows the use of a large repertoire of nonproteinogenic amino acids that can be used in the rational design of peptides to finely tune structural and physicochemical properties and precisely probe structure-function relationships.

  14. Antimicrobial peptide defenses of the Tarahumara frog, Rana tarahumarae.

    PubMed

    Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Reinert, Laura K; Miera, Verma; Conlon, J Michael

    2002-09-20

    Populations of the Tarahumara frog Rana tarahumarae have decreased markedly in recent years in the northern part of their range. Infection by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been implicated in these declines. To determine whether antimicrobial peptides in the skin provide protection against this pathogen, norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions were tested for their ability to inhibit growth of B. dendrobatidis in vitro. After concentration, crude mixtures of skin peptides inhibited the growth of the chytrid in a concentration-dependent manner. Proteomic analysis led to the identification and characterization of three peptides belonging to the brevinin-1 family of antimicrobial peptides and three belonging to the ranatuerin-2 family. The two most abundant peptides, ranatuerin-2TRa (GIMDSIKGAAKEIAGHLLDNLKCKITGC) and brevinin-1TRa (FLPVIAGIAANVLPKLFCKLTKRC), were active against B. dendrobatidis (MIC of 50 microM for ranatuerin-2TRa and 12.5 microM for brevinin-1TRa against zoospores). These data clearly show that antimicrobial peptides in the skin secretions of the Tarahumara frog are active against B. dendrobatidis and should provide some protection against infection. Therefore, the observed susceptibility of these frogs to this pathogen in the wild may be due to the effects of additional environmental factors that impair this innate defense mechanism, leading to the observed population declines.

  15. Trefoil peptides promote restitution of wounded corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Göke, M N; Cook, J R; Kunert, K S; Fini, M E; Gipson, I K; Podolsky, D K

    2001-04-01

    The ocular surface shares many characteristics with mucosal surfaces. In both, healing is regulated by peptide growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins. However, these factors are not sufficient to ensure most rapid healing. Trefoil peptides are abundantly expressed epithelial cell products which exert protective effects and are key regulators of gastrointestinal epithelial restitution, the critical early phase of cell migration after mucosal injury. To assess the role of trefoil peptides in corneal epithelial wound healing, the effects of intestinal trefoil factor (ITF/TFF3) and spasmolytic polypeptide (SP/TFF2) on migration and proliferation of corneal epithelial cells were analyzed. Both ITF and SP enhanced restitution of primary rabbit corneal epithelial cells in vitro. While the restitution-enhancing effects of TGF-alpha and TGF-beta were both inhibited by neutralizing anti-TGF-beta-antibodies, trefoil peptide stimulation of restitution was not. Neither trefoil peptide significantly affected proliferation of primary corneal epithelial cells. ITF but not SP or pS2 mRNA was present in rabbit corneal and conjunctival tissues. In summary, the data indicate an unanticipated role of trefoil peptides in healing of ocular surface and demand rating their functional actions beyond the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. [Biodegradable microparticles with immobilized peptide for wound healing].

    PubMed

    Stashevskaia, K S; Markvicheva, E A; Strukova, S M; Rusanova, A V; Makarova, A M; Gorbacheva, L R; Prudchenko, I A; Zubov, V P; Grandfis, K

    2006-01-01

    Thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP-6) may effectively replace thrombin for stimulation of damaged tissue regeneration. (Thrombin employment is limited by its high cost, instability and proinflammatory effect at high concentrations.) Immobilization of TRAP-6 into a poly(D,L)-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA)-based matrix can protect peptides from a destruction by peptidases located in a wound area, and can also provide controlled release of the peptide. PLGA microparticles with immobilized peptide were produced by double emulsion/evaporation technique. An observation of microparticle morphology by scanning electron microscopy highlighted that peptide immobilization resulted in the increase of the microparticle porosity. TRAP-6 release kinetics was characterized by burst increase of TRAP-6 concentration in HEPES buffer solution (pH 7.5) for first 2 hours from the beginning of the experiment, and TRAP-6 complete release occurred for 20 hours. An investigation of TRAP-6 destruction by scanning electron microscopy revealed that the increase of microparticle size and surface porosity were observed already after 1 day of incubation in the buffer solution, and an aggregation of destructing microparticles was obvious by the 7th day of the incubation. Thus, peptide immobilization into PLGA microparticles can allow to develop a novel controlled release drug delivery system. PMID:16739924

  17. An evolutionary perspective on signaling peptides: toxic peptides are selected to provide information regarding the processing of the propeptide, which represents the phenotypic state of the signaling cell

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Keith Daniel; Barzilai, Ari; Zahavi, Amotz

    2015-01-01

    Structurally similar short peptides often serve as signals in diverse signaling systems. Similar peptides affect diverse physiological pathways in different species or even within the same organism. Assuming that signals provide information, and that this information is tested by the structure of the signal, it is curious that highly similar signaling peptides appear to provide information relevant to very different metabolic processes. Here we suggest a solution to this problem: the synthesis of the propeptide, and its post-translational modifications that are required for its cleavage and the production of the mature peptide, provide information on the phenotypic state of the signaling cell. The mature peptide, due to its chemical properties which render it harmful, serves as a stimulant that forces cells to respond to this information. To support this suggestion, we present cases of signaling peptides in which the sequence and structure of the mature peptide is similar yet provides diverse information. The sequence of the propeptide and its post-translational modifications, which represent the phenotypic state of the signaling cell, determine the quantity and specificity of the information. We also speculate on the evolution of signaling peptides. We hope that this perspective will encourage researchers to reevaluate pathological conditions in which the synthesis of the mature peptide is abnormal. PMID:26594342

  18. High Throughput Screening Methods for Assessing Antibiofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Synthetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Evan F.; Mansour, Sarah; Hilchie, Ashley L.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2015-01-01

    The recent observation that certain cationic peptides possess potent antibiofilm activity demonstrated that small peptides could be used to treat biofilm-associated infections. Other so-called innate defense regulator peptides possess potent immunomodulatory properties such as leukocyte recruitment and suppression of harmful inflammation. A peptide that directly targets biofilm cells while favourably modulating the immune response would be particularly advantageous for treating serious skin infections caused by S. aureus. In the present work, using SPOT-synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membranes, we outline a strategy for systematically assessing the antibiofilm activity of hundreds of IDR-1002 (VQRWLIVWRIRK-NH2) and IDR-HH2 (VQLRIRVAVIRA-NH2) peptide variants against MRSA biofilms. In addition, the ability of these peptides to stimulate production of a monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and suppress LPS-induced interleukin (IL)-1β production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was evaluated. These results informed the synthesis of second-generation peptides resulting in a new peptide, IDR-2009 (KWRLLIRWRIQK-NH2), with enhanced MCP-1 stimulatory activity, favourable IL-1β suppression characteristics and strong antibiofilm activity against MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. This work provides a proof-of-concept that multiple peptide activities can be optimized simultaneously to generate novel sequences that possess a variety of biological properties. PMID:25836992

  19. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  20. Peptide and peptide library cyclization via bromomethylbenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David E; Almohaini, Mohammed; Anbazhagan, Aruna; Ma, Zhong; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2015-01-01

    Cyclization confers several advantages to peptides, cumulatively serving to make them more drug-like. In this protocol, cyclic peptides are generated via bis-alkylation of cysteine-containing peptides using α,α'-dibromo-m-xylene. The reactions are robust and high yielding. Multiple reaction platforms for the application of this versatile strategy are described herein: the cyclization of solid-phase-synthesized peptides, both in solution and on resin, as well as the cyclization of in vitro translated mRNA-peptide fusion libraries on oligo(dT) resin.

  1. Relative distribution of gastrin-, CCK-8-, NPY- and CGRP-immunoreactive cells in the digestive tract of dorado (Salminus brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Pereira, R T; Costa, L S; Oliveira, I R C; Araújo, J C; Aerts, M; Vigliano, F A; Rosa, P V

    2015-04-01

    The endocrine cells (ECs) of the gastrointestinal mucosa form the largest endocrine system in the body, not only in terms of cell numbers but also in terms of the different produced substances. Data describing the association between the relative distributions of the peptide-specific ECs in relation to feeding habits can be useful tools that enable the creation of a general expected pattern of EC distribution. We aimed to investigate the distribution of ECs immunoreactive for the peptides gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in different segments of the digestive tract of carnivorous fish dorado (Salminus brasiliensis) by using immunohistochemistry procedures. The distribution of endocrine cells immunoreactive for gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in digestive tract of dorado S. brasiliensis was examined by immunohistochemistry. The results describe the association between the distribution of the peptide-specific endocrine cells and feeding habits in different carnivorous fish. The largest number of endocrine cells immunoreactive for GAS, CCK-8, and CGRP were found in the pyloric stomach region and the pyloric caeca. However, NPY-immunoreactive endocrine cells were markedly restricted to the midgut. The distribution pattern of endocrine cells identified in S. brasiliensis is similar to that found in other carnivorous fishes.

  2. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  3. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants.

  4. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  5. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  6. Receptor systems mediating c-fos expression within trigeminal nucleus caudalis in animal models of migraine.

    PubMed

    Mitsikostas, D D; Sanchez del Rio, M

    2001-03-01

    In intracranial structures unmyelinated C- and Adelta-fibers of the trigeminal nerve transmit pain stimuli from meninges to the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C). Peripheral nerve endings surround meningeal vessels (the so-called trigeminovascular system) and contain vasoactive neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P and neurokinin A). Activation of the trigeminovascular system promotes a meningeal sterile inflammatory response through the release of neuropeptides by peripheral endings. Orthodromic conduction along trigeminovascular fibers transmits information centrally with induction of immediate early c-fos gene within post-synaptic Sp5C neurons, as a marker of neuronal activity within central nociceptive pathways. In laboratory animals the system is activated by either electrical stimulation of the TG, chemical stimulation of the meninges, electrical or mechanical stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus or by induction of cortical spreading depression. All these techniques induce c-fos within Sp5C and are used as a rodent/feline model of vascular headache in humans. Up-to-date there is evidence that at least ten receptors (5-HT(1B), 5-HT(1D), 5-HT(lF), 5-HT(2B), NK-1, GABA(A), NMDA, AMPA, class III metabotropic glutamate receptors, and opioids mu receptors) modulate c-fos expression within Sp5C. These receptors represent potential targets for anti-migraine drugs as shown by triptans (5-HT(1B/1D/1F)) and ergot alkaloids (5-HT(1A1B/1D/1F)). This review discusses the importance of c-fos expression within Sp5C as a marker of cephalic nociception, the different cephalic pain models that induce c-fos within Sp5C, the receptors involved and their potential role as targets for anti-migraine drugs.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides: premises and promises.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K V R; Yedery, R D; Aranha, C

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the natural defences of most living organisms against invading pathogens. These are relatively small (< 10kDa), cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. Most of these peptides are obtained from different sources like macrophages, neutrophils, epithelial cells, haemocytes, fat body, reproductive tract, etc. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. A few peptides have also been found to be cytotoxic to sperm and tumour cells. AMPs are classified based on the three dimensional structural studies carried out with the help of NMR. The peptides are broadly classified into five major groups namely (a) peptides that form alpha-helical structures, (b) peptides rich in cysteine residues, (c) peptides that form beta-sheet, (d) peptides rich in regular amino acids namely histatin, arginine and proline and (e) peptides composed of rare and modified amino acids. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. AMPs have been found to be excellent candidates for developing novel antimicrobial agents and a few of these peptides show antimicrobial activity against pathogens causing sexually transmitted infection (STI), including HIV/HSV. Peptides, namely magainin and nisin have been shown to demonstrate contraceptive properties in vitro and in vivo. A few peptides have already entered clinical trials for the treatment of impetigo, diabetic foot ulcers and gastric helicobacter infections. In this review, we discuss the source, structures and mode of action with special reference to therapeutic considerations of various AMPs

  8. [Progression of the mechanism study on experimental migraine treated with acupuncture in rat model].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Pei, Pei; Wang, Linpeng

    2016-03-01

    In the paper, by taking acupuncture and migraine as the key words to retrieve CNKI and PubMed database, the literature analysis was done on the mechanism study on experimental migraine treated with acupuncture in rat model. The results showed that acupuncture mechanism study focused on the regulation and control of the relevant neurotransmitters/neuromodulators of migraine, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), serotonin (5-HT), nitric oxide (NO), etc. Moreover, in the paper, the review had been done on the neurotransmitters/neuromodulators involved in the study.

  9. CGRP as a neuropeptide in migraine: lessons from mice

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that is far more than just a bad headache. A hallmark of migraine is altered sensory perception. A likely contributor to this altered perception is the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Over the past decade, CGRP has become firmly established as a key player in migraine. Although the mechanisms and sites of action by which CGRP might trigger migraine remain speculative, recent advances with mouse models provide some hints. This brief review focuses on how CGRP might act as both a central and peripheral neuromodulator to contribute to the migraine-like symptom of light aversive behaviour in mice. PMID:26032833

  10. [Expression of AIF and CGRP markers in pineal gland and thymus during aging].

