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Sample records for calcitonin-gene-related peptide stimulates

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) stimulates purkinje cell dendrite growth in culture.

    PubMed

    D'Antoni, Simona; Zambusi, Laura; Codazzi, Franca; Zacchetti, Daniele; Grohovaz, Fabio; Provini, Luciano; Catania, Maria Vincenza; Morara, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    Previous reports described the transient expression during development of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) in rodent cerebellar climbing fibers and CGRP receptor in astrocytes. Here, mixed cerebellar cultures were used to analyze the effects of CGRP on Purkinje cells growth. Our results show that CGRP stimulated Purkinje cell dendrite growth under cell culture conditions mimicking Purkinje cell development in vivo. The stimulation was not blocked by CGRP8-37, a specific antagonist, suggesting the activation of other related receptors. CGRP did not affect survival of Purkinje cells, granule cells or astrocytes. The selective expression of Receptor Component Protein (RCP) (a component of CGRP receptor family) in astrocytes points to a role of these cells as mediators of CGRP effect. Finally, in pure cerebellar astrocyte cultures CGRP induced a transient morphological differentiation from flat, polygonal to stellate form. It is concluded that CGRP influences Purkinje cell dendrite growth in vitro, most likely through the involvement of astrocytes.

  2. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that manifests as a debilitating headache associated with altered sensory perception. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is now firmly established as a key player in migraine. Clinical trials carried out during the past decade have proved that CGRP receptor antagonists are effective for treating migraine, and antibodies to the receptor and CGRP are currently under investigation. Despite this progress in the clinical arena, the mechanisms by which CGRP triggers migraine remain uncertain. This review discusses mechanisms whereby CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Future studies on epistatic and epigenetic regulators of CGRP actions are expected to shed further light on CGRP actions in migraine. In conclusion, targeting CGRP represents an approachable therapeutic strategy for migraine. PMID:25340934

  3. Non-excitatory electrical stimulation attenuates myocardial infarction via homeostasis of calcitonin gene-related peptide in myocardium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Jia; Guo, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown protection of brain, retina, optic nerves and pancreatic β-cells but the effect on cardio-protection is still unknown. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in the pathology of injury and protection of myocardium but whether or not electrical stimulation modulates endogenous CGRP is not clear. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, without any treatment. (2) I/R group, animals were subjected to 30 min of myocardial ischemia followed by 60 min reperfusion. (3) NES+I/R group, non-excitatory electrical stimulation (NES) was commenced from 15 min before coronary artery occlusion till the end of reperfusion. (4) I/R+CGRP8-37 group, animals were given with CGRP8-37 (an antagonist of CGRP receptor, 10(-7) mol/L, 0.3 ml, i.v.) at 5 min before reperfusion without any electrical stimulation. The hemodynamics and electrocardiogram were monitored and recorded. Infarct size and troponin I were examined and CGRP expression in the myocardium and serum was analyzed. It was found that the infarct size and TnI were significantly reduced in NES+I/R group, by 45% and 58% respectively, accompanied by an obvious fall back of CGRP in myocardium, compared to I/R group (all p<0.05). Treatment with CGRP8-37 resulted in the same protection on myocardium as NES did. No significant difference in hemodynamics or ventricular tachycardia was detected among the groups (all p>0.05). It can be concluded that NES reduced the infarction size after acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, for which the underlying mechanism may be associated with modulation of endogenous CGRP in myocardium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands enhance capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Schmutzler, B S; Roy, S; Hingtgen, C M

    2009-06-16

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family ligands (GFLs) are a group of peptides that have been implicated as important factors in inflammation, since they are released in increased amounts during inflammation and induce thermal hyperalgesia upon injection. Mouse isolated sensory neurons in culture and freshly dissociated spinal cord slices were used to examine the enhancement in stimulated-release of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), as a measure of sensitization. Exposure of isolated sensory neurons in culture to GDNF, neurturin, and artemin enhanced the capsaicin-stimulated release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (iCGRP) two- to threefold, but did not increase potassium-stimulated release of iCGRP. A similar profile of sensitization was observed in freshly dissociated spinal cord slices. Persephin, another member of the GFL family thought to be important in development, was unable to induce an enhancement in the release of iCGRP. These results demonstrate that specific GFLs are important mediators affecting sensory neuronal sensitivity, likely through modulation of the capsaicin receptor. The sensitization of sensory neurons during inflammation, and the pain and neurogenic inflammation resulting from this sensitization, may be due in part to the effects of these selected GFLs.

  5. Effect of a calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist (CGRP8-37) on skin vasodilatation and oedema induced by stimulation of the rat saphenous nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Escott, K. J.; Brain, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist (CGRP8-37, 400 nmol kg-1, i.v.) on the increased blood flow induced by calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), vasodilator prostaglandins, and topical capsaicin was measured with a laser Doppler blood flow meter in rat abdominal skin. 2. The saphenous nerve was electrically stimulated and the effect of CGRP8-37 (400 nmol kg-1, i.v.) on the increased blood flow (measured by laser Doppler flowmetry) and oedema formation (measured by the extravascular accumulation of [125I]-albumin) was investigated in the rat hind paw. 3. CGRP8-37 (400 nmol kg-1, i.v.) had no effect on basal cutaneous blood flow at uninjected sites and sites injected with Tyrode buffer, but acted selectively to inhibit the increased blood flow induced by intradermal CGRP (10 pmol/site, P < 0.05), but not that induced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 300 pmol/site) or carba-prostacyclin (cPGI2, 100 pmol/site). 4. Capsaicin (0.1-33 mM), applied topically, acted in a dose-related manner to increase blood flow. CGRP8-37 (400 nmol kg-1, i.v.) almost totally inhibited blood flow induced by capsaicin (10 mM; P < 0.05) but did not significantly inhibit blood flow induced by a higher dose of capsaicin (33 mM). 5. The increased blood flow induced by short stimulation of the saphenous nerve (10 V, 1 ms, 2 Hz for 30 s) was inhibited by 76%, 5 min after i.v. CGRP8-37 (400 nmol kg-1, i.v., P < 0.05). 6. A longer (5 min) electrical stimulation of the saphenous nerve caused oedema formation, in addition to increased blood flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8242250

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide as inflammatory mediator.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jochen; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Fischer, Axel; Groneberg, David A

    2003-01-01

    Sensory neuropeptides have been proposed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of a number of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic cough. Next to prominent neuropeptides such as tachykinins or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has long been suggested to participate in airway physiology and pathophysiology. CGRP is a 37 amino-acid peptide which is expressed by nerve fibers projecting to the airways and by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. The most prominent effects of CGRP in the airways are vasodilatation and in a few instances bronchoconstriction. A further pulmonary effect of CGRP is the induction of eosinophil migration and the stimulation of beta-integrin-mediated T cell adhesion to fibronectin at the site of inflammation. By contrast, CGRP inhibits macrophage secretion and the capacity of macrophages to activate T-cells, indicating a potential anti-inflammatory effect. Due to the complex pulmonary effects of CGRP with bronchoconstriction and vasodilatation and diverse immunomodulatory actions, potential anti-asthma drugs based on this peptide have not been established so far. However, targeting the effects of CGRP may be of value for future strategies in nerve modulation.

  7. Calcitonin gene-related peptide produces skeletal muscle vasodilation following antidromic stimulation of unmyelinated afferents in the dorsal root in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Shimura, M; Uchida, S

    2000-04-07

    In anesthetized rats, the contribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to antidromic vasodilation of skeletal muscle blood flow (MBF) following electrical stimulation of muscle afferent was investigated by measuring biceps femoris MBF using laser Doppler flowmetry. Repetitive antidromic electrical stimulation of unmyelinated C fibers in ipsilateral dorsal roots at the 3rd-5th lumbar segments for 30 s caused an increase in MBF for 3-15 min (mean 4.5 min) without significant change in systemic arterial blood pressure. The increase in skeletal MBF started about 10 s after the onset of stimulation, and peaked at approximately 130% of the control value at about 30 s after the end of the 30 s period of stimulation. The MBF response was totally abolished by topical application of hCGRP (8-37), a CGRP receptor antagonist. It is concluded that antidromic vasodilation in skeletal muscles following stimulation of unmyelinated C afferents in dorsal roots is independent of systemic blood pressure and is mediated essentially by CGRP. It is suggested that this CGRP-related antidromic vasodilation may be important in the clinical improvement of skeletal MBF produced by physical therapy, e.g. acupuncture.

  8. Calcitonin gene related peptide as inhibitory neurotransmitter in the ureter.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S; Meini, S; Santicioli, P

    1995-07-01

    A dense plexus of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) containing nerve fibres is present in the mammalian ureter, from which CGRP is released by depolarizing stimuli, including chemical normally present in the urine. CGRP exerts a profound, receptor-mediated, inhibitory effect on the evoked motility of the ureter by suppressing latent pacemakers in the smooth muscle. This effect is largely glibenclamide sensitive, indicating the activation of potassium (K) channels in its genesis. Electrical stimulation of intramural nerves in the guinea-pig ureter produces a transient membrane hyperpolarization, which is blocked by glibenclamide or by capsaicin pretreatment, enhanced in a low-K medium, and inhibited by a CGRP receptor antagonist. Thus endogenous CGRP acts as a neurotransmitter K channel opener in the ureter. The refractory period of the guinea-pig ureter is markedly and similarly reduced by capsaicin pretreatment or administration of a CGRP receptor antagonist, indicating that endogenous CGRP can modulate the maximal frequency of ureteral peristalsis. Using a three-chamber organ bath that enabled the separate perfusion of the renal, middle, and bladder regions of the organ, evidence was obtained that CGRP blocks propagation of impulses along the ureter through a glibenclamide-sensitive mechanism. These findings indicate a role of CGRP in the local regulation of ureteral motility and peristalsis.

  9. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lima, William Gustavo; Marques-Oliveira, Gleuber Henrique; da Silva, Thaís Marques; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia

    2017-09-07

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide produced by alternative tissue-specific splicing of the primary transcript of the CALC genes. CGRP is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as in several organs and tissues. The presence of CGRP in the liver and brown and white adipose tissue suggests an effect of this neuropeptide on regulation of energy homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effect of CGRP on the control of energy metabolism, primarily focusing on food intake, thermoregulation and lipid metabolism in adipose tissue, liver and muscle. CGRP induces anorexia, stimulating anorexigenic neuropeptide and/or inhibiting orexigenic neuropeptide expression, through cAMP/PKA pathway activation. CGRP also induces energy expenditure, increasing the skin temperature and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. It has been also suggested that information related to peripheral lipid stores may be conveyed to the brain via CGRP-sensory innervation from adipose tissue. More recently, it was demonstrated that mice lacking αCGRP are protected from obesity induced by high-fat diet and that CGRP regulates the content of lipid in liver, muscle and adipose tissue. It is unclear the receptor responsible by CGRP effects, as well as whether this neuropeptide acts directly or indirectly in liver, muscle and adipose tissue.

  10. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulator of Cutaneous Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Granstein, Richard D.; Wagner, John A.; Stohl, Lori L.; Ding, Wanhong

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been viewed as a neuropeptide and vasodilator. However, CGRP is more appropriately thought of as a pleiotropic signaling molecule. Indeed, CGRP has key regulatory functions on immune and inflammatory processes within the skin. CGRP-containing nerves are intimately associated with epidermal LCs and CGRP has profound regulatory effects on Langerhans cell antigen-presenting capability. When LCs are exposed to CGRP in vitro, their ability to present antigen for in vivo priming of naïve mice or elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity is inhibited in at least some situations. Administration of CGRP intradermally inhibits acquisition of immunity to Th1-dominant haptens applied to the injected site while augmenting immunity to Th2-dominant haptens, although the cellular targets of activity in these experiments remains unclear. Although CGRP can be a pro-inflammatory agent, several studies have demonstrated that administration of CGRP can inhibit the elicitation of inflammation by inflammatory stimuli in vivo. In this regard, CGRP inhibits the release of certain chemokines by stimulated endothelial cells. This is likely to be physiologically relevant since cutaneous blood vessels are innervated by sensory nerves. Exciting new studies suggest a significant role for CGRP in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and, most strikingly, that CGRP inhibit the ability of LCs to transmit the human immunodeficiency virus 1 to T lymphocytes. A more complete understanding of the role of CGRP in the skin immune system may lead to new and novel approaches for the therapy of immune mediated skin disorders. PMID:25534428

  11. Release of sensory neuropeptides in the spinal cord: studies with calcitonin gene-related peptide and galanin.

    PubMed

    Morton, C R; Hutchison, W D

    1989-01-01

    In anaesthetized cats, antibody microprobes were used to investigate the release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide and galanin in the lower lumbar spinal cord. In the absence of applied stimulation, a basal release of both peptides was detected at the level of the substantia gelatinosa. This release of calcitonin gene-related peptide was not altered by innocuous thermal cutaneous stimulation nor by electrical stimulation of low-threshold myelinated primary afferent fibres, but was increased by noxious thermal or noxious mechanical cutaneous stimuli and by electrical stimulation of unmyelinated primary afferents. A simultaneous release of both calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P was detected in the substantia gelatinosa region by the use of pairs of microprobes. In contrast, none of the peripheral stimulation procedures increased intraspinal galanin release. The results suggest that the spinal transmission of nociceptive information may involve the simultaneous release and action of several neuropeptides within the superficial layers of the dorsal horn.

  12. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  13. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kyani, Anahita; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Jenssen, Håvard

    2012-02-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression. The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model resulted in an extremely robust and highly predictive model with calibration, leave-one-out and leave-20-out validation R(2) of 0.9194, 0.9103, and 0.9214, respectively. We performed docking of the most potent calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor and demonstrated that peptide antagonists act by blocking access to the peptide-binding cleft. We also demonstrated the direct contact of residues 28-37 of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the receptor. These results are in agreement with the conclusions drawn from the quantitative structure-activity relationship model, indicating that both electrostatic and steric factors should be taken into account when designing novel calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

  14. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the sensitization of dorsal horn neurons to mechanical stimulation after intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Qing; Lawand, Nada B; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D

    2004-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor in the sensitization of dorsal horn neurons induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Extracellular recordings were made from wide dynamic range (WDR) dorsal horn neurons with receptive fields on the hindpaw in the lumbar enlargement of anesthetized rats. The background activity and responses to brushing, pressing, and pinching the skin were assessed. A postsuperfusion or a presuperfusion of CGRP(8-37) paradigm was followed. When tested 30 min after capsaicin injection, there was an increase in background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch applied to the receptive field. Superfusion of CGRP(8-37) into the spinal cord at 45 min after capsaicin injection significantly reversed the increased background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch applied to the receptive field. On the other hand, spinal superfusion of CGRP(8-37) prior to capsaicin injection prevented the increased background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch of WDR neurons that occurred following capsaicin injection in control experiments. A sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons could also be induced by superfusion of the spinal cord with CGRP. The effect could be blocked by CGRP(8-37) dose-dependently. Collectively, these results suggest that CGRP and its receptors are involved in the spinal cord central sensitization induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin.

  15. Morphine does not reduce the intraspinal release of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the cat.

    PubMed

    Morton, C R; Hutchison, W D

    1990-09-18

    In anaesthetised cats, antibody microprobes were used to measure the release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (irCGRP) in the lumbar dorsal horn during stimulation of non-nociceptive or nociceptive primary afferent fibres. Release of irCGRP was detected in the substantia gelatinosa, where immunostaining for CGRP was subsequently observed. Intravenous administration of morphine did not affect release of irCGRP detected during either non-nociceptive or nociceptive afferent stimulation. The results suggest that the analgesic action of morphine does not involve reduced release of CGRP from the central terminals of nociceptive primary afferents.

  16. Intraspinal release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide during opiate dependence and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Morton, C R; Hutchison, W D; Hendry, I A

    1991-01-01

    The antibody microprobe technique was used to study the release of immunoreactive substance P and immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide within the lower lumbar spinal cord of anaesthetized spinalized cats pretreated twice daily for 3.5 days with increasing doses of morphine hydrochloride (2-20 mg/kg, i.p.). Both peptides were released in the region of the substantia gelatinosa during noxious cutaneous thermal stimulation or high-intensity electrical stimulation of a hind limb nerve. Intravenous administration of naloxone increased the nociceptive excitation of lumbar dorsal horn neurons, but did not alter the evoked release of immunoreactive substance P or immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide in the superficial gray matter dorsal to these neurons. In addition, the release of both peptides was not significantly different to that detected under similar experimental conditions in opioid-naive cats. The results suggest that alterations in neuropeptide release from the central terminals of nociceptive primary afferent neurons do not occur during states of opiate dependence and withdrawal, and thus do not contribute to the characteristic signs of these phenomena in dependent animals.

  17. Activities of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and related peptides at the CGRP receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Pradhan, T.; Zhou, Z.C.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T. )

    1990-05-01

    In guinea pig pancreatic acini rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased amylase release 2-fold, salmon calcitonin had an efficacy of only 44% of that of CGRP and (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) and human calcitonin had no actions. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37), but not human calcitonin, antagonized the actions of CGRP in pancreatic acini with an IC50 of 3 microM. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for CGRP-stimulated amylase secretion. The inhibition was specific for CGRP and was reversible. Studies with 125I-CGRP demonstrated that CGRP, salmon calcitonin and (Tyr0)CGRP, but not human calcitonin, interacted with CGRP receptors on pancreatic acini. These results indicate that various CGRP-related peptides demonstrate different relationships between their abilities to occupy the CGRP receptor and to affect biologic activity, with CGRP itself being a full agonist, salmon calcitonin a partial agonist, (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) a competitive antagonist, and human calcitonin having no actions.

  18. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypertension-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mark C; Katki, Khurshed A; Rao, Arundhati; Koehler, Michael; Patel, Parag; Spiekerman, Alvin; DiPette, Donald J; Supowit, Scott C

    2005-07-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide, a potent vasodilator neuropeptide, is localized in perivascular sensory nerves. We have reported that alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide knockout mice have elevated baseline blood pressure and enhanced hypertension-induced renal damage compared with wild-type controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the mechanism and functional significance of this increased hypertension-induced renal damage. We previously demonstrated by telemetric recording that the deoxycorticosterone-salt protocol produces a 35% increase in mean arterial pressure in both alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide knockout and wild-type mice. Both strains of mice were studied at 0, 14, and 21 days after deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertension. Renal sections from hypertensive wild-type mice showed no pathological changes at any time point studied. However, on days 14 and 21, hypertensive knockout mice displayed progressive increases in glomerular proliferation, crescent formation, and tubular protein casts, as well as the inflammatory markers intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. There was a significant increase in 24-hour urinary isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation, levels at days 14 and 21 in the hypertensive knockout compared with hypertensive wild-type mice. Urinary microalbumin was significantly higher (2-fold) at day 21 and creatinine clearance was significantly decreased 4-fold in the hypertensive knockout compared with hypertensive wild-type mice. Therefore, in the absence of alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide, deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertension induces enhanced oxidative stress, inflammation, and renal histopathologic damage, resulting in reduced renal function. Thus, sensory nerves, via alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide, appear to be renoprotective against hypertension-induced damage.

  19. Paclitaxel inhibits the activity and membrane localization of PKCα and PKCβI/II to elicit a decrease in stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide release from cultured sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Darby, Lisa M; Meng, Hongdi; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2017-04-09

    Peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting and debilitating side effect of the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Consequently, elucidating the mechanisms by which this drug alters sensory neuronal function is essential for the development of successful therapeutics for peripheral neuropathy. We previously demonstrated that chronic treatment with paclitaxel (3-5days) reduces neuropeptide release stimulated by agonists of TRPV1. Because the activity of TRPV1 channels is modulated by conventional and novel PKC isozymes (c/nPKC), we investigated whether c/nPKC mediate the loss of neuropeptide release following chronic treatment with paclitaxel (300nM; 3 and 5days). Release of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), was measured as an index of neuronal sensitivity. Following paclitaxel treatment, cultured dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons were stimulated with a c/nPKC activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), or a TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, in the absence and presence of selective inhibitors of conventional PKCα and PKCβI/II isozymes (cPKC). Paclitaxel (300nM; 3days and 5days) attenuated both PDBu- and capsaicin-stimulated release in a cPKC-dependent manner. Under basal conditions, there were no changes in the protein expression, phosphorylation or membrane localization of PKC α, βI or βII, however, paclitaxel decreased cPKC activity as indicated by a reduction in the phosphorylation of cPKC substrates. Under stimulatory conditions, paclitaxel attenuated the membrane translocation of phosphorylated PKC α, βI and βII, providing a rationale for the attenuation in PDBu- and capsaicin-stimulated release. Our findings suggest that a decrease in cPKC activity and membrane localization are responsible for the reduction in stimulated peptide release following chronic treatment with paclitaxel in sensory neurons.

  20. Depletion of substance P, neurokinin A and calcitonin gene-related peptide from the contralateral and ipsilateral caudal trigeminal nucleus following unilateral electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion; a possible neurophysiological and neuroanatomical link to generalized head pain.

    PubMed

    Samsam, M; Coveñas, R; Csillik, B; Ahangari, R; Yajeya, J; Riquelme, R; Narváez, J A; Tramu, G

    2001-03-01

    Primary trigeminal neurons of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) innervate major parts of the face and head, including the dura. Electrical stimulation of the TG at specific parameters, can activate its nociceptive neurons and may serve as an experimental pain model. Markowitz [J. Neurosci. 7 (1987) 4129] reported that electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) causes extravasation of plasma proteins from venules of the trigeminally innervated domain possibly due to the release of vasoactive substances. Neurogenic inflammation (vasodilatation, plasma protein extravasation, release of vasoactive peptides) in dura may serve as one of the possible pathomechanisms underlying vascular head pain [Moskowitz, Ann. Neurol. 16 (1984) 157]. We performed a unilateral electrical stimulation (7.5 Hz, 5 ms, 0.8-1.4 mA for 5 min) of the TG in rat, to induce a neurogenic inflammation in the peripheral trigeminal domain including the dura, looking for calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) immunoreactivity (IR) in the caudal trigeminal nucleus (CTN) into which massive central trigeminal processes terminate. Here, we show patchy depletion(s) of CGRP-, SP- and NKA-IRs in the contralateral CTN of the rat in addition to their ipsilateral depletion. Such depletion is due to the release of these neuropeptides in the CTN leading to the activation of bilateral trigeminal nociceptive pathway. These data afford the possibility that under specific frequencies (which may roughly correlate to the intensity of the painful stimulus) and/or specific intensities (may correlate to specific areas of the peripheral trigeminal domain) of stimulation, activation of one side of the TG may activate bilateral trigeminal nociceptive pathway leading to the perception of an ill localized/generalized pain or headache rather than a unilateral one.

  1. Nitric oxide regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide gene expression in rat trigeminal ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bellamy, Jamie; Bowen, Elizabeth J.; Russo, Andrew F.; Durham, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and nitric oxide are involved in the underlying pathophysiology of migraine and other diseases involving neurogenic inflammation. We have tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide might trigger signaling mechanisms within the trigeminal ganglia neurons that would coordinately stimulate CGRP synthesis and release. Treatment of primary trigeminal ganglia cultures with nitric oxide donors caused a greater than four-fold increase in CGRP release compared with unstimulated cultures. Similarly, CGRP promoter activity was also stimulated by nitric oxide donors and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Cotreatment with the antimigraine drug sumatriptan greatly repressed nitric oxide stimulation of CGRP promoter activity and secretion. Somewhat surprisingly, the mechanisms of nitric oxide stimulation of CGRP secretion did not require cGMP or PI3-kinase signaling pathways, but rather, nitric oxide action required extracellular calcium and likely involves T-type calcium channels. Furthermore, nitric oxide was shown to increase expression of the active forms of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Jun amino-terminal kinase and p38 but not extracellular signal-related kinase in trigeminal neurons. In summary, our results provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms by which nitric oxide induces CGRP synthesis and secretion from trigeminal neurons. PMID:16630053

  2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonism and cluster headache: an emerging new treatment.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Håkan; Newman, Lawrence; Ashina, Sait

    2017-08-30

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key signaling molecule involved in migraine pathophysiology. Efficacy of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists in migraine treatment has fueled an increasing interest in the prospect of treating cluster headache (CH) with CGRP antagonism. The exact role of CGRP and its mechanism of action in CH have not been fully clarified. A search for original studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English was performed in PubMed and in ClinicalTrials.gov . The search term used was "cluster headache and calcitonin gene related peptide" and "primary headaches and calcitonin gene related peptide." Reference lists of identified articles were also searched for additional relevant papers. Human experimental studies have reported elevated plasma CGRP levels during both spontaneous and glyceryl trinitrate-induced cluster attacks. CGRP may play an important role in cluster headache pathophysiology. More refined human studies are warranted with regard to assay validation and using larger sample sizes. The results from RCTs may reveal the therapeutic potential of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists for cluster headache treatment.

  3. Superior Cervical Ganglia Neurons Induce Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells via Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide.

    PubMed

    Szklany, Kirsten; Ruiter, Evelyn; Mian, Firoz; Kunze, Wolfgang; Bienenstock, John; Forsythe, Paul; Karimi, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems communicate bidirectionally, utilizing diverse molecular signals including cytokines and neurotransmitters to provide an integrated response to changes in the body's internal and external environment. Although, neuro-immune interactions are becoming better understood under inflammatory circumstances and it has been evidenced that interaction between neurons and T cells results in the conversion of encephalitogenic T cells to T regulatory cells, relatively little is known about the communication between neurons and naïve T cells. Here, we demonstrate that following co-culture of naïve CD4+ T cells with superior cervical ganglion neurons, the percentage of Foxp3 expressing CD4+CD25+ cells significantly increased. This was mediated in part by immune-regulatory cytokines TGF-β and IL-10, as well as the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide while vasoactive intestinal peptide was shown to play no role in generation of T regulatory cells. Additionally, T cells co-cultured with neurons showed a decrease in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ released upon in vitro stimulation. These findings suggest that the generation of Tregs may be promoted by naïve CD4+ T cell: neuron interaction through the release of neuropeptide CGRP.

  4. Anti-insulin effects of amylin and calcitonin-gene-related peptide on hepatic glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Foix, A M; Rodriguez-Gil, J E; Guinovart, J J

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of amylin and calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) as anti-insulin agents in hepatic tissue, we have studied whether these two agents counteracted the action of insulin on glycogen metabolism in isolated rat hepatocytes. In this system insulin stimulates [14C]glucose incorporation into glycogen and activates glycogen synthase. Incubation of the cells with insulin in the presence of amylin or CGRP markedly blocked the insulin stimulation of these two parameters, whereas amylin or CGRP acting alone did not induce any effect. We also examined the ability of amylin and CGRP to modify the anti-glucagon effects of insulin. In the presence of 100 nM-amylin or -CGRP, 10 nM-insulin was almost unable to counteract the inactivation of glycogen synthase and the activation of phosphorylase induced by glucagon. In contrast, neither amylin nor CGRP modified the effect of glucagon on these two enzymes. Our results indicate that amylin and CGRP are able to impair the action of insulin on hepatic glycogen metabolism. PMID:1905922

  5. Repression of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in trigeminal neurons by a Theobroma cacao extract☆

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Marcie J.; Patil, Vinit V.; Vause, Carrie V.; Durham, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Cocoa bean preparations were first used by the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations of South America to treat a variety of medical ailments involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Diets rich in foods containing abundant polyphenols, as found in cocoa, underlie the protective effects reported in chronic inflammatory diseases. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal nerves promotes inflammation in peripheral tissues and nociception. Aim of the study To determine whether a methanol extract of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) beans enriched for polyphenols could inhibit CGRP expression, both an in vitro and an in vivo approach was taken. Results Treatment of rat trigeminal ganglia cultures with depolarizing stimuli caused a significant increase in CGRP release that was repressed by pretreatment with Theobroma cacao extract. Pretreatment with Theobroma cacao was also shown to block the KCl- and capsaicin-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Next, the effects of Theobroma cacao on CGRP levels were determined using an in vivo model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the TMJ capsule caused an ipsilateral decrease in CGRP levels. Theobroma cacao extract injected into the TMJ capsule 24 h prior to capsaicin treatment repressed the stimulatory effects of capsaicin. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Theobroma cacao extract can repress stimulated CGRP release by a mechanism that likely involves blockage of calcium channel activity. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of diets rich in cocoa may include suppression of sensory trigeminal nerve activation. PMID:17997062

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Christensen, Anne Francke; Liu, Marie Louise; Janjooa, Benjamin Naveed; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-02-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide provokes migraine attacks in 65% of patients with migraine without aura. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives (family load) or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms contributes to migraine susceptibility to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine patients is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and, therefore, migraine without aura patients with high family load would report more migraine attacks after calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion than patients with low family load. Methods We allocated 40 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 1.5 µg/min calcitonin gene-related peptide and recorded migraine attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial aggregation was obtained by telephone interview of first-degree relatives using a validated semi-structured questionnaire. Results Calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion induced a migraine-like attack in 75% (12 out of 16) of patients with high family load compared to 52% (12 out of 23) with low family load ( P = 0.150). In addition, we found that the migraine response after calcitonin gene-related peptide was not associated with specific or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms of migraine without aura. Conclusion We found no statistical association between familial aggregation of migraine and hypersensitivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine without aura patients. We also demonstrated that the currently known single nucleotide polymorphisms conferring risk of migraine without aura have no additive effect on calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine-like attacks.

  7. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and receptor component protein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Claudia; Zambusi, Laura; Finardi, Annamaria; Ruffini, Francesca; Tolun, Adviye A.; Dickerson, Ian M.; Righi, Marco; Zacchetti, Daniele; Grohovaz, Fabio; Provini, Luciano; Furlan, Roberto; Morara, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) inhibits microglia inflammatory activation in vitro. We here analyzed the involvement of CGRP and Receptor Component Protein (RCP) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Alpha-CGRP deficiency increased EAE scores which followed the scale alpha-CGRP null > heterozygote > wild type. In wild type mice, CGRP delivery into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 1) reduced chronic EAE (C-EAE) signs, 2) inhibited microglia activation (revealed by quantitative shape analysis), and 3) did not alter GFAP expression, cell density, lymphocyte infiltration, and peripheral lymphocyte production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-17, IL-2, and IL-4. RCP (probe for receptor involvement) was expressed in white matter microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and vascular-endothelial cells: in EAE, also in infiltrating lymphocytes. In relapsing–remitting EAE (R-EAE) RCP increased during relapse, without correlation with lymphocyte density. RCP nuclear localization (stimulated by CGRP in vitro) was I) increased in microglia and decreased in astrocytes (R-EAE), and II) increased in microglia by CGRP CSF delivery (C-EAE). Calcitonin like receptor was rarely localized in nuclei of control and relapse mice. CGRP increased in motoneurons. In conclusion, CGRP can inhibit microglia activation in vivo in EAE. CGRP and its receptor may represent novel protective factors in EAE, apparently acting through the differential cell-specific intracellular translocationof RCP. PMID:24746422

  8. Modulation of voltage-activated channels by calcitonin gene-related peptide in cultured rat neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Zona, C; Farini, D; Palma, E; Eusebi, F

    1991-01-01

    1. Whole-cell currents were recorded from cultures of dissociated neocortical neurones of the rat. Rat alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; 1 nM-1 microM) caused significant dose-dependent decreases in the voltage-activated transient (A-current) and delayed rectifier K+ currents. Forskolin (10 nM-20 microM) mimicked this effect. Peak K+ currents were gradually decreased after loading neurones with cyclic AMP (100 microM) through patch pipettes. CGRP was ineffective in neurones loaded with cyclic AMP. 2. CGRP (0.5-2 microM) increased cytosolic cyclic AMP concentration and this effect was mimicked by forskolin (5-40 microM). 3. CGRP (0.1-1 microM) reduced high-threshold Ca2+ currents; as did forskolin (5-20 microM) and cyclic AMP loaded into the neurones. In contrast, low-threshold Ca2+ currents were not affected by any of these agents. 4. Voltage-activated Na+ currents were significantly reduced by both CGRP (0.1-1 microM) and forskolin (5-20 microM). A similar effect was observed when cells were loaded with cyclic AMP. 5. We conclude that, in neocortical neurones, CGRP attenuates voltage-activated currents by stimulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signalling system. PMID:1726796

  9. Pharmacologic study of C-terminal fragments of frog skin calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Ladram, Ali; Besné, Isabelle; Breton, Lionel; de Lacharrière, Olivier; Nicolas, Pierre; Amiche, Mohamed

    2008-07-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide from the skin of the frog Phyllomedusa bicolor (pbCGRP) is a 37-residue neuropeptide that differs from human alpha CGRP (halphaCGRP) at 16 positions. The affinities of the C-terminal fragments of pbCGRP and halphaCGRP were evaluated in SK-N-MC cells: pbCGRP(8-37) (K(i)=0.2nM) and pbCGRP(27-37) (K(i)=95nM) were, respectively, 3 times and 20 times more potent than the human fragments halphaCGRP(8-37) and halphaCGRP(27-37). Their antagonistic potencies were measured in SK-N-MC and Col 29 cells, and the rat vas deferens. pbCGRP(8-37) inhibited the halphaCGRP-stimulated production of cAMP by SK-N-MC and Col 29 cells 3 to 4 times more strongly than halphaCGRP(8-37). Thus pbCGRP(8-37) is the most potent CGRP-1 competitive antagonist of all the natural sequences reported to date. pbCGRP(27-37) was also as potent as [D(31), A(34), F(35)] halphaCGRP(27-37), a prototypic antagonist analog derived from structure-activity relationship studies of halphaCGRP(8-37).

  10. Substance P and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulators of Cutaneous Microbiota Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    N’Diaye, Awa; Gannesen, Andrei; Borrel, Valérie; Maillot, Olivier; Enault, Jeremy; Racine, Pierre-Jean; Plakunov, Vladimir; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2017-01-01

    Neurohormones diffuse in sweat and epidermis leading skin bacterial microflora to be largely exposed to these host factors. Bacteria can sense a multitude of neurohormones, but their role in skin homeostasis was only investigated recently. The first study focused on substance P (SP), a neuropeptide produced in abundance by skin nerve terminals. SP is without effect on the growth of Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria. However, SP is stimulating the virulence of Bacillus and Staphylococci. The action of SP is highly specific with a threshold below the nanomolar level. Mechanisms involved in the response to SP are different between bacteria although they are all leading to increased adhesion and/or virulence. The moonlighting protein EfTu was identified as the SP-binding site in B. cereus and Staphylococci. In skin nerve terminals, SP is co-secreted with the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which was shown to modulate the virulence of S. epidermidis. This effect is antagonized by SP. Identification of the CGRP sensor, DnaK, allowed understanding this phenomenon as EfTu and DnaK are apparently exported from the bacterium through a common system before acting as SP and CGRP sensors. Many other neuropeptides are expressed in skin, and their potential effects on skin bacteria remain to be investigated. Integration of these host signals by the cutaneous microbiota now appears as a key parameter in skin homeostasis. PMID:28194136

  11. Adrenomedullin and calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in endocrine-related cancers: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Poyner, David R

    2011-02-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), adrenomedullin 2 (AM2/intermedin) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are members of the calcitonin family of peptides. They can act as growth or survival factors for a number of tumours, including those that are endocrine-related. One mechanism through which this occurs is stimulating angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. AM is expressed by numerous tumour types and for some cancers, plasma AM levels can be correlated with the severity of the disease. In cancer models, lowering AM content or blocking AM receptors can reduce tumour mass. AM receptors are complexes formed between a seven transmembrane protein, calcitonin receptor-like receptor and one of the two accessory proteins, receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 2 or 3 to give the AM1 and AM2 receptors respectively. AM also has affinity at the CGRP receptor, which uses RAMP1. Unfortunately, due to a lack of selective pharmacological tools or antibodies to distinguish AM and CGRP receptors, the precise receptors and signal transduction pathways used by the peptides are often uncertain. Two other membrane proteins, RDC1 and L1/G10D (the 'ADMR'), are not currently considered to be genuine CGRP or AM receptors. In order to properly evaluate whether AM or CGRP receptor inhibition has a role in cancer therapy, it is important to identify which receptors mediate the effects of these peptides. To effectively distinguish AM1 and AM2 receptors, selective receptor antagonists need to be developed. The development of specific CGRP receptor antagonists suggests that this is now feasible.

  12. Alternative RNA processing events in human calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, V; Lin, C R; Kawashima, E; Semon, D; Swanson, L W; Mermod, J J; Evans, R M; Rosenfeld, M G

    1985-01-01

    Two mRNAs generated as a consequence of alternative RNA processing events in expression of the human calcitonin gene encode the protein precursors of either calcitonin or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Both calcitonin and CGRP RNAs and their encoded peptide products are expressed in the human pituitary and in medullary thyroid tumors. On the basis of sequence comparison, it is suggested that both the calcitonin and CGRP exons arose from a common primordial sequence, suggesting that duplication and rearrangement events are responsible for the generation of this complex transcription unit. Images PMID:3872459

  13. The role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in peripheral and central pain mechanisms including migraine.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Smriti; Ossipov, Michael H; Johnson, Kirk W

    2017-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid peptide found primarily in the C and Aδ sensory fibers arising from the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, as well as the central nervous system. Calcitonin gene-related peptide was found to play important roles in cardiovascular, digestive, and sensory functions. Although the vasodilatory properties of CGRP are well documented, its somatosensory function regarding modulation of neuronal sensitization and of enhanced pain has received considerable attention recently. Growing evidence indicates that CGRP plays a key role in the development of peripheral sensitization and the associated enhanced pain. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is implicated in the development of neurogenic inflammation and it is upregulated in conditions of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. It is most likely that CGRP facilitates nociceptive transmission and contributes to the development and maintenance of a sensitized, hyperresponsive state not only of the primary afferent sensory neurons but also of the second-order pain transmission neurons within the central nervous system, thus contributing to central sensitization as well. The maintenance of a sensitized neuronal condition is believed to be an important factor underlying migraine. Recent successful clinical studies have shown that blocking the function of CGRP can alleviate migraine. However, the mechanisms through which CGRP may contribute to migraine are still not fully understood. We reviewed the role of CGRP in primary afferents, the dorsal root ganglion, and in the trigeminal system as well as its role in peripheral and central sensitization and its potential contribution to pain processing and to migraine.

  14. Calcitonin gene-related peptide targeted immunotherapy for migraine: progress and challenges in treating headache.

    PubMed

    Peroutka, Stephen J

    2014-06-01

    A role for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the pathophysiology of migraine has been established over the past 25 years. There have now been at least five different small-molecule CGRP antagonists that have demonstrated statistical proof of efficacy in the acute treatment of migraine. At present, multiple clinical trials are underway that are assessing the ability of long-acting antibodies against CGRP to prevent frequent migraine attacks. This review summarizes the existing data concerning the role of CGRP in migraine and attempts to highlight some possible outcomes from the ongoing anti-CGRP antibody trials.

  15. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F; Hammond, Donna L

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  16. Heat Hyperalgesia and Mechanical Hypersensitivity Induced by Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in a Mouse Model of Neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F.; Hammond, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/− mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/− mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/− and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/− and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/− mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/− mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/− mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/− mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients. PMID:25184332

  17. Centrifugal neurons of the octopus optic lobe cortex are immunopositive for calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2002-05-10

    Distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-like substance in the optic lobe cortex and retina of the octopus was examined immunohistochemically. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a retrograde-transporting marker, was also used to label the centrifugal neurons. CGRP-immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) somata were seen in the inner granular cell layer, but not in the outer granular cell layer or the retina. CGRP-IR fibers were seen not only in the optic lobe cortex, but also in the retinal nerve plexus. Retrogradely labeled somata were seen in the inner granular cell layer, but not in the outer granular cell layer. Immunohistochemical double staining indicated that WGA-labeled centrifugal neurons were immunopositive for CGRP. These results suggested that the centrifugal neurons in the octopus optic lobe cortex are CGRP-like peptide-containing neurons, and that the peptide may modulate photoreceptor cell functions.

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) regulates excitability and refractory period of the guinea pig ureter.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S

    1994-08-01

    Previous studies have indicated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), released from the peripheral endings of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons, may play a role as an inhibitory transmitter in the guinea pig ureter. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of capsaicin desensitization and administration of a CGRP receptor antagonist on the excitability and refractory period of the guinea pig ureter to electrical field stimulation. Electrical field stimulation using a long (5 msec.) pulse width produced phasic contractions of the ureter which were unaffected by tetrodotoxin, that is, were produced through direct excitation of ureteral smooth muscle. Human alpha CGRP (1 to 10 nM.) produced a concentration-dependent transient suppression of the evoked contractions, and its effect was prevented by the CGRP receptor antagonist human alpha CGRP(8-37) (1 microM.). In vitro capsaicin pretreatment (10 microM. for 15 minutes) to block neuropeptide release from peripheral endings of sensory nerves or administration of the CGRP receptor antagonist enhanced the responsiveness of the guinea pig ureter to electrical stimulation. In control ureters, the application of two trains of electrical stimuli failed to produce a second contraction at intertrain intervals greater than 20 seconds. The intertrain interval required to obtain a second contraction averaging 50% of the amplitude of the first response (ITI50) of control ureters was about 50 seconds. In vitro capsaicin pretreatment or administration of the CGRP receptor antagonist reduced the refractory period of the ureter to electrical field stimulation: ITI50 averaged 8.8 and 9.1 seconds after capsaicin or CGRP antagonist pretreatment, respectively. These findings demonstrate that capsaicin pretreatment or blockade of CGRP receptors produced qualitatively and quantitatively similar excitatory effects on ureteral excitability and refractory period and are in general agreement with the idea that CGRP is a

  19. Endogenous α-calcitonin-gene-related peptide promotes exercise-induced, physiological heart hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Schuler, B; Rieger, G; Gubser, M; Arras, M; Gianella, M; Vogel, O; Jirkof, P; Cesarovic, N; Klohs, J; Jakob, P; Brock, M; Gorr, T A; Baum, O; Hoppeler, H; Samillan-Soto, V; Gassmann, M; Fischer, J A; Born, W; Vogel, J

    2014-05-01

    It is unknown how the heart distinguishes various overloads, such as exercise or hypertension, causing either physiological or pathological hypertrophy. We hypothesize that alpha-calcitonin-gene-related peptide (αCGRP), known to be released from contracting skeletal muscles, is key at this remodelling. The hypertrophic effect of αCGRP was measured in vitro (cultured cardiac myocytes) and in vivo (magnetic resonance imaging) in mice. Exercise performance was assessed by determination of maximum oxygen consumption and time to exhaustion. Cardiac phenotype was defined by transcriptional analysis, cardiac histology and morphometry. Finally, we measured spontaneous activity, body fat content, blood volume, haemoglobin mass and skeletal muscle capillarization and fibre composition. While αCGRP exposure yielded larger cultured cardiac myocytes, exercise-induced heart hypertrophy was completely abrogated by treatment with the peptide antagonist CGRP(8-37). Exercise performance was attenuated in αCGRP(-/-) mice or CGRP(8-37) treated wild-type mice but improved in animals with higher density of cardiac CGRP receptors (CLR-tg). Spontaneous activity, body fat content, blood volume, haemoglobin mass, muscle capillarization and fibre composition were unaffected, whereas heart index and ventricular myocyte volume were reduced in αCGRP(-/-) mice and elevated in CLR-tg. Transcriptional changes seen in αCGRP(-/-) (but not CLR-tg) hearts resembled maladaptive cardiac phenotype. Alpha-calcitonin-gene-related peptide released by skeletal muscles during exercise is a hitherto unrecognized effector directing the strained heart into physiological instead of pathological adaptation. Thus, αCGRP agonists might be beneficial in heart failure patients. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Spatiotemporal Changes of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Innervation in Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wu, Sui-Yi; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yi-Lin; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the role calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays in the process of spinal fusion. The aim of the present study is to observe the temporal and spatial changes of CGRP induced by experimental fusion surgery in rats and elucidate the role of CGRP in spinal fusion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study and the specimens were collected on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day, respectively. Then, histological and immunohistochemical analysis were applied to evaluate the fusion mass and spatiotemporal changes of CGRP chronologically. The results demonstrated that density of CGRP reached peak on the 21st day after surgery and most of the CGRP expression located surrounding the interface of allograft and fibrous tissue where the cells differentiate into osteoblasts, indicating that CGRP might be involved in the process of bone formation and absorption. PMID:27990431

  1. Inhibition of calcitonin gene-related peptide function: a promising strategy for treating migraine.

    PubMed

    Durham, Paul L

    2008-09-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine. Serum levels of CGRP, which are elevated during a migraine attack, have been reported to return to normal with alleviation of pain. In addition, CGRP administration has been shown to cause a migraine-like headache in susceptible individuals. Importantly, CGRP receptors are found on many cell types within the trigeminovascular system that are thought to play important roles in controlling inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Based on these findings, it was proposed that blockage of CGRP receptor function and, hence, the physiological effects of CGRP would be effective in aborting a migraine attack. This review will summarize key preclinical data that support the therapeutic potential of using CGRP receptor antagonists or molecules that bind CGRP within the context of current neurovascular theories on migraine pathology.

  2. [Calcitonin gene-related peptide: a key player neuropeptide in migraine].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Romero, M L; Sobrino-Mejia, F E

    2016-11-16

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP is widely distributed in the nervous system, particularly at anatomical areas thought to be involved with migraine pathophysiology, including the trigeminovascular nociceptive system. Over the past two decades, a convergence of basic and clinical evidence has established the CGRP as a key player in migraine. CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Within the brain, the wide distribution of CGRP and CGRP receptors provides numerous possible targets for CGRP to act as a neuromodulator. Now, CGRP has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for a number of novel treatments for migraine. This review discusses the evidence behind the role of CGRP in migraine and the state of CGRP-based mechanism treatment development.

  3. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP): a molecular link between obesity and migraine?

    PubMed Central

    Recober, Ana; Goadsby, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have begun to suggest obesity is a risk factor for chronic migraine, although no causal relationship has been established, and risk factors for progression from episodic to chronic migraine remain unknown. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a important role in the pathophysiology of migraine. Here the potential role of CGRP as a molecular link between obesity and migraine is reviewed. A mechanistic association is supported by several lines of evidence: a) common markers are elevated in obesity and migraine, b) adipose tissue secretes pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipocytokines that have been implicated in migraine pathophysiology and c) elevated plasma levels of CGRP have been found in obese individuals. We propose that CGRP released from trigeminal neurons may represent a biological link between obesity and migraine. Enhanced trigeminal CGRP production in obese susceptible individuals may lower the threshold necessary to trigger migraine attacks, leading to more frequent episodes and eventually to chronic migraine. PMID:20369076

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: intersection of peripheral inflammation and central modulation

    PubMed Central

    Raddant, Ann C.; Russo, Andrew F.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a convergence of basic and clinical evidence has established the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) as a key player in migraine. Although CGRP is a recognised neuromodulator of nociception, its mechanism of action in migraine remains elusive. In this review, we present evidence that led us to propose that CGRP is well poised to enhance neurotransmission in migraine by both peripheral and central mechanisms. In the periphery, it is thought that local release of CGRP from the nerve endings of meningeal nociceptors following their initial activation by cortical spreading depression is critical for the induction of vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, neurogenic inflammation and the consequential sensitisation of meningeal nociceptors. Mechanistically, we propose that CGRP release can give rise to a positive-feedback loop involved in localised increased synthesis and release of CGRP from neurons and a CGRP-like peptide called procalcitonin from trigeminal ganglion glia. Within the brain, the wide distribution of CGRP and CGRP receptors provides numerous possible targets for CGRP to act as a neuromodulator. PMID:22123247

  5. Peripheral amplification of sweating – a role for calcitonin gene-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Schlereth, Tanja; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Seewald, Bianca; Birklein, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Neuropeptides are the mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Some pain disorders, e.g. complex regional pain syndromes, are characterized by increased neurogenic inflammation and by exaggerated sudomotor function. The aim of this study was to explore whether neuropeptides have a peripheral effect on human sweating. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) on acetylcholine-induced axon reflex sweating in healthy subjects (total n = 18). All substances were applied via dermal microdialysis. The experiments were done in a parallel setting: ACh alone and ACh combined with CGRP, VIP or SP in various concentrations were applied. Acetylcholine (10−2m) always elicited a sweating response, neuropeptides alone did not. However, CGRP significantly enhanced ACh-induced sweating (P < 0.01). Post hoc tests revealed that CGRP in physiological concentrations of 10−7–10−9m was most effective. VIP at any concentration had no significant effect on axon reflex sweating. The duration of the sweating response (P < 0.01), but not the amount of sweat, was reduced by SP. ACh-induced skin blood flow was significantly increased by CGRP (P < 0.01), but unaltered by VIP and SP. The results indicate that CGRP amplifies axon reflex sweating in human skin. PMID:16931551

  6. Peripheral amplification of sweating--a role for calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Schlereth, Tanja; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Seewald, Bianca; Birklein, Frank

    2006-11-01

    Neuropeptides are the mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Some pain disorders, e.g. complex regional pain syndromes, are characterized by increased neurogenic inflammation and by exaggerated sudomotor function. The aim of this study was to explore whether neuropeptides have a peripheral effect on human sweating. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) on acetylcholine-induced axon reflex sweating in healthy subjects (total n = 18). All substances were applied via dermal microdialysis. The experiments were done in a parallel setting: ACh alone and ACh combined with CGRP, VIP or SP in various concentrations were applied. Acetylcholine (10(-2) m) always elicited a sweating response, neuropeptides alone did not. However, CGRP significantly enhanced ACh-induced sweating (P < 0.01). Post hoc tests revealed that CGRP in physiological concentrations of 10(-7)-10(-9) m was most effective. VIP at any concentration had no significant effect on axon reflex sweating. The duration of the sweating response (P < 0.01), but not the amount of sweat, was reduced by SP. ACh-induced skin blood flow was significantly increased by CGRP (P < 0.01), but unaltered by VIP and SP. The results indicate that CGRP amplifies axon reflex sweating in human skin.

  7. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits local acute inflammation and protects mice against lethal endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rachel Novaes; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Bozza, Patricia T; Soares, Milena B P; Shoemaker, Charles B; David, John R; Bozza, Marcelo T

    2005-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilatory peptide present in central and peripheral neurons, is released at inflammatory sites and inhibits several macrophage, dendritic cell, and lymphocyte functions. In the present study, we investigated the role of CGRP in models of local and systemic acute inflammation and on macrophage activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Intraperitoneal pretreatment with synthetic CGRP reduces in approximately 50% the number of neutrophils in the blood and into the peritoneal cavity 4 h after LPS injection. CGRP failed to inhibit neutrophil recruitment induced by the direct chemoattractant platelet-activating factor, whereas it significantly inhibited LPS-induced KC generation, suggesting that the effect of CGRP on neutrophil recruitment is indirect, acting on chemokine production by resident cells. Pretreatment of mice with 1 mug of CGRP protects against a lethal dose of LPS. The CGRP-induced protection is receptor mediated because it is completely reverted by the CGRP receptor antagonist, CGRP 8-37. The protective effect of CGRP correlates with an inhibition of TNF-alpha and an induction of IL-6 and IL-10 in mice sera 90 min after LPS challenge. Finally, CGRP significantly inhibits LPS-induced TNF-alpha released from mouse peritoneal macrophages. These results suggest that activation of the CGRP receptor on macrophages during acute inflammation could be part of the negative feedback mechanism controlling the extension of acute inflammatory responses.

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in the joint: contributions to pain and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, David A; Mapp, Paul I; Kelly, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Arthritis is the commonest cause of disabling chronic pain, and both osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain major burdens on both individuals and society. Peripheral release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) contributes to the vasodilation of acute neurogenic inflammation. Contributions of CGRP to the pain and inflammation of chronic arthritis, however, are only recently being elucidated. Animal models of arthritis are revealing the molecular and pathophysiological events that accompany and lead to progression of both arthritis and pain. Peripheral actions of CGRP in the joint might contribute to both inflammation and joint afferent sensitization. CGRP and its specific receptors are expressed in joint afferents and up-regulated following arthritis induction. Peripheral CGRP release results in activation of synovial vascular cells, through which acute vasodilatation is followed by endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis, key features of chronic inflammation. Local administration of CGRP to the knee also increases mechanosensitivity of joint afferents, mimicking peripheral sensitization seen in arthritic joints. Increased mechanosensitivity in OA knees and pain behaviour can be reduced by peripherally acting CGRP receptor antagonists. Effects of CGRP pathway blockade on arthritic joint afferents, but not in normal joints, suggest contributions to sensitization rather than normal joint nociception. CGRP therefore might make key contributions to the transition from normal to persistent synovitis, and the progression from nociception to sensitization. Targeting CGRP or its receptors within joint tissues to prevent these undesirable transitions during early arthritis, or suppress them in established disease, might prevent persistent inflammation and relieve arthritis pain. PMID:25923821

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in the joint: contributions to pain and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, David A; Mapp, Paul I; Kelly, Sara

    2015-11-01

    Arthritis is the commonest cause of disabling chronic pain, and both osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain major burdens on both individuals and society. Peripheral release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) contributes to the vasodilation of acute neurogenic inflammation. Contributions of CGRP to the pain and inflammation of chronic arthritis, however, are only recently being elucidated. Animal models of arthritis are revealing the molecular and pathophysiological events that accompany and lead to progression of both arthritis and pain. Peripheral actions of CGRP in the joint might contribute to both inflammation and joint afferent sensitization. CGRP and its specific receptors are expressed in joint afferents and up-regulated following arthritis induction. Peripheral CGRP release results in activation of synovial vascular cells, through which acute vasodilatation is followed by endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis, key features of chronic inflammation. Local administration of CGRP to the knee also increases mechanosensitivity of joint afferents, mimicking peripheral sensitization seen in arthritic joints. Increased mechanosensitivity in OA knees and pain behaviour can be reduced by peripherally acting CGRP receptor antagonists. Effects of CGRP pathway blockade on arthritic joint afferents, but not in normal joints, suggest contributions to sensitization rather than normal joint nociception. CGRP therefore might make key contributions to the transition from normal to persistent synovitis, and the progression from nociception to sensitization. Targeting CGRP or its receptors within joint tissues to prevent these undesirable transitions during early arthritis, or suppress them in established disease, might prevent persistent inflammation and relieve arthritis pain.

  10. Acupuncture as treatment of hot flashes and the possible role of calcitonin gene-related Peptide.

    PubMed

    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara E; Frisk, Jessica; Hammar, Mats L

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms behind hot flashes in menopausal women are not fully understood. The flashes in women are probably preceded by and actually initiated by a sudden downward shift in the set point for the core body temperature in the thermoregulatory center that is affected by sex steroids, β-endorphins, and other central neurotransmitters. Treatments that influence these factors may be expected to reduce hot flashes. Since therapy with sex steroids for hot flashes has appeared to cause a number of side effects and risks and women with hot flashes and breast cancer as well as men with prostate cancer and hot flashes are prevented from sex steroid therapy there is a great need for alternative therapies. Acupuncture affecting the opioid system has been suggested as an alternative treatment option for hot flashes in menopausal women and castrated men. The heat loss during hot flashes may be mediated by the potent vasodilator and sweat gland activator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the concentration of which increases in plasma during flashes in menopausal women and, according to one study, in castrated men with flushes. There is also evidence for connections between the opioid system and the release of CGRP. In this paper we discuss acupuncture as a treatment alternative for hot flashes and the role of CGRP in this context.

  11. Calcitonin gene-related peptide pre-administration acts as a novel antidepressant in stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Matsuo, Yumi; Ogawa, Mami; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa, Naoya

    2015-08-07

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide that has potent vasodilator properties and is involved in various behavioral disorders. The relationship between CGRP and depression-like behavior is unclear. In this study, we used chronically stressed mice to investigate whether CGRP is involved in depression-like behavior. Each mouse was exposed to restraint and water immersion stress for 15 days. After stress exposure, mice were assessed using behavioral tests: open field test, forced swim test and sucrose preference test. Serum corticosterone levels, hippocampal proliferation and mRNA expression of neurotrophins were measured. After stress exposure, mice exhibited depression-like behavior and decreased CGRP mRNA levels in the hippocampus. Although intracerebroventricular CGRP administration (0.5 nmol) did not alter depression-like behavior after 15-day stress exposure, a single CGRP administration into the brain, before the beginning of the 15-day stress exposure, normalized the behavioral dysfunctions and increased nerve growth factor (Ngf) mRNA levels in stressed mice. Furthermore, in the mouse E14 hippocampal cell line, CGRP treatment induced increased expression of Ngf mRNA. The NGF receptor inhibitor K252a inhibited CGRP's antidepressant-like effects in stressed mice. These results suggest that CGRP expression in the mouse hippocampus is associated with depression-like behavior and changes in Ngf mRNA levels.

  12. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in autonomic cardiovascular regulation and vascular structure.

    PubMed

    Mai, Tu H; Wu, Jing; Diedrich, André; Garland, Emily M; Robertson, David

    2014-05-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is reported to play important roles in cardiovascular regulation in human and animal models. In spite of this, its role remains controversial. We aim to clarify this by studying the autonomic cardiovascular function and vascular structure in CGRP knockout (CGRP(-/-)) mice. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were assessed by telemeters. Urine (24-hour) and blood were collected for catecholamines measurements. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed using phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside administered in an acute study. Daytime mean arterial pressure (MAP; 12-hour period) was significantly higher in the CGRP(-/-) mice than in the wild type (WT) mice (114.5 vs. 104.5 mm Hg; P = .04). Norepinephrine was elevated in plasma and 24-hour urine in the knockouts (Urine, 956 vs. 618 pg/mL; P = .004; Plasma, 2505 vs. 1168 pg/mL; P = .04). Paradoxically, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity was higher in CGRP(-/-) mice (3.2 vs. 1.4 ms/mm Hg; P = .03). To increase insight, we studied aortic stiffness in CGRP(-/-) mice and found it increased compared with age-matched WT mice, as evidenced by the depression of the compliance curve (P < .05). CGRP(-/-) mice have higher BP due to elevated sympathetic signals and abnormalities in blood vessel structure. Moreover, our data also showed that CGRP plays an important role in the regulation of the cardio-vagal tone.

  13. Acupuncture as Treatment of Hot Flashes and the Possible Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara E.; Frisk, Jessica; Hammar, Mats L.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms behind hot flashes in menopausal women are not fully understood. The flashes in women are probably preceded by and actually initiated by a sudden downward shift in the set point for the core body temperature in the thermoregulatory center that is affected by sex steroids, β-endorphins, and other central neurotransmitters. Treatments that influence these factors may be expected to reduce hot flashes. Since therapy with sex steroids for hot flashes has appeared to cause a number of side effects and risks and women with hot flashes and breast cancer as well as men with prostate cancer and hot flashes are prevented from sex steroid therapy there is a great need for alternative therapies. Acupuncture affecting the opioid system has been suggested as an alternative treatment option for hot flashes in menopausal women and castrated men. The heat loss during hot flashes may be mediated by the potent vasodilator and sweat gland activator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the concentration of which increases in plasma during flashes in menopausal women and, according to one study, in castrated men with flushes. There is also evidence for connections between the opioid system and the release of CGRP. In this paper we discuss acupuncture as a treatment alternative for hot flashes and the role of CGRP in this context. PMID:22110545

  14. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in peripheral blood as a biomarker for migraine.

    PubMed

    Ramón, César; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Pascual, Julio

    2017-06-01

    There is no available biomarker for any of the primary headaches, including migraine. As demonstrated in jugular blood, during a migraine attack, trigeminal activation releases several neuropeptides, very especially calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which gives rise to the typical throbbing migraine pain. Here, we review the current evidence for measurement of peripheral CGRP levels as a potential biomarker for trigemino-vascular activation in migraine. Several studies, including a limited number of migraine patients, have shown increased peripheral CGRP levels during migraine attacks. The maximum increase in plasma CGRP levels was reached within 2 h of the onset of the attacks and can be reverted by triptans. In addition, CGRP levels measured in peripheral blood outside migraine attacks and in the absence of symptomatic medication have been shown to be increased in chronic migraine patients. Increased CGRP levels were able to predict the response to onabotulinumtoxinA treatment and were reduced 1 month after onabotulinumtypeA therapy. Although CGRP data must be confirmed and expanded in future studies and specificity of CGRP levels should be studied in entities able to resemble migraine, it seems that peripheral CGRP levels are a good biomarker of acute migraine and somewhat specific and sensitive interictally in chronic migraine.

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor expression in alternatively activated monocytes/macrophages during irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Caviedes-Bucheli, Javier; Moreno, Gloria Cristina; López, María Paula; Bermeo-Noguera, Ana Milena; Pacheco-Rodríguez, Gloriana; Cuellar, Adriana; Muñoz, Hugo Roberto

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the percentage and the mean fluorescence intensity of viable alternatively activated monocytes/macrophages (AAMø) CD163+ positive for calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor (CGRPr) within the total AAMø population in human dental pulp. Pulp tissue samples were collected from teeth with a clinical diagnosis of irreversible pulpitis (n = 13), pulps with induced inflammation (n = 13), and normal pulps (n = 13). All samples were labeled to identify positive cells for CGRPr and CD163 using a flow cytometry assay. Results demonstrated that a high percentage of total viable AAMø CD163+ expressed CGRPr on their membranes (72.12% in healthy pulp, 62.20% in irreversible pulpitis, and 58.01% in induced pulpitis). Significant differences were found between mean AAMø CD163+ fluorescence for CGRPr according to pulp condition, being greater in irreversible pulpitis. It can be concluded that AAMø CD163+ are expressed during normal and inflammatory processes, supporting the hypothesis that they could exercise an anti-inflammatory action that could be controlled by CGRP signaling after its binding.

  16. Local neurogenic regulation of rat hindlimb circulation: CO2-induced release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Masami; Ishikawa, Tomohisa; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Fujimori, Akira; Goto, Katsutoshi

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory nerves in response to skeletal muscle contraction was investigated in the rat hindlimb in vivo and in vitro. In the anaesthetized rat, sciatic nerve stimulation at 10 Hz for 1 min caused a hyperaemic response in the hindlimb. During the response, partial pressure of CO2 in the venous blood effluent from the hindlimb significantly increased from 43±3 to 73±8 mmHg, whereas a small decrease in pH and no appreciable change in partial pressure of O2 were observed. An intra-arterial bolus injection of NaHCO3 (titrated to pH 7.2 with HCl), which elevated PCO2 of the venous blood, caused a sustained increase in regional blood flow of the iliac artery. Capsaicin (0.33 μmol kg−1, i.a.) and a specific calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, CGRP(8–37), (100 nmol kg−1 min−1, i.v.) significantly suppressed the hyperaemic response to NaHCO3. Neither NDΩ-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (1 μmol kg−1 min−1, i.v.) nor indomethacin (5 mg kg−1, i.v.) affected the response. The serum level of CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the venous blood was significantly increased by a bolus injection of NaHCO3 (pH=7.2) from 50±4 to 196±16 fmol ml−1. In the isolated hindlimb perfused with Krebs-Ringer solution, a bolus injection of NaHCO3 (pH=7.2) caused a decrease in perfusion pressure which was composed of two responses, i.e., an initial transient response and a slowly-developing long-lasting one. CGRP(8–37) significantly inhibited the latter response by 73%. These results suggest that CO2 liberated from exercising skeletal muscle activates capsaicin-sensitive perivascular sensory nerves locally, which results in the release of CGRP from their peripheral endings, and then the released peptide causes local vasodilatation. PMID:9375968

  17. Activin Acts with Nerve Growth Factor to Regulate Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide mRNA in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pin; Hall, Alison K.

    2009-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) increases in sensory neurons after inflammation and plays an important role in abnormal pain responses, but how this neuropeptide is regulated is not well understood. Both activin A and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) increase in skin after inflammation and induce CGRP in neurons in vivo and in vitro. This study was designed to understand how neurons integrate these two signals to regulate the neuropeptide important for inflammatory pain. In adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, NGF but not activin alone produced a dose-dependent increase in CGRP mRNA. When added together with NGF, activin synergistically increased CGRP mRNA, indicating that sensory neurons combine these signals. Studies were then designed to learn if that combination occurred at a common receptor or shared intracellular signals. Studies with Activin IB receptor or trkA inhibitors suggested that each ligand required its cognate receptor to stimulate the neuropeptide. Further, activin did not augment NGF-initiated intracellular MAPK signals but instead stimulated Smad phosphorylation, suggesting these ligands initiated parallel signals in the cytoplasm. Activin synergy required several NGF intracellular signals to be present. Because activin did not further stimulate, but did require NGF intracellular signals, it appears that activin and NGF converge not in receptor or cytoplasmic signals, but in transcriptional mechanisms to regulate CGRP in sensory neurons after inflammation. PMID:17964731

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide down-regulates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Wei; Li, Xiao-Hui; Du, Jie; Li, Dai; Li, Yuan-Jian; Hu, Chang-Ping

    2016-12-01

    We have found that eIF3a plays an important role in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and up-regulation of eIF3a induced by TGF-β1 is mediated via the ERK1/2 pathway. Whether ERK1/2 - eIF3a signal pathway is involved in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-mediated pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis remains unknown. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (5 mg/kg) in rats. Primary pulmonary fibroblasts were cultured to investigate the proliferation by BrdU incorporation method and flow cytometry. Sensory CGRP depletion by capsaicin exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, as shown by a significant disturbed alveolar structure, marked thickening of the interalveolar septa and dense interstitial infiltration by inflammatory cells and fibroblasts, accompanied with increased expression of TGF-β1, eIF3a, phosphorylated ERK1/2, α-SMA, collagen I, and collagen III. Exogenous application of CGRP significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced proliferation and differentiation of pulmonary fibroblasts concomitantly with decreased expression of eIF3a, phosphorylated ERK1/2, α-SMA, collagen I, and collagen III. These effects of CGRP were abolished in the presence of CGRP8-37. These results suggest that endogenous CGRP is related to the development of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin, and the inhibitory effect of CGRP on proliferation of lung fibroblasts involves the ERK1/2 - eIF3a signaling pathway.

