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Sample records for calcium oxalate calcium

  1. Plasma oxalic acid and calcium levels in oxalate poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Zarembski, P. M.; Hodgkinson, A.

    1967-01-01

    Observations are reported on five cases of suicide or attempted suicide by poisoning with oxalic acid or ethylene glycol. Elevated oxalic acid levels were observed in the plasma, stomach contents, and a number of tissues. Raised oxalic acid levels in plasma were associated with reduced total and ultrafilterable calcium levels. It is suggested that the reduction in plasma total calcium level is due mainly to the deposition of calcium oxalate in the soft tissues, but inhibition of the parathyroid glands may be a contributory factor. Microscopic examination of various tissues indicated that oxalic acid is deposited in the tissues in two forms: (1) crystalline calcium oxalate dihydrate in the kidney and (2) a non-crystalline complex of calcium oxalate and lipid in liver and other tissues. PMID:5602563

  2. Risk of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in postmenopausal women supplemented with calcium or combined calcium and estrogen.

    PubMed

    Domrongkitchaiporn, Somnuek; Ongphiphadhanakul, Boonsong; Stitchantrakul, Wasana; Chansirikarn, Sirinthorn; Puavilai, Gobchai; Rajatanavin, Rajata

    2002-02-26

    Recent studies showed that postmenopausal women lost less bone mass when supplemented with calcium or estrogen therapy. However, the safety of the treatments in terms of the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation is unknown. We therefore conducted this study to determine the alteration in calcium oxalate supersaturation after calcium supplement or after combined calcium and estrogen therapy in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Fifty-six postmenopausal women were enrolled in this study. All subjects were more than 10 years postmenopausal with vertebral or femoral osteoporosis by bone mineral density criteria. They were randomly allocated to receive either 625 mg of calcium carbonate (250 mg of elemental calcium) at the end of a meal three times a day (group A, n=26) or calcium carbonate in the same manner plus 0.625 mg/day of conjugated equine estrogen and 5 mg medrogestone acetate from day 1-12 each month (group B, n=30). The age (mean +/- S.E.M.) was 66.3 +/- 1.2 and 65.1 +/- 1.1 years, weight 54.1 +/- 1.2 and 55.3 +/- 2.1 kg, in group A and group B, respectively. Urine specimens (24-h) were collected at baseline and 3 months after treatment for the determination of calcium oxalate saturation by using Tiselius's index (AP(CaOx)) and calcium/citrate ratio. After 3 months of treatment, there was no significant alteration from baseline for urinary excretion of calcium, citrate and oxalate. Urinary phosphate excretion was significantly reduced (6.3 +/- 0.7 vs. 5.1 +/- 0.7 mmol/day for group A and 8.2 +/- 0.9 vs. 5.8 +/- 0.7 mmol/day for group B, P<0.05), whereas net alkaline absorption was significantly elevated (10.1 +/- 3.6 vs. 20.1 +/- 4.4 meq/day for group A and 4.8 +/- 3.2 vs. 19.9 +/- 3.6 meq/day for group B, P<0.05). Calcium/citrate ratio and AP(CaOx) determined at baseline were not different from the corresponding values after treatment in both groups; calcium/citrate: 10.1 +/- 3.1 vs. 10.1 +/- 2.5 for group A and 9.3 +/- 1.8 vs. 11.9 +/- 2.5 for group B and

  3. Lowering urinary oxalate excretion to decrease calcium oxalate stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John; Assimos, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary modifications should be considered as a first line approach in the treatment of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. The amounts of oxalate and calcium consumed in the diet are significant factors in the development of the disease due to their impact on urinary oxalate excretion. There are a number of strategies that can be employed to reduce oxalate excretion. The consumption of oxalate-rich foods should be avoided and calcium intake adjusted to 1000–1200 mg/day. To encourage compliance it should be emphasized to patients that they be vigilant with this diet as a deviation in any meal or snack could potentially result in significant stone growth. The evidence underlying these two modifications is outlined and other strategies to reduce urinary oxalate excretion are reviewed. PMID:26614109

  4. Calcium oxalate contribution to calcium cycling in forests of contrasting nutrient status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (Ca oxalate) is an insoluble biomineral that forms in plants and fungi, and occurs in soils across many types of ecosystems. Assessing how Ca oxalate may shape ecosystem Ca cycling requires information on the distribution of Ca oxalate among plant biomass, detritus, and mineral soil, and how it varies with ecosystem Ca status. We compared two Douglas-fir forests of contrasting ecosystem Ca availability, and found that Ca oxalate was partitioned similarly among plant biomass, detritus and mineral soil major ecosystem compartments at both sites, and total pools of Ca oxalate were greater in the high-Ca forest. However, the proportional importance of Ca oxalate was greater in the low-Ca than high-Ca forest (18% versus 4% of actively cycling ecosystem Ca, respectively). And calcium oxalate in mineral soil, which is of particular interest as a potential long-term Ca reservoir, was a larger portion of total available Ca (exchangeable Ca plus Ca oxalate Ca) in the low-Ca site than the high-Ca site (9% versus 1% of available soil Ca, respectively). Calcium oxalate was the dominant form of Ca returned from plants to soil as leaf litterfall at the high-Ca site, yet calcium oxalate disappeared rapidly from decomposing litter (0.28 yr−1 or faster) at both sites. We conclude that accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest ecosystems appears most closely related to overall Ca supply for live biomass pools, and that the accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest floor and mineral soil is limited by rapid microbial degradation of putatively unavailable Ca oxalate.

  5. Diet, but not oral probiotics, effectively reduces urinary oxalate excretion and calcium oxalate supersaturation.

    PubMed

    Lieske, John C; Tremaine, William J; De Simone, Claudio; O'Connor, Helen M; Li, Xujian; Bergstralh, Eric J; Goldfarb, David S

    2010-12-01

    We examined the effect of a controlled diet and two probiotic preparations on urinary oxalate excretion, a risk factor for calcium oxalate kidney stone formation, in patients with mild hyperoxaluria. Patients were randomized to a placebo, a probiotic, or a synbiotic preparation. This tested whether these probiotic preparations can increase oxalate metabolism in the intestine and/or decrease oxalate absorption from the gut. Patients were maintained on a controlled diet to remove the confounding variable of differing oxalate intake from food. Urinary oxalate excretion and calcium oxalate supersaturation on the controlled diet were significantly lower compared with baseline on a free-choice diet. Neither study preparation reduced urinary oxalate excretion nor calcium oxalate supersaturation. Fecal lactobacilli colony counts increased on both preparations, whereas enterococcal and yeast colony counts were increased on the synbiotic. Total urine volume and the excretion of oxalate and calcium were all strong independent determinants of urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation. Hence, dietary oxalate restriction reduced urinary oxalate excretion, but the tested probiotics did not influence urinary oxalate levels in patients on a restricted oxalate diet. However, this study suggests that dietary oxalate restriction is useful for kidney stone prevention.