    PubMed

    Lin'kova, N S; Katanugina, A S; Khavinson, V Kh

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the expression of AIF (apoptotic inducing factor) and CGRP (calcitonin gene related peptide) at autopsy material of pineal gland and thymus of people after 60 years old. The expression of AIF and CGRP was identified in both organs, but it did not change with age, which demonstrates the probable safety of functional activity of neuroimmunoendocrine system at aging. We found correlation between expression AIF and CGRP at pineal gland, but the correlation at thymus wasn't found. It is possible that pineal gland can express unidentified signal molecule controlling the expression of AIF and CGRP.

  11. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  12. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve.

  13. Stimulant Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Park, Taryn M; Haning, William F

    2016-07-01

    Compared with other illicit substances, stimulants are not commonly used by adolescents; however, they represent a serious concern regarding substance use among youths. This article uses methamphetamine as a model for stimulant use in adolescents; cocaine and prescription stimulants are also mentioned. Methamphetamine use among adolescents and young adults is a serious health concern with potentially long-term physical, cognitive, and psychiatric consequences. Brain development and the effects of misusing stimulants align such that usage in adolescents can more dangerous than during adulthood. It seems helpful to keep in mind the differences between adolescents and young adults when implementing interventions. PMID:27338967

  14. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  15. Neuroendocrine regulation of thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Okada, Reiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Vaudry, Hubert; Kikuyama, Sakae

    2009-04-01

    The hypothalamic peptides thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which have been postulated as acting as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone in amphibians, were tested for their activity by employing a recently developed radioimmunoassay for bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) TSH. CRF markedly stimulated the release of TSH from both adult and larval bullfrog pituitary cells. Both TRH and GnRH moderately stimulated the release of TSH from adult pituitary cells but not from larval ones. The release of TSH was also enhanced by bullfrog hypothalamic extracts. The hypothalamic extract-evoked release of TSH was markedly reduced by a CRF receptor antagonist, suggesting that CRF and/or CRF-related peptides are the main TSH-releasing factors occurring in the bullfrog hypothalamus. Experiments using CRF receptor agonists and antagonists revealed that CRF acts through the type 2 receptor. With regard to other hypothalamic substances that influence the release of TSH, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide were found to be potent stimulators and somatostatin an inhibitor of TSH release. Thus, it becomes clear that the main regulatory peptides controlling TSH secretion in amphibians are different from those in mammals. Triiodothyronine did not affect the basal release of TSH from the pituitary of either larval or adult bullfrogs but suppressed the CRF-induced release of TSH, suggesting that negative feedback by thyroid hormone is functioning both in larvae and adults.

  16. Delivery of vaccine peptides by rapid conjugation to baculovirus particles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah; Baird, Margaret; Ward, Vernon K

    2008-05-12

    Baculoviruses deliver strong activation signals to dendritic cells and can promote potent immune responses. These properties can be harnessed to use baculovirus as an adjuvant and carrier particle for immunogenic peptides. In this study we use a chemical linker to couple peptides to the baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Intranasal delivery of baculovirus coupled with immunogenic peptides to mice elicited antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibody. Furthermore, antigen-specific IgA was detected in the lung, and an IFN-gamma response was observed upon re-stimulation with antigen. We show that chemical coupling enables the rapid modification of AcMNPV, allowing multiple epitopes to be delivered simultaneously on a self-adjuvanting carrier particle. PMID:18417258

  17. Immunogenicity of polysaccharides conjugated to peptides containing T- and B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Lett, E; Gangloff, S; Zimmermann, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1994-01-01

    To develop a general model of polysaccharide-peptide vaccine, we have investigated the efficiency of linear peptides derived from protein SR, and adhesin of the I/II protein antigen family of oral streptococci, to act as carriers for two T cell-independent polysaccharides: serogroup f polysaccharide from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 (poly f) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan. Peptide 3 (YEKEPTPPTRTPDQ) and peptide 6 (TPEDPTDPTDPQDPSS), accessible on the native SR protein as demonstrated by their reactivity in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with rat antisera raised against protein SR, correspond to immunodominant regions of SR. Peptide 3 contains at least one B- and one T-cell epitope, as demonstrated by its ability to induce peptide- and SR-specific antibody responses without any carrier and to stimulate the proliferation of rat lymph node cells primed either with free peptide or native SR, whereas peptide 6 contains only B-cell epitope(s). Peptide 3 was then covalently coupled though reductive amination to either poly f or mannan, and peptide 6 was coupled to poly f. Subcutaneous immunizations of rats with poly f-peptide 3 or mannan-peptide 3 conjugates produced a systemic immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody response, and the elicited antibodies reacted with free poly f or mannan, peptide 3, protein SR, and S. mutans or S. cerevisiae whole cells. Rats immunized with poly f-peptide 6 did not develop any antipeptide or anti-SR response. Furthermore, a booster immunization of animals with poly f-peptide 3 or mannan-peptide 3 conjugates induced high titers of anti-peptide 3, anti-poly f, and antimannan antibodies, which occurred quickly. The response is anamnestic for the peptide and the polysaccharides and is characterized by an Ig switch from IgM to IgG. The data presented here confirm that the presence of B- and T-cell epitopes is necessary to induce an anamnestic antipeptide response and that a peptide containing relevant B- and T-cell epitopes can act

  18. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  19. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  20. Bradykinin Induces TRPV1 Exocytotic Recruitment in Peptidergic Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mathivanan, Sakthikumar; Devesa, Isabel; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid I (TRPV1) sensitization in peripheral nociceptors is a prominent phenomenon that occurs in inflammatory pain conditions. Pro-algesic agents can potentiate TRPV1 activity in nociceptors through both stimulation of its channel gating and mobilization of channels to the neuronal surface in a context dependent manner. A recent study reported that ATP-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors involves the exocytotic release of channels trafficked by large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) that cargo alpha-calcitonin gene related peptide alpha (αCGRP). We hypothesized that, similar to ATP, bradykinin may also use different mechanisms to sensitize TRPV1 channels in peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptors. We found that bradykinin notably enhances the excitability of peptidergic nociceptors, and sensitizes TRPV1, primarily through the bradykinin receptor 2 pathway. Notably, bradykinin sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors was significantly blocked by inhibiting Ca2+-dependent neuronal exocytosis. In addition, silencing αCGRP gene expression, but not substance P, drastically reduced bradykinin-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors. Taken together, these findings indicate that bradykinin-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors is partially mediated by the exocytotic mobilization of new channels trafficked by αCGRP-loaded LDCVs to the neuronal membrane. Our findings further imply a central role of αCGRP peptidergic nociceptors in peripheral algesic sensitization, and substantiate that inhibition of LDCVs exocytosis is a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat pain, as it concurrently reduces the release of pro-inflammatory peptides and the membrane recruitment of thermoTRP channels. PMID:27445816

  1. Diet Induced Obesity in Sprague Dawley Rats Causes Microvascular and Neural Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Eric P.; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Oltman, Christine L.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective was to determine the effect of diet induced obesity (DIO) on microvascular and neural function. Methods Rats were fed a standard or high fat diet for up to 32 weeks. Measurements were performed of vasodilation in epineurial arterioles by videomicroscopy, endoneurial blood flow by hydrogen clearance, nerve conduction velocity by electrical stimulation, size-frequency distribution of myelinated fibers of the sciatic nerve, intraepidermal nerve fiber density using confocal microscopy and thermal nociception using the Hargreaves method. Results Rats fed a high fat diet for 32 weeks developed sensory neuropathy as indicated by slowing of sensory nerve conduction velocity and thermal hypoalgesia. Motor nerve conduction velocity and endoneurial blood flow were not impaired. Mean axonal diameter of myelinated fibers of the sciatic nerve was unchanged in high fat fed rats compared to control. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density was significantly reduced in high fat fed rats. Vascular relaxation to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide was decreased and expression of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) increased in epineurial arterioles of rats fed a high fat diet. In contrast, insulin-mediated vascular relaxation was increased in epineurial arterioles. NEP activity was significantly increased in the skin of the hindpaw. Markers of oxidative stress were increased in the aorta and serum of high fat fed rats but not in epineurial arterioles. Conclusion Chronic obesity causes microvascular and neural dysfunction. This is associated with increased expression of NEP but not oxidative stress in epineurial arterioles. NEP degrades vasoactive peptides which may explain the decrease in microvascular function. PMID:20503263

  2. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  3. Molecular cellular mechanisms of peptide regulation of melatonin synthesis in pinealocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Linkova, N S; Kvetnoy, I M; Kvetnaia, T V; Polyakova, V O; Korf, H-W

    2012-06-01

    The effects of epithalone and vilone peptides on the synthesis of melatonin and factors involved in this process, arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme and pCREB transcription protein, were studied in rat pinealocyte culture. Epithalone stimulated AANAT and pCREB synthesis and increased melatonin level in culture medium. Simultaneous addition of norepinephrine and peptides into the culture potentiated the expression of AANAT and pCREB.

  4. [Electromagnetic urological stimulator].

    PubMed

    Zaslavskiĭ AOi; Markarov, G S; Gelis, Iu S

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with an electromagnetic urological stimulator which generates a modulated low-frequency electromagnetic field of nonthermal intensity and its brief technical data. It presents a treatment regimen for urolithiasis and recommendations how to use the above therapeutical agent to stimulate urinary function in patients with urolithiasis in order to inoperatively eliminate urinary calculi and sand which form following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

  5. Stimulating your appetite.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, L

    1998-01-01

    A number of legal and illegal drugs can help stimulate appetite and are used for people with HIV to prevent wasting. Stimulating hunger is important because lower calorie intake and poor absorption of nutrients are associated with wasting. The uses and potential drawbacks of marijuana, thalidomide (Synovir), Marinol, and Megace are described. PMID:11365223

  6. The Use of an IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Peptide to Control Inflammation in the Treatment of Corneal Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fok, E.; Guildford, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) may be treated using ex vivo limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) derived from cadaveric donor tissue. However, continuing challenges exist around tissue availability, inflammation, and transplant rejection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or recombinant human IL-1β stimulated primary human keratocyte and LESC models were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of a short chain, IL-1 receptor antagonist peptide for use in LESC sheet growth to control inflammation. The peptide was characterized using mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Peptide cytotoxicity, patterns of cell cytokine expression in response to LPS or IL-1β stimulation, and peptide suppression of this response were investigated by MTS/LDH assays, ELISA, and q-PCR. Cell differences in LPS stimulated toll-like receptor 4 expression were investigated using immunocytochemistry. A significant reduction in rIL-1β stimulated inflammatory cytokine production occurred following LESC and keratocyte incubation with anti-inflammatory peptide and in LPS stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 production following keratocyte incubation with peptide (1 mg/mL) (P < 0.05). LESCs produced no cytokine response to LPS stimulation and showed no TLR4 expression. The peptide supported LESC growth when adhered to a silicone hydrogel contact lens indicating potential use in improved LESC grafting through suppression of inflammation. PMID:25705668

  7. An analogue peptide from the Cancer/Testis antigen PASD1 induces CD8+ T cell responses against naturally processed peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, Nicola; Buchan, Sarah; Ingram, Wendy; Khan, Ghazala; Vittes, Gisella; Rice, Jason; Pulford, Karen; Mufti, Ghulam; Stevenson, Freda; Guinn, Barbara-ann

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified the novel Cancer/Testis antigen PASD1 by immunoscreening a testis library with pooled acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient sera. To develop a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-inducing vaccine, we have now investigated the carboxy-terminal region, known to contain serological determinants, for MHC class I (HLA-A⋆0201)-binding peptides. Algorithm-selected natural peptides failed to show detectable HLA-A⋆0201 binding in T2 assays. However, anchor-modified analogue peptides showed enhanced binding, with decreased off-rates. Analogue peptide-loaded antigen-presenting cells (APCs) induced IFN-γ production by T cells from normal donors and patients. In addition, peptide-specific T cells could be expanded from cancer patients by stimulation with the PASD1 analogue peptide Pa14. For clinical application, a DNA fusion gene vaccine encoding Pa14 was designed and tested in “humanized” mice. Splenocytes from vaccinated mice showed in vitro cytotoxicity against tumour cells, either exogenously loaded with the corresponding wild-type peptide (Pw8) or expressing endogenously processed PASD1 protein. We show for the first time that a DNA vaccine encoding an altered PASD1 epitope can induce CTLs to target the natural peptide expressed by human tumour cells. PMID:23882161

  8. Detection of C-Peptide in Urine as a Measure of Ongoing Beta Cell Function.

    PubMed

    McDonald, T J; Perry, M H

    2016-01-01

    C-peptide is a protein secreted by the pancreatic beta cells in equimolar quantities with insulin, following the cleavage of proinsulin into insulin. Measurement of C-peptide is used as a surrogate marker of endogenous insulin secretory capacity. Assessing C-peptide levels can be useful in classifying the subtype of diabetes as well as assessing potential treatment choices in the management of diabetes.Standard measures of C-peptide involve blood samples collected either fasted or, most often, after a fixed stimulus (such as oral glucose, mixed meal, or IV glucagon). Despite the established clinical utility of blood C-peptide measurement, its widespread use is limited. In many instances this is due to perceived practical restrictions associated with sample collection.Urine C-peptide measurement is an attractive noninvasive alternative to blood measures of beta-cell function. Urine C-peptide creatinine ratio measured in a single post stimulated sample has been shown to be a robust, reproducible measure of endogenous C-peptide which is stable for three days at room temperature when collected in boric acid. Modern high sensitivity immunoassay technologies have facilitated measurement of C-peptide down to single picomolar concentrations. PMID:27083170