  19. Critical role of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in cortical spreading depression

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Costa, Cinzia; Caproni, Stefano; Pisani, Antonio; Bonsi, Paola; Picconi, Barbara; Cupini, Letizia M.; Materazzi, Serena; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Sarchielli, Paola; Calabresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a key pathogenetic step in migraine with aura. Dysfunctions of voltage-dependent and receptor-operated channels have been implicated in the generation of CSD and in the pathophysiology of migraine. Although a known correlation exists between migraine and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), the possibility that CGRP is involved in CSD has not been examined in detail. We analyzed the pharmacological mechanisms underlying CSD and investigated the possibility that endogenous CGRP contributes to this phenomenon. CSD was analyzed in rat neocortical slices by imaging of the intrinsic optical signal. CSD was measured as the percentage of the maximal surface of a cortical slice covered by the propagation of intrinsic optical signal changes during an induction episode. Reproducible CSD episodes were induced through repetitive elevations of extracellular potassium concentration. AMPA glutamate receptor antagonism did not inhibit CSD, whereas NMDA receptor antagonism did inhibit CSD. Blockade of voltage-dependent sodium channels by TTX also reduced CSD. CSD was also decreased by the antiepileptic drug topiramate, but not by carbamazepine. Interestingly, endogenous CGRP was released in the cortical tissue in a calcium-dependent manner during CSD, and three different CGRP receptor antagonists had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on CSD, suggesting a critical role of CGRP in this phenomenon. Our findings show that both glutamate NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent sodium channels play roles in CSD. They also demonstrate that CGRP antagonism reduces CSD, supporting the possible use of drugs targeting central CGRP receptors as antimigraine agents. PMID:23112192

  20. The modulation of inflammatory oedema by calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, P.; Brain, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) when given with or as a pretreatment to oedema inducing agents was investigated in the skin and paws of male Wistar and Sprague Dawley rats. 2. Oedema formation at intradermally-injected sites in the skin was measured by a 125I-labelled human serum albumin accumulation technique and paw oedema was measured by a weight displacement technique. 3. CGRP (30 pmol) when given with, or as a 20 min pretreatment, markedly potentiated oedema formation induced by substance P (100 pmol) in rat skin. In comparison, CGRP had little effect on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 0.1-3 nmol)-induced oedema when given as a co-injection but significantly potentiated 5-HT-induced oedema when given as a 20 min pretreatment in the skin. Similar results were obtained in both Wistar and Sprague Dawley rats. 4. Pretreatment with CGRP (30 pmol) had little modulatory effect on oedema induced by substance P (100 pmol) in the presence of the vasodilator prostanoid, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 850 pmol) in the skin of Wistar rats. 5. Pretreatment with CGRP (30 pmol) caused a non-significant increase in carrageenin (300 micrograms)-induced oedema in the hind paw of Wistar rats. Capsaicin (100 nmol) given as a pretreatment had little effect on carrageenin-induced oedema. 6. CGRP (30 pmol), given as a pretreatment, had little modulatory effect on 5-HT (3 nmol)-induced oedema in the paw of Wistar rats but a non-significant decrease in paw oedema was observed in Sprague Dawley rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682134

  1. Differential localization and characterization of functional calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in human subcutaneous arteries.

    PubMed

    Edvinsson, L; Ahnstedt, H; Larsen, R; Sheykhzade, M

    2014-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor are widely distributed within the circulation and the mechanism behind its vasodilation not only differs from one animal species to another but is also dependent on the type and size of vessel. The present study examines the nature of CGRP-induced vasodilation, characteristics of the CGRP receptor antagonist telcagepant and localization of the key components calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) of the CGRP receptor in human subcutaneous arteries. CGRP-induced vasodilation and receptor localization in human subcutaneous arteries were studied by wire myograph in the presence and absence of the CGRP receptor antagonist telcagepant and immunohistochemistry respectively. At concentrations of 1, 3, 5, 10 and 30 nm, telcagepant had a competitive antagonist-like behaviour characterized by a parallel rightwards shift in the log CGRP concentration-tension/calcium curve with no depression of the maximal relaxation. CGRP-induced vasodilation was not affected by mechanical removal of the endothelium or addition of L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester and indomethacin, antagonists for synthesis of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, respectively. CLR and RAMP1 were localized in the vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. The present results indicate that CGRP exerts its vasodilatory effect in human subcutaneous arteries by binding to its receptors located on the smooth muscle cells and is suggested to be endothelium-independent. In conclusion, these results underline the dynamic distribution of CGRP receptor components in the human circulation reflecting the important role of CGRP in fine tuning of the blood flow in resistance arteries. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Functional Adaptation of the Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sample, Susannah J.; Heaton, Caitlin M.; Behan, Mary; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Racette, Molly A.; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Peptidergic sensory nerve fibers innervating bone and periosteum are rich in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), an osteoanabolic neurotransmitter. There are two CGRP isoforms, CGRPα and CGRPβ. Sensory fibers are a potential means by which the nervous system may detect and respond to loading events within the skeleton. However, the functional role of the nervous system in the response of bone to mechanical loading is unclear. We used the ulna end-loading model to induce an adaptive modeling response in CGRPα and CGRPβ knockout mouse lines and their respective wildtype controls. For each knockout mouse line, groups of mice were treated with cyclic loading or sham-loading of the right ulna. A third group of mice received brachial plexus anesthesia (BPA) of the loaded limb before mechanical loading. Fluorochrome labels were administered at the time of loading and 7 days later. Ten days after loading, bone responses were quantified morphometrically. We hypothesized that CGRP signaling is required for normal mechanosensing and associated load-induced bone formation. We found that mechanically-induced activation of periosteal mineralizing surface in mice and associated blocking with BPA were eliminated by knockout of CGRPα signaling. This effect was not evident in CGRPβ knockout mice. We also found that mineral apposition responses to mechanical loading and associated BPA blocking were retained with CGRPα deletion. We conclude that activation of periosteal mineralizing surfaces in response to mechanical loading of bone is CGRPα-dependent in vivo. This suggests that release of CGRP from sensory peptidergic fibers in periosteum and bone has a functional role in load-induced bone formation. PMID:25536054

  3. Phospholipase C gamma mediates endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor-regulated calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in colitis-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Fiza; Liu, Miao; Shen, Shanwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a complex pathophysiological paradigm with unclear mechanisms. Primary afferent neuronal plasticity marked by alterations in neuroactive compounds such as calcitonin gene-related peptide is suggested to underlie the heightened sensory responses. Signal transduction that leads to calcitonin gene-related peptide expression thereby sensory neuroplasticity during colitis remains to be elucidated. Results In a rat model with colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, we found that endogenously elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor elicited an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the lumbar L1 dorsal root ganglia. At seven days of colitis, neutralization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor with a specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody reversed calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia. Colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide transcription was also inhibited by brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody treatment. Signal transduction studies with dorsal root ganglia explants showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression was mediated by the phospholipase C gamma, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt or the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway. Application of PLC inhibitor U73122 in vivo confirmed that colitis-induced and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia was regulated by the phospholipase C gamma pathway. In contrast, suppression of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in vivo had no effect on colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression. During colitis, calcitonin gene-related peptide also co-expressed with phospholipase C gamma but not with p-Akt. Calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation during colitis correlated to the activation

  4. Skin-bacteria communication: Involvement of the neurohormone Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) in the regulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence

    PubMed Central

    N’Diaye, Awa R.; Leclerc, Camille; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Poc, Cecile Duclairoir; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci can sense Substance P (SP) in skin, but this molecule is generally released by nerve terminals along with another neuropeptide, Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP). In this study, we investigated the effects of αCGRP on Staphylococci. CGRP induced a strong stimulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence with a low threshold (<10−12 M) whereas Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to CGRP. We observed that CGRP-treated S. epidermidis induced interleukin 8 release by keratinocytes. This effect was associated with an increase in cathelicidin LL37 secretion. S. epidermidis displayed no change in virulence factors secretion but showed marked differences in surface properties. After exposure to CGRP, the adherence of S. epidermidis to keratinocytes increased, whereas its internalization and biofilm formation activity were reduced. These effects were correlated with an increase in surface hydrophobicity. The DnaK chaperone was identified as the S. epidermidis CGRP-binding protein. We further showed that the effects of CGRP were blocked by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), an inhibitor of MscL mechanosensitive channels. In addition, GdCl3 inhibited the membrane translocation of EfTu, the Substance P sensor. This work reveals that through interaction with specific sensors S. epidermidis integrates different skin signals and consequently adapts its virulence. PMID:27739485

  5. Skin-bacteria communication: Involvement of the neurohormone Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) in the regulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence.

    PubMed

    N'Diaye, Awa R; Leclerc, Camille; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Poc, Cecile Duclairoir; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2016-10-14

    Staphylococci can sense Substance P (SP) in skin, but this molecule is generally released by nerve terminals along with another neuropeptide, Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP). In this study, we investigated the effects of αCGRP on Staphylococci. CGRP induced a strong stimulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence with a low threshold (<10(-12 )M) whereas Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to CGRP. We observed that CGRP-treated S. epidermidis induced interleukin 8 release by keratinocytes. This effect was associated with an increase in cathelicidin LL37 secretion. S. epidermidis displayed no change in virulence factors secretion but showed marked differences in surface properties. After exposure to CGRP, the adherence of S. epidermidis to keratinocytes increased, whereas its internalization and biofilm formation activity were reduced. These effects were correlated with an increase in surface hydrophobicity. The DnaK chaperone was identified as the S. epidermidis CGRP-binding protein. We further showed that the effects of CGRP were blocked by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), an inhibitor of MscL mechanosensitive channels. In addition, GdCl3 inhibited the membrane translocation of EfTu, the Substance P sensor. This work reveals that through interaction with specific sensors S. epidermidis integrates different skin signals and consequently adapts its virulence.

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes cellular changes in trigeminal neurons and glia implicated in peripheral and central sensitization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide released from trigeminal nerves, is implicated in the underlying pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). Elevated levels of CGRP in the joint capsule correlate with inflammation and pain. CGRP mediates neurogenic inflammation in peripheral tissues by increasing blood flow, recruiting immune cells, and activating sensory neurons. The goal of this study was to investigate the capability of CGRP to promote peripheral and central sensitization in a model of TMD. Results Temporal changes in protein expression in trigeminal ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus were determined by immunohistochemistry following injection of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) capsule of male Sprague-Dawley rats. CGRP stimulated expression of the active forms of the MAP kinases p38 and ERK, and PKA in trigeminal ganglia at 2 and 24 hours. CGRP also caused a sustained increase in the expression of c-Fos neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus. In contrast, levels of P2X3 in spinal neurons were only significantly elevated at 2 hours in response to CGRP. In addition, CGRP stimulated expression of GFAP in astrocytes and OX-42 in microglia at 2 and 24 hours post injection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that an elevated level of CGRP in the joint, which is associated with TMD, stimulate neuronal and glial expression of proteins implicated in the development of peripheral and central sensitization. Based on our findings, we propose that inhibition of CGRP-mediated activation of trigeminal neurons and glial cells with selective non-peptide CGRP receptor antagonists would be beneficial in the treatment of TMD. PMID:22145886

  7. Elevated levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide in upper spinal cord promotes sensitization of primary trigeminal nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Lauren E; Hawkins, Jordan L; Durham, Paul L

    2016-12-17

    Orofacial pain conditions including temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and migraine are characterized by peripheral and central sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive neurons. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in promoting bidirectional signaling within the trigeminal system to mediate sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intercisternally with CGRP or co-injected with the receptor antagonist CGRP8-37 or KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Nocifensive head withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation was investigated using von Frey filaments. Expression of PKA, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) in the spinal cord and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK) in the ganglion was studied using immunohistochemistry. Some animals were co-injected with CGRP and Fast Blue dye and the ganglion was imaged using fluorescent microscopy. CGRP increased nocifensive responses to mechanical stimulation when compared to control. Co-injection of CGRP8-37 or KT 5720 with CGRP inhibited the nocifensive response. CGRP stimulated PKA and GFAP expression in the spinal cord, and P-ERK in ganglion neurons. Seven days post injection, Fast Blue was observed in ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells. Our results demonstrate that elevated levels of CGRP in the upper spinal cord promote sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons via a mechanism that involves activation of PKA centrally and P-ERK in ganglion neurons. Our findings provide evidence of bidirectional signaling within the trigeminal system that facilitate increased neuron-glia communication within the ganglion associated with trigeminal sensitization.

  8. A role for the sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in endothelial cell proliferation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mapp, Paul I; McWilliams, Daniel F; Turley, Matthew J; Hargin, Edward; Walsh, David A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We have tested the hypothesis that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a mediator of capsaicin-induced angiogenesis in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In a series of experiments, the knee joints of rats were injected with CGRP, capsaicin or vehicle control. Groups of animals (n = 6) were treated with the CGRP receptor antagonist BIBN4096BS and/or the NK1 receptor antagonist SR140333. Endothelium, proliferating endothelial cell nuclei and macrophages were identified 24 h later in the synovium by immunohistochemistry and quantified by image analysis. mRNA for the receptors for CGRP and adrenomedullin were sought in normal and inflamed rat and human synovia using RT-PCR. KEY RESULTS Intra-articular CGRP injection increased the endothelial cell proliferation index, whereas macrophage infiltration and knee joint diameters were similar to saline-injected controls. CGRP-induced endothelial cell proliferation was dose-dependently inhibited by BIBN4096BS. mRNA for adrenomedullin and the CGRP receptor subunits were detected in normal and inflamed human and rat synovia. In capsaicin-induced synovitis, the increased endothelial cell proliferation index was partially blocked by administration of NK1 or CGRP antagonists individually and was reduced to the level of saline controls by coadministration of both receptor antagonists. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data support the hypothesis that CGRP stimulates angiogenesis in vivo directly by activating CGRP receptors. Capsaicin-induced endothelial cell proliferation was completely blocked by coadministration of CGRP and NK1 receptor antagonists, indicating that both CGRP and substance P may contribute to angiogenesis in this model of synovitis. PMID:22233274

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100 μg kg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation.

  10. Identification of potent, selective, and metabolically stable peptide antagonists to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Les P; Holder, Jerry Ryan; Shi, Licheng; Bennett, Brian; Aral, Jennifer; Gegg, Colin V; Wright, Marie; Walker, Kenneth; Doellgast, George; Rogers, Rick; Li, Hongyan; Valladares, Violeta; Salyers, Kevin; Johnson, Eileen; Wild, Kenneth

    2008-12-25

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-residue neuropeptide that can be converted to a CGRP(1) receptor antagonist by the truncation of its first seven residues. CGRP(8-37), 1, has a CGRP(1) receptor K(i) = 3.2 nM but is rapidly degraded in human plasma (t(1/2) = 20 min). As part of an effort to identify a prolonged in vivo circulating CGRP peptide antagonist, we found that the substitution of multiple residues in the CGRP peptide increased CGRP(1) receptor affinity >50-fold. Ac-Trp-[Arg(24),Lys(25),Asp(31),Pro(34),Phe(35)]CGRP(8-37)-NH(2), 5 (K(i) = 0.06 nM) had the highest CGRP(1) receptor affinity. Using complimentary in vitro and in vivo metabolic studies, we iteratively identified degradation sites and prepared high affinity analogues with significantly improved plasma stability. Ac-Trp-[Cit(11,18),hArg(24),Lys(25),2-Nal(27,37),Asp(31),Oic(29,34),Phe(35)]CGRP(8-37)-NH(2), 32 (K(i) = 3.3 nM), had significantly increased (>100-fold) stability over 1 or 5, with a cynomolgus monkey and human in vitro plasma half-life of 38 and 68 h, respectively.

  11. Changes in the Expression of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide After Exposure to Injurious Stretch-Shortening Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C.; Miller, G.R.; Baker, B.A.; Hollander, M.; Kashon, M.L.; Waugh, S; Krajnak, K.

    2016-01-01

    One of the factors that can result in musculoskeletal injuries, and time off work, is exposure to repetitive motion. The goal of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle injury induced by exposure to injurious stretch-shortening cycles (iSSCs), resulted in hyperalgesia in the hind limb and changes in calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) immunolabeling in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in young and old male rats. Methods Young (3 mo) and old (30 mo) male Fisher 344 × BN F1 rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and the left hind limbs were exposed to 15 sets of 10 SSCs. Control animals were exposed to a single bout of SSCs of equal intensity. Sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was assessed using von Frey filaments prior to beginning the experiment, and on days 2 and 9 following exposure to iSSCs. Rats were euthanized one, 3 or 10 days after the exposure. The ipsilateral DRG were dissected from the L4-5 region of the spine, along with the left tibialis anterior (LTA) muscle. Results Rats exposed to iSSCs were more sensitive to mechanical stimulation than control rats 2 days after the exposure, and showed a reduction in peak force 3 days after exposure. Changes in sensitivity to pressure were not associated with increases in CGRP labeling in the DRG at 3 days. However, 9 days after exposure to iSSCs, old rats still displayed an increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation, and this hyperalgesia was associated with an increase in CGRP immunolabeling in the DRG. Young rats exposed to iSSC did not display a change in CGRP immunolabeling and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation returned to control levels at 10 days. Conclusions These findings suggest that hyperalgesia seen shortly after exposure to iSSC is not influenced by CGRP levels. However, in cases where recovery from injury may be slower, as it is in older rats, CGRP may contribute to the maintenance of hyperalgesia. PMID:26972633

  12. Expression of Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide in Rat Pulp and Periodontal Tissues by Indirect Immunofluorescence Method

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Zhang, Mengjie; Cao, Xue; Wang, Hong; Xue, Lufeng; Wu, Meng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nerve fibers immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in pulp and periodontal tissues of rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 6 weeks, were sacrificed, and the jaws were excised, demineralized, and processed for indirect immunofluorescence staining. A considerably higher density of nerve fibers immunoreactive to CGRP was found in the dental pulp and gingiva than in periodontal ligament. The majority of pulpal CGRP immunopositive fibers that were located followed blood vessels parallel to the long axis of the root. A subodontoblastic network of fibers IR to CGRP was found in the coronal pulp in rat molars. In the periodontium, CGRP immunopositive fibers were mainly located in the periapical area and close to the alveolar bone. Gingiva was also well supplied with CGRP-IR nerves. PMID:24328744

  13. Exercise alleviates hypoalgesia and increases the level of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Patrícia Severo; Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Ilha, Jocemar; Xavier, Léder L; Schaan, Beatriz D'Agord; Achaval, Matilde

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of treadmill training on nociceptive sensitivity and immunoreactivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, diabetic and trained diabetic. Treadmill training was performed for 8 weeks. The blood glucose concentrations and body weight were evaluated 48 h after diabetes induction and every 30 days thereafter. The nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using the tail-flick apparatus. The animals were then transcardially perfused, and the spinal cords were post-fixed, cryoprotected and sectioned in a cryostat. Immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide analysis was performed on the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. RESULTS: The nociceptive sensitivity analysis revealed that, compared with the control and trained diabetic animals, the latency to tail deflection on the apparatus was longer for the diabetic animals. Optical densitometry demonstrated decreased calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in diabetic animals, which was reversed by treadmill training. CONCLUSION: We concluded that treadmill training can alleviate nociceptive hypoalgesia and reverse decreased calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic animals without pharmacological treatment. PMID:23018308

  14. Effects of Voluntary Locomotion and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide on the Dynamics of Single Dural Vessels in Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The dura mater is a vascularized membrane surrounding the brain and is heavily innervated by sensory nerves. Our knowledge of the dural vasculature has been limited to pathological conditions, such as headaches, but little is known about the dural blood flow regulation during behavior. To better understand the dynamics of dural vessels during behavior, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) to measure the diameter changes of single dural and pial vessels in the awake mouse during voluntary locomotion. Surprisingly, we found that voluntary locomotion drove the constriction of dural vessels, and the dynamics of these constrictions could be captured with a linear convolution model. Dural vessel constrictions did not mirror the large increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) during locomotion, indicating that dural vessel constriction was not caused passively by compression. To study how behaviorally driven dynamics of dural vessels might be altered in pathological states, we injected the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which induces headache in humans. CGRP dilated dural, but not pial, vessels and significantly reduced spontaneous locomotion but did not block locomotion-induced constrictions in dural vessels. Sumatriptan, a drug commonly used to treat headaches, blocked the vascular and behavioral the effects of CGRP. These findings suggest that, in the awake animal, the diameters of dural vessels are regulated dynamically during behavior and during drug-induced pathological states. SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT The vasculature of the dura has been implicated in the pathophysiology of headaches, but how individual dural vessels respond during behavior, both under normal conditions and after treatment with the headache-inducing peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is poorly understood. To address these issues, we imaged individual dural vessels in awake mice and found that dural vessels constricted during voluntary locomotion, and

  15. Effects of age on binding sites for calcitonin gene-related peptide in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Guidobono, F; Netti, C; Bettica, P; Sibilia, V; Pagani, F; Cazzamalli, E; Pecile, A

    1989-07-17

    The binding site distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was studied in the central nervous system of aged rats (22 months old) and compared with that of young rats (2 months). The regional distribution of [125I]Tyr-rat CGRP binding in coronal sections of young and old rat CNS was examined by an in vitro autoradiographic technique. The results, showed that in aged rats there was a marked reduction in CGRP binding, without any change in binding affinity, in the hippocampus, the nucleus rhomboideus, the nucleus arcuatus, the colliculus superior, the substantia grisea centralis and the spinal cord. In the cortical areas, the amygdala, the caudatus putamen and the accumbens binding was not modified. In the cortex cerebellaris CGRP binding was strikingly greater in the aged rats. The increase in binding might be a consequence of an adaptive process due to a decline of the peptide synthesis with age and is suggestive of a role for CGRP in the cerebellum functions.

  16. C-terminal calcitonin gene-related peptide fragments and vasopressin but not somatostatin-28 induce miosis in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Almegård, B; Bill, A

    1993-11-30

    The miotic effects of C-terminal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) fragments, somatostatin-28 and vasopressin have been evaluated with special attention being paid to possible interactions with cholecystokinin (CCK)A receptors. The peptides were injected intracamerally to anesthetized monkeys pretreated with indomethacin and atropine. CGRP-(32-37) induced a miosis with a potency 1000 times lower than that previously found with sulphated CCK-8. Two other fragments, CGRP-(30-37) and CGRP-(31-37), also had miotic properties. The CGRP-(32-37)-induced miosis was antagonized by the CCKA receptor antagonist loxiglumide. No contractile effect was elicited by 67 pmol-7.4 nmol somatostatin-28. Vasopressin (360 pmol) caused a small reduction in pupil size. Loxiglumide pretreatment did not affect the reduction in pupil size but a vasopressin receptor antagonist partly inhibited the response. The results indicate that CGRP-(32-37) is a miotic with low potency but high efficacy in the monkey eye, probably interacting with CCKA receptors, and that vasopressin is a mitotic with low potency and efficacy, probably acting via vasopressin receptors.

  17. Overexpression and Purification of Human Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide - Receptor Component Protein (CGRP-RCP) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tolun, Adviye A.; Dickerson, Ian M.; Malhotra, Arun

    2007-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide secreted by the central and peripheral nervous system nerves that has important physiological functions such as vasodilation, cardiotonic actions, metabolic and pro-inflammatory effects. The CGRP receptor is unique among G-protein coupled receptors in that a functional CGRP receptor consists of at least three proteins: Calcitonin Like Receptor (CLR), Receptor Activity Modifying Protein (RAMP1) and Receptor Component Protein (RCP). RCP is a required factor in CGRP-mediated signal transduction and it couples the CGRP receptor to the signal transduction pathway. Here we describe methods to overexpress and purify RCP for structure-function studies. Human RCP was cloned and overexpressed with a poly-histidine tag and as a Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) fusion in Escherichia coli using commercially available expression vectors. While his-tagged RCP is prone to aggregation, solubility is improved when RCP is expressed as a MBP fusion. Expression and purification procedures for these constructs are described. Results from these studies will facilitate structural analysis of human RCP, and allow further understanding of RCP function. PMID:17067815

  18. Characterization and localization of the rabbit ocular calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, M I; Dahl, G P; Dickerson, I M

    2000-04-01

    To determine whether the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP), a novel signal transduction molecule, is required for CGRP signaling in the eye and to determine potential ocular sites of CGRP action. The cDNA for the rabbit ocular RCP homologue was cloned using a combination of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Function of the rabbit ocular RCP was assessed using a sensitive oocyte-based assay, which utilizes the protein kinase A (PKA)-sensitive cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a sensor of cAMP formation. RCP expression in the rabbit eye was localized using immunohistochemistry. A 2063-bp cDNA for the rabbit ocular RCP was cloned and sequenced. Expression of the rabbit RCP cDNA confers CGRP responsiveness in a sensitive oocyte-based assay. Antisense oligonucleotides made to the ocular RCP abolishes CGRP responsiveness of ciliary body and iris mRNA in the oocyte-CFTR assay. Localization of RCP protein in the rabbit eye using immunohistochemistry demonstrated RCP immunoreactivity in the ciliary body and iris blood vessels, as well as in layers of the ciliary epithelium. The rabbit ocular RCP appears to be required for signal transduction at ocular CGRP receptors and is localized to sites previously reported to bind CGRP, which affect intraocular pressure and neurogenic inflammation.

  19. Cells showing immunoreactivity for calcitonin or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the central nervous system of some invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Y; Katoh, A; Oguro, C; Kambegawa, A; Yoshizawa, H

    1991-09-01

    In the central nervous system of some species of several invertebrate phyla, including land planarians (Platyhelminthes), ribbon worms (Nemertina), slugs (Mollusca), polychaetes, earthworms and leeches (Annelida), pill bugs (Arthropoda), and beard worms (Pogonophora), salmon calcitonin-immunoreactive cells and rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive cells were found by immunohistochemistry. These immunoreactive cells were located in the region surrounding the neuropile, although the sizes of the cells varied according to species. Some of them were round or polygonal and regarded as apolar nerve cells because of their lack of cytoplasmic processes, whereas others were spindle-shaped or elongated, being comparable with unipolar nerve cells because of extension of their cytoplasmic processes in the direction of the neuropile. In some cases, it was noted that the cytoplasmic processes had complicated branches or formed loop-like structures at their ends. These observations suggest that a calcitonin-like or CGRP-like substance is extensively present in invertebrates as well as vertebrates.

  20. Gelatin microspheres containing calcitonin gene-related peptide or substance P repair bone defects in osteoporotic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianghao; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Jinxiu; Sun, Cong; Chen, Jie; Hu, Kaijin; Zhang, Linlin; Ding, Yuxiang

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of gelatin microspheres containing different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or substance P on repairing bone defects in a rabbit osteoporosis model. Gelatin microspheres containing different concentrations of CGRP or substance P promoted osteogenesis after 3 months in a rabbit osteoporotic bone defective model. From micro-computed tomography imaging results, 10 nM CGRP was optimal for increasing the trabecular number and decreasing the trabecular bone separation degree; similar effects were observed with the microspheres containing 1 µM substance P. Histological analysis showed that the gelatin microspheres containing CGRP or substance P, regardless of the concentration, effectively promoted osteogenesis, and the highest effect was achieved in the groups containing 1 µM CGRP or 1 µM substance P. Gelatin microspheres containing CGRP or substance P effectively promoted osteogenesis in a rabbit osteoporotic bone defect model dose-dependently, though their effects in repairing human alveolar ridge defects still need further investigation.

  1. Expression Pattern of Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide-like Immunoreactivity in the Duck Thymus During Embryonic and Postembryonic Development.

    PubMed

    Yin, Heng; Fang, Jing; Peng, Xi; Jiang, Min

    2015-08-01

    To study the expression pattern of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-like immunoreactivity (-ir) in the duck thymus during the embryonic and postembryonic development. Studies were carried out on Tianfu ducks on 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, and 26 days of age prehatching, and at 0 (hatching), 1, 3, 5, 8, 14, 17, 20, 26, 29, and 32 weeks of age posthatching using high-sensitivity immunocytochemistry. CGRP-ir was detected in the neuron-like cells, the lymphocytes, the vascular smooth muscle cells, as well as the reticular epithelial cells of Hassall's corpuscle and diffuse forms of Hassall's corpuscle. CGRP-ir cells were predominantly distributed in the medulla and very rarely in the cortex. The distribution density of CGRP-ir cells in the medulla increased progressively from 24 days of age prehatching to 5 weeks of age posthatching, and thereafter showed a tendency to decrease. CGRP-ir nerves, mainly running along the blood vessels, were recognized during the postembryonic development of the thymus. The expression pattern of CGRP-ir showed obvious age-related changes during the embryonic and postembryonic development of the duck thymus, which might be related to thymus growth and involution.

  2. Expression pattern of sonic hedgehog signaling and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the socket healing process after tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Pang, Pai; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Yoshioka, Norie; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Sasaki, Akira

    2015-11-06

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), a neural development inducer, plays a significant role in the bone healing process. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide marker of sensory nerves, has been demonstrated to affect bone formation. The roles of SHH signaling and CGRP-positive sensory nerves in the alveolar bone formation process have been unknown. Here we examined the expression patterns of SHH signaling and CGRP in mouse socket by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. We found that the expression level of SHH peaked at day 3 and was then decreased at 5 days after tooth extraction. CGRP, PTCH1 and GLI2 were each expressed in a similar pattern with their highest expression levels at day 5 and day 7 after tooth extraction. CGRP and GLI2 were co-expressed in some inflammatory cells and bone forming cells. In some areas, CGRP-positive neurons expressed GLI2. In conclusion, SHH may affect alveolar bone healing by interacting with CGRP-positive sensory neurons and thus regulate the socket's healing process after tooth extraction.

  3. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Modulates Heat Nociception in the Human Brain - An fMRI Study in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Borsook, David; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we recorded blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the brain by functional MRI after infusion of CGRP in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 27 healthy volunteers. BOLD-signals were recorded in response to noxious heat stimuli in the V1-area of the trigeminal nerve. In addition, we measured BOLD-signals after injection of sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D antagonist). Results Brain activation to noxious heat stimuli following CGRP infusion compared to baseline resulted in increased BOLD-signal in insula and brainstem, and decreased BOLD-signal in the caudate nuclei, thalamus and cingulate cortex. Sumatriptan injection reversed these changes. Conclusion The changes in BOLD-signals in the brain after CGRP infusion suggests that systemic CGRP modulates nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal pain pathways in response to noxious heat stimuli. PMID:26990646

  4. Statins decrease expression of the proinflammatory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bucelli, Robert C; Gonsiorek, Eugene A; Kim, Woo-Yang; Bruun, Donald; Rabin, Richard A; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2008-03-01

    Clinical and experimental observations suggest that statins may be useful for treating diseases presenting with predominant neurogenic inflammation, but the mechanism(s) mediating this potential therapeutic effect are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that statins act directly on sensory neurons to decrease expression of proinflammatory neuropeptides that trigger neurogenic inflammation, specifically calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, radioimmunoassay, and immunocytochemistry were used to quantify CGRP and substance P expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) harvested from adult male rats and in primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat DRG. Systemic administration of statins at pharmacologically relevant doses significantly reduced CGRP and substance P levels in DRG in vivo. In cultured sensory neurons, statins blocked bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced CGRP and substance P expression and decreased expression of these neuropeptides in sensory neurons pretreated with BMPs. These effects were concentration-dependent and occurred independent of effects on cell survival or axon growth. Statin inhibition of neuropeptide expression was reversed by supplementation with mevalonate and cholesterol, but not isoprenoid precursors. BMPs signal via Smad activation, and cholesterol depletion by statins inhibited Smad1 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. These findings identify a novel action of statins involving down-regulation of proinflammatory neuropeptide expression in sensory ganglia via cholesterol depletion and decreased Smad1 activation and suggest that statins may be effective in attenuating neurogenic inflammation.

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive sensory neurons in the vagal and glossopharyngeal ganglia innervating the larynx of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tetsu; Kuwahara-Otani, Sachi; Maeda, Seishi; Tanaka, Koichi; Seki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We have examined whether calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) neurons in the vagal and glossopharyngeal ganglia innervate the larynx. Many CGRP-ir neurons were located mostly in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex that was fused the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion and the jugular ganglion in the cranial cavity. When Fluorogold was applied to the cut end of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) or the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), many Fluorogold-labeled neurons were found in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex and the nodose ganglion. Double-labeling for CGRP and Fluorogold showed that about 80% of Fluorogold-labeled neurons in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex expressed CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the case of application to the SLN, and about 50% of Fluorogold-labeled neurons expressed CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the case of the RLN. Only a few double-labeled neurons were found in the nodose ganglion. The number of the Fluorogold-labeled neurons and double-labeled neurons in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex in the case of the SLN was larger than that in the case of the RLN. These results indicate that sensory information from the larynx might be conveyed by many CGRP-ir neurons located in the superior glossopharyngeal-jugular ganglion complex by way of the SLN and the RLN.

  6. Vascular reactivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide is enhanced in subtotal nephrectomy-salt induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Katki, Khurshed A.; Hein, Travis W.; Gupta, Prakash; Kuo, Lih; Dickerson, Ian M.; DiPette, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    In subtotal nephrectomy (SN)- and salt-induced hypertension, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a compensatory role to attenuate the blood pressure increase in the absence of an increase in the neuronal synthesis and release of this peptide. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the mechanism of this antihypertensive activity is through enhanced sensitivity of the vasculature to the dilator actions of this neuropeptide. Hypertension was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by SN and 1% saline drinking water. Control rats were sham-operated and given tap water to drink. After 11 days, rats had intravenous (drug administration) and arterial (continuous mean arterial pressure recording) catheters surgically placed and were studied in a conscious unrestrained state. Baseline mean arterial pressure was higher in the SN-salt rats (157 ± 5 mmHg) compared with controls (128 ± 3 mmHg). Administration of CGRP (and adrenomedullin) produced a significantly greater dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure in SN-salt rats compared with controls (∼2.0-fold for both the low and high doses). Interestingly, isolated superior mesenteric arterioles from SN-salt rats were significantly more responsive to the dilator effects of CGRP (but not adenomedullin) than the controls (pEC50, SN-salt, 14.0 ± 0.1 vs. control, 12.0 ± 0.1). Analysis of the CGRP receptor proteins showed that only the receptor component protein was increased significantly in arterioles from SN-salt rats. These data indicate that the compensatory antihypertensive effects of CGRP result from an increased sensitivity of the vasculature to dilator activity of this peptide. The mechanism may be via the upregulation of receptor component protein, thereby providing a more efficient coupling of the receptor to the signal transduction pathways. PMID:21666123

  7. Immature osteoblastic MG63 cells possess two calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor subtypes that respond differently to [Cys(Acm)(2,7)] calcitonin gene-related peptide and CGRP(8-37).

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tomoyuki; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Burns, Douglas M

    2005-10-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is clearly an anabolic factor in skeletal tissue, but the distribution of CGRP receptor (CGRPR) subtypes in osteoblastic cells is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that the CGRPR expressed in osteoblastic MG63 cells does not match exactly the known characteristics of the classic subtype 1 receptor (CGRPR1). The aim of the present study was to further characterize the MG63 CGRPR using a selective agonist of the putative CGRPR2, [Cys(Acm)(2,7)]CGRP, and a relatively specific antagonist of CGRPR1, CGRP(8-37). [Cys(Acm)(2,7)]CGRP acted as a significant agonist only upon ERK dephosphorylation, whereas this analog effectively antagonized CGRP-induced cAMP production and phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and p38 MAPK. Although it had no agonistic action when used alone, CGRP(8-37) potently blocked CGRP actions on cAMP, CREB, and p38 MAPK but had less of an effect on ERK. Schild plot analysis of the latter data revealed that the apparent pA2 value for ERK is clearly distinguishable from those of the other three plots as judged using the 95% confidence intervals. Additional assays using 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine or the PKA inhibitor N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino]ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-89) indicated that the cAMP-dependent pathway was predominantly responsible for CREB phosphorylation, partially involved in ERK dephosphorylation, and not involved in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Considering previous data from Scatchard analysis of [125I]CGRP binding in connection with these results, these findings suggest that MG63 cells possess two functionally distinct CGRPR subtypes that show almost identical affinity for CGRP but different sensitivity to CGRP analogs: one is best characterized as a variation of CGRPR1, and the second may be a novel variant of CGRPR2.

  8. Anti-nociceptive effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide in nucleus raphe magnus of rats: an effect attenuated by naloxone.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Brodda-Jansen, G; Lundeberg, T; Yu, L C

    2000-08-04

    The present study investigated the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on nociception in nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) and the interaction between CGRP and opioid peptides in NRM of rats. CGRP-like immunoreactivity was found at a concentration of 6.0+/-0. 77 pmol/g in NRM tissue of ten samples of rats, suggesting that it may contribute to physiological responses orchestrated by the NRM. The hindpaw withdrawal latency (HWL) to thermal and mechanical stimulation increased significantly after intra-NRM administration of 0.5 or 1 nmol of CGRP in rats, but not 0.25 nmol. The anti-nociceptive effect induced by CGRP was antagonized by following intra-NRM injection of 1 nmol of the CGRP receptor antagonist CGRP8-37. Furthermore, the CGRP-induced anti-nociceptive effect was attenuated by following intra-NRM administration of 6 nmol of naloxone. The results indicate that CGRP and its receptors play an important role in anti-nociception, and there is a possible interaction between CGRP and opioid peptides in NRM of rats.

  9. CGRP-RCP, a novel protein required for signal transduction at calcitonin gene-related peptide and adrenomedullin receptors.

    PubMed

    Evans, B N; Rosenblatt, M I; Mnayer, L O; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2000-10-06

    It is becoming clear that receptors that initiate signal transduction by interacting with G-proteins do not function as monomers, but often require accessory proteins for function. Some of these accessory proteins are chaperones, required for correct transport of the receptor to the cell surface, but the function of many accessory proteins remains unknown. We determined the role of an accessory protein for the receptor for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator neuropeptide. We have previously shown that this accessory protein, the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP), is expressed in CGRP responsive tissues and that RCP protein expression correlates with the biological efficacy of CGRP in vivo. However, the function of RCP has remained elusive. In this study stable cell lines were made that express antisense RCP RNA, and CGRP- and adrenomedullin-mediated signal transduction were greatly reduced. However, the loss of RCP did not effect CGRP binding or receptor density, indicating that RCP did not behave as a chaperone but was instead coupling the CGRP receptor to downstream effectors. A candidate CGRP receptor named calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been identified, and in this study RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR indicating that these two proteins interact directly. Since CGRP and adrenomedullin can both signal through CRLR, which has been previously shown to require a chaperone protein for function, we now propose that a functional CGRP or adrenomedullin receptor consists of at least three proteins: the receptor (CRLR), the chaperone protein (RAMP), and RCP that couples the receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway.

  10. [Calcitonin gene-related peptide-induced osteogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow stromal cells through Hippo pathway in vitro].

    PubMed

    Fei, Wang; Huiyu, Zhang; Yuxin, Dou; Shiting, Li; Gang, Zhang; Yinghui, Tan

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have clarified that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) can promote the biologi- cal activity of osteoblasts. To further reveal the role of CGRP in bone repair, we studied its influence on osteogenic differentia- tion of mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and initially explored the effect of the Hippo signaling pathway with this process. BMSCs were induced to osteogenic differentiate osteoblasts by different concentrations of CGRP for a screening of the optimal concentration. CGRP was added in BMSCs, then the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the number of mineralized nodules were examined by specific ALP kits after 48 hours and alizarin red staining fluid after 7 days, respectively. The protein expression of p-Mst1/2 was measured by Western blot. Verteporfin was used to block the downstream Yap signaling. The mRNA expression of collagen type I (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Compared to the blank group, different concentrations of CGRP (10⁻⁹, 10⁻⁸, 10⁻⁷ mol · L⁻¹), especially 10⁻⁸ mol · L⁻¹, significantly increased the ALP activity of BMSCs (P < 0.05). Alizarin red staining also showed more mineralized nodules in 10⁻⁸ mol · L⁻¹ group. The expression of p-Mst1/2 increased in the CGRP group (P < 0.05). Verteporfin treatment effectively decreased the mRNA expression of Runx2 and Col I (P < 0.05). The Hippo signaling pathway plays a role in CGRP-induced osteogenic differentiation in mouse BMSCs.

  11. The paradoxical vascular interactions between endothelin-1 and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the rat gastric mucosal microcirculation.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Belmonte, J.; Whittle, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. The interactions between local intra-arterial infusion of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and rat alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (alpha-CGRP) on gastric mucosal damage and blood flow have been investigated in the pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rat. 2. Close-arterial infusion of ET-1 (2-200 pmol kg-1 min-1) induced a significant and dose-dependent increase in gastric mucosal haemorrhagic injury. 3. Close-arterial infusion of the higher doses of ET-1 (100 and 200 pmol kg-1 min-1) resulted in a biphasic effect on mucosal blood flow, as determined by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). This consisted of an initial transient increase followed by a pronounced and sustained fall in LDF. 4. Local microvascular constriction may thus contribute to the mechanisms underlying the gastric injury induced by these higher doses of ET-1. 5. However, close-arterial infusion of lower doses of ET-1 (2-50 pmol kg-1 min-1), that also provoked substantial mucosal damage, induced only a sustained and significant mucosal hyperaemia, which may be secondary to microvascular injury. 6. Concurrent dose-arterial administration of rat alpha-CGRP (50 pmol kg-1 min-1) significantly inhibited the extent of gastric mucosal injury induced by ET-1 (5 pmol kg-1 min-1). 7. Furthermore, concurrent close-arterial infusion of this dose of alpha-CGRP, which itself increased mucosal LDF, significantly inhibited the hyperaemic response induced by close-arterial infusion of ET-1 (5 pmol kg-1 min-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220913

  12. Crossed and uncrossed projections to the cat sacrocaudal spinal cord: III. Axons expressing calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ritz, L A; Murray, C R; Foli, K

    2001-10-01

    We have investigated the projection patterns of peptidergic small-diameter primary afferent fibers to the cat sacrocaudal spinal cord, a region associated with midline structures of the lower urogenital system and of the tail. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) primary afferent fibers were observed within the superficial laminae, rostrally as the typical inverted U-shaped band that capped the separate dorsal horns (S1 to rostral S2) and caudally as a broad band that spanned the entire mediolateral extent of the fused dorsal horns (caudal S2 and caudal). Within the dorsal gray commissure, labeling was seen as a periodic vertical, midline band. CGRP-IR labeling was prevalent in an extensive mediolateral distribution at the base of the dorsal horn, originating from both lateral and medial collateral bundles that extend from the superficial dorsal horn. Some bundles, in part traveling within the dorsal commissure, conspicuously crossed the midline. In addition to the robust projection to the superficial dorsal horn, there was a more extensive distribution of CGRP-IR fibers within the deeper portions of the cat sacrocaudal dorsal horn than has been reported for other regions of the cat spinal cord. Presumably, these deep projections convey visceral information to projection or segmental neurons at the neck of the dorsal horn and in the region of the central canal. This deep distribution overlaps the reported projections of the pelvic and pudendal nerves. In addition, the contralateral projections of CGRP-IR fibers may form an anatomical substrate of the bilateral receptive fields for selective dorsal horn neurons. The density and variety of CGRP-IR projection patterns is a reflection of the functional attributes of the innervated structures.

  13. Distribution and fine structure of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat skin.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, A; Senba, E; Tohyama, M

    1989-07-03

    Distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive (CGRPI) nerve fibers and their fine structure were examined in the skin of rat foot pads using immunocytochemistry. The CGRPI fibers formed bundles in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Two types of single-stranded CGRPI fibers were seen to leave the fiber bundles: one was located along the blood vessels or around the eccrine sweat glands, while the other entered the epidermis directly or through the Meissner's corpuscles in the dermal papillae. CGRPI fibers in the epidermis were distributed widely and were occasionally associated with Merkel cells. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed that CGRPI fibers located around blood vessels, sweat glands, epidermal keratinocytes and Merkel cells, or in the Meissner's corpuscles did not form typical synaptic contacts with underlying cells, despite being varicose and filled with vesicles resembling synaptic ones. These findings suggested that the CGRP is released non-synaptically from these terminals to influence diffusely the organs surrounding the terminals. These cutaneous fibers seemed to originate from CGRPI neurons (both small type B cells and large type A cells) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), because injection of fast blue dye into the cutaneous nerve resulted in labeling of these CGRPI cells in the DRG and excision of the L3-L6 DRG resulted in the non-detection of cutaneous CGRPI fibers in the foot pads. Analysis of the composition of CGRPI fibers found in the rat skin has revealed that these are mostly unmyelinated. C-type fibers with some of them being thin myelinated fibers. This was true even of CGRPI fibers at the proximal end of peripheral neurites of the DRG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Peripheral Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Receptor Activation and Mechanical Sensitization of the Joint in Rat Models of Osteoarthritis Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Craig M; Wookey, Peter; Bennett, Andrew; Mobasheri, Ali; Dickerson, Ian; Kelly, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of the sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in peripheral sensitization in experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA) pain. Methods Experimental knee OA was induced in rats by intraarticular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) or by transection of the medial meniscus (MMT). Single-unit recordings of joint-innervating nociceptors were obtained in MIA- and saline-treated rats following administration of CGRP or the CGRP receptor antagonist CGRP 8–37. Effects of CGRP 8–37 were also examined in rats that underwent MMT and sham operations. Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CGRP receptor components in the L3–L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were investigated following MIA treatment. Results In both the MIA and MMT groups, the mechanical sensitivity of joint nociceptors was enhanced compared to that in the control groups. Exogenous CGRP increased mechanical sensitivity in a greater proportion of joint nociceptors in the MIA-treated rats than in the saline-treated rats. Local blockade of endogenous CGRP by CGRP 8–37 reversed both the MIA- and MMT-induced enhancement of joint nociceptor responses. Joint afferent cell bodies coexpressed the receptor for CGRP, called the calcitonin-like receptor (CLR), and the intracellular accessory CGRP receptor component protein. MIA treatment increased the levels of mRNA for CLR in the L3–L4 DRG and the levels of CLR protein in medium and large joint afferent neurons. Conclusion Our findings provide new and compelling evidence implicating a role of CGRP in peripheral sensitization in experimental OA. Our novel finding of CGRP-mediated control of joint nociceptor mechanosensitivity suggests that the CGRP receptor system may be an important target for the modulation of pain during OA. CGRP receptor antagonists recently developed for migraine pain should be investigated for their efficacy against pain in OA. PMID:24719311

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide elevates cyclic AMP levels in chick skeletal muscle: possible neurotrophic role for a coexisting neuronal messenger.

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, R; Changeux, J P

    1987-01-01

    Recent immunocytochemical studies have shown that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) coexists with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in spinal motoneurons of the chick. Moreover, CGRP causes an increase in the number of acetylcholine receptors on the surface of cultured chick myotubes. CGRP might thus serve as one of the signals by which motoneurons regulate endplate development. In a search for the second messengers involved, we now demonstrate that CGRP stimulates accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in cultured chick myotubes. This effect is, at least in part, mediated by an increase in cAMP synthesis, as the peptide also activates adenylate cyclase in chick muscle membranes. Nanomolar concentrations of CGRP elicit significant increases in both cellular cAMP levels and acetylcholine receptor numbers. The present findings suggest that cAMP is one of the second messengers which mediate the increase in acetylcholine receptor number elicited by CGRP. Furthermore, CGRP might be implicated in other trophic actions mediated by cAMP in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:3036493

  16. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  17. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide-Induced Calcium Alginate Gel Combined with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Differentiating to Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Zhi; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Liu, Da-Cheng; Sun, Yi-Gong; Dai, Xing-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been confirmed with induction osteoblastic differentiation, but if it can make the three-dimensional culture of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to the osteoblastic differentiation, thus constructing tissue-engineered bone rare reports. To investigate the feasibility of exogenous CGRP-induced calcium alginate gel combined with ADSCs from rabbits in three-dimensional condition to construct tissue-engineered bone. ADSCs were obtained by collagenase I digestion of the subcutaneous adipose tissue of inguinal region of New Zealand rabbits. At the third passage, cells were mixed with sodium alginate to prepare calcium alginate gel, and the cells were assigned into two-group cultivates in 24 orifice plates. ADSCs in the control group were treated with DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10(-2) mol/L β-glycerophosphate sodium, 10(-7)mol/L dexamethasone, 50 mg/L ascorbic acid, 0.1 % volume fraction of fetal bovine serum. ADSCs in the experimental group were incubated with the same medium as above, and in addition 1.5 µg/L CGRP was added. The cells proliferation and the mRNA expressions of collagen I and osteocalcin were detected by MTT and RT-PCR assays, respectively and alkaline phosphatase(ALP)and calcium concentration at different induction time were detected. The cell proliferation curves were S shaped. The OD values of experimental group were higher than those of control group at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days after osteogenic induction (P < 0.05). ALP and alizarin red stains of ADSCs were all positive, but golden round nodes became bigger and more in the experimental group compared with the control group after 2 weeks. At 7 and 14 days, collagen I and osteocalcin mRNA expression were greater in the experimental group than the control group. ALP and calcium concentration of experimental group were higher than that of control group at 1, 2, 3, 4 weeks after osteogenic induction (P < 0.05). Thus, these results show

  18. [Construction of recombinant adenovirus vector of calcitonin gene-related peptide gene and transfection to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-hui; Han, Jie; Shao, Lei; Wang, Li-hong; Song, Jun-xian; Wei, Zhong-hai; Zheng, Liang-rong

    2010-05-01

    To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) by AdEasy system and to validate its expression in myocardial cells. The full-length of CGRP gene cDNA was acquired by RT-PCR and cloned into pShuttle-CMV. After linearization with Pme I, the recombinant plasmid (pShuttle-CMV-CGRP) was transformed into E.coli BJ5183 by electroporation to construct the recombinant adenovirus plasmid AdEasy-pShuttle-CGRP. The recombinant adenovirus plasmids were transformed into E.coli XL10-Gold cells to be amplified. Then the recombinant plasmid was digested with Pac I and transfected to 293 cells to package recombinant adenovirus particles. PCR technique was used to detect target gene. The recombinant adenovirus particles were purified by CsC1 density gradient. The purified recombinant adenovirus was transfected to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes,and the recombinant adenovirus production was observed by fluorescent microscope. Expression of CGRP in hearts 7 days after intravenous delivery of adenoviral vectors AV-CGRP was determined by radioimmunoassay. The RT-PCR products confirmed a full-length cDNA of CGRP gene in PUC(57) by sequencing. The corresponding double endonuclease and PCR analysis certified the successful cloning of the gene into the pShuttle-CMV. The recombinant adenovirus plasmid AdEasy-pShuttle-CGRP was digested by Pac I endonuclease to form the typical DNA segments, whose length was about 3 kb and 30 kb. PCR analysis and fluorescent microscope observation confirmed that the CGRP gene was inserted into the adenovirus vector with very strong power of transfection. The recombinant adenovirus particles infected neonatal rat cardiomyocytes successfully. Radioimmunoassay showed that delivery of AV-CGRP significantly increased the expression of CGRP in mice hearts. The recombinant adenovirus vector of CGRP gene has been constructed,and it can infect neonatal rat cardiomyocytes successfully. Somatic delivery of CGRP gene can significantly

  19. Immunization and challenge with toluene diisocyanate decrease tachykinin and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in guinea pig central airways.

    PubMed

    Mapp, C E; Lucchini, R E; Miotto, D; Chitano, P; Jovine, L; Saetta, M; Maestrelli, P; Springall, D R; Polak, J; Fabbri, L M

    1998-07-01

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is a potent sensitizer that causes occupational asthma in a significant proportion of subjects exposed. We used an animal model to investigate whether neuropeptide changes occur in the airways of immunized and TDI-challenged guinea pigs. Animals were immunized by weekly intradermal injections, challenged with TDI (5 to 20 ppb) after the third injection, and killed 6 h after exposure. Control guinea pigs received injections of saline. Lung tissue was processed immediately and analyzed for nerves using the streptavidin-biotin complex peroxidase method with antisera to the neural marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), substance P (SP), and calcitonin gene- related peptide (CGRP). We also quantified the inflammatory infiltrate in the submucosa of central airways, and we measured the serum level of specific IgG and IgG1. Specific antibodies against TDI were present only in immunized animals. Immunized as compared with nonimmunized animals had a significant increase in eosinophils in the submucosa of central airways, and a further increase was observed 6 h after TDI challenge. Immunization and TDI challenge did not modify the number of mononuclear cells in the submucosa of central airways in both nonimmunized and immunized animals. TDI exposure did not change the overall innervation in both nonimmunized and immunized animals, but the density of PGP 9.5-positive nerves was significantly different between nonimmunized and immunized TDI-challenged animals. The density of SP-, and CGRP-immunostained nerves was significantly lower in immunized TDI-challenged than in nonimmunized animals. TDI exposure significantly decreased the density of SP-positive nerves in nonimmunized animals. A negative relationship was found between the presence of airway inflammation, as indexed by eosinophil cell infiltration, and the density of PGP 9.5-, SP-, and CGRP-immunostained nerves. In conclusion, TDI produces airway inflammation and neuropeptides changes in the

  20. Effect of vasoactive peptides in Tetrahymena: chemotactic activities of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP).

    PubMed

    Kőhidai, László; Tóth, Katalin; Samotik, Paul; Ranganathan, Kiran; Láng, Orsolya; Tóth, Miklós; Ruskoaho, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AMD), proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were studied for chemotaxis, chemotactic selection and G-actin/F-actin transition in Tetrahymena. The aim of the experiments was to study the effects of two different peptides encoded by the same gene compared to a peptide related to one of the two, but encoded by a different gene, at a low level of phylogeny. The positive, chemotactic effect of ADM and the strong negative, chemorepellent effect of PAMP suggest that in Tetrahymena, the two peptides elicit their chemotactic effects via different signalling mechanisms. The complexity of swimming behaviour modulated by the three peptides underlines that chemotaxis, chemokinesis and some characteristics of migratory behaviour (velocity, tortuosity) are working as a sub-population level complex functional unit. Chemotactic responsiveness to ADM and CGRP is short-term, in contrast to PAMP, which as a chemorepellent ligand, has the ability to select sub-populations with negative chemotactic responsiveness. The different effects of ADM and PAMP on the polymerization of actin networks show that the microtubular structure of cilia is more essential to chemotactic response than are transitions of the actin network. The results draw attention to the characteristic effects of vasoactive peptides at this low level of phylogeny.

  1. Involvement of multiple receptors in the biological effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide and amylin in rat and guinea-pig preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, S.; Wimalawansa, S. J.; Maggi, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The activity of rat alpha and beta calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as compared to the structurally related peptide, rat amylin, has been investigated in the guinea-pig isolated left atrium (electrically driven), in mucosa-free strips from the base of the guinea-pig urinary bladder and in the rat isolated vas deferens (pars prostatica). The antagonist activity of the C-terminal fragment of human alpha CGRP, alpha CGRP(8-37), was also investigated. 2. In the guinea-pig isolated left atrium the three peptides produced a concentration-related positive inotropic effect, amylin being about 16 and 31 times less potent than alpha or beta CGRP, respectively. Human alpha CGRP(8-37) produced a rightward displacement of the log concentration-response curve to the three agonists tested, without depression of maximal response attainable. Apparent pKB values calculated on the basis of the displacement produced by 1 microM human alpha CGRP(8-37) indicated an agonist-independent affinity of the antagonist (6.66 +/- 0.11 for alpha CGRP, 6.42 +/- 0.17 for beta CGRP and 6.95 +/- 0.11 for amylin). 3. In the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder, alpha or beta CGRP or amylin produce a concentration-related inhibition of twitch contractions evoked by train electrical field stimulation (10 Hz frequency, 0.25 ms duration at 100 V for 0.5 s every 60 s). Amylin was about 100 times less potent than alpha or beta CGRP. Human alpha CGRP(8-37) (3 microM) did not significantly affect the inhibitory action of the three agonists tested.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1330181

  2. RT97- and calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity in lumbar intervertebral discs and adjacent tissue from the rat.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, P W; Petts, P; Hamilton, A

    1992-01-01

    The innervation of rat intervertebral disc and adjacent ligamentous tissue has been investigated using 2 antibodies, RT97 and anti-calcitonin gene-related peptide. Immunoreactivity to the peptide was found in many fibres throughout the long ligaments around the intervertebral discs and in the periosteum, especially associated with vascular channels entering the vertebral bodies. Few of the immunoreactive fibres entered the annular lamellae of the disc tissue. Most of those which terminated did so as fine fibres which lay close to, or in, the interlamellar spaces of the outer annulus fibrosus. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity was also found in more complex endings in the longitudinal ligaments and rarely within the annulus fibrosus. RT97-immunoreactivity was also present in the complex endings and associated fibres. Conversely, RT97-immunoreactivity was apparent only in a few fine filamentous fibre endings. This suggested that the majority of fine filamentous, or free, nerve endings were of an unmyelinated sensory origin. Alternatively, those endings of a more complex nature, which were RT97-immunoreactive, were of a myelinated sensory origin. No immunoreactivity to either antibody was seen in the inner annular or nuclear tissue. It was therefore concluded that the sensory innervation of the rat intervertebral disc has both myelinated and unmyelinated components, the latter being more extensive. Both types of innervation appear to be restricted to the outermost rings of the annulus fibrosus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1452470

  3. Activation of calcitonin gene-related peptide signaling through the prostaglandin E2-EP1/EP2/EP4 receptor pathway in synovium of knee osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Minatani, Atsushi; Uchida, Kentaro; Inoue, Gen; Takano, Shotaro; Aikawa, Jun; Miyagi, Masayuki; Fujimaki, Hisako; Iwase, Dai; Onuma, Kenji; Matsumoto, Toshihide; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-10-17

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino-acid vasodilatory neuropeptide that binds to receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) and the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). Clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that CGRP is associated with hip and knee joint pain; however, the regulation mechanisms of CGRP/CGRP receptor signaling in synovial tissue are not fully understood. Synovial tissues were harvested from 43 participants with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA; unilateral Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grades 3-4) during total knee arthroplasty. Correlationships between the mRNA expression levels of CGRP and those of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) were evaluated using real-time PCR analysis of total RNA extracted from the collected synovial tissues. To investigate the factors controlling the regulation of CGRP and CGRP receptor expression, cultured synovial cells were stimulated with TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and were also treated with PGE2 receptor (EP) agonist. CGRP and COX-2 localized in the synovial lining layer. Expression of COX-2 positively correlated with CGRP mRNA expression in the synovial tissue of OA patients. The gene expression of CGRP and RAMP1 increased significantly in synovial cells exogenously treated with PGE2 compared to untreated control cells. In cultured synovial cells, CGRP gene expression increased significantly following EP4 agonist treatment, whereas RAMP1 gene expression increased significantly in the presence of exogenously added EP1 and EP2 agonists. PGE2 appears to regulate CGRP/CGRP receptor signaling through the EP receptor in the synovium of knee OA patients.

  4. The effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide on submucosal gland secretion and epithelial albumin transport in the ferret trachea in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, S. E.; Lim, J. C.; Widdicombe, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    1. We have examined the effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on basal mucus volume, lysozyme and albumin outputs from the ferret whole trachea in vitro, and on the outputs produced by methacholine and substance P (SP). We have also examined the effect of inhibiting neutral enkephalinase with thiorphan on the responses to CGRP. 2. CGRP (1-100 nM) produced small concentration-dependent increases in basal mucus volume, lysozyme and albumin outputs. These effect of CGRP were enhanced by thiorphan. The increases in basal outputs with CGRP and the potentiation by thiorphan were considerably less than previously observed with SP and neurokinin A (NKA). CGRP had no significant effect on potential difference (PD) across the trachea. 3. CGRP produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of methacholine- and SP-induced lysozyme output but a concentration-dependent increase in methacholine- and SP-induced albumin output. The effects of CGRP on methacholine-induced lysozyme and albumin outputs were enhanced by thiorphan. CGRP weakly inhibited methacholine-induced mucus volume output and weakly enhanced SP-induced mucus volume output. 4. Thus, CGRP weakly stimulates basal serous cell secretion and epithelial albumin transport, but does not alter epithelial integrity. CGRP inhibits the serous cell secretion due to methacholine or SP, but potentiates the epithelial albumin transport produced by these agents. The interaction between CGRP and other sensory neuropeptides or muscarinic agonists on airway submucosal glands and epithelium may be important in the normal airway and in inflammatory airway diseases where release of sensory neuropeptides is enhanced. PMID:1710527

  5. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion—A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further. PMID:27376323

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide modulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with periprosthetic osteolysis by THP-1 macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Heidrun; Kauther, Max Daniel; Bachmann, Hagen Sjard; Jäger, Marcus; Wedemeyer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    An anti-resorptive impact of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on periprosthetic osteolysis, the leading cause of early prosthesis loosening, has been shown previously. In this study, the impact of CGRP on pro-inflammatory cytokine production associated with periprosthetic osteolysis was analysed using THP-1 macrophage-like cells. Cells were stimulated with ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles (cell-to-particle ratios of 1:100 and 1:500) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS; 1 µg/ml) to establish osteolytic conditions, and simultaneously treated with CGRP (10(-8)M). Receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), RANK ligand (RANKL) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA expression were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. RANK protein was detected by Western blot. Secreted protein levels of TNF-α as well as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were quantified in cell culture supernatants by ELISA and Bio-Plex cytokine assay, respectively. Activation of macrophage-like cells failed to enhance the production of RANK but led to a dose- and time-dependent increase of TNF-α mRNA and secreted protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Application of CGRP time-dependently suppressed TNF-α mRNA expression induced by low-particle concentrations and LPS, while both particle- and LPS-induced secretion of TNF-α was inhibited. A pronounced inhibitory effect of CGRP on LPS-induced cytokine production at 24 h of incubation was also observed with IL-1β and IL-6. CGRP shows a time-dependent inhibitory effect on the secretion of osteolysis-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines, indicating an indirect anti-resorptive influence of the neuropeptide on both aseptic prosthesis loosening and bacterially induced bone resorption which might enhance the life time of total joint replacements. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion-A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further.

  8. Endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mediates adrenergic-dependent vasodilation induced by nicotine in mesenteric resistance arteries of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Shiraki, Hinako; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Tezuka, Satoko; Nakatsuma, Akira; Kurosaki, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying vasodilator effect of nicotine on mesenteric resistance blood vessels and the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing (CGRPergic) vasodilator nerves were studied in the rat. Mesenteric vascular beds isolated from Wistar rats were perfused with Krebs solution, and perfusion pressure was measured with a pressure transducer. In preparations with intact endothelium and contracted by perfusion with Krebs solution containing methoxamine, perfusion of nicotine (1–100 μM) for 1 min caused a concentration-dependent vasodilator response without vasoconstriction. The nicotine-induced vasodilation was markedly inhibited by hexamethonium (nicotinic cholinoceptor antagonist, 10 μM) and blocked by guanethidine (adrenergic neuron blocker, 5 μM). Either denervation by cold storage (4°C for 72 h) or adrenergic denervation by 6-hydroxydopamine (toxin for adrenergic neurons, 2 mM for 20 min incubation, twice) blocked the nicotine-induced vasodilation. Neither endothelium removal with perfusion of sodium deoxycholate (1.80 mg ml−1, for 30 s) nor treatment with Nω-nitro-L-arginine (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 100 μM), atropine (muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist, 10 nM) or propranolol (β-adrenoceptor antagonist, 100 nM) affected the nicotine-induced vasodilation. In preparations without endothelium, treatment with capsaicin (depleting CGRP-containing sensory nerves, 1 μM) or human CGRP[8–37] (CGRP receptor antagonist, 0.5 μM) markedly inhibited the nicotine-induced vasodilation. These results suggest that, in the mesenteric resistance artery of the rat, nicotine induces vasodilation, which is independent of the function of the endothelium and is involved in activation of CGRPergic nerves. It is also suggested that nicotine stimulates presynaptic nicotinic cholinoceptors on adrenergic nerves to release adrenergic neurotransmitters, which then act on CGRPergic nerves to release endogenous CGRP

  9. Quantitative distribution and localization of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like cells in the stomach of two kidney, one clip rats.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, I

    2009-06-01

    The majority of research for the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the stomach in the hypertension has been devoted to the submucosal blood flow, and no attention has been paid to its quantitative distribution in the gastric neuroendocrine cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the number and distribution of CGRP-containing cells in the pylorus of "two kidney, one clip" (2K1C) renovascular hypertension model in rats. The studies were carried out on the stomach of rats. After 6 week period of the renal artery clipping procedure, eight 2K1C rats developed stable hypertension. The hypertension significantly increased the number of endocrine cells pylorus immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antisera. The differences between the hypertensive rats and the control group concerned not only the number of endocrine cells but also their distribution. CGRP participates in the regulation of cardiovascular functions both in normal state and in the pathophysiology of hypertension through interactions with the prohypertensive systems. The changes induced by hypertension in the neuroendocrine cells containing CGRP of the rats are discussed.

  10. Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor component protein (CGRP-RCP) in human myometrium in differing physiological states and following misoprostol administration.

    PubMed

    Goharkhay, Nina; Lu, Jing; Felix, Juan C; Wing, Deborah A

    2007-09-01

    Our objective was to assess relative expression levels of mRNA for calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor component protein (CGRP-RCP) in human myometrium in various physiological states. Using semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we analyzed myometrial samples from 46 women (10 menopausal, 10 nongravid premenopausal, 19 gravidae, and 7 premenopausal misoprostol-treated nongravid women) for the specific expression of CGRP-RCP mRNA. The expression of CGRP-RCP was significantly increased in gravid compared with nongravid myometrium ( P < 0.002). No significant differences in CGRP-RCP expression were found among the other study groups. We concluded that the increased mRNA expression CGRP-RCP in gravid myometrium supports the possibility of involvement of CGRP in the control of myometrial contractility. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate the exact mechanism of action of CGRP and CGRP-RCP in human myometrium.