  6. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  7. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  8. Impact of Dietary Calcium and Oxalate, and Oxalobacter Formigenes Colonization on Urinary Oxalate Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Juquan; Knight, John; Easter, Linda H.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Holmes, Ross P.; Assimos, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Enteric colonization with Oxalobacter formigenes, a bacterium whose main energy source is oxalate, has been demonstrated to decrease the risk of recurrent calcium oxalate kidney stone formation. We assessed the impact of diets controlled in calcium and oxalate contents on urinary and fecal analytes in healthy subjects who were naturally colonized with O. formigenes or not colonized with O. formigenes. Materials and Methods A total of 11 O. formigenes colonized and 11 noncolonized subjects were administered diets controlled in calcium and oxalate contents. We assayed 24-hour urine collections and stool samples obtained on the last 4 days of each 1-week diet for stone risk parameters and O. formigenes levels. Mixed model analysis was used to determine the effects of colonization status on these variables. Results Urinary calcium and oxalate excretion were significantly altered by the dietary changes in O. formigenes colonized and noncolonized individuals. Mixed model analysis showed significant interaction between colonization status and oxalate excretion on a low calcium (400 mg daily)/moderate oxalate (250 mg daily) diet (p = 0.026). Urinary oxalate excretion was 19.5% lower in O. formigenes colonized subjects than in noncolonized subjects on the low calcium/moderate oxalate diet (mean ± SE 34.9 ± 2.6 vs 43.6 ± 2.6 mg, p = 0.031). Conclusions Results suggest that O. formigenes colonization decreases oxalate excretion during periods of low calcium and moderate oxalate intake. PMID:21575973

  9. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this pote...

  10. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-28

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current.

  11. Aluminum Citrate Prevents Renal Injury from Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Besenhofer, Lauren M.; Cain, Marie C.; Dunning, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol–treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate’s interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  12. Patterns of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization in complex biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Korol'kov, V. V.; Kuimova, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the features of calcium oxalate crystallization in the presence of additives revealed through experimental modeling. The patterns of phase formation are shown for the Ca2+ - C2O4 2- - H2O and Ca2+ - C2O4 2- - PO4 3- - H2O systems with the components and pH of the saline varying over a wide concentrations range. The effect of additives on crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate was investigated. It was found that the ionic strength and magnesium ions are inhibitors, and calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite crystals are catalysts of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization. The basic calcium phosphate (apatite) was found to be most thermodynamically stable, which indicates its special role in kidney stone formation since it is found in virtually all stones.

  13. Characterization of Medicago truncatula reduced calcium oxalate crystal mutant alleles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation is common in plants. Formation of these crystals has been shown to function in plant defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. Although calcium oxalate is common and plays important roles in plant development, our understanding of how these crystals form ...

  14. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  15. Modulation of polyepoxysuccinic acid on crystallization of calcium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanqing; Tang, Yongming, E-mail: tangym@njtech.edu.cn; Xu, Jinqiu

    The influence of polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA) on the phase composition and crystal morphology of calcium oxalate was investigated in this paper. It was found that the presence of PESA inhibited the growth of the monoclinic calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal and promoted the nucleation of the tetragonal calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). In addition, with the increase in PESA concentration, the aggregation of COD crystals was reduced but the particle size was increased. Under the conditions of low calcium-to-oxalate ratio and high CaOx concentration, PESA could not effectively stabilize the formation of COD. Based on molecular dynamic simulations, the adsorption ofmore » PESA on CaOx crystal faces was confirmed. - Graphical abstract: Introduction of PESA into crystallization solutions promotes the formation of calcium oxalate dehydrate and modifies the morphology of crystals. - Highlights: • PESA induces the formation of COD at low supersaturation. • Establishment of Ca-rich surface augments the adsorption of PESA. • At Ca/Ox=0.5 PESA cannot induce the formation of COD compared with Ca/Ox=2. • Interaction of PESA with COM faces is stronger than that with COD faces.« less

  16. Unusual calcium oxalate crystals in ethylene glycol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Godolphin, W; Meagher, E P; Sanders, H D; Frohlich, J

    1980-06-01

    A patient poisoned with ethylene glycol exhibited the symptoms of (1) hysteria, (2) metabolic acidosis with both a large anion gap and osmolal gap, and (3) crystalluria. However, the shape of the urinary crystals was prismatic and resembled hippurate rather than the expected dipyramidal calcium oxalate dihydrate. X-ray crystallography positively identified them as calcium oxalate monohydrate.

  17. Calcium extraction from brine water and seawater using oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natasha, Nadia Chrisayu; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum

    2017-01-01

    Calcium can be extracted not only from rocks but also from natural liquor such as seawater and brine water. In order to extract the calcium from seawater and brine water, oxalic acid was used in this research. Effect of variations of the volume of the oxalic acid at a constant concentration in seawater and brine water to produce calcium was investigated. The concentration of oxalic acid was 100 g/l and the variations of its volume were 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml, and 50 ml. The used seawater and brine water were firstly evaporated from 100 ml into 50 ml and then the oxalic acid was added into them with mixing to produce the calcium precipitates. The precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The SEM analysis showed that the precipitates from brine water were consisted of only calcium compound while from seawater sodium one was also found along with calcium compound. The XRD analysis showed that the calcium was present in the form of calcium oxalate for both seawater and brine water. The ICP-OES analysis of the filtrate from seawater precipitation showed that the its calcium content was decreased from 826.20 ppm to 0.04 ppm while from brine water, it decreased from 170.06 ppm to 1.96 ppm. These results showed that both seawater and brine water have the potential to be a raw material for calcium production.