  9. Multiple Factors Related to the Secretion of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XingChun; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 is secreted by intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. It regulates the secretion and sensitivity of insulin while suppressing glucagon secretion and decreasing postprandial glucose levels. It also improves beta-cell proliferation and prevents beta-cell apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents. Additionally, glucagon-like peptide-1 delays gastric emptying and suppresses appetite. The impaired secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 has negative influence on diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance related diseases. Thus, glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) are now well accepted in the management of type 2 diabetes. The levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 are influenced by multiple factors including a variety of nutrients. The component of a meal acts as potent stimulants of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. The levels of its secretion change with the intake of different nutrients. Some drugs also have influence on GLP-1 secretion. Bariatric surgery may improve metabolism through the action on GLP-1 levels. In recent years, there has been a great interest in developing effective methods to regulate glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. This review summarizes the literature on glucagon-like peptide-1 and related factors affecting its levels. PMID:26366173

  10. Mechanistic understanding and significance of small peptides interaction with MHC class II molecules for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Saifullah; Hoessli, Daniel C; Hameed, Muhammad Waqar

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are expressed by antigen-presenting cells and stimulate CD4(+) T cells, which initiate humoral immune responses. Over the past decade, interest has developed to therapeutically impact the peptides to be exposed to CD4(+) T cells. Structurally diverse small molecules have been discovered that act on the endogenous peptide exchanger HLA-DM by different mechanisms. Exogenously delivered peptides are highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage in vivo; however, it is only when successfully incorporated into stable MHC II-peptide complexes that these peptides can induce an immune response. Many of the small molecules so far discovered have highlighted the molecular interactions mediating the formation of MHC II-peptide complexes. As potential drugs, these small molecules open new therapeutic approaches to modulate MHC II antigen presentation pathways and influence the quality and specificity of immune responses. This review briefly introduces how CD4(+) T cells recognize antigen when displayed by MHC class II molecules, as well as MHC class II-peptide-loading pathways, structural basis of peptide binding and stabilization of the peptide-MHC complexes. We discuss the concept of MHC-loading enhancers, how they could modulate immune responses and how these molecules have been identified. Finally, we suggest mechanisms whereby MHC-loading enhancers could act upon MHC class II molecules.

  11. Evidence for an interaction between proinsulin C-peptide and GPR146.

    PubMed

    Yosten, Gina L C; Kolar, Grant R; Redlinger, Lauren J; Samson, Willis K

    2013-01-01

    Microvascular diseases, such as retinopathies, neuropathies, and nephropathies, are a devastating consequence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The etiology of diabetes-associated microvascular dysfunction is poorly understood, and, likewise, treatment modalities for these disorders are limited. Interestingly, proinsulin C-peptide has been shown to play a protective role against diabetes-associated complications in experimental animals and in diabetic humans and is thus an attractive therapeutic target. However, an important step in the development of C-peptide-based therapeutics is identification of the C-peptide receptor, which is likely a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Using a unique Deductive Ligand-Receptor Matching Strategy, we sought to determine whether one of the known orphan GPCRs is essential for C-peptide signaling. Knockdown of GPR146, but not GPR107 or GPR160, blocked C-peptide-induced cFos expression in KATOIII cells. Furthermore, stimulation with C-peptide caused internalization of GPR146, and examples of punctate colocalization were observed between C-peptide and GPR146 on KATOIII cell membranes. These data indicate that GPR146 is likely a part of the C-peptide signaling complex and provide a platform for the elucidation of the C-peptide signalosome. PMID:23980258

  12. Evidence for an interaction between proinsulin C-peptide and GPR146.

    PubMed

    Yosten, Gina L C; Kolar, Grant R; Redlinger, Lauren J; Samson, Willis K

    2013-01-01

    Microvascular diseases, such as retinopathies, neuropathies, and nephropathies, are a devastating consequence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The etiology of diabetes-associated microvascular dysfunction is poorly understood, and, likewise, treatment modalities for these disorders are limited. Interestingly, proinsulin C-peptide has been shown to play a protective role against diabetes-associated complications in experimental animals and in diabetic humans and is thus an attractive therapeutic target. However, an important step in the development of C-peptide-based therapeutics is identification of the C-peptide receptor, which is likely a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Using a unique Deductive Ligand-Receptor Matching Strategy, we sought to determine whether one of the known orphan GPCRs is essential for C-peptide signaling. Knockdown of GPR146, but not GPR107 or GPR160, blocked C-peptide-induced cFos expression in KATOIII cells. Furthermore, stimulation with C-peptide caused internalization of GPR146, and examples of punctate colocalization were observed between C-peptide and GPR146 on KATOIII cell membranes. These data indicate that GPR146 is likely a part of the C-peptide signaling complex and provide a platform for the elucidation of the C-peptide signalosome. PMID:23759446

  13. Peptide analogs of the beef heart mitochondrial F1-ATPase inhibitor protein.

    PubMed

    Stout, J S; Partridge, B E; Dibbern, D A; Schuster, S M

    1993-07-27

    Peptide analogs which correspond to the conserved region of the natural ATPase inhibitor protein from beef heart, Candida utilis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria were synthesized by solid-phase methodologies and tested for ATPase inhibitory activity. These peptides were found to be potent inhibitors of F1-ATPase-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in acidic reaction media, having I50 values of 1.1 +/- 0.4 microM, 10 +/- 5 microM, and 48 +/- 19 microM, respectively. These results closely match those obtained for the naturally occurring inhibitor proteins. Additional peptides that correspond to the beef heart beta-subunit near the binding site of the beef heart inhibitor protein and that possess a substantial homology with the conserved region of the inhibitor protein were synthesized. Several of these peptides were found to be inhibitors of the ATPase activity. The best inhibitor, with an I50 value of 20 +/- 3 microM, was the peptide resembling the beef heart beta-subunit comprising amino acids 394-413. This peptide most closely resembles the peptides derived from the conserved region of the inhibitor protein. The insertion of five glycine residues between the charge clusters in the beta-394-413 peptide resulted in a peptide which was able to stimulate the hydrolysis of ATP.

  14. Host-defense peptides from skin secretions of the octoploid frogs Xenopus vestitus and Xenopus wittei (Pipidae): insights into evolutionary relationships.

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Michalak, Katarzyna; Michalak, Pawel; Conlon, J Michael

    2014-09-01

    The primary structures of host-defense peptides have proved useful in elucidating the evolution history of frogs. Peptidomic analysis was used to compare the diversity of host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from the octoploid frogs, Xenopus vestitus (Kivu clawed frog) and Xenopus wittei (De Witte's clawed frog) in the family Pipidae. Structural characterization demonstrated that the X. vestitus peptides belong to the magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; 4 peptides), xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF; 1 peptide), and caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF; 5 peptides) families. The X. wittei peptides comprise magainin (4 peptides), PGLa (1 peptide), XPF (2 peptides), and CPF (7 peptides). In addition, secretions from both species contain caerulein, identical to the peptide from Xenopus laevis, but X. wittei secretions contains the novel peptide [R4K]xenopsin. The variability in the numbers of paralogs in each peptide family indicates a selective silencing of the host-defense peptide genes following the polyploidization events. The primary structures of the peptides provide insight into phylogenetic relationships among the octoploid Xenopus frogs. The data support a sister-group relationship between X. vestitus and Xenopus lenduensis, suggestive of bifurcating speciation after allopolyploidization, whereas X. wittei is more closely related to the Xenopus amieti-Xenopus andrei group suggesting a common tetraploid ancestor. Consistent with previous data, the CPF peptides showed the highest growth inhibitory activity against bacteria with CPF-W6 (GIGSLLAKAAKLAAGLV.NH2) combining high antimicrobial potency against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=4 μM) with relatively low hemolytic activity (LC50=190 μM). PMID:25086320

  15. Synthetic Peptide-Based ELISA and ELISpot Assay for Identifying Autoantibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Pozsgay, Judit; Szarka, Eszter; Huber, Krisztina; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Hudecz, Ferenc; Sarmay, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is an invaluable diagnostic tool to detect serum autoantibody binding to target antigen. To map the autoantigenic epitope(s), overlapping synthetic peptides covering the total sequence of a protein antigen are used. A large set of peptides synthesized on the crown of pins can be tested by Multipin ELISA for fast screening. Next, to validate the results, the candidate epitope peptides are resynthesized by solid-phase synthesis, coupled to ELISA plate directly, or in a biotinylated form, bound to neutravidin-coated surface and the binding of autoantibodies from patients' sera is tested by indirect ELISA. Further, selected epitope peptides can be applied in enzyme-linked immunospot assay to distinguish individual, citrullinated peptide-specific autoreactive B cells in a pre-stimulated culture of patients' lymphocytes. PMID:26490479

  16. Role of opioid receptors in neurogenic dural vasodilation and sensitization of trigeminal neurones in anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, D J; Shepheard, S L; Cook, D A; Hargreaves, R J; Hill, R G; Cumberbatch, M J

    2001-01-01

    Migraine headache is thought to be caused by a distension of meningeal blood vessels, the activation of trigeminal sensory neurones and the the development of a central sensitization within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). It has been proposed that clinically effective 5-HT1B/1D agonists act peripherally to inhibit the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurogenic dural vasodilation, and to attenuate nociceptive neurotransmission within the TNC. Since opioids are also effective anti-migraine agents the present studies investigated the role of opioids within the trigemino-vascular system in anaesthetised rats. Electrical stimulation of the dura mater evoked neurogenic dural vasodilation which was significantly inhibited by morphine (1 mg kg−1) the selective μ-opioid agonist DAGO (10 μg kg−1) and the mixed agonist/antagonist butorphanol (1 mg kg−1) but not by the κ- and δ-opioid agonists (±) U50488H (100 μg kg−1) and DPDPE (1 mg kg−1). Morphine had no effect on CGRP-evoked dural vasodilation. In electrophysiological studies morphine (1 – 10 mg kg−1) significantly attenuated brainstem neuronal activity in response to electrical stimulation of the dura by 65% at 10 mg kg−1. Morphine (3 mg kg−1) also inhibited the TNC neuronal sensitization following CGRP-evoked dilation. The present studies have demonstrated that opioids block the nociceptive neurotransmission within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and in addition inhibit neurogenic dural vasodilation via an action on μ-opioid receptors located on trigeminal sensory fibres innervating dural blood vessels. These peripheral and central actions are similar to those of the ‘triptan' 5-HT1B/1D agonists and could account for the anti-migraine actions of opioids. PMID:11454653

  17. Cigarette smoke has sensory effects through nicotinic and TRPA1 but not TRPV1 receptors on the isolated mouse trachea and larynx

    PubMed Central

    Kichko, Tatjana I.; Kobal, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposes chemosensory nerves in the airways to a multitude of chemicals, some acting through the irritant receptors TRPV1 and TRPA1 but potentially also through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Our aim was to characterize the differences in sensory neuronal effects of CS, gas phase, and particulate matter as well as of typical constituents, such as nicotine and reactive carbonyls. Isolated mouse trachea and larynx were employed to measure release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as an index of sensory neuron activation evoked by CS, by filtered CS gas phase essentially free of nicotine, and by dilute total particulate matter (TPM) containing defined nicotine concentrations. With CS stimulation of the superfused trachea, TRPV1 null mutants showed about the same large responses as wild-type mice, whereas both TRPA1−/− and double knockouts exhibited 80% reduction; the retained 20% response was abolished by mecamylamine (10 μM), indicating a distinct contribution of nAChRs. These phenotypes were accentuated by using TPM to stimulate the immersed trachea; 50% of response was retained in TRPA1−/− and abolished by mecamylamine. In contrast, the gas phase acted like a sheer TRPA1 agonist, consistent with its composition, among other compounds, of volatile reactive carbonyls like formaldehyde and acrolein. In the trachea, the gas phase and CS were equally effective in releasing CGRP, whereas the larynx showed much larger CS than gas phase responses. Thus nicotinic receptors contribute to the sensory effects of cigarette smoke on the trachea, which are dominated by TRPA1. How this translates to human perception affords future research. PMID:26472811

  18. Cigarette smoke has sensory effects through nicotinic and TRPA1 but not TRPV1 receptors on the isolated mouse trachea and larynx.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2015-10-15

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposes chemosensory nerves in the airways to a multitude of chemicals, some acting through the irritant receptors TRPV1 and TRPA1 but potentially also through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Our aim was to characterize the differences in sensory neuronal effects of CS, gas phase, and particulate matter as well as of typical constituents, such as nicotine and reactive carbonyls. Isolated mouse trachea and larynx were employed to measure release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as an index of sensory neuron activation evoked by CS, by filtered CS gas phase essentially free of nicotine, and by dilute total particulate matter (TPM) containing defined nicotine concentrations. With CS stimulation of the superfused trachea, TRPV1 null mutants showed about the same large responses as wild-type mice, whereas both TRPA1(-/-) and double knockouts exhibited 80% reduction; the retained 20% response was abolished by mecamylamine (10 μM), indicating a distinct contribution of nAChRs. These phenotypes were accentuated by using TPM to stimulate the immersed trachea; 50% of response was retained in TRPA1(-/-) and abolished by mecamylamine. In contrast, the gas phase acted like a sheer TRPA1 agonist, consistent with its composition, among other compounds, of volatile reactive carbonyls like formaldehyde and acrolein. In the trachea, the gas phase and CS were equally effective in releasing CGRP, whereas the larynx showed much larger CS than gas phase responses. Thus nicotinic receptors contribute to the sensory effects of cigarette smoke on the trachea, which are dominated by TRPA1. How this translates to human perception affords future research.