  11. Diverse Physiological Roles of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Migraine Pathology: Modulation of Neuronal-Glial-Immune Cells to Promote Peripheral and Central Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Durham, Paul L

    2016-08-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine by promoting the development of a sensitized state of primary and secondary nociceptive neurons. The ability of CGRP to initiate and maintain peripheral and central sensitization is mediated by modulation of neuronal, glial, and immune cells in the trigeminal nociceptive signaling pathway. There is accumulating evidence to support a key role of CGRP in promoting cross excitation within the trigeminal ganglion that may help to explain the high co-morbidity of migraine with rhinosinusitis and temporomandibular joint disorder. In addition, there is emerging evidence that CGRP facilitates and sustains a hyperresponsive neuronal state in migraineurs mediated by reported risk factors such as stress and anxiety. In this review, the significant role of CGRP as a modulator of the trigeminal system will be discussed to provide a better understanding of the underlying pathology associated with the migraine phenotype.

  12. Wistar Rats Resistant to the Hypertensive Effects of Ouabain Exhibit Enhanced Cardiac Vagal Activity and Elevated Plasma Levels of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ghadhanfar, Elham; Al-Bader, Maie; Turcani, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Ouabain is a cardiac glycoside produced in the adrenal glands and hypothalamus. It affects the function of all cells by binding to Na+/K+-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that endogenous ouabain could be involved in the pathogenesis of essential (particularly, salt-sensitive) hypertension. However, information regarding the postulated hypertensive effect of the long-term administration of low-dose exogenous ouabain is inconsistent. This study was designed to help settle this controversy through the use of telemetric monitoring of arterial blood pressure and to elucidate the ouabain-induced alterations that could either promote or prevent hypertension. Ouabain (63 and 324 µg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously to male Wistar rats. Radiotelemetry was used to monitor blood pressure, heart rate and measures of cardiovascular variability and baroreflex sensitivity. The continuous administration of ouabain for 3 months did not elevate arterial blood pressure. The low-frequency power of systolic pressure variability, urinary excretion of catecholamines, and cardiovascular response to restraint stress and a high-salt diet as well as the responsiveness to α1-adrenergic stimulation were all unaltered by ouabain administration, suggesting that the activity of the sympathetic nervous system was not increased. However, surrogate indices of cardiac vagal nerve activity based on heart rate variability were elevated. Molecular remodeling in mesenteric arteries that could support the development of hypertension (increased expression of the genes for the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/K+-ATPase α2 isoform) was not evident. Instead, the plasma level of vasodilatory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) significantly rose from 55 (11, SD) in the control group to 89 (20, SD) pg/ml in the ouabain-treated rats (PTukey's = 18.10−5). These data show that long-term administration of exogenous ouabain does not necessarily cause hypertension in rodents. The augmented

  13. Potentiation of evoked calcitonin gene-related peptide release from oral mucosa: a potential basis for the pro-inflammatory effects of nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Dussor, Gregory O.; Leong, Anthony S.; Gracia, Nicholas B.; Kilo, Sonja; Price, Theodore J.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Flores, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation of the buccal mucosa, gingiva and periodontal tissues is a significant problem in users of nicotine-containing tobacco products; however, the potential role of nicotine in the development of this inflammation is unclear. In many tissues, nicotine, acting through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), has been shown to increase the release of the pro-inflammatory mediator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) thereby potentially contributing to neurogenic inflammation. The purpose of the present studies was to determine the effects of nicotine and other nAChR agonists on capsaicin-evoked immunoreactive CGRP (iCGRP) release from rat buccal mucosa and to identify a potential cellular basis for these effects. Using a previously validated model of in vitro superfusion, we show that the nAChR agonists nicotine (EC50 557 μM), epibatidine (EC50 317 pM) and cytisine (EC50 4.83 nM) potentiated capsaicin-evoked iCGRP release in a concentration-dependent manner by 123, 70 and 76%, respectively. The expression and distribution patterns of the mRNA transcripts encoding the α3, α4 and α6 nAChR subunits and their colocalization with CGRP and the capsaicin receptor VR1 were examined in rat trigeminal ganglion using combined in situ hybridization and immunohistofluorescence. Of all trigeminal neurons counted, mRNA encoding the α3, α4 and α6 subunits was found, respectively, in 14.45, 9.2 and 19.21% of neurons. The cell body diameter of most neurons containing any nAChR subunit was in the 30–40 μm range with slightly fewer in the 20–30 μm range. Co-localization of these α subunit transcripts with either CGRP or VR1 immunoreactivity ranged from approximately 5 to 7% for α4 and over 8% for α3 to 18% for α6. These data support the hypothesis that nicotinic agents, acting at nAChRs contained on primary sensory neurons, are capable of directly modulating the stimulated release of iCGRP In the case of users of nicotine-containing tobacco products, this

  14. Structural studies on the [Bu(t)-Cys18](19-37)-fragment of human beta-calcitonin-gene-related peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, J K; Bose, C; Beeley, N R; Tendler, S J

    1991-01-01

    High-field n.m.r. studies were undertaken upon a peptide fragment of the C-terminal region of human beta-calcitonin-gene-related peptide (beta-hCGRP). Studies on the antigenic [Bu(t)-Cys18]beta-hCGRP-(19-37)-fragment revealed that several elements of secondary structure were present when the peptide was dissolved in [2H6]dimethyl sulphoxide. In particular an unspecified turn in the region of Ser19-Gly20 and a type I beta-turn in the region of Asn31-Val32-Gly33 were identified. Through-space connections between the terminal Phe37 amide group and the beta-protons of Thr50 suggest that the peptide may be folded into a loop-type conformation. These structural elements appear to overlap with the epitopes of a number of monoclonal antibodies and provide a molecular basis for understanding the role of the terminal Phe37 amide residue in the immune recognition of beta-hCGRP. Images Fig. 3. PMID:1741742

  15. Effects of rizatriptan on the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and cholecystokinin in the periaqueductal gray of a rat migraine model.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Han, Ximei; Hao, Tingting; Huang, Qian; Yu, Tingmin

    2015-02-05

    Triptans are serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1B/D agonists that are highly effective in the treatment of migraine. We previously found that rizatriptan can reduce the expression of proenkephalin and P substance in the rat midbrain, suggesting that rizatriptan may exert its analgesic effects by influencing the endogenous pain modulatory system. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are mainly responsible for antagonizing the analgesic effects of opioid peptides in the endogenous pain modulatory system. In this study, we investigated the effects of rizatriptan on the expression of CGRP and CCK in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a key structure of the endogenous pain modulatory system, in a rat migraine model induced by nitroglycerin. We found that the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and CCK in the PAG of migraine rats were significantly increased compared to those in control rats, and these levels were significantly reduced upon treatment with rizatriptan in migraine rats (P<0.05). Our results suggest that the expression of CGRP and CCK in the endogenous pain modulatory system may be increased during migraine attacks, which further antagonizes the analgesic effects of endogenous opioid peptides and induces sustained migraine. Rizatriptan, however, significantly reduces the levels of CGRP and CCK to enhance the inhibition of pain signals via the endogenous pain modulatory system, resulting in effective treatment of migraine.

  16. High arterial compliance in cirrhosis is related to low adrenaline and elevated circulating calcitonin gene related peptide but not to activated vasoconstrictor systems

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, J; Moller, S; Schifter, S; Abrahamsen, J; Becker, U

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Static and dynamic functions of the wall of large arteries are largely unknown in cirrhosis in vivo. The present study was undertaken to determine arterial compliance (COMPart) in relation to vasodilator and vasoconstrictor systems in patients with cirrhosis. In addition, vasoactivity was manipulated by inhalation of oxygen.
STUDY POPULATION AND METHODS—In 20 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and 12 controls we determined COMPart (stroke volume relative to pulse pressure), cardiac output, plasma volume, systemic vascular resistance, central circulation time, plasma catecholamines, renin activity, endothelin-1, and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) at baseline and during oxygen inhalation.
RESULTS—COMPart was significantly increased in cirrhotic patients compared with controls (1.32 v 1.06 ml/mm Hg; p< 0.05) and inversely related to plasma adrenaline levels (r=−0.53; p<0.02) but positively related to circulating levels of CGRP (r=0.58; p<0.01). No significant relation was found for plasma noradrenaline, renin activity, or endothelin-1. COMPart was positively related to plasma volume (r=0.50; p<0.02) and inversely to systemic vascular resistance (r=−0.69; p<0.001) and central circulation time (r=−0.49; p<0.02). During oxygen inhalation, COMPart decreased (−13%; p<0.005) and systemic vascular resistance increased (+10%; p<0.001) towards normal values without significant changes in mean arterial pressure. Plasma adrenaline (−16%; p<0.01) decreased and the relation to COMPart disappeared. The relation of COMPart to CGRP and circulatory variables remained unchanged.
CONCLUSION—Elevated arterial compliance in cirrhosis is related to low adrenaline, high CGRP, and systemic hyperdynamics but not to indicators of the activated vasoconstrictor systems (noradrenaline, renin, endothelin-1). Thus the altered static and dynamic characteristics of the wall of large arteries are intimately associated with circulatory and

  17. Calcitonin gene-related peptide erases the fear memory and facilitates long-term potentiation in the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Liu, Jue; Yang, Si; Chen, Tao; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37 amino acid neuropeptide, which plays a critical role in the central nervous system. CGRP binds to G protein-coupled receptors, including CGRP1, which couples positively to adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. CGRP and CGRP1 receptors are enriched in central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the main part of the amygdala, which regulates conditioned fear memories. Here, we reported the importance of CGRP and CGRP1 receptor for synaptic plasticity in the CeA and the extinction of fear memory in rats. Our electrophysiological and behavioral in vitro and in vivo results showed exogenous application of CGRP induced an immediate and lasting long-term potentiation in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, but not in the lateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, while bilateral intra-CeA infusion CGRP (0, 5, 13 and 21 μM/side) dose dependently enhanced fear memory extinction. The effects were blocked by CGRP1 receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 ), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors antagonist MK801 and PKA inhibitor H89. These results demonstrate that CGRP can lead to long-term potentiation of basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway through a PKA-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and enhance the extinction of fear memory in rats. Together, the results strongly support a pivotal role of CGRP in the synaptic plasticity of CeA and extinction of fear memory. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays an essential role in synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and fear memory. We found that CGRP-induced chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) in a dose-dependent way in the BLA-CeA (basolateral and central nucleus of amygdala, respectively) pathway and enhanced fear memory extinction in rats through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved NMDA receptors. These results support a pivotal role of CGRP in amygdala. © 2015 International

  18. Endothelin in normal lung tissue of newborn mammals: immunocytochemical distribution and co-localization with serotonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Seldeslagh, K A; Lauweryns, J M

    1993-10-01

    We demonstrated immunoreactivity for endothelins (ET)-1, -2, and -3 and for the precursor, big-ET-1, in the pulmonary diffuse neuroendocrine system (PDNES) of newborn cat, rat, hamster, and mouse. ET-like positive neuroepithelial bodies (NEB) were numerous in the intrapulmonary airways and the alveolar parenchyma. Single neuroendocrine cells (NEC) were less often labeled and mainly localized in the larger bronchi. ET-3-reactive neuronal elements were rarely observed. The intensity and number of immunostained NEB were highest for ET-3, followed in declining order by big-ET-1, ET-1, and ET-2. ET-like possessing NEB displayed interspecies differences. We conclude that ET-3 represents a neuroendocrine form of the ET peptide family. NEB expressing several ET isoforms can be grouped into NEB containing either big-ET-1 and ET-1 or ET-3 only. ET-like immunoreactivity was present in a subpopulation of serotonin (5HT)- and/or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-positive NEB. As ET, 5HT, and CGRP have potent pulmonary vaso- and/or bronchomotor effects, our observations suggest that they play a separate or synergistic role in regulatory function of the mammalian PDNES, exerting their influence by paracrine, endocrine, and neurocrine pathways or a combination of these.

  19. Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-directed G Protein Signaling Specificity for the Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Family of Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Winfield, Ian; Harris, Matthew; Hodgson, Rose; Shah, Archna; Dowell, Simon J.; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Woodlock, David A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Poyner, David R.; Watkins, Harriet A.; Ladds, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is formed through the association of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Binding of one of the three peptide ligands, CGRP, adrenomedullin (AM), and intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 (AM2), is well known to result in a Gαs-mediated increase in cAMP. Here we used modified yeast strains that couple receptor activation to cell growth, via chimeric yeast/Gα subunits, and HEK-293 cells to characterize the effect of different RAMP and ligand combinations on this pathway. We not only demonstrate functional couplings to both Gαs and Gαq but also identify a Gαi component to CLR signaling in both yeast and HEK-293 cells, which is absent in HEK-293S cells. We show that the CGRP family of receptors displays both ligand- and RAMP-dependent signaling bias among the Gαs, Gαi, and Gαq/11 pathways. The results are discussed in the context of RAMP interactions probed through molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of the RAMP-GPCR-G protein complexes. This study further highlights the importance of RAMPs to CLR pharmacology and to bias in general, as well as identifying the importance of choosing an appropriate model system for the study of GPCR pharmacology. PMID:27566546

  20. Colocalization and shared distribution of endomorphins with substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and the mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Inglis, Fiona M; Zadina, James E

    2007-07-10

    The endomorphins are endogenous opioids with high affinity and selectivity for the mu opioid receptor (MOR, MOR-1, MOP). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH(2); EM1) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH(2); EM2) have been localized to many regions of the central nervous system (CNS), including those that regulate antinociception, autonomic function, and reward. Colocalization or shared distribution (overlap) of two neurotransmitters, or a transmitter and its cognate receptor, may imply an interaction of these elements in the regulation of functions mediated in that region. For example, previous evidence of colocalization of EM2 with substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and MOR in primary afferent neurons suggested an interaction of these peptides in pain modulation. We therefore investigated the colocalization of EM1 and EM2 with SP, CGRP, and MOR in other areas of the CNS. EM2 was colocalized with SP and CGRP in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and with SP, CGRP and MOR in the parabrachial nucleus. Several areas in which EM1 and EM2 showed extensive shared distributions, but no detectable colocalization with other signaling molecules, are also described.

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a key factor in the homing of transplanted human MSCs to sites of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jinhua; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jianwei; Fan, Zhihai; Shen, Yixin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used to treat many diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment relies mostly on the precise navigation of cells to the injury site for rebuilding the damaged spinal cord. However, the key factors guiding MSCs to the epicenter of SCI remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neural peptide synthesized in spinal cord, can dramatically aid the homing of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in spinal cord-transected SCI rats. First, HUMSCs exhibited chemotactic responses in vitro to CGRP. By time-lapse video analysis, increased chemotactic index (CMI), forward migration index (FMI) and speed contributed to this observed migration. Then, through enzyme immunoassay, higher CGRP concentrations at the lesion site were observed after injury. The release of CGRP directed HUMSCs to the injury site, which was suppressed by CGRP 8–37, a CGRP antagonist. We also verified that the PI3K/Akt and p38MAPK signaling pathways played a critical role in the CGRP-induced chemotactic migration of HUMSCs. Collectively, our data reveal that CGRP is a key chemokine that helps HUMSCs migrate to the lesion site and thereby can be used as a model molecule to study MSCs homing after SCI. PMID:27296555

  2. Solution structure of human calcitonin gene-related peptide by sup 1 H NMR and distance geometry with restrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Breeze, A.L.; Harvey, T.S.; Bazzo, R.; Campbell, I.D. )

    1991-01-01

    The structure of human calcitonin gene-related peptide 1 (hCGRP-1) has been determined by {sup 1}H NMR in a mixed-solvent system of 50{percent} trifluoroethanol/50{percent} H{sub 2}O at pH 3.7 and 27 {degree}C. Complete resonance assignment was achieved by using two-dimensional methods. Distance restraints for structure calculations were obtained by semiquantitative analysis of intra- and interresidue nuclear Overhauser effects; in addition, stereospecific or {chi}{sup 1} rotamer assignments were obtained for certain side chains. Structures were generated from the distance restraints by distance geometry, followed by refinement using molecular dynamics, and were compared with experimental NH-C{alpha}H coupling constants and amide hydrogen exchange data. The structure of hCGRP-1 in this solvent comprises an amino-terminal disulfide-bonded loop (residues 2-7) leading into a well-defined {alpha}-helix between residues 8 and 18; thereafter, the structure is predominantly disordered, although there are indications of a preference for a turn-type conformation between residues 19 and 21. Comparison of spectra for the homologous hCGRP-2 with those of hCGRP-1 indicates that the conformations of these two forms are essentially identical.

  3. Antidromic effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide containing nerves on cerebral arteries in rats--a possible role of sensory nerves on cerebral circulatio.

    PubMed

    Asari, J; Suzuki, K; Matsumoto, M; Sasaki, T; Kodama, N

    2001-12-01

    It has generally been thought that the neurogenic control of cerebral circulation is decided mainly by the autonomic nervous system. Recent studies, however, indicate that sensory nerves rich in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are also distributed on cerebral arteries. CGRP is one of neuropeptides that has strong vasodilative effect. This indicates that sensory nerves may antidromically dilate cerebral arteries mediated by CGRP. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the CGRP containing nerves and cerebral circulation. Firstly, we developed a selective denervation model of CGRP containing nerves. The denervation was performed with intrathecal administration of capsaicin in rats. Secondly, we measured the change of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during the occlusion of bilateral common carotid artery or systemic hypotension. CGRP immunoreactivity around cerebral arteries disappeared after capsaicin treatment. The rCBF during the occlusion of bilateral common carotid artery decreased more in the capsaicin group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in the changes of rCBF during systemic hypotension. These results showed that CGRP containing nerves would participate in the vascular response of cerebral arteries. It is likely that sensory nerves with CGRP should have antidromic effect on cerebral circulation.

  4. A research design for the quantification of the neuropeptides substance p and calcitonin gene-related Peptide in rat skin using Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Lapin, Guilherme Abbud Franco; Hochman, Bernardo; Nishioka, Michele Akemi; Maximino, Jessica Ruivo; Chadi, Gerson; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-06-01

    To describe and standardize a protocol that overcomes the technical limitations of Western blot (WB) analysis in the quantification of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) following nociceptive stimuli in rat skin. Male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) weighing 250 to 350 g were used in this study. Elements of WB analysis were adapted by using specific manipulation of samples, repeated cycles of freezing and thawing, more thorough maceration, and a more potent homogenizer; increasing lytic reagents; promoting greater inhibition of protease activity; and using polyvinylidene fluoride membranes as transfer means for skin-specific protein. Other changes were also made to adapt the WB analysis to a rat model. University research center. Western blot analysis adapted to a rat model. This research design has proven effective in collecting and preparing skin samples to quantify SP and CGRP using WB analysis in rat skin. This study described a research design that uses WB analysis as a reproducible, technically accessible, and cost-effective method for the quantification of SP and CGRP in rat skin that overcomes technical biases.

  5. Quantitative analysis of afferents expressing substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, isolectin B4, neurofilament 200, and Peripherin in the sensory root of the rat trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jin Young; Kim, Jae Hyun; Cho, Yi Sul; Mah, Won; Bae, Yong Chul

    2015-01-01

    Substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and isolectin B4 (IB4) are widely used as markers for peripheral neurons with unmyelinated fibers, whereas neurofilament 200 (NF200), and Peripherin are used as markers for neurons with myelinated fibers, and with unmyelinated or small-caliber fibers, respectively. To study the selectivity of these markers for specific neuronal types, we analyzed their expression in neurons in the rat trigeminal ganglion by light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry. Most SP-immunopositive (+), CGRP+, and IB4+ fibers were unmyelinated, but a small fraction (∼5%) were small myelinated fibers (<20 µm(2) in cross-sectional area, equivalent to <5 µm in diameter, Aδ fiber). Similarly, whereas the majority of NF200+ fibers were myelinated, a large fraction (23.9%) were unmyelinated, and whereas the majority of Peripherin+ fibers were unmyelinated and small myelinated, a significant fraction (15.5%) were large myelinated (>20 µm(2) in cross-sectional area, equivalent to >5 µm in diameter, Aβ fiber). Our findings confirm that SP, CGRP, and IB4 can be used as reliable markers for neurons with unmyelinated fibers, and question the suitability of NF200 as a marker for neurons with myelinated fibers, and of Peripherin as a marker for neurons with unmyelinated, or fine-caliber fibers.

  6. Quinoline derivatives: candidate drugs for a Class B G-protein coupled receptor, the Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, a cause of migraines

    PubMed Central

    Iftikhar, Hira; Ahmad, Iqra; Gan, Siew Hua; Shaik, Munvar Miya; Iftikhar, Naveed; Nawaz, Muhammad Sulaman; Greig, Nigel H.; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Class B G-protein coupled receptors are involved in a wide variety of diseases and are a major focus in drug design. Migraines are a common problem, and one of their major causative agents is class B G-protein coupled receptor, Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor, a target for competitive drug discovery. The calcitonin receptor-like receptor generates complexes with a receptor activity-modifying protein, which determines the type of receptor protein formed. The CGRP receptor comprises a complex formed from the calcitonin receptor-like receptor and receptor activity-modifying protein 1. In this study, an in silico docking approach was used to target calcitonin receptor-like receptor in the bound form with receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (CGRP receptor), as well as in the unbound form. In both cases, the resulting inhibitors bound to the same cavity of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor. The twelve evaluated compounds were competitive inhibitors and showed efficient inhibitory activity against the CGRP receptor and Calcitonin receptor-like receptor. The two studied quinoline derivatives demonstrated potentially ideal inhibitory activity in terms of binding interactions and low range nano-molar inhibition constants. These compounds could prove helpful in designing drugs for the effective treatment of migraines. We propose that quinoline derivatives possess inhibitory activity by disturbing CGRP binding in the trigeminovascular system and may be considered for further preclinical appraisal for the treatment of migraines. PMID:25230231

  7. The potentiating effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide on transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 activity and the electrophysiological responses of rat trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chatchaisak, Duangthip; Connor, Mark; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2017-02-15

    Growing evidence suggests that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in trigeminal nociceptive responses. However, the role of CGRP in sensitization or desensitization of nociceptive transduction remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to further investigate the CGRP-induced up-regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and the responses of trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli. Rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) organ cultures and isolated trigeminal neurons were incubated with CGRP. An increase in TRPV1 levels was observed in CGRP-incubated TG organ cultures. CGRP potentiated capsaicin-induced increase in phosphorylated CaMKII levels in the TG organ cultures. The incubation of the trigeminal neurons with CGRP significantly increased the inward currents in response to capsaicin challenge, and this effect was inhibited by co-incubation with the CGRP receptor antagonist, BIBN4068BS or the inhibitor of protein kinase A, H-89. These findings reveal that CGRP acting on trigeminal neurons may play a significant role in facilitating cellular events that contribute to the peripheral sensitization of the TG in nociceptive transmission.

  8. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the guinea-pig liver: distribution and colocalization with neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Esteban, F J; Jiménez, A; Fernández, A P; del Moral, M L; Sánchez-López, A M; Hernández, R; Garrosa, M; Pedrosa, J A; Rodrigo, J; Peinado, M A

    2001-12-01

    The innervation pattern of the guinea-pig liver is similar to that of the human liver. However, many aspects of the distribution of the neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the guinea-pig liver and its colocalization with neuropeptides remain to be elucidated. The distribution of nNOS was studied in fixed guinea-pig liver by light microscopic immunohistochemistry. Confocal analysis was used to determine its colocalization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). nNOS-immunoreactive (nNOS-IR) nerves were observed in relation to hilar and interlobar vessels and in Glisson's capsule. A few nNOS-IR ganglia were observed in the extrahepatic bile duct and close to the interlobar portal triads. In addition, nNOS-IR fibers were located in the interlobular portal triads and pervading the parenchyma. Moreover, nNOS-IR nerves were demonstrated for the first time in the larger central veins and in the hepatic vein. nNOS-NPY and nNOS-CGRP colocalizations were detected in the fibromuscular layer of the bile duct and periductal plexus, respectively. These results support the phylogenetic conservation of the nNOS-IR hepatic innervation and its possible contribution to the regulation of hepatic blood flow and certain hepatic functions.

  9. Tachykinins, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y in nerves of the mammalian thymus: interactions with mast cells in autonomic and sensory neuroimmunomodulation?

    PubMed

    Weihe, E; Müller, S; Fink, T; Zentel, H J

    1989-05-22

    By the use of light microscopic (LM) immunohistochemistry the distribution of tachykinin (TK)-, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)- and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-like immunoreactivity in nerves supplying the mammalian (rat, mouse, guinea-pig, cat) thymus gland has been determined. There were no interspecies variations. Fibres staining for TK and CGRP completely overlapped indicating coexistence. They were present in the capsule, in interlobular septa and in the corticomedullary boundary and occurred in perivascular and paravascular plexus supplying arteries, veins and the microvasculature. Some TK/CGRP-immunoreactive (ir) fibres travelled between lymphoid cells and close contacts with mast cells were frequent. NPY-ir fibres were different from those staining for TK/CGRP and predominated in the perivascular plexus of arterial blood vessels. Only very rarely they coursed in the lymphoid parenchyma. Intimate contacts of NPY-ir fibres with mast cells were less frequent than those of TK/CGRP-ir fibres. We conclude that the NPY innervation is mainly sympathetic noradrenergic while thymic nerves coding for TK and CGRP are most likely of sensory origin. These pathways may play a differential neuroimmunomodulatory role in the thymus, possibly via interaction with mast cells.

  10. Variation of plasma levels of endothelin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y B; Wang, Y Z; Yue, Y H; Zhao, W C; Feng, G X

    2015-05-25

    We examined the variation in plasma levels of endothelin (ET), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model. Seventy rabbits were randomly assigned into 3 groups. Open-chest surgery (OCS) was performed for all rabbits. Group A (N = 20) received sham-surgery, group B (N = 25) was the reperfusion group, and group C (N = 25) was the infarction group. At 12 h after chest clo-sure, plasma ET levels in groups B and C were clearly increased, while CGRP levels were clearly decreased, particularly in group B. At 24 h after chest closure, ET levels were higher than before OCS, while there was no significant difference between groups B and C. ET in group B was decreased, while that in group C was increased at 12 h. No significant difference in CGRP was observed between 12 and 24 h after chest closure. NO levels in groups B and C at 12 h after chest closure were significantly decreased compared to those before OCS. NO levels in group B at 24, 48, and 72 h were significantly lower than those at 12 h, while those of group C were not significantly changed after 12 h. Dynamic monitoring and comparison of plasma levels of ET, CGRP, NO, and MDA as well as SOD activity revealed that appropriate intervention of these factors may reduce reperfusion injury.

  11. Developmental localization of calcitonin gene-related peptide in dorsal sensory axons and ventral motor neurons of mouse cervical spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongtae; Sunagawa, Masanobu; Kobayashi, Shiori; Shin, Taekyun; Takayama, Chitoshi

    2016-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide, synthesized by alternative splicing of calcitonin gene mRNA. CGRP is characteristically distributed in the nervous system, and its function varies depending on where it is expressed. To reveal developmental formation of the CGRP network and its function in neuronal maturation, we examined the immunohistochemical localization of CGRP in the developing mouse cervical spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion. CGRP immunolabeling (IL) was first detected in motor neurons on E13, and in ascending axons of the posterior funiculus and DRG neurons on E14. CGRP-positive sensory axon fibers entered Laminae I and II on E16, and Laminae I through IV on E18. The intensity of the CGRP-IL gradually increased in both ventral and dorsal horns during embryonic development, but markedly decreased in the ventral horn after birth. These results suggest that CGRP is expressed several days after neuronal settling and entry of sensory fibers, and that the CGRP network is formed in chronological and sequential order. Furthermore, because CGRP is markedly expressed in motor neurons when axons are vastly extending and innervating targets, CGRP may also be involved in axonal elongation and synapse formation during normal development.

  12. Alpha Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Increases Cerebral Vessel Diameter in Animal Models of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Liam M. C.; Begg, Caroline J.; Macleod, Malcolm R.; Andrews, Peter J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a life-threatening complication after subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is a strong association between cerebral vessel narrowing and DCI. Alpha calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) is a potent vasodilator, which may be effective at reducing cerebral vessel narrowing after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Here, we report a meta-analysis of data from nine in vivo animal studies identified in a systematic review in which αCGRP was administered in SAH models. Our primary outcome was change in cerebral vessel diameter and the secondary outcome was change in neurobehavioral scores. There was a 40.8 ± 8.2% increase in cerebral vessel diameter in those animals treated with αCGRP compared with controls (p < 0.0005, 95% CI 23.7–57.9). Neurobehavioral scores were reported in four publications and showed a standardized mean difference of 1.31 in favor of αCGRP (CI −0.49 to 3.12). We conclude that αCGRP reduces cerebral vessel narrowing seen after SAH in animal studies but note that there is insufficient evidence to determine its effect on functional outcomes. PMID:28790969

  13. Alpha Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Increases Cerebral Vessel Diameter in Animal Models of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Liam M C; Begg, Caroline J; Macleod, Malcolm R; Andrews, Peter J D

    2017-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a life-threatening complication after subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is a strong association between cerebral vessel narrowing and DCI. Alpha calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) is a potent vasodilator, which may be effective at reducing cerebral vessel narrowing after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Here, we report a meta-analysis of data from nine in vivo animal studies identified in a systematic review in which αCGRP was administered in SAH models. Our primary outcome was change in cerebral vessel diameter and the secondary outcome was change in neurobehavioral scores. There was a 40.8 ± 8.2% increase in cerebral vessel diameter in those animals treated with αCGRP compared with controls (p < 0.0005, 95% CI 23.7-57.9). Neurobehavioral scores were reported in four publications and showed a standardized mean difference of 1.31 in favor of αCGRP (CI -0.49 to 3.12). We conclude that αCGRP reduces cerebral vessel narrowing seen after SAH in animal studies but note that there is insufficient evidence to determine its effect on functional outcomes.

  14. Short bioactive Spiegelmers to migraine-associated calcitonin gene-related peptide rapidly identified by a novel approach: Tailored-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Vater, Axel; Jarosch, Florian; Buchner, Klaus; Klussmann, Sven

    2003-01-01

    We developed an integrated method to identify aptamers with only 10 fixed nucleotides through ligation and removal of primer binding sites within the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process. This Tailored-SELEX approach was validated by identifying a Spiegelmer (‘mirror-image aptamer’) that inhibits the action of the migraine-associated target calcitonin gene-related peptide 1 (α-CGRP) with an IC50 of 3 nM at 37°C in cell culture. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands that can be generated to bind to targets with high affinity and specificity. Stabilized aptamers and Spiegelmers have shown activity in vivo and may be used as therapeutics. Aptamers are isolated by in vitro selection from combinatorial nucleic acid libraries that are composed of a central randomized region and additional fixed primer binding sites with ∼30–40 nt. The identified sequences are usually not short enough for efficient chemical Spiegelmer synthesis, post-SELEX stabilization of aptamers and economical production. If the terminal primer binding sites are part of the target recognizing domain, truncation of aptamers has proven difficult and laborious. Tailored-SELEX results in short sequences that can be tested more rapidly in biological systems. Currently, our identified CGRP binding Spiegelmer serves as a lead compound for in vivo studies. PMID:14576330

  15. Topographic distribution of serotonin-immunoreactive urethral endocrine cells and their relationship with calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive nerves in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takuya; Saino, Tomoyuki; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the topographic distribution and morphology of serotonin (5-HT)-immunoreactive endocrine cells in the urethra of male rats, and focused on their relationship with peptidergic nerve fibers immunoreactive for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Urethral endocrine cells immunoreactive for 5-HT were densely distributed in the epithelial layers of the prostatic part, but were sparsely distributed in the membranous and spongy parts of urethra. Distribution of urethral endocrine cells with 5-HT immunoreactivity in the prostatic part was restricted from the internal urethral orifice to the region of seminal colliculus. 5-HT-immunoreactive endocrine cells were also observed in the ductal epithelial layers of coagulating glands, prostatic glands, and seminal vesicles. 5-HT-immunoreactive endocrine cells were triangular or flask in shape and possessed an apical projection extending toward the urethral lumen, and basal or lateral protrusions intruding between other epithelial cells were also detected in some cells. Double immunolabeling for 5-HT and CGRP revealed that CGRP-immunoreactive nerve fibers attached to urethral endocrine cells with 5-HT immunoreactivity in the prostatic part. These results suggest that urethral endocrine cells may release 5-HT in response to luminal stimuli, and that these cells and CGRP-immunoreactive nerves may regulate each other by an axon reflex mechanism.

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive neurons innervating the soft palate, the root of tongue, and the pharynx in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tetsu; Kuwahara, Sachi; Maeda, Seishi; Tanaka, Koichi; Seki, Makoto

    2010-07-01

    We have examined whether calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) neurons in the glossopharyngeal ganglia innervate the soft palate, the root of tongue, and the pharynx of the rat. Immunohistochemical observations revealed that numerous CGRP-ir neurons are located in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion located ventrolateral to the medulla oblongata in the cranial cavity, and that CGRP-ir neurons are also located in the inferior glossopharyngeal ganglion at the jugular foramen. When Fluorogold was injected into the soft palate, the root of tongue, or the pharyngeal constrictor muscles, many retrogradely Fluorogold-labeled neurons were found in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion and the nodose ganglion, and several Fluorogold-labeled neurons were found in the inferior glossopharyngeal ganglion. Double labeling with immunohistochemistry for CGRP and Fluorogold showed that in every case of injections of Fluorogold into the soft palate, the root of tongue, or the pharynx, about 30% of the Fluorogold-labeled neurons in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion expressed CGRP-like immunoreactivity, while no double-labeled neurons were found in the inferior glossopharyngeal ganglion or the nodose ganglion. These results indicate that nociceptive sensory information from the soft palate, the root of tongue, and the pharynx might be conveyed by the neurons in the superior glossopharyngeal ganglion to the nucleus tractus solitarii.

  17. Effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide on canine cerebral artery strips and the in-vivo vertebral blood flow in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, I; Suzuki, Y; Satoh, S; Asano, T; Shibuya, M; Sugita, K

    1989-10-01

    The effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on canine cerebral arteries and on vertebral blood flow were investigated in-vivo and in-vitro and the findings compared with the effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P. Administration of CGRP into the vertebral artery caused a dose-dependent and long-lasting increase in blood flow. The in-vivo vasodilatory effects of substance P and VIP were short-lasting. CGRP (0.1 to 100 nmol/l) elicited a concentration-dependent relaxation of the isolated middle cerebral and basilar arteries when the tissues were precontracted by exposure to prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha). This effect was not antagonized by propranolol, atropine, tetrodotoxin, (N-Ac-Tyr1, D-Phe2)-growth hormone-releasing factor(1-29)-NH2 or (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9) substance P. CGRP also reduced concentration-dependently the contraction of cerebral arteries induced by KCl or 9,11-epithio-11,12-metano-thromboxane A2 (STXA2). Mechanical removal of the endothelium did not abolish the vasodilatory response to CGRP. In PGF2 alpha-contracted canine cerebral arteries, VIP (0.1 to 100 nmol/l) was less potent a vasodilator than CGRP. At low concentrations (0.01 to 1 nmol/l) substance P elicited a rapid and short-lasting relaxation, and in the absence of endothelium this relaxation disappeared. These findings are clear evidence that CGRP modulates vascular tone.

  18. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments. PMID:26713069

  19. Enhancement by calcitonin gene-related peptide of nicotinic receptor-operated noncontractile Ca2+ mobilization at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, I.; Tsuneki, H.; Dezaki, K.; Kimura, M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the mechanism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-operated noncontractile Ca2+ mobilization (not accompanied by twitch tension) was investigated by measuring Ca(2+)-aequorin luminescence at the neuromuscular junction of mouse diaphragm muscle treated with neostigmine. 2. Noncontractile Ca2+ transients were enhanced by 4-aminopyridine (100 microM), a K+ channel blocker, and inhibited by botulinum toxin (1-100 micrograms, i.p.) and hexamethonium (10-100 microM), a neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonist. 3. Noncontractile Ca2+ transients were diminished by CGRP8-37 (10-20 microM), a CGRP antagonist. CGRP (0.3-10 nM) prolonged the duration of noncontractile Ca2+ transients. The effect of CGRP was suppressed by CGRP8-37 (0.1 microM). 4. Noncontractile Ca2+ transients were inhibited by H-89 (0.1-1 microM), a protein kinase-A inhibitor. The catalytic subunit of protein kinase-A and AA373 (300 microM), a protein kinase-A activator, prolonged the duration of noncontractile transients. The prolongations either by CGRP or by AA373 were not observed in the presence of H-89 (0.1 microM). 5. Contractile (accompanied by twitch tension) but not noncontractile Ca2+ transients were decreased by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA, 0.3-1 microM), a protein kinase-C activator. Phospholipase A2 increased only contractile Ca2+ transients. Calmodulin-related agents affected neither type of Ca2+ transients. 6. These results provide the first evidence that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-operated noncontractile Ca2+ mobilization is promoted by nerve-released CGRP activating protein kinase-A, and is dependent on the accumulated amounts of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction where desensitization might readily develop. PMID:8242236

  20. Distribution and changes with age of calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-immunoreactive nerves of the rat urinary bladder and lumbosacral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, H A; Santer, R M

    2002-12-01

    In the distal parts of the urinary tract, nerves containing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or substance P (SP) are sensory with their cell bodies located in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia. These two neuropeptides are recognised as being present in pelvic sensory nerves, and may be involved in the mediation of pain, stretch and/or vasodilatation. We have used indirect immunohistochemical techniques to examine the distribution and regional variation of nerves immunoreactive (-ir) for CGRP and SP in the urinary bladder and in neurons in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (L1-L2 & L6-S1) of young adult (3 months) and aged (24 months) male rats. Semi-quantitative estimations of nerve densities were made for CGRP-ir and SP-ir fibres innervating the dome, body and base of the urinary bladder. Quantitative studies were also used to examine the effects of age on the percentage of dorsal root ganglion neurons immunoreactive for CGRP and SP. There were very few immunoreactive axons in the dome and the overall density of innervation increased progressively towards the base of the bladder. The density of innervation in the aged rats revealed a slight reduction in CGRP and SP innervation of the detrusor muscle but was otherwise comparable to the young group. However, immunostaining of the lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia revealed that the percentage of CGRP- and SP-ir neuronal profiles showed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction from (mean +/- S.D) 44.5 +/- 2; 23.3 +/- 2 in young adult to 25.0 +/- 2.9; 14.8 +/- 1.6 in aged rats, respectively. These findings suggest that the involvement of CGRP and SP in urinary bladder innervation is relatively unchanged in old age, but their expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons is affected by age. The afferent micturition pathway from the pelvic region via these lumbosacral ganglia may be perturbed as a result.

  1. Co-expression of Achaete-Scute Homologue-1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide during NNK-Induced Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Hyperplasia and Carcinogenesis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Naizhen, Xu; Linnoila, R. Ilona; Kimura, Shioko

    2016-01-01

    Achaete-scute homologue-1 or ASCL1 (MASH1, hASH1) plays roles in neural development and pulmonary neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation, and it is expressed in certain lung cancers. This study was aimed to assess whether and/or how ASCL1 plays a role in 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced pulmonary NE hyperplasia and carcinogenesis in hamsters. Hamsters were injected 3 times weekly with either NNK or solvent alone (control) for treatment periods of 6 and 24 weeks, both without and with 6-week recovery. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out to examine the expressions of ASCL1, CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide), secretoglobin SCGB1A1 (club [Clara] cell specific 10 kD protein, CC10, CCSP), synaptophysin (SYP), and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen). The number of ASCL1-expressing NE foci per airway increased from 0.8 in controls to 1.6 and 2.0 during NNK exposure for 6 and 24 weeks, respectively, and the number of cells per foci doubled after NNK exposure. Most ASCL1-expressing cells in NEBs (neuroepithelial bodies) were also CGRP immunoreactive; NNK enhanced this co-expression with CGRP, a NE marker with known proliferation-promoting properties. NNK also increased PCNA expression within NE foci. NNK-induced tumors showed no immunoreactivity for NE markers. This study confirms ASCL1 as an excellent marker for pulmonary NE cells and demonstrates CGRP co-expression in ASCL1-positive NEB cells participating in NNK-induced NE hyperplasia. PMID:27877229

  2. Role of peptidergic nerve terminals in the skin: reversal of thermal sensation by calcitonin gene-related peptide in TRPV1-depleted neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chiang, Hao; Fu, Yaw-Syan; Lue, June-Horng; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of peptidergic intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) to nociceptive responses after depletion of the thermal-sensitive receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), we took advantage of a resiniferatoxin (RTX)-induced neuropathy which specifically affected small-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and their corresponding nerve terminals in the skin. Thermal hypoalgesia (p<0.001) developed from RTX-treatment day 7 (RTXd7) and became normalized from RTXd56 to RTXd84. Substance P (SP)(+) and TRPV1(+) neurons were completely depleted (p = 0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively), but RTX had a relatively minor effect on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)(+) neurons (p = 0.029). Accordingly, SP(+) (p<0.0001) and TRPV1(+) (p = 0.0008) IENFs were permanently depleted, but CGRP(+) IENFs (p = 0.012) were only transiently reduced and had recovered by RTXd84 (p = 0.83). The different effects of RTX on peptidergic neurons were attributed to the higher co-localization ratio of TRPV1/SP than of TRPV1/CGRP (p = 0.029). Thermal hypoalgesia (p = 0.0018) reappeared with an intraplantar injection of botulinum toxin type A (botox), and the temporal course of withdrawal latencies in the hot-plate test paralleled the innervation of CGRP(+) IENFs (p = 0.0003) and CGRP contents in skin (p = 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated the preferential effects of RTX on depletion of SP(+) IENFs which caused thermal hypoalgesia. In contrast, the skin was reinnervated by CGRP(+) IENFs, which resulted in a normalization of nociceptive functions.

  3. An ongoing role of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide as part of a protective network against hypertension, vascular hypertrophy, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Sarah-Jane; King, Ross; Kodji, Xenia; Outzen, Emilie; Pozsgai, Gabor; Fernandes, Elizabeth; Marshall, Nichola; de Winter, Patricia; Heads, Richard J; Dessapt-Baradez, Cecile; Gnudi, Luigi; Sams, Anette; Shah, Ajay M; Siow, Richard C; Brain, Susan D

    2014-05-01

    α-Calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) is a vasodilator, but there is limited knowledge of its long-term cardiovascular protective influence. We hypothesized that αCGRP protects against the onset and development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and have identified protective mechanisms at the vascular level. Wild-type and αCGRP knockout mice that have similar baseline blood pressure were investigated in the angiotensin II hypertension model for 14 and 28 days. αCGRP knockout mice exhibited enhanced hypertension and aortic hypertrophy. αCGRP gene expression was increased in dorsal root ganglia and at the conduit and resistance vessel level of wild-type mice at both time points. βCGRP gene expression was also observed and shown to be linked to plasma levels of CGRP. Mesenteric artery contractile and relaxant responses in vitro and endothelial NO synthase expression were similar in all groups. The aorta exhibited vascular hypertrophy, increased collagen formation, and oxidant stress markers in response to angiotensin II, with highest effects observed in αCGRP knockout mice. Gene and protein expression of endothelial NO synthase was lacking in the aortae after angiotensin II treatment, especially in αCGRP knockout mice. These results demonstrate the ongoing upregulation of αCGRP at the levels of both conduit and resistance vessels in vascular tissue in a model of hypertension and the direct association of this with protection against aortic vascular hypertrophy and fibrosis. This upregulation is maintained at a time when expression of aortic endothelial NO synthase and antioxidant defense genes have subsided, in keeping with the concept that the protective influence of αCGRP in hypertension may have been previously underestimated.

  4. Sensitization of Primary Afferent Nociceptors Induced by Intradermal Capsaicin Involves the Peripheral Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Driven by Dorsal Root Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dingge; Ren, Yong; Xu, Xijin; Zou, Xiaoju; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides released from axons of primary afferent nociceptive neurons are the key elements for the incidence of neurogenic inflammation and their release is associated with dorsal root reflexes (DRRs). However, whether the release is due to the triggering of DRRs and plays a role in inflammation-induced pain still remain to be determined. The present study assessed the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) following intradermal injection of capsaicin and determined if this release is due to activation of primary afferent neurons antidromically by triggering of DRRs. Under dorsal root intact conditions, primary afferent nociceptive fibers recorded in anesthetized rats could be sensitized by capsaicin injection, as shown by an increase in afferent responses and lowering of the response threshold to mechanical stimuli. After DRRs were removed by dorsal rhizotomy, the capsaicin-evoked sensitization was significantly reduced. In dorsal root intact rats, peripheral pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist could dose-dependently reduce the capsaicin-induced sensitization. Peripheral post-treatment with CGRP could dose-dependently restore the capsaicin-induced sensitization under dorsal rhizotomized conditions. Capsaicin injection evoked increases in numbers of single and double labeled TRPV1 and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). After dorsal rhizotomy, these evoked expressions were significantly inhibited. Perspective These data indicate that the DRR-mediated neurogenic inflammation enhances sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by capsaicin injection. The underlying mechanism involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors whereby CGRP is released peripherally. PMID:18701354

  5. The effect of a monoclonal antibody to calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) on injury-induced ectopic discharge following lingual nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Katie E.; Worsley, Matthew A.; Broad, Lisa; Sher, Emmanuel; Benschop, Robert; Johnson, Kirk; Boissonade, Fiona M.; Robinson, Peter P.; Yates, Julian M.

    2011-01-01

    The development of ectopic neural discharge at a site of peripheral nerve injury is thought to contribute to the initiation of sensory disturbances and pain. We have previously shown that this discharge can be initiated or increased by the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). We have now studied a potential therapeutic approach to reducing the discharge by evaluating the effect of a systemically administered monoclonal antibody to CGRP on injury-induced activity in the lingual nerve. In 16 anaesthetised adult ferrets the left lingual nerve was sectioned. One day after the injury, the animals received a subcutaneous injection of either a monoclonal antibody to CGRP or a vehicle control. Three days after the injury, under a second anaesthetic, single-unit electrophysiological recordings were made from central to the injury site (469 and 391 units were analysed in antibody and vehicle groups, respectively), and the proportion of units that were spontaneously active was determined. In the vehicle-treated animals 6.4 ± 2.7 [SEM]% of the units were spontaneously active, with conduction velocities of 8.8–40.8 m/s and discharge frequencies of 0.03–2.7 Hz. In the monoclonal antibody-treated animals 5.7 ± 2.0% of the units were spontaneously active, with conduction velocities of 13.9–38.8 m/s and discharge frequencies of 0.07–1.8 Hz. There was no significant difference between these two groups (for spontaneous activity and conduction velocity: p > 0.05, Student's t-test; for discharge frequency: p > 0.05, Mann–Whitney test), suggesting that the spontaneous activity initiated by a nerve injury cannot be modulated by administration of a monoclonal antibody to CGRP. PMID:22005578

  6. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Mi-Jung; Hwang, Se Jin; Cho, Yun Woo

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments.

  7. Phenotypic alterations of neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing neurons innervating the rat temporomandibular joint during carrageenan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Damico, J.P.; Ervolino, E.; Torres, K.R.; Batagello, D.S.; Cruz-Rizzolo, R.J.; Casatti, C.A.; Bauer, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) neurons in the autonomic and sensory ganglia, specifically neurons that innervate the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A possible variation between the percentages of these neurons in acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis was examined. Retrograde neuronal tracing was combined with indirect immunofluorescence to identify NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR) and CGRP- immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) neurons that send nerve fibers to the normal and arthritic temporomandibular joint. In normal joints, NPY-IR neurons constitute 78±3%, 77±6% and 10±4% of double-labeled nucleated neuronal profile originated from the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia, respectively. These percentages in the sympathetic ganglia were significantly decreased in acute (58±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 58±8% for stellate ganglion) and chronic (60±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 59±15% for stellate ganglion) phases of arthritis, while in the otic ganglion these percentages were significantly increased to 19±5% and 13±3%, respectively. In the trigeminal ganglion, CGRP-IR neurons innervating the joint significantly increased from 31±3% in normal animals to 54±2% and 49±3% in the acute and chronic phases of arthritis, respectively. It can be concluded that NPY neurons that send nerve fibers to the rat temporomandibular joint are located mainly in the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia. Acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis lead to an increase in the percentage of NPY-IR parasympathetic and CGRP-IR sensory neurons and to a decrease in the percentage of NPY-IR sympathetic neurons related to TMJ innervation. PMID:23027347

  8. Distribution and morphology of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunoreactive axons in the whole-mount atria of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Hatcher, Jeffrey T; Hoover, Donald B; Gu, He; Wurster, Robert D; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2014-04-01

    The murine model has been used to investigate the role of cardiac sensory axons in various disease states. However, the distribution and morphological structures of cardiac nociceptive axons in normal murine tissues have not yet been well characterized. In this study, whole-mount atria from FVB mice were processed with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) primary antibodies followed by secondary antibodies, and then examined using confocal microscopy. We found: 1) Large CGRP-IR axon bundles entered the atria with the major veins, and these large bundles bifurcated into small bundles and single axons that formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the epicardium. Varicose CGRP-IR axons had close contacts with muscle fibers, and some CGRP-IR axons formed varicosities around principle neurons (PNs) within intrinsic cardiac ganglia (ICGs). 2) SP-IR axons also were found in the same regions of the atria, attached to veins, and within cardiac ganglia. Similar to CGRP-IR axons, these SP-IR axons formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the atrial epicardium and myocardium. Within ICGs, SP-IR axons formed varicose endings around PNs. However, SP-IR nerve fibers were less abundant than CGRP-IR fibers in the atria. 3) None of the PNs were CGRP-IR or SP-IR. 4) CGRP-IR and SP-IR often colocalized in terminal varicosities around PNs. Collectively, our data document the distribution pattern and morphology of CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons and terminals in different regions of the atria. This knowledge provides useful information for CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons that can be referred to in future studies of pathological remodeling.

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide protects rats from cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via a mechanism of action in the MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SI; YUAN, YONGJIE; JIAO, SHAN; LUO, QI; YU, JINLU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective function and underlying mechanism of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion damage in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were selected for the establishment of an ischemia/reperfusion injury model through the application of a middle cerebral artery occlusion. Animals were randomly divided into 6 groups of 24 animals. Drugs were administered according to the design of each group; animals were administered CGRP, CGRP8–37, PD98059 and SB20358. The neurobehavioral scores of the rat cerebral ischemia model in each group were calculated. The infarction range of the rat brain tissues was observed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The expression levels of three proteins, phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/JNK, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)/ERK and p-p38/p38, in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in the brain tissues was detected by western blotting. The results showed that CGRP could improve the neurobehavioral function of the ischemic rats and reduce the infarction range. Western blotting results confirmed that the function of the CGRP was mediated mainly through the reduction of the JNK and p38 phosphorylation and the promotion of ERK phosphorylation. Therefore, the present study confirmed that an increase in the exogenous CRGP could effectively improve ischemia/reperfusion injury of the brain tissue. The mechanisms of action were achieved through a reduction in JNK and p38 phosphorylation and an increase in ERL phosphorylation in the MAPK pathway. These mechanisms were interdependent. PMID:27284409

  10. A potent and selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, MK-8825, inhibits responses to nociceptive trigeminal activation: Role of CGRP in orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Pardi, Vanessa; Akerman, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are orofacial pains within the trigeminal distribution, which involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint or both. Their pathophysiology remains unclear, as inflammatory mediators are thought to be involved, and clinically TMD presents pain and sometimes limitation of function, but often appears without gross indications of local inflammation, such as visible edema, redness and increase in temperature. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in other pain disorders with trigeminal distribution, such as migraine, of which TMD shares a significant co-morbidity. CGRP causes activation and sensitization of trigeminal primary afferent neurons, independent of any inflammatory mechanisms, and thus may also be involved in TMD. Here we used a small molecule, selective CGRP receptor antagonist, MK-8825, to dissect the role of CGRP in inducing spontaneous nociceptive facial grooming behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a mouse model of acute orofacial masseteric muscle pain that we have developed, as a surrogate of acute TMD. We show that CFA masseteric injection causes significant spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In mice pre-treated with MK-8825 there is a significant reduction in these spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors. Also, at 2 and 24h after CFA injection the level of Fos immunoreactivity in the trigeminal nucleus, used as a marker of neuronal activation, was much lower on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides after pre-treatment with MK-8825. There was no effect of MK-8825 on the release of IL-6. These data suggest that CGRP may be involved in TMD pathophysiology, but not via inflammatory mechanisms, at least in the acute stage. Furthermore, CGRP receptor antagonists may have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of TMD, as they

  11. Primary afferent neurons containing calcitonin gene-related peptide but not substance P in forepaw skin, dorsal root ganglia, and spinal cord of mice.

    PubMed

    Kestell, Garreth R; Anderson, Rebecca L; Clarke, Jennifer N; Haberberger, Rainer V; Gibbins, Ian L

    2015-12-01

    In mice dorsal root ganglia (DRG), some neurons express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) without substance P (SP; CGRP(+) SP(-) ). The projections and functions of these neurons are unknown. Therefore, we combined in vitro axonal tracing with multiple-labeling immunohistochemistry to neurochemically define these neurons and characterize their peripheral and central projections. Cervical spinal cord, DRG, and forepaw skin were removed from C57Bl/6 mice and multiple-labeled for CGRP, SP, and either marker for the sensory neuron subpopulations transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), neurofilament 200 (NF200), or vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT1). To determine central projections of CGRP(+) SP(-) neurons, Neurobiotin (NB) was applied to the C7 ventral ramus and visualized in DRG and spinal cord sections colabeled for CGRP and SP. Half (50%) of the CGRP-immunoreactive DRG neurons lacked detectable SP and had a mean soma size of 473 ± 14 μm(2) (n = 5); 89% of the CGRP(+) SP(-) neurons expressed NF200 (n = 5), but only 32% expressed TRPV1 (n = 5). Cutaneous CGRP(+) SP(-) fibers were numerous within dermal papillae and around hair shafts (n = 4). CGRP(+) SP(-) boutons were prevalent in lateral lamina I and in lamina IV/V of the dorsal horn (n = 5). NB predominantly labeled fibers penetrating lamina IV/V, 6 ± 3% contained CGRP (n = 5), and 21 ± 2% contained VGluT1 (n = 3). CGRP(+) SP(-) afferent neurons are likely to be non-nociceptive. Their soma size, neurochemical profile, and peripheral and central targets suggest that CGRP(+) SP(-) neurons are polymodal mechanoceptors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Similarity between class A and class B G-protein-coupled receptors exemplified through calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor modelling and mutagenesis studies

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Shabana; Taddese, Bruck; Conner, Alex C.; Poyner, David R.; Hay, Debbie L.; Barwell, James; Reeves, Philip J.; Upton, Graham J. G.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Modelling class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using class A GPCR structural templates is difficult due to lack of homology. The plant GPCR, GCR1, has homology to both class A and class B GPCRs. We have used this to generate a class A–class B alignment, and by incorporating maximum lagged correlation of entropy and hydrophobicity into a consensus score, we have been able to align receptor transmembrane regions. We have applied this analysis to generate active and inactive homology models of the class B calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor, and have supported it with site-directed mutagenesis data using 122 CGRP receptor residues and 144 published mutagenesis results on other class B GPCRs. The variation of sequence variability with structure, the analysis of polarity violations, the alignment of group-conserved residues and the mutagenesis results at 27 key positions were particularly informative in distinguishing between the proposed and plausible alternative alignments. Furthermore, we have been able to associate the key molecular features of the class B GPCR signalling machinery with their class A counterparts for the first time. These include the [K/R]KLH motif in intracellular loop 1, [I/L]xxxL and KxxK at the intracellular end of TM5 and TM6, the NPXXY/VAVLY motif on TM7 and small group-conserved residues in TM1, TM2, TM3 and TM7. The equivalent of the class A DRY motif is proposed to involve Arg2.39, His2.43 and Glu3.46, which makes a polar lock with T6.37. These alignments and models provide useful tools for understanding class B GPCR function. PMID:23235263

  13. CALCITONIN GENE-RELATED PEPTIDE IN THE BED NUCLEUS OF THE STRIA TERMINALIS PRODUCES AN ANXIETY-LIKE PATTERN OF BEHAVIOR AND INCREASES NEURAL ACTIVATION IN ANXIETY-RELATED STRUCTURES

    PubMed Central

    Sink, KS; Walker, DL; Yang, Y; Davis, M

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) evokes anxiety-like responses when infused into the lateral ventricle of rats. Because the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) lies immediately adjacent to the lateral ventricle, is rich in CGRP receptors, and has itself been implicated in anxiety, we evaluated the hypothesis that these effects are attributable to stimulation of CGRP receptors within the BNST itself. Bilateral intra-BNST, but not dorsal, CGRP infusions (0, 200, 400, 800 ng/side) dose-dependently enhanced startle amplitude, and produced an anxiety-like response on the elevated plus maze. Intra-BNST infusion of the CGRP antagonist, αCGRP8-37, blocked the effect of CGRP on startle, and also blocked startle potentiation produced by exposure to trimethylthiazoline (TMT – a component of fox feces that induces anxiety-like behavior in rats). Intra-BNST, but not dorsal, CGRP infusions also increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in a number of anxiety-related brain areas (central nucleus of the amygdala, locus coeruleus, ventrolateral septal nucleus, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, lateral hypothalamus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, and nucleus accumbens shell), all of which receive direct projections from the BNST. Together, the results indicate that the activation of BNST CGRP receptors is both necessary and sufficient for some anxiety responses and that these effects may be mediated by activation of a wider network of BNST efferent structures. If so, inhibition of CGRP receptors may be a clinically useful strategy for anxiety reduction. PMID:21289190

  14. Acid activation of Trpv1 leads to an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons via the CaMK-CREB cascade: a potential mechanism of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masako; Hata, Kenji; Nagayama, Tomotaka; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Hiraga, Toru; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2010-08-01

    Increased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensory neurons is implicated in inflammatory pain. The inflammatory site is acidic due to proton release from infiltrating inflammatory cells. Acid activation of peripheral nociceptors relays pain signals to the CNS. Here, we examined whether acid activated the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (Trpv1), a widely recognized acid-sensing nociceptor and subsequently increased CGRP expression. Chemically induced inflammation was associated with thermal hyperalgesia and increased CGRP expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats. In organ cultures of DRG, acid (pH 5.5) elevated CGRP expression and the selective Trpv1 antagonist 5'-Iodoresiniferatoxin decreased it. Trpv1-deficient DRG showed reduced CGRP increase by acid. Of note, many of CGRP/Trpv1-positive DRG neurons exhibited the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a nociceptive transcription factor. Knockdown of CREB by small interfering RNA or a dominant-negative form of CREB diminished acid-elevated CGRP expression. Acid elevated the transcriptional activity of CREB, which in turn stimulated CGRP gene promoter activity. These effects were inhibited by a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) inhibitor KN-93. In conclusion, our results suggest that inflammatory acidic environments activate Trpv1, leading to an up-regulation of CGRP expression via CaMK-CREB cascade, a series of events that may be associated with inflammatory pain.

  15. A Novel α-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Analogue Protects Against End-Organ Damage in Experimental Hypertension, Cardiac Hypertrophy, and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Thakore, Pratish; Argunhan, Fulye; Smillie, Sarah-Jane; Schnelle, Moritz; Srivastava, Salil; Alawi, Khadija M; Wilde, Elena; Mitchell, Jennifer; Farrell-Dillon, Keith; Richards, Daniel A; Maltese, Giuseppe; Siow, Richard C; Nandi, Manasi; Clark, James E; Shah, Ajay M; Sams, Anette; Brain, Susan D

    2017-07-25

    Research into the therapeutic potential of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (α-CGRP) has been limited because of its peptide nature and short half-life. Here, we evaluate whether a novel potent and long-lasting (t½ ≥7 hours) acylated α-CGRP analogue (αAnalogue) could alleviate and reverse cardiovascular disease in 2 distinct murine models of hypertension and heart failure in vivo. The ability of the αAnalogue to act selectively via the CGRP pathway was shown in skin by using a CGRP receptor antagonist. The effect of the αAnalogue on angiotensin II-induced hypertension was investigated over 14 days. Blood pressure was measured by radiotelemetry. The ability of the αAnalogue to modulate heart failure was studied in an abdominal aortic constriction model of murine cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure over 5 weeks. Extensive ex vivo analysis was performed via RNA analysis, Western blot, and histology. The angiotensin II-induced hypertension was attenuated by cotreatment with the αAnalogue (50 nmol·kg(-1)·d(-1), SC, at a dose selected for lack of long-term hypotensive effects at baseline). The αAnalogue protected against vascular, renal, and cardiac dysfunction, characterized by reduced hypertrophy and biomarkers of fibrosis, remodeling, inflammation, and oxidative stress. In a separate study, the αAnalogue reversed angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated vascular and cardiac damage. The αAnalogue was effective over 5 weeks in a murine model of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. It preserved heart function, assessed by echocardiography, while protecting against adverse cardiac remodeling and apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with the αAnalogue was well tolerated with neither signs of desensitization nor behavioral changes. These findings, in 2 distinct models, provide the first evidence for the therapeutic potential of a stabilized αAnalogue, by mediating (1) antihypertensive effects, (2) attenuating cardiac remodeling, and (3) increasing

  16. The role of the hippocampus and the function of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the mechanism of traumatic brain injury accelerating fracture-healing.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Han, G-X; Chen, L; Zhai, Y-Z; Dong, J; Chen, W; Li, T-S; Zhu, H-Y

    2017-04-01

    This research attempts to identify the part the hippocampus plays in accelerated fracture-healing after traumatic brain injury as well as to test functions of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) during this process. Experiments were carried out on Male Sprague-Dawley rats that were split into four groups at random: TBI-fracture group, fracture-only group, TBI-only group, and control group. In the first week, blood specimen would be drawn from rats among the groups except those of the control group at three-time points (24, 72 and 168 hours) post-damage. These rats would be assessed from the neurological perspective based on their grades of performance in a sequence of tests 24 hours before and 12 hours after brain injury. Blood samples were also taken from the control group 24 hours before the injury, and whole brain tissues in the injured groups were harvested at 72 and 168 hours post-injury. We compared the serum CGRP concentration, the distribution of CGRP, the CGRP expression, and the expression of CGRP in the hippocampus, the expression of CGRP in the hippocampus, the expression of CGRP in the hippocampus, and the expression of CGRP in the brain by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, RT- Of CGRP RNA expression levels. Neurological examinations suggested that the functions of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem showed significant differences pre- and post-injury (p < 0.001). ELISA analysis indicated a great density of CGRP in TBI-fracture group at different time points. Furthermore, in the TBI-fracture group, CGRP in both hippocampus and the whole brain showed a noticeable augment in RT-PCR and western blot analysis at 72 and 168 h post-injury, and only in this group, immunohistochemistry analysis indicated that CGRP was present in the hippocampus at 168 hours post-injury. We observed that the hippocampus and CGRP were responsible for quick bone-healing mechanisms. We suggest a role for the hippocampus in accelerated fracture healing. CGRP

  17. Changes in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component and nitric oxide receptor (sGC) immunoreactivity in rat trigeminal ganglion following glyceroltrinitrate pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to play an important role in the pathophysiology of migraine. Infusion of the nitrovasodilator glyceroltrinitrate (nitroglycerin, GTN), which mobilizes NO in the organism, is an approved migraine model in humans. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is regarded as another key mediator in migraine. Increased plasma levels of CGRP have been found during spontaneous as well as nitrovasodilator-induced migraine attacks. The nociceptive processes and interactions underlying the NO and CGRP mediated headache are poorly known but can be examined in animal experiments. In the present study we examined changes in immunofluorescence of CGRP receptor components (CLR and RAMP1) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), the intracellular receptor for NO, in rat trigeminal ganglia after pretreatment with GTN. Methods Isoflurane anaesthetised rats were intravenously infused with GTN (1 mg/kg) or saline for four hours and two hours later the trigeminal ganglia were processed for immunohistochemistry. Different primary antibodies recognizing CLR, RAMP1, CGRP and sGC coupled to fluorescent secondary antibodies were used to examine immunoreactive cells in serial sections of trigeminal ganglia with epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Several staining protocols were examined to yield optimized immunolabeling. Results In vehicle-treated animals, 42% of the trigeminal ganglion neurons were immunopositive for RAMP1 and 41% for CLR. After GTN pretreatment CLR-immunopositivity was unchanged, while there was an increase in RAMP1-immunopositive neurons to 46%. RAMP1 and CLR immunoreactivity was also detected in satellite cells. Neurons immunoreactive for sGC were on average smaller than sGC-immunonegative neurons. The percentage of sGC-immunopositive neurons (51% after vehicle) was decreased after GTN infusion (48%). Conclusions Prolonged infusion of GTN caused increased fractions of RAMP1- and decreased fractions of s

  18. Increasing expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in synovial tissue and fluid contribute to the progress of arthritis in developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiang; He, Ji-Ye; Zheng, Xin-Feng; Li, De; Li, Zheng; Zhu, Jun-Feng; Shen, Chao; Cai, Gui-Quan; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-12

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common musculoskeletal disorder that has pain and loss of joint function as major pathological features. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms of possible involvement and regulation of substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the pathological and inflammatory processes of arthritis in DDH. Blood, synovial tissue and fluid samples were collected from patients diagnosed with different severities of DDH and from patients with femoral neck fracture. Levels of SP, CGRP and inflammatory cytokines in synovium and synovial fluid (SF) in the different groups were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between neuropeptides and inflammatory cytokines in SF were evaluated by partial correlation analysis. The proinflammatory effects of SP and CGRP on synoviocytes obtained from patients with moderate DDH were investigated in vitro by real-time PCR and ELISA. The mechanisms of those effects were evaluated by Western blot analysis and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) DNA binding assay. Significantly increased levels of neuropeptides and inflammatory cytokines were observed in synovium and SF from patients in the severe DDH group compared with the moderate DDH and control groups. In moderate DDH samples, SP in SF correlated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and CGRP in SF correlated with TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-10. In the severe DDH group, SP in SF correlated with interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α and IL-10. CGRP in SF correlated with TNF-α. Additionally, SP might have had obvious proinflammatory effects on synoviocytes through the activation of NF-κB. The upregulation of SP and CGRP in synovium and SF might participate in the inflammatory process of arthritis in DDH. The activation of the NF-κB pathway seems indispensable in the proinflammatory effect of SP on synoviocytes. This original

  19. Recovery of corneal sensitivity, calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive nerves, and increased wound healing induced by pigment epithelial-derived factor plus docosahexaenoic acid after experimental surgery.