  18. Proteomic analysis of a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Matsuta, Yosuke; Moriyama, Manabu; Yasuda, Makoto; Chishima, Noriharu; Yamaoka, Noriko; Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the matrix protein of a rare urinary stone that contained calcium carbonate. A urinary stone was extracted from a 34-year-old male patient with metabolic alkalosis. After X-ray diffractometry and infrared analysis of the stone, proteomic analysis was carried out. The resulting mass spectra were evaluated with protein search software, and matrix proteins were identified. X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis confirmed that the stone contained calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Of the identified 53 proteins, 24 have not been previously reported from calcium oxalate- or calcium phosphate-containing stones. The protease inhibitors and several proteins related to cell adhesion or the cytoskeleton were identified for the first time. We analyzed in detail a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Considering the formation of a calcium carbonate stone, the new identified proteins should play an important role on the urolithiasis process in alkaline condition. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. Aspects of calcium oxalate crystallization: theory, in vitro studies, and in vivo implementation.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, A

    1999-11-01

    There are three main approaches to urolithiasis research: theory, basic science, and clinical implementation. Although each approach has yielded meaningful results, there does not appear to be complete synergy between them. This article examines these approaches as they pertain to urinary calcium oxalate crystallization processes. Theoretical calculations were performed to examine the role of oxalate concentration on calcium oxalate supersaturation. The effects of magnesium, citrate, and combinations thereof on calcium oxalate crystallization kinetics were examined in a mixed suspension, mixed product removal crystallizer. Finally, male volunteers were given supplements of calcium alone and binary combinations of calcium, magnesium, and citrate to investigate their effects on the urinary supersaturation of calcium oxalate. Calculations showed that oxalate is 23 times more potent than calcium in its effect on the supersaturation of calcium oxalate. In the in vitro experiments, magnesium and citrate reduced the growth and nucleation kinetics as well as the supersaturation. In combination, these two components were more effective than the individual components in reducing the growth rate and the supersaturation. All of the supplements favorably altered the kinetic and thermodynamic risk factors. Calcium was the most effective in reducing the urinary excretion of oxalate. Articulation of these three approaches is essential for the meaningful investigation and understanding of urolithiasis.

  20. Calcium carbonate crystals promote calcium oxalate crystallization by heterogeneous or epitaxial nucleation: possible involvement in the control of urinary lithogenesis.

    PubMed

    Geider, S; Dussol, B; Nitsche, S; Veesler, S; Berthézène, P; Dupuy, P; Astier, J P; Boistelle, R; Berland, Y; Dagorn, J C; Verdier, J M

    1996-07-01

    A large proportion of urinary stones have calcium oxalate (CaOx) as the major mineral phase. In these stones, CaOx is generally associated with minor amounts of other calcium salts. Several reports showing the presence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium phosphate in renal stones suggested that crystals of those salts might be present in the early steps of stone formation. Such crystals might therefore promote CaOx crystallization from supersaturated urine by providing an appropriate substrate for heterogeneous nucleation. That possibility was investigated by seeding a metastable solution of 45Ca oxalate with vaterite or calcite crystallites. Accretion of CaOx was monitored by 45Ca incorporation. We showed that (1) seeds of vaterite (the hexagonal polymorph of CaCO3) and calcite (the rhomboedric form) could initiate calcium oxalate crystal growth; (2) in the presence of lithostathine, an inhibitor of CaCO3 crystal growth, such accretion was not observed. In addition, scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that growth occurred by epitaxy onto calcite seeds whereas no special orientation was observed onto vaterite. It was concluded that calcium carbonate crystals promote crystallization of calcium oxalate and that inhibitors controlling calcium carbonate crystal formation in Henle's loop might play an important role in the prevention of calcium oxalate stone formation.

  1. Microelectrophoretic study of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1987-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopolysaccharides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  2. The influence of scale inhibitors on calcium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1999-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium oxalate is a common occurrence in mammalian urinary tract deposits and in various industrial processes such as paper making, brewery fermentation, sugar evaporation, and tannin concentration. Between pH 3.5 to 4.5 the driving force for calcium oxalate precipitation increases almost by three fold. It is a complicated process to predict both the nature of a deposit and at which stage of a multi-effect evaporator a particular mineral will deposit, as this depends on temperature, pH, total solids, and kinetics of mineralization. It is quite a challenge to inhibit calcium oxalate precipitation in the pH range of 4--6.more » Al{sup 3+} ions provide excellent threshold inhibition in this pH range and can be used to augment traditional inhibitors such as polyphosphates and polycarboxylates.« less

  3. Plant calcium oxalate crystal formation, function, and its impact on human health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crystals of calcium oxalate have been observed among members from most taxonomic groups of photosynthetic organisms ranging from the smallest algae to the largest trees. The biological roles for calcium oxalate crystal formation in plant growth and development include high capacity calcium regulatio...

  4. Oxalate and Sucralose Absorption in Idiopathic Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John; Jiang, Juquan; Wood, Kyle D.; Holmes, Ross P.; Assimos, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Oxalate has been hypothesized to undergo absorption in the large and small intestine by both paracellular and transepithelial transport. Sucralose is a chlorinated sugar that is absorbed by paracellular mechanisms. This study's objective was to better understand intestinal oxalate transport by correlating oxalate and sucralose absorption in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. Methods Idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers were recruited to provide urine specimens on both a self-selected diet and following a meal containing 90 mg of 13C2-oxalate and 5 grams of sucralose, and a stool sample for determination of Oxalobacter formigenes colonization. The 24 hour urine collections were fractionated into the first 6 hours and the subsequent 18 hours. Sucralose and oxalate excretion were measured during these periods and used to estimate absorption. Results A total of 38 subjects were evaluated. The majority of both the 13C2-oxalate and sucralose absorption occurred within the 0-6 hour collection. The 13C2-oxalate and sucralose absorptions were significantly correlated at the 0-6 hour, the 6-24 hour, and the total 24 hour time periods (p<0.04). All five oxalate hyperabsorbers(> 15% absorption) also absorbed significantly more sucralose during the 0-6 hour and whole 24 hour time points (p<0.04). Oxalobacter formigenes colonization did not significantly alter oxalate absorption. Conclusion The results suggest that the majority of oxalate is absorbed in the proximal portion of the gastrointestinal tract and that paracelluar transport is involved. Augmented paracellular transport, as evidenced by increased sucralose absorption, may also influence oxalate absorption. PMID:21676449