  19. Functional properties of submucosal venules in the rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Retsu; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2015-06-01

    Venules in the stomach may have intrinsic properties for maintaining active microcirculation drainage even during gastric filling. Properties of spontaneous and nerve-mediated activity of submucosal venules in the rat stomach were investigated. Changes in vasodiameter and intracellular Ca(2+) in venular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were monitored by video tracking and Fluo-8 Ca(2+) imaging, respectively. Venular SMCs developed synchronous spontaneous Ca(2+) transients and corresponding rhythmic constrictions of the venules. Nominally Ca(2+)-free solution or an L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker (1 μM nifedipine) disrupted the Ca(2+) transient synchrony and abolished spontaneous constrictions. Spontaneous constrictions were also prevented by inhibitors of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (10 μM cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)), IP3 receptors (100 μM 2-APB) or Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (100 μM niflumic acid). Transmural nerve stimulation (TNS) induced a long-lasting venular constriction that was abolished by α-adrenoceptor antagonist (1 μM phentolamine), while TNS evoked a sympathetic transient constriction of arterioles that was abolished by a combination of phentolamine and a P2 purinoceptor antagonist (10 μM pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS)). Consistently, P2X1 purinoceptor immunoreactivity was detected in arteriolar but not venular SMCs. Primary afferent nerve stimulation (300 nM capsaicin) caused a venular dilatation by releasing calcitonin gene-related peptide. Thus, Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum may play a fundamental role in the generation of spontaneous Ca(2+) transients, while electrical coupling amongst venular SMCs via L-type Ca(2+) channel activation appears to be critical for Ca(2+) transient synchrony as well as spontaneous contractions. Sympathetic venular constrictions appear to be exclusively mediated by noradrenaline due to the lack of P2X1 receptor in venular SMCs.

  20. Functional properties of submucosal venules in the rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Retsu; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2015-06-01

    Venules in the stomach may have intrinsic properties for maintaining active microcirculation drainage even during gastric filling. Properties of spontaneous and nerve-mediated activity of submucosal venules in the rat stomach were investigated. Changes in vasodiameter and intracellular Ca(2+) in venular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were monitored by video tracking and Fluo-8 Ca(2+) imaging, respectively. Venular SMCs developed synchronous spontaneous Ca(2+) transients and corresponding rhythmic constrictions of the venules. Nominally Ca(2+)-free solution or an L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker (1 μM nifedipine) disrupted the Ca(2+) transient synchrony and abolished spontaneous constrictions. Spontaneous constrictions were also prevented by inhibitors of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (10 μM cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)), IP3 receptors (100 μM 2-APB) or Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (100 μM niflumic acid). Transmural nerve stimulation (TNS) induced a long-lasting venular constriction that was abolished by α-adrenoceptor antagonist (1 μM phentolamine), while TNS evoked a sympathetic transient constriction of arterioles that was abolished by a combination of phentolamine and a P2 purinoceptor antagonist (10 μM pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS)). Consistently, P2X1 purinoceptor immunoreactivity was detected in arteriolar but not venular SMCs. Primary afferent nerve stimulation (300 nM capsaicin) caused a venular dilatation by releasing calcitonin gene-related peptide. Thus, Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum may play a fundamental role in the generation of spontaneous Ca(2+) transients, while electrical coupling amongst venular SMCs via L-type Ca(2+) channel activation appears to be critical for Ca(2+) transient synchrony as well as spontaneous contractions. Sympathetic venular constrictions appear to be exclusively mediated by noradrenaline due to the lack of P2X1 receptor in venular SMCs. PMID:25066613

  1. Reduced expression of SynGAP, a neuronal GTPase-activating protein, enhances capsaicin-induced peripheral sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Djane Braz; Duan, Jian-Hong; Nicol, Grant D.; Vasko, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic GTPase-activating protein (SynGAP) is a neuronal-specific Ras/Rap-GAP that increases the hydrolysis rate of GTP to GDP, converting Ras/Rap from the active into the inactive form. The Ras protein family modulates a wide range of cellular pathways including those involved in sensitization of sensory neurons. Since GAPs regulate Ras activity, SynGAP might be an important regulator of peripheral sensitization and pain. Therefore, we evaluated excitability, stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and nociception from wild-type (WT) mice and those with a heterozygous mutation of the SynGAP gene (SynGAP+/−). Our results demonstrate that SynGAP is expressed in primary afferent sensory neurons and that the capsaicin-stimulated CGRP release from spinal cord slices was two-fold higher from SynGAP+/− mice than that observed from WT mouse tissue, consistent with an increase in expression of the capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), in SynGAP+/− dorsal root ganglia. However, there was no difference between the two genotypes in potassium-stimulated release of CGRP, the number of action potentials generated by a ramp of depolarizing current, or mechanical hypernociception elicited by intraplantar injection of capsaicin. In contrast, capsaicin-induced thermal hypernociception occurred at lower doses of capsaicin and had a longer duration in SynGAP+/− mice than WT mice. These results provide the first evidence that SynGAP is an important regulator of neuropeptide release from primary sensory neurons and can modulate capsaicin-induced hypernociception, demonstrating the importance of GAP regulation in signaling pathways that play a role in peripheral sensitization. PMID:21525372

  2. Eccentric Muscle Contraction and Stretching Evoke Mechanical Hyperalgesia and Modulate CGRP and P2X3 Expression in a Functionally Relevant Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dessem, Dean; Ambalavanar, Ranjinidevi; Evancho, Melena; Moutanni, Aicha; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Bai, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive, movement-based models were used to investigate muscle pain. In rats, the masseter muscle was rapidly stretched or electrically stimulated during forced lengthening to produce eccentric muscle contractions (EC). Both EC and stretching disrupted scattered myofibers and produced intramuscular plasma extravasation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were elevated in the masseter 24h following EC. At 48h, neutrophils increased and ED1 macrophages infiltrated myofibers while ED2 macrophages were abundant at 4d. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evident in the ipsilateral head 4h-4d after a single bout of EC and for 7d following multiple bouts (1 bout/d for 4d). Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA increased in the trigeminal ganglion 24h following EC while immunoreactive CGRP decreased. By 2d, CGRP-muscle afferent numbers equaled naive numbers implying that CGRP is released following EC and replenished within 2d. EC elevated P2X3 mRNA and increased P2X3-muscle afferent neuron number for 12d while electrical stimulation without muscle contraction altered neither CGRP nor P2X3 mRNA levels. Muscle stretching produced hyperalgesia for 2d whereas contraction alone produced no hyperalgesia. Stretching increased CGRP mRNA at 24h but not CGRP-muscle afferent number at 2–12d. In contrast, stretching significantly increased the number of P2X3-muscle afferent neurons for 12d. The sustained, elevated P2X3 expression evoked by EC and stretching may enhance nociceptor responsiveness to ATP released during subsequent myofiber damage. Movement-based actions such as EC and muscle stretching produce unique tissue responses and modulate neuropeptide and nociceptive receptor expression in a manner particularly relevant to repeated muscle damage. PMID:20207080

  3. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  4. Therapeutic Approaches Using Host Defence Peptides to Tackle Herpes Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2009-01-01

    One of the most common viral infections in humans is caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can easily be treated with nucleoside analogues (e.g., acyclovir), but resistant strains are on the rise. Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides have been demonstrated to possess antiviral activity against HSV. New evidence has also indicated that these host defence peptides are able to selectively stimulate the innate immune system to fight of infections. This review will focus on the anti-HSV activity of such peptides (both natural and synthetic), describe their mode of action and their clinical potential. PMID:21994576

  5. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; Zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  6. Modulation of muscle contraction by a cell-permeable peptide

    PubMed Central

    Tünnemann, Gisela; Karczewski, Peter; Haase, Hannelore

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to immortal cell lines, primary cells are hardly susceptible to intracellular delivery methods such as transfection. In this study, we evaluated the direct delivery of several cell-permeable peptides under noninvasive conditions into living primary adult rat cardiomyocytes. We specifically monitored the functional effects of a cell-permeable peptide containing the 15 amino acid N-terminal peptide from human ventricular light chain-1 (VLC-1) on contraction and intracellular Ca2+ signals after electrical stimulation in primary adult cardiomyocytes. The transducible VLC-1 variant was taken up by cardiomyocytes within 5 min with more than 95% efficiency and localized to sarcomeric structures. Analysis of the functional effects of the cell-permeable VLC-1 revealed an enhancement of the intrinsic contractility of cardiomyocytes without affecting the intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, peptide transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides represents not only a unique strategy to enhance heart muscle function with no secondary effect on intracellular Ca2+ but also an invaluable tool for the modulation and manipulation of protein interactions in general and in primary cells. PMID:17717642

  7. Directed evolution of FLS2 towards novel flagellin peptide recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Helft, Laura; Thompson, Mikayla; Bent, Andrew F.

    2016-06-06

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wild type Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targetedmore » approach generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. As a result, these studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets.« less

  8. Directed Evolution of FLS2 towards Novel Flagellin Peptide Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Helft, Laura; Thompson, Mikayla

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wild-type Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targeted approach generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. These studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets. PMID:27270917

  9. Cloning, expression, and purification of a new antimicrobial peptide gene from Musca domestica larva.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaoning; Tang, Yan; Wang, Kai; Gao, Yunhang; Ma, Hongxia

    2014-10-01

    Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae), the housefly, exhibits unique immune defences and can produce antimicrobial peptides upon stimulation with bacteria. Based on the cDNA library constructed using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method, a 198-bp antimicrobial peptide gene, which we named MDAP-2, was amplified by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) from M. domestica larvae stimulated with Salmonella pullorum (Enterobacteriaceae: Salmonella). In the present study, the full-length MDAP-2 gene was cloned and inserted into a His-tagged Escherichia coli prokaryotic expression system to enable production of the recombinant peptide. The recombinant MDAP-2 peptide was purified using Ni-NTA HisTrap FF crude column chromatography. The bacteriostatic activity of the recombinant purified MDAP-2 protein was assessed. The results indicated that MDAP-2 had in vitro antibacterial activity against all of the tested Gram- bacteria from clinical isolates, including E. coli (Enterobacteriaceae: Escherichia), one strain of S. pullorum (Enterobacteriaceae: Salmonella), and one strain of Pasteurella multocida. DNA sequencing and BLAST analysis showed that the MDAP-2 antimicrobial peptide gene was not homologous to any other antimicrobial peptide genes in GenBank. The antibacterial mechanisms of the newly discovered MDAP-2 peptide warrant further study.

  10. Host-defense and trefoil factor family peptides in skin secretions of the Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Leprince, Jérôme; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2015-10-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from the octoploid Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis Loumont, 1983 led to the identification and characterization of 15 host-defense peptides belonging to the magainin (two peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; three peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; three peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; two peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; five peptides) families. In addition, caerulein and three peptides with structural similarity to the trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides, xP2 and xP4 from Xenopus laevis were also present in the secretions. Consistent with data from comparisons of the nucleotides sequence of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the primary structures of the peptides suggest a close phylogenetic relationship between X. boumbaensis and the octoploid frogs Xenopus amieti and Xenopus andrei. As the three species occupy disjunct ranges within Cameroon, it is suggested that they diverged from a common ancestor by allopatric speciation. PMID:25849343

  11. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities. PMID:26948900

  12. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  13. Peptide Aptamers: Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Peptide aptamers are small combinatorial proteins that are selected to bind to specific sites on their target molecules. Peptide aptamers consist of short, 5-20 amino acid residues long sequences, typically embedded as a loop within a stable protein scaffold. Various peptide aptamer scaffolds and in vitro and in vivo selection techniques are reviewed with emphasis on specific biomedical, bioimaging, and bioanalytical applications. PMID:25866267

  14. Identification of Four-Jointed Box 1 (FJX1)-Specific Peptides for Immunotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chai, San Jiun; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Foo, Yoke Ching; Yap, Lee Fah; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Teo, Soo Hwang; Cheong, Sok Ching; Patel, Vyomesh; Lim, Kue Peng

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly prevalent in South East Asia and China. The poor outcome is due to late presentation, recurrence, distant metastasis and limited therapeutic options. For improved treatment outcome, immunotherapeutic approaches focusing on dendritic and autologous cytotoxic T-cell based therapies have been developed, but cost and infrastructure remain barriers for implementing these in low-resource settings. As our prior observations had found that four-jointed box 1 (FJX1), a tumor antigen, is overexpressed in NPCs, we investigated if short 9-20 amino acid sequence specific peptides matching to FJX1 requiring only intramuscular immunization to train host immune systems would be a better treatment option for this disease. Thus, we designed 8 FJX1-specific peptides and implemented an assay system to first, assess the binding of these peptides to HLA-A2 molecules on T2 cells. After, ELISPOT assays were used to determine the peptides immunogenicity and ability to induce potential cytotoxicity activity towards cancer cells. Also, T-cell proliferation assay was used to evaluate the potential of MHC class II peptides to stimulate the expansion of isolated T-cells. Our results demonstrate that these peptides are immunogenic and peptide stimulated T-cells were able to induce peptide-specific cytolytic activity specifically against FJX1-expressing cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the MHC class II peptides were capable of inducing T-cell proliferation. Our results suggest that these peptides are capable of inducing specific cytotoxic cytokines secretion against FJX1-expressing cancer cells and serve as a potential vaccine-based therapy for NPC patients.