    PubMed

    Cortina, M Soledad; He, Jiucheng; Li, Na; Bazan, Nicolas G; Bazan, Haydee E P

    2012-01-01

    To assess function of regenerated corneal nerves in correlation with epithelial wound healing after experimental nerve damage in rabbits treated with pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). An 8-mm stromal dissection was performed in the right eyes of adult New Zealand rabbits. Treatment with PEDF+DHA was for 6 weeks. Corneal sensation was measured weekly by Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. After 8 weeks, immunofluorescence with βIII-tubulin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and substance P antibodies was performed to quantify nerves. Also, rabbits were treated with PEDF+DHA for 4 weeks after lamellar keratectomy, followed by 8-mm epithelial debridement and epithelial defect assessment. One week after surgery, corneas were stained with anti-Ki67 antibody to assess cell proliferation. Eight weeks after surgery, calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive nerve fibers in the PEDF+DHA group were similar to normal rabbit corneas but were decreased in the vehicle. Substance P was localized in the subepithelial plexus but appeared in epithelial cells after nerve injury regardless of treatment. Five weeks after surgery, an increase in corneal sensitivity occurred in the PEDF+DHA group and reached normal values by 8 weeks. Pigment epithelial-derived factor plus DHA increased epithelial wound healing after lamellar keratectomy. One week after epithelial injury, Ki67-positive cells increased in the limbal area. Pigment epithelial-derived factor plus DHA promotes regeneration of calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive corneal nerves, accelerating wound healing and return of corneal sensitivity. Pigment epithelial-derived factor plus DHA represents a new approach to regenerate nerves and a potential treatment for prevention of severe dry eye after surgery or diseases of the ocular surface.

  20. Modifications to the N-terminus but not the C-terminus of calcitonin gene-related peptide(8-37) produce antagonists with increased affinity.

    PubMed

    Smith, D David; Saha, Shankar; Fang, Guoyong; Schaffert, Courtney; Waugh, David J J; Zeng, Wanyun; Toth, Geza; Hulce, Martin; Abel, Peter W

    2003-06-05

    Seventeen novel analogues of human calcitonin gene-related peptide(8-37) (hCGRP(8-37)) were synthesized by solid-phase methods and purified to apparent homogeneity by semipreparative cation exchange and/or reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The C-terminal Phe was replaced by Gly, cyclohexylalanine (Cha), Tyr, all four isomers of beta-methylphenylalanine (beta-MePhe), and l- and d-tetrahydroisoquinoline carboxylic acid (Tic), resulting in analogues 3-11. For the synthesis of the beta-MePhe-containing analogues 6-9, crystallization was used to separate a mixture of all four isomers of beta-MePhe into the erythro pair of enantiomers (2S,3S, 2R,3R) and the threo pair of enantiomers (2S,3R, 2R,3S), which were then converted to Fmoc derivatives and used in two separate syntheses. Two diastereomeric peptides were obtained from each synthesis and were separated by RP-HPLC to yield enantiomerically pure 6-9. Substitution of Tyr for Phe caused no change in binding affinity at CGRP receptors. All other substitutions for Phe resulted in substantial reductions in binding affinity. Indeed, no binding was observed for analogues 7, 9, and 11, all of which contained a d-amino acid residue in the C-terminal position, and the binding affinities of the remaining analogues were >10-fold lower than that of h-alpha-CGRP(8-37). These data suggest that a conformationally flexible phenyl ring in the C-terminal position of h-alpha-CGRP(8-37) is preferred for high-affinity binding to CGRP receptors. Acetylation, benzoylation, and benzylation of the N-termini of h-alpha-CGRP(8-37) and h-beta-CGRP(8-37) produced analogues 12-14 and 16-18, respectively. A byproduct was isolated by RP-HPLC from the resin-cleaved crude product of each benzylated analogue, which was characterized as the dibenzylated derivative of h-alpha-CGRP(8-37) and h-beta-CGRP(8-37) (analogues 15 and 19, respectively). Amino acid analysis and (1)H NMR showed that the second benzyl group was located on the C4

  1. The effect and safety of monoclonal antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor on migraine: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Min; Xing, Haiyan; Cai, Yongqing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xianfeng; Li, Pan; Hu, Xiaolin; Chen, Jianhong

    2017-12-01

    Migraine has been recognized as one of the leading causes of disability in the 2013 Global Burden of Disease Study and seriously affects the quality of patients' life, current treatment options are not ideal. Monoclonal antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor (CGRP-mAbs) appear more promising for migraine because of considerably better effect and safety profiles. The objective of this study is to systematically assess the clinical efficacy and safety of CGRP-mAbs for migraine therapy. A systematic literature search in PubMed, Cochrane Library and Baidu Scholar was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which compared the effect and safety of CGRP-mAbs with placebo on migraine. Regarding the efficacy, the reduction of monthly migraine days from baseline to weeks 1-4, 5-8, and 9-12; responder rates were extracted as the outcome measures of the effects of CGRP-mAbs. Regarding the safety, total adverse events, the main adverse events, and other adverse events were evaluated. We found significant reduction of monthly migraine days in CGRP-mAbs vs. placebo (weeks 1-4: SMD -0.49, 95% CI -0.61 to -0.36; weeks 5-8: SMD -0.43, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.30; weeks 9-12: SMD -0.37, 95% CI -0.49 to -0.24). 50% and 75% responder rates (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.99 to 3.37; and OR 2.91, 95% CI 2.06 to 4.10) were significantly increased compared with placebo. There was no significant difference in total adverse events (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.51), and the main adverse events including upper respiratory tract infection (OR 1.44, 95% CI 0.82 to 2.55), nasopharyngitis (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.16), nausea (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.32), injection-site pain (OR 1.73, 95% CI 0.95 to 3.16) and back pain (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.90) were not obviously changed compared with placebo control, but the results showed significant increase of dizziness in CGRP-mAbs vs. placebo (OR 3.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 9.45). This meta-analysis suggests that CGRP-mAbs are

  2. Activation of TRPV1 mediates calcitonin gene-related peptide release, which excites trigeminal sensory neurons and is attenuated by a retargeted botulinum toxin with anti-nociceptive potential.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Ovsepian, Saak V; Wang, Jiafu; Pickering, Mark; Sasse, Astrid; Aoki, K Roger; Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2009-04-15

    Excessive release of inflammatory/pain mediators from peripheral sensory afferents renders nerve endings hyper-responsive, causing central sensitization and chronic pain. Herein, the basal release of proinflammatory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was shown to increase the excitability of trigeminal sensory neurons in brainstem slices via CGRP1 receptors because the effect was negated by an antagonist, CGRP8-37. This excitatory action could be prevented by cleaving synaptosomal-associated protein of M(r) 25,000 (SNAP-25) with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A, a potent inhibitor of exocytosis. Strikingly, BoNT/A proved unable to abolish the CGRP1 receptor-mediated effect of capsaicin, a nociceptive TRPV1 stimulant, or its elevation of CGRP release from trigeminal ganglionic neurons (TGNs) in culture. Although the latter was also not susceptible to BoNT/E, apparently attributable to a paucity of its acceptors (glycosylated synaptic vesicle protein 2 A/B), this was overcome by using a recombinant chimera (EA) of BoNT/A and BoNT/E. It bound effectively to the C isoform of SV2 abundantly expressed in TGNs and cleaved SNAP-25, indicating that its /A binding domain (H(C)) mediated uptake of the active /E protease. The efficacy of /EA is attributable to removal of 26 C-terminal residues from SNAP-25, precluding formation of SDS-resistant SNARE complexes. In contrast, exocytosis could be evoked after deleting nine of the SNAP-25 residues with /A but only on prolonged elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) with capsaicin. This successful targeting of /EA to nociceptive neurons and inhibition of CGRP release in vitro and in situ highlight its potential as a new therapy for sensory dysmodulation and chronic pain.

  3. The Influence of Low Doses of Zearalenone and T-2 Toxin on Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide-Like Immunoreactive (CGRP-LI) Neurons in the ENS of the Porcine Descending Colon

    PubMed Central

    Makowska, Krystyna; Obremski, Kazimierz; Zielonka, Lukasz; Gonkowski, Slawomir

    2017-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) can undergo adaptive and reparative changes in response to physiological and pathological stimuli. These manifest primarily as alterations in the levels of active substances expressed by the enteric neuron. While it is known that mycotoxins can affect the function of the central and peripheral nervous systems, knowledge about their influence on the ENS is limited. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of low doses of zearalenone (ZEN) and T-2 toxin on calcitonin gene related peptide-like immunoreactive (CGRP-LI) neurons in the ENS of the porcine descending colon using a double immunofluorescence technique. Both mycotoxins led to an increase in the percentage of CGRP-LI neurons in all types of enteric plexuses and changed the degree of co-localization of CGRP with other neuronal active substances, such as substance P, galanin, nitric oxide synthase, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide. The obtained results demonstrate that even low doses of ZEN and T-2 can affect living organisms and cause changes in the neurochemical profile of enteric neurons. PMID:28287437

  4. The effect of combined regulation of the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and calcitonin gene-related peptide on alcohol-induced adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Yisheng; Li, Yuebai; Sun, Junkui; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2014-07-01

    Studies have shown that alcohol can upregulate the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) gene in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). High expression of PPARγ can promote adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and reduce their osteogenic differentiation. Abnormal proliferation of adipocytes and fatty accumulation in osteocytes can result in high intraosseous pressure and disturbance of blood circulation in the femoral head, which induces osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Downregulation of PPARγ is efficient in inhibiting adipogenesis and maintaining osteogenesis of BMSCs, which might potentially reduce the incidence of ONFH. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide gene which has been closely associated with bone regeneration. In this study, we aimed to observe the effect of combined regulation of the expression of PPARγ and CGRP genes on alcohol-induced adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Our results demonstrated that simultaneous downregulation of PPARγ and upregulation of CGRP was efficient in suppressing adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs and promoting their osteogenic differentiation. These findings might enlighten a novel approach for the prevention of ONFH.

  5. Comparison of the effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in a number of in vivo and in vitro tests

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.P.; Brase, D.; Cooper, C.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    sCT and CGRP have been shown previously to have multiple activities in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work has shown that CGRP (15 ..mu..g) intraventricularly (IVT) produces a naloxone reversible 37% inhibition in the p-phenylquinone test (PPQ) accompanied by severe diarrhea. The ED50 of sCT in the PPQ test is 362 ng and this effect is not reversed totally by naloxone. The onset of CGRP is more rapid than that of sCT. sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/M) both produce naloxone reversible inhibition of the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (GPI) (25% and 50% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/ M) produce contracture (15% and 40% respectively) of the non-stimulated GPI that is not blocked by atropine. Both sCT and CGRP block the naloxone-induced contracture of the morphine (MS04) dependent ilea (29% and 68% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP produce biphasic shifts in the MS04 acetylcholine dose-effect curves in the stimulated and nonstimulated GPI, respectively. Neither sCT nor CGRP (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -4/ M) displaces /sup 3/H-naloxone binding to mouse brain membranes. Both sCT and CGRP may produce their effects by modulation of CA/sup +2/ fluxes in the CNS and GPI.

  6. [Involvement of the receptor component protein in the regulation of vascular peroxidase-1 expression induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide and angiotensin II in vascular smooth muscle cell].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Mei; Peng, Hong-Yan; Guo, Feng; Quan, Hai-Yan; Luo, Jing-Fei; Qin, Xu-Ping

    2015-04-25

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) play important roles in vascular injury and protection. In order to determine the role of CGRP receptor component protein (RCP) in signal transduction whereby CGRP and Ang II mediate the expression of vascular peroxidase-1 (VPO1) in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC), mouse derived A10 vascular smooth muscle cell line (A10VSMC) was cultured with CGRP or/and Ang II in vitro. RCP-specific small interference RNA (siRNA-RCP) was used to silence oligonucleotide sequence. Western blot and RT-PCR were used to determine the protein and mRNA expressions of RCP and VPO1, respectively. The results showed that the expressions of RCP and VPO1 were increased in the presence of CGRP or Ang II in the quiescent A10VSMC. But the protein expressions of RCP and VPO1 induced by Ang II were decreased by pretreatment of CGRP (P < 0.05). The expressions of VPO1 were decreased in all the groups treated with siRNA-RCP, compared with those of wide-type counterparts. Meanwhile, the expression of VPO1 was significantly induced by CGRP but not Ang II in the siRNA-RCP treated A10VSMCs. Ang II in combination with CGRP increased the protein expression of VPO1 in the siRNA-RCP-transfected cells, compared with Ang II alone, and this effect could be abolished by catalase. The results suggest that RCP may play an important role in the integration of signal transduction whereby CGRP and Ang II receptors jointly regulate VPO1 expression in VSMC.

  7. Spatial expression of components of a calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRL) signalling system (CRL, calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, adrenomedullin-2/intermedin) in mouse and human heart valves.

    PubMed

    Pfeil, Uwe; Bharathala, Subhashini; Murtaza, Ghulam; Mermer, Petra; Papadakis, Tamara; Boening, Andreas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Heart valves are highly organized structures determining the direction of blood flow through the heart. Smooth muscle cells within the valve are thought to play an active role during the heart cycle, rather than being just passive flaps. The mature heart valve is composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), various differentiations of valvular interstitial cells (VIC), smooth muscle cells and overlying endothelium. VIC are important for maintaining the structural integrity of the valve, thereby affecting valve function and ECM remodelling. Accumulating evidence suggests an important role of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRL) signalling in preventing heart damage under several pathological conditions. Thus we investigate the existence of a putative CRL signalling system in mouse and human heart valves by real-time RT-PCR, laser-assisted microdissection, immunofluorescence and NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. Mouse and human heart valves expressed mRNAs for the CRL ligands adrenomedullin (AM), adrenomedullin-2 (AM-2) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and for their receptor components, i.e., CRL and receptor-activity-modifying proteins 1-3. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed AM-, AM-2- and CRL-immunolabelling in endothelial cells and VIC, whereas CGRP immunoreactivity was restricted to nerve fibres and some endothelial cells. Nitric oxide synthase activity, as demonstrated by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, was shown mainly in valvular endothelial cells in mice, whereas in human aortic valves, VIC and smooth muscle cells were positive. Our results showed the presence of an intrinsic AM/AM-2/CGRP signalling system in murine and human heart valves with distinct cellular localization, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of valve stiffness and ECM production and turnover.

  8. In vivo quantification of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor occupancy by telcagepant in rhesus monkey and human brain using the positron emission tomography tracer [11C]MK-4232.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Eric D; Joshi, Aniket D; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan, Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Purcell, Mona; Gantert, Liza; Riffel, Kerry; Williams, Mangay; O'Malley, Stacey; Miller, Patricia; Selnick, Harold G; Gallicchio, Steven N; Bell, Ian M; Salvatore, Christopher A; Kane, Stefanie A; Li, Chi-Chung; Hargreaves, Richard J; de Groot, Tjibbe; Bormans, Guy; Van Hecken, Anne; Derdelinckx, Inge; de Hoon, Jan; Reynders, Tom; Declercq, Ruben; De Lepeleire, Inge; Kennedy, W P; Blanchard, Rebecca; Marcantonio, Eugene E; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Van Laere, Koen; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L

    2013-11-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent neuropeptide whose agonist interaction with the CGRP receptor (CGRP-R) in the periphery promotes vasodilation, neurogenic inflammation and trigeminovascular sensory activation. This process is implicated in the cause of migraine headaches, and CGRP-R antagonists in clinical development have proven effective in treating migraine-related pain in humans. CGRP-R is expressed on blood vessel smooth muscle and sensory trigeminal neurons and fibers in the periphery as well as in the central nervous system. However, it is not clear what role the inhibition of central CGRP-R plays in migraine pain relief. To this end, the CGRP-R positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(11)C]MK-4232 (2-[(8R)-8-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-6,8-[6-(11)C]dimethyl-10-oxo-6,9-diazaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]-N-[(2R)-2'-oxospiro[1,3-dihydroindene-2,3'-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-5-yl]acetamide) was discovered and developed for use in clinical PET studies. In rhesus monkeys and humans, [(11)C]MK-4232 displayed rapid brain uptake and a regional brain distribution consistent with the known distribution of CGRP-R. Monkey PET studies with [(11)C]MK-4232 after intravenous dosing with CGRP-R antagonists validated the ability of [(11)C]MK-4232 to detect changes in CGRP-R occupancy in proportion to drug plasma concentration. Application of [(11)C]MK-4232 in human PET studies revealed that telcagepant achieved only low receptor occupancy at an efficacious dose (140 mg PO). Therefore, it is unlikely that antagonism of central CGRP-R is required for migraine efficacy. However, it is not known whether high central CGRP-R antagonism may provide additional therapeutic benefit.

  9. Source and origin of nerve fibres immunoreactive for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the normal and chronically denervated superior cervical sympathetic ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Z F; Matthews, M R

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemical studies of sympathetic ganglia have indicated that the normal rat superior cervical ganglion contains both SP-IR and CGRP-IR fibres, and CGRP- and SP-immunoreactivity coexist in some fibres. In rat sympathetic ganglia decentralization by preganglionic denervation leads to intraganglionic increase of peptidergic fibres immunoreactive (IR) for substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide. We explored the sources of SP- and CGRP-IR fibres in normal and in chronically decentralized rat SCGs. The distribution of immunoreactivities for CGRP and SP was determined in SCGs of normal rats and of rats following preganglionic denervation followed by sensory denervation. Ganglia were studied after short-term (2-5 days) sensory denervation, and long-term (7-16 months) sympathetic denervation followed by short-term (2 days) sensory denervation. To explore for the production of SP and CGRP by intrinsic neurones within the ganglion, normal and chronically decentralized SCGs were examined following pretreatment by local in vivo application of colchicine. Normal and chronically decentralized ganglia were also injected with fluorescent tracer Fluorogold for retrograde tracing of extrinsic fibres back to their neurones of origin. The observations suggest that in normal SCG in the rat the SP-IR and CGRP-IR nerve fibres are derived via direct links from vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves and the cervical plexus, or from nerve fibres running along the cervical sympathetic trunk, and the external carotid and the internal carotid nerves. Sensory nerve inputs to the rat SCG following decentralization may contribute to the low levels of ganglionic activation observable in the autonomic failure of multiple system atrophy in man.

  10. Emotional stress and orthodontic tooth movement: effects on apical root resorption, tooth movement, and dental tissue expression of interleukin-1 alpha and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive nerve fibres in rats.

    PubMed

    Vandevska-Radunovic, Vaska; Murison, Robert

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of emotional stress on apical root resorption (ARR) and tooth displacement during orthodontic tooth movement in rats. A further area of interest was to evaluate if the expression of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha) as well as the density and distribution of peptidergic nerve fibres immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the periodontal ligament (PDL) are associated with possible stress-induced changes in root resorption and tooth movement. A total of 52 male Wistar rats, aged 6 weeks, were divided in three experimental and one control group (n = 4). Group 1 had orthodontic tooth movement and received foot shocks (OTMS; n = 16), group 2 had orthodontic tooth movement but received no foot shocks (OTMNS; n = 16), and group 3 had no orthodontic tooth movement and received foot shocks (NOTMS; n = 16). Each group was further divided into four subgroups (n = 4), corresponding to the period of the experiment, i.e. 3, 7, 13, and 21 days. At the end of each experimental period, the blood samples were taken, the animals were sacrificed, and the jaws excised, deminerialized, and processed for immunocytochemistry. One-way analysis of variance was used to detect inter-group differences for all investigated variables. CGRP immunopositive nerve fibres were evaluated qualitatively. All the experimental groups demonstrated higher corticosterone levels than the control group, suggesting a stress-induced experience by orthodontic treatment per se. The OTMS group had the least amount of cellular cementum throughout the experimental periods and showed significant reduction in tooth displacement, especially at 3 and 7 days. No obvious changes were observed in the dental tissue expression of IL-1alpha and CGRP immunoreactive nerve fibres between the stressed and non-stressed orthodontically treated groups.

  11. Effect of electroacupuncture on thermal pain threshold and expression of calcitonin-gene related peptide, substance P and γ-aminobutyric acid in the cervical dorsal root ganglion of rats with incisional neck pain.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Li-Na; Liu, Jun-Ling; Tan, Lian-Hong; Yang, Hai-Long; Zhai, Xu; Yang, Yong-Sheng

    2017-08-01

    Acupuncture therapy effectively reduces post-surgical pain, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether expression of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the primary sensory neurons of cervical dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are involved in electroacupuncture (EA)-induced analgesia in a rat model of incisional neck pain. The pain model was established by making a longitudinal midline neck incision in 60 rats. Another 15 rats underwent sham surgery (normal group). Post-incision, 15 rats remained untreated (model group) and 45 rats underwent EA (frequency 2/100 Hz, intensity 1 mA) at bilateral LI18, LI4-PC6 or ST36-GB34 (n=15 each) for 30 min at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours post-surgery, followed by thermal pain threshold (PT) measurement. 30 min later, the rats were euthanased and cervical (C3-6) DRGs removed for measurement of immunoreactivity and mRNA expression of SP/CGRP and the GABAergic neuronal marker glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67). Thermal PT was significantly lower in the model group versus the normal group and increased in the LI18 and LI4-PC6 groups but not the ST36-GB34 group compared with the model group. Additionally, EA at LI18 and LI4-PC6 markedly suppressed neck incision-induced upregulation of mRNA/protein expression of SP/CGRP, and upregulated mRNA/protein expression of GAD67 in the DRGs of C3-6 segments. EA at LI18/LI4-PC6 increases PT in rats with incisional neck pain, which is likely related to downregulation of pronociceptive mediators SP/CGRP and upregulation of the inhibitory transmitter GABA in the primary sensory neurons of cervical DRGs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Discovery of (5S,6S,9R)-5-amino-6-(2,3-difluorophenyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-cyclohepta[b]pyridin-9-yl 4-(2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridin-1-yl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (BMS-927711): an oral calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonist in clinical trials for treating migraine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Conway, Charles M; Denton, Rex; Keavy, Deborah; Signor, Laura; Kostich, Walter; Lentz, Kimberley A; Santone, Kenneth S; Schartman, Richard; Browning, Marc; Tong, Gary; Houston, John G; Dubowchik, Gene M; Macor, John E

    2012-12-13

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute migraine. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and preclinical characterization of a highly potent, oral CGRP receptor antagonist BMS-927711 (8). Compound 8 has good oral bioavailability in rat and cynomolgus monkey, attractive overall preclinical properties, and shows dose-dependent activity in a primate model of CGRP-induced facial blood flow. Compound 8 is presently in phase II clinical trials.

  13. Negative pressure wound therapy-associated tissue trauma and pain: a controlled in vivo study comparing foam and gauze dressing removal by immunohistochemistry for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the wound edge.

    PubMed

    Malmsjö, Malin; Gustafsson, Lotta; Lindstedt, Sandra; Ingemansson, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Pain upon negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing removal has been reported and is believed to be associated with the observation that granulation tissue grows into foam. Wound tissue damage upon removal of the foam may cause the reported pain. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P are neuropeptides that cause inflammation and signal pain and are known to be released when tissue trauma occurs. The aim of this controlled in vivo study was to compare the expression of CGRP and substance P in the wound bed in control wounds and following NPWT and foam or gauze dressing removal. Eight pigs with two wounds each were treated with open-pore structure polyurethane foam or AMD gauze and NPWT of 0 (control) or -80 mm Hg for 72 hours. Following removal of the wound filler, the expression of CGRP and substance P was measured, using arbitrary units, in sections of biopsies from the wound bed using immunofluorescence techniques. Substance P and CGRP were more abundant in the wound edge following the removal of foam than of gauze dressings and least abundant in control wounds. The immunofluorescence staining of the wound edge for CGRP was 52 ± 3 au after the removal of gauze and 97 ± 5 au after the removal of foam (P <0.001). For substance P, the staining was 55 ± 3 au after gauze removal and 95 ± 4 au after foam removal (P <0.001). CGRP and substance P staining was primarily located to nerves and leukocytes. The increase in CGRP and substance P immunofluorescence was especially prominent in the dermis but also was seen in subcutaneous and muscle tissue. Using gauze may be one way of reducing NPWT dressing change-related pain. New wound fillers designed to optimize granulation tissue formation and minimize pain issues presumably will be developed in the near future.

  14. Nitroglycerin-inhibited whole blood aggregation is partially mediated by calcitonin gene-related peptide–a neurogenic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Brian P; Nolan, Timothy D; Fung, Ho-Leung

    1997-01-01

    The role of the vasculature and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in nitroglycerin (NTG)-mediated platelet inhibition was studied. In vitro incubations of CGRP in whole blood induced a dose-dependent inhibition of platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 62.1 nM. The platelet inhibition induced by CGRP was blocked by co-incubation of 0.53 μM CGRP8-37, as well as 30 μM NG-nitro-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). In a separate group of experiments, 100 nM NTG in rat whole blood (WB) induced platelet inhibition of 6.0±1.3% (mean±s.d.), which was enhanced to 77.6±3.5% by the addition of rat aortic tissue (AT) (P<0.001). The inclusion of CGRP8-37 with NTG and AT in WB reduced platelet inhibition to 31.6±6.8% (P<0.01). Incubation of WB and AT with 30 μM L-NMMA reduced NTG-induced inhibition of platelet aggregation to 26.4±4.2% (P<0.001). It is concluded that vascular tissue contributes to the antiplatelet mechanism of action of NTG. Furthermore, NTG apparently evokes the release of CGRP from vascular tissue and this neuropeptide contributes to the antiplatelet actions of NTG. The antiplatelet activity of CGRP in whole blood is mediated primarily through the activation of nitric oxide synthase. PMID:9351518

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide released within the amygdala is involved in Pavlovian auditory fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kocorowski, L H; Helmstetter, F J

    2001-03-01

    The effects of CGRP and the CGRP receptor antagonist hCGRP(8-37) injected into the amygdala on both the acquisition and expression of fear behavior to a discrete auditory conditional stimulus (CS) and the training context were assessed. In Experiment 1, pretraining injections of CGRP but not hCGRP(8-37) produced fear-like behavior before any aversive stimuli were presented. While both compounds attenuated freezing to the contextual CS on the test day, neither affected learning about the auditory CS. In Experiment 2, pretesting injections of hCGRP(8-37) (0.63 mM) selectively attenuated freezing to the auditory CS but left freezing to the contextual CS intact. These data suggest that CGRP in the amygdala may selectively contribute to the expression of learning about auditory stimuli during fear conditioning.

  16. Capsaicin, arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction associated with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Di Bella, Gianluca; Cerrito, Marco; Coglitore, Sebastiano

    2009-05-01

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs significantly increase mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. It has also been reported that sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significant risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We present a case of arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction in a 59-year-old Italian man with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers which occurred the day before.

  17. Indole-3-carbinol protects against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity: role of calcitonin gene-related peptide and insulin-like growth factor-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Naga, Reem N.; Mahran, Yasmen F.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity associated with the clinical use of the anticancer drug cisplatin is a limiting problem. Thus, searching for new protective measures is required. Indole-3-carbinol is a powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. The present study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of indole-3-carbinol against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats were pre-treated with 20 mg/kg indole-3-carbinol orally before giving cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity was demonstrated where relative kidney weight, BUN and serum creatinine were significantly increased. Increased oxidative stress was evident in cisplatin group where GSH and SOD tissue levels were significantly depleted. Also, lipid peroxidation and NOX-1 were increased as compared to the control. Additionally, renal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced cell death was shown by increased caspase-3 and decreased expression of EGF, IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor. Nephrotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic effects induced by cisplatin were significantly ameliorated by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment. Besides, the role of CGRP in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was explored. Furthermore, cisplatin cytotoxic activity was significantly enhanced by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment in vitro. In conclusion, indole-3-carbinol provides protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Also, reduced expression of CGRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27417335

  18. Protective role of ellagitannins from Eucalyptus citriodora against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in rats: impact on oxidative stress, inflammation and calcitonin-gene related peptide.

    PubMed

    Al-Sayed, Eman; El-Naga, Reem N

    2015-01-15

    The gastroprotective activity of an ellagitannin-rich fraction obtained from Eucalyptus citriodora (ECF) was investigated against ethanol-induced gastric ulceration in rats. The rats were pretreated with ECF (25, 50 and 100mg/kg) 1h before the administration of absolute ethanol to induce acute gastric ulceration. The gastric lesions were significantly reduced by all doses of ECF. Notably, pre-treatment with ECF (100mg/kg) conferred 99.6% gastroprotection, which is significantly higher than that produced by omeprazole. Moreover, ECF administration markedly increased the mucin content in a dose-dependent manner. The potent gastroprotective effect of ECF could be partly mediated by attenuating ethanol-induced oxidative stress. ECF-pre-treatment markedly increased the depleted GSH and SOD levels in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, ECF significantly decreased the elevated MDA tissue levels induced by ethanol administration. The results demonstrated that ECF administration exerted a powerful anti-inflammatory activity as evidenced by the reduction in the pro-inflammatory markers; IL-1β, TNF-α, 5-LO and COX-2. Additionally, the caspase-3 tissue levels were significantly reduced in the groups pre-treated with ECF. These results suggest that ECF could exert a beneficial gastroprotective effect through their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. Furthermore, ECF pre-treatment significantly attenuated the ethanol-induced decrease in CGRP expression, which has a protective role against gastric ulceration. Histopathological examination revealed intact mucosal layer, absence of hemorrhage and necrosis in groups treated with ECF. Ellagitannins were identified as the major active constituents responsible for the marked antioxidant and gastroprotective properties of ECF. The HPLC-PDA-ESI/MS/MS technique was employed to identify the ellagitannins of E. citriodora. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Adrenergic stimulation-released histamine taken-up in adrenergic nerves induces endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Yuto; Takatori, Shingo; Hattori, Sayo; Zamami, Yoshito; Koyama, Toshihiro; Tangsucharit, Panot; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether histamine was taken up by perivascular adrenergic nerves and released by periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) to induce vascular responses. In rat mesenteric vascular beds treated with capsaicin to eliminate calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)ergic vasodilation and with active tone, PNS (1 - 4 Hz) induced only adrenergic nerve-mediated vasoconstriction. Histamine treatment for 20 min induced PNS-induced vasoconstriction followed by vasodilation without affecting CGRP-induced vasodilation. Chlorpheniramine, guanethidine, combination of histamine and desipramine, and endothelium-removal abolished PNS-induced vasodilation in histamine-treated preparations. These results suggest that histamine taken up by and released from adrenergic nerves by PNS causes endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rat mesenteric arteries.

  20. Adrenocorticotrophic and melanocyte-stimulating peptides in the human pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alexander P.; Lowry, Philip J.

    1974-01-01

    The adrenocorticotrophic and melanocyte-stimulating peptides of the human pituitary were investigated by means of radioimmunoassay, bioassay and physicochemical procedures. Substantial amounts of adrenocorticotrophin and a peptide resembling β-lipotrophin were identified in pituitary extracts, but α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, β-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide, which have been identified in the pars intermedia of pituitaries from other vertebrates, were not found. The absence of β-melanocyte-stimulating hormone appears to contradict previous chemical and radioimmunological studies. Our results suggest, however, that it is not a natural pituitary peptide but an artefact formed by enzymic degradation of β-lipotrophin during extraction. PMID:4368382

  1. The Differential Expression of Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide, alpha CGRP mRNA, Choline Acetyltransferase, and Low Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor in Cranial Motoneurons After Hypoglossal Nerve Injury During Postnatal Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-21

    postnatal weeks, produced rapid apoptosis of Schwann cells but the same injury resulted in negligible Schwann ce1110ss in 25 dpn rats (Trachtenberg & Thompson...in rapid apoptosis of’Schwann cells (Trachtenberg and Thompson, 1996). Whether comparable Schwann cell death also occurs 71 after nerve crush in rats...age in rats is not known. It may be relevant that axonal injury during the first two postnatal weeks resulted in rapid apoptosis ofSchwann cells but

  2. Na+-K+ pump stimulation improves contractility in damaged muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Torben

    2005-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a high content of Na+-K+-ATPase, an enzyme that is identical to the Na+-K+ pump, a transport system mediating active extrusion of Na+ from the cells and accumulation of K+ in the cells. The major function of the Na+-K+ pumps is to maintain the concentration gradients for Na+ and K+ across the plasma membrane. This generates the resting membrane potential, allowing the propagation of action potentials, excitation-contraction coupling and force development. Muscles exposed to (1) high extracellular K+ or (2) low extracellular Na+ show a considerable loss of force. A similar force decline is elicited by (3) increasing Na+ permeability or (4) decreasing K+ permeability. Under all of these four conditions, stimulation of the Na+-K+ pumps can restore contractility. Following exposure to electroporation or fatiguing stimulation, muscle cell membranes develop leaks to Na+ and K+ and a partially reversible loss of force. The restoration of force is abolished by blocking the Na+-K+ pumps and markedly improved by stimulating the Na+-K+ pumps with beta 2-agonists, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or dbcAMP. These observations indicate that the Na+-K+ pumps are important for the functional compensation of the commonly occurring loss of muscle cell integrity. Stimulation of the Na+-K+ pumps with beta 2-agonists or other agents may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of muscle cell damage induced by electrical shocks, prolonged exercise, burns, or bruises.

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) via up-regulation of CGRP and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liucheng; Song, Tao; Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n=15), DM group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG.

  4. ECL-cell histamine mobilization in conscious rats: effects of locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Bernsand, M; Konagaya, T; Håkanson, R

    2001-12-01

    1. The ECL cells control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to circulating gastrin. In addition, the ECL cells are thought to operate under nervous control and to be influenced by local inflammatory processes. 2. The purpose of the present study was to monitor histamine mobilization from ECL cells in conscious rats in response to locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators. 3. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. Three days later, the agents to be tested were administered via the microdialysis probe and their effects on basal (48 h fast) and stimulated (intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, 3 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)) mobilization of ECL-cell histamine was monitored by continuous measurement of histamine in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). 4. Locally administered gastrin-17 and sulfated cholecystokinin-8 mobilized histamine as did pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27, vasoactive intestinal peptide, peptide YY, met-enkephalin, endothelin and noradrenaline, adrenaline and isoprenaline. 5. While gastrin, sulfated-cholecystokinin-8, met-enkephalin and isoprenaline induced a sustained elevation of the submucosal histamine concentration, endothelin, peptide YY, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, noradrenaline and adrenaline induced a transient elevation. 6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, somatostatin and the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-stimulated histamine mobilization. 7. The gut hormones neurotensin and secretin and the neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide, neuropeptide Y and substance P failed to affect ECL-cell histamine mobilization, while motilin and neuromedin U-25 had weak stimulatory effects. Also acetylcholine, carbachol, serotonin and the amino acid neurotransmitters aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and glycine were inactive or weakly

  5. Calcitonin Peptide Family Members Are Differentially Regulated by LPS and Inhibit Functions of Rat Alveolar NR8383 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soultanova, Aichurek; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Pfeil, Uwe; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the calcitonin peptide family—calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (AM), and adrenomedullin2/intermedin (IMD)–exert modulatory effects upon monocytes and macrophages of various extrapulmonary origins. Utilizing the rat alveolar macrophage (AMφ) cell line NR8383, we here set out to determine to which extent these three peptides and their receptors are differentially regulated in AMφ and what specific effects they have on AMφ key functions. LPS treatment differentially up-regulated expression of the peptides and receptors. Among the three peptides, IMD mRNA content was lowest both in primary rat AMφ and NR8383 cells, whereas IMD peptide dominated in basal and LPS-stimulated secretion from NR8383 cells. Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis and TNF-α production were inhibited by AM, IMD, and CGRP, whereas pro-IL-1β mRNA was slightly down-regulated exclusively by CGRP. Neither of these peptides affected IL-6 or IL-10 production. None increased intracellular calcium concentration, but AM significantly inhibited store-operated calcium entry. In conclusion, the rat AMφ cell line NR8383 is both a source and a target of the calcitonin peptide family members AM, IMD, and CGRP. Despite sharing proteins of the receptor complexes, AM, IMD, and CGRP each showed a characteristic pattern of effects and regulation, suggesting that these closely related peptides are not just redundant members of one common signaling pathway but act in concert by addressing parallel signaling cascades. Since peptide and receptor expression are up-regulated by LPS, these signaling pathways might act as inhibitory feedback mechanisms in pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27737007

  6. Current-modulated electrical stimulation as a treatment for peripheral nerve regeneration in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hong; Cheng, Yu-Kai; Chen, Jia-Jin J; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    To study if electrical stimulation (ES) can be a useful tool to improve functional recovery after neuronal injury in the peripheral nervous system. We studied the effects of 2 Hz of percutaneous ES at different intensities of 1, 10 and 20 mA on peripheral nerve regeneration in rats with diabetes induced by streptozotocin. Non-stimulated diabetic rats were used as the sham-controls. A10-mm gap was made in the rat sciatic nerve by suturing the stumps into silicone rubber tubes and stimulation was carried out every other day for 3 weeks starting 1 week after surgery. After 4 weeks of recovery, the diabetic rats showed that ES of 1 mA or above could increase the cutaneous blood flow in their ipsilateral hindpaw to the injury. ES of 10 mA could improve the amplitude and the area of evoked muscle action potentials with faster target muscle reinnervation. ES of 10 mA could also ameliorate the calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in lamina I-II regions in the dorsal horn ipsilateral to the injury and the number of macrophages in the diabetic distal sciatic nerve. The impaired growth and maturation of regenerating axons in diabetic rat could be improved by ES of 10 mA or above. All these results lead to the conclusion that ES of 10 mA or above might be necessary to improve regeneration after a dissect lesion of the sciatic nerve in the diabetic rat.

  7. [The central mechanisms of the stimulating influence of intervalic hypoxic conditioning on the endocrine function of the pancreas in rats].

    PubMed

    Abramov, A V

    1997-01-01

    In the investigation of Wistar rats the morpho-functional state of the neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of n. vagus (DVC), locus coeruleus (LC) and peptidergic neurons of medical parvocellular subnuclei of paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVHmp) in the conditions of intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) (6 hours a day on the altitude 6000 m for 21 day) was studied. Immunocytochemical method was used to determine the functional state of peptidergic neurons of PVMmp and of the median eminence of hypothalamus, which are synthesizing neurotensin, cholecystokinin, bombesin, leu- and met-enkephalins, calcitonin-gene-related peptide and vasointestinal peptide. It was established that IHT leads to the activation of peptidergic neurons of PVHmp, neurons of DVC and to the lesser restrain of LC. It is demonstrated that these structures may take part in realisation of IHT's stimulating effect on the state of pancreatic beta-cells. In consists of insulin-stimulating and insulocyteprotective effects, that can be realised by the hypothalamic and neuroconducting ways of regulation of endocrine pancreas, with direct participation of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

  8. The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on tissue repair: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Santana, Eduardo Ferreira; Tacani, Pascale Mutti; Liebano, Richard Eloin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) consists of a generic application of low-frequency, pulsed electrical currents transmitted by electrodes through the skin surface. It is a therapeutic modality that is nonpharmacological, noninvasive, inexpensive, easy to use and widely applied in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To narratively review the scientific evidence of the effects of TENS on tissue repair with respect to wound healing, skin flap viability and tendinous repair. METHODS: The study was conducted using the MEDLINE, Lilacs and Scielo databases, without limit to the period of publication, and was completed in November 2011. Inclusion criteria were randomized or nonrandomized, controlled or noncontrolled clinical trials, and experimental trials involving rats subjected to TENS for tissue repair. RESULTS: Thirty articles on tissue repair were found and, among these, 14 reported on wound healing, 14 reported on skin flaps and two analyzed tedinous repair. DISCUSSION: It was suggested that TENS stimulates skin wound healing and tendon repair, as well as the viability of random skin flaps. Such effects may be due to the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, which would increase blood flow and, consequently, hasten the events leading to tissue repair. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the scientific evidence regarding the effects of TENS on tissue repair, the findings of the present literature review were inconclusive because data from the randomized controlled clinical trials were insufficient to confirm such effects. PMID:24294017

  9. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  10. C-type natriuretic peptide stimulates ovarian follicle development.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yorino; Cheng, Yuan; Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Takae, Seido; Hsueh, Aaron J W

    2012-07-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) encoded by the NPPC (Natriuretic Peptide Precursor C) gene expressed in ovarian granulosa cells inhibits oocyte maturation by activating the natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)B (NPRB) in cumulus cells. RT-PCR analyses indicated increased NPPC and NPRB expression during ovarian development and follicle growth, associated with increases in ovarian CNP peptides in mice. In cultured somatic cells from infantile ovaries and granulosa cells from prepubertal animals, treatment with CNP stimulated cGMP production. Also, treatment of cultured preantral follicles with CNP stimulated follicle growth whereas treatment of cultured ovarian explants from infantile mice with CNP, similar to FSH, increased ovarian weight gain that was associated with the development of primary and early secondary follicles to the late secondary stage. Of interest, treatment with FSH increased levels of NPPC, but not NPRB, transcripts in ovarian explants. In vivo studies further indicated that daily injections of infantile mice with CNP for 4 d promoted ovarian growth, allowing successful ovulation induction by gonadotropins. In prepubertal mice, CNP treatment alone also promoted early antral follicle growth to the preovulatory stage, leading to efficient ovulation induction by LH/human chorionic gonadotropin. Mature oocytes retrieved after CNP treatment could be fertilized in vitro and developed into blastocysts, allowing the delivery of viable offspring. Thus, CNP secreted by growing follicles is capable of stimulating preantral and antral follicle growth. In place of FSH, CNP treatment could provide an alternative therapy for female infertility.

  11. Vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulates tracheal submucosal gland secretion in ferret

    SciTech Connect

    Peatfield, A.C.; Barnes, P.J.; Bratcher, C.; Nadel, J.A.; Davis, B.

    1983-07-01

    We studied the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on the output of 35S-labeled macromolecules from ferret tracheal explants either placed in beakers or suspended in modified Ussing chambers. In Ussing chamber experiments, the radiolabel precursor, sodium (35S)sulfate, and all drugs were placed on the submucosal side of the tissue. Washings were collected at 30-min intervals from the luminal side and were dialyzed to remove unbound 35S, leaving radiolabeled macromolecules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide at 3 X 10(-7) M stimulated bound 35S output by a mean of + 252.6% (n . 14). The VIP response was dose-dependent with a near maximal response and a half maximal response at approximately 10(-6) M and 10(-8), M, respectively. The VIP effect was not inhibited by a mixture of tetrodotoxin, atropine, I-propranolol, and phentolamine. Vasoactive intestinal peptide had no effect on the electrical properties of the of the tissues. We conclude that VIP stimulates output of sulfated-macromolecules from ferret tracheal submucosal glands without stimulating ion transport. Our studies also suggest that VIP acts on submucosal glands via specific VIP receptors. Vasoactive intestinal peptide has been shown to increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP, and we suggest that this may be the mechanism for its effect on the output of macromolecules. This mechanism may be important in the neural regulation of submucosal gland secretion.

  12. Expression of ayu antimicrobial peptide genes after LPS stimulation

    PubMed Central

    NSRELDEN, Rehab Marray; HORIUCHI, Hiroyuki; FURUSAWA, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    Plecoglossus altivelis (ayu) is one of the most important fish species in the Japanese islands and in internal fish hatcheries. Living in open aquatic environments exposes fish to many pathogens. Therefore, they require rapid and strong immune defenses. We investigated in vivo the direct association between the ayu innate immune response, represented by the relative transcription of genes encoding the cathelicidin and hepcidin antimicrobial peptides, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a conventional pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of Gram-negative bacteria. Different concentrations of LPS (1, 10 and 100 µg/fish) were injected intraperitoneally into young (sexually immature) and adult (fully sexually mature) ayu. The relative expression of the antimicrobial peptide genes was measured 6 hr, 24 hr and 1 week after stimulation with LPS. We found a direct association between the expression of the antimicrobial peptide genes investigated and LPS stimulation. This relationship was time-, dose- and age-dependent. Further research is required to determine the cell-specific transcriptional regulation and posttranscriptional regulation of these antimicrobial peptides. PMID:28484129

  13. Gastrin-releasing peptide stimulates glycoconjugate release from feline trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, J.D.; Baraniuk, J.N.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Kaliner, M.A.; Shelhamer, J.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) on respiratory glycoconjugate (RGC) secretion was investigated in a feline tracheal organ culture model. RGC secretion was stimulated by GRP in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-5) M (range 15-38% increase above control) with a peak effect within 0.5-1 h of incubation. GRP-(14-27), the receptor binding portion of GRP, and the related molecule, bombesin, also stimulated RGC secretion by approximately 20% above control. Acetyl-GRP-(20-27) stimulated RGC release by 10%, whereas GRP-(1-16) was inactive. Autoradiographic studies with 125I-GRP revealed that specific binding was restricted to the submucosal glands and the surface epithelium. A specific radioimmunoassay showed the content of GRP in feline trachea after extraction with ethanol-acetic acid to be 156 +/- 91 fmol/g wet wt. Indirect immunohistochemistry indicated that ganglion cells located just outside the cartilage contained GRP-immunoreactive materials. GRP is a novel mucus secretagogue that may participate in regulating airway mucosal gland secretion.

  14. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  15. Helical synthetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Natarajan, Pradeep

    2010-04-06

    The present invention provides peptides comprising at least one amphipathic alpha helix and having an cholesterol mediating activity and a ABCA stabilization activity. The invention further provides methods of using such peptides.

  16. Peptide portions may hold key to amplifying bone against porosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, P.

    1990-02-02

    Pieces of peptides that are encoded in the calcitonin gene may explain enigmas in treatment of bone disease. Amplification of bone formation by two peptides with similar amino acid sequences was reported at the Third International Conference on the Fundamentals of Bone Growth at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), schools of medicine and dentistry. One treatment enigma is that calcitonin regulates normal bone resorption but does not work as well when administered for the treatment of osteoporosis. While hormone therapy does work, it has wide-ranging effects like the potential for an increased risk of breast cancer. Bone-growth promotion by a better-known peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), was described. The CGRP is usually processed in the nervous system and has a wide range of activity.

  17. Starfish gonadotropic hormone: Relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptides.

    PubMed

    Mita, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) of starfish Patiria (= Asterina) pectinifera is the first identified invertebrate gonadotropin to trigger final gamete maturation. Recently, chemical structures of RGP were identified in several species of starfish. Three kinds of RGP molecules are found in the class Asteroidea. The chemical structure of P. pectinifera RGP (PpeRGP) is conserved among starfish of the order Valvatida beyond species. In contrast, the chemical structures of RGP identified in Asterias amurensis and Aphelasterias japonica of the order Forcipulatida are quite different from that of PpeRGP. The chemical structure of RGP in A. amurensis (AamRGP) is exactly the same as that in Asterias rubens (the order Forcipulatida), Astropecten scoparius (the order Paxillosida), Astropecten polyacanthus (the order Paxillosida), and Echinaster luzonicus (the order Spinulosida). The chemical structure of Coscinasterias acutispina RGP (the order Forcipulatida) is consistent with that of A. japonica RGP (AjaRGP). In cross-experiments using P. pectinifera, A. amurensis, and A. japonica ovaries, AamRGP and AjaRGP can induce each species of ovaries. Neither AamRGP nor AjaRGP induce oocyte maturation and ovulation in the ovary of P. pectinifera, although the PpeRGP is active in ovaries of A. amurensis and A. japonica. This suggests that the AamRGP and AjaRGP partly act species specificity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. GLP-1 Receptor Stimulation of the Lateral Parabrachial Nucleus Reduces Food Intake: Neuroanatomical, Electrophysiological, and Behavioral Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jennifer E.; Farkas, Imre; Anesten, Fredrik; Anderberg, Rozita H.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Jansson, John-Olov; Liposits, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is a key nucleus for the regulation of feeding behavior. Inhibitory inputs from the hypothalamus to the PBN play a crucial role in the normal maintenance of feeding behavior, because their loss leads to starvation. Viscerosensory stimuli result in neuronal activation of the PBN. However, the origin and neurochemical identity of the excitatory neuronal input to the PBN remain largely unexplored. Here, we hypothesize that hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons provide excitatory inputs to the PBN, activation of which may lead to a reduction in feeding behavior. Our data, obtained from mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in GLP-1-producing neurons, revealed that hindbrain GLP-1-producing neurons project to the lateral PBN (lPBN). Stimulation of lPBN GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduced the intake of chow and palatable food and decreased body weight in rats. It also activated lPBN neurons, reflected by an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in this region. Further support for an excitatory role of GLP-1 in the PBN is provided by electrophysiological studies showing a remarkable increase in firing of lPBN neurons after Exendin-4 application. We show that within the PBN, GLP-1R activation increased gene expression of 2 energy balance regulating peptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and IL-6. Moreover, nearly 70% of the lPBN GLP-1 fibers innervated lPBN CGRP neurons. Direct intra-lPBN CGRP application resulted in anorexia. Collectively, our molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral data provide evidence for a functional role of the GLP-1R for feeding control in the PBN. PMID:25116706

  19. Endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 and -2 and deltorphin I, stimulate angiogenesis in the CAM assay.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xu; Cui, Shi-Gang; Wang, Ting; Liu, Qian; Song, Hong-Jin; Wang, Rui

    2008-01-28

    The opioid peptides modulate extensive bioactivities, including pain, cardiovascular response, development and so on. The effects of endogenous opioid peptides on angiogenesis were evaluated in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the first time in the present study. Endomorphin-1, endomorphin-2 and deltorphin I at the dosage of 1, 10, 100 nmol/embryo could stimulate angiogenesis dose-dependently, respectively. Naloxone, the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, did not influence angiogenesis alone; but it could antagonize the stimulative effects of the opioid peptides on angiogenesis when it was administrated in combination with the opioid peptides. Taken altogether, the results suggested that endogenous opioid peptides (endomorphin-1 and -2 and deltorphin I) stimulated angiogenesis in the CAM assay, and these effects were modulated with the opioid receptors. These data are important for potential future clinical implementation.

  20. CGRP, a vasodilator neuropeptide that stimulates neuromuscular transmission and EC coupling.

    PubMed

    Vega, Ana Victoria; Avila, Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) is a vasodilator; its plasma levels are altered in several human diseases, including migraine, hypertension and diabetes. CGRP is locally released by motor neurons, and is overexpressed in response to surgical or pharmacological blockage of neuromuscular transmission. Additionally to a brief discussion with regard to the clinical relevance of CGRP, this review focuses on the effects of CGRP on skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, as well as the corresponding pathophysiological consequences. EC coupling involves activation of 2 different types of calcium channels: dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) located at the sarcolemma, and ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) located at the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In response to electrical depolarization, DHPRs activate nearby and physically bound RyR1s, allowing Ca(2+) from the SR to move into the cytosol (termed voltage-gated Ca(2+) release, or VGCR). We recently found that CGRP stimulates VGCR by 350 % in as short as 1h. This effect, which lasts for at least 48 h, is due to activation of the CGRP receptor, and requires activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. CGRP also increases the amplitude of caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release (400 %); suggesting increased SR Ca(2+) content underlies stimulation of VGCR. Interestingly, in the long-term CGRP also increases the density of sarcolemmal DHPRs (up to 30%, within 24-48 h). We propose that these CGRP effects may contribute to prevent and/or restore symptoms in central core disease (CCD); a congenital myopathy that is linked to mutations in the gene encoding RyR1.

  1. Natriuretic peptides stimulate oocyte meiotic resumption in bovine.

    PubMed

    De Cesaro, Matheus P; Macedo, Mariana P; Santos, Joabel T; Rosa, Paulo R A; Ludke, Charles A; Rissi, Vitor B; Gasperin, Bernardo G; Gonçalves, Paulo B D

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of mRNA encoding natriuretic peptides (NPs) and their receptors in the cumulus-oocyte complex in cattle, a monovular mammalian species, and also to investigate the role of NPs in oocyte meiotic resumption in vitro. mRNA was observed for the NP precursor type-A (NPPA), type-C (NPPC), NP receptor-1 (NPR-1), receptor-2 (NPR-2) and receptor-3 (NPR-3) in bovine cumulus cells, and NPR-2 mRNA was observed in oocytes. These results are different from those obtained in mouse and pig models. The effects of NPPA, NP precursor type-B (NPPB) and NPPC on the resumption of arrested meiosis maintained by forskolin were studied at three different doses (10, 100 and 1000nM) with a 12h culture system. The germinal vesicle breakdown rates were greater (P≤0.05) in oocytes that were cultured in the presence of one or a combination of NPs (from 44% to 73%) than the negative control (from 24% to 27%). Additionally, it was demonstrated that the concentration of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) is increased by NPPA and NPPC in oocytes and cumulus cells after 3h of in vitro maturation. However, in both groups, the concentration of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in the oocyte did not increase between 3 and 6h of culture, even when forskolin was used. In summary, we observed the presence of mRNA for NPs and their receptors in the bovine cumulus-oocyte complex and demonstrated that, in vitro, NPPA, NPPB and NPPC stimulate oocyte meiotic resumption in a monovular species.

  2. Baclofen and the Release of Neuropeptides in the Cat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Morton, C. R.; Hutchison, W. D.; Lacey, G.

    1992-01-01

    The antibody microprobe technique was used to study the effect of baclofen on the release of immunoreactive substance P and immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide within the lower lumbar spinal cord of pentobarbitone-anaesthetized spinalized cats. Both peptides were released in the region of the substantia gelatinosa during ipsilateral noxious cutaneous stimulation or high-intensity electrical stimulation of a hind limb nerve. Intravenous administration of baclofen suppressed the excitation of lumbar dorsal horn neurons, but did not produce detectable alterations of the evoked release of immunoreactive substance P or immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide in the superficial grey matter dorsal to these neurons. The results suggest that the antinociceptive action of baclofen does not involve a reduction of the intraspinal release of substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide from the central terminals of nociceptive sensory fibres.

  3. Inhibition of Transmitter Release and Attenuation of Anti-retroviral-associated and Tibial Nerve Injury-related Painful Peripheral Neuropathy by Novel Synthetic Ca2+ Channel Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah M.; Schmutzler, Brian S.; Brittain, Joel M.; Dustrude, Erik T.; Ripsch, Matthew S.; Pellman, Jessica J.; Yeum, Tae-Sung; Hurley, Joyce H.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; White, Fletcher A.; Khanna, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    N-type Ca2+ channels (CaV2.2) are a nidus for neurotransmitter release and nociceptive transmission. However, the use of CaV2.2 blockers in pain therapeutics is limited by side effects resulting from inhibition of the physiological functions of CaV2.2 within the CNS. We identified an anti-nociceptive peptide (Brittain, J. M., Duarte, D. B., Wilson, S. M., Zhu, W., Ballard, C., Johnson, P. L., Liu, N., Xiong, W., Ripsch, M. S., Wang, Y., Fehrenbacher, J. C., Fitz, S. D., Khanna, M., Park, C. K., Schmutzler, B. S., Cheon, B. M., Due, M. R., Brustovetsky, T., Ashpole, N. M., Hudmon, A., Meroueh, S. O., Hingtgen, C. M., Brustovetsky, N., Ji, R. R., Hurley, J. H., Jin, X., Shekhar, A., Xu, X. M., Oxford, G. S., Vasko, M. R., White, F. A., and Khanna, R. (2011) Suppression of inflammatory and neuropathic pain by uncoupling CRMP2 from the presynaptic Ca2+ channel complex. Nat. Med. 17, 822–829) derived from the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), a protein known to bind and enhance CaV2.2 activity. Using a peptide tiling array, we identified novel peptides within the first intracellular loop (CaV2.2(388–402), “L1”) and the distal C terminus (CaV1.2(2014–2028) “Ct-dis”) that bound CRMP2. Microscale thermophoresis demonstrated micromolar and nanomolar binding affinities between recombinant CRMP2 and synthetic L1 and Ct-dis peptides, respectively. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that CRMP2 association with CaV2.2 was inhibited by L1 and Ct-dis peptides. L1 and Ct-dis, rendered cell-penetrant by fusion with the protein transduction domain of the human immunodeficiency virus TAT protein, were tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Depolarization-induced calcium influx in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was inhibited by both peptides. Ct-dis, but not L1, peptide inhibited depolarization-stimulated release of the neuropeptide transmitter calcitonin gene-related peptide in mouse DRG neurons. Similar results were obtained in DRGs

  4. High-Frequency Electrical Stimulation Can Be a Complementary Therapy to Promote Nerve Regeneration in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chia-Hong; Chen, Jia-Jin J.; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Bau, Da-Tian; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether 1 mA of percutaneous electrical stimulation (ES) at 0, 2, 20, or 200 Hz augments regeneration between the proximal and distal nerve stumps in streptozotocin diabetic rats. A10-mm gap was made in the diabetic rat sciatic nerve by suturing the stumps into silicone rubber tubes. Normal animals were used as the controls. Starting 1 week after transection, ES was applied between the cathode placed at the distal stump and the anode at the proximal stump every other day for 3 weeks. At 4 weeks after surgery, the normal controls and the groups receiving ES at 20, and 200 Hz had a higher success percentage of regeneration compared to the ES groups at 0 and 2 Hz. In addition, quantitative histology of the successfully regenerated nerves revealed that the groups receiving ES at a higher frequency, especially at 200 Hz, had a more mature structure with more myelinated fibers compared to those in the lower-frequency ES groups. Similarly, electrophysiology in the ES group at 200 Hz showed significantly shorter latency, larger amplitude, larger area of evoked muscle action potentials and faster conduction velocity compared to other groups. Immunohistochemical staining showed that ES at a higher frequency could significantly promote calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in lamina I-II regions in the dorsal horn and recruit a higher number of macrophages in the diabetic distal sciatic nerve. The macrophages were found that they could stimulate the secretion of nerve growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β in dissected sciatic nerve segments. The ES at a higher frequency could also increase cutaneous blood flow in the ipsilateral hindpaw to the injury. These results indicated that a high-frequency ES could be necessary to heal severed diabetic peripheral nerve with a long gap to be repaired. PMID:24265744

  5. Sensory nerves contribute to cutaneous vasodilator response to cathodal stimulation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Gohin, Stéphanie; Decorps, Johanna; Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique; Fromy, Bérengère

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous current-induced vasodilation (CIV) in response to galvanic current application is an integrative model of neurovascular interaction that relies on capsaicin-sensitive fiber activation. The upstream and downstream mechanisms related to the activation of the capsaicin-sensitive fibers involved in CIV are not elucidated. In particular, the activation of cutaneous transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels and/or acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) (activators mechanisms) and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) (effector mechanisms) have been tested. To assess cathodal CIV, we measured cutaneous blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry for 20min following cathodal current application (240s, 100μA) on the skin of the thigh in anesthetized healthy rats for 20min. CIV was studied in rats treated with capsazepine and amiloride to inhibit TRPV1 and ASIC channels, respectively; CGRP8-37 and SR140333 to antagonize CGRP and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors, respectively; compared to their respective controls. Cathodal CIV was attenuated by capsazepine (12±2% vs 54±6%, P<0.001), amiloride (19±8% vs 61±6%, P<0.01), CGRP8-37 (15±6% vs 61±6%, P<0.001) and SR140333 (9±5% vs 54±6%, P<0.001) without changing local acidification. This is the first integrative study performed in healthy rats showing that cutaneous vasodilation in response to cathodal stimulation is initiated by activation of cutaneous TRPV1 and ASIC channels likely through local acidification. The involvement of CGRP and NK1 receptors suggests that cathodal CIV is the result of CGRP and SP released through activated capsaicin-sensitive fibers. Therefore cathodal CIV could be a valuable method to assess sensory neurovascular function in the skin, which would be particularly relevant to evaluate the presence of small nerve fiber disorders and the effectiveness of treatments.

  6. Effects of insulin on vascular responses to spinal cord stimulation and vasoactive agents in pithed rats

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Shingo; Mizote, Masako; Zamami, Yoshito; Kurosaki, Yuji; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    Effects of insulin (2–600 pmol kg−1 min−1, i.v.) on vascular responses to spinal cord (lower thoracic vertebra, Th 9–12) stimulation (SCS) and to i.v. injection of noradrenaline (NA, 125–500 ng kg−1), angiotensin II (Ang II, 40–200 pmol kg−1), acetylcholine (ACh, 1 nmol kg−1), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, 0.1 nmol kg−1) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 5 μg kg−1) were examined in pithed rats. In euglycemic pithed rats, low and medium doses of insulin dose-dependently potentiated vasopressor responses to SCS (2–8 Hz), NA, while higher doses of insulin had little effect on SCS- and NA-induced pressor responses. All doses of insulin significantly augmented pressor responses to Ang II. In pithed rats with artificially increased blood pressure, SCS (2 and 4 Hz) induced a frequency-dependent depressor response, which was blocked by infusion of CGRP(8–37) (CGRP receptor antagonist, 60 nmol kg−1 min−1). In euglycemic pithed rats, low-doses of insulin significantly attenuated depressor responses to SCS and CGRP, but medium and high doses of insulin remained unaffected. All doses of insulin significantly inhibited depressor response to ACh, while SNP-induced depressor response was not significantly affected by any doses of insulin. These results suggest that insulin at low and medium concentrations increases adrenergic vasoconstriction, which is partly associated with inhibition of CGRPergic nerve function and endothelium function. It is also suggested that lack of insulin effect at higher concentrations may result from acute desensitization of insulin action, possibly via insulin receptors. PMID:14581176

  7. Cupric-amyloid beta peptide complex stimulates oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Vitek, Michael P; Mason, Ronald P

    2004-02-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an important role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, a number of papers have shown a synergistic neurotoxicity of amyloid beta peptide and cupric ions. We hypothesized that complexes of cupric ions with neurotoxic amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) can stimulate copper-mediated free radical formation. We found that neurotoxic Abeta (1-42), Abeta (1-40), and Abeta (25-35) stimulated copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate, whereas nontoxic Abeta (40-1) did not. Formation of ascorbate free radical was significantly increased by Abeta (1-42) in the presence of ceruloplasmin. Once cupric ion is reduced to cuprous ion, it can be oxidized by oxygen to generate superoxide radical or it can react with hydrogen peroxide to form hydroxyl radical. Hydrogen peroxide greatly increased the oxidation of cyclic hydroxylamines and ascorbate by cupric-amyloid beta peptide complexes, implying redox cycling of copper ions. Using the spin-trapping technique, we have shown that toxic amyloid beta peptides led to a 4-fold increase in copper-mediated hydroxyl radical formation. We conclude that toxic Abeta peptides do indeed stimulate copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, cupric-amyloid beta peptide-stimulated free radical generation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113- 130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  10. Amphipathic polyproline peptides stimulate cholesterol efflux by the ABCA1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Sviridov, D O; Drake, S K; Freeman, L A; Remaley, A T

    2016-03-18

    ApoA-I mimetics are short synthetic peptides that contain an amphipathic α-helix and stimulate cholesterol efflux by the ABCA1 transporter in a detergent-like extraction mechanism. We investigated the use of amphipathic peptides with a polypro helix for stimulating cholesterol efflux by ABCA1. Polypro peptides were synthesized with modified prolines, containing either a hydrophobic phenyl group (Prop) or a polar N-acetylgalactosamine (Prog) attached to the pyrrolidine ring and were designated as either PP-2, 3, 4, or 5, depending on the number of 3 amino acid repeat units (Prop-Prog-Prop). Based on molecular modeling, these peptides were predicted to be relatively rigid and to bind to a phospholipid bilayer. By CD spectroscopy, PP peptides formed a Type-II polypro helix in an aqueous solution. PP-2 was inactive in promoting cholesterol efflux, but peptides with more than 2 repeat units were active. PP-4 showed a similar Vmax as a much longer amphipathic α-helical peptide, containing 37 amino acids, but had a Km that was approximately 20-fold lower. PP peptides were specific in that they did not stimulate cholesterol efflux from cells not expressing ABCA1 and were also non-cytotoxic. Addition of PP-3, 4 and 5 to serum promoted the formation of smaller size HDL species (7 nM) and increased its capacity for ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux by approximately 20-35% (p < 0.05). Because of their relatively small size and increased potency, amphipathic peptides with a polypro helix may represent an alternative structural motif for the development of apoA-I mimetic peptides.

  11. Potassium channel stimulation by natriuretic peptides through cGMP-dependent dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    White, R E; Lee, A B; Shcherbatko, A D; Lincoln, T M; Schonbrunn, A; Armstrong, D L

    1993-01-21

    Natriuretic peptides inhibit the release and action of many hormones through cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), but the mechanism of cGMP action is unclear. In frog ventricular muscle and guinea-pig hippocampal neurons, cGMP inhibits voltage-activated Ca2+ currents by stimulating phosphodiesterase activity and reducing intracellular cyclic AMP; however, this mechanism is not involved in the action of cGMP on other channels or on Ca2+ channels in other cells. Natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat pituitary also stimulate guanylyl cyclase activity but inhibit secretion by increasing membrane conductance to potassium. In an electrophysiological study on rat pituitary tumour cells, we identified the large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK) as the primary target of another inhibitory neuropeptide, somatostatin. Here we report that atrial natriuretic peptide also stimulates BK channel activity in GH4C1 cells through protein dephosphorylation. Unlike somatostatin, however, the effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on BK channel activity is preceded by a rapid and potent stimulation of cGMP production and requires cGMP-dependent protein kinase activity. Protein phosphatase activation by cGMP-dependent kinase could explain the inhibitory effects of natriuretic peptides on electrical excitability and the antagonism of cGMP and cAMP in many systems.