  5. Efficacy of Mixtures of Magnesium, Citrate and Phytate as Calcium Oxalate Crystallization Inhibitors in Urine.

    PubMed

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mixtures of magnesium, citrate and phytate as calcium oxalate crystallization inhibitors. A turbidimetric assay in synthetic urine was performed to obtain induction times for calcium oxalate crystallization in the absence and presence of different mixtures of inhibitors. The morphology of calcium oxalate crystals in the absence or presence of inhibitors and mixtures of the inhibitors was evaluated in 2 crystallization experiments at low and high calcium oxalate supersaturation. The crystals formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Examination of crystallization induction times revealed clear inhibitory effects of magnesium, citrate and phytate on calcium oxalate crystallization, supporting usefulness in the treatment and prevention of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Significant synergistic effects between magnesium and phytate were observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that phytate is a powerful crystal growth inhibitor of calcium oxalate, totally preventing the formation of trihydrate and monohydrate. In addition to crystallization inhibition capacity, citrate and magnesium avoided calcium oxalate crystallization by decreasing its supersaturation. The synergistic effect between magnesium and phytate on calcium oxalate crystallization suggests that a combination of these 2 compounds may be highly useful as antilithiasis therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxalate co-precipitation synthesis of calcium zirconate and calcium titanate powders.

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew

    2009-06-01

    Fine powders of calcium zirconate (CaZrO{sub 3}, CZ) and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}, CT) were synthesized using a nonaqueous oxalate co-precipitation route from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4 H{sub 2}O and group(IV) n-butoxides (Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} or Zr(OBu{sup n}){sub 4}). Several reaction conditions and batch sizes (2-35 g) were explored to determine their influence on final particle size, morphology, and phase. Characterization of the as-prepared oxalate precursors, oven dried oxalate precursors (60-90 C), and calcined powders (635-900 C) were analyzed with TGA/DTA, XRD, TEM, and SEM. Densification and sintering studies on pressed CZ pellets at 1375 and 1400 C were also performed.more » Through the developed oxalate co-precipitation route, densification temperatures for CZ were lowered by 125 C from the 1500 C firing temperature required for conventional mixed oxide powders. Low field electrical tests of the CZ pellets indicated excellent dielectric properties with dielectric constants of {approx}30 and a dissipation factor of 0.0004 were measured at 1 kHz.« less

  7. Effect of animal and vegetable protein intake on oxalate excretion in idiopathic calcium stone disease.

    PubMed

    Marangella, M; Bianco, O; Martini, C; Petrarulo, M; Vitale, C; Linari, F

    1989-04-01

    Oxalate excretion was measured in healthy subjects and idiopathic calcium stone-formers on dietary regimens which differed in the type and amount of protein allowed; 24-h urine collections were obtained from 41 practising vegetarians and 40 normal persons on a free, mixed, "mediterranean" diet. Twenty idiopathic calcium stone-formers were also studied while on two low calcium, low oxalate diets which differed in that animal protein was high in one and restricted in the other. Vegetarians had higher urinary oxalate levels than controls and although the calcium levels were markedly lower, urinary saturation with calcium/oxalate was significantly higher. This mild hypercalciuria was interpreted as being secondary to both a higher intake and increased fractional intestinal absorption of oxalate. Changing calcium stone-formers from a high to a low animal protein intake produced a significant decrease in calcium excretion but there was no variation in urinary oxalate. As a result, the decrease in calcium oxalate saturation was only marginal and not significant. It was concluded that dietary animal protein has a minimal effect on oxalate excretion. Mild hyperoxaluria of idiopathic calcium stone disease is likely to be intestinal in origin. Calcium stone-formers should be advised to avoid an excess of animal protein but the risks of a vegetable-rich diet should also be borne in mind.

  8. Characterization of calcium oxalate defective (cod) 3 mutant from Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many plants invest a considerable amount of resources and energy into the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. Assigned roles for plant crystal formation include functions in defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. From a human health standpoint, oxalate present in edible plant tiss...

  9. Calcium Oxalate Accumulation in Malpighian Tubules of Silkworm (Bombyx mori)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Aaron J.; Webb, Mary Alice

    2007-04-01

    Silkworm provides an ideal model system for study of calcium oxalate crystallization in kidney-like organs, called Malpighian tubules. During their growth and development, silkworm larvae accumulate massive amounts of calcium oxalate crystals in their Malpighian tubules with no apparent harm to the organism. This manuscript reports studies of crystal structure in the tubules along with analyses identifying molecular constituents of tubule exudate.

  10. Crystallization of calcium oxalate in minimally diluted urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, T.; Rodgers, A.

    1998-09-01

    Crystallization of calcium oxalate was studied in minimally diluted (92%) urine using a mixed suspension mixed product crystallizer in series with a Malvern particle sizer. The crystallization was initiated by constant flow of aqueous sodium oxalate and urine into the reaction vessel via two independent feed lines. Because the Malvern cell was in series with the reaction vessel, noninvasive measurement of particle sizes could be effected. In addition, aliquots of the mixed suspension were withdrawn and transferred to a Coulter counter for crystal counting and sizing. Steady-state particle size distributions were used to determine nucleation and growth kinetics while scanning electron microscopy was used to examine deposited crystals. Two sets of experiments were performed. In the first, the effect of the concentration of the exogenous sodium oxalate was investigated while in the second, the effect of temperature was studied. Calcium oxalate nucleation and growth rates were found to be dependent on supersaturation levels inside the crystallizer. However, while growth rate increased with increasing temperature, nucleation rates decreased. The favored phases were the trihydrate at 18°C, the dihydrate at 38° and the monohydrate at 58°C. The results of both experiments are in agreement with those obtained in other studies that have been conducted in synthetic and in maximally diluted urine and which have employed invasive crystal counting and sizing techniques. As such, the present study lends confidence to the models of urinary calcium oxalate crystallization processes which currently prevail in the literature.

  11. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  12. Reverse engineering the kidney: modelling calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization in the nephron.