  15. Identification of Four-Jointed Box 1 (FJX1)-Specific Peptides for Immunotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chai, San Jiun; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Foo, Yoke Ching; Yap, Lee Fah; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Teo, Soo Hwang; Cheong, Sok Ching; Patel, Vyomesh; Lim, Kue Peng

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly prevalent in South East Asia and China. The poor outcome is due to late presentation, recurrence, distant metastasis and limited therapeutic options. For improved treatment outcome, immunotherapeutic approaches focusing on dendritic and autologous cytotoxic T-cell based therapies have been developed, but cost and infrastructure remain barriers for implementing these in low-resource settings. As our prior observations had found that four-jointed box 1 (FJX1), a tumor antigen, is overexpressed in NPCs, we investigated if short 9–20 amino acid sequence specific peptides matching to FJX1 requiring only intramuscular immunization to train host immune systems would be a better treatment option for this disease. Thus, we designed 8 FJX1-specific peptides and implemented an assay system to first, assess the binding of these peptides to HLA-A2 molecules on T2 cells. After, ELISPOT assays were used to determine the peptides immunogenicity and ability to induce potential cytotoxicity activity towards cancer cells. Also, T-cell proliferation assay was used to evaluate the potential of MHC class II peptides to stimulate the expansion of isolated T-cells. Our results demonstrate that these peptides are immunogenic and peptide stimulated T-cells were able to induce peptide-specific cytolytic activity specifically against FJX1-expressing cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the MHC class II peptides were capable of inducing T-cell proliferation. Our results suggest that these peptides are capable of inducing specific cytotoxic cytokines secretion against FJX1-expressing cancer cells and serve as a potential vaccine-based therapy for NPC patients. PMID:26536470

  16. Identification of Four-Jointed Box 1 (FJX1)-Specific Peptides for Immunotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chai, San Jiun; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Foo, Yoke Ching; Yap, Lee Fah; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Teo, Soo Hwang; Cheong, Sok Ching; Patel, Vyomesh; Lim, Kue Peng

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly prevalent in South East Asia and China. The poor outcome is due to late presentation, recurrence, distant metastasis and limited therapeutic options. For improved treatment outcome, immunotherapeutic approaches focusing on dendritic and autologous cytotoxic T-cell based therapies have been developed, but cost and infrastructure remain barriers for implementing these in low-resource settings. As our prior observations had found that four-jointed box 1 (FJX1), a tumor antigen, is overexpressed in NPCs, we investigated if short 9-20 amino acid sequence specific peptides matching to FJX1 requiring only intramuscular immunization to train host immune systems would be a better treatment option for this disease. Thus, we designed 8 FJX1-specific peptides and implemented an assay system to first, assess the binding of these peptides to HLA-A2 molecules on T2 cells. After, ELISPOT assays were used to determine the peptides immunogenicity and ability to induce potential cytotoxicity activity towards cancer cells. Also, T-cell proliferation assay was used to evaluate the potential of MHC class II peptides to stimulate the expansion of isolated T-cells. Our results demonstrate that these peptides are immunogenic and peptide stimulated T-cells were able to induce peptide-specific cytolytic activity specifically against FJX1-expressing cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the MHC class II peptides were capable of inducing T-cell proliferation. Our results suggest that these peptides are capable of inducing specific cytotoxic cytokines secretion against FJX1-expressing cancer cells and serve as a potential vaccine-based therapy for NPC patients. PMID:26536470

  17. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  18. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology. PMID:26279082

  19. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  20. Fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Paizs, Béla; Suhai, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides are reviewed in the present paper paying special attention to classification of the known fragmentation channels into a simple hierarchy defined according to the chemistry involved. It is shown that the 'mobile proton' model of peptide fragmentation can be used to understand the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides only in a qualitative manner rationalizing differences observed for low-energy collision induced dissociation of peptide ions having or lacking a mobile proton. To overcome this limitation, a deeper understanding of the dissociation chemistry of protonated peptides is needed. To this end use of the 'pathways in competition' (PIC) model that involves a detailed energetic and kinetic characterization of the major peptide fragmentation pathways (PFPs) is proposed. The known PFPs are described in detail including all the pre-dissociation, dissociation, and post-dissociation events. It is our hope that studies to further extend PIC will lead to semi-quantative understanding of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides which could be used to develop refined bioinformatics algorithms for MS/MS based proteomics. Experimental and computational data on the fragmentation of protonated peptides are reevaluated from the point of view of the PIC model considering the mechanism, energetics, and kinetics of the major PFPs. Evidence proving semi-quantitative predictability of some of the ion intensity relationships (IIRs) of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides is presented. PMID:15389847

  1. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  2. Biosynthesized (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled pro-opiomelanocortin peptides as novel recovery markers in radioimmunoassay of peptide hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendale, B.E.; Jarrett, D.B.

    1985-12-01

    Hormones are extracted from plasma with varying efficiency. Thus, markers or internal standards are often needed, to monitor and correct for extraction losses. To do so is difficult in the case of peptide hormones because radioactive recovery markers either have a low specific activity or, if labeled with iodine, may not be fully representative because of alterations in their size and charge. More importantly, markers labeled with /sup 125/I can interact in, and thus compromise, the subsequent radioimmunoassay. AtT-20 mouse pituitary tumor cells, which can be stimulated to synthesize and secrete pro-opiomelanocortin peptides, can biosynthetically label beta-lipotropin (beta-LPH) with (/sup 35/S)methionine. The labeled peptide, which is co-eluted with unlabeled beta-LPH in high-performance liquid chromatography, is fully immunoprecipitable and has a specific activity of 34 Ci/g. We use this labeled peptide to monitor the recovery of beta-LPH in silicic acid extraction from plasma. This peptide is an ideal marker of analytical recovery because it does not interfere in subsequent radioimmunoassays.

  3. Ligand-independent activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma by insulin and C-peptide in kidney proximal tubular cells: dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Rasheed, Nawal M; Chana, Ravinder S; Baines, Richard J; Willars, Gary B; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2004-11-26

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) has key roles in the regulation of adipogenesis, inflammation, and lipid and glucose metabolism. C-peptide is believed to be inert and without appreciable biological functions. Recent studies suggest that C-peptide possesses multiple functions. The present study investigated the effects of insulin and C-peptide on PPARgamma transcriptional activity in opossum kidney proximal tubular cells. Both insulin and C-peptide induced a concentration-dependent stimulation of PPARgamma transcriptional activity. Both agents substantially augmented thiazolidinedione-stimulated PPARgamma transcriptional activity. Neither insulin nor C-peptide had any effect on the expression levels of PPARgamma. GW9662, a PPARgamma antagonist, blocked PPARgamma activation by thiazolidinediones but had no effect on either insulin- or C-peptide-stimulated PPARgamma transcriptional activity. Co-transfection of opossum kidney cells with dominant negative mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase significantly depressed basal PPARgamma transcriptional activity but had no effect on that induced by either insulin or C-peptide. Both insulin- and C-peptide-stimulated PPARgamma transcriptional activity were attenuated by wortmannin and by expression of a dominant negative phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase p85 regulatory subunit. In addition PI 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of PPARgamma was observed after stimulation by C-peptide or insulin. C-peptide effects but not insulin on PPARgamma transcriptional activity were abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Finally both C-peptide and insulin positively control the expression of the PPARgamma-regulated CD36 scavenger receptor in human THP-1 monocytes. We concluded that insulin and C-peptide can stimulate PPARgamma activity in a ligand-independent fashion and that this effect is mediated by PI 3-kinase. These results support a new and potentially important physiological role for C-peptide in

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent stimulation of amphiregulin expression in androgen-stimulated human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, I; Bailey, J; Hitzemann, K; Pittelkow, M R; Maihle, N J

    1994-01-01

    Amphiregulin is a heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that binds to the EGF receptor (EGF-R) with high affinity. In this study, we report a role for amphiregulin in androgen-stimulated regulation of prostate cancer cell growth. Androgen is known to enhance EGF-R expression in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line, and it has been suggested that androgenic stimuli may regulate proliferation, in part, through autocrine mechanisms involving the EGF-R. In this study, we demonstrate that LNCaP cells express amphiregulin mRNA and peptide and that this expression is elevated by androgenic stimulation. We also show that ligand-dependent EGF-R stimulation induces amphiregulin expression and that androgenic effects on amphiregulin synthesis are mediated through this EGF-R pathway. Parallel studies using the estrogen-responsive breast carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, suggest that regulation of amphiregulin by estrogen may also be mediated via an EGF-R pathway. In addition, heparin treatment of LNCaP cells inhibits androgen-stimulated cell growth further suggesting that amphiregulin can mediate androgen-stimulated LNCaP proliferation. Together, these results implicate an androgen-regulated autocrine loop composed of amphiregulin and its receptor in prostate cancer cell growth and suggest that the mechanism of steroid hormone regulation of amphiregulin synthesis may occur through androgen upregulation of the EGF-R and subsequent receptor-dependent pathways. Images PMID:8049525

  5. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W. S.

    2001-09-01

    Models and the conceptual framework necessary for an understanding of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) are described. Examples of various OSL readout schemes are described, along with examples of the use of OSL in radiation dosimetry.

  6. Deep brain stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain The neurostimulator, which puts out the electric current. The stimulator is similar to a heart pacemaker . It is usually placed under the skin near the collarbone, but may be ... pulses travel from the neurostimulator, along the extension ...

  7. ACTH stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 102. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. ACTH stimulation test - diagnostic. In: ... . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  8. Geothermal Well Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

    1981-03-01

    The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

  9. The Plasma Membrane as a Reservoir, Protective Shield, and Light-Triggered Launch Pad for Peptide Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    O'Banion, Colin P; Nguyen, Luong T; Wang, Qunzhao; Priestman, Melanie A; Holly, Stephen P; Parise, Leslie V; Lawrence, David S

    2016-01-18

    Although peptide-based therapeutics are finding increasing application in the clinic, extensive structural modification is typically required to prevent their rapid degradation by proteases in the blood. We have evaluated the ability of erythrocytes to serve as reservoirs, protective shields (against proteases), and light-triggered launch pads for peptides. We designed lipidated peptides that are anchored to the surface of red blood cells, which furnishes a protease-resistant environment. A photocleavable moiety is inserted between the lipid anchor and the peptide backbone, thereby enabling light-triggered peptide release from erythrocytes. We have shown that a cell-permeable peptide, a hormone (melanocyte stimulating hormone), and a blood-clotting agent can be anchored to erythrocytes, protected from proteases, and photolytically released to create the desired biological effect.

  10. Phytosulfokine peptide signalling.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Margret

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) belongs to the group of plant peptide growth factors. It is a disulfated pentapeptide encoded by precursor genes that are ubiquitously present in higher plants, suggestive of universal functions. Processing of the preproprotein involves sulfonylation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase in the trans-golgi and proteolytic cleavage in the apoplast. The secreted peptide is perceived at the cell surface by a membrane-bound receptor kinase of the leucine-rich repeat family. The PSK receptor PSKR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is an active kinase and has guanylate cyclase activity resulting in dual-signal outputs. Receptor activity is regulated by calmodulin. While PSK may be an autocrine growth factor, it also acts non-cell autonomously by promoting growth of cells that are receptor-deficient. In planta, PSK has multiple functions. It promotes cell growth, acts in the quiescent centre cells of the root apical meristem, contributes to funicular pollen tube guidance, and differentially alters immune responses depending on the pathogen. It has been suggested that PSK integrates growth and defence signals to balance the competing metabolic costs of these responses. This review summarizes our current understanding of PSK synthesis, signalling, and activity.

  11. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  12. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  13. Thermolysin: a peptide forming enzyme.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A V

    1991-02-01

    Thermolysin, a thermostable endopeptidase, is recognised as a potential peptide bond forming enzyme. The importance of structural properties and its stereospecific nature towards peptide bond formation is described. Thermolysin's use in the keystep of the preparation of an artificial sweetener 'aspartame' is highlighted.