  12. Stimulating TRPV1 externalization and synthesis in dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to PGE2 potentiation of TRPV1 activity and nociceptor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Ma, W; St-Jacques, B; Rudakou, U; Kim, Y N

    2017-04-01

    Persistent peripheral sensitization contributes to chronic pain. Plasticity of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) induced by pro-inflammatory mediators contributes to sensitization. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) enriched in injured tissues is known not only directly to sensitize DRG neurons, but also to potentiate sensitizing effects of other pain mediators such as capsaicin and its receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). It remains unknown whether PGE2 potentiates TRPV1 activity by stimulating its synthesis, cell surface and axonal trafficking in DRG neurons. Combined biochemical, morphological, pharmacological and behavioral approaches have been used to address this issue in both in vitro and in vivo models. PGE2 increased TRPV1 externalization in cultured rat DRG neurons in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, an event blocked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis or anterograde export. EP1 and EP4, but not EP2 and EP3, mediated this event. EP1 agonist-induced TRPV1 externalization was suppressed by inhibitors of CaMKII, PLC, PKC and PKCε, while EP4 agonist-induced TRPV1 externalization by inhibitors of cAMP/PKA and ERK/MAPK. Pre-exposure to PGE2 potentiated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from cultured DRG neurons evoked by subsequent capsaicin stimulation. This event was blocked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis or export, suggesting that PGE2-induced TRPV1 synthesis and externalization is coupled to enhanced TRPV1 activity. Pre-exposure to PGE2 not only prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by subsequent capsaicin challenge, but also increased TRPV1 levels in L4-6 DRG, sciatic nerves and plantar skin. Our data indicate that facilitating TRPV1 synthesis, cell surface and axonal trafficking is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2 potentiation of TRPV1 activity. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  13. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells.

  14. Peptides having reduced toxicity that stimulate cholesterol efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan; Danho, Waleed

    2016-08-16

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABCA1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. Further, the peptides of the invention have little or no toxicity when administered at therapeutic and higher doses. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  15. Peptide YY antagonizes beta-adrenergic-stimulated release of insulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley, G.H. Jr.; Lluis, F.; Gomex, G.; Ishizuka, J.; Holland, B.; Thompson, J.C. )

    1988-04-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are peptides of 36 amino acids that share structural homologies with pancreatic polypeptide (PP). PP is predominantly found in the endocrine pancreas. PYY is primarily found in mucosal endocrine cells of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum, whereas NPY is found in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Previous studies indicate that these peptides can interact with the autonomic nervous system. The objective of the present experiments was to study the effect of PYY on neurally stimulated insulin release in conscious dogs. Intravenous administration of PYY (100, 200, and 400 pmol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1} {center dot}h{sup {minus}1}) reduced 2-DG-stimulated insulin release in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.05) without affecting plasma glucose levels. Administration of NPY, but not PP, reduced 2-DG-stimulated release of insulin. The inhibitory action of PYY on 2-DG-stimulated insulin release persisted in the presence of atropine or phentolamine treatment; however, hexamethonium alone or phentolamine plus propranolol treatment blocked the inhibitory action of PYY. Release of insulin stimulated by the {beta}-agonist isoproterenol was also inhibited by PYY. These results indicate that PYY can inhibit autonomic neurotransmission by a mechanism that may involve ganglionic or postganglionic inhibition of {beta}-adrenergic stimulation. The findings suggest a role for PYY and NPY in the autonomic regulation of insulin release.

  16. Melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides inhibit TNF-alpha signaling in human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Hill, R P; MacNeil, S; Haycock, J W

    2006-02-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) has been identified as a potent anti-inflammatory in various tissues including the skin. It has previously been shown in skin cell keratinocytes and melanocytes/melanoma cells that MSH peptides inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) upregulation. However, the precise anti-inflammatory role of MSH peptides in dermal fibroblasts is unclear. Some studies report on pro-inflammatory responses, while others on anti-inflammatory responses. The present study confirms MC1R expression in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and reports that the MSH peptides alpha-MSH and KP(-D-)V inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity and ICAM-1 upregulation, consistent with an anti-inflammatory role. However, involvement of IkappaB-alpha regulation by either peptide was not confirmed, supporting a mechanism independent of the NF-kappaB inhibitor. In conclusion, alpha-MSH and KP(-D-)V peptides have an anti-inflammatory action on dermal fibroblast signaling by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF-alpha in vitro.

  17. Biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius favored by a competence-stimulating signaling peptide.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Fernanda C; Pecharki, Daniele; Scheie, Anne A

    2004-09-01

    Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate population behavior. In several streptococci, quorum sensing mediated by competence-stimulating peptides (CSP) is associated with development of competence for transformation. We show here that a synthetic CSP favored the biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius without affecting the rate of culture growth.

  18. The immune-stimulating peptide WKYMVm has therapeutic effects against ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Doo; Kwon, Soonil; Lee, Sung Kyun; Kook, Minsoo; Lee, Ha Young; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Park, Chan Bae; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the therapeutic effects of an immune-stimulating peptide, WKYMVm, in ulcerative colitis. The administration of WKYMVm to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated mice reversed decreases in body weight, bleeding score and stool score in addition to reversing DSS-induced mucosa destruction and shortened colon. The WKYMVm-induced therapeutic effect against ulcerative colitis was strongly inhibited by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 2 antagonist, WRWWWW, indicating the crucial role of FPR2 in this effect. Mechanistically, WKYMVm effectively decreases intestinal permeability by stimulating colon epithelial cell proliferation. WKYMVm also strongly decreases interleukin-23 and transforming growth factor-β production in the colon of DSS-treated mice. We suggest that the potent immune-modulating peptide WKYMVm and its receptor FPR2 may be useful in the development of efficient therapeutic agents against chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:24030327

  19. GPR54 peptide agonists stimulate insulin secretion from murine, porcine and human islets.

    PubMed

    Bowe, James E; Foot, Victoria L; Amiel, Stephanie A; Huang, Gao Cai; Lamb, Morgan W; Lakey, Jonathan; Jones, Peter M; Persaud, Shanta J

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of 10 and 13 amino acid forms of kisspeptin on dynamic insulin secretion from mammalian islets since it is not clear from published data whether the shorter peptide is stimulatory while the longer peptide inhibits insulin release. Insulin secretion was measured by radioimmunoassay following perifusion of human, pig, rat and mouse isolated islets with kisspeptin-10 or kisspeptin-13 in the presence of 20 mM glucose. Both peptides stimulated rapid, reversible potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from islets of all species tested. These data indicate that both kisspeptin-10 and kisspeptin-13, which is an extension of kisspeptin-10 by three amino acids, act directly at islet β-cells of various species to potentiate insulin secretion, and suggest that inhibitory effects reported in earlier studies may reflect differences in experimental protocols.

  20. Neuron-Derived ADAM10 Production Stimulates Peripheral Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain by Cleavage of E-Cadherin in Satellite Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Ouyang, Qing; Chen, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Li, Xiang-Nan; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the potential involvement of metalloproteinase family proteins in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using the spinal nerve ligation model, we investigated whether ADAM10 proteins participate in pain regulation. By implementing invitro methods, we produced a purified culture of satellite glial cells to study the underlying mechanisms of ADAM10 in regulating neuropathic pain. Results showed that the ADAM10 protein was expressed in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing neurons of the dorsal root ganglia, and expression was upregulated following spinal nerve ligation surgery invivo. Intrathecal administration of GI254023X, an ADAM10 selective inhibitor, to the rats one to three days after spinal nerve ligation surgery attenuated the spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of ADAM10 recombinant protein simulated pain behavior in normal rats to a similar extent as those treated by spinal nerve ligation surgery. These results raised a question about the relative contribution of ADAM10 in pain regulation. Further results showed that ADAM10 might act by cleaving E-cadherin, which is mainly expressed in satellite glial cells. GI254023X reversed spinal nerve ligation-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and activation of cyclooxygenase 2 after spinal nerve ligation. β-catenin, which creates a complex with E-cadherin in the membranes of satellite glial cells, was also downregulated by spinal nerve ligation surgery in satellite glial cells. Finally, knockdown expression of β-catenin by lentiviral infection in purified satellite glial cells increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Our findings indicate that neuron-derived ADAM10 production stimulates peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain by cleaving E-cadherin in satellite glial cells.

  1. Adrenergic stimulation-released 5-HT stored in adrenergic nerves inhibits CGRPergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hirohito; Takatori, Shingo; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Miyake, Natsuki; Tangsucharit, Panot; Mio, Mitsunobu; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 5-HT is taken up by and stored in adrenergic nerves and periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) releases 5-HT to cause vasoconstriction in rat mesenteric arteries. The present study investigated whether PNS-released 5-HT stored in adrenergic nerves affects the function of perivascular calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing (CGRPergic) nerves. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rat mesenteric vascular beds without endothelium and with active tone were perfused with Krebs solution. Changes in perfusion pressure in response to PNS and CGRP injection were measured before (control) and after perfusion of Krebs solution containing 5-HT (10 µM) for 20 min. Distributions of 5-HT- and TH-immunopositive fibres in mesenteric arteries were studied using immunohistochemical methods. KEY RESULTS PNS (1–4 Hz) frequency dependently caused adrenergic nerve-mediated vasoconstriction followed by CGRPergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation. 5-HT treatment inhibited PNS-induced vasodilatation without affecting exogenous CGRP-induced vasodilatation, while it augmented PNS-induced vasoconstriction. Guanethidine (adrenergic neuron blocker), methysergide (non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist) and BRL15572 (selective 5-HT1D receptor antagonist) abolished inhibition of PNS-induced vasodilatation in 5-HT-treated preparations. Combined treatment with 5-HT and desipramine (catecholamine transporter inhibitor), but not fluoxetine (selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor), did not inhibit PNS-induced vasodilatation. Exogenous 5-HT inhibited PNS-induced vasodilatation, which was antagonized by methysergide. In immunohistochemical experiments, 5-HT-immunopositive nerves, colocalized with adrenergic TH-immunopositive nerves, were observed only in 5-HT-treated mesenteric arteries, but not in control preparations or arteries co-treated with desipramine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that 5-HT can be taken up by and released from adrenergic nerves in vitro by PNS to inhibit

  2. Stimulation of rat cranial dura mater with potassium chloride causes CGRP release into the cerebrospinal fluid and increases medullary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Dux, Mária; Will, Christine; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Fischer, Michael J M; Messlinger, Karl

    2017-02-10

    Primary headaches may be accompanied by increased intracranial blood flow induced by the release of the potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from activated meningeal afferents. We aimed to record meningeal and medullary blood flow simultaneously and to localize the sites of CGRP release in rodent preparations in vivo and ex vivo. Blood flow in the exposed rat parietal dura mater and the medulla oblongata was recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry, while the dura was stimulated by topical application of 60mM potassium chloride (KCl). Samples of jugular venous plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the cisterna magna were analysed for CGRP concentrations using an enzyme immunoassay. In a hemisected rat skull preparation lined with dura mater the CGRP releasing effect of KCl superfusion was examined. Superfusion of the dura mater with KCl decreased meningeal blood flow unless alpha-adrenoceptors were blocked by phentolamine, whereas the medullary blood flow was increased. The same treatment caused increased CGRP concentrations in jugular plasma and CSF and induced significant CGRP release in the hemisected rat skull preparation. Anaesthesia of the trigeminal ganglion by injection of lidocaine reduced increases in medullary blood flow and CGRP concentration in the CSF upon meningeal KCl application. CGRP release evoked by depolarisation of meningeal afferents is accompanied by increased blood flow in the medulla oblongata but not the dura mater. This discrepancy can be explained by the smooth muscle depolarising effect of KCl and the activation of sympathetic vasoconstrictor mechanisms. The medullary blood flow response is most likely mediated by CGRP released from activated central terminals of trigeminal afferents. Increased blood supply of the medulla oblongata and CGRP release into the CSF may also occur in headaches accompanying vigorous activation of meningeal afferents.

  3. Ventral tegmental self-stimulation selectively induces opioid peptide release in rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Stein, E A

    1993-01-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICS) is thought to activate neuronal systems involved in processing natural reinforcing agents. Metabolic mapping studies have previously demonstrated a subset of CNS structures specifically engaged by ICS in animals receiving stimulation actively vs. passively. Since opiates are known to enhance ICS behavior and presumably its reinforcing properties, the current study addressed the question of the role of opioid peptides as mediators of ICS. Rats were trained on a fixed ration (FR) 20 schedule of responding maintained by ICS. Following response stabilization, rats were assigned either to an active or a corresponding yoked stimulation group at 1 of 2 schedules of reinforcement (i.e., FR1-YFR1, FR20-YFR20, or sedentary control), and opioid peptide release was inferred from in vivo receptor occupancy. Autoradiographic analyses identified 3 groups of structures. Treatment-induced alterations in occupancy were seen in the medial dorsal nucleus of the thalamus, basolateral amygdala, ventral pallidum, medial habenula, dorsal raphe, posterior hypothalamus, substantia nigra pars compacta, agranular preinsular cortex, and zona incerta. Depending upon the structure, peptide release was dependent upon stimulus contingency (active vs. yoked) and/or schedule (FR1 vs. FR20). Evidence for ICS-induced inhibition of peptide release was found in the habenula and preinsular cortex. Nine additional structures, all components of, or receiving projections from, the limbic system, revealed complex interactions between ICS treatment and the electrode side. Finally, a widespread ipsilateral increase in receptor binding was seen rostrally from the cingulate, olfactory tubercle, and nucleus accumbens, along the lateral hypothalamus and hippocampus, and extending caudally to the substantia nigra and ventral tegmentum. These later effects appear to be related to stimulation-induced changes in blood flow and subsequent ligant presentation increases. Collectively

  4. Metabolically Stabilized Long-Circulating PEGylated Polyacridine Peptide Polyplexes Mediate Hydrodynamically Stimulated Gene Expression in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Christian A.; Baumhover, Nicholas J.; Duskey, Jason T.; Khargharia, Sanjib; Kizzire, Koby; Ericson, Mark D.; Rice, Kevin G.

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of PEGylated polyacridine peptides was developed that mediate potent stimulated gene transfer in the liver of mice. Polyacridine peptides, (Acr-X)n-Cys-PEG, possessing 2–6 repeats of Lys-acridine (Acr) spaced by either Lys, Arg, Leu or Glu, were Cys derivatized with polyethylene glycol (PEG 5000 Da) and evaluated as in vivo gene transfer agents. An optimal peptide of (Acr-Lys)6-Cys-PEG was able to bind to plasmid DNA (pGL3) with high affinity by polyintercalation, stabilize DNA from metabolism by DNAse and extend the pharmacokinetic half-life of DNA in the circulation for up to 2 hrs. A tail vein dose of PEGylated polyacridine peptide pGL3 polyplexes (1 μg in 50 μl), followed by a stimulatory hydrodynamic dose of normal saline at times ranging from 5–60 min post-DNA administration, led to a high level of luciferase expression in the liver, equivalent to levels mediated by direct hydrodynamic dosing of 1 μg of pGL3. The results establish the unique properties of PEGylated polyacridine peptides as a new and promising class of gene delivery peptides that facilitate reversible binding to plasmid DNA, protecting it from DNase in vivo resulting in an extended circulatory half-life, and release of transfection-competent DNA into the liver to mediate a high-level of gene expression upon hydrodynamic boost. PMID:20720577

  5. A new relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide identified in the starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Mita, Masatoshi; Daiya, Misaki; Haraguchi, Shogo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2015-10-01

    Relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) of starfish Asterina pectinifera was the first invertebrate gonadotropin to have its chemical structure identified. However, it is unclear whether gonadotropic hormones in other species starfish are relaxin-like peptides. Thus, this study tried to identify the molecular structure of gonadotropic hormone in Asterias amurensis. As a result, we identified A. amurensis gonadotropic hormone as the RGP (AamRGP). The DNA sequence encoding AamRGP consisted of 330 base pairs with an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 109 amino acids (aa), including a signal peptide (26 aa), B-chain (20 aa), C-peptide (38 aa) and A-chain (25 aa). Comparing with A. pectinifera RGP (ApeRGP), the amino acid identity levels between AmaRGP and ApeRGP were 58% for the A-chain and 73% for the B-chain. Furthermore, chemical synthetic AamRGP induced gamete spawning and oocyte maturation in ovarian fragments of A. amurensis. In contrast, the ovary of A. pectinifera failed to respond to the AamRGP. This suggested that AamRGP is a new relaxin-like peptide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Responses of peptide-specific T cells to stimulation with polystyrene beads carrying HLA class I molecules loaded with single peptides.

    PubMed

    Chersi, Alberto; Galati, Rossella; Accapezzato, Daniele; Francavilla, Vittorio; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Butler, Richard H; Tanigaki, Nobuyuki

    2004-08-01

    Cell-sized microbeads carrying single peptide-loaded HLA class I molecules were prepared for HLA-A2 and HLA-B7 by a simple procedure which transfers single peptide-loaded HLA class I molecules from cultured cells to polystyrene beads using anti-peptide antibodies directed to an intracellular segment of HLA-A alpha chains. The surface density of peptide-loaded HLA class I molecules on beads was comparable to that on the peptide-loaded cells. HLA-A2 beads loaded with an HCV peptide HCV1073 were tested for stimulation activity on an HCV1073-specific CD8+ T cell clone NS3-1. A substantial level of gamma-IFN production was induced. The stimulation was peptide-specific. The efficiency was dependent on the bead concentration and the surface HLA class I density on beads and enhanced significantly by co-coupling of anti-CD28 to peptide-loaded beads. The peptide-loading efficiency on HLA class I molecules and the transfer efficiency of HLA class I molecules to polystyrene beads were reasonably high for HLA-A2 and HLA-B7. Thus, polystyrene beads carrying these single peptide-loaded HLA class I molecules are potentially useful in further analysis of the co-stimulatory or inhibitory factors involved in CD8+ T cell responses and eventually in detection of cytotoxic T cells in PBLs.

  7. alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone and oxytocin: a peptide signalling cascade in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, N

    2006-09-01

    alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and oxytocin share remarkable similarities of effects on behaviour in rats; in particular, they both inhibit feeding behaviour and stimulate sexual behaviour. Recently, we showed that alpha-MSH interacts with the magnocellular oxytocin system in the supraoptic nucleus; alpha-MSH induces the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of magnocellular neurones but it inhibits the secretion of oxytocin from their nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary. This effect of alpha-MSH on supraoptic nucleus oxytocin neurones is remarkable for two reasons. First, it illustrates the capacity of magnocellular neurones to differentially regulate peptide release from dendrites and axons and, second, it emphasises the putative role of magnocellular neurones as a major source of central oxytocin release, and as a likely substrate of some oxytocin-mediated behaviours. The ability of peptides to differentially control secretion from different compartments of their targets indicates one way by which peptide signals might have a particularly significant effect on neuronal circuitry. This suggests a possible explanation for the striking way in which some peptides can influence specific, complex behaviours.

  8. Enterococcus faecium stimulates human neutrophils via the formyl-peptide receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Bloes, Dominik Alexander; Otto, Michael; Peschel, Andreas; Kretschmer, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    The human formyl-peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX) senses phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptide toxins produced by pathogenic staphylococcal species and plays a crucial role in directing neutrophil influx during staphylococcal infection. However, it has remained unclear if FPR2 responds also to molecules from other bacterial pathogens. Here we analyzed a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens and found that apart from staphylococci only certain enterococcal strains have the capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX. Most of the analyzed Enterococcus faecium but only sporadic Enterococcus faecalis strains released FPR2/ALX-stimulating molecules leading to neutrophil calcium ion fluxes, chemotaxis, and complement receptor upregulation. Among ten test strains vancomycin-resistant E. faecium had a significantly higher capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX than vancomycin-susceptible strains, suggesting an association of strong FPR2/ALX activation with health-care associated strains. The enterococcal FPR2/ALX agonists were found to be peptides or proteins, which appear, however, to be unrelated to staphylococcal PSMs in sequence and physicochemical properties. Enterococci are among the most frequent invasive bacterial pathogens but the basis of enterococcal virulence and immune activation has remained incompletely understood. Our study indicates that previously unrecognized proteinaceous agonists contribute to Enterococcus-host interaction and underscores the importance of FPR2/ALX in host defense against major endogenous bacterial pathogens.

  9. Na+,K+-pump stimulation improves contractility in isolated muscles of mice with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard; Clausen, Johannes D.; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Hayward, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    In patients with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperKPP), attacks of muscle weakness or paralysis are triggered by K+ ingestion or rest after exercise. Force can be restored by muscle work or treatment with β2-adrenoceptor agonists. A missense substitution corresponding to a mutation in the skeletal muscle voltage-gated Na+ channel (Nav1.4, Met1592Val) causing human HyperKPP was targeted into the mouse SCN4A gene (mutants). In soleus muscles prepared from these mutant mice, twitch, tetanic force, and endurance were markedly reduced compared with soleus from wild type (WT), reflecting impaired excitability. In mutant soleus, contractility was considerably more sensitive than WT soleus to inhibition by elevated [K+]o. In resting mutant soleus, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-suppressible 22Na uptake and [Na+]i were increased by 470 and 58%, respectively, and membrane potential was depolarized (by 16 mV, P < 0.0001) and repolarized by TTX. Na+,K+ pump–mediated 86Rb uptake was 83% larger than in WT. Salbutamol stimulated 86Rb uptake and reduced [Na+]i both in mutant and WT soleus. Stimulating Na+,K+ pumps with salbutamol restored force in mutant soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Increasing [Na+]i with monensin also restored force in soleus. In soleus, EDL, and tibialis anterior muscles of mutant mice, the content of Na+,K+ pumps was 28, 62, and 33% higher than in WT, respectively, possibly reflecting the stimulating effect of elevated [Na+]i on the synthesis of Na+,K+ pumps. The results confirm that the functional disorders of skeletal muscles in HyperKPP are secondary to increased Na+ influx and show that contractility can be restored by acute stimulation of the Na+,K+ pumps. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) restored force in mutant soleus but caused no detectable increase in 86Rb uptake. Repeated excitation and capsaicin also restored contractility, possibly because of the release of endogenous CGRP from nerve endings in the isolated muscles. These

  10. A relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide from the starfish Aphelasterias japonica.

    PubMed

    Mita, Masatoshi; Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    Relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) in starfish is the first identified invertebrate gonadotropin responsible for final gamete maturation. In this study, a new ortholog RGP was identified from Aphelasterias japonica. The DNA sequence encoding A. japonica RGP (AjaRGP) consists of 342 base pairs with an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 113 amino acids (aa), including a signal peptide (26aa), B-chain (20aa), C-peptide (42aa), and A-chain (25aa). AjaRGP is a heterodimeric peptide with disulfide cross-linkages. Comparing with Asterias amurensis RGP (AamRGP) and Patiria (=Asterina) pectinifera RGP (PpeRGP), the amino acid identity levels of AjaRGP with respect to AamRGP and PpeRGP are 84% and 58% for the A-chain and 90% and 68% for the B-chain, respectively. This suggests that AjaRGP is closer to AmaRGP rather than PpeRGP. Although chemical synthetic AjaRGP can induce gamete spawning and oocyte maturation in ovarian fragments of A. japonica, the ovary of P. pectinifera fails to respond to AjaRGP. This suggests that AjaRGP acts species-specifically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeted Melanoma Imaging and Therapy with Radiolabeled Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Thomas; Zhang, Xiuli; Miao, Yubin

    2010-01-01

    Radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) analogues have been used to define the expression, affinity and function of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R). The MC1-R is one of a family of five G-protein linker receptors, which is primarily involved in regulation of skin pigmentation. Over-expression of the MC1-R on melanoma tumor cells has made it an attractive target for the development of α-MSH peptide based imaging and therapeutic agents. Initially, the native α-MSH peptide was radiolabeled directly, but it suffered from low specific activity and poor stability. The addition of non-natural amino acids yielded α-MSH analogues with greater MC-1R affinity and stability. Furthermore, peptide cyclization via disulfide and lactam bond formation as well as site-specific metal coordination resulted in additional gains in receptor affinity and peptide stability in vitro and in vivo. Radiochemical stability of the α-MSH analogues was improved through the conjugation of metal chelators to the peptide’s N-terminus or lysine residues for radionuclide coordination. In vitro cell binding studies demonstrated that the radiolabeled α-MSH analogues had low to subnanomolar affinities for the MC1-R. Biodistribution and imaging studies in the B16 mouse melanoma modeled showed rapid tumor uptake of the radiolabeled peptides, with the cyclic peptides demonstrating prolonged tumor retention. Cyclic α-MSH analogues labeled with beta and alpha emitting radionuclides demonstrated melanoma therapeutic efficacy in the B16 melanoma mouse model. Strong pre-clinical imaging and therapy data highlight the clinical potential use of radiolabeled α-MSH peptides for melanoma imaging and treatment of disseminated disease. PMID:20467398

  12. The effects of individualized gastric electrical stimulation on food craving and gastrointestinal peptides in dogs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Li, Yanmei; Yao, Shukun; Chen, Shaoxuan; Du, Yuhui; Wang, Zhihua

    2014-07-01

    Using an adjustable stimulator with a wide range of stimulation parameters, the aims of this study were 1) to investigate the effects of long-term gastric electrical stimulation (GES) on appetite and differential food cravings for three different foods and 2) to investigate the effects of GES on plasma gastrointestinal peptide concentrations. The study was performed in eight Beagle dogs implanted with one pair of serosal electrodes. They were followed during GES and sham GES sessions in a crossover design. GES was conducted using a series of individualized parameters. Food intake and food cravings were observed to evaluate the effects of long-term GES. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal peptides. Dogs on GES for three months ate significantly less food than those on sham GES for three months (p < 0.05). A significant change in food cravings was induced by GES. Dogs with GES ate significantly less high-fat food. However, there was no significant difference in consumption of high-carbohydrate food or balanced food between the periods of GES and sham GES. The plasma concentrations of ghrelin, peptide YY3-36, and glucagon-like peptide 1 did not differ significantly between the periods of GES and sham GES. Food intake and food craving were changed significantly by adjustable GES. GES may be used for treating obesity by changing food preferences. Further clinical studies are necessary to highlight the effect of adjustable GES on eating behavior. © 2014 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. C-peptide exhibits a late induction effect on matrix metallopeptidase-9 in high glucose-stimulated rat mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junxia; Li, Yanning; Xu, Mingzhi; Li, Dandan; Wang, Yu; Qi, Jinsheng; He, Kunyu

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 is considered to be a contributor of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). C-peptide can reverse fibrosis, thus exerting a beneficial effect on DN. Whether C-peptide induces MMP-9 and MMP-2 to reverse ECM accumulation is not clear. In the present study, in order to determine ECM metabolism, rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (HG) and C-peptide intervention, then the early and late effects of C-peptide on HG-affected MMP-9 and MMP-2 were evaluated. Firstly, it was confirmed that HG mainly suppressed MMP-9 expression levels. Furthermore, C-peptide treatment induced MMP-9 expression at 6 h and suppressed it at 24 h, revealing the early dual effects of C-peptide on MMP-9 expression. Subsequently, significant increase in MMP-9 expression at 72, 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment was observed. These changes in MMP-9 protein content confirmed its expression changes following late C-peptide treatment. Furthermore, at 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment reversed the HG-inhibited MMP-9 secretion, further indicating the late induction effect of C-peptide on MMP-9. The present results demonstrated that C-peptide exerted a late induction effect on MMP-9 in HG-stimulated rat mesangial cells, which may be associated with the underlying mechanism of C-peptide's reversal effects on DN. PMID:28101192

  14. Novel alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues with high candidacidal activity.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Paolo; Rossi, Claudia; Colombo, Gualtiero; Gatti, Stefano; Novellino, Ettore; Lipton, James M; Catania, Anna

    2003-02-27

    alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is an endogenous linear tridecapeptide with potent antiinflammatory effects. We recently demonstrated that alpha-MSH and its C-terminal sequence Lys-Pro-Val (alpha-MSH (11-13)) have antimicrobial effects against two major and representative pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. In an attempt to improve the candidacidal activity of alpha-MSH and to better understand the peptide structure-antifungal activity relations, we designed and synthesized novel peptide analogues. Because previous data suggested that antimicrobial effects of alpha-MSH were receptor-mediated, we chose to focus on the sequence alpha-MSH (6-13), which contains the invariant core sequence His-Phe-Arg-Trp (6-9) that is important for binding to the known melanocortin receptors and also contains the sequence Lys-Pro-Val (11-13) that is known to be important for antimicrobial activity. In this structure-activity study, we discovered several compounds that have greater candidacidal activity than alpha-MSH. The peptide [d-Nal-7,Phe-12]-alpha-MSH (6-13) was the most potent of the analogues tested. The present results are very encouraging because they show the great potential of these peptides as a truly novel class of candidacidal compounds.

  15. Antimicrobial peptides trigger a division block in Escherichia coli through stimulation of a signalling system

    PubMed Central

    Yadavalli, Srujana S.; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Leibman, Rachel S.; Chen, Annie I.; Stern, Andrew M.; Roggiani, Manuela; Lippa, Andrew M.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the molecular arsenal employed by hosts against bacteria. Many bacteria in turn possess pathways that provide protection against these compounds. In Escherichia coli and related bacteria, the PhoQ/PhoP signalling system is a key regulator of this antimicrobial peptide defence. Here we show that treating E. coli with sublethal concentrations of antimicrobial peptides causes cells to filament, and that this division block is controlled by the PhoQ/PhoP system. The filamentation results from increased expression of QueE, an enzyme that is part of a tRNA modification pathway but that, as we show here, also affects cell division. We also find that a functional YFP–QueE fusion localizes to the division septum in filamentous cells, suggesting QueE blocks septation through interaction with the divisome. Regulation of septation by PhoQ/PhoP may protect cells from antimicrobial peptide-induced stress or other conditions associated with high-level stimulation of this signalling system. PMID:27471053

  16. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  17. Homologous HSV1 and alpha-synuclein peptides stimulate a T cell response in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Caggiu, E; Paulus, K; Galleri, G; Arru, G; Manetti, R; Sechi, G P; Sechi, L A

    2017-09-15

    Environmental factors are implicated in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study is to investigate the role of cell-mediated immunity upon a specific immune-stimulation with HSV-1 and human alpha-synuclein homologues peptides by using the intracellular cytokine method on Parkinson's patients and healthy controls. The study showed, for the first time, a specific response to TNF-α CD8, CD4 and NK cells after stimulation in PD patients. Our data show a possible role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, and that HSV-1 infections may lead to a progression of the disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The non-immunosuppressive immunophilin ligand GPI-1046 potently stimulates regenerating axon growth from adult mouse dorsal root ganglia cultured in Matrigel.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z; Ferrari, G; Kasper, M; Tonge, D A; Steiner, J P; Hamilton, G S; Gordon-Weeks, P R

    2002-01-01

    We used explant cultures of adult mouse dorsal root ganglia with spinal nerve attached growing in Matrigel to assess the effects of the non-immunosuppressive immunophilin ligand GPI-1046 [Snyder et al. (1998) TIPS 19, 21-26] on the growth rate of regenerating sensory axons and found a potent stimulation of axon growth. In these explant cultures, naked, unfasciculated axons emerge from the cut end of the spinal nerve and continue to grow in the Matrigel for up to eight days [Tonge et al. (1996) Neuroscience 73, 541-551]. Some axons are entirely smooth whilst others show prominent varicosities. Some of the former express the phosphorylated neurofilament epitope recognised by monoclonal antibody RT97, a marker for large calibre, myelinated axons, whilst the latter express calcitonin gene-related peptide, predominantly a marker for unmyelinated, and small diameter myelinated sensory axons. Many of the axons in these cultures also express the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75. GPI-1046 has been shown to have striking stimulatory effects on embryonic primary sensory axons growing in vitro and it was therefore of interest to see whether it could also enhance regenerating sensory axon growth from the adult ganglia in our cultures. GPI-1046 potently stimulated axon growth in our cultures in a dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect was not dependent on the class of sensory axon. These observations show that GPI-1046 is a potent stimulator of regenerating axons from adult, primary sensory neurones. The cellular site of action of GPI-1046 is unknown. To distinguish between a direct effect of the drug on neurones and an indirect effect we compared the effects of GPI-1046 on explant and dissociated cultures. In confirmation of previous results, we found that GPI-1046 potently stimulated axon outgrowth from explants of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia. However, the drug was without effect on dissociated embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurones, suggesting that non

  19. Histone H4-related osteogenic growth peptide (OGP): a novel circulating stimulator of osteoblastic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bab, I; Gazit, D; Chorev, M; Muhlrad, A; Shteyer, A; Greenberg, Z; Namdar, M; Kahn, A

    1992-01-01

    It has been established that regenerating marrow induces an osteogenic response in distant skeletal sites and that this activity is mediated by factors released into the circulation by the healing tissue. In the present study we have characterized one of these factors, a 14 amino acid peptide named osteogenic growth peptide (OGP). Synthetic OGP, identical in structure to the native molecule, stimulates the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblastic cells in vitro and increases bone mass in rats when injected in vivo. Immunoreactive OGP in high abundance is present physiologically in the serum, mainly in the form of an OGP-OGP binding protein complex. A marked increase in serum bound and unbound OGP accompanies the osteogenic phase of post-ablation marrow regeneration and associated systemic osteogenic response. Authentic OGP is identical to the C-terminus of histone H4 and shares a five residue motif with a T-cell receptor beta-chain V-region and the Bacillus subtilis outB locus. Since these latter proteins have not been implicated previously in the control of cell proliferation or differentiation, OGP may belong to a novel, heretofore unrecognized family of regulatory peptides. Perhaps more importantly, OGP appears to represent a new class of molecules involved in the systemic control of osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Images PMID:1582415

  20. THE BIOSYNTHESIS, INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT, AND PACKAGING OF MELANOCYTE-STIMULATING PEPTIDES IN THE AMPHIBIAN PARS INTERMEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments in which glycine-3H has been introduced into excised neurointermediate lobes of Xenopus laevis incubated in a modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate medium have shown that ∼ 50% of the incorporated radioactivity is present in small peptides which have an electrophoretic mobility characteristic of the melanocyte-stimulating (MSH) peptides shown to be elaborated within the tissue. Based on these results and the demonstration that a discrete ∼ 7 min pulse of the label can be introduced into the tissue, electron microscope radioautography has been employed to follow the subcellular events concerned with the synthesis, intracellular transport, and packaging of the labeled secretory product. Together, these studies indicate that the newly synthesized material arises in peptide form, rather than as part of a larger prohormone molecule, on the ribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum within the parenchymal cells of the intermediate portion of the lobe. A proportion is then incorporated into and remains for an extended period within the intracisternal granules which are a feature of the rough endoplasmic reticulum within these cells in vitro Most (∼ 60%) of the labeled secretory product, however, is transferred to the Golgi complex within 30 min and, within a further 10 min, becomes packaged into small (∼ 200 mµ) electron-opaque secretory granules. It is probable that under the conditions employed these granules represent the final intracellular location of secretory product before it is released PMID:5028257

  1. CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV-infected patients express multiple negative immune checkpoints following stimulation with HCV peptides.

    PubMed

    Barathan, Muttiah; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Chang, Li Yen; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Sigamani, Panneer; Saeidi, Alireza; Ram, M Ravishankar; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie; Shankar, Esaki M

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are key to successful viral clearance in HCV disease. Accumulation of exhausted HCV-specific T cells during chronic infection results in considerable loss of protective functional immune responses. The role of T-cell exhaustion in chronic HCV disease remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the frequency of HCV peptide-stimulated T cells expressing negative immune checkpoints (PD-1, CTLA-4, TRAIL, TIM-3 and BTLA) by flow cytometry, and measured the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines secreted by T cells by a commercial Multi-Analyte ELISArray™ following in vitro stimulation of T cells using HCV peptides and phytohemagglutinin (PHA). HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV (CHC) patients showed significant increase of CTLA-4. Furthermore, HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ T cells of CHC patients also displayed relatively higher levels of PD-1 and TRAIL, whereas TIM-3 was up-regulated on HCV peptide-stimulated CD8+ T cells. Whereas the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 were significantly increased, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 were markedly decreased in the T cell cultures of CHC patients. Chronic HCV infection results in functional exhaustion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells likely contributing to viral persistence.

  2. IL-1β Stimulates COX-2 Dependent PGE2 Synthesis and CGRP Release in Rat Trigeminal Ganglia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neeb, Lars; Hellen, Peter; Boehnke, Carsten; Hoffmann, Jan; Schuh-Hofer, Sigrid; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Reuter, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Objective Pro-inflammatory cytokines like Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine and inflammatory pain. The trigeminal ganglion and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are crucial components in the pathophysiology of primary headaches. 5-HT1B/D receptor agonists, which reduce CGRP release, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors can abort trigeminally mediated pain. However, the cellular source of COX and the interplay between COX and CGRP within the trigeminal ganglion have not been clearly identified. Methods and Results 1. We used primary cultured rat trigeminal ganglia cells to assess whether IL-1β can induce the expression of COX-2 and which cells express COX-2. Stimulation with IL-1β caused a dose and time dependent induction of COX-2 but not COX-1 mRNA. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of COX-2 protein in neuronal and glial cells. 2. Functional significance was demonstrated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release 4 hours after stimulation with IL-1β, which could be aborted by a selective COX-2 (parecoxib) and a non-selective COX-inhibitor (indomethacin). 3. Induction of CGRP release, indicating functional neuronal activation, was seen 1 hour after PGE2 and 24 hours after IL-1β stimulation. Immunohistochemistry showed trigeminal neurons as the source of CGRP. IL-1β induced CGRP release was blocked by parecoxib and indomethacin, but the 5-HT1B/D receptor agonist sumatriptan had no effect. Conclusion We identified a COX-2 dependent pathway of cytokine induced CGRP release in trigeminal ganglia neurons that is not affected by 5-HT1B/D receptor activation. Activation of neuronal and glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion by IL-β leads to an elevated expression of COX-2 in these cells. Newly synthesized PGE2 (by COX-2) in turn activates trigeminal neurons to release CGRP. These findings support a glia-neuron interaction in the trigeminal ganglion and demonstrate a sequential link between COX-2 and CGRP. The

  3. Adrenomedullin - new perspectives of a potent peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Ria; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2017-07-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a 52-amino acid multifunctional peptide, which belongs to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) superfamily of vasoactive peptide hormones. ADM exhibits a significant vasodilatory potential and plays a key role in various regulatory mechanisms, predominantly in the cardiovascular and lymphatic system. It exerts its effects by activation of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor associated with one of the receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 or 3. ADM was first isolated from human phaeochromocytoma in 1993. Numerous studies revealed a widespread distribution in various tissues and organs, which is reflected by its multiple physiological roles in health and disease. Because of its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and proliferative properties, ADM exhibits potent protective functions under diverse pathological conditions, but it is also critically involved in tumor progression. ADM has therefore raised great interest in therapeutic applications and several clinical trials already revealed promising results. However, because the receptor activation mode has not yet been fully elucidated, a rational design of potent and selective ligands is still challenging. Detailed information on the binding mode of ADM from a recently reported crystal structure as well as efforts to improve its plasma stability and bioavailability may help to overcome these limitations in the future. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Stimulation of murine peritoneal macrophage functions by neuropeptide Y and peptide YY. Involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, M; Bernaez, I; Del Rio, M; Hernanz, A

    1993-01-01

    The peptides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) at concentrations from 10(-12) M to 10(-8) M have been shown in this study to stimulate significantly, in vitro, several functions of resting peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of inert particles (latex beads) and foreign cells (Candida albicans), and production of superoxide anion measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. A dose-response relationship was observed, with a maximal stimulation of the macrophage functions studied at 10(-10) M. These effects seem to be produced by specific receptors for the neuropeptides studied in peritoneal macrophages. Whereas the two peptides induced no change of intracellular cyclic AMP, they caused a significant stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) in murine macrophages. These results suggest that NPY and PYY produce their effects on macrophage function through PKC activation. PMID:8262554

  5. HPLC determination of an oxytocin-like peptide produced by isolated guinea pig Leydig cells: stimulation by ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Kukucka, M A; Misra, H P

    1992-01-01

    Highly purified populations of guinea pig Leydig cells were incubated with a maximally stimulating dose of 100 ng/mL LH for 24 h in the presence of increasing concentrations of sodium ascorbate. Sample supernatants were extracted, concentrated under vacuum, and reconstituted with acidified absolute ethanol. Samples were analyzed for oxytocin using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection and known concentrations of an authentic oxytocin standard. Leydig cells stimulated with 0, 25, and 50 microM ascorbate produced and secreted 40.1 +/- 1.23, 77.4 +/- 13.8, 74.2 +/- 26.3 pg of an oxytocin-like peptide, respectively, per 1 x 10(6) cells. These results indicate that guinea pig Leydig cells are capable of producing an oxytocin-like peptide de novo and that low concentrations of ascorbate stimulate the production of this peptide in Leydig cells cultured in vitro.

  6. Vasodilatation in hyperalgesic rat skin evoked by stimulation of afferent A beta-fibers: further evidence for a role of dorsal root reflexes in allodynia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Nicas, E; Laird, J M; Cervero, F

    2001-12-01

    In areas of secondary hyperalgesia, innocuous mechanical stimuli evoke pain (allodynia). We have proposed that this is produced by a central pre-synaptic interaction whereby A beta-fibers evoke spike activity (dorsal root reflexes) in nociceptive afferents (Pain, 68 (1996) 13). This activity should conduct centrally, evoking allodynia, and peripherally, evoking neurogenic vasodilatation. Here we tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of electrical stimulation of A beta-fibers on cutaneous blood flow before and after producing secondary hyperalgesia in anesthetized rats. Cutaneous blood flow was recorded in the hind paw skin innervated by the sural nerve using a laser Doppler flowmeter. The sural nerve was prepared for electrical stimulation, and the evoked activity was recorded from the sciatic nerve in continuity. Electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 4 x 0.2 ms pulses, 20 s) was applied to the sural nerve at 2T (A beta-fibers only) and 4T and 6T (A beta + A delta-fibers). Flux was recorded at baseline and after capsaicin or mustard oil application outside the sural nerve territory. The effects of intravenous administration of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, alpha-CGRP(8-37), or of section of the sciatic nerve or of the L4-L6 dorsal roots were examined. Selective activation of the sural nerve A beta-fibers reliably evoked increases in cutaneous blood flow close to areas of chemical irritation or skin damage. A beta-fiber-evoked vasodilatation was abolished by sciatic nerve or dorsal root section and had a spatial arrangement and optimal stimulation pattern suggesting a central synaptic interaction similar to that responsible for dorsal root reflexes. The flux increases were dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited by alpha-CGRP(8-37), indicating that the A beta-fiber-evoked vasodilatation resulted from the antidromic activation of nociceptive cutaneous afferent fibers. These results support our hypothesis by showing activation of

  7. Flavonoids stimulate cholecystokinin peptide secretion from the enteroendocrine STC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Ravallec, Rozenn; Van Camp, John; Raes, Katleen; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Animal experiments showed that flavonoids might have the potential for an anti-obesity effect by reducing weight and food intake. However, the exact mechanisms that could be involved in these proposed effects are still under investigation. The complex process of food intake is partially regulated by gastrointestinal hormones. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is the best known gastrointestinal hormone to induce satiety signal that plays a key role in food intake regulation. It is released from the endocrine cells (I cell) in response to the ingestion of nutrients into the small intestine. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, apigenin, rutin and baicalein) on stimulation of CCK release in vitro using enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. In comparison with the control, quercetin, kaempferol and apigenin resulted in a significant increase in CCK secretion with quercetin showing the highest activity. On the other hand, no significant effect was seen by rutin and baicalein. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study the stimulation of CCK peptide hormone secretion from STC-1 cells by quercetin and kaempferol, rutin, apigenin and baicalein. Based on the cell-based results in this work, it can be suggested that the reported activity of flavonoids against food intake and weight could be mediated by stimulation of CCK signal which in turn is responsible for food intake reduction, but future animal and human studies are needed to confirm this conclusion at organism level.

  8. Apelin stimulates both cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1 secretions in vitro and in vivo in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wattez, Jean-Sébastien; Ravallec, Rozenn; Cudennec, Benoit; Knauf, Claude; Dhulster, Pascal; Valet, Philippe; Breton, Christophe; Vieau, Didier; Lesage, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Apelin is an enteric peptide that exerts several digestive functions such as stimulation of cell proliferation and cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion. We investigated using murine enteroendocrine cell line (STC-1) and rats if apelin-13 stimulates both CCK and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretions. We demonstrated that, in vitro and in vivo, apelin-13 increases the release of these two hormones in a dose-dependent manner. Present data suggest that apelin may modulate digestive functions, food intake behavior and glucose homoeostasis via apelin-induced release of enteric CCK but also through a new incretin-releasing activity on enteric GLP-1.

  9. Opioid peptide receptor stimulation reverses beta-adrenergic effects in rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, R P; Pepe, S; Spurgeon, H A; Capogrossi, M C; Lakatta, E G

    1997-02-01

    Opioid peptide receptor (OPR) agonists are co-released with the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) agonist norepinephrine (NE) from nerve terminals in the heart during sympathetic stimulation. Whereas recent studies indicate that OPR and beta-AR coexist on the surface of cardiac myocytes, whether significant "cross talk" occurs between OPR and beta-AR signaling cascades within heart cells is unknown. In the present study we demonstrate a marked effect of delta-OPR stimulation to modulate beta-adrenergic responses in single isolated rat ventricular myocytes. Nanomolar concentrations (10(-8) M) of the OPR agonist leucine enkephalin (LE), a naturally occurring delta-opioid peptide, inhibited NE-induced increases in sarcolemmal L-type Ca2+ current, cytosolic Ca2+ transient, and contraction. The antiadrenergic effect of LE was pertussis toxin sensitive and abolished by naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist. In contrast, LE was unable to inhibit the positive inotropic effects induced by equipotent concentrations of 8-(4 chlorophenylthio)-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, a cell-permeant adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate analog, or by the non-receptor-induced increase in contraction by elevated bathing Ca2+ concentration. These results indicate that an interaction of the OPR and beta-AR systems occurs proximal to activation of the adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase of the beta-AR intracellular signaling pathway. This modulation of beta-adrenergic effects by OPR activation at the myocyte level may have important implications in the regulation of cardiac Ca2+ metabolism and contractility, particularly during the myocardial response to stress.

  10. Mating and sex peptide stimulate the accumulation of yolk in oocytes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Soller, M; Bownes, M; Kubli, E

    1997-02-01

    Mating elicits two reactions in many insect females: egg deposition is increased and receptivity to males is reduced. Central to the control of receptivity and oviposition in Drosophila melanogaster is the sex peptide (SP), a 36-amino-acid peptide sex pheromone synthesized in the male accessory glands and transferred to the female during copulation. To identify regulatory mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the oviposition response, we have compared the effects of mating and SP application with respect to oogenesis. The distribution of the various stages of oogenesis in the ovary, yolk protein (YP) synthesis by the fat body, as well as YP content, uptake and synthesis by the ovary were investigated. Transcripts of the yolk protein genes (yp) were quantified by Northern blotting. Based on our results, we conclude that mating and SP injection into virgin females stimulate yp gene transcription in the fat body only moderately above the background level. However, uptake into the ovary and transcription of the yp genes in the ovary is strongly enhanced after either mating or SP injection. These data are supported by the finding that the abundance of the vitellogenic stage 10 oocytes is also increased. In contrast, early vitellogenic stages 8 and 9 of oogenesis are present in the same numbers in virgin, mated, and SP-injected females, which suggests a control point at about stage 9 determining vitellogenic oocyte progression. The finding that SP can elicit equally all changes observed after copulation suggests that in the sexually mature female it is the major component controlling and stimulating oogenesis after mating.

  11. Calcitriol stimulates gene expression of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide in breast cancer cells with different phenotype.

    PubMed

    García-Quiroz, Janice; García-Becerra, Rocío; Santos-Martínez, Nancy; Avila, Euclides; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2016-11-10

    In normal and neoplastic cells, growth-promoting, proangiogenic, cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effects have all been attributed to cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP). Nevertheless, little is known about the factors regulating this peptide expression in breast cancer. Herein we asked if the well-known antineoplastic hormone calcitriol could differentially modulate CAMP gene expression in human breast cancer cells depending on the cell phenotype in terms of efficacy and potency. The established breast cancer cell lines MCF7, BT-474, HCC1806, HCC1937, SUM-229PE and a primary cell culture generated from invasive ductal breast carcinoma were used in this study. Calcitriol regulation of cathelicidin gene expression in vitro and in human breast cancer xenografts was studied by real time PCR. Tumorigenicity was evaluated for each cell line in athymic mice. Estrogen receptor (ER)α + breast cancer cells showed the highest basal CAMP gene expression. When incubated with calcitriol, CAMP gene expression was stimulated in a dose-dependent and cell phenotype-independent manner. Efficacy of calcitriol was lower in ERα + cells when compared to ERα- cells (<10 vs. >70 folds over control, respectively). Conversely, calcitriol lowest potency upon CAMP gene expression was observed in the ERα-/EGFR+ SUM-229PE cell line (EC50 = 70.8 nM), while the highest was in the basal-type/triple-negative cells HCC1806 (EC50 = 2.13 nM) followed by ERα + cells MCF7 and BT-474 (EC50 = 4.42 nM and 14.6 nM, respectively). In vivo, lower basal CAMP gene expression was related to increased tumorigenicity and lack of ERα expression. Xenografted triple-negative breast tumors of calcitriol-treated mice showed increased CAMP gene expression compared to vehicle-treated animals. Independently of the cell phenotype, calcitriol provoked a concentration-dependent stimulation on CAMP gene expression, showing greater potency in the triple negative HCC1806 cell line. Efficacy of

  12. The functional involvement of gut-expressed sweet taste receptors in glucose-stimulated secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY).

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Gerspach, A C; Gutmann, H; Asarian, L; Drewe, J; Beglinger, C

    2011-08-01

    Enteroendocrine cells are thought to directly sense nutrients via α-gustducin coupled taste receptors (originally identified in the oral epithelium) to modulate the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY). We measured mRNA expression of α-gustducin and T1R3 along the human gut; immunohistochemistry was used to confirm co-localization with GLP-1. Functional implication of sweet taste receptors in glucose-stimulated secretion of GLP-1 and PYY was determined by intragastric infusion of glucose with or without lactisole (a sweet taste receptor antagonist) in 16 healthy subjects. α-gustducin was expressed in a region-specific manner (predominantly in the proximal gut and less in ileum and colon, P < 0.05). Both, T1R3 and α-gustducin were co-localized with GLP-1. Glucose-stimulated secretions of GLP-1 (P = 0.026) and PYY (P = 0.034) were reduced by blocking sweet receptors with lactisole. Key proteins implicated in taste signaling are present in the human gut and co-localized with GLP-1 suggesting that these proteins are functionally linked to peptide secretion from enteroendocrine cells. Glucose-stimulated secretion of GLP-1 and PYY is reduced by a sweet taste antagonist, suggesting the functional involvement of gut-expressed sweet taste receptors in glucose-stimulated secretion of both peptides in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  13. Mastoparan, a wasp venom peptide, stimulates release of prolactin from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Mau, S E; Witt, M R; Vilhardt, H

    1994-07-01

    Studies have shown that mastoparan and other amphiphilic peptides induce exocytosis of hormones from anterior pituitary cells. We have studied the effect of mastoparan on the secretion of prolactin from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells and on the concomitant functional status of signal-transducing pathways in lactotroph-enriched cell cultures. Mastoparan stimulation of prolactin secretion was dose-dependent, time-dependent, reversible and required the presence of calcium. Pretreatment of pituitary cell cultures with cholera and pertussis toxin had no effect on the secretory response, whereas encapsulation of guanosine 5-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP-beta-S) by reversible electropermeabilization inhibited mastoparan-stimulated secretion. Incubation of mastoparan with myo-[3H]inositol-labelled lactotroph-enriched anterior pituitary cell cultures resulted in increased formation of inositol phosphates compared with control cells, and encapsulation of GDP-beta-S blocked mastoparan-induced inositol lipid hydrolysis. Mastoparan caused translocation of protein kinase C activity from a soluble to a membrane-attached form. Mastoparan was able to increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in Fura-2-loaded individual lactotrophs. Omission of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium did not change the Ca2+ response in lactotrophs when stimulated with mastoparan. On the basis of these results it is concluded that mastoparan-induced release of prolactin is preceded by activation of the inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate/diacylglycerol pathway with resulting translocation of protein kinase activity and increment in intracellular Ca2+. However, other signal-transducing pathways may be involved in the secretory process.

  14. The effect of discrete stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors on atrial natriuretic peptide in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    al-Obaidi, M; Whitaker, E M; Karim, F

    1991-01-01

    1. In seven chloralose-anaesthetized and artificially ventilated beagles, the carotid sinus regions were vascularly isolated and perfused with either arterial or mixed (arterial and venous) blood (PO2 46.4 +/- 1.5 mmHg, mean +/- S.E.M.) to stimulate the chemoreceptors at constant flow and pressure. Cervical vagosympathetic trunks were ligated in all dogs, and gallamine triethiodide (2.0 mg kg-1 h-1, I.V.) was given in five dogs. Right atrial pressure was measured in all dogs, and left atrial pressure in four dogs. Mean aortic pressure was held constant (91.0 +/- 3.0 mmHg) by means of a reservoir connected to the animal via the common carotid and femoral arteries. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was measured by radioimmunoassay and urinary sodium by flame photometry. 2. In seven dogs with mean carotid sinus pressure maintained at 96.0 +/- 4.3 mmHg, stimulation of the carotid chemoreceptors for 25 min produced significant increases in left atrial pressure of 41.2 +/- 3.3% (n = 4; P less than 0.005) from 5.4 +/- 0.6 cmH2O and of 30.9 +/- 4.5% (n = 7; P less than 0.002) in ANP from 31.6 +/- 2.1 pg ml-1. However, chemoreceptor stimulation produced significant decreases in urine flow rate of 26.1 +/- 1.9% (n = 9; P less than 0.001) from 0.29 +/- 0.03 ml min-1 (100 g kidney weight)-1 and sodium excretion of 29.0 +/- 2.3% (P less than 0.001) from 8.5 +/- 1.7 mumol min-1 (100 g kidney weight)-1 but right atrial pressure and heart rate did not change significantly. In three of the dogs, beta-adrenoceptor blockade by atenolol (2 mg kg-1, I.V.) greatly reduced the effects of chemoreceptor stimulation on plasma levels of ANP. 3. The results show, for the first time, that discrete stimulation of the carotid chemoreceptors caused an increase in plasma ANP levels, probably due to the reflex increase in atrial pressure that results from an inhibition of the cardiac sympathetic nerves, and an increase in venous return from a reduction of peripheral vascular capacitance. PMID

  15. Treatment of adjuvant arthritis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and peptide derived from heat shock protein 65.

    PubMed

    Brendolan, Andrea; Higuchi, Masanori; Sibley, Richard; Strober, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats is induced by the subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil, and the predominant T cell immune reactivity is against the heat shock protein 65 derived peptide 176-190. We treated Lewis rats with human recombinant G-CSF followed by (i.v) administration of peptide 176-190 after induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA), and observed decreased disease severity, joint destruction, new bone formation and joint ankylosis. Treatment with G-CSF alone was also effective, but to a lesser extent. In addition, we found that splenocytes from rats treated with G-CSF had reduced antigen presenting capacity compared with splenocytes from vehicle treated rats. Primed lymph node cells from G-CSF plus peptide treated rats showed a marked reduction in proliferation and secretion of IFN-gamma after stimulation with the heat shock protein peptide in vitro as compared to controls.

  16. Microfluidic Device for the Selective Chemical Stimulation of Neurons and Characterization of Peptide Release with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides are synthesized in and released from neurons and are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including temperature homeostasis, learning, memory, and disease. When working with sparse neuronal networks, the ability to collect and characterize small sample volumes is important as neurons often release only a small proportion of their mass-limited content. Microfluidic systems are well suited for the study of neuropeptides. They offer the ability to control and manipulate the extracellular environment and small sample volumes, thereby reducing the dilution of peptides following release. We present an approach for the culture and stimulation of a neuronal network within a microfluidic device, subsequent collection of the released peptides, and their detection via mass spectrometry. The system employs microvalve-controlled stimulation channels to selectively stimulate a low-density neuronal culture, allowing us to determine the temporal onset of peptide release. Released peptides from the well-characterized, peptidergic bag cell neurons of Aplysia californica were collected and their temporal pattern of release was characterized with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We show a robust difference in the timing of release for chemical solutions containing elevated K+ (7 ± 3 min), when compared to insulin (19 ± 7 min) (p < 0.000 01). PMID:23004687

  17. Complement peptide C3a stimulates neural plasticity after experimental brain ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Stokowska, Anna; Atkins, Alison L; Morán, Javier; Pekny, Tulen; Bulmer, Linda; Pascoe, Michaela C; Barnum, Scott R; Wetsel, Rick A; Nilsson, Jonas A; Dragunow, Mike; Pekna, Marcela

    2017-02-01

    Ischaemic stroke induces endogenous repair processes that include proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells and extensive rewiring of the remaining neural connections, yet about 50% of stroke survivors live with severe long-term disability. There is an unmet need for drug therapies to improve recovery by promoting brain plasticity in the subacute to chronic phase after ischaemic stroke. We previously showed that complement-derived peptide C3a regulates neural progenitor cell migration and differentiation in vitro and that C3a receptor signalling stimulates neurogenesis in unchallenged adult mice. To determine the role of C3a-C3a receptor signalling in ischaemia-induced neural plasticity, we subjected C3a receptor-deficient mice, GFAP-C3a transgenic mice expressing biologically active C3a in the central nervous system, and their respective wild-type controls to photothrombotic stroke. We found that C3a overexpression increased, whereas C3a receptor deficiency decreased post-stroke expression of GAP43 (P < 0.01), a marker of axonal sprouting and plasticity, in the peri-infarct cortex. To verify the translational potential of these findings, we used a pharmacological approach. Daily intranasal treatment of wild-type mice with C3a beginning 7 days after stroke induction robustly increased synaptic density (P < 0.01) and expression of GAP43 in peri-infarct cortex (P < 0.05). Importantly, the C3a treatment led to faster and more complete recovery of forepaw motor function (P < 0.05). We conclude that C3a-C3a receptor signalling stimulates post-ischaemic neural plasticity and intranasal treatment with C3a receptor agonists is an attractive approach to improve functional recovery after ischaemic brain injury.

  18. Phospholipase D catalyzes phospholipid metabolism in chemotactic peptide-stimulated HL-60 granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, J.K.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Billah, M.M.

    1988-09-05

    There exists circumstantial evidence for activation of phospholipase D (PLD) in intact cells. However, because of the complexity of phospholipid remodeling processes, it is essential to distinguish PLD clearly from other phospholipases and phospholipid remodeling enzymes. Therefore, to establish unequivocally PLD activity in dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 granulocytes, to demonstrate the relative contribution of PLD to phospholipid turnover, and to validate the hypothesis that the formation of phosphatidylethanol is an expression of PLD-catalyzed transphosphatidylation, we have developed methodologies to label HL-60 granulocytes in 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-PC) with 32P without labeling cellular ATP. These methodologies involve (a) synthesis of alkyl-lysoPC containing 32P by a combination of enzymatic and chemical procedures and (b) incubation of HL-60 granulocytes with this alkyl-(32P) lysoPC which enters the cell and becomes acylated into membrane-associated alkyl-(32P)PC. Upon stimulation of these 32P-labeled cells with the chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), alkyl-(32P)phosphatidic acid (alkyl-(32P)PA) is formed rapidly. Because, under these conditions, cellular ATP has not been labeled with 32P, alkyl-(32P)PA must be formed via PLD-catalyzed hydrolysis of alkyl-(32P)PC at the terminal phosphodiester bond. This result conclusively demonstrates fMLP-induced activation of PLD in HL-60 granulocytes. These 32P-labeled HL-60 granulocytes have also been stimulated in the presence of ethanol to produce alkyl-(32P)phosphatidylethanol (alkyl-(32P)PEt). Formation of alkyl-(32P)PEt parallels that of alkyl-(32P)PA with respect to time course, fMLP concentration, inhibition by a specific fMLP antagonist (t-butoxycarbonyl-Met-Leu-Phe), and Ca2+ concentration.

  19. An optimized B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) antagonist peptide inhibits the interaction of BLyS with BCMA.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Feng; Wu, Zhen; Feng, Jian-Nan; Li, Yan; Shen, Bei-Fen; Sun, Jian

    2013-04-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) antagonists are new therapeutic reagents for treating the autoimmune diseases. Peptibodies can inhibit the bioactivity of BLyS, the same as other BLyS antagonists: decoyed BLyS receptors and anti-BLyS antibodies. In this study, a new optimized BLyS antagonist peptide was designed according to our previous work by the computer-aided homology modeling. Competitive ELISA showed that the peptide at 100 μg/ml could inhibit 54 % of the BCMA-Fc binding to BLyS. To maintain its stability and spatial conformation, the peptide was fused to human IgG1 Fc to form a peptide-Fc fusion protein-a novel peptibody by gene engineering. ELISA indicated that the peptibody could bind with BLyS in dosage-dependent manner as BCMA-Fc did. This study highlights the possibility of designing and optimizing BLyS antagonist peptides with high biopotency by the computer-aided design. Thus, these peptides could neutralize BLyS activity and be potential antagonists to treat autoimmune diseases related with BLyS overexpression.

  20. Analysis of the proteolysis of bioactive peptides using a peptidomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun-Gon; Lone, Anna Mari; Saghatelian, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the peptidases that inactivate bioactive peptides (e.g. peptide hormones and neuropeptides) in mammals is an important unmet challenge. This protocol describes a recent approach that combines liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry peptidomics to identify endogenous cleavage sites of a bioactive peptide, the subsequent biochemical purification of a candidate peptidase based on these cleavage sites, and validation of the candidate peptidase’s role in the physiological regulation of the bioactive peptide by examining a peptidase knockout mouse. We highlight successful application of this protocol to discover that insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) regulates physiological calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels and detail the key stages and steps in this approach. This protocol requires 7 days of work; however, the total time for this protocol is highly variable because of its dependence on the availability of biological reagents, namely purified enzymes and knockout mice. The protocol is valuable because it expedites the characterization of mammalian peptidases, such as IDE, which in certain instances can be used to develop novel therapeutics. PMID:23949379

  1. Nucleotide sequence and expression of relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide gene in starfish Asterina pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Ikeda, Narumi; Abe, Michiko; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Mita, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    Starfish gonad-stimulating substance (GSS) is the only known invertebrate peptide hormone responsible for final gamete maturation, rendering it functionally analogous to gonadotropins in vertebrates. Because GSS belongs to the relaxin-like peptide family, we propose renaming for starfish gonadotropic hormone as relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP). This study examined the primary structure and expression regulation of the RGP gene in starfish Asterina pectinifera. RGP consisted of 3896 base pairs (bp) divided over two exons, exon 1 of 208 bp and exon 2 of 2277 bp, and one intron of 1411 bp. Promoter sequences, CAAT and TATA boxes, were present in the 5'-upstream region of the coding DNA sequence of RGP. The transcript was 2485 bases (b) in length. The AAUAAA polyadenylation signal was found in 3'-untranslated region over 2kb away from the stop codon. This showed that only 14% of the RGP mRNA was translated into the peptide, because a size of the open-reading frame was 351 b. Furthermore, an analysis by using real-time quantitative PCR with specific primers for RGP showed that mRNA of RGP was expressed at high levels in the radial nerves. Expression was also observed in the cardiac stomachs, although the level was low, and trace levels were detected in the gonads, pyloric caeca and tube feet. This result suggests that the RGP gene is transcribed mainly in the radial nerves of A. pectinifera. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeting of follicle stimulating hormone peptide-conjugated dendrimers to ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Dimple A.; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Bugno, Jason; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Hong, Seungpyo; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side effects. To address these issues, we have designed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to selectively target the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), which is overexpressed by tumorigenic ovarian cancer cells but not by immature primordial follicles and other non-tumorigenic cells. Fluorescein-labeled generation 5 (G5) PAMAM dendrimers were conjugated with the binding peptide domain of FSH (FSH33) that has a high affinity to FSHR. The targeted dendrimers exhibited high receptor selectivity to FSHR-expressing OVCAR-3 cells, resulting in significant uptake and downregulation of an anti-apoptotic protein survivin, while showing minimal interactions with SKOV-3 cells that do not express FSHR. The selectivity of the FSH33-targeted dendrimers was further validated in 3D organ cultures of normal mouse ovaries. Immunostaining of the conjugates revealed their selective binding and uptake by ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells that express FSHR, while sparing the immature primordial follicles. In addition, an in vivo study monitoring tissue accumulation following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the conjugates showed significantly higher accumulation of FSH33-targeted dendrimers in the ovary and oviduct compared to the non-targeted conjugates. These proof-of-concept findings highlight the potential of these FSH33-targeted dendrimers to serve as a delivery platform for anti-ovarian cancer drugs, while reducing their systemic side effects by preventing nonspecific uptake by the primordial follicles.Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side

  3. Subpopulation-Specific Transcriptome Analysis of Competence-Stimulating-Peptide-Induced Streptococcus mutans▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lemme, André; Gröbe, Lothar; Reck, Michael; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Competence-stimulating-peptide (CSP)-mediated competence development in Streptococcus mutans is a transient and biphasic process, since only a subpopulation induces the expression of ComX in the presence of CSP, and the activation of the DNA uptake machinery in this fraction shuts down ∼3 to 4 h postinduction. Here, we combine for the first time, to our knowledge, the bacterial flow-cytometric sorting of cells and subpopulation-specific transcriptome analysis of both the competent and noncompetent fraction of CSP-treated S. mutans cells. Sorting was guided by a ComX-green fluorescent protein (ComX-GFP) reporter, and the transcriptome analysis demonstrated the successful combination of both methods, because a strong enrichment of transcripts for comX and its downstream genes was achieved. Three two-component systems were expressed in the competent fraction, and among them was ComDE. Moreover, the recently identified regulator system ComR/S was expressed exclusively in the competent fraction. In contrast, the expression of bacteriocin-related genes was at the same level in all cells. GFP reporter strains for ComE and CipB (mutacin V) confirmed this expression pattern on the single-cell level. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that some ComX-expressing cells committed autolysis in an early stage of competence initiation. In viable ComX-expressing cells, the uptake of DNA could be shown on the single-cell level. This study demonstrates that all cells in the population respond to CSP through the activation of bacteriocin-related genes. Some of these cells start to activate ComX expression but then segregate into two subpopulations, one becoming competent and another one that lyses, resulting in intrapopulation diversity. PMID:21317319

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation increases GFR and suppresses proximal reabsorption in the rat.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Scott C; Kashkouli, Ali; Singh, Prabhleen

    2013-01-15

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released from the gut in response to fat or carbohydrate and contributes to negative feedback control of blood glucose by stimulating insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon, and slowing gastric emptying. GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) are also expressed in the proximal tubule, and possibly elsewhere in the kidney. Presently, we examined the effect of a GLP-1R agonist on single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (GFR; SNGFR), proximal reabsorption (Jprox), tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) responses, and urine flow rate in hydropenic male Wistar and Wistar-Froemter rats. Micropuncture and whole-kidney data were obtained before and during infusion of the GLP-1 agonist exenatide (1 nmol/h iv). SNGFR and Jprox were measured by late proximal collection at both extremes of TGF activation, which was achieved by perfusing Henle's loop at 0 or 50 nl/min. Primary changes in Jprox were revealed by analysis of covariance for Jprox with SNGFR as a covariate. Effects on TGF activation were determined in a separate set of experiments by comparing early distal and late proximal collections. Exenatide increased SNGFR by 33-50%, suppressed proximal tubular reabsorption by 20-40%, doubled early distal flow rate, and increased urine flow rate sixfold without altering the efficiency of glomerulotubular balance, TGF responsiveness, or the tonic influence of TGF. This implies that exenatide is both a proximal diuretic and a renal vasodilator. Since the natural agonist for the GLP-1R is regulated by intake of fat and carbohydrate, but not by salt or fluid, the control of salt excretion by the GLP-1R system departs from the usual negative-feedback paradigm for regulating salt balance.