    PubMed

    Borissova, A; Goltz, G E; Kavanagh, J P; Wilkins, T A

    2010-07-01

    Crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate in a section of a single kidney nephron (distal convoluted tubule) is simulated using a model adapted from industrial crystallization. The nephron fluid dynamics is represented as a crystallizer/separator series with changing volume to allow for water removal along the tubule. The model integrates crystallization kinetics and crystal size distribution and allows the prediction of the calcium oxalate concentration profile and the nucleation and growth rates. The critical supersaturation ratio for the nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals has been estimated as 2 and the mean crystal size as 1 mum. The crystal growth order, determined as 2.2, indicates a surface integration mechanism of crystal growth and crystal growth dispersion. The model allows the exploration of the effect of varying the input calcium oxalate concentration and the rate of water extraction, simulating real life stressors for stone formation such as dietary loading and dehydration.

  13. Characterization of calcium oxalate biominerals in Pereskia species (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Monje, Paula V; Baran, Enrique J

    2009-01-01

    Calcium oxalate druses were isolated from the stems and leaves of six Pereskioideae family members and investigated by infrared spectroscopy, showing that in all samples the biomineral was present in the form of whewellite, CaC2O4 x H2O. As Pereskia is thought to represent the "ancestral" condition of the leafless stem-succulent cacti, these results suggest that the biomineralization of calcium oxalate in Cactaceae represents a primitive characteristic of the group and also support a close genetic relationship between Pereskia and Opuntia.

  14. Microorganisms and calcium oxalate stone disease.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David S

    2004-01-01

    Microorganisms may have a role in the pathogenesis and prevention of kidney stones. The subjects of this review include nanobacteria, Oxalobacter formigenes, and lactic acid bacteria. Not reviewed here is the well-described role of infections of the urinary tract with Proteus species and other urease-producing organisms associated with struvite stone formation. Nanobacteria have been proposed to be very small (0.08-0.5 nm), ubiquitous organisms that could play a role in stone formation. The theory is that nanobacteria can nucleate carbonate apatite on their surfaces and thereby provide the nidus for stone formation. However, their existence remains uncertain and many investigators are openly skeptical. Recent investigations suggest that they are artifacts, and not actually living organisms, but their proponents continue to study them. O. formigenes is an obligate anaerobe which may be important in the prevention of stone formation. Its sole substrate for generation of ATP is oxalate. It may thereby metabolize its human host's dietary oxalate and diminish intestinal absorption and subsequent urinary excretion of oxalate. There is evidence that the organism's absence, perhaps sometimes due to courses of antibiotics, may be a cause of hyperoxaluria and stone formation. In early investigations, patients not colonized with the organism can be recolonized. Urinary oxalate can be diminished by accompanying an oxalate-containing meal with the organism. One study demonstrated that a preparation of lactic acid bacteria successfully reduced urinary oxalate excretion in 6 patients with calcium oxalate stones and hyperoxaluria. The mechanism of this effect is uncertain since these bacteria lacked the gene possessed by O. formigenes which codes for that organism's oxalate uptake mechanism. The author is currently completing a small randomized controlled clinical trial with this preparation in calcium stone-forming patients with idiopathic hyperoxaluria. Copyright (c) 2004 S

  15. Fasting urinary calcium-to-creatinine and oxalate-to-creatinine ratios in dogs with calcium oxalate urolithiasis and breed-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Furrow, E; Patterson, E E; Armstrong, P J; Osborne, C A; Lulich, J P

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalciuria and hyperoxaluria are risk factors for calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolithiasis, but breed-specific reports of urinary metabolites and their relationship with stone status are lacking. To compare urinary metabolites (calcium and oxalate) and blood ionized calcium (iCa) concentrations between CaOx stone formers and breed-matched stone-free controls for the Miniature Schnauzer, Bichon Frise, and Shih Tzu breeds. Forty-seven Miniature Schnauzers (23 cases and 24 controls), 27 Bichons Frise (14 cases and 13 controls), and 15 Shih Tzus (7 cases and 8 controls). Prospective study. Fasting spot urinary calcium-to-creatinine and oxalate-to-creatinine ratios (UCa/Cr and UOx/Cr, respectively) and blood iCa concentrations were measured and compared between cases and controls within and across breeds. Regression models were used to test the effect of patient and environmental factors on these variables. UCa/Cr was higher in cases than controls for each of the 3 breeds. In addition to stone status, being on a therapeutic food designed to prevent CaOx stone recurrence was associated with higher UCa/Cr. UOx/Cr did not differ between cases and controls for any of the breeds. Blood iCa was higher in cases than controls in the Miniature Schnauzer and Bichon Frise breeds and had a moderate correlation with UCa/Cr. Hypercalciuria is associated with CaOx stone status in the Miniature Schnauzer, Bichon Frise, and Shih Tzu breeds. UOx/Cr did not correlate with stone status in these 3 breeds. These findings may influence breed-specific stone prevention recommendations. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  17. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  18. [Quantitative mineralogical analyzes of kidney stones and diagnosing metabolic disorders in female patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Kustov, A V; Moryganov, M A; Strel'nikov, A I; Zhuravleva, N I; Airapetyan, A O

    2016-02-01

    To conduct a complex examination of female patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis to detect metabolic disorders, leading to stone formation. The study was carried out using complex physical and chemical methods, including quantitative X-ray phase analysis of urinary stones, pH measurement, volumetry, urine and blood spectrophotometry. Quantitative mineralogical composition of stones, daily urine pH profile, daily urinary excretion of ions of calcium, magnesium, oxalate, phosphate, citrate and uric acid were determined in 20 female patients with calcium oxalate stones. We have shown that most of the stones comprised calcium oxalate monohydrate or mixtures of calcium oxalate dihydrate and hydroxyapatite. Among the identified abnormalities, the most frequent were hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria - 90 and 45%, respectively. Our findings revealed that the daily secretion of citrate and oxalate in patients older than 50 years was significantly lower than in younger patients. In conclusion, daily urinary citrate excretion should be measured in female patients with calcium oxalate stones. This is necessary both to determine the causes of stone formation, and to monitor the effectiveness of citrate therapy.

  19. The electrokinetic behavior of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1988-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chrondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for chemical adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopopolysacchrides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. The amount of proteins that can chemically adsorb appears to be limited to approximately one monomolecular layer. When the surface charge is high, an insufficient number of proteins can chemically adsorb to neutralize or reverse the surface charge. The remaining surface charge is balanced by proteins held near the surface by longer range electrostatic forces only. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  20. Oxalate absorption and endogenous oxalate synthesis from ascorbate in calcium oxalate stone formers and non-stone formers.