  14. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  15. Peptide and non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shibo; Zhao, Qian; Debnath, Asim K

    2002-01-01

    Fusion of the HIV envelope with the target cell membrane is a critical step of HIV entry into the target cell. The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays an important role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV fusion inhibitors. The extracellular domain of gp41 contains three important functional regions, i.e. fusion peptide (FP), N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). The FP region is composed of hydrophobic, glycine-rich residues that are essential for the initial penetration of the target cell membrane. NHR and CHR regions consist of hydrophobic residues, which have the tendency to form alpha-helical coiled coils. During the process of fusion of HIV or HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells, FP inserts into the target cell membrane and subsequently the NHR and CHR regions change conformations and associate with each other to form a fusion-active gp41 core. Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions, designated N- and C-peptides, respectively, have potent inhibitory activity against HIV fusion by binding to the CHR and NHR regions, respectively, to prevent the formation of the fusion-active gp41 core. C-peptide may also bind to FP, thereby blocking its insertion into the target cell membrane. One of the C-peptides, T-20, which is in the phase III clinical trials, has potent in vivo activity against HIV infection and is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion. Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having a mechanism of action similar to the C-peptides. One of the approaches in identifying the inhibitors is to use an immunological assay to screen chemical libraries for the compounds that potentially block the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form a fusion

  16. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-derived peptides as epitopes for hepatoma immunotherapy: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Mizejewski, Gerald J

    2009-02-01

    The various immunological roles of human alpha-fetoprotein (HAFP), and its correlation with hepatomas, that is, hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), are not often addressed together in biomedical reports considering that HAFP is an established biomarker for hepatomas. Studies reporting measurement of HAFP serum levels in hepatoma patients in basic/clinical research settings has greatly increased over the years. Recent reports have now expanded our base knowledge in the mounting of an immune response against AFP, a self antigen, during hepatoma tumorigenesis. Advances in the detection and identification of AFP-derived peptide epitopes are opening new vistas of knowledge regarding the immunological role of AFP-peptides as T cell stimulating antigens in the course of hepatoma growth and progression. The present commentary addresses HAFP-derived peptides as immunologic responders in HCC and their use in the study and generation of AFP-peptide sensitized T cells directed against hepatoma cells. Attempts were further made to relate the AFP-derived peptide epitopes to T cell activities during the course of hepatoma immunotherapies and to profile the traits and properties of the peptides themselves. Hence, the present commentary was divided into two sections; (1) the characterization, properties, and traits of AFP peptide epitopes, and (2) the use of AFP-derived peptides in the therapeutic induction of T cells primed against hepatoma cells using both in vivo and in vitro models.

  17. Antibacterial peptides isolated from insects.

    PubMed

    Otvos, L

    2000-10-01

    Insects are amazingly resistant to bacterial infections. To combat pathogens, insects rely on cellular and humoral mechanisms, innate immunity being dominant in the latter category. Upon detection of bacteria, a complex genetic cascade is activated, which ultimately results in the synthesis of a battery of antibacterial peptides and their release into the haemolymph. The peptides are usually basic in character and are composed of 20-40 amino acid residues, although some smaller proteins are also included in the antimicrobial repertoire. While the proline-rich peptides and the glycine-rich peptides are predominantly active against Gram-negative strains, the defensins selectively kill Gram-positive bacteria and the cecropins are active against both types. The insect antibacterial peptides are very potent: their IC50 (50% of the bacterial growth inhibition) hovers in the submicromolar or low micromolar range. The majority of the peptides act through disintegrating the bacterial membrane or interfering with membrane assembly, with the exception of drosocin, apidaecin and pyrrhocoricin which appear to deactivate a bacterial protein in a stereospecific manner. In accordance with their biological function, the membrane-active peptides form ordered structures, e.g. alpha-helices or beta-pleated sheets and often cast permeable ion-pores. Their cytotoxic properties were exploited in in vivo studies targeting tumour progression. Although the native peptides degrade quickly in biological fluids other than insect haemolymph, structural modifications render the peptides resistant against proteases without sacrificing biological activity. Indeed, a pyrrhocoricin analogue shows lack of toxicity in vitro and in vivo and protects mice against experimental Escherichia coli infection. Careful selection of lead molecules based on the insect antibacterial peptides may extend their utility and produce viable alternatives to the conventional antimicrobial compounds for mammalian therapy.

  18. Biological effect of varying peptide binding affinity to the BoLA-DRB3*2703 allele

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    MHC class I and II molecules are immunoregulatory cell surface glycoproteins, which selectively bind to and present antigenic peptides to T-lymphocytes. Murine and human studies show that variable peptide binding affinity to MHC II molecules influences Th1/Th2 responses by inducing distinctive cytokine expression. To examine the biological effects of peptide binding affinity to bovine MHC (BoLA), various self peptides (BoLA-DQ and fibrinogen fragments) and non-self peptides from ovalbumin (OVA), as well as VP2 and VP4 peptides from foot and mouth disease virus (FMD-V) were used to (1) determine binding affinities to the BoLA-DRB3*2703 allele, previously associated with mastitis susceptibility and (2) determine whether peptide binding affinity influences T-lymphocyte function. Peptide binding affinity was determined by a competitive assay using high affinity biotinylated self-peptide incubated with purified BoLA-DRB3*2703 in the presence of various concentrations of competing peptides. The concentrations of non-self peptide required to inhibit self-peptide binding by 50% (IC50) were variable, ranging from 26.92 to > 320 μM. Peptide-specific T-lymphocyte function was determined by measuring DNA synthesis, cell division, and IFN-γ production in cultures of mononuclear cells from a BoLA-DRB3*2703 homozygous cow. When compared to non-stimulated control cultures, differences in lymphocyte function were observed for all of the assessed parameters; however, peptide-binding affinity did not always account for the observed differences in lymphocyte function. PMID:12927080

  19. Proinsulin C-peptide inhibits lipolysis in diabetic rat adipose tissue through phosphodiestrase-3B enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, A; Omrani, G R; Hadjzadeh, M A; Varedi, M

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that C-peptide modulates insulin-mediated inhibition of lipolysis and glucose consumption but has no significant effects per se on adipose tissue of normal rats. It has been repeatedly observed that certain actions of C-peptide are restricted to the diabetic states. In the present study, therefore, we examined whether C-peptide alters lipolysis in adipose tissue of diabetic rats. Rats were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin and divided into 2 groups; insulin treated and untreated. Retroperitoneal adipose tissue was excised aseptically, subjected to organ culture and incubated with rat C-peptide, insulin, or a combination of both peptides in the presence or absence of isoproterenol. Tissue lipolysis was assessed by the rate of glycerol release into the culture media. The cultures were pretreated with cilostamide, a phosphodiesterase-3B enzyme inhibitor, when the role of this enzyme was to be examined. C-Peptide on its own, like insulin, significantly inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis in the adipose tissue of untreated diabetic rats. The effect was enhanced by a combination of C-peptide and insulin. Notably, the C-peptide's effect was totally blocked in the presence of cilostamide. In the adipose tissue of insulin treated rats, however, C-peptide failed to show any significant antilipolytic effects. These data show that C-peptide has the potential to act, conditionally, as an antilipolytic hormone by activating phosphodiesterase-3B and suggest that the action may contribute to the C-peptide's beneficial effects on diabetes-induced complications. PMID:22990990

  20. Peptidomic analysis of skin secretions from the bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus (Ranidae) identifies multiple peptides with potent insulin-releasing activity.

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Ojo, Opeolu O; Meetani, Mohammed A; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Abdel-Wahab, Yasser H A; Flatt, Peter R; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2011-02-01

    Using a combination of reversed-phase HPLC and electrospray mass spectrometry, peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of the American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus Shaw, 1802 led to the identification and characterization of five newly described peptides (ranatuerin-1CBb, ranatuerin-2CBc, and -CBd, palustrin-2CBa, and temporin-CBf) together with seven peptides previously isolated on the basis of their antimicrobial activity (ranatuerin-1CBa, ranatuerin-2CBa, brevinin-1CBa, and -1CBb, temporin-CBa, -CBb, and -CBd). The abilities of the most abundant of the purified peptides to stimulate the release of insulin from the rat BRIN-BD11 clonal β cell line were evaluated. Ranatuerin-2CBd (GFLDIIKNLGKTFAGHMLDKIRCTIGTCPPSP) was the most potent peptide producing a significant stimulation of insulin release (119% of basal rate, P<0.01) from BRIN-BD11 cells at a concentration of 30nM, with a maximum response (236% of basal rate, P<0.001) at a concentration of 3μM. Ranatuerin-2CBd did not stimulate release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase at concentrations up to 3μM, indicating that the integrity of the plasma membrane had been preserved. Brevinin-1CBb (FLPFIARLAAKVFPSIICSVTKKC) produced the maximum stimulation of insulin release (285% of basal rate, P<0.001 at 3μM) but the peptide was cytotoxic at this concentration. PMID:21087647

  1. Immunogenicity of Two FMDV Nonameric Peptides Encapsulated in Liposomes in Mice and the Protective Efficacy in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Yan, Ruo-qian; Li, Yun-Gang; Li, Xin-sheng

    2013-01-01

    It has been predicted that nonameric peptides I (VP126–34, RRQHTDVSF), II (VP1157–165, RTLPTSFNY) and III (VP145–53, KEQVNVLDL) from the VP1 capsid protein of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) are T cell epitopes. To investigate whether these peptides have immunological activity, BALB/c mice were immunized with peptide I, II or III conjugated with immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs). A cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxic activity induced by peptides along with by measuring peptide-specific T-cell proliferation and CD8+ T lymphocyte numbers in whole blood and interferon (IFN)-γ production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells induced by peptides. To further identify the protective efficacy of peptides, an FMDV challenge assay was done in guinea pigs. Peptides I and II stimulated significant increases in T-cell proliferation, CD8+ T lymphocytes, and IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxic activity compared to controls. The FMDV challenge assay indicated peptides I and II can protect over 60% of animals from virus attack. The results demonstrate that peptides I and II encapsulated in liposomes should be CTL epitopes of FMDV and can protect animals from virus attack to some extent. PMID:23874709

  2. Highly Angiogenic Peptide Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Taylor, Nichole L.; Shi, Siyu; Wang, Benjamin K.; Jalan, Abhishek A.; Kang, Marci K.; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Major limitations of current tissue regeneration approaches using artificial scaffolds are fibrous encapsulation, lack of host cellular infiltration, unwanted immune responses, surface degradation preceding biointegration, and artificial degradation byproducts. Specifically, for scaffolds larger than 200 500 μm, implants must be accompanied by host angiogenesis in order to provide adequate nutrient/waste exchange in the newly forming tissue. In the current work, we design a peptide-based self-assembling nanofibrous hydrogel containing cell-mediated degradation and proangiogenic moieties that specifically address these challenges. This hydrogel can be easily delivered by syringe, is rapidly infiltrated by cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin, and rapidly forms an extremely robust mature vascular network. scaffolds show no signs of fibrous encapsulation and after 3 weeks are resorbed into the native tissue. These supramolecular assemblies may prove a vital paradigm for tissue regeneration and specifically for ischemic tissue disease. PMID:25584521

  3. Amyloid peptide channels.

    PubMed

    Kagan, B L; Azimov, R; Azimova, R

    2004-11-01

    At least 16 distinct clinical syndromes including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), rheumatoid arthritis, type II diabetes mellitus (DM), and spongiform encephelopathies (prion diseases), are characterized by the deposition of amorphous, Congo red-staining deposits known as amyloid. These "misfolded" proteins adopt beta-sheet structures and aggregate spontaneously into similar extended fibrils despite their widely divergent primary sequences. Many, if not all, of these peptides are capable of forming ion-permeable channels in vitro and possibly in vivo. Common channel properties include irreversible, spontaneous insertion into membranes, relatively large, heterogeneous single-channel conductances, inhibition of channel formation by Congo red, and blockade of inserted channels by Zn2+. Physiologic effects of amyloid, including Ca2+ dysregulation, membrane depolarization, mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP), and cytotoxicity, suggest that channel formation in plasma and intracellular membranes may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the amyloidoses. PMID:15702375

  4. C-peptide, Na+,K+-ATPase, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Coste, T. C.; Jannot, M. F.; Raccah, D.; Tsimaratos, M.

    2004-01-01

    Na+,K+-ATPase is an ubiquitous membrane enzyme that allows the extrusion of three sodium ions from the cell and two potassium ions from the extracellular fluid. Its activity is decreased in many tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals. This impairment could be at least partly responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Na+,K+-ATPase activity is decreased in the red blood cell membranes of type 1 diabetic individuals, irrespective of the degree of diabetic control. It is less impaired or even normal in those of type 2 diabetic patients. The authors have shown that in the red blood cells of type 2 diabetic patients, Na+,K+-ATPase activity was strongly related to blood C-peptide levels in non–insulin-treated patients (in whom C-peptide concentration reflects that of insulin) as well as in insulin-treated patients. Furthermore, a gene-environment relationship has been observed. The alpha-1 isoform of the enzyme predominant in red blood cells and nerve tissue is encoded by the ATP1A1 gene.Apolymorphism in the intron 1 of this gene is associated with lower enzyme activity in patients with C-peptide deficiency either with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but not in normal individuals. There are several lines of evidence for a low C-peptide level being responsible for low Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the red blood cells. Short-term C-peptide infusion to type 1 diabetic patients restores normal Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Islet transplantation, which restores endogenous C-peptide secretion, enhances Na+,K+-ATPase activity proportionally to the rise in C-peptide. This C-peptide effect is not indirect. In fact, incubation of diabetic red blood cells with C-peptide at physiological concentration leads to an increase of Na+,K+-ATPase activity. In isolated proximal tubules of rats or in the medullary thick ascending limb of the kidney, C-peptide stimulates in a dose-dependent manner Na+,K+-ATPase activity. This impairment in Na+,K+-ATPase activity, mainly

  5. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  7. The pharmacology of Malo maxima jellyfish venom extract in isolated cardiovascular tissues: A probable cause of the Irukandji syndrome in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wright, Christine E; Winkel, Kenneth D; Gershwin, Lisa-Ann; Angus, James A