  5. Radioimmunoassay of relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide in the starfish Patiria (=Asterina) pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Kiyomoto, Masato; Katayama, Hidekazu; Mita, Masatoshi

    2017-03-01

    A relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) from starfish Patiria (=Asterina) pectinifera is the first identified invertebrate gonadotropin for final gamete maturation. An antiserum against P. pectinifera RGP (PpeRGP) was produced by immunizing rabbits with a PpeRGP sulfanyl-polyethylene glycol derivative conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) as the antigen. The antiserum was used for the development of a specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of RGP. In binding experiments using radioiodinated PpeRGP and antiserum against PpeRGP, a displacement curve was obtained using radioinert PpeRGP. The sensitivity of the RIA, defined as the amount of PpeRGP that significantly decreased the counts by 2 SD from the 100% bound point, averaged 0.040±0.002pmol PpeRGP per 100μl assay buffer (0.40±0.02nM) in 10 assays. Intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 6.1% and 2.7%, respectively. Serial dilution of whole homogenates from the radial nerve cords and circumoral nerve-rings of P. pectinifera produced displacement curves parallel to the PpeRGP standard. Thus, the amounts of PpeRGP were determined as 1.54±0.09pmol/mg wet weight of radial nerves and 0.87±0.04pmol/mg wet weight of nerve-rings, respectively. On contrary, pyloric stomach, pyloric caeca, tube-feet, ovaries, testes, and ovarian follicle cells did not react in the RIA system. Furthermore, the A- and B-chains of PpeRGP, Asterias amurensis RGP, bovine insulin, and human relaxin did not show cross-reactivity in the RIA. These results strongly suggest that the RIA system is a highly specific and sensitive with respect to PpeRGP.

  6. Structural basis for receptor activity-modifying protein-dependent selective peptide recognition by a G protein-coupled receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Booe, Jason M.; Walker, Christopher S.; Barwell, James; ...

    2015-05-14

    Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind relatedmore » GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. Lastly, the structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes.« less

  7. Characterization of desmoglein-3 epitope region peptides as synthetic antigens: analysis of their in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy, cytotoxicity, stability, and their conformational features.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Hajnalka; Uray, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Silló, Pálma; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-09-01

    Desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) adhesion protein is the main target of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoimmune skin disorder. Several mapping studies of Dsg3 T cell epitope regions were performed, and based on those data, we designed and synthesized four peptide series corresponding to Dsg3 T cell epitope regions. Each peptide series consists of a 17mer full-length peptide (Dsg3/189-205, Dsg3/206-222, Dsg3/342-358, and Dsg3/761-777) and its N-terminally truncated derivatives, resulting in 15 peptides altogether. The peptides were prepared on solid phase and were chemically characterized. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the solution conformation of the synthetic peptides has been investigated using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy of the peptides has been determined on peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from whole blood of PV patients and also from healthy donors. After 20 h of stimulation, the interferon (IFN)-γ content of the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro conditions, peptides were stable and non-cytotoxic. The in vitro IFN-γ production profile of healthy donors and PV patients, induced by peptides as synthetic antigens, was markedly different. The most unambiguous differences were observed after stimulation with 17mer peptide Dsg3/342-358, and three truncated derivatives from two other peptide series, namely, peptides Dsg3/192-205, Dsg3/763-777, and Dsg3/764-777. Comparative analysis of in vitro activity and the capability of oligopeptides to form ordered or unordered secondary structure showed that peptides bearing high solvent sensibility and backbone flexibility were the most capable to distinguish between healthy and PV donors.

  8. Molecular and functional characterization of amylin, a peptide associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, A.N.; Leighton, B.; Todd, J.A.; Schofield, P.N.; Sutton, R.; Day, A.J.; Foot, E.A.; Willis, A.C.; Reid, K.B.M.; Cooper, H.J.S. ); Holt, S.; Boyd, Y. Medical Research Council Radiobiology Unit, Chilton )

    1989-12-01

    The 37-amino acid peptide called amylin is a major component of the islet amyloid deposited in the pancreases of persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The authors report the isolation of a partial cDNA clone and a phage {lambda} genomic clone of the coding region of the amylin gene. The DNA sequence encodes a protein sequences identical to that of amylin isolated from the amyloid found in the diabetic pancreas and shows that amylin is likely to be synthesized as a precursor peptide, now named proamylin. They have demonstrated that the amylin gene is present on chromosome 12 and that it is probably transcribed in the islets of Langerhans. The sequences of the genes for amyli and the calcitonin gene-related peptides (CGRPs) show strong similarity, especially over their 5{prime} coding regions, where both peptides have a conserved intramolecular disulfide bridge, and also over their 3{prime} coding regions, where the presence of a glycine codon strongly suggests that the carboxylterminal residue of amylin, like that of CGRP, is amidated. To examine the functional relevance of these posttranslational modifications, the biological activity of amylin synthesized with or without the disulfide bridge and/or amidation was measured. It was found that both features are necessary for full biological activity, thereby confirming the functional importance of those regions of the molecule whose sequences are conserved at both protein and genetic levels.

  9. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  10. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Avdic, Vanja; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Voronova, Anastassia; Skerjanc, Ilona; Couture, Jean-Francois

    2011-08-24

    The SET1 family of methyltransferases carries out the bulk of histone H3 Lys-4 methylation in vivo. One of the common features of this family is the regulation of their methyltransferase activity by a tripartite complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L. To selectively probe the role of the SET1 family of methyltransferases, we have developed a library of histone H3 peptide mimetics and report herein the characterization of an N{alpha} acetylated form of histone H3 peptide (N{alpha}H3). Binding and inhibition studies reveal that the addition of an acetyl moiety to the N terminus of histone H3 significantly enhances its binding to WDR5 and prevents the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by the WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L complex. The crystal structure of N{alpha}H3 in complex with WDR5 reveals that a high-affinity hydrophobic pocket accommodates the binding of the acetyl moiety. These results provide the structural basis to control WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L-MLL1 activity and a tool to manipulate stem cell differentiation programs.-Avdic, V., Zhang, P., Lanouette, S., Voronova, A., Skerjanc, I., Couture, J.-F. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic.

  11. Melanoma Therapy with Rhenium-Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas P Quinn

    2005-11-22

    Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with {sup 188}Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, {sup 188}Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The {sup 177}Lu

  12. Peptidomics approach to elucidate the proteolytic regulation of bioactive peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun-Gon; Lone, Anna Mari; Nolte, Whitney M.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Peptide hormones and neuropeptides have important roles in physiology and therefore the regulation of these bioactive peptides is of great interest. In some cases proteolysis controls the concentrations and signaling of bioactive peptides, and the peptidases that mediate this biochemistry have proven to be extremely successful drug targets. Due to the lack of any general method to identify these peptidases, however, the role of proteolysis in the regulation of most neuropeptides and peptide hormones is unknown. This limitation prompted us to develop an advanced peptidomics-based strategy to identify the peptidases responsible for the proteolysis of significant bioactive peptides. The application of this approach to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide associated with blood pressure and migraine, revealed the endogenous CGRP cleavage sites. This information was then used to biochemically purify the peptidase capable of proteolysis of CGRP at those cleavage sites, which led to the identification of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) as a candidate CGRP-degrading enzyme. CGRP had not been identified as an IDE substrate before and we tested the physiological relevance of this interaction by quantitative measurements of CGRP using IDE null (IDE−/−) mice. In the absence of IDE, full-length CGRP levels are elevated in vivo, confirming IDE as an endogenous CGRP-degrading enzyme. By linking CGRP and IDE, this strategy uncovers a previously unknown pathway for CGRP regulation and characterizes an additional role for IDE. More generally, this work suggests that this may be an effective general strategy for characterizing these pathways and peptidases moving forward. PMID:22586115

  13. Fat digestion is required for suppression of ghrelin and stimulation of peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide secretion by intraduodenal lipid.

    PubMed

    Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Patterson, Michael; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Horowitz, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Stimulation of cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by fat is mediated by the products of fat digestion. Ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) appear to play an important role in appetite regulation, and their release is modulated by food ingestion, including fat. It is unknown whether fat digestion is a prerequisite for their suppression (ghrelin) or release (PYY, PP). Moreover, it is not known whether small intestinal exposure to fat is sufficient to suppress ghrelin secretion. Our study aimed to resolve these issues. Sixteen healthy young males received, on two separate occasions, 120-min intraduodenal infusions of a long-chain triglyceride emulsion (2.8 kcal/min) 1) without (condition FAT) or 2) with (FAT-THL) 120 mg of tetrahydrolipstatin (THL, lipase inhibitor), followed by a standard buffet-style meal. Blood samples for ghrelin, PYY, and PP were taken throughout. FAT infusion was associated with a marked, and progressive, suppression of plasma ghrelin from t = 60 min (P < 0.001) and stimulation of PYY from t = 30 min (P < 0.01). FAT infusion also stimulated plasma PP (P < or = 0.01), and the release was immediate. FAT-THL completely abolished the FAT-induced changes in ghrelin, PYY, and PP. In response to the meal, plasma ghrelin was further suppressed, and PYY and PP stimulated, during both FAT and FAT-THL infusions. In conclusion, in healthy humans, 1) the presence of fat in the small intestine suppresses ghrelin secretion, and 2) fat-induced suppression of ghrelin and stimulation of PYY and PP is dependent on fat digestion.

  14. Purification and identification of a growth-stimulating peptide for Bifidobacterium bifidum from natural rubber serum powder.

    PubMed

    Etoh, S; Asamura, K; Obu, A; Sonomoto, K; Ishizaki, A

    2000-10-01

    Natural rubber serum powder, which is a by-product obtained in the production of latex rubber, has a strong growth-stimulating activity for Bifidobacterium bifidum JCM 1254. The retained fraction obtained by ultrafiltration (molecular weight cutoff 1000) showed a growth-stimulating activity in a dose-dependent manner on B12 assay medium with ammonium sulfate. One of the growth stimulators was purified from the retained fraction by acetone precipitation, solid-phase extraction with a hydrophobic pretreatment column, and multistage reversed-phase HPLC. An increase of 53-fold in the specific activity, and a recovery of 1.3% were obtained. The amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence analysis of this growth stimulator provided the structure of Ala-Thr-Pro-Glu-Lys-Glu-Glu-Pro-Thr-Ala. The molecular mass was 1075 by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. These results showed that this growth stimulator was a decapeptide with the sequence shown above. This is the first report that clarified the structure of an active peptide for the growth of Bifidobacterium.

  15. Use of the Photo-Electromyogram to Objectively Diagnose and Monitor Treatment of Post-TBI Light Sensitivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    14. ABSTRACT Purpose: to test the whether photosensitivity (photophobia) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is due to increased sensitivity of the...and in a mouse strain genetically engineered to be hypersensitive to calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), the neurotransmitter modulating...photodynia, photosensitivity, light sensitivity, traumatic brain injury , electromyogram, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), trigeminal 16. SECURITY

  16. Proteolytic degradation and deactivation of amphibian skin peptides obtained by electrical stimulation of their dorsal glands.

    PubMed

    Samgina, Tatiana Yu; Tolpina, Miriam I; Hakalehto, Elias; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Bergquist, Jonas; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-05-01

    Amphibians are among the oldest creatures on our planet. Their only defensive weapon efficient against microorganisms and predators involves their skin secretion. The wide range of biological activities of the peptides in the skin secretion of amphibians makes these compounds rather interesting for generation of prospective pharmaceuticals. The first step in studying these molecules requires their structures to be established. Mass spectrometry is the most powerful tool for this purpose. The sampling and sample preparation stages preceding mass spectrometry experiments appear to be rather crucial. The results obtained here demonstrate that these preparation procedures might lead to partial or complete loss of the bioactive peptides in the secretion. Five minutes in water was enough to completely destroy all of the bioactive peptides in the skin secretion of the marsh frog (Rana ridibunda); even immediate addition of methanol to the water solution of the peptides did not prevent partial destruction. Concerted effort should be directed towards development of the most efficient procedure to keep the secreted peptides intact. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Amphipathic variable region heavy chain peptides derived from monoclonal human Wegener's anti-PR3 antibodies stimulate lymphocytes from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Peen, E; Malone, C; Myers, C; Williams, R C; Peck, A B; Csernok, E; Gross, W L; Staud, R

    2001-01-01

    Amphipathic variable-region heavy chain 11-mer peptides from monoclonal human IgM antiproteinase-3 antibodies were studied for peripheral blood lymphocyte stimulation in 21 patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) or microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), connective tissue disease controls and normal control subjects. Positive T-cell activation was observed in most experiments with WG patients' lymphocytes using amphipathic VH-region peptides from four different human monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies. Control peptides of the same length but without amphipathic characteristics along with other amphipathic peptides not derived from monoclonal anti-PR3 sequence were employed as controls. No significant lymphocyte stimulation was observed with normal controls, but positive stimulation with amphipathic VH peptides was also recorded in other connective tissue disease controls mainly patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Amphipathic peptides not derived from anti-PR3 sequence did not stimulate WG lymphocytes. Our findings indicate that lymphocyte reactivity as an element of cell-mediated immunity may be activated by amphipathic VH-region amino acid sequences of autoantibodies which are themselves associated with diseases such as WG. PMID:11529926

  18. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-03

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway.

  19. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Martina M; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E; Sachs, Matthew S; Atkins, John F

    2015-07-17

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3' end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5' and 3' of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5' of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5' part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3' part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3' of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting.

  20. Interaction between Pirenzepine and Ninjinto, a Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine, on the Plasma Gut-Regulated Peptide Levels in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuhki; Hiroki, Itoh; Suzuki, Yosuke; Tatsuta, Ryosuke; Takeyama, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    The Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo) Ninjinto has been used for the treatment of gastroenteritis, esogastritis, gastric atony, gastrectasis, vomiting, and anorexia. The pharmacological effects of Ninjinto on the gastrointestine are due to changes in the levels of gut-regulated peptide, such as motilin, somatostatin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). The release of these peptides is controlled by acetylcholine (ACh) from the preganglionic fibers of the parasympathetic nerve. Thus, we examined the effects of the selective M1 muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine on the elevation of Ninjinto-induced plasma the area under the plasma gut-regulated peptide concentration-time curve from 0 to 240 min (AUC0→240 min) in humans. Oral pretreatment with pirenzepine significantly reduced the Ninjinto-induced elevation of plasma motilin and substance P release (AUC0→240 min). Combined treatment with Ninjinto and pirenzepine significantly increased the release of plasma somatostatin (AUC0→240 min) compared with administration of Ninjinto alone or placebo. Ninjinto appeared to induce the release of substance P and motilin into plasma mainly through the activation of M1 muscarinic receptors, and pirenzepine may affect the pharmacologic action of Ninjinto by the elevation of plasma substance P, motilin, and somatostatin.

  1. Differential roles of calcitonin family peptides in the dendrite formation and spinogenesis of the cerebral cortex in vitro.

    PubMed

    Harigai, Yuichi; Natsume, Masaki; Li, Fei; Ohtani, Akiko; Senzaki, Kouji; Shiga, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    We examined roles of calcitonin family peptides in the initial stages of dendrite formation and the maturation of dendritic spines in the rat cerebral cortex in vitro. Embryonic day 18 cortical neurons were dissociated and cultured for 2-3days in the presence of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), calcitonin, amylin or adrenomedullin. The treatment of cortical neurons with CGRP promoted the formation of primary dendrites of non-GABAergic neurons. In contrast, the treatment with amylin and adrenomedullin for 3days inhibited the dendritic elongation of non-GABAergic neurons. Calcitonin had no effect on the initial dendrite formation. Next, we examined roles of the peptides in the spine formation. Embryonic day 16 cortical neurons were cultured for 14days and then treated acutely with CGRP, amylin or adrenomedullin for 24h. The density of filopodia, puncta/stubby spines and spines were increased by the CGRP treatment, whereas decreased by amylin. Therefore, CGRP and amylin showed opposite effects on the formation of dendritic filopodia, puncta and spines. Adrenomedullin had no effects on the spine formation. In conclusion, the present study showed that calcitonin family peptides have differential effects both in the dendrite formation during the initial stages and the spine formation of cortical neurons in vitro.

  2. A method for identification of the peptides that bind to a clone of thyroid-stimulating antibodies in the serum of Graves' disease patients.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Cho, Bo Youn; Chae, Chi-Bom

    2003-04-01

    A method was developed for identification of the peptide sequences that bind to thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) clones from phage-displayed peptide library. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified from the serum of a Graves' disease patient that stimulates the synthesis of cAMP in the cells that express TSH receptor (TSHR). The IgG that binds to TSHR was purified by an affinity column packed with the resin cross-linked with the extracellular domain of human TSHR. The receptor-binding IgG was then mixed with phages that display linear or cyclic peptides at the end of tail protein pIII. The bound phages were eluted with acidic glycine after extensive washing. From sequencing of the pIII gene of the bound phages, one can deduce the sequences of the peptides that bind to the receptor-binding IgG. Each peptide sequence was then tested for inhibition of the synthesis of cAMP from thyroid cells induced by the serum of a Graves' patient. In this way, one can obtain the peptides that bind to a clone of TSAb. We obtained a peptide sequence that inhibits the action of TSAb at an extremely low concentration (<10(-14) M). Such a peptide will be useful for various studies on TSAb.

  3. Cell adhesive peptides functionalized on CoCr alloy stimulate endothelialization and prevent thrombogenesis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Isabel; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Díaz-Ricart, Maribel; Escolar, Ginés; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Gil, Francisco Javier; Pegueroles, Marta; Manero, Jose María

    2017-04-01

    Immobilization of bioactive peptide sequences on CoCr surfaces is an effective route to improve endothelialization, which is of great interest for cardiovascular stents. In this work, we explored the effect of physical and covalent immoblization of RGDS, YIGSR and their equimolar combination peptides on endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion and on thrombogenicity. We extensively investigated using RT-qPCR, the expression by ECs cultured on functionalised CoCr surfaces of different genes. Genes relevant for adhesion (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1), vascularization (VEGFA, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) and anti-thrombogenicity (tPA and eNOS) were over-expressed in the ECs grown to covalently functionalized CoCr surfaces compared to physisorbed and control surfaces. Pro-thrombogenic genes expression (PAI-1 and vWF) decreased over time. Cell co-cultures of ECs/SMCs found that functionalization increased the amount of adhered ECs onto modified surfaces compared to plain CoCr, independently of the used peptide and the strategy of immobilization. SMCs adhered less compared to ECs in all surfaces. All studied peptides showed a lower platelet cell adhesion compared to TCPS. Covalent functionalization of CoCr surfaces with an equimolar combination of RGDS and YIGSR represented prevailing strategy to enhance the early stages of ECs adhesion and proliferation, while preventing SMCs and platelet adhesion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 973-983, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Inhibition of Competence Development, Horizontal Gene Transfer and Virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae by a Modified Competence Stimulating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Luchang; Lau, Gee W.

    2011-01-01

    Competence stimulating peptide (CSP) is a 17-amino acid peptide pheromone secreted by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Upon binding of CSP to its membrane-associated receptor kinase ComD, a cascade of signaling events is initiated, leading to activation of the competence regulon by the response regulator ComE. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in DNA uptake and transformation, as well as virulence, are upregulated. Previous studies have shown that disruption of key components in the competence regulon inhibits DNA transformation and attenuates virulence. Thus, synthetic analogues that competitively inhibit CSPs may serve as attractive drugs to control pneumococcal infection and to reduce horizontal gene transfer during infection. We performed amino acid substitutions on conserved amino acid residues of CSP1 in an effort to disable DNA transformation and to attenuate the virulence of S. pneumoniae. One of the mutated peptides, CSP1-E1A, inhibited development of competence in DNA transformation by outcompeting CSP1 in time and concentration-dependent manners. CSP1-E1A reduced the expression of pneumococcal virulence factors choline binding protein D (CbpD) and autolysin A (LytA) in vitro, and significantly reduced mouse mortality after lung infection. Furthermore, CSP1-E1A attenuated the acquisition of an antibiotic resistance gene and a capsule gene in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that the strategy of using a peptide inhibitor is applicable to other CSP subtype, including CSP2. CSP1-E1A and CSP2-E1A were able to cross inhibit the induction of competence and DNA transformation in pneumococcal strains with incompatible ComD subtypes. These results demonstrate the applicability of generating competitive analogues of CSPs as drugs to control horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes, and to attenuate virulence during infection by S. pneumoniae. PMID:21909280

  5. Hypergravity differentially modulates cGMP efflux in human melanocytic cells stimulated by nitric oxide and natriuretic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, K.; Stieber, C.; Lambers, B.; Block, I.; Krieg, R.; Wellmann, A.; Gerzer, R.

    Nitric oxide NO plays a key role in many patho physiologic processes including inflammation and skin cancer The diverse cellular effects of NO are mainly mediated by activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase sGC isoform that leads to increases in intracellular cGMP levels whereas the membrane-bound isoforms serve as receptors for natriuretic peptides e g ANP In human skin epidermal melanocytes represent the principal cells for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress as a result of potentially harmful effects of the environment In previous studies we found that long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulated cGMP efflux in normal human melanocytes NHMs and non-metastatic melanoma cells at least partly by an enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance proteins MRP and cGMP transporters MRP4 5 The present study investigated whether hypergravity generated by centrifugal acceleration may modulate the cGMP efflux in NO-stimulated NHMs and melanoma cells MCs with different metastatic potential The NONOates PAPA-NO and DETA-NO were used as direct NO donors for cell stimulation In the presence of 0 1 mM DETA-NO t 1 2 sim 20 h long-term application of hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h reduced intracellular cGMP levels by stimulating cGMP efflux in NHMs and non-metastatic MCs in comparison to 1 g whereas exposure to 5 g for 6 h in the presence of 0 1 mM PAPA-NO t 1 2 sim 30 min was not effective The hypergravity-stimulated

  6. Repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide as a cell-stimulating agent on electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chaisri, Pacharaporn; Chingsungnoen, Artit; Siri, Sineenat

    2013-11-01

    Electrospun scaffolds derived from poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL), a well known biodegradable material, have an architecture that is suitable for hosting cells. However, their biomedical applications are restricted because these scaffolds lack the bioactivity necessary to stimulate cell responses. In this work, a repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp (rRGD) peptide was produced as a cell-stimulating agent to provide the PCL scaffold with bioactivity. DNA encoding rRGD was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using overlap primers without a DNA template, and cloned into a protein expression vector to produce a His-tag fusion peptide. In an in vitro cell adhesion assay, the purified rRGD peptide, comprising 30 RGD repeats, promoted a 1.5-fold greater cell adhesion than the commercial tripeptide RGD. The rRGD peptide was immobilized onto an electrospun PCL scaffold that had been pretreated with argon plasma and graft-polymerized with acrylic acid. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicated that covalently linked rRGD peptide was present on the scaffold. The PCL scaffold with immobilized rRGD showed significantly changed hydrophilic properties and an enhanced adhesion and proliferation of mouse fibroblast cells by 2.3- and 2.9-fold, respectively, compared to the PCL scaffold alone. Through its ability to promote cell adhesion and proliferation, the rRGD peptide has great potential as a stimulant for improving the suboptimal cell-matrix interaction of polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  7. Extracellular Life Cycle of ComS, the Competence-Stimulating Peptide of Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Besset, Colette; Gitton, Christophe; Guillot, Alain; Fontaine, Laetitia; Hols, Pascal; Monnet, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    In streptococci, ComX is the alternative sigma factor controlling the transcription of the genes encoding the genetic transformation machinery. In Streptococcus thermophilus, comX transcription is controlled by a complex consisting of a transcriptional regulator of the Rgg family, ComR, and a signaling peptide, ComS, which controls ComR activity. Following its initial production, ComS is processed, secreted, and imported back into the cell by the Ami oligopeptide transporter. We characterized these steps and the partners interacting with ComS during its extracellular circuit in more detail. We identified the mature form of ComS and demonstrated the involvement of the membrane protease Eep in ComS processing. We found that ComS was secreted but probably not released into the extracellular medium. Natural competence was first discovered in a chemically defined medium without peptides. We show here that the presence of a high concentration of nutritional peptides in the medium prevents the triggering of competence. In milk, the ecological niche of S. thermophilus, competence was found to be functional, suggesting that the concentration of nutritional peptides was too low to interfere with ComR activation. The kinetics of expression of the comS, comR, and comX genes and of a late competence gene, dprA, in cultures inoculated at different initial densities revealed that the activation mechanism of ComR by ComS is more a timing device than a quorum-sensing mechanism sensu stricto. We concluded that the ComS extracellular circuit facilitates tight control over the triggering of competence in S. thermophilus. PMID:23396911

  8. Extracellular life cycle of ComS, the competence-stimulating peptide of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Gardan, Rozenn; Besset, Colette; Gitton, Christophe; Guillot, Alain; Fontaine, Laetitia; Hols, Pascal; Monnet, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    In streptococci, ComX is the alternative sigma factor controlling the transcription of the genes encoding the genetic transformation machinery. In Streptococcus thermophilus, comX transcription is controlled by a complex consisting of a transcriptional regulator of the Rgg family, ComR, and a signaling peptide, ComS, which controls ComR activity. Following its initial production, ComS is processed, secreted, and imported back into the cell by the Ami oligopeptide transporter. We characterized these steps and the partners interacting with ComS during its extracellular circuit in more detail. We identified the mature form of ComS and demonstrated the involvement of the membrane protease Eep in ComS processing. We found that ComS was secreted but probably not released into the extracellular medium. Natural competence was first discovered in a chemically defined medium without peptides. We show here that the presence of a high concentration of nutritional peptides in the medium prevents the triggering of competence. In milk, the ecological niche of S. thermophilus, competence was found to be functional, suggesting that the concentration of nutritional peptides was too low to interfere with ComR activation. The kinetics of expression of the comS, comR, and comX genes and of a late competence gene, dprA, in cultures inoculated at different initial densities revealed that the activation mechanism of ComR by ComS is more a timing device than a quorum-sensing mechanism sensu stricto. We concluded that the ComS extracellular circuit facilitates tight control over the triggering of competence in S. thermophilus.

  9. Oleic acid stimulates glucagon-like peptide-1 release from enteroendocrine cells by modulating cell respiration and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Clara, Rosmarie; Langhans, Wolfgang; Mansouri, Abdelhak

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent satiating and incretin hormone released by enteroendocrine L-cells in response to eating. Dietary fat, in particular monounsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic acid (OA), potently stimulates GLP-1 secretion from L-cells. It is, however, unclear whether the intracellular metabolic handling of OA is involved in this effect. First we determined the optimal medium for the bioenergetics measurements. Then we examined the effect of OA on the metabolism of the immortalized enteroendocrine GLUTag cell model and assessed GLP-1 release in parallel. We measured oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in response to OA and to different metabolic inhibitors with the Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer. OA increased cellular respiration and potently stimulated GLP-1 release. The fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir did neither reduce OA-induced respiration nor affect the OA-induced GLP-1 release. In contrast, inhibition of the respiratory chain or of downstream steps of aerobic glycolysis reduced the OA-induced GLP-1 release, and an inhibition of the first step of glycolysis by addition of 2-deoxy-d-glucose even abolished it. These findings indicate that an indirect stimulation of glycolysis is crucial for the OA-induced release of GLP-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Activation of TRPM3 by a potent synthetic ligand reveals a role in peptide release.

    PubMed

    Held, Katharina; Kichko, Tatjana; De Clercq, Katrien; Klaassen, Hugo; Van Bree, Rieta; Vanherck, Jean-Christophe; Marchand, Arnaud; Reeh, Peter W; Chaltin, Patrick; Voets, Thomas; Vriens, Joris

    2015-03-17

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel subfamily M member 3 (TRPM3), a member of the TRP channel superfamily, was recently identified as a nociceptor channel in the somatosensory system, where it is involved in the detection of noxious heat; however, owing to the lack of potent and selective agonists, little is known about other potential physiological consequences of the opening of TRPM3. Here we identify and characterize a synthetic TRPM3 activator, CIM0216, whose potency and apparent affinity greatly exceeds that of the canonical TRPM3 agonist, pregnenolone sulfate (PS). In particular, a single application of CIM0216 causes opening of both the central calcium-conducting pore and the alternative cation permeation pathway in a membrane-delimited manner. CIM0216 evoked robust calcium influx in TRPM3-expressing somatosensory neurons, and intradermal injection of the compound induced a TRPM3-dependent nocifensive behavior. Moreover, CIM0216 elicited the release of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory nerve terminals and insulin from isolated pancreatic islets in a TRPM3-dependent manner. These experiments identify CIM0216 as a powerful tool for use in investigating the physiological roles of TRPM3, and indicate that TRPM3 activation in sensory nerve endings can contribute to neurogenic inflammation.

  11. Nesfatin-1 stimulates cholecystokinin and suppresses peptide YY expression and secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mortazavi, Sima; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-25

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid secreted peptide encoded in the precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). It is an insulinotropic anorexigen abundantly expressed in the stomach and hypothalamus. Post-prandial insulin secretion is predominantly regulated by incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Nesfatin-1 was previously reported to modulate GLP-1 and GIP secretion in vitro in an enteroendocrine (STC-1) cell line. Intestine is a source of additional hormones including cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) that regulate metabolism. We hypothesized that nesfatin-1 modulates CCK and PYY secretion. Immunofluorescence histochemistry showed NUCB2/nesfatin-1 co-localizing CCK and PYY in the intestinal mucosa of mice. Static incubation of STC-1 cells with nesfatin-1 upregulated both CCK mRNA expression (1 and 10 nM) and secretion (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) at 1 h post-incubation. In contrast, nesfatin-1 treatment for 1 h downregulated PYY mRNA expression (all doses tested) and secretion (0.01 and 0.1 nM) in STC-1 cells. Continuous infusion of nesfatin-1 using osmotic mini-pumps for 12 h upregulated CCK mRNA expression in large intestine, and downregulated PYY mRNA expression in both large and small intestines of male C57BL/6J mice. In these tissues, Western blot analysis found a corresponding increase in CCK and a decrease in PYY content. Collectively, we provide new information on the cell specific localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the intestinal mucosa, and a novel function for nesfatin-1 in modulating intestinal CCK and PYY expression and secretion in mice.

  12. Tickling the TCR: selective T-cell functions stimulated by altered peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Evavold, B D; Sloan-Lancaster, J; Allen, P M

    1993-12-01

    Recent observations of T-cell responses following T-cell receptor (TCR) interaction with altered peptide ligands have highlighted the complexity of this signalling system. The indications are that the TCR responds to minor changes in ligand with gradations of T-cell activation and effector functions. Brian Evavold, Joanne Sloan-Lancaster and Paul Allen review these studies and present a model in which partial T-cell activation and TCR antagonism are related events in a continuum of signalling through the TCR.

  13. GH-releasing peptide-2 does not stimulate arginine vasopressin secretion in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Kamoi, Kyuzi; Minagawa, Shinichi; Kimura, Keita; Ishizawa, Masahiro; Ohara, Nobumasa; Uemura, Yasuyuki; Tsuchiya, Junpei

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin has a stimulating effect on arginine vasopressin (AVP). However, it is not known whether GHRP-2, a synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, also has a stimulating effect on AVP release in men. To determine whether the GHRP-2 test is useful for assessing AVP secretion, blood ACTH, GH, FSH, LH, PRL, TSH and AVP levels, as well as glucose, osmolality, sodium and hematocrit, were measured before and 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after an intravenous bolus of 100 microg GHRP-2 in 10 healthy men with and without fasting. Blood pressure was measured at 15-min intervals. AVP secretion was not stimulated by the GHRP-2 test with and without fasting. There were no significant differences in hematocrit, blood pressure and plasma osmolality before and after GFRP-2 injection, although significant (p<0.001) peak blood GH, and ACTH and PRL levels were observed 30 and 15 min after GHRP-2 injection with and without fasting, respectively, and the maximal peaks were significantly (p<0.05) higher with fasting than without fasting. These results suggest that AVP secretion is not stimulated by the GHRP-2 test both with and without fasting, though GH, ACTH and PRL levels were higher with than without fasting.

  14. Reducing renal uptake of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Fisher, Darrell R.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to improve the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-[1,2,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-Re-Cys,D-Phe,Arg]alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH), through coupling a negatively charged glutamic acid (Glu) to the peptide sequence. A new peptide of DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH was designed, synthesized and labeled with 90Y and 177Lu. Pharmacokinetics of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Glu,Arg)CCNSH were determined in B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Both exhibited significantly less renal uptake than 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH at 30 min and at 2, 3, and 24 h after dose administration. The renal uptake values of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH were 28.16% and 28.81% of those of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 hr post-injection. We also showed higher tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios 2.28 and 1.69 times that of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 h post-injection. The90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH activity accumulation was low in normal organs except for kidneys. Coupling a negatively charged amino acid (Glu) to the CCMSH peptide sequence dramatically reduced the renal uptake values and increased the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH, facilitating their potential applications as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  15. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide analogs labeled with technetium-99m and indium-111 for malignant melanoma targeting.

    PubMed

    Chen, JianQing; Cheng, Zhen; Miao, Yubin; Jurisson, Silvia S; Quinn, Thomas P

    2002-02-15

    Previous studies have shown that the compact structure of a rhenium-cyclized alpha--melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide analog, [Cys3410,D-Phe7]alpha-MSH(3--13), or Re-CCMSH, significantly enhanced its in vivo tumor uptake and retention. In this study, the metal chelate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) was coupled to the N-terminus of Re-CCMSH in order to develop a melanoma-targeting peptide that could be labeled with a wider variety of imaging and therapeutic radionuclides. Biodistribution properties of indium-111 ((111)In)--labeled DOTA-Re-CCMSH were compared with the non-DOTA-containing technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)--CCMSH in murine melanoma--bearing C57 mice to determine the effects of DOTA on tumor uptake and whole-body clearance. The tumor targeting capacity and clearance kinetics of (111)In-DOTA-Re-CCMSH were also compared with other related cyclic and linear (111)In-labeled DOTA-alpha-MSH complexes. The in vivo distribution data showed that the conjugation of DOTA to Re-CCMSH did not reduce its initial tumor uptake kinetics but did enhance its tumor retention and renal clearance properties. The tumor uptake of (111)In-DOTA-Re-CCMSH was significantly higher than the other (111)In-DOTA--coupled cyclic or linear alpha-MSH analogs used in this study. Moreover, (111)In-DOTA-Re-CCMSH displayed lower radioactivity accumulation in normal tissues of interest than its non-Re-cyclized counterpart, (111)In-DOTA-CCMSH; the disulfide bond--cyclized (111)In-DOTA-CMSH; or the linear (111)In-DOTA-NDP. Peptide cyclization via rhenium coordination significantly enhanced the tumor targeting and renal clearance properties of DOTA-Re-CCMSH, making it an excellent candidate for melanoma radiodetection and radiotherapy. Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.

  16. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Martina M.; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Atkins, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3′ end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5′ and 3′ of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5′ of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5′ part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3′ part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3′ of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. PMID:25998126

  17. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 stimulates production of amyloid beta-peptide in neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Kadoyama, K; Takahashi, Y; Higashida, H; Tanabe, T; Yoshimoto, T

    2001-02-23

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) synthesizes bioactive prostaglandins from arachidonic acid, and there are COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms with distinct pathophysiological functions. Recent studies demonstrated that COX-2 expression was up-regulated in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. We established mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid NG108-15 cells stably expressing human COX-2. The COX-2-expressing cells showed 3- to 4-fold increases in both COX activity and prostaglandin E(2) production. The mRNA level of amyloid precursor protein (APP) was elevated by approximately 2-fold in the COX-2-expressing cells compared with mock-transfected cells. Amyloid beta-peptide and a secreted form of APP, both derived from APP by proteolysis was also increased. Interestingly, neurite outgrowth was stimulated in the COX-2-expressing cells with concomitant reduction of the cell proliferation rate. A selective COX-2 inhibitor (JTE-522) and a nonselective COX inhibitor (indomethacin) suppressed production of amyloid beta-peptide and a secreted form of APP by inhibition of APP mRNA level, suggesting that COX-2 plays important roles in the neurodegenerative processes of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. The HtrA protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae digests both denatured proteins and the competence-stimulating peptide.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Marco; Gagne, Alyssa L; Spruce, Lynn A; Seeholzer, Steven H; Sebert, Michael E

    2012-11-09

    The HtrA protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae functions both in a general stress response role and as an error sensor that specifically represses genetic competence when the overall level of biosynthetic errors in cellular proteins is low. However, the mechanism through which HtrA inhibits development of competence has been unknown. We found that HtrA digested the pneumococcal competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) and constituted the primary extracytoplasmic CSP-degrading activity in cultures of S. pneumoniae. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that cleavage predominantly followed residue Phe-8 of the CSP-1 isoform of the peptide within its central hydrophobic patch, and in competition assays, both CSP-1 and CSP-2 interacted with HtrA with similar efficiencies. More generally, analysis of β-casein digestion and of digestion within HtrA itself revealed a preference for substrates with non-polar residues at the P1 site. Consistent with a specificity for exposed hydrophobic residues, competition from native BSA only weakly inhibited digestion of CSP, but denaturation converted BSA into a strong competitive inhibitor of such proteolysis. Together these findings support a model in which digestion of CSP by HtrA is reduced in the presence of other unfolded proteins that serve as alternative targets for degradation. Such competition may provide a mechanism by which HtrA functions in a quality control capacity to monitor the frequency of biosynthetic errors that result in protein misfolding.

  20. Frog skin peptides (tigerinin-1R, magainin-AM1, -AM2, CPF-AM1, and PGla-AM1) stimulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) by GLUTag cells.

    PubMed

    Ojo, O O; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2013-02-01

    Skin secretions of several frog species contain host-defense peptides with multiple biological activities including in vitro and in vivo insulin-releasing actions. This study investigates the effects of tigerinin-1R from Hoplobatrachus rugulosus (Dicroglossidae) and magainin-AM1, magainin-AM2, caerulein precursor fragment (CPF-AM1) and peptide glycine leucine amide (PGLa-AM1) from Xenopus amieti (Pipidae) on GLP-1 secretion from GLUTag cells. Tigerinin-1R showed the highest potency producing a significant (P<0.05) increase in GLP-1 release at a concentration of 0.1nM for the cyclic peptide and 0.3nM for the reduced form. All peptides from X. amieti significantly (P<0.05) stimulated GLP-1 release at concentrations ⩾300nM with magainin-AM2 exhibiting the greatest potency (minimum concentration producing a significant stimulation=1nM). The maximum stimulatory response (3.2-fold of basal rate, P<0.001) was produced by CPF-AM1 at a concentration of 3μM. No peptide stimulated release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase from GLUTag cells at concentrations up to 3μM indicating that the integrity of the plasma membrane had been preserved. The data indicate that frog skin peptides, by stimulating GLP-1 release as well as direct effects on insulin secretion, show therapeutic potential as agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastric bypass surgery restores meal stimulation of the anorexigenic gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY independently of caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sarah; Pamuklar, Zehra; Rosko, Jonathan; Mahaney, Patrick; Jiang, Ning; Park, Chan; Torquati, Alfonso

    2012-04-01

    The effects of gastric bypass surgery on the secretion of the anorexigenic gut-derived hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY), independent of caloric restriction and due to different dietary macronutrients, is not well characterized. This study examines the effects of a mixed-nutrient or high-fat liquid meal on the postprandial stimulation of GLP-1 and PYY following gastric bypass or equivalent hypocaloric diet. Total PYY and active GLP-1 were measured fasting and at multiple points after standardized mixed-nutrient and high-fat liquid meals in two matched groups of obese subjects. The meal stimulation tests were performed before and 14.6 ± 3.3 days after gastric bypass (GBP, n = 10) and before and after a 7-day hypocaloric liquid diet matching the post-GBP diet (control, n = 10). Mixed-nutrient and high-fat postprandial GLP-1 levels increased following GBP (mixed-nutrient peak: 85.0 ± 28.6-323 ± 51 pg/ml, P < 0.01; high-fat peak: 81.8 ± 9.6-278 ± 49 pg/ml, P < 0.01), but not after diet (mixed-nutrient peak: 104.4 ± 9.4-114.9 ± 15.8 pg/ml, P = NS; high-fat peak: 118.1 ± 16.4-104.4 ± 10.8 pg/ml, P = NS). The postprandial PYY response also increased after GBP but not diet, though the increase in peak PYY did not reach statistical significance (GBP mixed-nutrient peak: 134.8 ± 26.0-220.7 ± 52.9 pg/ml, P = 0.09; GBP high-fat peak: 142.1 ± 34.6-197.9 ± 12.7 pg/ml, P = 0.07; diet mixed-nutrient peak: 99.8 ± 8.0-101.1 ± 13.3 pg/ml, P = NS; diet high-fat peak: 105.0 ± 8.8-103.1 ± 11.8 pg/ml, P = NS). The postprandial GLP-1 response was not affected by the macronutrient content of the meal. However, following GBP the mixed-nutrient PYY total area under the curve (AUC(0-120)) was significantly greater than the high-fat PYY AUC(0-120) (22,081 ± 5,662 pg/ml min vs. 18,711 ± 1,811 pg/ml min, P = 0.04). Following GBP there is an increase in the postprandial stimulation of PYY and GLP-1 that is independent of caloric restriction. The

  2. GASTRIC BYPASS SURGERY RESTORES MEAL STIMULATION OF THE ANOREXIGENIC GUT HORMONES GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1 AND PEPTIDE YY INDEPENDENTLY OF CALORIC RESTRICTION

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sarah; Pamuklar, Zehra; Rosko, Jonathan; Mahaney, Patrick; Jiang, Ning; Park, Chan; Torquati, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Background The effects of gastric bypass surgery on the secretion of the anorexogenic gut-derived hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY), independent of caloric restriction and due to different dietary macronutrients, is not well-characterized. This study examines the effects of a mixed-nutrient or high-fat liquid meal on the postprandial stimulation of GLP-1 and PYY following gastric bypass or equivalent hypocaloric diet. Methods Total PYY and active GLP-1 were measured fasting and at multiple points after standardized mixed-nutrient and high-fat liquid meals in two matched groups of obese subjects. The meal stimulation tests were performed before and 14.6±3.3 days after gastric bypass (GBP, n=10) and before and after a 7-day hypocaloric liquid diet matching the post-GBP diet (Control, n=10). Results Mixed-nutrient and high-fat postprandial GLP-1 levels increased following GBP (mixed-nutrient peak: 85.0±28.6 pg/ml to 323±51 pg/ml, p<0.01; high-fat peak: 81.8±9.6 pg/ml to 278±49 pg/ml, p<0.01), but not after diet (mixed-nutrient peak: 104.4±9.4 pg/ml to 114.9±15.8 pg/ml, p=NS; high-fat peak: 118.1±16.4 pg/ml to 104.4±10.8 pg/ml, p=NS). The postprandial PYY response also increased after GBP but not diet, though the increase in peak PYY did not reach statistical significance (GBP mixed-nutrient peak: 134.8±26.0 pg/ml to 220.7±52.9 pg/ml, p=0.09; GBP high-fat peak: 142.1±34.6 pg/ml to 197.9±12.7 pg/ml, p=0.07; diet mixed-nutrient peak: 99.8±8.0 pg/ml to 101.1±13.3 pg/ml, p=NS; diet high-fat peak: 105.0±8.8 pg/ml to 103.1±11.8 pg/ml, p=NS). The postprandial GLP-1 response was not affected by the macronutrient content of the meal. However, following GBP the mixed-nutrient PYY AUC0–120 was significantly greater than the high-fat PYY AUC0–120 (22081±5662 pg/ml•min versus 18711±1811 pg/ml•min, p=0.04). Conclusions Following GBP there is an increase in the postprandial stimulation of PYY and GLP-1 that is independent from

  3. Human host defense peptide LL-37 stimulates virulence factor production and adaptive resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Strempel, Nikola; Neidig, Anke; Nusser, Michael; Geffers, Robert; Vieillard, Julien; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Overhage, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of different virulence factors as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to adverse environmental conditions are important features for the high pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both virulence and adaptive resistance are tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network and respond to external stimuli, such as host signals or antibiotic stress, in a highly specific manner. Here, we demonstrate that physiological concentrations of the human host defense peptide LL-37 promote virulence factor production as well as an adaptive resistance against fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analyses of P. aeruginosa cells exposed to LL-37 revealed an upregulation of gene clusters involved in the production of quorum sensing molecules and secreted virulence factors (PQS, phenazine, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), elastase and rhamnolipids) and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification as well as an induction of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps MexCD-OprJ and MexGHI-OpmD. Accordingly, we detected significantly elevated levels of toxic metabolites and proteases in bacterial supernatants after LL-37 treatment. Pre-incubation of bacteria with LL-37 for 2 h led to a decreased susceptibility towards gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Quantitative Realtime PCR results using a PAO1-pqsE mutant strain present evidence that the quinolone response protein and virulence regulator PqsE may be implicated in the regulation of the observed phenotype in response to LL-37. Further experiments with synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides IDR-1018, 1037 and HHC-36 showed no induction of pqsE expression, suggesting a new role of PqsE as highly specific host stress sensor.

  4. Human Host Defense Peptide LL-37 Stimulates Virulence Factor Production and Adaptive Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Strempel, Nikola; Neidig, Anke; Nusser, Michael; Geffers, Robert; Vieillard, Julien; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Overhage, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of different virulence factors as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to adverse environmental conditions are important features for the high pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both virulence and adaptive resistance are tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network and respond to external stimuli, such as host signals or antibiotic stress, in a highly specific manner. Here, we demonstrate that physiological concentrations of the human host defense peptide LL-37 promote virulence factor production as well as an adaptive resistance against fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analyses of P. aeruginosa cells exposed to LL-37 revealed an upregulation of gene clusters involved in the production of quorum sensing molecules and secreted virulence factors (PQS, phenazine, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), elastase and rhamnolipids) and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification as well as an induction of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps MexCD-OprJ and MexGHI-OpmD. Accordingly, we detected significantly elevated levels of toxic metabolites and proteases in bacterial supernatants after LL-37 treatment. Pre-incubation of bacteria with LL-37 for 2 h led to a decreased susceptibility towards gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Quantitative Realtime PCR results using a PAO1-pqsE mutant strain present evidence that the quinolone response protein and virulence regulator PqsE may be implicated in the regulation of the observed phenotype in response to LL-37. Further experiments with synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides IDR-1018, 1037 and HHC-36 showed no induction of pqsE expression, suggesting a new role of PqsE as highly specific host stress sensor. PMID:24349231

  5. Biphasic peptide amphiphile nanomatrix embedded with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for stimulated osteoinductive response.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel M; Patterson, Jessica L; Vines, Jeremy B; Javed, Amjad; Gilbert, Shawn R; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2011-12-27

    Formation of the native bone extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an attractive template for bone tissue engineering. The structural support and biological complexity of bone ECM are provided within a composite microenvironment that consists of an organic fibrous network reinforced by inorganic hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. Recreating this biphasic assembly, a bone ECM analogous scaffold comprising self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers and interspersed HA nanoparticles was investigated. PAs were endowed with biomolecular ligand signaling using a synthetically inscribed peptide sequence (i.e., RGDS) and integrated with HA nanoparticles to form a biphasic nanomatrix hydrogel. It was hypothesized the biphasic hydrogel would induce osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and improve bone healing as mediated by RGDS ligand signaling within PA nanofibers and embedded HA mineralization source. Viscoelastic stability of the biphasic PA hydrogels was evaluated with different weight concentrations of HA for improved gelation. After demonstrating initial viability, long-term cellularity and osteoinduction of encapsulated hMSCs in different PA hydrogels were studied in vitro. Temporal progression of osteogenic maturation was assessed by gene expression of key markers. A preliminary animal study demonstrated bone healing capacity of the biphasic PA nanomatrix under physiological conditions using a critical size femoral defect rat model. The combination of RGDS ligand signaling and HA nanoparticles within the biphasic PA nanomatrix hydrogel demonstrated the most effective osteoinduction and comparative bone healing response. Therefore, the biphasic PA nanomatrix establishes a well-organized scaffold with increased similarity to natural bone ECM with the prospect for improved bone tissue regeneration.

  6. In vivo effect of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) on the gene expression of calcitonin peptides in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Olga; Gögebakan, Ozlem; Osterhoff, Martin A; Nauck, Michael; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Rudovich, Natalia

    2012-11-10

    Increased plasma levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide-I (CGRP-I) and procalcitonin (Pro-CT) (both also named calcitonin peptides (CT peptides)) are associated with obesity and systemic inflammation. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), a nutrient-dependent incretin hormone, was recently found to induce CGRP-I and CT expression in human adipocytes in vitro. However, a physiological relevance of a possible interaction between GIP and CT peptides has not yet been studied. In this study, we analyzed the effect of GIP on the expression of CGRP-I and CT mRNA in human subcutaneous adipose tissue within a randomized, controlled trial. Seventeen male obese subjects were infused with GIP [2.0 pmol kg(-1) min(-1) for 240 min] or placebo, either in the fasting state, during euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (EC) or hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps (HC). The CGRP-I gene expression was detected in all investigated adipose tissue samples, whereas very low CT expression was found in only 8 out of 116 analyzed samples. No significant influence of either GIP or glucose and insulin infusions on the CGRP-I and CT expression was observed in any of the individual experiments (GIP infusion, EC and HC) or in the combined analysis of all experiments with and without GIP. Furthermore, CGRP-I expression was not correlated with plasma GIP level before or after 240 min of infusions or clamps. In contrast to in vitro data, an acute application of GIP has no effect on mRNA expression of CT peptides in subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Speract, a sea urchin egg peptide that regulates sperm motility, also stimulates sperm mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    García-Rincón, Juan; Darszon, Alberto; Beltrán, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Sea urchin sperm have only one mitochondrion, that in addition to being the main source of energy, may modulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to regulate their motility and possibly the acrosome reaction. Speract is a decapeptide from the outer jelly layer of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus egg that upon binding to its receptor in the sperm, stimulates sperm motility, respiration and ion fluxes, among other physiological events. Altering the sea urchin sperm mitochondrial function with specific inhibitors of this organelle, increases [Ca(2+)]i in an external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext)-dependent manner (Ardón, et al., 2009. BBActa 1787: 15), suggesting that the mitochondrion is involved in sperm [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis. To further understand the interrelationship between the mitochondrion and the speract responses, we measured mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) and NADH levels. We found that the stimulation of sperm with speract depolarizes the mitochondrion and increases the levels of NADH. Surprisingly, these responses are independent of external Ca(2+) and are due to the increase in intracellular pH (pHi) induced by speract. Our findings indicate that speract, by regulating pHi, in addition to [Ca(2+)]i, may finely modulate mitochondrial metabolism to control motility and ensure that sperm reach the egg and fertilize it.

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulates DNA synthesis in mouse 3T3 cells: Role of cAMP, Ca sup 2+ , and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Zurier, B.B.; Kozma, M.; Sinnett-Smith, J.; Rozengurt, E. )

    1988-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulated initiation of DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. The peptide stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin and either forskolin or an inhibitor of cAMP phosphodiesterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effect was obtained at 1 nM. At mitogenic concentrations, VIP stimulated a marked accumulation (eightfold) of cAMP. In contrast to other growth-promoting neuropeptides, VIP did not induce an increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} or the activation of protein kinase C. The authors conclude that neuropeptides can modulate long-term cell proliferation through multiple signaling pathways.

  9. The opioid peptide beta-endorphin stimulates acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Urizar-Arenaza, I; Estomba, H; Muñoa-Hoyos, I; Matorras, R; Esposito, A; Candenas, L; Pinto, F M; Valdivia, A; Irazusta, J; Subirán, N

    2016-01-01

    The acrosome reaction occurs in vivo following sperm capacitation and is essential for the acquisition of sperm fertilization ability. However, little is known about the molecular identity of the physiological acrosome reaction regulators. In addition to progesterone, which is produced by cumulus oophorus cells and known to regulate acrosome reaction by activating the specific calcium channel CatSper, endogenous opioid peptides such as beta-endorphin and met-enkephalin are present at high concentrations in the follicular fluid suggesting that the opioid system may be involved in the mechanisms regulating the acrosome reaction in humans. By using Reverse Transcription-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence approaches, we described the presence and localization of the beta-endorphin precursor, pro-opiomelanocortinin the middle section and in flagellum of human spermatozoa, and inside the seminiferous tubules of human testis. Flow cytometry and intracellular calcium analyses showed that beta-endorphin causes an inversely dose-dependent increase in the percentage of acrosome-reacted sperm cells by a calcium-independent protein kinase C pathway. These findings are important for future studies of sperm physiology and provide new insight into the function of the opioid system as a target of fertility management.

  10. Immunohistochemical distribution of cocaine and amphetamine regulatory peptide-like immunoreactive (CART-LI) nerve fibers in the circular muscle layer and their relationship to other peptides in the human caecum.

    PubMed

    Bulc, Michał; Gonkowski, Sławomir; Landowski, Piotr; Kamińska, Barbara; Całka, Jarosław

    2014-07-01

    Motor activity of the gastrointestinal tract is extensively controlled by the enteric nervous system (ENS). Numerous neurotransmitters and neuromodulators are responsible for this regulation. One of them is cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART). So far, there are few reports available concerning the distribution, functions, and co-localization of CART in the human gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the present investigation was to study the distribution and degree of co-localization of CART with substances taking part in conducting sensory stimuli, such as: substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and Leu 5 enkephalin (L-ENK) in the circular muscle layer of the human caecum. CART-like immunoreactive (CART-LI) nerve fibers formed a very dense meshwork in the circular muscle layer of the caecum in all patients studied. Moreover, all neuronal substances tested during the present investigation were observed in CART-LI processes, but the degree of co-localization depended on the type of substance. The highest number of CART-positive nerves also contained L-ENK. A slightly lower level of co-localization was observed in the case of CART and SP or NKA, while only single nerve fibers were simultaneously CART- and CGRP-positive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Stimulation of human formyl peptide receptors by calpain inhibitors: homology modeling of receptors and ligand docking simulation.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hisakazu; Kato, Takayuki; Watanabe, Norifumi; Takahashi, Tatsuji; Kitagawa, Seiichi

    2011-12-15

    Calpain inhibitors, including peptide aldehydes (N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO and N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Met-CHO) and α-mercapto-acrylic acid derivatives (PD150606 and PD151746), have been shown to stimulate phagocyte functions via activation of human formyl peptide receptor (hFPR) and/or hFPR-like 1 (hFPRL1). Using the homology modeling of the receptors and the ligand docking simulation, here we show that these calpain inhibitors could bind to the putative N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) binding site on hFPR and/or hFPRL1. The studies with HEK-293 cells stably expressing hFPR or hFPRL1 showed that the concentrations of calpain inhibitors required to induce an increase in cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) was much higher (>100 folds) than those of fMLF and Trp-Lys-Tyr-Met-Val-D-Met (WKYMVm). HEK-293 cells expressing hFPR or hFPRL1 with the mutated fMLF binding site never exhibited the [Ca(2+)](i) response to calpain inhibitors. When the optimal concentrations of each stimulus were used, pretreatment of cells with fMLF or WKYMVm abolished an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by calpain inhibitors as well as the same stimulus, whereas pretreatment of cells with calpain inhibitors significantly suppressed, but never abolished, the [Ca(2+)](i) response induced by fMLF or WKYMVm, suggesting that the binding affinity of the inhibitors to the putative fMLF binding site may be lower than that of fMLF or WKYMVm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The dietary ingredient, genistein, stimulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression through a novel S1P-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Kim, Young-Il; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Jong Youl; Mann, Taj; Oda, Yuko; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M; Elias, Peter M; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2014-07-01

    We recently discovered that a signaling lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), generated by sphingosine kinase 1, regulates a major epidermal antimicrobial peptide's [cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP)] expression via an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent pathway, independent of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in epithelial cells. Activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by either estrogens or phytoestrogens also is known to stimulate S1P production, but it is unknown whether ER activation increases CAMP production. We investigated whether a phytoestrogen, genistein, simulates CAMP expression in keratinocytes, a model of epithelial cells, by either a S1P-dependent mechanism(s) or the alternate VDR-regulated pathway. Exogenous genistein, as well as an ER-β ligand, WAY-200070, increased CAMP mRNA and protein expression in cultured human keratinocytes, while ER-β antagonist, ICI182780, attenuated the expected genistein- and WAY-200070-induced increase in CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Genistein treatment increased acidic and alkaline ceramidase expression and cellular S1P levels in parallel with increased S1P lyase inhibition, accounting for increased CAMP production. In contrast, siRNA against VDR did not alter genistein-mediated up-regulation of CAMP. Taken together, genistein induces CAMP production via an ER-β→S1P→NF-κB→C/EBPα- rather than a VDR-dependent mechanism, illuminating a new role for estrogens in the regulation of epithelial innate immunity and pointing to potential additional benefits of dietary genistein in enhancing cutaneous antimicrobial defense.

  13. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  14. Chronic stimulation of the hypothalamic vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor lengthens circadian period in mice and hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Pantazopoulos, Harry; Dolatshad, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that circadian rhythms are regulated through diffusible signals generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is located in SCN neurons positioned to receive photic input from the retinohypothalamic tract and transmit information to other SCN cells and adjacent hypothalamic areas. Studies using knockout mice indicate that VIP is essential for synchrony among SCN cells and for the expression of normal circadian rhythms. To test the hypothesis that VIP is also an SCN output signal, we recorded wheel-running activity rhythms in hamsters and continuously infused the VIP receptor agonist BAY 55-9837 in the third ventricle for 28 days. Unlike other candidate output signals, infusion of BAY 55-9837 did not affect activity levels. Instead, BAY 55-9837 lengthened the circadian period by 0.69 ± 0.04 h (P < 0.0002 compared with controls). Period returned to baseline after infusions. We analyzed the effect of BAY 55-9837 on cultured SCN from PER2::LUC mice to determine if lengthening of the period by BAY 55-9837 is a direct effect on the SCN. Application of 10 μM BAY 55-9837 to SCN in culture lengthened the period of PER2 luciferase expression (24.73 ± 0.24 h) compared with control SCN (23.57 ± 0.26, P = 0.01). In addition, rhythm amplitude was significantly increased, consistent with increased synchronization of SCN neurons. The effect of BAY 55-9837 in vivo on period is similar to the effect of constant light. The present results suggest that VIP-VPAC2 signaling in the SCN may play two roles, synchronizing SCN neurons and setting the period of the SCN as a whole. PMID:20463182

  15. SKPDT is a signaling peptide that stimulates sporulation and cry1Aa expression in Bacillus thuringiensis but not in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Diez, Angel E; Robles-Burgueño, Refugio; de la Torre, Mayra

    2007-08-01

    We have identified and characterized in the supernatant of the transition phase of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki the peptide SKPDT. This peptide was previously identified by in silico analysis by Pottathil and Lazazzera (Front Biosci 8:32-45 2003) as a putative signaling peptide (NprRB) of the Phr family in B. thuringiensis. The chemically synthesized NprRB did not affect the growth kinetics of B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki but stimulated the sporulation, spore release, and transcription of cry1Aa when added to cultures during the transition phase. In fact, when the peptide (100 nM) was added to a culture in transition phase, the transcription of cry1Aa was stimulated almost threefold, mainly from the late promoter BtII, which requires the late-stage sporulation-specific transcription factor sigma (K). On the other hand, NprRB did not have any effect on B. subtilis. Thus, SKPDT seems to be a signaling peptide specific for B. thuringiensis.

  16. Localization of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Immunoreactivity in Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Abdelalim, Essam M.; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exerts its functions through NP receptors. Recently, BNP has been shown to be involved in a wide range of functions. Previous studies reported BNP expression in the sensory afferent fibers in the dorsal horn (DH) of the spinal cord. However, BNP expression and function in the neurons of the central nervous system are still controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated BNP expression in the rat spinal cord in detail using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR analysis showed that BNP mRNA was present in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). BNP immunoreactivity was observed in different structures of the spinal cord, including the neuronal cell bodies and neuronal processes. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in the DH of the spinal cord and in the neurons of the intermediate column (IC) and ventral horn (VH). Double-immunolabeling showed a high level of BNP expression in the afferent fibers (laminae I–II) labeled with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), suggesting BNP involvement in sensory function. In addition, BNP was co-localized with CGRP and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the motor neurons of the VH. Together, these results indicate that BNP is expressed in sensory and motor systems of the spinal cord, suggesting its involvement in several biological actions on sensory and motor neurons via its binding to NP receptor-A (NPR-A) and/or NP receptor-B (NPR-B) at the spinal cord level. PMID:27994541

  17. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide stimulates thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells: role of endothelin-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Ke-Hong; Zhong, Qing; Isales, Carlos M.; Iscules, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have previously characterized the receptor for glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) in vascular endothelial cells (EC). Different EC types were found to contain distinct GIPR splice variants. To determine whether activation of the GIPR splice variants resulted in different cellular responses, we examined GIP effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), which contain two GIPR splice variants, and compared them with a spontaneously transformed human umbilical vein EC line, ECV 304, which contains four GIPR splice variants. GIP dose-dependently stimulated HUVEC and ECV 304 proliferation as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. GIP increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion from HUVEC but not from ECV 304. Use of the endothelin B receptor blocker BQ-788 resulted in an inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation in HUVEC but not in ECV 304. These findings suggest that, although GIP increases [3H]thymidine incorporation in both HUVEC and ECV 304, this proliferative response is mediated by ET-1 only in HUVEC. These differences in cellular response to GIP may be related to differences in activation of GIPR splice variants.

  18. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide stimulates thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells: role of endothelin-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Ke-Hong; Zhong, Qing; Isales, Carlos M.; Iscules, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have previously characterized the receptor for glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) in vascular endothelial cells (EC). Different EC types were found to contain distinct GIPR splice variants. To determine whether activation of the GIPR splice variants resulted in different cellular responses, we examined GIP effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), which contain two GIPR splice variants, and compared them with a spontaneously transformed human umbilical vein EC line, ECV 304, which contains four GIPR splice variants. GIP dose-dependently stimulated HUVEC and ECV 304 proliferation as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. GIP increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion from HUVEC but not from ECV 304. Use of the endothelin B receptor blocker BQ-788 resulted in an inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation in HUVEC but not in ECV 304. These findings suggest that, although GIP increases [3H]thymidine incorporation in both HUVEC and ECV 304, this proliferative response is mediated by ET-1 only in HUVEC. These differences in cellular response to GIP may be related to differences in activation of GIPR splice variants.

  19. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone: a protective peptide against chemotherapy-induced hair follicle damage?