    PubMed

    Chai, Weiwen; Liebman, Michael; Kynast-Gales, Susan; Massey, Linda

    2004-12-01

    Increased rates of either oxalate absorption or endogenous oxalate synthesis can contribute to hyperoxaluria, a primary risk factor for the formation of calcium oxalate-containing kidney stones. This study involves a comparative assessment of oxalate absorption and endogenous oxalate synthesis in subpopulations of stone formers (SFs) and non-stone formers (NSFs) and an assessment of the effect of ascorbate supplementation on oxalate absorption and endogenous oxalate synthesis. Twenty-nine individuals with a history of calcium oxalate kidney stones (19 men, 10 women) and 19 age-matched NSFs (8 men, 11 women) participated in two 6-day controlled feeding experimental periods: ascorbate-supplement (2 g/d) and no-supplement treatments. An oxalate load consisting of 118 mg of unlabeled oxalate and 18 mg of 13C2 -oxalic acid was administered the morning of day 6 of each experimental period. Mean 13C2 -oxalic acid absorption averaged across the ascorbate and no-supplement treatments was significantly greater in SFs (9.9%) than NSFs (8.0%). SFs also had significantly greater 24-hour post-oxalate load urinary total oxalate and endogenous oxalate levels with both treatments. Twenty-four-hour urinary total oxalate level correlated strongly with both 13C2 -oxalic acid absorption (SFs, r = 0.76; P < 0.01; NSFs, r = 0.62; P < 0.01) and endogenous oxalate synthesis (SFs, r = 0.95; P < 0.01; NSFs, r = 0.92; P < 0.01). SFs are characterized by greater rates of both oxalate absorption and endogenous oxalate synthesis, and both these factors contribute to the hyperoxaluric state. The finding that ascorbate supplementation increased urinary total and endogenous oxalate levels suggested that this practice is a risk factor for individuals predisposed to kidney stones.

  1. Crystallization of calcium oxalate dihydrate in a buffered calcium-containing glucose solution by irradiation with non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Hori, Masaru

    2017-10-01

    Oxalate was synthesized in the glucose solution by irradiation with non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP), in which the NEAPP plume contacted the solution surface, via the generation of several intermediate organic products such as gluconic acid. A thermodynamically unstable phase of calcium oxalate dihydrate crystallized rapidly during incubation of a NEAPP-irradiated glucose solution that contained calcium ions and was buffered at neutral pH. Longer irradiation times increased the growth rate and the number of seed crystals.

  2. Effect of vitamin C supplements on urinary oxalate and pH in calcium stone-forming patients.

    PubMed

    Baxmann, Alessandra Calábria; De O G Mendonça, Claudia; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2003-03-01

    The contribution of ascorbate to urinary oxalate is controversial. The present study aimed to determine whether urinary oxalate and pH may be affected by vitamin C supplementation in calcium stone-forming patients. Forty-seven adult calcium stone-forming patients received either 1 g (N=23) or 2 g (N=24) of vitamin C supplement for 3 days and 20 healthy subjects received 1 g. A 24-hour urine sample was obtained both before and after vitamin C for calcium, oxalate, magnesium, citrate, sodium, potassium, and creatinine determination. The Tiselius index was used as a calcium oxalate crystallization index. A spot fasting morning urine sample was also obtained to determine the urinary pH before and after vitamin C. Fasting urinary pH did not change after 1 g (5.8 +/- 0.6 vs. 5.8 +/- 0.7) or 2 g vitamin C (5.8 +/- 0.8 vs. 5.8 +/- 0.7). A significant increase in mean urinary oxalate was observed in calcium stone-forming patients receiving either 1 g (50 +/- 16 vs. 31 +/- 12 mg/24 hours) or 2 g (48 +/- 21 vs. 34 +/- 12 mg/24 hours) of vitamin C and in healthy subjects (25 +/- 12 vs. 39 +/- 13 mg/24 hours). A significant increase in mean Tiselius index was observed in calcium stone-forming patients after 1 g (1.43 +/- 0.70 vs. 0.92 +/- 0.65) or 2 g vitamin C (1.61 +/- 1.05 vs. 0.99 +/- 0.55) and in healthy subjects (1.50 +/- 0.69 vs. 0.91 +/- 0.46). Ancillary analyses of spot urine obtained after vitamin C were performed in 15 control subjects in vessels with or without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with no difference in urinary oxalate between them (28 +/- 23 vs. 26 +/- 21 mg/L), suggesting that the in vitro conversion of ascorbate to oxalate did not occur. These data suggest that vitamin C supplementation may increase urinary oxalate excretion and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallization in calcium stone-forming patients.

  3. Role of cellular oxalate in oxalate clearance of patients with calcium oxalate monohydrate stone formation and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Oehlschläger, Sven; Fuessel, Susanne; Meye, Axel; Herrmann, Jana; Froehner, Michael; Albrecht, Steffen; Wirth, Manfred P

    2009-03-01

    To examine the cellular, plasma, and urinary oxalate and erythrocyte oxalate flux in patients with calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stone formation vs normal controls. Pathologic oxalate clearance in humans is mostly integrated in calcium oxalate stone formation. An underlying cause of deficient oxalate clearance could be defective transmembrane oxalate transport, which, in many tissues, is regulated by an anion exchanger (SLC26). We studied 2 groups: 40 normal controls and 41 patients with COM stone formation. Red blood cells were divided for cellular oxalate measurement and for resuspension in a buffered solution (pH 7.40); 0.1 mmol/L oxalate was added. The supernatant was measured for oxalate immediately and 1 hour after incubation. The plasma and urinary oxalate were analyzed in parallel. The mean cellular oxalate concentrations were significantly greater in the normal controls (5.25 +/- 0.47 micromol/L) than in those with COM stone formation (2.36 +/- 0.28 micromol/L; P < .01). The mean urinary oxalate concentrations were significantly greater in those with COM stone formation (0.31 +/- 0.02 mmol/L) than in the controls (0.24 +/- 0.02 mmol/L; P < .01). The cellular oxalate concentrations correlated significantly with the plasma (r = 0.49-0.63; P < .01) and urinary oxalate (r = -0.29-0.41; P < .03) concentrations in both groups. The plasma oxalate concentrations correlated significantly with the urinary oxalate concentrations (r = -0.30; P < .03) in the controls and with the erythrocyte oxalate flux (r = 0.25; P < .05) in those with COM stone formation. Our data implicate the presence of a cellular oxalate buffer to stabilize plasma and urinary oxalate concentrations in normal controls.