    2011-03-25

    The in vitro cardiac and vascular pharmacology of Malo maxima, a newly described jellyfish suspected of causing Irukandji syndrome in the Broome region of Western Australia, was investigated in rat tissues. In left atria, M. maxima crude venom extract (CVE; 1-100μg/mL) caused concentration-dependent inotropic responses which were unaffected by atropine (1μM), but significantly attenuated by tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.1μM), propranolol (1μM), Mg(2+) (6mM) or calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist (CGRP(8-37); 1μM). CVE caused no change in right atrial rate until 100μg/mL, which elicited bradycardia. This was unaffected by atropine, TTX, propranolol or CGRP(8-37). In the presence of Mg(2+), CVE 30-100μg/mL caused tachycardia. In small mesenteric arteries CVE caused concentration-dependent contractions (pEC(50) 1.03±0.07μg/mL) that were unaffected by prazosin (0.3μM), ω-conotoxin GVIA (0.1μM) or Mg(2+) (6mM). There was a 2-fold increase in sensitivity in the presence of CGRP(8-37) (3μM). TTX (0.1μM), box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri antivenom (92.6U/mL) and benextramine (3μM) decreased sensitivity by 2.6, 1.9 and 2.1-fold, respectively. CVE-induced maximum contractions were attenuated by C. fleckeri antivenom (-22%) or benextramine (-49%). M. maxima CVE appears to activate the sympathetic, but not parasympathetic, nervous system and to stimulate sensory nerve CGRP release in left atria and resistance arteries. These effects are consistent with the catecholamine excess thought to cause Irukandji syndrome, with additional actions of CGRP release. PMID:21237252

  8. Efferent innervation of turtle semicircular canal cristae: comparisons with bird and mouse.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Paivi M; Fettis, Margaret; Holt, Joseph C

    2015-06-01

    In the vestibular periphery of nearly every vertebrate, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons give rise to numerous presynaptic varicosities that target hair cells and afferent processes in the sensory neuroepithelium. Although pharmacological studies have described the postsynaptic actions of vestibular efferent stimulation in several species, characterization of efferent innervation patterns and the relative distribution of efferent varicosities among hair cells and afferents are also integral to understanding how efferent synapses operate. Vestibular efferent markers, however, have not been well characterized in the turtle, one of the animal models used by our laboratory. Here we sought to identify reliable efferent neuronal markers in the vestibular periphery of turtle, to use these markers to understand how efferent synapses are organized, and to compare efferent neuronal labeling patterns in turtle with two other amniotes using some of the same markers. Efferent fibers and varicosities were visualized in the semicircular canal of red-eared turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and mice (Mus musculus) utilizing fluorescent immunohistochemistry with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Vestibular hair cells and afferents were counterstained using antibodies to myosin VIIa and calretinin. In all species, ChAT labeled a population of small diameter fibers giving rise to numerous spherical varicosities abutting type II hair cells and afferent processes. That these ChAT-positive varicosities represent presynaptic release sites were demonstrated by colabeling with antibodies against the synaptic vesicle proteins synapsin I, SV2, or syntaxin and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide. Comparisons of efferent innervation patterns among the three species are discussed.

  9. Streptozotocin-Induced Early Thermal Hyperalgesia is independent of Glycemic State of Rats: Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1(TRPV1) and Inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptozotocin (STZ) is used as a common tool to induce diabetes and to study diabetes-induced complications including diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Previously, we have reported that STZ induces a direct effect on neurons through expression and function of the Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel in sensory neurons resulting in thermal hyperalgesia, even in non-diabetic STZ-treated mice. In the present study, we investigated the role of expression and function of TRPV1 in the central sensory nerve terminals in the spinal cord in STZ-induced hyperalgesia in rats. Results We found that a proportion of STZ-treated rats were normoglycemic but still exhibited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Immunohistochemical data show that STZ treatment, irrespective of glycemic state of the animal, caused microglial activation and increased expression of TRPV1 in spinal dorsal horn. Further, there was a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in spinal cord tissue, irrespective of the glycemic state. Capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) was significantly higher in the spinal cord of STZ-treated animals. Intrathecal administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a potent TRPV1 agonist, significantly attenuated STZ-induced thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. RTX treatment also prevented the increase in TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide release in the spinal cord tissue. Conclusions From these results, it is concluded that TRPV1 is an integral component of initiating and maintaining inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia, which can be alleviated by intrathecal administration of RTX. Further, the results suggest that enhanced expression and inflammation-induced sensitization of TRPV1 at the spinal cord may play a role in central sensitization in STZ-induced neuropathy. PMID:21794120

  10. Cortical spreading depression as a target for anti-migraine agents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a slowly propagating wave of neuronal and glial depolarization lasting a few minutes, that can develop within the cerebral cortex or other brain areas after electrical, mechanical or chemical depolarizing stimulations. Cortical SD (CSD) is considered the neurophysiological correlate of migraine aura. It is characterized by massive increases in both extracellular K+ and glutamate, as well as rises in intracellular Na+ and Ca2+. These ionic shifts produce slow direct current (DC) potential shifts that can be recorded extracellularly. Moreover, CSD is associated with changes in cortical parenchymal blood flow. CSD has been shown to be a common therapeutic target for currently prescribed migraine prophylactic drugs. Yet, no effects have been observed for the antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, consistent with their lack of efficacy on migraine. Some molecules of interest for migraine have been tested for their effect on CSD. Specifically, blocking CSD may play an enabling role for novel benzopyran derivative tonabersat in preventing migraine with aura. Additionally, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonists have been recently reported to inhibit CSD, suggesting the contribution of CGRP receptor activation to the initiation and maintenance of CSD not only at the classic vascular sites, but also at a central neuronal level. Understanding what may be lying behind this contribution, would add further insights into the mechanisms of actions for “gepants”, which may be pivotal for the effectiveness of these drugs as anti-migraine agents. CSD models are useful tools for testing current and novel prophylactic drugs, providing knowledge on mechanisms of action relevant for migraine. PMID:23879550

  11. Efferent innervation of turtle semicircular canal cristae: comparisons with bird and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Paivi M.; Fettis, Margaret; Holt, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    In the vestibular periphery of nearly every vertebrate, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons give rise to numerous presynaptic varicosities that target hair cells and afferent processes in the sensory neuroepithelium. Although pharmacological studies have described the postsynaptic actions of vestibular efferent stimulation in several species, characterization of efferent innervation patterns and the relative distribution of efferent varicosities among hair cells and afferents are also integral to understanding how efferent synapses operate. Vestibular efferent markers, however, have not been well characterized in the turtle, one of the animal models utilized by our laboratory. Here, we sought to identify reliable efferent neuronal markers in the vestibular periphery of turtle, to utilize these markers to understand how efferent synapses are organized, and to compare efferent neuronal labeling patterns in turtle with two other amniotes using some of the same markers. Efferent fibers and varicosities were visualized in the semicircular canal of Red-Eared Turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans), Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and mice (Mus musculus) utilizing fluorescent immunohistochemistry with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Vestibular hair cells and afferents were counterstained using antibodies to myosin VIIa and calretinin. In all species, ChAT labeled a population of small diameter fibers giving rise to numerous spherical varicosities abutting type II hair cells and afferent processes. That these ChAT-positive varicosities represent presynaptic release sites were demonstrated by colabeling with antibodies against the synaptic vesicle proteins synapsin I, SV2, or syntaxin and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Comparisons of efferent innervation patterns among the three species are discussed. PMID:25560461

  12. Reconstruction of atonic bladder innervation after spinal cord injury: A bladder reflex arc with afferent and efferent pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Li, Guitao; Luo, Dixin; Sun, Hongtao; Qi, Yong; Li, Yiyi; Jin, Xunjie

    2015-11-01

    Background Establishing bladder reflex arcs only with the efferent pathway to induce micturition after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been successful. However, the absence of sensory function and micturition desires can lead to serious complications. Objectives To reconstruct a bladder reflex arc with both afferent and efferent pathways to achieve atonic bladder innervation after SCI. Methods A reflex arc was established by microanastomosis of the S2 dorsal root to the peripheral process of the L5 dorsal ganglion and the L5 ventral root to the S2 ventral root. The functions of the reflex arc were evaluated using electrophysiology, wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) tracing, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunocytochemistry analysis. Hind-paw motion was evaluated by CatWalk gait. Results Compound action potentials and compound muscle action potentials were recorded at the right L5 dorsal root following electrical stimulation of right S2 dorsal root. Similar to the control side, these were not significantly different before or after the spinal cord destruction between L6 and S4. WGA-HRP tracing and CGRP immunocytochemistry showed that construction of the afferent and efferent pathways of the bladder reflex arc encouraged axonal regeneration of motor and sensory nerves, which then made contact with the anterior and posterior horns of the spinal cord, ultimately reestablishing axoplasmic transportation. Gait analysis showed that at 3 months following the operation, only the regularity index was significantly different as compared with 1 day before the operation, other parameters showing no difference. Conclusion Bladder reflex arc with the afferent and efferent pathways reconstructs the micturition function without great influence on the motion of leg.

  13. Therapeutic synergy and complementarity for ischemia/reperfusion injury: β1-adrenergic blockade and phosphodiesterase-3 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-He; Poh, Kian-Keong; Tan, Huay-Cheem; Welt, Frederick G P; Lui, Charles Y

    2016-07-01

    The β1-blocker when administered before reperfusion activates myocyte prosurvival signaling via β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent mechanism during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). The heart is endowed with powerful self-protective ability executed by endogenous β2-adrenopeptide receptor activation. I/R triggers cardiac epinephrine and neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release. Cardiac β1- and β2-AR stimulation mediates pro- and anti-apoptotic cell signaling, respectively. Removal of myocardial β1-AR-derived proapoptotic force with β1-AR blockade unmasks the dominance of β2-AR mediated prosurvival cell signaling through the well-defined PKA-Akt dependent mechanism. This review focuses on recent clinical and experimental findings including intrinsic cardiac β2-adrenopeptide neuroparacrine signaling mechanisms involved in I/R injury protection. While β2-adrenopeptide-mediated cardioprotection is important, age-related β2-adrenopeptide receptor decoupling can result in their ineffectiveness in response to the receptor-specific therapies. Accordingly, direct activation of receptor-coupled upstream PKA-dependent signaling may serve as a therapeutic alternative to achieve cardioprotection bypassing adrenopeptidergic receptor decoupling accompanied with aging. Phosphodiesterase-3 (PDE3) inhibitor reduces infarct-size via cAMP-dependent PKA signaling. Non-β1-AR-mediated PKA activation activates multiple prosurvival signaling pathways eventually leading to Akt activation. Combination therapy with β1-blocker esmolol and PDE3 inhibitor milrinone additively reduced infarct-size in preclinical studies. Concurrent β1-AR blockade and PDE3 inhibition provides complementary synergy with promising therapeutic potential in patients with acute myocardial infarction and beyond. PMID:27085132

  14. Neuropathy-Induced Spinal GAP-43 Expression Is Not a Main Player in the Onset of Mechanical Pain Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jaken, Robby J.; van Gorp, Sebastiaan; Joosten, Elbert A.; Losen, Mario; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; De Baets, Marc; Marcus, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Structural plasticity within the spinal nociceptive network may be fundamental to the chronic nature of neuropathic pain. In the present study, the spatiotemporal expression of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a protein which has been traditionally implicated in nerve fiber growth and sprouting, was investigated in relation to mechanical pain hypersensitivity. An L5 spinal nerve transection model was validated by the presence of mechanical pain hypersensitivity and an increase in the early neuronal activation marker cFos within the superficial spinal dorsal horn upon innocuous hindpaw stimulation. Spinal GAP-43 was found to be upregulated in the superficial L5 dorsal horn from 5 up to 10 days after injury. GAP-43 was co-localized with calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), but not vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT-1), IB4, or protein kinase-γ (PKC-γ), suggesting the regulation of GAP-43 in peptidergic nociceptive afferents. These GAP-43/CGRP fibers may be indicative of sprouting peptidergic fibers. Fiber sprouting largely depends on growth factors, which are typically associated with neuro-inflammatory processes. The putative role of neuropathy-induced GAP-43 expression in the development of mechanical pain hypersensitivity was investigated using the immune modulator propentofylline. Propentofylline treatment strongly attenuated the development of mechanical pain hypersensitivity and glial responses to nerve injury as measured by microglial and astroglial markers, but did not affect neuropathy-induced levels of spinal GAP-43 or GAP-43 regulation in CGRP fibers. We conclude that nerve injury induces structural plasticity in fibers expressing CGRP, which is regarded as a main player in central sensitization. Our data do not, however, support a major role of these structural changes in the onset of mechanical pain hypersensitivity. PMID:21671799

  15. Cocoa Enriched Diets Enhance Expression of Phosphatases and Decrease Expression of Inflammatory Molecules in Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Ryan J.; Durham, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of trigeminal nerves and release of neuropeptides that promote inflammation are implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. The overall response of trigeminal nerves to peripheral inflammatory stimuli involves a balance between enzymes that promote inflammation, kinases, and those that restore homeostasis, phosphatases. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of a cocoa-enriched diet on the expression of key inflammatory proteins in trigeminal ganglion neurons under basal and inflammatory conditions. Rats were fed a control diet or an isocaloric diet enriched in cocoa for 14 days prior to an injection of noxious stimuli to cause acute or chronic excitation of trigeminal neurons. In animals fed a cocoa-enriched diet, basal levels of the mitogen-activated kinase (MAP) phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 were elevated in neurons. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of acute or chronic peripheral inflammation on neuronal expression of the MAPK p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) were significantly repressed in response to cocoa. Similarly, dietary cocoa significantly suppressed basal neuronal expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as well as stimulated levels of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proteins implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine and TMJ disorders. To our knowledge, this is first evidence that a dietary supplement can cause upregulation of MKP, and that cocoa can prevent inflammatory responses in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that cocoa contains biologically active compounds that would be beneficial in the treatment of migraine and TMJ disorders. PMID:20138852