    PubMed

    Böhm, M; Bodó, E; Funk, W; Paus, R

    2014-04-01

    Effective, safe and well-tolerated therapeutic and/or preventive regimens for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) still remain to be developed. Because α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) exerts a number of cytoprotective effects and is well tolerated, we hypothesized that it may be a candidate CIA-protective agent. To explore, using a human in vitro model for chemotherapy-induced hair follicle (HF) dystrophy that employs the key cyclophosphamide metabolite (4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, 4-HC), whether α-MSH protects from 4-HC-induced HF dystrophy. Microdissected human scalp HFs from four individuals were treated with 4-HC, α-MSH and 4-HC plus α-MSH. Changes in HF cycling, melanin distribution and hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation/apoptosis were examined by quantitative (immune-) morphometry. Expression of the cytoprotective enzyme haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was determined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in HF of two individuals. In 50% of the individuals α-MSH reduced melanin clumping as an early sign of 4-HC-induced disruption of follicular pigmentation. α-MSH reduced 4-HC-induced apoptosis in the HFs of one female patient. These protective effects of α-MSH were not associated with changes in 4-HC-induced catagen induction. α-MSH and 4-HC both increased HO-1 mRNA expression, while the combination of both agents had additive effects on HO-1 transcription. Exogenous α-MSH exerts moderate HF-protective effects against 4-HC-induced human scalp HF damage and upregulates the intrafollicular expression of a key cytoprotective enzyme. However, as substantial interindividual response variations were found, further studies are needed to probe α-MSH as a candidate CIA-protective agent. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Eosinophilopoietin. A circulating low molecular weight peptide-like substance which stimulates the production of eosinophils in mice.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A A; Stone, M K; Kellermeyer, R W

    1977-09-01

    In earlier studies, methods were developed to raise specific antibodies in rabbits against purified suspensions of mouse or human eosinophils. On administration of antieosinophil serum (AES) to mice, the mature eosinophils in tissues, peripheral blood, and bone marrow were depleted, while the immature eosinophil pool in the bone marrow was observed to proliferate. The current investigations explore the generation of eosinophilopoietic factors during AES-induced eosinophilopenia. Mice received three injections of AES, one every other day. As the peripheral eosinophil counts started to recover after the last AES injection, the serum was collected and transferred to normal animals. Within 2 days the recipients showed an increase in peripheral blood as well as in bone marrow eosinophils. The rise in bone marrow eosinophils was due to newly formed cells as evidenced by increased uptake of [(3)H]thymidine. The generation of eosinophilopoietic activity was specifically related to depletion of eosinophils but not neutrophils. The eosinophilopoietic activity was: (a) dependent on the volume of serum transferred, (b) lost on dialysis, and (c) largely heat labile. The activity eluted as a low molecular weight substance on G-25 Sephadex and was digested by pronase but not by trypsin. Active fractions collected from G-25 columns were not chemotactic for the eosinophils in vitro. Thus, specific depletion of mature eosinophils generates a low molecular weight peptide which stimulates eosinophilopoiesis in vivo. It is suggested that this substance be named eosinophilopoietin.

  1. Immunosuppressive activity of a novel peptide analog of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Edling, Andrea E; Gomes, Danilo; Weeden, Timothy; Dzuris, John; Stefano, Jim; Pan, Clark; Williams, John; Kaplan, Johanne; Perricone, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an inflammatory disorder of the eye that can lead to pain and vision loss. Steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are currently the only therapeutics for uveitis and have serious ocular and systemic toxicities. Therefore, safer alternative therapeutics are desired. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide that suppresses effector T cell functions, induces regulatory T cells and has beneficial effects in certain autoimmune and transplant models. A novel d-amino acid peptide analog of native α-MSH (dRI-α-MSH) was produced that was protected from protease digestion and had increased selectivity for the melanocortin-1 receptor. Systemic delivery of the dRI-α-MSH analog dramatically suppressed disease progression and retained retinal architecture in the experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) model. Local delivery by periorbital injection was equally effective. Importantly, treatment with the novel dRI-α-MSH analog suppressed uveitis with a similar magnitude to the corticosteroid, dexamethasone. Data indicate that the novel dRI-α-MSH analogs show anti-inflammatory activities and have potential therapeutic use in uveitis and other autoimmune diseases.

  2. Inhibiting effects of fructanase on competence-stimulating peptide-dependent quorum sensing system in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Nagasawa, Ryo; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2017-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans produces glucosyltransferases encoded by the gtfB and gtfC genes, which synthesize insoluble glucan, and both insoluble and soluble glucans by conversion of sucrose, and are known as principal agents to provide strong biofilm formation and demineralization on tooth surfaces. S. mutans possess a Com-dependent quorum sensing (QS) system, which is important for survival in severe conditions. The QS system is stimulated by the interaction between ComD {Receptor to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)} encoded by the comD and CSP encoded by the comC, and importantly associated with bacteriocin production and genetic competence. Previously, we found enzyme fructanase (FruA) as a new inhibitor for the glucan-dependent biofilm formation. In the present study, inhibiting effects by FruA on glucan-independent biofilm formation of S. mutans UA159, UA159.gtfB(-), UA159.gtfC(-), and UA159.gtfBC(-) were observed in sucrose and no sucrose sugars-supplemented conditions using the plate assay. The reduction of UA159.comC(-) and UA159.comD(-) biofilm formation were also observed as compared with UA159 in same conditions. These results suggested that inhibitions of glucan-independent and Com-dependent biofilm formation were involved in the inhibiting mechanism by FruA. To more thoroughly investigate effects by FruA on the QS system, we examined on CSP-stimulated and Com-dependent bacteriocin production and genetic transformation. FruA inhibited bacteriocin production in collaboration with CSP and genetic transformation in bacterial cell conditions treated with FruA. Our findings show that FruA has multiple effects that inhibit survival functions of S. mutans, including biofilm formation and CSP-dependent QS responses, indicating its potential use as an agent for prevention of dental caries. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition by atrial and brain natriuretic peptides of endothelin-1 secretion after stimulation with angiotensin II and thrombin of cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, M; Yasunari, K; Yokokawa, K; Murakawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1991-01-01

    We examined the inhibition by atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) of endothelin-1 secretion stimulated by angiotensin II (ANGII) and thrombin using cultured human umbilical-vein endothelial cells. ANGII and thrombin dose-dependently stimulated immunoreactive (ir) endothelin-1 secretion. Human ANP(1-28) and human BNP-32 both inhibited such secretion in a dose-dependent way. Inhibition of this secretion by ANP and BNP was paralleled by an increase in the level of cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP). The addition of a cyclic GMP analogue, 8-bromo cyclic GMP, reduced this stimulated secretion. Rat ANP(5-25) was weaker than human ANP(1-28) at inhibiting ir-endothelin-1 secretion and increasing cyclic GMP in the cells. ir-Endothelin-1 in the medium consisted of two components separated by high pressure liquid chromatography; the major one corresponded to endothelin-1(1-21) and the minor one corresponded to big endothelin-1(1-38). Treatment with ANP and BNP did not affect this profile. These findings suggest that human ANP and BNP inhibit endothelin-1 secretion stimulated by ANGII and thrombin in these cells through a cyclic GMP-dependent process. Taken together with endothelin stimulation of ANP and BNP secretion from the heart, our results suggest the existence of a cardiac-endothelium feedback. PMID:1645748

  4. Vasoactive intestinal peptide enhanced aromatase activity in the neonatal rat ovary before development of primary follicles or responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    George, F.W.; Ojeda, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have investigated the factors that regulate aromatase activity in fetal-neonatal rat ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity (assessed by measuring the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed from (1..beta..-/sup 3/H)testosterone) is low prior to birth and increases to values greater than 30 pmol/hr per mg of protein between days 8 and 12 after birth. The appearance of ovarian aromatase coincides with the development of primordial follicles. Fetal-neonatal ovaries maintained in serum-free organ culture do not develop aromatase activity at the expected time. Ovine follicle-stimulating hormone, ovine luteinizing hormone, or their combination failed to induce the enzyme activity in cultured fetal ovaries, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone is effective in preventing the decline in aromatase activity when postnatal day 8 ovaries are placed in culture. In contrast to follicle-stimulating hormone, dibutyryl-cAMP markedly enhances ovarian aromatase in cultured fetal ovaries. Likewise, enhancement of endogenouse cAMP formation with forskolin or cholera toxin caused an increase in enzyme activity within 24 hr. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a peptide known to occur in ovarian nerves, caused a dose-dependent increase in aromatase activity in fetal ovaries prior to folliculogenesis. Of related peptides tested, only the peptide having N-terminal histidine and C-terminal isoleucine amide was capable of inducing aromatase activity in fetal ovaries. The fact that VIP can induce aromatase activity in fetal rat ovaries prior to follicle formation and prior to responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone suggests that this neuropeptide may play a critical role in ovarian differentiation.

  5. Vasoactive intestinal peptide enhances aromatase activity in the neonatal rat ovary before development of primary follicles or responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed Central

    George, F W; Ojeda, S R

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the factors that regulate aromatase activity in fetal-neonatal rat ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity (assessed by measuring the amount of 3H2O) formed from [1 beta-3H]testosterone) is low prior to birth (less than 0.5 pmol/hr per mg of protein) and increases to values greater than 30 pmol/hr per mg of protein between days 8 and 12 after birth. The appearance of ovarian aromatase (postnatal days 2-4) coincides with the development of primordial follicles. Fetal-neonatal ovaries maintained in serum-free organ culture do not develop aromatase activity at the expected time. Ovine follicle-stimulating hormone (0.1-1 microgram/ml), ovine luteinizing hormone (0.1 microgram/ml), or their combination failed to induce the enzyme activity in cultured fetal ovaries, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone is effective in preventing the decline in aromatase activity when postnatal day 8 ovaries are placed in culture. In contrast to follicle-stimulating hormone, dibutyryl-cAMP markedly enhances ovarian aromatase in cultured fetal ovaries. Likewise, enhancement of endogenous cAMP formation with forskolin or cholera toxin caused an increase in enzyme activity within 24 hr. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a peptide known to occur in ovarian nerves, caused a dose-dependent increase in aromatase activity in fetal ovaries prior to folliculogenesis. Of related peptides tested, only the peptide having N-terminal histidine and C-terminal isoleucine amide was capable of inducing aromatase activity in fetal ovaries. The fact that VIP can induce aromatase activity in fetal rat ovaries prior to follicle formation and prior to responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone suggests that this neuropeptide may play a critical role in ovarian differentiation. Images PMID:3039508

  6. Glucagonlike peptide 2 analogue teduglutide: stimulation of proliferation but reduction of differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S; Basson, Marc D

    2013-11-01

    Short bowel syndrome occurs when a shortened intestine cannot absorb sufficient nutrients or fluids. Teduglutide is a recombinant analogue of human glucagonlike peptide 2 that reduces dependence on parenteral nutrition in patients with short bowel syndrome by promoting enterocytic proliferation, increasing the absorptive surface area. However, enterocyte function depends not only on the number of cells that are present but also on differentiated features that facilitate nutrient absorption and digestion. To test the hypothesis that teduglutide impairs human intestinal epithelial differentiation. We investigated the effects of teduglutide in the modulation of proliferation and differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells at a basic science laboratory. This was an in vitro study using Caco-2 cells, a human-derived intestinal epithelial cell line commonly used to model enterocytic biology. Cells were exposed to teduglutide or vehicle control. We analyzed the cell cycle by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation or propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. We used quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assay the expression of the enterocytic differentiation markers villin, sucrase-isomaltase, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as well as that of the putative differentiation signals schlafen 12 (SLFN12) and caudal-related homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor (Cdx2). Villin promoter activity was measured by a luciferase-based assay. The MTS assay demonstrated that teduglutide increased cell numbers by a mean (SD) of 10% (2%) over untreated controls at a maximal 500 nM (n = 6, P < .05). Teduglutide increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells vs untreated controls by a mean (SD) of 19.4% (2.3%) vs 12.0% (0.8%) (n = 6, P < .05) and increased the S-phase fraction

  7. Ontogeny and modulation after PAMPs stimulation of β-defensin, hepcidin, and piscidin antimicrobial peptides in meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    PubMed

    Campoverde, Cindy; Milne, Douglas J; Estévez, Alicia; Duncan, Neil; Secombes, Christopher J; Andree, Karl B

    2017-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), components of innate immunity, play an important role in protecting fish. In this study we report the molecular cloning of full open reading frames and characterization of expression of three AMP genes (β-defensin (defb), hepcidin (hep2), piscidin (pisc) in meagre (Argyrosomus regius). A phylogenetic analysis of the expressed sequences obtained shows the defensin isoform forms a clade with the other members of the beta class of this family, hepcidin corresponds to hepcidin 2, and piscidin corresponds to class I of its respective family. Gene expression profiles of AMPs was investigated, by means of quantification of mRNA in nine development stages, from 8 days post-hatching (dph) to accomplishment of juvenile form (120 dph). During development it was demonstrated defb, hep2, pisc were expressed in all stages of larval development and in juvenile tissues (kidney, spleen gut and gill). Moreover, expression patterns suggest the expression levels of theses AMPs are influenced by live prey (rotifer, Artemia) and first intake of commercial diet. Induction experiments in vivo (24 h) and in vitro (4, 12, 24 h) with PAMPs (LPS, poly (I:C), β-glucan) revealed significant changes in gene expression of the three AMP genes, in kidney, spleen, gut and gill. However, expression profiles differed in magnitude and time course response. defb expression shows a similar trend in vivo and in vitro in kidney at 24 h after LPS and β-glucan stimulation. The hep2 expression levels were up-regulated upon β-glucan challenge in vivo, more in gut and gills than kidney, while in vitro hep2 expression was up-regulated in kidney cells by LPS, poly (I:C), β-glucan (4 h). pisc expression was up-regulated in kidney cells, splenocytes by β-glucan, but in gill cells by poly (I:C) and β-glucan in vivo. However, pisc expression was upregulated in kidney cells by β-glucan and gill cells by LPS at 4 post-stimulation in vitro. These data suggest that AMPs

  8. The dietary ingredient, genistein, stimulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression through a novel S1P-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Kim, Young-Il; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Jong Youl; Mann, Taj; Oda, Yuko; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M.; Elias, Peter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered that a signaling lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), generated by sphingosine kinase 1, regulates a major epidermal antimicrobial peptide’s [cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP)] expression via an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent pathway, independent of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in epithelial cells. Activation of estrogen receptors (ER) by either estrogens or phytoestrogens also is known to stimulate S1P production, but it is unknown whether ER activation increases CAMP production. We investigated whether a phytoestrogen, genistein, simulates CAMP expression in keratinocytes, a model of epithelial cells, by either a S1P-dependent mechanism(s) or the alternate VDR-regulated pathway. Exogenous genistein, as well as a ER-β ligand, WAY-200070, increased CAMP mRNA and protein expression in cultured human keratinocytes, while ER-β antagonist, ICI182780, attenuated the expected genistein- and WAY-200070-induced increase in CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Genistein treatment increased acidic and alkaline ceramidase expression and cellular S1P levels in parallel with increased S1P lyase inhibition, accounting for increased CAMP production. In contrast, siRNA against VDR did not alter genistein-mediated upregulation of CAMP. Taken together, genistein induces CAMP production via an ER-β→S1P→NF-κB→C/EBPα-rather than a VDR-dependent mechanism, illuminating a new role for estrogens in the regulation of epithelial innate immunity and pointing to potential additional benefits of dietary genistein in enhancing cutaneous antimicrobial defense. PMID:24768661

  9. Inhibiting effects of Streptococcus salivarius on competence-stimulating peptide-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tamura, S; Yonezawa, H; Motegi, M; Nakao, R; Yoneda, S; Watanabe, H; Yamazaki, T; Senpuku, H

    2009-04-01

    The effects of Streptococcus salivarius on the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans were investigated. Biofilms were grown on 96-well microtiter plates coated with salivary components in tryptic soy broth without dextrose supplemented with 0.25% sucrose. Biofilm formations were stained using safranin and quantification of stained biofilms was performed by measuring absorbance at 492 nm. S. mutans formed substantial biofilms, whereas biofilms of S. salivarius were formed poorly in the medium conditions used. Furthermore, in combination cultures, S. salivarius strongly inhibited biofilm formation when cultured with S. mutans. This inhibition occurred in the early phase of biofilm formation and was dependent on inactivation of the CSP of S. mutans, which is associated with competence, biofilm formation, and antimicrobial activity of the bacterium, and is induced by expression of the comC gene. Comparisons between the S. mutans clinical strains FSC-3 and FSC-3DeltaglrA in separate dual-species cultures with S. salivarius indicated that the presence of the bacitracin transport ATP-binding protein gene glrA caused susceptibility to inhibition of S. mutans biofilm formation by S. salivarius, and was also associated with the regulation of CSP production by com gene-dependent quorum sensing systems. It is considered that regulation of CSP by glrA in S. mutans and CSP inactivation by S. salivarius are important functions for cell-to-cell communication between biofilm bacteria and oral streptococci such as S. salivarius. Our results provide useful information for understanding the ecosystem of oral streptococcal biofilms, as well as the competition between and coexistence of multiple species in the oral cavity.

  10. Increased Litter Size and Suckling Intensity Stimulate mRNA of RFamide-related Peptide in Rats.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Atefeh; Jafarzadeh Shirazi, Mohammad Reza; Tamadon, Amin; Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) inhibits gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in rats. This study evaluates the effects of litter size and suckling intensity on RFRP mRNA expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) of rats. A total of 32 pregnant and 4 non-lactating ovariectomized (control group) Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experimental study. Lactating rats were allotted to 8 equal groups. In 3 groups, the litter size was adjusted to 5, 10, or 15 pups upon parturition. Dams were allowed to suckle their pups continuously until 8 days postpartum. In the other 3 groups, the litter size was adjusted to 5 pups following birth. These pups were separated from the dams for 6 hours on day 8 postpartum, after which the pups were allowed to suckle for 2.5, 5, or 7.5 minutes prior to killing the dams. In 2 groups, lactating rats with 10 and 15 pups were separated from their pups for 6 hours on day 8 postpartum. In these groups, the pups were allowed to suckle their dams for 5 minutes before the dams were killed. All rats were killed on day 8 postpartum and the DMH was removed from each rat. We evaluated RFRP mRNA expression using realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The expression of RFRP mRNA in the DMH increased with increased litter size and suckling intensity compared to the controls. The effect of suckling intensity on the expression of RFRP mRNA was more pronounced compared to the litter size. Increased litter size and suckling intensity stimulated RFRP mRNA expression in the DMH which might contribute to lactation anestrus in rats.

  11. Increased Litter Size and Suckling Intensity Stimulate mRNA of RFamide-related Peptide in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Atefeh; Jafarzadeh Shirazi, Mohammad Reza; Tamadon, Amin; Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) inhibits gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in rats. This study evaluates the effects of litter size and suckling intensity on RFRP mRNA expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) of rats. Materials and Methods A total of 32 pregnant and 4 non-lactating ovariectomized (control group) Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experimental study. Lactating rats were allotted to 8 equal groups. In 3 groups, the litter size was adjusted to 5, 10, or 15 pups upon parturition. Dams were allowed to suckle their pups continuously until 8 days postpartum. In the other 3 groups, the litter size was adjusted to 5 pups following birth. These pups were separated from the dams for 6 hours on day 8 postpartum, after which the pups were allowed to suckle for 2.5, 5, or 7.5 minutes prior to killing the dams. In 2 groups, lactating rats with 10 and 15 pups were separated from their pups for 6 hours on day 8 postpartum. In these groups, the pups were allowed to suckle their dams for 5 minutes before the dams were killed. All rats were killed on day 8 postpartum and the DMH was removed from each rat. We evaluated RFRP mRNA expression using realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The expression of RFRP mRNA in the DMH increased with increased litter size and suckling intensity compared to the controls. The effect of suckling intensity on the expression of RFRP mRNA was more pronounced compared to the litter size. Conclusion Increased litter size and suckling intensity stimulated RFRP mRNA expression in the DMH which might contribute to lactation anestrus in rats. PMID:26644862

  12. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  13. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Vicentini, Geraldo E.; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R. G.; Martins, Heber A.; Guarnier, Flávia A.; Zanoni, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  14. An immunodominant epitope in a functional domain near the N-terminus of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor identified by cross-reaction of synthetic peptides with neutralizing anti-protein and anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Beffy, P; Rovero, P; Di Bartolo, V; Laricchia Robbio, L; Dané, A; Pegoraro, S; Bertolero, F; Revoltella, R P

    1994-12-01

    We produced polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and performed studies of epitope mapping by ELISA, using five synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences along this molecule. Additionally, anti-peptide MAbs were generated. The antibody ability to inhibit rhGM-CSF activity was determined using as bioassay the MO7e cell line, which is dependent on hGM-CSF for growth in vitro. An immunodominant epitope able to induce the highest neutralization antibody titers was identified near the N terminus of hGM-CSF. A synthetic peptide 14-24, homologous to a sequence including part of the first alpha-helix of the molecule, was recognized by neutralizing anti-protein antibodies. Similarly, MAbs anti- 14-24 cross-reacted with rhGM-CSF and specifically blocked its function. Replacement of Val16 or Asn17 with alanine greatly reduced the antibody-binding capacity to peptide 14-24, whereas substitution of Gln20 or Glu21 was less critical. Monoclonal antibodies generated against residues 30-41 (corresponding to an intrahelical loop) and 79-91 (homologous to a sequence including part of the third alpha-helix) or its analog [Ala88](79-91)beta Ala-Cys, were conformation dependent and nonneutralizing: they failed to react or bound poorly to rhGM-CSF in ELISA, but readily recognized the homologous sequence in the denatured protein, by Western blotting.

  15. Thyroid hormone stimulates synthesis of a cardiac myosin isozyme. Comparison of the two-two-dimensional electrophoretic patterns of the cyanogen bromide peptides of cardiac myosin heavy chains from euthyroid and thyrotoxic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Flink, I L; Rader, J H; Morkin, E

    1979-04-25

    The CNBr peptides of [14C]carboxymethylated cardiac myosin heavy chains from euthyroid and thyrotoxic rabbits have been compared using a two-dimensional electrophoretic system. The results indicated that there were extensive differences in the peptide "maps" of these heavy chains, which included differences in the distribution of radiolabeled thiol peptides. Also, the patterns of heavy chain peptides from the cardiac myosins have been compared with those produced by the heavy chain myosin isozymes from skeletal muscles. Peptide maps of heavy chains from red skeletal muscle myosin closely resembled the pattern of peptides found with cardiac myosin heavy chains from euthyroid rabbits. However, peptide maps of heavy chains from white skeletal muscle myosin were dissimilar to those of the cardiac myosin isozymes. We conclude that thyroxine administration stimulates the synthesis of a cardiac myosin isozyme with a heavy chain primary structure which is different from either of the skeletal muscle myosin isozymes.

  16. 203Pb-Labeled Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide as an Imaging Probe for Melanoma Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yubin, Miao; Figueroa, Said D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Moore, Herbert A.; Testa, Richard F.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2008-05-01

    Abbreviations: a-MSH; alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone, DOTA; 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid, Re(Arg11)CCMSH; DOTA-[Cys3,4,10, D-Phe7, Arg11]a-MSH3-13, NDP; [Nle4,d-Phe7] a-MSH3-13. Abstract Peptide-targeted alpha therapy with 200 mCi of 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH cured 45% of B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice in a 120-day study, highlighting its melanoma treatment potential. However, there is a need to develop an imaging surrogate for patient specific dosimetry and to monitor the tumor response to 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH as a matched-pair SPECT imaging agent for 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH. Method: DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was labeled with 203Pb in 0.5 M NH4OAc buffer at pH 5.4. The internalization and efflux of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were examined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. A micro-SPECT/CT imaging study was performed with 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in a B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mouse at 2 h post-injection. Results: 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was easily prepared in NH4OAc buffer and completely separated from the excess non-radiolabeled peptide by RP-HPLC. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH displayed fast internalization and extended retention in B16/F1 cells. Approximately 73% of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH activity internalized after a 20-min incubation at 25C. After incubating the cells in culture media for 20 min, 78% of internalized activity remained in the cells. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited similar biodistribution pattern with 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor uptake of 12.00 +/- 3.20 %ID/g at 1 h post-injection. The tumor uptake gradually decreased to 3.43 +/- 1.12 %ID/g at 48 h post-injection. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor to kidney

  17. Multifunctional cyclic D,L-α-peptide architectures stimulate non-insulin dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells and protect them against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Renana; Rudnick, Safra; Daniel, Bareket; Viskind, Olga; Aisha, Vered; Richman, Michal; Ayasolla, Kamesh R; Perelman, Alex; Chill, Jordan H; Gruzman, Arie; Rahimipour, Shai

    2013-09-12

    Oxidative stress directly correlates with the early onset of vascular complications and the progression of peripheral insulin resistance in diabetes. Accordingly, exogenous antioxidants augment insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic patients and ameliorate its clinical signs. Herein, we explored the unique structural and functional properties of the abiotic cyclic D,L-α-peptide architecture as a new scaffold for developing multifunctional agents to catalytically decompose ROS and stimulate glucose uptake. We showed that His-rich cyclic D,L-α-peptide 1 is very stable under high H2O2 concentrations, effectively self-assembles to peptide nanotubes, and increases the uptake of glucose by increasing the translocation of GLUT1 and GLUT4. It also penetrates cells and protects them against oxidative stress induced under hyperglycemic conditions at a much lower concentration than α-lipoic acid (ALA). In vivo studies are now required to probe the mode of action and efficacy of these abiotic cyclic D,L-α-peptides as a novel class of antihyperglycemic compounds.

  18. Chronic preclinical safety evaluation of EPO-018B, a pegylated peptidic erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in monkeys and rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue-Lian; Gu, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Yong-Chun; Zhu, Hai; Xia, Zhen-Na; Li, Jian-Zhong; Lu, Guo-Cai

    2016-09-15

    EPO-018B, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA), is mainly designed for treatment of anemia caused by chronic renal failure and chemotherapy against cancer. It overcomes the deficiencies of currently approved ESA, including the frequent administration of temperature-sensitive recombinant protein and anti-EPO antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). This study was designed to evaluate the potential chronic toxicity of EPO-018B. Subcutaneous administration doses were designed as 0, 0.2, 1 and 10mg/kg for six months for 160 rats (20/gender/group) and 0, 0.3, 3 and 20mg/kg for nine months for 32 monkeys (4/gender/group) once every three weeks. The vehicles received the same volume of physiological saline injection. All animals survived to the scheduled necropsies after six weeks (for rats) and fourteen weeks (for monkeys) recovery period, except for the two high-dose female rats and two high-dose male monkeys, which were considered related to the increased RBCs, chronic blood hyperviscosity and chronic cardiac injury. EPO-018B is supposed to be subcutaneously injected once every month and the intended human therapeutic dose is 0.025mg/kg. The study findings at 0.2mg/kg for rats and 0.3mg/kg for monkeys were considered to be the study NOAEL (the no observed adverse effect level), which were more than ten times the intended human therapeutic dose. Higher doses caused adverse effects related to the liver toxicity, cardiotoxicity, appearance of neutralizing antibodies of EPO-018B and the decrease of serum glucose and cholesterol. Most treatment-induced effects were reversible or revealed ongoing recovery upon the discontinuation of treatment. The sequelae occurred in rats and monkeys were considered secondary to exaggerated pharmacology and would less likely occur in the intended patient population. As to the differences between human beings and animals, the safety of EPO-018B need to be further confirmed in the future clinical studies.

  19. LPXRFamide peptide stimulates growth hormone and prolactin gene expression during the spawning period in the grass puffer, a semi-lunar synchronized spawner.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2016-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) plays as a multifunctional neurohormone that controls reproduction in birds and mammals. LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) peptide, the fish ortholog of GnIH, has been shown to regulate the secretion of not only gonadotropin (GTH) but also growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), which are potentially important for gonadal function. To investigate the role of LPXRFa peptide on reproduction of the grass puffer, which spawns in semilunar cycles, we examined changes in the levels of gh and prl expression over the several months during the reproductive cycle, and the effects of goldfish LPXRFa peptide-1 (gfLPXRFa-1) on their expression were examined using primary pituitary cultures. The expression levels of both gh and prl showed significant changes during the reproductive cycle in both sexes with one peak in the spawning and pre-spawning periods for gh and prl, respectively. Particularly, gh showed substantial increase in expression in the spawning and post-spawning periods, indicative of its essentiality in the advanced stage of reproduction. gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated the expression of both gh and prl but there was a marked difference in response between them: gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated gh expression at a relatively low dose but little effect was observed on prl. Combined with the previous results of daily and circadian oscillations of lpxrfa expression, the present results suggest that LPXRFa peptide is important in the control of the cyclic reproduction by serving as a multifunctional hypophysiotropic factor that regulates the expression of gh and prl as well as GTH subunit genes.

  20. Graphene oxide-stimulated myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells on PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y. C.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Hong, S. W.; Oh, J.-W.; Kim, C.-S.; Kim, B.; Hyun, J. K.; Kim, Y.-J.; Han, D.-W.

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade, much attention has been paid to graphene-based nanomaterials because they are considered as potential candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds for tissue engineering and substrates for the differentiation of stem cells. Until now, electrospun matrices composed of various biodegradable copolymers have been extensively developed for tissue engineering and regeneration; however, their use in combination with graphene oxide (GO) is novel and challenging. In this study, nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 phage with RGD peptide displayed on its surface (RGD peptide-M13 phage) were prepared as extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking substrates. RGD peptide is a tripeptide (Arg-Gly-Asp) found on ECM proteins that promotes various cellular behaviors. The physicochemical properties of PLGA and RGD peptide-M13 phage (PLGA/RGD peptide) nanofiber matrices were characterized by atomic force microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, the growth of C2C12 mouse myoblasts on the PLGA/RGD peptide matrices was examined by measuring the metabolic activity. Moreover, the differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts on the matrices when treated with GO was evaluated. The cellular behaviors, including growth and differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts, were substantially enhanced on the PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices when treated with GO. Overall, these findings suggest that the PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices can be used in combination with GO as a novel strategy for skeletal tissue regeneration.

  1. An extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaves and purified gymnemic acid inhibits glucose-stimulated gastric inhibitory peptide secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fushiki, T; Kojima, A; Imoto, T; Inoue, K; Sugimoto, E

    1992-12-01

    Gastric inhibitory peptide release into the portal vein in response to duodenal infusion of D-glucose was studied in the presence of a leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and inhibitors of some putative glucose sensors and carriers in the intestinal lumen. Intraduodenal infusion of D-glucose significantly increased the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentration in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide induced by glucose was significantly depressed by concomitantly infused leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin but not by cytochalasin B. Mannoheptulose, which inhibits glycolysis, and procaine and lidocaine, which inhibit the vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen, did not affect portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentrations. These results suggest that a glucose receptor, which interacts with the leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin, exists for the release of immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide and that the glucose receptor for gastric inhibitory peptide release is not likely to be identical with a glucose transporter or a vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen.

  2. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  3. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1.

  4. Campylobacter jejuni carbon starvation protein A (CstA) is involved in peptide utilization, motility and agglutination, and has a role in stimulation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, J J; Vegge, C S; Frøkiær, H; Howlett, R M; Krogfelt, K A; Kelly, D J; Ingmer, H

    2013-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of severe gastroenteritis in the developed world. The major symptom of campylobacteriosis is inflammatory diarrhoea. The molecular mechanisms of this infection are poorly understood compared to those of less frequent disease-causing pathogens. In a previous study, we identified C. jejuni proteins that antibodies in human campylobacteriosis patients reacted with. One of the immunogenic proteins identified (Cj0917) displays homology to carbon starvation protein A (CstA) from Escherichia coli, where this protein is involved in the starvation response and peptide uptake. In contrast to many bacteria, C. jejuni relies on amino acids and organic acids for energy, but in vivo it is highly likely that peptides are also utilized, although their mechanisms of uptake are unknown. In this study, Biolog phenotype microarrays have been used to show that a ΔcstA mutant has a reduced ability to utilize a number of di- and tri-peptides as nitrogen sources. This phenotype was restored through genetic complementation, suggesting CstA is a peptide uptake system in C. jejuni. Furthermore, the ΔcstA mutant also displayed reduced motility and reduced agglutination compared to WT bacteria; these phenotypes were also restored through complementation. Murine dendritic cells exposed to UV-killed bacteria showed a reduced IL-12 production, but the same IL-10 response when encountering C. jejuni ΔcstA compared to the WT strain. The greater Th1 stimulation elicited by the WT as compared to ΔcstA mutant cells indicates an altered antigenic presentation on the surface, and thus an altered recognition of the mutant. Thus, we conclude that C. jejuni CstA is important not only for peptide utilization, but also it may influence host-pathogen interactions.

  5. Effects of amino acids on melanoma targeting and clearance properties of Tc-99m-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2013-11-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of amino acids on melanoma targeting and clearance properties of new (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-DTyr-Asp]-Lys-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RNleD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, RPheD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, and RdPheD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin-1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, (99m)Tc-RFD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, and (99m)Tc-RfD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of Gly with Ser, Phe, and dPhe increased the MC1 receptor binding affinities of the peptides, whereas the substitution of Gly with Nle decreased the MC1 receptor binding affinity of the peptide. (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (18.01 ± 4.22% ID/g) and the lowest kidney and liver uptake among these (99m)Tc-peptides. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by SPECT/CT using (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH as an imaging probe. It is desirable to reduce the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH to facilitate its potential therapeutic application.

  6. Statins promote the degradation of extracellular amyloid {beta}-peptide by microglia via stimulation of exosome-associated insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) secretion.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Irfan Y; Barth, Esther; Christian, Leonie; Siepmann, Martin; Kumar, Sathish; Singh, Sandesh; Tolksdorf, Karen; Heneka, Michael T; Lütjohann, Dieter; Wunderlich, Patrick; Walter, Jochen

    2010-11-26

    Epidemiological studies indicate that intake of statins decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer disease. Cellular and in vivo studies suggested that statins might decrease the generation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) from the β-amyloid precursor protein. Here, we show that statins potently stimulate the degradation of extracellular Aβ by microglia. The statin-dependent clearance of extracellular Aβ is mainly exerted by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) that is secreted in a nonconventional pathway in association with exosomes. Stimulated IDE secretion and Aβ degradation were also observed in blood of mice upon peripheral treatment with lovastatin. Importantly, increased IDE secretion upon lovastatin treatment was dependent on protein isoprenylation and up-regulation of exosome secretion by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. These data demonstrate a novel pathway for the nonconventional secretion of IDE via exosomes. The modulation of this pathway could provide a new strategy to enhance the extracellular clearance of Aβ.

  7. The Anorexigenic Peptide Neuromedin U (NMU) Attenuates Amphetamine-Induced Locomotor Stimulation, Accumbal Dopamine Release and Expression of Conditioned Place Preference in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallöf, Daniel; Vestlund, Jesper; Engel, Jörgen A.; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine dependence, besides its substantial economical consequence, is a serious cause of mortality and morbidity. By investigations of the neurochemical correlates through which addictive drugs, such as amphetamine, activate the mesoaccumbal dopamine system unique targets for treatment of drug addiction can be identified. This reward link consists of a dopamine projection from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) suggesting that these brain areas are important for reward. The physiological function of gut-brain peptides has expanded beyond food intake modulation and involves regulation of drug reinforcement. A novel candidate for reward regulation is the anorexigenic peptide neuromedin U (NMU). We therefore investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of NMU on amphetamine’s well-documented effects on the mesoaccumbal dopamine system, i.e. locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release in mice. In addition, the effect of accumbal NMU administration on locomotor activity was examined. The effect of NMU, icv or intra-NAc, on the expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) was elucidated. Firstly, we showed that icv administration of NMU attenuate the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation, accumbal dopamine release and expression of CPP in mice. Secondly, we found that a lower dose of NMU (icv) reduce the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice. Thirdly, we demonstrated that NMU administration into the NAc block the ability of amphetamine to cause a locomotor stimulation in mice. However, accumbal NMU administration did not attenuate the amphetamine-induced expression of CPP in mice. Our novel data suggest that central NMU signalling is involved in development of amphetamine dependence. PMID:27139195

  8. Differential localization of vesicular glutamate transporters and peptides in corneal afferents to trigeminal nucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Deborah M; Tonsfeldt, Karen; Hermes, Sam M; Helfand, Helen; Aicher, Sue A

    2010-09-01

    Trigeminal afferents convey nociceptive information from the corneal surface of the eye to the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc). Trigeminal afferents, like other nociceptors, are thought to use glutamate and neuropeptides as neurotransmitters. The current studies examined whether corneal afferents contain both neuropeptides and vesicular glutamate transporters. Corneal afferents to the Vc were identified by using cholera toxin B (CTb). Corneal afferents project in two clusters to the rostral and caudal borders of the Vc, regions that contain functionally distinct nociceptive neurons. Thus, corneal afferents projecting to these two regions were examined separately. Dual immunocytochemical studies combined CTb with either calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1), or VGluT2. Corneal afferents were more likely to contain CGRP than SP, and corneal afferents projecting to the rostral region were more likely to contain CGRP than afferents projecting caudally. Overall, corneal afferents were equally likely to contain VGluT1 or VGluT2. Together, 61% of corneal afferents contained either VGluT1 or VGluT2, suggesting that some afferents lack a VGluT. Caudal corneal afferents were more likely to contain VGluT2 than VGluT1, whereas rostral corneal afferents were more likely to contain VGluT1 than VGluT2. Triple-labeling studies combining CTb, CGRP, and VGluT2 showed that very few corneal afferents contain both CGRP and VGluT2, caudally (1%) and rostrally (2%). These results suggest that most corneal afferents contain a peptide or a VGluT, but rarely both. Our results are consistent with a growing literature suggesting that glutamatergic and peptidergic sensory afferents may be distinct populations.

  9. Pregnancy Increases Relaxation in Human Omental Arteries to the CGRP Family of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanlin; Betancourt, Ancizar; Chauhan, Madhu; Balakrishnan, Meena; Lugo, Fernando; Anderson, Matthew L; Espinoza, Jimmy; Fox, Karin; Belfort, Michael; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2015-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CALCB) and its family members adrenomedullin (ADM) and intermedin (ADM2) play important roles in maintaining vascular adaptations during pregnancy in animal models. The present study was designed to evaluate the responses of omental arteries to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 in pregnant and nonpregnant women, and to determine the mechanisms involved. By using resistance omental arteries collected from nonpregnant women (n = 15) during laparotomy and from term pregnant women (n = 15) at cesarean delivery, this study shows that the receptor components--calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CALCRL) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1, 2 and 3--are localized to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in omental arteries, with increased expressions of both mRNA and protein in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. The myography study demonstrated that CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 (0.1-100 nM) dose dependently relax U46619 (1 muM) precontracted omental artery segments, and the maximum possible effects to CALCB and ADM2, but not to ADM, are significantly enhanced in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. Further, the vasodilatory responses to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 are reduced by inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NAME), adenylyl cyclase (SQ22536), voltage-activated potassium channels (4-aminopyrodin and tetrabutylammonium), Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel (charybdotoxin), and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin). In conclusion, the CALCB family of peptides, CALCB and ADM2, increase human omental artery relaxation during pregnancy through diverse mechanisms, including NO, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) and prostaglandins, and thus could contribute to the vascular adaptations during pregnancy in the human.

  10. Pregnancy Increases Relaxation in Human Omental Arteries to the CGRP Family of Peptides1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Betancourt, Ancizar; Chauhan, Madhu; Balakrishnan, Meena; Lugo, Fernando; Anderson, Matthew L.; Espinoza, Jimmy; Fox, Karin; Belfort, Michael; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CALCB) and its family members adrenomedullin (ADM) and intermedin (ADM2) play important roles in maintaining vascular adaptations during pregnancy in animal models. The present study was designed to evaluate the responses of omental arteries to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 in pregnant and nonpregnant women, and to determine the mechanisms involved. By using resistance omental arteries collected from nonpregnant women (n = 15) during laparotomy and from term pregnant women (n = 15) at cesarean delivery, this study shows that the receptor components—calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CALCRL) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1, 2 and 3—are localized to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in omental arteries, with increased expressions of both mRNA and protein in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. The myography study demonstrated that CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 (0.1–100 nM) dose dependently relax U46619 (1 muM) precontracted omental artery segments, and the maximum possible effects to CALCB and ADM2, but not to ADM, are significantly enhanced in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. Further, the vasodilatory responses to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 are reduced by inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NAME), adenylyl cyclase (SQ22536), voltage-activated potassium channels (4-aminopyrodin and tetrabutylammonium), Ca2+-activated potassium channel (charybdotoxin), and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin). In conclusion, the CALCB family of peptides, CALCB and ADM2, increase human omental artery relaxation during pregnancy through diverse mechanisms, including NO, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) and prostaglandins, and thus could contribute to the vascular adaptations during pregnancy in the human. PMID:26510864

  11. Free fatty acids stimulate the polymerization of tau and amyloid beta peptides. In vitro evidence for a common effector of pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D. M.; Binder, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by the concomitant deposition of extracellular filaments composed of beta-amyloid peptides and intracellular filaments composed of the microtubule-associated protein tau. We have discovered that free fatty acids (FFAs) stimulate the assembly of both amyloid and tau filaments in vitro. The minimal concentration of arachidonic acid observed to stimulate tau assembly ranged from 10 to 20 mumol/L, depending on the source of the purified tau. Tau preparations that do not exhibit spontaneous assembly were among those induced to polymerize by arachidonic acid. All long-chain FFAs tested enhanced assembly to some extent, although greater stimulation was usually associated with unsaturated forms. Utilizing fluorescence spectroscopy, unsaturated FFAs were also demonstrated to induce beta-amyloid assembly. The minimal concentration of oleic or linoleic acid observed to stimulate the assembly of amyloid was 40 mumol/L. The filamentous nature of these thioflavin-binding amyloid polymers was verified by electron microscopy. These data define a new set of tools for examining the polymerization of amyloid and tau proteins and suggest that cortical elevations of FFAs may constitute a unifying stimulatory event driving the formation of two of the obvious pathogenetic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9176408

  12. Low-molecular fraction of wheat protein hydrolysate stimulates glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion in an enteroendocrine L cell line and improves glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masaki; Nakanishi, Takenori; Tani, Tsubasa; Tsuda, Takanori

    2017-01-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted by enteroendocrine L cells. Stimulating endogenous GLP-1 secretion by dietary factors is a promising strategy to increase GLP-1 action. Several studies have examined the specific physiological function of wheat protein hydrolysate. Some reports suggested that intake of wheat protein ameliorates hyperglycemia. We hypothesized that wheat protein hydrolysate reduces blood glucose concentration via stimulation of GLP-1 secretion. In this study, we investigated whether wheat protein hydrolysate stimulates GLP-1 secretion and its molecular mechanism in an enteroendocrine L cell line (GLUTag cells), and we examined the effect on glucose tolerance via stimulation of GLP-1 secretion followed by induction of insulin secretion in rats. The low-molecular fraction of wheat protein hydrolysate (LWP) significantly increased GLP-1 secretion, whereas the high-molecular fraction did not. This increase was found to involve activation of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II pathway mediated by G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 subtype A. Moreover, preadministration of LWP ameliorated hyperglycemia via the stimulation of GLP-1 secretion followed by induction of insulin secretion in rats. Furthermore, this LWP-induced glucose-lowering effect was significantly attenuated by the administration of a GLP-1 receptor antagonist. These results demonstrate that LWP significantly increased GLP-1 secretion through activation of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II pathway mediated by G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 subtype A in GLUTag cells. Moreover, preadministration of LWP ameliorated hyperglycemia via the stimulation of GLP-1 secretion followed by induction of insulin secretion in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Brevinin-2-related peptide and its [D4K] analogue stimulate insulin release in vitro and improve glucose tolerance in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Y H A; Patterson, S; Flatt, P R; Conlon, J M

    2010-08-01

    The cationic, alpha-helical frog skin antimicrobial peptide B2RP (brevinin-2-related peptide) shows sequence similarity to antimicrobial peptides belonging to the brevinin-2 family, but lacks the C-terminal cyclic heptapeptide domain (Cys-Lys-Xaa (4)-Cys). Synthetic B2RP produced a significant (p<0.05) stimulation of insulin release (148% of basal rate at a concentration of 1 muM with a maximum response of 222% of basal rate at a concentration of 3 muM) from BRIN-BD11 clonal beta-cells without increasing the release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. Increasing cationicity of B2RP while maintaining amphipathicity by the substitution Asp (4) --> Lys enhanced the insulin-releasing potency (137% of basal rate at a concentration of 0.3 muM; p<0.05) with no stimulation of lactate dehydrogenase release. In contrast, the L18K, and D4K, L18K analogues were toxic to the cells, and the K16A analogue, with increased amphipathicity and hydrophobicity, showed reduced potency. Administration of [D4K]B2RP (100 nmol/kg body weight) to mice fed a high fat diet to induce obesity and insulin-resistance significantly (p<0.05) enhanced insulin release and improved glucose tolerance during the 60-minute period following an intraperitoneal glucose load (18 mmol/kg body weight). B2RP shows potential for development into an agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Immunoreactive Changes in the Hypoglossal Nucleus after Nerve Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-25

    Skene & Willard, 1981a,b). Levels of synthetic enzymes for neurotransmitter biosynthesis have been shown to be reduced after nerve injury (Ross et...significantly with maturity ( Skene & Willard, 1981b); GAPs have also been shown to increase after axotomy ( Skene & Willard, 1981a). In rat hypoglossal...proteins (Willard & Skene , 1981a,b; Redshaw and Bisby, 1984). Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a novel

  15. Melanoma targeting with [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogs: Effects of cyclization on the radiopharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Carta, Davide; Salvarese, Nicola; Morellato, Nicolò; Gao, Feng; Sihver, Wiebke; Pietzsch, Hans Jurgen; Biondi, Barbara; Ruzza, Paolo; Refosco, Fiorenzo; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio; Bolzati, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of cyclization on the biological profile of a [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analog. A lactam bridge-cyclized H-Cys-Ahx-βAla(3)-c[Lys(4)-Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Glu(10)]-Arg(11)-Pro-Val-NH2 (NAP-NS2) and the corresponding linear H-Cys-Ahx-βAla-Nle-Asp-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-NH2 (NAP-NS1) peptide were synthetized, characterized by ESI-MS spectroscopy and their melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) binding affinity was determined in B16/F10 melanoma cells. The consistent [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled compounds were readily obtained in high specific activity and their stability and biological properties were assessed. As an example, the chemical identity of [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) was confirmed by carrier added experiments supported by radio/UV HPLC analysis combined with ESI(+)-MS. Compared with the linear peptide, cyclization negatively affected the biological properties of NAP-NS2 peptide by reducing its binding affinity for MC1R and by decreasing the overall excretion rate of the corresponding [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled peptide from the body as well as its in vivo stability. [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) was evaluated for its potential as melanoma imaging probe in murine melanoma model. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies on B16/F10 melanoma model of [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) clearly evidenced that the radiolabeled linear peptide keeps its biological properties up on the conjugation to the [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-building block. The progressive increase of the tumor-to-nontarget ratios over the time indicates a quite stable interaction between the radio-complex and the MC1R.

  16. Helicobacter pylori Lipopolysaccharide Binds to CD14 and Stimulates Release of Interleukin-8, Epithelial Neutrophil-Activating Peptide 78, and Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 by Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Charles M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Keates, Sarah; Linevsky, Joanne K.; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori gastritis is characterized by leukocyte infiltration of the gastric mucosa. The aims of this study were to determine whether H. pylori-derived factors stimulate chemokine release from human monocytes and to ascertain whether H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may be responsible for this effect. Human peripheral blood monocytes were exposed to an H. pylori water extract (HPE) or to purified H. pylori LPS. Levels of the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The contribution of H. pylori LPS to monocyte activation was determined by using the LPS antagonist Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RSLA) and a blocking monoclonal antibody to CD14 (60bca). HPE increased monocyte secretion of IL-8, ENA-78, and MCP-1. Heat treatment of HPE did not reduce its ability to activate monocytes. Purified H. pylori LPS also stimulated monocyte chemokine production but was 1,000-fold less potent than Salmonella minnesota lipid A. RSLA blocked H. pylori LPS-induced monocyte IL-8 release in a dose-dependent fashion (maximal inhibition 82%, P < 0.001). RSLA also inhibited HPE-induced IL-8 release (by 93%, P < 0.001). The anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody 60bca substantially inhibited IL-8 release from HPE-stimulated monocytes (by 88%, P < 0.01), whereas the nonblocking anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody did not. These experiments with potent and specific LPS inhibitors indicate that the main monocyte-stimulating factor in HPE is LPS. H. pylori LPS, acting through CD14, stimulates human monocytes to release the neutrophil-activating chemokines IL-8 and ENA-78 and the monocyte-activating chemokine MCP-1. Despite its low relative potency, H. pylori LPS may play an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori gastritis. PMID:9784544

  17. The Aβ peptides-activated calcium-sensing receptor stimulates the production and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor-A by normoxic adult human cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Dal Prà, Ilaria; Armato, Ubaldo; Chioffi, Franco; Pacchiana, Raffaella; Whitfield, James F; Chakravarthy, Balu; Gui, Li; Chiarini, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The excess vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) produced in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain can harm neurons, blood vessels, and other components of the neurovascular units (NVUs). But could astrocytes partaking in networks of astrocyte-neuron teams and connected to blood vessels of NVUs contribute to VEGF production? We have shown with cultured cerebral cortical normal (i.e., untransformed) adult human astrocytes (NAHAs) that exogenous amyloid-β peptides (Aβs) stimulate the astrocytes to make and secrete large amounts of Aβs and nitric oxide by a mechanism mediated through the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). Here, we report that exogenous Aβs stimulate the NAHAs to produce and secrete even VEGF-A through a CaSR-mediated mechanism. This is indicated by the ability of Aβs to specifically bind the CaSR, and the capability of a CaSR activator, the "calcimimetic" NPS R-568, to imitate, and of the CaSR antagonist, "calcilytic" NPS 2143, to inhibit, the Aβs stimulation of VEGF-A production and secretion by the NAHAs. Thus, Aβs that accumulate in the AD brain may make the astrocytes that envelop and functionally collaborate with neurons into multi-agent AD-driving "machines" via a CaSR signaling mechanism(s). These observations suggest the possibility that CaSR allosteric antagonists such as NPS 2143 might impede AD progression.

  18. Endocrine cells producing peptide hormones in the intestine of Nile tilapia: distribution and effects of feeding and fasting on the cell density.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Raquel Tatiane; de Freitas, Thaiza Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Izabela Regina Cardoso; Costa, Leandro Santos; Vigliano, Fabricio Andrés; Rosa, Priscila Vieira

    2017-05-13

    Endocrine cells (ECs) act as a luminal surveillance system responding to either the presence or absence of food in the gut through the secretion of peptide hormones. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of feeding and fasting on the EC peptide-specific distribution along the intestine of Nile tilapia. We assessed the density of ECs producing gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in nine segments of the intestine using immunohistochemistry. Our results show that ECs immunoreactive to CCK-8, GAS, NPY, and CGRP can be found along all the intestinal segments sampled, from the midgut to hindgut, although differences in their distribution along the gut were observed. Regarding nutrient status, we found that the anterior segments of the midgut seem to be the main site responding to luminal changes in Nile tilapia. The NPY+ and CGRP+ EC densities increased in the fasted group, while the amount of CCK-8+ ECs were higher in the fed group. No effects of fasting or feeding were found in the GAS+ EC densities. Changes in ECs density were found only at the anterior segments of the intestine which may be due to the correlation between vagus nerve anatomy, EC location, and peptide turnover. Lastly, ECs may need to be considered an active cell subpopulation that may adapt and respond to different nutrient status as stimuli. Due to the complexity of the enteroendocrine system and its importance in fish nutrition, much remains to be elucidated and it deserves closer attention.

  19. Single vagus nerve stimulation reduces early postprandial C-peptide levels but not other hormones or postprandial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tang, M W; van Nierop, F S; Koopman, F A; Eggink, H M; Gerlag, D M; Chan, M W; Zitnik, R; Vaz, F M; Romijn, J A; Tak, P P; Soeters, M R

    2017-04-08

    A recent study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) to activate the inflammatory reflex has shown promising effects on disease activity. Innervation by the autonomic nerve system might be involved in the regulation of many endocrine and metabolic processes and could therefore theoretically lead to unwanted side effects. Possible effects of VNS on secretion of hormones are currently unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of a single VNS on plasma levels of pituitary hormones and parameters of postprandial metabolism. Six female patients with RA were studied twice in balanced assignment (crossover design) to either VNS or no stimulation. The patients selected for this substudy had been on VNS therapy daily for at least 3 months and at maximum of 24 months. We compared 10-, 20-, and 30-min poststimulus levels to baseline levels, and a 4-h mixed meal test was performed 30 min after VNS. We also determined energy expenditure (EE) by indirect calorimetry before and after VNS. VNS did not affect pituitary hormones (growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone), postprandial metabolism, or EE. Of note, VNS reduced early postprandial insulin secretion, but not AUC of postprandial plasma insulin levels. Cortisol and catecholamine levels in serum did not change significantly. Short stimulation of vagal activity by VNS reduces early postprandial insulin secretion, but not other hormone levels and postprandial response. This suggests VNS as a safe treatment for RA patients.

  20. Involvement of neurokinins in antidromic vasodilatation in hairy and hairless skin of the rat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Häbler, H J; Timmermann, L; Stegmann, J U; Jänig, W

    1999-01-01

    By intravenous application of the specific neurokininl receptor antagonist SR 140333 and the specific calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist CGRP8-37 we tested to what extent neurokinins (substance P, neurokinin A) and calcitonin gene-related peptide are involved in mediating antidromic vasodilatation in skin of anaesthetized Wistar rats. The lumbar sympathetic chain was sectioned bilaterally between ganglia L2 and L3 to remove ongoing vasoconstrictor activity to the hindquarter. The left dorsal root L5 was stimulated electrically at 1 Hz with 20 pulses supramaximal for activating C-fibres to evoke antidromic vasodilatation which was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry on the glabrous plantar skin and the hairy skin of the lower hindlimb within the left L5 territory. Stimulation-induced vasodilatation was tested after applying SR 140333 (0.1 mg/kg) and CGRP8-37 (0.3 mg/kg) alone or in combination. SR 140333 delayed the onset of the vasodilatation, but did not change its amplitude. CGRP8-37 reduced the amplitude and duration of the vasodilatation, but did not affect the latency of its onset. In combination, SR 140333 potentiated the effect of CGRP8-37 on the amplitude of the vasodilatation in glabrous but not in hairy skin and CGRP8-37 potentiated the delayed onset produced by SR 140333 in both cutaneous tissues. Antidromic vasodilatation in glabrous skin was almost totally blocked by SR 140333 (0.1 mg/kg) in combination with CGRP8-37 (0.45 mg/kg), but a substantial dilatation remained in hairy skin. It is concluded that in rat glabrous skin the vasodilatation evoked by a low level of activity in small-diameter primary afferents is likely to result from the release and synergistic action of neurokinins (substance P and/or neurokinin A) and calcitonin gene-related peptide, while in hairy skin neurokinins are involved to a minor extent only.

  1. Prenatal exposure to ethanol stimulates hypothalamic CCR2 chemokine receptor system: Possible relation to increased density of orexigenic peptide neurons and ethanol drinking in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    Chang, G-Q; Karatayev, O; Leibowitz, S F

    2015-12-03

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that maternal consumption of ethanol during pregnancy increases alcohol drinking in the offspring. Possible underlying mechanisms may involve orexigenic peptides, which are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure and themselves promote drinking. Building on evidence that ethanol stimulates neuroimmune factors such as the chemokine CCL2 that in adult rats is shown to colocalize with the orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the present study sought to investigate the possibility that CCL2 or its receptor CCR2 in LH is stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure, perhaps specifically within MCH neurons. Our paradigm of intraoral administration of ethanol to pregnant rats, at low-to-moderate doses (1 or 3g/kg/day) during peak hypothalamic neurogenesis, caused in adolescent male offspring twofold increase in drinking of and preference for ethanol and reinstatement of ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice paradigm under an intermittent access schedule. This effect of prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with an increased expression of MCH and density of MCH(+) neurons in LH of preadolescent offspring. Whereas CCL2(+) cells at this age were low in density and unaffected by ethanol, CCR2(+) cells were dense in LH and increased by prenatal ethanol, with a large percentage (83-87%) identified as neurons and found to colocalize MCH. Prenatal ethanol also stimulated the genesis of CCR2(+) and MCH(+) neurons in the embryo, which co-labeled the proliferation marker, BrdU. Ethanol also increased the genesis and density of neurons that co-expressed CCR2 and MCH in LH, with triple-labeled CCR2(+)/MCH(+)/BrdU(+) neurons that were absent in control rats accounting for 35% of newly generated neurons in ethanol-exposed rats. With both the chemokine and MCH systems believed to promote ethanol consumption, this greater density of CCR2(+)/MCH(+) neurons in the LH of preadolescent rats suggests that

  2. Prenatal exposure to ethanol stimulates hypothalamic CCR2 chemokine receptor system: Possible relation to increased density of orexigenic peptide neurons and ethanol drinking in adolescent offspring

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G.-Q.; Karatayev, O.; Leibowitz, S. F.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that maternal consumption of ethanol during pregnancy increases alcohol drinking in the offspring. Possible underlying mechanisms may involve orexigenic peptides, which are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure and themselves promote drinking. Building on evidence that ethanol stimulates neuroimmune factors such as the chemokine CCL2 that in adult rats is shown to colocalize with the orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the present study sought to investigate the possibility that CCL2 or its receptor CCR2 in LH are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure, perhaps specifically within MCH neurons. Our paradigm of intraoral administration of ethanol to pregnant rats, at low-to-moderate doses (1 or 3 g/kg/day) during peak hypothalamic neurogenesis, caused in adolescent male offspring two-fold increase in drinking of and preference for ethanol and reinstatement of ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice paradigm under an intermittent access schedule. This effect of prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with an increased expression of MCH and density of MCH+ neurons in LH of preadolescent offspring. Whereas CCL2+ cells at this age were low in density and unaffected by ethanol, CCR2+ cells were dense in LH and increased by prenatal ethanol, with a large percentage (83–87%) identified as neurons and found to colocalize MCH. Prenatal ethanol also stimulated the genesis of CCR2+ and MCH+ neurons in the embryo, which co-labeled the proliferation marker, BrdU. Ethanol also increased the genesis and density of neurons that co-expressed CCR2 and MCH in LH, with triple-labeled CCR2+/MCH+/BrdU+ neurons that were absent in control rats accounting for 35% of newly generated neurons in ethanol-exposed rats. With both the chemokine and MCH systems believed to promote ethanol consumption, this greater density of CCR2+/MCH+ neurons in the LH of preadolescent rats suggests that these systems

  3. WKYMVm-induced activation of formyl peptide receptor 2 stimulates ischemic neovasculogenesis by promoting homing of endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Soon Chul; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Jeong, Geun Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Chi Dae; Kwon, Sang Mo; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Kim, Jae Ho

    2014-03-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are recruited to the sites of ischemic injury in order to contribute to neovascularization and repair of injured tissues. However, therapeutic potential of ECFCs is limited due to low homing and engraftment efficiency of transplanted ECFCs. The G-protein-coupled formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 2 has been implicated in regulation of inflammation and angiogenesis, while the role of FPR2 in homing and engraftment of ECFCs and neovascularization in ischemic tissues has not been fully defined. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of WKYMVm, a selective FPR2 agonist isolated by screening synthetic peptide libraries, on homing ability of ECFCs and vascular regeneration of ischemic tissues. WKYMVm stimulated chemotactic migration, angiogenesis, and proliferation ability of human ECFCs in vitro. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of FPR2, but not FPR3, abrogated WKYMVm-induced migration and angiogenesis of ECFCs. Intramuscular injection of WKYMVm resulted in attenuation of severe hind limb ischemia and promoted neovascularization in ischemic limb. ECFCs transplanted via tail vein into nude mice were incorporated into capillary vessels in the ischemic hind limb, resulting in augmented neovascularization and improved ischemic limb salvage. Intramuscular injection of WKYMVm promoted homing of exogenously administered ECFCs to the ischemic limb and ECFC-mediated vascular regeneration. Silencing of FPR2 expression in ECFCs resulted in abrogation of WKYMVm-induced in vivo homing of exogenously transplanted ECFCs to the ischemic limb, neovascularization, and ischemic limb salvage. These results suggest that WKYMVm promotes repair of ischemic tissues by stimulating homing of ECFCs and neovascularization via a FPR2-dependent mechanism. © AlphaMed Press.

  4. Stimulus-evoked release of neuropeptides is enhanced in sensory neurons from mice with a heterozygous mutation of the Nf1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hingtgen, C M; Roy, S L; Clapp, D W

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I is a common autosomal dominant disease characterized by formation of multiple benign and malignant tumors. People with this disorder also experience chronic pain, which can be disabling. Neurofibrinomin, the protein product of the NF1 gene (neurofibromin gene (human)), is a guanosine triphosphate activating protein for p21(ras). Loss of NF1 results in an increase in activity of the p21(ras) transduction cascade. Because of the growing evidence suggesting involvement of downstream components of the p21(ras) transduction cascade in the sensitization of nociceptive sensory neurons, we examined the stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, from primary sensory neurons of mice with a mutation of the Nf1 gene (neurofibromin gene (mouse)) (Nf1+/-). Measuring immunoreactive substance P and immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide by radioimmunoassay, we demonstrated that capsaicin-stimulated release of neuropeptides is three to five-fold higher in spinal cord slices from Nf1+/- mice than from wildtype mouse tissue. In addition, the potassium and capsaicin-stimulated release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide from cultures of sensory neurons isolated from Nf1+/- mice was more than double that from cultures of wildtype neurons. Treatment of wildtype sensory neurons with nerve growth factor for 5-7 days mimicked the enhanced stimulus-evoked release observed from the Nf1+/- neurons. When nerve growth factor was removed 48 h before conducting release experiments, nerve growth factor-induced augmentation of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide release from Nf1+/- neurons was more pronounced than in Nf1+/- sensory neurons that were treated with nerve growth factor continuously for 5-7 days. Thus, sensory neurons from mice with a heterozygous mutation of the Nf1 gene that is analogous to the human disease neurofibromatosis type I, exhibit increased sensitivity to chemical

  5. Upregulation of pronociceptive mediators and downregulation of opioid peptide by adrenomedullin following chronic exposure to morphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Li, J; Chen, P; Hong, Y

    2014-11-07

    Adrenomedullin (AM) belongs to a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family and has been demonstrated to recruit CGRP following chronic use of morphine and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in inflammation. The present study investigated the possibility that AM initiates the changes of other molecules contributing to the development of morphine tolerance in its chronic use. Intrathecal (i.t.) co-administration of the AM receptor antagonist AM22-52 (35.8 μg) inhibited tolerance to morphine-induced analgesia while a daily injection of the AM receptor agonist AM1-50 (8 μg, i.t., bolus) for 9 days induced a decrease in the potency of morphine analgesia and thermal hyperalgesia. Persistent exposure of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants to morphine (3.3 μM) for 4 days resulted in an increase in AM and CGRP mRNA levels. However, morphine failed to produce these effects in the presence of AM22-52 (2 μM). The i.t. administration of morphine for 6 days increased the expression of nNOS in the spinal dorsal horn and DRG neurons but decreased expression of the endogenous opioid peptide bovine adrenal medulla 22 (BAM22) in small- and medium-sized neurons in DRG. Particularly, the co-administration of AM22-52 (35.8 μg) inhibited the morphine-induced alterations in nNOS and BAM22. These results indicated that the increase in nNOS and CGRP expressions and the decrease in BAM22 were attributed to the increased AM receptor signaling induced by chronic morphine. The present study supports the hypothesis that the enhancement of AM bioactivity triggered upregulation of pronociceptive mediators and downregulation of pain-inhibiting molecule in a cascade contributing to the development of morphine tolerance.

  6. Supra-molecular assembly of a lumican-derived peptide amphiphile enhances its collagen-stimulating activity.

    PubMed

    Walter, Merlin N M; Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Hamley, Ian W; Connon, Che J

    2016-02-01

    C16-YEALRVANEVTLN, a peptide amphiphile (PA) incorporating a biologically active amino acid sequence found in lumican, has been examined for its influence upon collagen synthesis by human corneal fibroblasts in vitro, and the roles of supra-molecular assembly and activin receptor-like kinase ALK receptor signaling in this effect were assessed. Cell viability was monitored using the Alamar blue assay, and collagen synthesis was assessed using Sirius red. The role of ALK signaling was studied by receptor inhibition. Cultured human corneal fibroblasts synthesized significantly greater amounts of collagen in the presence of the PA over both 7-day and 21-day periods. The aggregation of the PA to form nanotapes resulted in a notable enhancement in this activity, with an approximately two-fold increase in collagen production per cell. This increase was reduced by the addition of an ALK inhibitor. The data presented reveal a stimulatory effect upon collagen synthesis by the primary cells of the corneal stroma, and demonstrate a direct influence of supra-molecular assembly of the PA upon the cellular response observed. The effects of PA upon fibroblasts were dependent upon ALK receptor function. These findings elucidate the role of self-assembled nanostructures in the biological activity of peptide amphiphiles, and support the potential use of a self-assembling lumican derived PA as a novel biomaterial, intended to promote collagen deposition for wound repair and tissue engineering purposes.

  7. Cardiovascular effects of newly discovered peptide intermedin/adrenomedullin 2.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chun-Shui; Yang, Jing-Hui; Cai, Da-Yong; Zhao, Jing; Gerns, Helen; Yang, Jun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Tang, Chao-Shu; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2005-09-01

    Intermedin (IMD) is a novel member of the calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The present study aimed to investigate the cardiovascular effects of IMDs (IMD1-47 and IMD8-47) in rats. Intravenous administration of 150 nmol IMDs continuously decreased mean arterial pressure and inhibited cardiac function. Administration with IMDs decreased left ventricular end-systolic pressure (LVESP) and maximal rate of left-ventricle pressure development (+/-LVdp/dt(max)), and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). Changes with IMD1-47 treatment were close to that with IMD8-47 (P>0.05). Perfusion of isolated rat hearts in vitro with IMD8-47 (10(-8) and 10(-7)mol/L) resulted in lower LVSP, by 40 and 56% (P<0.01); lower +LVdp/dt (max), by 33 and 47% (P<0.01); lower -LVdp/dt(max), by 25 and 39% (P<0.01); but higher coronary perfusion flow (CPF), by 25% (P<0.05) and 33% (P<0.01), respectively, than controls. However, both IMD8-47 and IMD1-47 (from 10(-13) to 10(-7)mol/L) relaxed preconstricted aortic rings in a dose-dependent manner. Intravenous administration of IMD1-47 and IMD8-47 (10(-7)mol/L) in vivo increased the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) content by 68 and 150% (both P<0.01), respectively, in myocardia and 320 and 281% (both P<0.01), respectively, in aortas, compared with controls. Perfusion of isolated hearts with IMD1-47 and IMD8-47 (10(-7)mol/L) enhanced cAMP content by 24% (P<0.05) and 73% (P<0.01), respectively, compared with controls. IMDs inhibited 3H-Leucine incorporation in cardiomyocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. IMD1-47 and IMD8-47 (10(-7) and 10(-8)mol/L) decreased 3H-Leucine incorporation by 12-25% (P<0.01) and 14-18% (P<0.01), respectively. IMD mRNA was detected in cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes and isoproterenol-induced hypertrophic myocardia but not normal myocardia of adult rats. These results suggest that IMD might be a regulatory factor for cardiovascular function and myocardial hypertrophy as a

  8. Differential induction of innate defense antimicrobial peptides in primary nasal epithelial cells upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines, Th17 cytokines or bacterial conditioned medium from Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Burgey, Christine; Kern, Winfried V; Römer, Winfried; Rieg, Siegbert

    2016-01-01

    To date it is incompletely understood why half of the human population is intrinsically resistant to Staphylococcus aureus colonization whereas the other half is intermittently or permanently colonized. Nasal colonization represents the primary niche for S. aureus. We therefore investigated whether primary nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) express antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) upon stimulation by inflammatory cytokines or bacterial conditioned medium (BCM) of different colonizing and invasive staphylococci. Stimulation with classical cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ) potently induced hBD-3 and RNase7 in HNEC. Th17 cytokines (IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22) yielded comparably weak hBD-3 and RNase7 induction and no synergistic effects with classical cytokines. BCM of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates moderately induced hBD3 and RNase7 mRNA expression without significant differences when comparing colonizing vs. invasive isolates. Our results indicate that HNEC contribute to the innate defense by secretion of an AMP-containing chemical defense shield along the nasal mucosa i.e. within the primary colonization niche of S. aureus. Further studies are needed to investigate whether a deficient AMP expression in the nasal mucosa may be related to different S. aureus carrier states. AMPs or AMP-inducing agents may be promising candidates for future topical decolonization regimens that aim to prevent invasive S. aureus infections.