  4. Effect of calcium oxalate on the photocatalytic degradation of Orange II on ZnO surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassaid, S.; Ziane, B.; Badaoui, M.; Chaib, M.; Robert, D.

    2013-06-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of aqueous solution of Orange II, has been investigated in the presence of ZnO catalyst with calcium oxalate as sacrificial agent. This study demonstrated that the performance of ZnO photocatalyst can be improved by addition of calcium oxalate. Results show that adsorption is an important parameter controlling the degradation phenomena. Indeed, the added oxalate causes a drop in the pH medium, what causes a better adsorption of Orange II on the ZnO surface. The effect of calcium oxalate is to increase the concentration of superoxides (O{2/·-}) and hydroperoxides (HO2·) radicals, which are key intermediaries in the mechanism of photodegradation because of their powerful force of oxidation.

  5. Genetically modified Medicago truncatula lacking calcium oxalate has increased calcium bioavailability and partially rescues vitamin D receptor knockout mice phenotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    How the distribution and sequestered form of plant macro/micro-nutrients influence their bioavailability, and ultimately impact human health, is poorly understood. The legume Medicago truncatula has a portion of its tissue calcium sequestered in the form of the calcium oxalate crystal, which reduces...

  6. SaRNA-mediated activation of TRPV5 reduces renal calcium oxalate deposition in rat via decreasing urinary calcium excretion.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Duan, Xiaolu; Zhu, Wei; Liu, Yang; Wu, Wenqi; Zeng, Guohua

    2018-06-01

    Hypercalciuria is a main risk factor for kidney stone  formation. TRPV5 is the gatekeeper protein for mediating calcium transport and reabsorption in the kidney. In the present study, we tested the effect of TRPV5 activation with small activating RNA (saRNA), which could induce gene expression by targeting the promoter of the gene, on ethylene glycol (EG)-induced calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals formation in rat kidney. Five pairs of RNA activation sequences targeting the promoter of rat TRPV5 were designed and synthesized. The synthesized saRNA with the strongest activating effect was selected, and transcellular calcium transportation was tested by Fura-2 analysis. Subsequently, Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into three groups and fed with water, 1% EG for 28 days after injecting the negative control saRNA, 1% EG for 28 days after injecting the selected TRPV5-saRNA, respectively. The CaOx crystal formation and the 24-h urine components were assessed. In vitro study, saRNA ds-320 could significantly activate the expression of TRPV5 and transcellular calcium transportation. In vivo study, after 28 days treatment of EG, rats pre-infected with saRNA ds-320 had lower urinary calcium excretion and renal CaOx crystals formation as compared to that pre-infected with negative control saRNA. Activation of TRVP5 with saRNA ds-320 could inhibit EG-induced calcium oxalate crystals formation via promoting urine calcium reabsorption and decreasing urine calcium excretion in rats.

  7. The genetic composition of Oxalobacter formigenes and its relationship to colonization and calcium oxalate stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John; Deora, Rajendar; Assimos, Dean G.; Holmes, Ross P.

    2013-01-01

    Oxalobacter formigenes is a unique intestinal organism that relies on oxalate degradation to meet most of its energy and carbon needs. A lack of colonization is a risk factor for calcium oxalate stone disease. Protection against calcium oxalate stone disease appears to be due to the oxalate degradation that occurs in the gut on low calcium diets with a possible further contribution from intestinal oxalate secretion. Much remains to be learned about how the organism establishes and maintains gut colonization and the precise mechanisms by which it modifies stone risk. The sequencing and annotation of the genomes of a Group 1 and a Group 2 strain of O. formigenes should provide the informatic tools required for the identification of the genes and pathways associated with colonization and survival. In this review we have identified genes that may be involved and where appropriate suggested how they may be important in calcium oxalate stone disease. Elaborating the functional roles of these genes should accelerate our understanding of the organism and clarify its role in preventing stone formation. PMID:23632911

  8. Characterization of Calcium Oxalates Generated as Biominerals in Cacti1

    PubMed Central

    Monje, Paula V.; Baran, Enrique J.

    2002-01-01

    The chemical composition and morphology of solid material isolated from various Cactaceae species have been analyzed. All of the tested specimens deposited high-purity calcium oxalate crystals in their succulent modified stems. These deposits occurred most frequently as round-shaped druses that sometimes coexist with abundant crystal sand in the tissue. The biominerals were identified either as CaC2O4.2H2O (weddellite) or as CaC2O4.H2O (whewellite). Seven different species from the Opuntioideae subfamily showed the presence of whewellite, and an equal number of species from the Cereoideae subfamily showed the deposition of weddellite. The chemical nature of these deposits was assessed by infrared spectroscopy. The crystal morphology of the crystals was visualized by both conventional light and scanning electron microscopy. Weddellite druses were made up of tetragonal crystallites, whereas those from whewellite were most often recognized by their acute points and general star-like shape. These studies clearly demonstrated that members from the main traditional subfamilies of the Cactaceae family could synthesize different chemical forms of calcium oxalate, suggesting a definite but different genetic control. The direct relationship established between a given Cactaceae species and a definite calcium oxalate biomineral seems to be a useful tool for plant identification and chemotaxonomy. PMID:11842173

  9. Quantitative Mineralogical Composition of Calculi and Urine Abnormalities for Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers: A Single-Center Results.

    PubMed

    Kustov, Andrey V; Strelnikov, Alexander I

    2018-05-03

    The paper focuses on the relationship of risk factors and metabolic disorders with mineralogical composition of calculi, age and gender of calcium oxalate stone formers. Stone mineralogical composition, 24 hour biochemistry and pH-profile of urine were examined for sixty four stone formers using powder X-ray diffraction, spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques. The analysis indicated that 44 % of calculi were composed of pure calcium oxalate monohydrate, whereas other 56 % contained both monohydrate and dihydrate or usually their mixtures with hydroxyl apatite. Hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria and hyperuricosuria were identified as the most frequent disorders. Patients with pure calcium oxalate stones and calcium oxalate mixed with apatite revealed different patterns including age, acid-base balance of urine, calcium, citrate excretion etc.Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that most patients simultaneously reveal several risk factors. The special attention should be paid to normalize the daily citrate, calcium and urate excretion. High risk patients, such as postmenopausal females or stone formers with a high apatite content require a specific metabolic evaluation towards in highlighting abnormalities associated with stone formation.