  16. The Role of the Paratrigeminal Nucleus in Vagal Afferent Evoked Respiratory Reflexes: A Neuroanatomical and Functional Study in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Alexandria K.; Farrell, Michael J.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; McGovern, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory tree receives sensory innervation from the jugular and nodose vagal sensory ganglia. Neurons of these ganglia are derived from embryologically distinct origins and as such demonstrate differing molecular, neurochemical and physiological phenotypes. Furthermore, whereas nodose afferent neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS), recent neuroanatomical studies in rats suggest that jugular neurons have their central terminations in the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5). In the present study we confirm that guinea pigs demonstrate a comparable distinction between the brainstem terminations of nodose and jugular ganglia afferents. Thus, microinjection of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CT-B) neural tracers into the caudal nTS and Pa5 resulted in highly specific retrograde labeling of neurons in the nodose and jugular ganglia, respectively. Whereas, nodose neurons more often expressed 160 KD neurofilament proteins and the alpha3 subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase, significantly more jugular neurons expressed the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and, especially, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP). Indeed, terminal fibers in the Pa5 compared to the nTS were characterized by their significantly greater expression of CGRP, further supporting the notion that jugular afferents project to trigeminal-related brainstem regions. Electrical stimulation of the guinea pig larynx following selective surgical denervation of the nodose afferent innervation to the larynx (leaving intact the jugular innervation) resulted in stimulus dependent respiratory slowing and eventual apnea. This jugular ganglia neuron mediated response was unaffected by bilateral microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into the nTS, but was abolished by muscimol injected into the Pa5. Taken together these data confirm that jugular and nodose vagal ganglia afferent neurons innervate distinct central circuits and support the notion that multiple peripheral and central pathways

  17. A novel method of selective ablation of afferent renal nerves by periaxonal application of capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Jason D.; Wainford, Richard D.; Engeland, William C.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Renal denervation has been shown to lower arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, yet it remains unclear whether this is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. To investigate the role of afferent renal nerves in arterial pressure regulation, previous studies have used methods that disrupt both renal and nonrenal afferent signaling. The present study was conducted to develop and validate a technique for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves that does not disrupt other afferent pathways. To do this, we adapted a technique for sensory denervation of the adrenal gland by topical application of capsaicin and tested the hypothesis that exposure of the renal nerves to capsaicin (renal-CAP) causes ablation of afferent but not efferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP had no effect on renal content of the efferent nerve markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine; however, the afferent nerve marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide was largely depleted from the kidney 10 days after intervention, but returned to roughly half of control levels by 7 wk postintervention. Moreover, renal-CAP abolished the cardiovascular responses to acute pharmacological stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP rats showed normal weight gain, as well as cardiovascular and fluid balance regulation during dietary sodium loading. To some extent, renal-CAP did blunt the bradycardic response and increase the dipsogenic response to increased salt intake. Lastly, renal-CAP significantly attenuated the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. These results demonstrate that renal-CAP effectively causes selective ablation of afferent renal nerves in rats. PMID:25411365

  18. A novel cholinergic epithelial cell with chemosensory traits in the murine conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Stephanie; Papadakis, Tamara; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We recently identified a specialized cholinergic cell type in tracheal and urethral epithelium that utilizes molecules of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade to sense potentially harmful substances in the luminal content. Upon stimulation, this cell initiates protective reflexes. Assuming a sentinel role of such cells at mucosal surfaces exposed to bacteria, we hypothesized their occurrence also in ocular mucosal surfaces. Utilizing a mouse strain expressing eGFP under the promoter of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-eGFP), we observed a cholinergic cell in the murine conjunctiva. Singular cholinergic cells reaching the epithelial surface with slender processes were detected in fornical, but neither in bulbar nor palpebral epithelia. These cells were found neither in the lacrimal canaliculi, nor in the lacrimal sac and the nasolacrimal duct. Cholinergic conjunctival epithelial cells were immunoreactive for components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade, i.e. α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 and the monovalent cation channel TRPM5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-immunoreactive sensory nerve fibers were observed extending into the conjunctival epithelium approaching slender ChAT-eGFP-positive cells. In addition, we noted both ChAT-eGFP expression and α-gustducin-immunoreactivity, albeit in different cell populations, in occasionally occurring lymphoid follicles of the nictitating membrane. The data show a previously unidentified cholinergic cell in murine conjunctiva with chemosensory traits that presumably utilizes acetylcholine for signaling. In analogy to similar cells described in the respiratory and urethral epithelium, it might serve to detect bacterial products and to initiate protective reflexes. PMID:26119492

  19. Potential of phage-displayed peptide library technology to identify functional targeting peptides

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Lauren RH; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide library technology is a valuable resource for drug discovery and development. Several peptide drugs developed through phage-displayed peptide library technology are presently in clinical trials and the authors envision that phage-displayed peptide library technology will assist in the discovery and development of many more. This review attempts to compile and summarize recent literature on targeting peptides developed through peptide library technology, with special emphasis on novel peptides with targeting capacity evaluated in vivo. PMID:20150977

  20. Antimicrobial peptides present in mammalian skin and gut are multifunctional defence molecules.

    PubMed

    Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Hélène; Shooshtarizadeh, Peiman; Prevost, Gilles; Haikel, Youssef; Chich, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are major components of the innate immune defence. They are well conserved along evolution, non-toxic and they ensure potent defences against a large number of pathogens. They act by direct killing of microorganisms and they possess additional roles in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, by recruting or stimulating immune cells. Skin and gut are positioned at the interface of internal milieu and external environment. They represent a physical and chemical barrier against pathogens invasion and the antimicrobial peptides limit pathogen growth in normal conditions. During infection or injury, some of these peptides are overexpressed and disrupt microbial membranes and/or stimulate immune cell recruitment, allowing to return to homeostasis or to increase inflammation. Antimicrobial peptides expression is altered in several diseases: alpha-defensins deficiency is related with Crohn's disease and in skin, cathelicidin LL-37 and beta-defensin-2 are overexpressed in psoriasis, while in atopic dermatitis, their expression is decreased. The present review provides an up-to-date summary of the expression and the biological roles of the antimicrobial peptides found in the skin and gastrointestinal mucosa of the host, in normal and pathological conditions. The involvement of these natural antimicrobial peptides in inflammation, is also discussed.

  1. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Falta, Michael T; Pinilla, Clemencia; Mack, Douglas G; Tinega, Alex N; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-07-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4⁺ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4⁺ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4⁺ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLADP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4⁺ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD.

  2. Identification of immunogenic MAGED4B peptides for vaccine development in oral cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kue Peng; Chun, Nicole Ai Leng; Gan, Chai Phei; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2014-01-01

    The ever-increasing number of tumor-associated antigens has provided a major stimulus for the development of therapeutic peptides vaccines. Tumor-associated peptides can induce high immune response rates and have been developed as vaccines for several types of solid tumors, and many are at various stages of clinical testing. MAGED4B, a melanoma antigen, is overexpressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and this expression promotes proliferation and cell migration. In this study, we have identified 9 short peptides derived from MAGED4B protein that are restricted in binding to the HLA subtypes common in the Asian population (HLA-A2, A11, and A24). The peptides had good binding affinity with the MHC-Class I molecules and stimulated ex-vivo IFN-gamma and Granzyme-B production in blood samples from OSCC patients, suggesting that they are immunogenic. Further, T cells stimulated with peptide-pulsed dendritic cells showed enhanced T-cell cytotoxic activity against MAGED4B-overexpressing OSCC cell lines. In summary, we have identified MAGED4B peptides that induce anti-tumor immune responses advocating that they could be further developed as vaccine candidates for the treatment of OSCC. PMID:25483651

  3. New York Canyon Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Raemy, Bernard

    2012-06-21

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "No Go" decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  4. Muscle Stimulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Goddard Space Flight Center contract, Electrologic of America was able to refine the process of densely packing circuitry on personal computer boards, providing significant contributions to the closed-loop systems for the Remote Manipulator System Simulator. The microcircuitry work was then applied to the StimMaster FES Ergometer, an exercise device used to stimulate muscles suffering from paralysis. The electrical stimulation equipment was developed exclusively for V-Care Health Systems, Inc. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  5. Immunologically active peptides capable of inducing immunization against malaria and genes encoding therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, J.B.; Williams, J.L.; McCutchan, T.F.; Schneider, I.

    1987-11-17

    An antimalarial immunogenic stimulant is described comprising an immunogenic carrier and a peptide sequence of between 2 and 1000 consecutive repeats of a sequence Asn-X-Y-Pro, wherein X is Ala or Val and Y is Asn or Asp.

  6. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  7. The good taste of peptides.

    PubMed

    Temussi, Piero A

    2012-02-01

    The taste of peptides is seldom one of the most relevant issues when one considers the many important biological functions of this class of molecules. However, peptides generally do have a taste, covering essentially the entire range of established taste modalities: sweet, bitter, umami, sour and salty. The last two modalities cannot be attributed to peptides as such because they are due to the presence of charged terminals and/or charged side chains, thus reflecting only the zwitterionic nature of these compounds and/or the nature of some side chains but not the electronic and/or conformational features of a specific peptide. The other three tastes, that is, sweet, umami and bitter, are represented by different families of peptides. This review describes the main peptides with a sweet, umami or bitter taste and their relationship with food acceptance or rejection. Particular emphasis will be given to the sweet taste modality, owing to the practical and scientific relevance of aspartame, the well-known sweetener, and to the theoretical importance of sweet proteins, the most potent peptide sweet molecules.

  8. Induction of intestinal epithelial proliferation by glucagon-like peptide 2.

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, D J; Erlich, P; Asa, S L; Brubaker, P L

    1996-01-01

    Injury, inflammation, or resection of the small intestine results in severe compromise of intestinal function. Nevertheless, therapeutic strategies for enhancing growth and repair of the intestinal mucosal epithelium are currently not available. We demonstrate that nude mice bearing subcutaneous proglucagon-producing tumors exhibit marked proliferation of the small intestinal epithelium. The factor responsible for inducing intestinal proliferation was identified as glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), a 33-aa peptide with no previously ascribed biological function. GLP-2 stimulated crypt cell proliferation and consistently induced a marked increase in bowel weight and villus growth of the jejunum and ileum that was evident within 4 days after initiation of GLP-2 administration. These observations define a novel biological role for GLP-2 as an intestinal-derived peptide stimulator of small bowel epithelial proliferation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8755576

  9. The pipeline in headache therapy.

    PubMed

    Vollbracht, Sarah; Rapoport, Alan M

    2013-09-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling, neurovascular disorder characterized by episodic attacks of head pain and associated disability plus systemic autonomic and neurologic symptoms. The advent of the triptan class of medication in the 1990s revolutionized the acute treatment of migraine, but many migraineurs do not respond optimally or at all to triptans, have intolerable adverse effects, or have contraindications to their use. Preventive pharmacotherapy has advanced mostly through serendipity, with new drugs being found effective while being used for other indications. There remains a significant need for new medications and devices that can provide effective, rapid, and sustained pain relief without adverse effects or recurrence. Several new acute and preventive therapies for the treatment of migraine and cluster headaches have shown promise and are currently under investigation. This article covers innovative delivery mechanisms, calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists, antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor, 5-HT1F receptor agonists, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor modulators, orexin receptor antagonists, glial cell modulators, and neurostimulation. PMID:23839594

  10. Peptidomic analysis of the extensive array of host-defense peptides in skin secretions of the dodecaploid frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Coquet, Laurent; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Jouenne, Thierry; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2016-09-01

    The Uganda clawed frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis with a karyotype of 2n=108 is one of the very few vertebrates with dodecaploid status. Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from this species led to the isolation and structural characterization of 23 host-defense peptides belonging to the following families: magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; 6 peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; 3 peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; 8 peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; 3 peptides). In addition, the secretions contained caerulein, identical to the peptide from Xenopus laevis, and two peptides that were identified as members of the trefoil factor family (TFF). The data indicate that silencing of the host-defense peptide genes following polyploidization has been appreciable and non-uniform. Consistent with data derived from comparison of nucleotide sequences of mitochrondrial and nuclear genes, cladistic analyses based upon the primary structures of the host-defense peptides provide support for an evolutionary scenario in which X. ruwenzoriensis arose from an allopolyploidization event involving an octoploid ancestor of the present-day frogs belonging to the Xenopus amieti species group and a tetraploid ancestor of Xenopus pygmaeus. PMID:27290612

  11. Endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Neumaier, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The role of endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus was investigated by using extracellular recording and radioligand binding techniques in the hippocampal slice preparation. Synaptic conductances from endogenously released opioid peptides have been difficult to detect. This problem was approach by designing a novel assay of opioid peptide release, in which release was detected b