  9. Alpha(1)- and beta-adrenoceptor stimulation differentially activate p38-MAPK and atrial natriuretic peptide production in the perfused amphibian heart.

    PubMed

    Aggeli, Ioanna-Katerina S; Gaitanaki, Catherine; Lazou, Antigone; Beis, Isidoros

    2002-08-01

    We investigated the activation of p38-MAPK by various adrenergic agents in the perfused Rana ridibunda heart. Phenylephrine (50 micromol l(-1)) rapidly induced the differential activation of all three mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies (ERK, JNKs and p38-MAPK) in this experimental system. Focusing on p38-MAPK response to phenylephrine, we found that the kinase phosphorylation reached maximal values at 30 s, declining thereafter to basal values at 15 min. p38-MAPK activation by phenylephrine was verified as exclusively alpha(1)-AR-mediated. Furthermore, SB203580 (1 micromol l(-1)) abolished the kinase phosphorylation by phenylephrine. Isoproterenol (50 micromol l(-1)) was also shown to activate p38-MAPK in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. A marked, sustained p38-MAPK activation profile was observed at 25 degrees C, while at 18 degrees C the kinase response to isoproterenol was modest. Isoproterenol effect on p38-MAPK stimulation was beta-AR-mediated. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the enhanced presence of phosphorylated p38-MAPK and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in both phenylephrine- and isoproterenol-stimulated hearts, a reaction completely blocked by the respective specific antagonists, or the specific p38-MAPK inhibitor SB203580. These findings indicate a functional correlation between p38-MAPK activation and ANP accumulation in the perfused amphibian heart.

  10. Subchronic safety evaluation of EPO-018B, a pegylated peptidic erythropoiesis stimulating agent, after 5-week subcutaneous injection in Cynomolgus monkeys and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue-Lian; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Li, Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Zong, Ying; Lu, Guo-Cai; Yuan, Bo-Jun

    2013-10-01

    EPO-018B, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA), is coupled to polyethylene glycol (PEG) and designed to specifically bind and activate the erythropoietin (EPO) receptor to result in production of red blood cells. This study was designed to evaluate the potential subchronic toxicity of EPO-018B for Cynomolgus monkeys and Sprague-Dawley rats both at 0, 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg every week for 5 weeks, followed by 6-week recovery for rats and 12-week recovery for monkeys. The No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) for rats and monkeys were both considered to be at least 0.5 mg/kg/day, the minimum toxic dose to be 5.0 mg/kg/day and the severe toxic dose to be more than 50.0 mg/kg/day. The toxicological effects included the exaggerated pharmacology and secondary sequelae that resulted from an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment to healthy animals. Most treatment induced effects were reversible or showed ongoing recovery upon discontinuation of treatment. The anticipated patient population for EPO-018B treatment is targeted to be the anemia patients caused by chronic renal failure or chemotherapy against to cancer and is expected to have an ideal clinical application prospect.

  11. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition.

  12. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 501-506] PMID:25644636

  13. ER stress stimulates production of the key antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin, by forming a previously unidentified intracellular S1P signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Ikushiro, Hiroko; Seo, Ho Seong; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yano, Takato; Holleran, Walter M; Elias, Peter; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2016-03-08

    We recently identified a previously unidentified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling mechanism that stimulates production of a key innate immune element, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), in mammalian cells exposed to external perturbations, such as UVB irradiation and other oxidative stressors that provoke subapoptotic levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, independent of the well-known vitamin D receptor-dependent mechanism. ER stress increases cellular ceramide and one of its distal metabolites, S1P, which activates NF-κB followed by C/EBPα activation, leading to CAMP production, but in a S1P receptor-independent fashion. We now show that S1P activates NF-κB through formation of a previously unidentified signaling complex, consisting of S1P, TRAF2, and RIP1 that further associates with three stress-responsive proteins; i.e., heat shock proteins (GRP94 and HSP90α) and IRE1α. S1P specifically interacts with the N-terminal domain of heat shock proteins. Because this ER stress-initiated mechanism is operative in both epithelial cells and macrophages, it appears to be a universal, highly conserved response, broadly protective against diverse external perturbations that lead to increased ER stress. Finally, these studies further illuminate how ER stress and S1P orchestrate critical stress-specific signals that regulate production of one protective response by stimulating production of the key innate immune element, CAMP.

  14. The TRPV1/2/3 activator 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate sensitizes native nociceptive neurons to heat in wildtype but not TRPV1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, K; Leffler, A; Fischer, M M J; Messlinger, K; Nau, C; Reeh, P W

    2005-01-01

    TRPV1 gene disruption results in a loss of capsaicin and proton responsiveness, but has minimal effects on heat-induced nocifensive behavior, suggesting that sensory transduction of heat is independent of TRPV1. TRPV3, another heat-activated ion channel but insensitive to capsaicin, was shown to be expressed in keratinocytes as well as in sensory neurons projecting to the skin. Recently, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate was introduced as a TRPV3 agonist, but its selectivity was questioned by showing that it activated recombinant TRPV1 and TRPV2 as well. We used the isolated mouse skin-saphenous nerve preparation and whole-cell patch-clamping of cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons from TRPV1-/- and wildtype mice. We found no phenotypic differences between the heat responses of polymodal C-fibers, whereas cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons of TRPV1-/- hardly showed any heat-activated currents. Only C-fibers of wildtype but not TRPV1-/- mice were clearly sensitized to heat by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate 10 and 100 microM; heat-activated current in wildtype neurons was only facilitated at 100 microM. Noxious heat-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide release showed clear deficits (<50%) in TRPV1 deficient skin, but the stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide release from the isolated skull dura was unaffected. In both models, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate was able to potentiate the heat response (46 degrees C, 5 min) in a concentration-dependent manner, again, only in wildtype but not TRPV1-/- mice, suggesting that TRPV2/3 are not involved in this sensitization to heat. The results further suggest that TRPV1 is not responsible for the normal heat response of native nociceptors but plays the essential role in thermal sensitization and a prominent one in controlling dermal calcitonin gene-related peptide release, i.e. neurogenic inflammation.

  15. Noxious mechanical stimulation evokes the segmental release of opioid peptides that induce μ-opioid receptor internalization in the presence of peptidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Lijun; Song, Bingbing; Chen, Wenling; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides an ideal way to locate areas of opioid peptide release. We used this method to study opioid release in the spinal cord evoked by noxious stimuli in anesthetized rats. Previous studies have shown that opioids released in the spinal cord produce MOR internalization only when they are protected from peptidase degradation. Accordingly, rats were implanted with chronic intrathecal catheters that were used to inject a mixture of peptidase inhibitors (amastatin, captopril and phosphoramidon) onto the lumbar spinal cord. Five minutes later, a noxious stimulus was delivered to the paw. Lumbar spinal segments were double-stained with antibodies against MORs and neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) using immunofluorescence. Mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw consisted of repeated 10 sec clamps with a hemostat for 10 min. In the ipsilateral dorsal horn, the stimulus produced abundant NK1R internalization in segments L3–L6, and a more modest but significant MOR internalization in segments L5 and L6. In the contralateral dorsal horn, NK1R was substantially lower and MOR internalization was negligible. The same mechanical stimulus applied to a forepaw did not produce NK1R or MOR internalization in the lumbar spinal cord. Thermal stimulation consisted of immersing a hindpaw in water at 52 °C for 2 min. It produced substantial NK1R internalization ipsilaterally in segment L6, but no MOR internalization. These results show that mechanical stimulation induces segmental opioid release, i.e., in the dorsal horn receiving the noxious signals and not in other spinal segments. PMID:18207137

  16. Solid-phase peptide head-to-side chain cyclodimerization: discovery of C(2)-symmetric cyclic lactam hybrid α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)/agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) analogues with potent activities at the human melanocortin receptors.

    PubMed

    Mayorov, Alexander V; Cai, Minying; Palmer, Erin S; Liu, Zhihua; Cain, James P; Vagner, Josef; Trivedi, Dev; Hruby, Victor J

    2010-10-01

    A novel hybrid melanocortin pharmacophore was designed based on the pharmacophores of the agouti-signaling protein (ASIP), an endogenous melanocortin antagonist, and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), an endogenous melanocortin agonist. The designed hybrid ASIP/MSH pharmacophore was explored in monomeric cyclic, and cyclodimeric templates. The monomeric cyclic disulfide series yielded peptides with hMC3R-selective non-competitive binding affinities. The direct on-resin peptide lactam cyclodimerization yielded nanomolar range (25-120 nM) hMC1R-selective full and partial agonists in the cyclodimeric lactam series which demonstrates an improvement over the previous attempts at hybridization of MSH and agouti protein sequences. The secondary structure-oriented pharmacophore hybridization strategy will prove useful in development of unique allosteric and orthosteric melanocortin receptor modulators. This report also illustrates the utility of peptide cyclodimerization for the development of novel GPCR peptide ligands.

  17. Minocycline inhibits the enhancement of antidromic primary afferent stimulation-evoked vasodilation following intradermal capsaicin injection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Yue, Yue; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Lin, Qing

    2010-09-27

    Neurogenic inflammation is induced by inflammatory mediators released in peripheral tissue from primary afferent nociceptors. Our previous studies suggest that neurogenic inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin results from the enhancement of dorsal root reflexes (DRRs), which involve antidromic activation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Numerous studies have reported the important role of glial modulation in pain. However, it remains unclear whether glial cells participate in the process of neurogenic inflammation-induced pain. Here we tested the role of DRG satellite glial cells (SGCs) in this process in anesthetized rats by administration of a glial inhibitor, minocycline. Electrical stimuli (ES, frequency 10 Hz; duration 1 ms; strength 3 mA) were applied to the cut distal ends of the L4-5 dorsal roots. The stimuli evoked antidromic action potentials designed to mimic DRRs. Local cutaneous blood flow in the hindpaw was measured using a Doppler flow meter. Antidromic ES for 10 min evoked a significant vasodilation that could be inhibited dose-dependently by local administration of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, CGRP8-37. Pretreatment with capsaicin intradermally injected into the hindpaw 2h before the ES enhanced greatly the vasodilation evoked by antidromic ES, and this enhancement could be reversed by minocycline pretreatment. Our findings support the view that neurogenic inflammation following capsaicin injection involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via the generation of DRRs. Inhibition of neurogenic inflammation by minocycline is suggested to be associated with its inhibitory effect on SGCs that are possibly activated following capsaicin injection.

  18. A nutritional supplement containing lactoferrin stimulates the immune system, extends lifespan, and reduces amyloid β peptide toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Patricia; Llopis, Silvia; Gonzalez, Nuria; Ramón, Daniel; Serrano, Gabriel; Torrens, Ana; Serrano, Juan M; Navarro, Maria; Genovés, Salvador

    2017-03-01

    Lactoferrin is a highly multifunctional glycoprotein involved in many physiological functions, including regulation of iron absorption and immune responses. Moreover, there is increasing evidence for neuroprotective effects of lactoferrin. We used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to test the protective effects, both on phenotype and transcriptome, of a nutraceutical product based on lactoferrin liposomes. In a dose-dependent manner, the lactoferrin-based product protected against acute oxidative stress and extended lifespan of C. elegans N2. Furthermore, Paralysis of the transgenic C. elegans strain CL4176, caused by Aβ1-42 aggregates, was clearly ameliorated by treatment. Transcriptome analysis in treated nematodes indicated immune system stimulation, together with enhancement of processes involved in the oxidative stress response. The lactoferrin-based product also improved the protein homeostasis processes, cellular adhesion processes, and neurogenesis in the nematode. In summary, the tested product exerts protection against aging and neurodegeneration, modulating processes involved in oxidative stress response, protein homeostasis, synaptic function, and xenobiotic metabolism. This lactoferrin-based product is also able to stimulate the immune system, as well as improving reproductive status and energy metabolism. These findings suggest that oral supplementation with this lactoferrin-based product could improve the immune system and antioxidant capacity. Further studies to understand the molecular mechanisms related with neuronal function would be of interest.

  19. Lactoferrin Peptide Increases the Survival of Candida albicans- Inoculated Mice by Upregulating Neutrophil and Macrophage Functions, Especially in Combination with Amphotericin B and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Tanida, Toyohiro; Rao, Fu; Hamada, Toshihiro; Ueta, Eisaku; Osaki, Tokio

    2001-01-01

    To develop a new strategy to control candidiasis, we examined in vivo the anticandidal effects of a synthetic lactoferrin peptide, FKCRRWQWRM (peptide 2) and the peptide that mimics it, FKARRWQWRM (peptide 2′). Although all mice that underwent intraperitoneal injection of 5 × 108 Candida cells with or without peptide 2′ died within 8 or 7 days, respectively, the survival times of mice treated with 5 to 100 μg of intravenous peptide 2 per day for 5 days after the candidal inoculation were prolonged between 8.4 ± 2.9 and 22.4 ± 3.6 days, depending on the dose of peptide 2. The prolongation of survival by peptide 2 was also observed in mice that were infected with 1.0 × 109 Candida albicans cells (3.2 ± 1.3 days in control mice versus 8.2 ± 2.4 days in the mice injected with 10 μg of peptide 2 per day). In the high-dose inoculation, a combination of peptide 2 (10 μg/day) with amphotericin B (0.1 μg/day) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (0.1 μg/day) brought prolonged survival. With a combination of these agents, 60% of the mice were alive for more than 22 days. Correspondingly, peptide 2 activated phagocytes inducing inducible NO synthase and the expression of p47phox and p67phox, and peptide 2 increased phagocyte Candida-killing activities up to 1.5-fold of the control levels upregulating the generation of superoxide, lactoferrin, and defensin from neutrophils and macrophages. These findings indicated that the anticandidal effects of peptide 2 depend not only on the direct Candida cell growth-inhibitory activity, but also on the phagocytes' upregulatory activity, and that combinations of peptide 2 with GM-CSF and antifungal drugs will help in the development of new strategies for control of candidiasis. PMID:11349055

  20. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  1. Stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion downstream of the ligand-gated ion channel TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Edward C.; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Gentry, Clive; Psichas, Arianna; Habib, Abdella M.; Bevan, Stuart; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus-coupled incretin secretion from enteroendocrine cells plays a fundamental role in glucose homeostasis, and could be targeted for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Here, we investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in enteroendocrine L-cells producing glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). By microarray and qPCR analysis we identified trpa1 as an L-cell enriched transcript in the small intestine. Calcium imaging of primary L-cells and the model cell line GLUTag revealed responses triggered by the TRPA1 agonists allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC, mustard oil), carvacrol and polyunsaturated fatty acids, that were blocked by TRPA1 antagonists. Electrophysiology in GLUTag cells showed that carvacrol induced a current with characteristics typical of TRPA1 and triggered the firing of action potentials. TRPA1 activation caused an increase in GLP-1 secretion from primary murine intestinal cultures and GLUTag cells; an effect that was abolished in cultures from trpa1−/− mice or by pharmacological TRPA1 inhibition. These findings present TRPA1 as a novel sensory mechanism in enteroendocrine L-cells, coupled to the facilitation of GLP-1 release, which may be exploitable as a target for treating diabetes. PMID:25325736

  2. CRMP-2 peptide mediated decrease of high and low voltage-activated calcium channels, attenuation of nociceptor excitability, and anti-nociception in a model of AIDS therapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Piekarz, Andrew D; Due, Michael R; Khanna, May; Wang, Bo; Ripsch, Matthew S; Wang, Ruizhong; Meroueh, Samy O; Vasko, Michael R; White, Fletcher A; Khanna, Rajesh

    2012-07-24

    The ubiquity of protein-protein interactions in biological signaling offers ample opportunities for therapeutic intervention. We previously identified a peptide, designated CBD3, that suppressed inflammatory and neuropathic behavioral hypersensitivity in rodents by inhibiting the ability of collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2) to bind to N-type voltage-activated calcium channels (CaV2.2) [Brittain et al. Nature Medicine 17:822-829 (2011)]. Here, we utilized SPOTScan analysis to identify an optimized variation of the CBD3 peptide (CBD3A6K) that bound with greater affinity to Ca²⁺ channels. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that the CBD3A6K peptide was more stable and less prone to the unfolding observed with the parent CBD3 peptide. This mutant peptide, conjugated to the cell penetrating motif of the HIV transduction domain protein TAT, exhibited greater anti-nociception in a rodent model of AIDS therapy-induced peripheral neuropathy when compared to the parent TAT-CBD3 peptide. Remarkably, intraperitoneal administration of TAT-CBD3A6K produced none of the minor side effects (i.e. tail kinking, body contortion) observed with the parent peptide. Interestingly, excitability of dissociated small diameter sensory neurons isolated from rats was also reduced by TAT-CBD3A6K peptide suggesting that suppression of excitability may be due to inhibition of T- and R-type Ca²⁺ channels. TAT-CBD3A6K had no effect on depolarization-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release compared to vehicle control. Collectively, these results establish TAT-CBD3A6K as a peptide therapeutic with greater efficacy in an AIDS therapy-induced model of peripheral neuropathy than its parent peptide, TAT-CBD3. Structural modifications of the CBD3 scaffold peptide may result in peptides with selectivity against a particular subset of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in a multipharmacology of action on the target.

  3. Measurement of Calcitonin and Calcitonin Gene–Related Peptide mRNA Refines the Management of Patients with Medullary Thyroid Cancer and May Replace Calcitonin-Stimulation Tests

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Cléber P.; Lindsey, Susan C.; Melo, Maria Clara C.; Yang, Ji H.; Germano-Neto, Fausto; Valente, Flávia de O.F.; Lima, Thiago R.N.; Biscolla, Rosa Paula M.; Vieira, José G.H.; Cerutti, Janete M.; Maciel, Rui M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum calcitonin (sCT) is the main tumor marker for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), but it has certain limitations. Various sCT assays may have important intra-assay or interassay variation and may yield different and sometimes conflicting results. A pentagastrin- or calcium-stimulation calcitonin (CT) test may be desirable in some situations. Alternatively, or in the absence of the stimulation test, mRNA detection offers the advantages of being more comfortable and less invasive; it only requires blood collection and has no side effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of measuring calcitonin-related polypeptide alpha (CALCA) gene transcripts (CT-CALCA and calcitonin gene–related peptide [CGRP]-CALCA) in patients with MTC and in relatives diagnosed with a RET mutation and to test mRNA as an alternative diagnostic tool for the calcitonin-stimulation test. Methods Twenty-three healthy controls and 26 individuals evaluated for MTC were selected, including patients with sporadic or hereditary MTC and RET mutation–carrying relatives. For molecular analysis, RNA was extracted from peripheral blood, followed by cDNA synthesis using 3.5 μg of total RNA. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was performed with SYBR Green and 200 nM of each primer for the two specific mRNA targets (CT-CALCA or CGRP-CALCA) and normalized with the ribosomal protein S8 as the reference gene. Results We detected CALCA transcripts in the blood samples and observed a positive correlation between them (r=0.946, p<0.0001). Both mRNAs also correlated with sCT (CT-CALCA, r=0.713, p<0.0001; CGRP-CALCA, r=0.714, p<0.0001). The relative expression of CT-CALCA and CGRP-CALCA presented higher clinical sensitivity (86.67 and 100, respectively), specificity (97.06 and 97.06), positive predictive value (92.86 and 93.75), and negative predictive value (94.29 and 100), than did sCT (73.33, 82.35, 64.71, and 87.50, respectively). In

  4. Inhibition of bradykinin-evoked trigeminal nerve stimulation by the non-peptide bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist WIN 64338 in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J. M.; Figini, M.; Butt, S. K.; Geppetti, P.

    1995-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effect of the recently described non-peptide bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, WIN 64338 ([[4-[[2- [[bis(cyclohexylamino)methylene]amino]-3-(2-naphthalenyl)-1-oxopropyl] amino]phenyl]methyl]tributylphosphoniumchloride monohydrochloride), in experimental models of bradykinin-evoked sensory nerve stimulation. 2. In the rabbit isolated iris sphincter in vitro, bradykinin-evoked contractile responses are mediated via tachykinins released from peripheral endings of the trigeminal sensory nerve. WIN 64338 (1-10 microM) competitively antagonised contractile responses to bradykinin with a pKB estimate of 6.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 11). The antagonism was selective since WIN 64338 (10 microM) did not significantly inhibit submaximal contractile responses to the direct-acting spasmogens substance P (10 nM), neurokinin A (3 nM), substance P methyl ester (10 nM) or senktide (100 nM); nor by sensory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic nerve stimulation evoked by capsaicin (10 microM), or electrical field-stimulation (3, 10, 30 Hz) (P > 0.05; n = 3-11). 3. Topical application of bradykinin to the conjunctiva and to the nasal mucosa of the guinea-pig in vivo causes plasma extravasation predominantly via the release of tachykinins from peripheral endings of the trigeminal nerve. The increases in plasma extravasation (measured by extravasation of Evans blue dye) induced by bradykinin in the guinea-pig conjunctiva (20 nmol) and nasal mucosa (50 nmol) were markedly reduced (by 81 +/- 3% and 69 +/- 5%, respectively) following pretreatment with WIN 64338 (30 nmol kg-1, i.v.) (n = 5-6; P < 0.05), with almost complete inhibition at a higher dose of WIN 64338 (300 nmol kg-1, i.v.; n = 5-6). This inhibition was selective since at 300 nmol kg-1, WIN 64338 did not inhibit plasma extravasation evoked by substance P in the conjunctiva (5 nmol; P > 0.05; n = 6) or in the nasal mucosa (50 nmol; P > 0.05; n = 5). 4. This study demonstrates that WIN 64338 is a selective and

  5. Stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptor C attenuates accumulation of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide synthesis in ammonia-treated astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska, Marta; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2010-11-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress contribute to ammonia-induced astrocytic dysfunction in hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of cultured astrocytes with 5 mmol/L ammonium chloride ('ammonia') increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the toxic NADPH oxidase reaction product, •O(2)(-). Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), natriuretic peptide C and a selective natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-C ligand, cANP((4-23),) each decreased the total ROS content both in control cells and cells treated with ammonia. However, attenuation of •O(2)(-) accumulation by ANP and cANP((4-23),) was observed in ammonia-treated cells only and the effect of cANP((4-23)) was decreased when the NADPH oxidase-regulatory protein G(iα-2) was blocked with a specific anti-G(iα-2) antibody. Although in contrast to ANP, cANP((4-23)) did not elevate the cGMP content in control astrocytes, it decreased cAMP content and reduced the expression of G(iα-2), the NADPH oxidase-regulatory protein. The results show the presence of functional NPR-C in astrocytes, activation of which (i) attenuates basal ROS production, and (ii) prevents excessive accumulation of the toxic ROS species, •O(2)(-) by ammonia. Ammonia, ANP and cANP((4-23)) added separately, each stimulated formation of NO(x) (nitrates + nitrites) which was associated with up-regulation of the activity [cANP((4-23))] or/and expression (ammonia) of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase. However, the ammonia-induced increase of NO(x) was not augmented by co-addition of ANP, and was reduced to the control level by co-addition of cANP((4-23)) , indicating that activation of NPR-C may also reduce nitrosative stress. Future hepatic encephalopathy therapy might include the use of cANP((4-23)) or other NPR-C agonists to control oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by ammonia.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide 1 stimulates insulin secretion via inhibiting RhoA/ROCK signaling and disassembling glucotoxicity-induced stress fibers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangchen; Yan, Dan; Sun, Jiangming; Wu, Xuerui; Mulder, Hindrik; Hua, Xianxin; Ma, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia leads to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction characterized by diminished glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but the precise cellular processes involved are largely unknown. Here we show that pancreatic β-cells chronically exposed to a high glucose level displayed substantially increased amounts of stress fibers compared with β-cells cultured at a low glucose level. β-Cells at high glucose were refractory to glucose-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and insulin secretion. Importantly, F-actin depolymerization by either cytochalasin B or latrunculin B restored glucotoxicity-diminished GSIS. The effects of glucotoxicity on increasing stress fibers and reducing GSIS were reversed by Y-27632, a Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)-specific inhibitor, which caused actin depolymerization and enhanced GSIS. Notably, glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36) amide (GLP-1), a peptide hormone that stimulates GSIS at both normal and hyperglycemic conditions, also reversed glucotoxicity-induced increase of stress fibers and reduction of GSIS. In addition, GLP-1 inhibited glucotoxicity-induced activation of RhoA/ROCK and thereby resulted in actin depolymerization and potentiation of GSIS. Furthermore, this effect of GLP-1 was mimicked by cAMP-increasing agents forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine as well as the protein kinase A agonist 6-Bnz-cAMP-AM whereas it was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate triethylammonium salt. To establish a clinical relevance of our findings, we examined the association of genetic variants of RhoA/ROCK with metabolic traits in homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms in and around RHOA were associated with elevated fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance, suggesting a possible role in metabolic dysregulation. Collectively these findings unravel a novel mechanism whereby GLP-1

  7. Single-chain bifunctional vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-C-terminal peptide (CTP) is superior to the combination therapy of recombinant VEGF plus FSH-CTP in stimulating angiogenesis during ovarian folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trousdale, Rhonda K; Pollak, Susan V; Klein, Jeffrey; Lobel, Leslie; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Feirt, Nikki; Lustbader, Joyce W

    2007-03-01

    Infertility technologies often employ exogenous gonadotropin therapy to increase antral follicle production. In an effort to enhance ovarian response, several long-acting FSH therapies have been developed including an FSH-C-terminal peptide (CTP), where the FSH subunits are linked by the CTP moiety from human chorionic gonadotropin, which is responsible for the increased half-life of human chorionic gonadotropin. We found that administration of FSH-CTP for ovarian hyperstimulation in rats blunted ovarian follicle vascular development. In women, reduced ovarian vasculature has been associated with lower pregnancy rates. We were interested in determining whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy could enhance ovarian angiogenesis in FSH-CTP-treated rats. Coadministration of systemic FSH-CTP plus recombinant VEGF was compared with treatment with a novel, single-chain bifunctional VEGF-FSH-CTP (VFC) analog. For VFC, the FSH portion targets the protein to the ovary and stimulates follicle growth, whereas VEGF enhances local vascular development. Both in vitro and in vivo studies confirm the dual FSH and VEGF action of the VFC protein. Evaluation of ovarian follicle development demonstrates that administration of combination therapy using VEGF and FSH-CTP failed to increase follicle vasculature above levels seen with FSH-CTP monotherapy. However, treatment with VFC significantly increased follicle vascular development while concurrently increasing the number of large antral follicles produced. In conclusion, we report the production and characterization of a long-acting, bifunctional VEGF-FSH-CTP protein that is superior to combination therapy for enhancing VEGF activity in the ovary and stimulating follicular angiogenesis in rats.

  8. Expression of cholecystokinin2-receptor in rat and human L cells and the stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by gastrin treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Cao, Xun; Liu, Xiao-Min

    2015-03-01

    Gastrin is a gastrointestinal hormone secreted by G cells. Hypergastrinemia can improve blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. These positive effects are primarily due to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells. In recent years, many receptors that regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) have been identified in enteroendocrine L cell lines. This led us to hypothesize that, in addition to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells, L cells also express cholecystokinin2-receptor (CCK2R), which may regulate GLP-1 secretion and have synergistic effects on glucose homeostasis. Our research provides a preliminary analysis of CCK2R expression and the stimulating effect of gastrin treatment on GLP-1 secretion in a human endocrine L cell line, using RT-PCR, Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and ELISA analyses. The expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3, which regulate GLP-1 biosynthesis, were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Double immunofluorescence labeling was utilized to assess the intracellular localization of CCK2R and GLP-1 in L cells harvested from rat colon tissue. Our results showed that CCK2R was expressed in both the human L cell line and the rat L cells. We also showed that treatment with gastrin, a CCK2R agonist, stimulated the secretion of GLP-1, and that this effect was likely due to increased expression of proglucagon and PCSK1 (also known as prohormone convertase 3 (PC3 gene)). These results not only provide a basis for the role gastrin may play in intestinal L cells, and may also provide the basis for the development of a method of gastrin-mediated glycemic regulation.

  9. Cellular localization of relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide expression in Asterias rubens: New insights into neurohormonal control of spawning in starfish.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming; Mita, Masatoshi; Egertová, Michaela; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Jones, Alexandra M; Elphick, Maurice R

    2017-05-01

    Gamete maturation and spawning in starfish is triggered by a gonad-stimulating substance (GSS), which is present in extracts of the radial nerve cords. Purification of GSS from the starfish Patiria pectinifera identified GSS as a relaxin-like polypeptide, which is now known as relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP). Cells expressing RGP in the radial nerve cord of P. pectinifera have been visualized, but the presence of RGP-expressing cells in other parts of the starfish body has not been investigated. Here we addressed this issue in the starfish Asterias rubens. An A. rubens RGP (AruRGP) precursor cDNA was sequenced and the A chain and B chain that form AruRGP were detected in A. rubens radial nerve cord extracts using mass spectrometry. Comparison of the bioactivity of AruRGP and P. pectinifera RGP (PpeRGP) revealed that both polypeptides induce oocyte maturation and ovulation in A. rubens ovarian fragments, but AruRGP is more potent than PpeRGP. Analysis of the expression of AruRGP in A. rubens using mRNA in situ hybridization revealed cells expressing RGP in the radial nerve cords, circumoral nerve ring, and tube feet. Furthermore, a band of RGP-expressing cells was identified in the body wall epithelium lining the cavity that surrounds the sensory terminal tentacle and optic cushion at the tips of the arms. Discovery of these RGP-expressing cells closely associated with sensory organs in the arm tips is an important finding because these cells are candidate physiological mediators for hormonal control of starfish spawning in response to environmental cues. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1599-1617, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cellular localization of relaxin‐like gonad‐stimulating peptide expression in Asterias rubens: New insights into neurohormonal control of spawning in starfish

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming; Mita, Masatoshi; Egertová, Michaela; Zampronio, Cleidiane G.; Jones, Alexandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gamete maturation and spawning in starfish is triggered by a gonad‐stimulating substance (GSS), which is present in extracts of the radial nerve cords. Purification of GSS from the starfish Patiria pectinifera identified GSS as a relaxin‐like polypeptide, which is now known as relaxin‐like gonad‐stimulating peptide (RGP). Cells expressing RGP in the radial nerve cord of P. pectinifera have been visualized, but the presence of RGP‐expressing cells in other parts of the starfish body has not been investigated. Here we addressed this issue in the starfish Asterias rubens. An A. rubens RGP (AruRGP) precursor cDNA was sequenced and the A chain and B chain that form AruRGP were detected in A. rubens radial nerve cord extracts using mass spectrometry. Comparison of the bioactivity of AruRGP and P. pectinifera RGP (PpeRGP) revealed that both polypeptides induce oocyte maturation and ovulation in A. rubens ovarian fragments, but AruRGP is more potent than PpeRGP. Analysis of the expression of AruRGP in A. rubens using mRNA in situ hybridization revealed cells expressing RGP in the radial nerve cords, circumoral nerve ring, and tube feet. Furthermore, a band of RGP‐expressing cells was identified in the body wall epithelium lining the cavity that surrounds the sensory terminal tentacle and optic cushion at the tips of the arms. Discovery of these RGP‐expressing cells closely associated with sensory organs in the arm tips is an important finding because these cells are candidate physiological mediators for hormonal control of starfish spawning in response to environmental cues. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1599–1617, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27806429

  11. Differential gene expression of RAW 264.7 macrophages in response to the RGD peptide lunasin with and without lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2011-10-01

    Lunasin is a novel peptide from soybean with demonstrated chemopreventive property. We compared the effect of lunasin on gene expression of RAW 264.7 macrophages with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulation. Our hypothesis was that lunasin will have a differential effect in RAW 264.7 gene expression in a normal and challenged state. Analysis of the microarray data using False Discovery Rate (FDR) method resulted in the identification of 340 up-regulated and 162 down-regulated genes (FDR p-value <0.05) associated with simultaneous treatment of lunasin and LPS for 24h. Treatment of lunasin with no LPS for 24h resulted in the up-regulation of 855 genes and down-regulation of 397 genes. Pre-treatment of lunasin for 24h resulted in the up-regulation of 35 genes and down-regulation of 65 genes in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. GeneVenn analysis of these three sets of genes showed that there are 66 genes common among the three groups which are mostly associated with regulation of cell death, ion binding and transcription as datamined by DAVID. Analysis of the 838 genes unique to lunasin alone by functional annotation clustering tool showed that lunasin mostly affected genes associated with RNA processing, apoptosis and protein kinase activity. Further datamining of these genes by ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) showed that lunasin affected genes involved in cellular growth and proliferation, cellular function and maintenance, and cell to cell signaling and interaction. These findings support the potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic use of lunasin against cancer.

  12. Intermedin in rat uterus: changes in gene expression and peptide levels across the estrous cycle and its effects on uterine contraction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study demonstrates the expression of intermedin (IMD) and its receptor components in the uterus of the female rat during the estrous cycle and its effect on uterine contraction. Methods The gene expression level of intermedin and its receptor components and the peptide level of intermedin were studied by real-time RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) respectively. The separation of precursor and mature IMD was studied by gel filtration chromatography and EIA. The localization of IMD in the uterus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. The effect of IMD on in vitro uterine contraction was studied by organ bath technique. Results Uterine mRNAs of Imd and its receptor components and IMD levels displayed cyclic changes across the estrous cycle. Imd mRNA level was the highest at proestrus while the IMD level was the highest at diestrus. IMD was found in the luminal and glandular epithelia and IMD treatment significantly reduced the amplitude and frequency of uterine contraction but not the basal tone. Both calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist hCGRP8-37 and adrenomedullin (ADM) receptor antagonist hADM22-52 partially abolished the inhibitory effect of IMD on uterine contraction while the specific IMD receptor antagonist hIMD17-47 completely blocked the actions. The enzyme inhibitors of NO (L-NAME) and PI3K (Wortmannin) pathways diminished the IMD effects on uterine contraction while the cAMP/PKA blocker, KT5720, had no effect, indicating an involvement of NO and PI3K/Akt but not PKA. Conclusions IMD and the gene expression of its receptor components are differentially regulated in the uterus during the estrous cycle and IMD inhibits uterine contraction by decreasing the amplitude and frequency. PMID:23442365

  13. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  14. Stimulating effect of graphene oxide on myogenesis of C2C12 myoblasts on RGD peptide-decorated PLGA nanofiber matrices.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Min Jeong; Hong, Suck Won; Kim, Bongju; Hyun, Jung Keun; Choi, Yu Suk; Park, Jong-Chul; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    In the field of biomedical engineering, many studies have focused on the possible applications of graphene and related nanomaterials due to their potential for use as scaffolds, coating materials and delivery carriers. On the other hand, electrospun nanofiber matrices composed of diverse biocompatible polymers have attracted tremendous attention for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, their combination is intriguing and still challenging. In the present study, we fabricated nanofiber matrices composed of M13 bacteriophage with RGD peptide displayed on its surface (RGD-M13 phage) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and characterized their physicochemical properties. In addition, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the cellular behaviors of C2C12 myoblasts, which were cultured on PLGA decorated with RGD-M13 phage (RGD/PLGA) nanofiber matrices, was investigated. Our results revealed that the RGD/PLGA nanofiber matrices have suitable physicochemical properties as a tissue engineering scaffold and the growth of C2C12 myoblasts were significantly enhanced on the matrices. Moreover, the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was substantially stimulated when they were cultured on the RGD/PLGA matrices in the presence of GO. In conclusion, these findings propose that the combination of RGD/PLGA nanofiber matrices and GO can be used as a promising strategy for skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration.

  15. A peptide from Porphyra yezoensis stimulates the proliferation of IEC-6 cells by activating the insulin-like growth factor I receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Kyeong; Kim, In-Hye; Choi, Youn-Hee; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-02-01

    Porphyra yezoensis (P. yezoensis) is the most noteworthy red alga and is mainly consumed in China, Japan and Korea. In the present study, the effects of a P. yezoensis peptide (PY‑PE) on cell proliferation and the associated signaling pathways were examined in IEC‑6 rat intestinal epithelial cells. First, the MTS assay showed that PY‑PE induced cell proliferation in a dose‑dependent manner. Subsequently, the mechanism behind the proliferative activity induced by PY‑PE was determined. The insulin‑like growth factor‑I receptor (IGF‑IR) signaling pathway was the main focus as it plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. PY‑PE increased the protein and mRNA expression of IGF‑IR, insulin receptor substrate‑1, Shc and PY‑99. In addition, PY‑PE stimulated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase phosphorylation and phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase/Akt activation but inhibited p38 and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase phosphorylation. Furthermore, PY‑PE treatment increased protein and mRNA expression levels of activator protein‑1, which regulates cell proliferation and survival, in the nuclear fraction. These results have significant implications for understanding the role of cell proliferation signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

  16. Fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma peptide-YY levels are elevated in critical illness and associated with feed intolerance: an observational, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Fraser, Robert JL; Chapman, Marianne; Bryant, Laura K; Wishart, Judith; Holloway, Richard H; Horowitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Delayed gastric emptying and feed intolerance occur frequently in the critically ill. In these patients, gastric motor responses to nutrients are disturbed. Peptide YY (PYY) slows gastric emptying. The aim of this study was to determine fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma PYY concentrations and their relationship to cholecystokinin (CCK) in critically ill patients. Methods Studies were performed in 19 unselected mechanically ventilated critically ill patients (12 males; 48 ± 7 years old) in a randomised, single-blind fashion. Subjects received a 60-minute duodenal infusion of Ensure® at either 1 or 2 kcal/minute. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 20, 40, 60, and 180 minutes following commencement of the nutrient infusion for the measurement of plasma PYY and CCK concentrations (using radioimmunoassay). Patient data were compared to 24 healthy subjects (17 males; 43 ± 2 years old). Results Fasting PYY concentration was higher in patients (P < 0.05), particularly in those with feed intolerance (P < 0.05). Plasma PYY concentrations were higher in patients during nutrient infusion (area under the curve [AUC] at 1 kcal/minute: 2,265 ± 718 versus 1,125 ± 138 pmol/l.min, P < 0.05; at 2 kcal/minute: 2,276 ± 303 versus 1,378 ± 210 pmol/l.min, P = 0.01) compared to healthy subjects. The magnitude of PYY elevation was greater in patients during the 1 kcal/minute infusion (AUC: 441 ± 153 versus 186 ± 58 pmol/l.min, P < 0.05), but not the 2 kcal/minute infusion. Fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma CCK concentrations were higher in patients (P < 0.05). There was a relationship between plasma PYY and CCK concentrations during fasting (r = 0.52, P < 0.05) and nutrient infusion (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Conclusion In critical illness, both fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma PYY concentrations are elevated, particularly in patients with feed intolerance, in conjunction with increased CCK concentrations. PMID:17173662

  17. Isolation and characterization of a resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); confirmation of the GM-CSF amino acid sequence by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsarbopoulos, A.; Pramanik, B. N.; Labdon, J. E.; Reichert, P.; Gitlin, G.; Patel, S.; Sardana, V.; Nagabhushan, T. L.; Trotta, P. P.

    1993-01-01

    A trypsin-resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was isolated and analyzed by high-energy Cs+ liquid secondary-ion (LSI) mass spectrometric analysis. This analysis provided successful detection of the high-mass disulfide-linked core peptide as well as information confirming the existence of disulfide pairing. Similarly, LSI mass spectrometric analysis of the peptide fragments isolated chromatographically from a Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digest of rhGM-CSF provided rapid confirmation of the cDNA-derived sequence and determination of the existing disulfide bonds between cysteine residues 54-96 and 88-121. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to measure the molecular weight of the intact protein and to determine the number of the disulfide bonds in the protein molecule by comparative analysis of the protein before and after reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol. PMID:8268804

  18. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  19. Dual receptor-targeting ⁹⁹mTc-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated Alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone hybrid peptides for human melanoma imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingli; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker could substantially decrease the non-specific renal uptake of (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) hybrid peptides. The RGD motif {Arg-Gly-Asp-DTyr-Asp} was coupled to [Cys(3,4,10), D-Phe(7), Arg(11)]α-MSH₃₋₁₃ via the Aoc or PEG₂ linker to generate RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH and RGD-PEG-(Arg(11))CCMSH. The biodistribution results of (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RGD-PEG₂-(Arg(11))CCMSH were examined in M21 human melanoma-xenografted nude mice. The substitution of Lys linker with Aoc and PEG₂ linker significantly reduced the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RGD-PEG₂-(Arg(11))CCMSH by 58% and 63% at 2h post-injection. The renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RGD-PEG₂-(Arg(11))CCMSH was 27.93 ± 3.98 and 22.01 ± 9.89% ID/g at 2 h post-injection. (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH displayed higher tumor uptake than (99m)Tc-RGD-PEG₂-(Arg(11))CCMSH (2.35 ± 0.12 vs. 1.71 ± 0.25% ID/g at 2 h post-injection). The M21 human melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by SPECT/CT using (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH as an imaging probe. The favorable effect of Aoc and PEG₂ linker in reducing the renal uptake provided a new insight into the design of novel dual receptor-targeting radiolabeled peptides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of new Tc-99m-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides for melanoma imaging.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2013-09-03

    The purpose of this study was to examine the melanoma targeting and imaging properties of two new (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH {c[Asp-Arg-Thr-Asp-DTyr]-Lys-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2} and RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH peptides were synthesized, and their melanocortin-1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution and melanoma imaging properties of (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The IC50 values of RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH were 0.7 ± 0.07 and 1.0 ± 0.3 nM in B16/F1 melanoma cells. Both (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH displayed high melanoma uptake. (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH exhibited the highest tumor uptake of 18.77 ± 5.13% ID/g at 2 h postinjection, whereas (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH reached the highest tumor uptake of 19.63 ± 4.68% ID/g at 4 h postinjection. Both (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH showed low accumulation in normal organs (<1.7% ID/g) except for the kidneys at 2 h postinjection. The renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH was 135.14 ± 23.62 and 94.01 ± 18.31% ID/g at 2 h postinjection, respectively. The melanoma lesions were clearly visualized by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT using either (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH or (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH as an imaging probe at 2 h postinjection. Overall, the introduction of Thr or Val residue retained high melanoma uptake of (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH. However, high renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RTD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RVD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH need to be reduced to facilitate their future applications.

  1. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139 is activated by the peptides: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-, and β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH, and β-MSH), and the conserved core motif HFRW.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Shehata, Mohamed A; Hauser, Alexander S; Isberg, Vignir; Mokrosinski, Jacek; Andersen, Kirsten B; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Gloriam, David E; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that is expressed primarily in the brain. Not much is known regarding the function of GPR139. Recently we have shown that GPR139 is activated by the amino acids l-tryptophan and l-phenylalanine (EC50 values of 220 μM and 320 μM, respectively), as well as di-peptides comprised of aromatic amino acids. This led us to hypothesize that GPR139 may be activated by peptides. Sequence alignment of the binding cavities of all class A GPCRs, revealed that the binding pocket of the melanocortin 4 receptor is similar to that of GPR139. Based on the chemogenomics principle "similar targets bind similar ligands", we tested three known endogenous melanocortin 4 receptor agonists; adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and α- and β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH and β-MSH) on CHO-k1 cells stably expressing the human GPR139 in a Fluo-4 Ca(2+)-assay. All three peptides, as well as their conserved core motif HFRW, were found to activate GPR139 in the low micromolar range. Moreover, we found that peptides consisting of nine or ten N-terminal residues of α-MSH activate GPR139 in the submicromolar range. α-MSH1-9 was found to correspond to the product of a predicted cleavage site in the pre-pro-protein pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). Our results demonstrate that GPR139 is a peptide receptor, activated by ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, the conserved core motif HFRW as well as a potential endogenous peptide α-MSH1-9. Further studies are needed to determine the functional relevance of GPR139 mediated signaling by these peptides.

  2. The activity of the rectal gland of the North Pacific spiny dogfish Squalus suckleyi is glucose dependent and stimulated by glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Deck, Courtney A; Anderson, W Gary; Conlon, J Michael; Walsh, Patrick J

    2017-04-25

    Elasmobranchs possess a specialised organ, the rectal gland, which is responsible for excreting sodium chloride via the posterior intestine. Previous work has indicated that the gland may be activated by a number of hormones, some of which are likely related to the salt or volume loads associated with feeding. Furthermore, evidence exists for the gland being glucose dependent which is atypical for an elasmobranch tissue. In this study, the presence of sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLTs) in the rectal gland and their regulation by feeding were investigated. In addition, the hypothesis of glucose dependence was examined through the use of glucose transporter (GLUT and SGLT) inhibitors, phlorizin, Indinavir, and STF-31 and their effect on secretion by the rectal gland. Finally, the effects on rectal gland activity of insulin, glucagon, and glucagon-like peptide-1, hormones typically involved in glucoregulation, were examined. The results showed that sglt1 mRNA is present in the gland, and there was a significant reduction in sglt1 transcript abundance 24 h post-feeding. An almost complete suppression of chloride secretion was observed when glucose uptake was inhibited, confirming the organ's glucose dependence. Finally, perfusion with dogfish GLP-1 (10 nmol L(-1)), but not dogfish glucagon, was shown to markedly stimulate the activity of the gland, increasing chloride secretion rates above baseline by approximately 16-fold (p < 0.001). As GLP-1 is released from the intestine upon feeding, we propose that this may be the primary signal for activation of the rectal gland post-feeding.

  3. Reinnervation of hind limb extremity after lumbar dorsal root ganglion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Bréjot, Thomas; Cressant, Arnaud; Bacci, Josette; Saïd, Gérard; Tadié, Marc; Heard, Jean Michel

    2005-12-01

    Loss of dorsal root ganglion neuron, or injury to dorsal roots, induces permanent somatosensory defect without therapeutic option. We explored an approach to restoring hind limb somatosensory innervation after elimination of L4, L5 and L6 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats. Somatosensory pathways were reconstructed by connecting L4, L5 and L6 lumbar dorsal roots to T10, T11 and T12 intercostal nerves, respectively, thus allowing elongation of thoracic ganglion neuron peripheral axons into the sciatic nerve. Connection of thoracic dorsal root ganglion neurons to peripheral tissues was documented 4 and 7 months after injury. Myelinated and unmyelinated fibers regrew in the sciatic nerve. Nerve terminations expressing calcitonin-gene-related-peptide colonized the footpad skin. Retrograde tracing showed that T10, T11 and T12 dorsal root ganglion neurons expressing calcitonin-gene-related-peptide or the neurofilament RT97 projected axons to the sciatic nerve and the footpad skin. Recording of somatosensory evoked potentials in the upper spinal cord indicated connection between the sciatic nerve and the central nervous system. Hind limb retraction in response to nociceptive stimulation of the reinnervated footpads and reversion of skin lesions suggested partial recovery of sensory function. Proprioceptive defects persisted. Delayed somatosensory reinnervation of the hind limb after destruction of lumbar dorsal root neurons in rats indicates potential approaches to reduce chronic disability after severe injury to somatosensory pathways.

  4. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an endogenous aldehyde, causes pain and neurogenic inflammation through activation of the irritant receptor TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Trevisani, Marcello; Siemens, Jan; Materazzi, Serena; Bautista, Diana M; Nassini, Romina; Campi, Barbara; Imamachi, Noritaka; Andrè, Eunice; Patacchini, Riccardo; Cottrell, Graeme S; Gatti, Raffaele; Basbaum, Allan I; Bunnett, Nigel W; Julius, David; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2007-08-14

    TRPA1 is an excitatory ion channel expressed by a subpopulation of primary afferent somatosensory neurons that contain substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Environmental irritants such as mustard oil, allicin, and acrolein activate TRPA1, causing acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Genetic studies indicate that TRPA1 is also activated downstream of one or more proalgesic agents that stimulate phospholipase C signaling pathways, thereby implicating this channel in peripheral mechanisms controlling pain hypersensitivity. However, it is not known whether tissue injury also produces endogenous proalgesic factors that activate TRPA1 directly to augment inflammatory pain. Here, we report that recombinant or native TRPA1 channels are activated by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde that is produced when reactive oxygen species peroxidate membrane phospholipids in response to tissue injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress. HNE provokes release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide from central (spinal cord) and peripheral (esophagus) nerve endings, resulting in neurogenic plasma protein extravasation in peripheral tissues. Moreover, injection of HNE into the rodent hind paw elicits pain-related behaviors that are inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists and absent in animals lacking functional TRPA1 channels. These findings demonstrate that HNE activates TRPA1 on nociceptive neurons to promote acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Our results also provide a mechanism-based rationale for developing novel analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents that target HNE production or TRPA1 activation.

  5. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an endogenous aldehyde, causes pain and neurogenic inflammation through activation of the irritant receptor TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Trevisani, Marcello; Siemens, Jan; Materazzi, Serena; Bautista, Diana M.; Nassini, Romina; Campi, Barbara; Imamachi, Noritaka; Andrè, Eunice; Patacchini, Riccardo; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Gatti, Raffaele; Basbaum, Allan I.; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Julius, David; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2007-01-01

    TRPA1 is an excitatory ion channel expressed by a subpopulation of primary afferent somatosensory neurons that contain substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Environmental irritants such as mustard oil, allicin, and acrolein activate TRPA1, causing acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Genetic studies indicate that TRPA1 is also activated downstream of one or more proalgesic agents that stimulate phospholipase C signaling pathways, thereby implicating this channel in peripheral mechanisms controlling pain hypersensitivity. However, it is not known whether tissue injury also produces endogenous proalgesic factors that activate TRPA1 directly to augment inflammatory pain. Here, we report that recombinant or native TRPA1 channels are activated by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous α,β-unsaturated aldehyde that is produced when reactive oxygen species peroxidate membrane phospholipids in response to tissue injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress. HNE provokes release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide from central (spinal cord) and peripheral (esophagus) nerve endings, resulting in neurogenic plasma protein extravasation in peripheral tissues. Moreover, injection of HNE into the rodent hind paw elicits pain-related behaviors that are inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists and absent in animals lacking functional TRPA1 channels. These findings demonstrate that HNE activates TRPA1 on nociceptive neurons to promote acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Our results also provide a mechanism-based rationale for developing novel analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents that target HNE production or TRPA1 activation. PMID:17684094

  6. Role of capsaicin sensitive nerves in epidermal growth factor effects on gastric mucosal injury and blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J; Teng, C; Chen, F; Wee, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and capsaicin protect against experimental gastric mucosal injury. Capsaicin exerts its gastroprotective effect by stimulating afferent neurones leading to release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) which causes gastric hyperaemia. EGF also causes gastric hyperaemia but whether it acts via capsaicin sensitive neurones is unknown. 
Aims—To assess the influence of: (1) capsaicin desensitisation on EGF effects on gastric mucosal injury and gastric mucosal blood flow; and (2) close arterial infusion of hCGRP8-37, a CGRP antagonist, on EGF effects on gastric mucosal blood flow. 
Methods—The absolute ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury model in the rat was used. Gastric mucosal damage was assessed by planimetry and light microscopy. Gastric mucosal blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry in a gastric chamber preparation. 
Results—Capsaicin desensitisation abolished the gastroprotective and gastric hyperaemic effects of EGF. Close arterial infusion of hCGRP8-37 antagonised the hyperaemic effect of both capsaicin and EGF. 
Conclusion—Results show that EGF may exert its gastroprotective and gastric hyperaemic effects via capsaicin sensitive afferent neurones. 

 Keywords: capsaicin; epidermal growth factor; gastric mucosal injury; gastric mucosal blood flow; calcitonin gene related peptide antagonist; rat PMID:9577339

  7. Adherence of neutrophils to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation by chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators and dependence upon the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family.

    PubMed Central

    Tonnesen, M G; Anderson, D C; Springer, T A; Knedler, A; Avdi, N; Henson, P M

    1989-01-01

    The process of neutrophil adhesion to and migration through the microvascular endothelium, an early event in the induction of the acute inflammatory response, has been attributed to the generation of extravascular chemoattractants. Although both chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators enhance neutrophil adherence in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism(s) involved in the interaction between circulating neutrophils and microvascular endothelial cells is still not completely understood. In a microtiter well adherence assay, the chemotactic peptides, FMLP and C5a, and the lipid mediators, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and platelet activating factor (PAF), enhanced human neutrophil adherence to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells as well as to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner with a rapid time course. This stimulated adhesive interaction between neutrophils and cultured human endothelial cells was dependent on the expression of the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family on the neutrophil surface since neutrophils from patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency, lacking surface expression of the adhesive glycoproteins, exhibited markedly diminished adherence to human endothelial cells in response to stimulation with chemotactic factors compared to normal control neutrophils. All four mediators enhanced expression of the glycoprotein family on the surface of normal neutrophils as determined by flow cytofluorimetry using a monoclonal antibody (TS1/18) to the glycoprotein common beta subunit. In addition, TS1/18 inhibited up to 100% the adherence of normal neutrophils to endothelial cells stimulated by maximal concentrations of FMLP, C5a, LTB4, or PAF. Moreover, HL-60 cells, human promyelocytic leukemia cells, neither increased glycoprotein surface expression nor adherence in response to stimulation. Thus, peptide and lipid mediators of the acute inflammatory response appear to enhance adherence of circulating neutrophils to the

  8. Development of peptide-containing nerves in the human fetal prostate gland.

    PubMed Central

    Jen, P Y; Dixon, J S

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical methods were used to study the developing peptidergic innervation of the human fetal prostate gland in a series of specimens ranging in gestational age from 13 to 30 wk. The overall innervation of each specimen was visualised using protein gene product 9.5 (PGP), a general nerve marker. The onset and development of specific neuropeptide-containing subpopulations were investigated using antisera to neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), bombesin (BOM), somatostatin (SOM), leu-enkephalin (l-ENK) and met-enkephalin (m-ENK). In addition the occurrence and distribution of presumptive noradrenergic nerves was studied using antisera to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). At 13 wk numerous branching PGP-immunoreactive (-IR) nerves were observed in the capsule of the developing prostate gland and surrounding the preprostatic urethra but the remainder of the gland was devoid of nerves. The majority of nerves in the capsule contained D beta H and TH and were presumed to be noradrenergic in type while other nerves (in decreasing numbers) contained NPY, l-ENK, SP and CGRP. Nerves associated with the preprostatic urethra did not contain any of the neuropeptides under investigation. At 17 wk the density of nerves in the capsule had increased and occasional m-ENK-, VIP- and BOM-IR nerve fibres were also observed. In addition PGP, D beta H-, TH-, NPY- and l-ENK-IR nerves occurred in association with smooth muscle bundles which at 17 wk were present in the outer part of the gland. Occasional PGP-IR nerves were also present at the base of the epithelium forming some of the prostatic glands. At 23 wk some of the subepithelial nerves showed immunoreactivity for NPY, VIP or l-ENK. At 26 wk smooth muscle bundles occurred throughout the gland and were richly innervated by PGP, D beta H and TH-IR nerves while a less dense plexus was formed by NPY- and l

  9. An apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide designed with a reductionist approach stimulates reverse cholesterol transport and reduces atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ditiatkovski, Michael; D'Souza, Wilissa; Kesani, Rajitha; Chin-Dusting, Jaye; de Haan, Judy B; Remaley, Alan; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are considered a promising novel therapeutic approach to prevent and/or treat atherosclerosis. An apoA-I mimetic peptide ELK-2A2K2E was designed with a reductionist approach and has shown exceptional activity in supporting cholesterol efflux but modest anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties in vitro. In this study we compared these in vitro properties with the capacity of this peptide to modify rates of reverse cholesterol transport and development of atherosclerosis in mouse models. The peptide enhanced the rate of reverse cholesterol transport in C57BL/6 mice and reduced atherosclerosis in Apoe(-/-) mice receiving a high fat diet. The peptide modestly reduced the size of the plaques in aortic arch, but was highly active in reducing vascular inflammation and oxidation. Administration of the peptide to Apoe(-/-) mice on a high fat diet reduced the levels of total, high density lipoprotein and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. It increased the proportion of smaller HDL particles in plasma at the expense of larger HDL particles, and increased the capacity of the plasma to support cholesterol efflux. Thus, ELK-2A2K2E peptide reduced atherosclerosis in Apoe(-/-) mice, however, the functional activity profile after chronic in vivo administration was different from that found in acute in vitro studies.

  10. Deficiency of formyl peptide receptor 1 and 2 is associated with increased inflammation and enhanced liver injury after LPS-stimulation.

    PubMed

    Giebeler, Arne; Streetz, Konrad L; Soehnlein, Oliver; Neumann, Ulf; Wang, Ji Ming; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide-receptor 1 and 2 (FPR1 and FPR2) in mice were identified as receptors with contrary affinity for the PAMP fMLF. Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine is either part of the bacterial membrane and is secreted by the mitochondria of eukaryotic ceslls during apoptosis. Furthermore FPR1 and 2 are described as highly relevant factors for the chemotaxis of immune cells. Their role during the acute liver injury has not been investigated yet. Constitutive knockout mice for FPR1 (mFPR1-/-), FPR2 (mFPR2-/-) and wild type (WT) mice were challenged with LPS i.p. for 3 h and 6 h. Liver and serum were sampled for further analysis. Liver transaminases were elevated in all mice 3 h and 6 h post LPS stimulation. Gene expression analysis displayed a reduced expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and CXCL1 after 3 h in the mFPR1-/- compared to wild type and mFPR2-/- mice. After 6 h, IL-6, TNF-α and CXCL1 were significantly higher in mice lacking mFPR1 or 2. Consistent to these findings the numbers of CD11b+ and Ly6G+ immune cells were altered in the livers. The analysis of TLR2 and TLR4 revealed time and genotype specific changes in theirs gene expression. Additionally, the liver in mFPR1- and mFPR2-deficient mice seem to be more susceptible to apoptosis by showing a significant higher number of TUNEL+-cells in the liver than WT-mice and displayed less Ki67-positive nuclei in the liver. The results suggest a prominent role of FPRs in the regulation of the hepatic inflammatory response after LPS induced liver injury. Deletion of mFPR1 or mFPR2 leads to deregulation of the inflammatory response compared to WT mice, associated with more severe liver injury represented by higher levels of transaminases, apoptotic cells and a reduced regenerative capacity.

  11. A rhesus monkey model to characterize the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in lung development. Evidence for stimulation of airway growth.

    PubMed Central

    Li, K; Nagalla, S R; Spindel, E R

    1994-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is developmentally expressed in human fetal lung and is a growth factor for normal and neoplastic lung but its role in normal lung development has yet to be clearly defined. In this study we have characterized the expression of GRP and its receptor in fetal rhesus monkey lung and determined the effects of bombesin on fetal lung development in vitro. By RNA blot analysis, GRP mRNA was first detectable in fetal monkey lung at 63 days gestation, reached highest levels at 80 days gestation, and then declined to near adult levels by 120 days gestation; a pattern closely paralleling GRP expression in human fetal lung. As in human lung, in situ hybridization localized GRP mRNA to neuroendocrine cells though during the canalicular phase of development (between 63-80 days gestation) GRP mRNA was present not only in classic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, but also in cells of budding airways. Immunohistochemistry showed that bombesin-like immunoreactivity was present in neuroendocrine cells, but not in budding airways, suggesting that in budding airways either the GRP mRNA is not translated, is rapidly secreted, or a related, but different RNA is present. RNase protection analysis using a probe to the monkey GRP receptor demonstrated that the time course of receptor RNA expression closely paralleled the time course of GRP RNA expression. In situ hybridization showed that GRP receptors were primarily expressed in epithelial cells of the developing airways. Thus GRP would appear to be secreted from neuroendocrine cells to act on target cells in developing airways. This hypothesis was confirmed by organ culture of fetal monkey lung in the presence of bombesin and bombesin antagonists. Bombesin treatment at 1 and 10 nM significantly increased DNA synthesis in airway epithelial cells and significantly increased the number and size of airways in cultured fetal lung. In fact, culturing 60 d fetal lung for 5 d with 10 nM bombesin increased airway size

  12. Increases in transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 mRNA and protein in primary afferent neurons stimulated by protein kinase C and their possible role in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by our group demonstrates pharmacologically that the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to initiate neurogenic inflammation by the release of neuropeptides in the periphery. In this study, expression of TRPV1, phosphorylated protein kinase C (p-PKC) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were visualized using immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blots to examine whether increases in TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels evoked by capsaicin injection are subject to modulation by the activation of PKC and to analyze the role of this process in the pathogenesis of neurogenic inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the hindpaw skin of anesthetized rats evoked increases in the expression of TRPV1, CGRP and p-PKC in mRNA and/or protein levels and in the number of single labeled TRPV1, p-PKC and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral L4–5 DRGs. Co-expressions of TRPV1 with p-PKC and/or CGRP in DRG neurons were also significantly increased after CAP injection. These evoked expressions both at molecular and cellular levels were significantly inhibited after TRPV1 receptors were blocked by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (5 μg) or PKC was inhibited by chelerythrine chloride (5 μg). Taken together, these results provide evidence that up-regulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels under inflammatory conditions evoked by capsaicin injection is subject to modulation by the PKC cascade in which increased CGRP level in DRG neurons may be related to the initiation of neurogenic inflammation. Thus, up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons seems critical for initiating acute neurogenic inflammation. PMID:18752301

  13. Antisecretory Factor Peptide AF-16 Inhibits the Secreted Autotransporter Toxin-Stimulated Transcellular and Paracellular Passages of Fluid in Cultured Human Enterocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Both the endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) protein and peptide AF-16, which has a sequence that matches that of the active N-terminal region of AF, inhibit the increase in the epithelial transport of fluid and electrolytes induced by bacterial toxins in animal and ex vivo models. We conducted a study to investigate the inhibitory effect of peptide AF-16 against the increase of transcellular passage and paracellular permeability promoted by the secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) in a cultured cellular model of the human intestinal epithelial barrier. Peptide AF-16 produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the Sat-induced increase in the formation of fluid domes, in the mucosal-to-serosal passage of d-[1-14C]mannitol, and in the rearrangements in the distribution and protein expression of the tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins ZO-1 and occludin in cultured human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. In addition, we show that peptide AF-16 also inhibits the cholera toxin-induced increase of transcellular passage and the Clostridium difficile toxin-induced effects on paracellular permeability and TJ protein organization in Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. Treatment of cell monolayers by the lipid raft disorganizer methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished the inhibitory activity of peptide AF-16 at the transcellular passage level and did not modify the effect of the peptide at the paracellular level. PMID:25534938

  14. Impaired Vasodilatory Responses of Omental Arteries to CGRP Family Peptides in Pregnancies Complicated by Fetal Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Madhu; Betancourt, Ancizar; Balakrishnan, Meena; Yallampalli, Uma; Dong, Yuanlin; Fox, Karin; Belfort, Michael; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2016-08-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (ADM), and adrenomedullin2 (ADM2)/intermedin are potent vasorelaxant peptides considered to play a role in the adaptive mechanisms in rat pregnancy through increased vasodilation in mesenteric and uterine artery. This study was designed to demonstrate the response of omental arteries (OA) to vasoactive peptides CGRP, ADM, and ADM2 in pregnancy complications such as fetal growth restriction (FGR), and assess the changes in the expression of their receptor components in segments of OA from FGR pregnancy compared to the control. The findings for this study are: 1) relaxation responses of OA were higher for bradykinin (78.55 ± 3.91 vs 52.67 ± 2.19; P < .05) in pregnancy with FGR compared to the normal, 2) relaxation response of OA segments to CGRP was similar with no change in the expression of G-protein couple receptor-calcitonin receptor-like receptor complex in normal healthy pregnancy and pregnancy complicated by FGR, 3) maximal relaxation response of OA were significantly (P < .05) lower for both ADM (18.2 ± 6.7 vs 38 ± 2.5) and ADM2 (26.9 ± 6.7 vs 48 ± 2.6) along with decreases in their respective ligand-receptor complex in FGR compared to the normal pregnancies, 4) expression of calcitonin receptor-like receptor mRNA was higher but its immunoreactivity was lower in OA from FGR pregnancy compared to the normal, and 5) mRNA and protein levels of RAMP1, RAMP2, and RAMP3 were lower in OA isolated from FGR pregnancies compared to the normal. The current study demonstrates that FGR is associated with an increase in the sensitivity of OA to bradykinin and decreased sensitivity for ADM and ADM2 ligand-receptor system with no change in the response for CGRP compared to the normal healthy pregnancy, and suggests a potential role for ADM and ADM2 in the pathophysiology of maternal vasculature in FGR pregnancy.

  15. Cluster headache: present and future therapy.