  10. Distribution of organic matrix in calcium oxalate renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Warpehoski, M A; Buscemi, P J; Osborn, D C; Finlayson, B; Goldberg, E P

    1981-01-01

    The quantity of protein and carbohydrate comprising the matrix of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) renal stones was found to decrease with distance from the surface of the stone. The average organic concentration of stones 3 to 30 mm in diameter ranged from 5.7% at the surface to 2.7% at the core. This concentration gradient suggests matrix involvement in a "growth front" on stone surfaces with migration of organic material from the "older" interior. The matrix distribution was not readily correlated with density variations or with the presence of hydroxyapatite or calcium oxalate dihydrate. Surface matrix concentrations were greater than amounts predicted by physical adsorption. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of the organic-rich surface layer and also suggested that increase in stone size occurs predominantly by crystal growth with microcrystal aggregates as growth centers.

  11. Diversity in Protein Profiles of Individual Calcium Oxalate Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Nobuaki; Tsujihata, Masao; Momohara, Chikahiro; Yoshioka, Iwao; Suto, Kouzou; Nonomura, Norio; Okuyama, Akihiko; Takao, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Calcium oxalate kidney stones contain low amounts of proteins, some of which have been implicated in progression or prevention of kidney stone formation. To gain insights into the pathophysiology of urolithiasis, we have characterized protein components of calcium oxalate kidney stones by proteomic approaches. Proteins extracted from kidney stones showed highly heterogeneous migration patterns in gel electrophoresis as reported. This was likely to be mainly due to proteolytic degradation and protein-protein crosslinking of Tamm-Horsfall protein and prothrombin. Protein profiles of calcium oxalate kidney stones were obtained by in-solution protease digestion followed by nanoLC-MALDI-tandem mass spectrometry, which resulted in identification of a total of 92 proteins in stones from 9 urolithiasis patients. Further analysis showed that protein species and their relative amounts were highly variable among individual stones. Although proteins such as prothrombin, osteopontin, calgranulin A and calgranulin B were found in most stones tested, some samples had high contents of prothrombin and osteopontin, while others had high contents of calgranulins. In addition, calgranulin-rich stones had various neutrophil-enriched proteins such as myeloperoxidase and lactotransferrin. These proteomic profiles of individual kidney stones suggest that multiple systems composed of different groups of proteins including leucocyte-derived ones are differently involved in pathogenesis of individual kidney stones depending on situations. PMID:23874695

  12. Calcium oxalate druses affect leaf optical properties in selenium-treated Fagopyrum tataricum.

    PubMed

    Golob, Aleksandra; Stibilj, Vekoslava; Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Kreft, Ivan; Hočevar, Anja; Gaberščik, Alenka; Germ, Mateja

    2018-03-01

    Plants of the genus Fagopyrum contain high levels of crystalline calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposits, or druses, that can affect the leaf optical properties. As selenium has been shown to modify the uptake and accumulation of metabolically important elements such as calcium, we hypothesised that the numbers of druses can be altered by selenium treatment, and this would affect the leaf optical properties. Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) was grown outdoors in an experimental field. At the beginning of flowering, plants were foliarly sprayed with sodium selenate solution at 10 mg selenium L -1 or only with water. Plant morphological, biochemical, physiological and optical properties were examined, along with leaf elemental composition and content. Se spraying did not affect leaf biochemical and functional properties. However, it increased leaf thickness and the contents of Se in the leaves, and decreased the density of calcium oxalate druses in the leaves. Except Se content, Se spraying did not affect contents of other elements in leaves, including total calcium per dry mass of leaf tissue. Redundancy analysis showed that of all parameters tested, only the calcium oxalate druses parameters were significant in explaining the variability of the leaf reflectance and transmittance spectra. The density of CaOx druses positively correlated with the reflectance in the blue, green, yellow and UV-B regions of the spectrum, while the area of CaOx druses per mm 2 of leaf transection area positively correlated with the transmittance in the green and yellow regions of the spectrum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of calcium oxalate biominerals in some (non-Cactaceae) succulent plant species.

    PubMed

    Monje, Paula V; Baran, Enrique J

    2010-01-01

    The water-accumulating leaves of crassulacean acid metabolism plants belonging to five different families were investigated for the presence of biominerals by infrared spectroscopic and microscopic analyses. Spectroscopic results revealed that the mineral present in succulent species of Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, and Asphodelaceae was calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite, CaC2O4 x H2O). Crystals were predominantly found as raphides or solitary crystals of various morphologies. However, representative Crassulaceae members and a succulent species of Asteraceae did not show the presence of biominerals. Overall, these results suggest no correlation between calcium oxalate generation and crassulacean acid metabolism in succulent plants.

  14. Managing calcium oxalate scale in the bleach plant

    Treesearch

    Alan Rudie; Peter Hart

    2005-01-01

    To comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's "Cluster Rule," most U.S. mills have switched from the use of chlorine to chlorine dioxide as the oxidant in the first stage of bleaching. This process change has a downside. it increases the formation of mineral scale in bleach plants. Typically, calcium oxalate forms in the chlorine dioxide...

  15. Spectroscopic study of the inhibition of calcium oxalate calculi by Larrea tridentata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinales, Luis Alonso

    The causes of urolithiasis include such influences as diet, metabolic disorders, and genetic factors which have been documented as sources that aggravate urinary calculi depositions and aggregations, and, implicitly, as causes of urolithiasis. This study endeavors to detail the scientific mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate calculi formation, and, more importantly, their inhibition under growth conditions imposed by the traditional medicinal approach using the herbal extract, Larrea tridentata. The calculi were synthesized without and with Larrea tridentata infusion by employing the single diffusion gel technique. A visible decrease in calcium oxalate crystal growth with increasing amounts of Larrea tridentata herbal infusion was observed in photomicrographs, as well as a color change from white-transparent for pure crystals to light orange-brown for crystals with inhibitor. Analysis of the samples, which includes Raman, infrared absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques, demonstrate an overall transition in morphology of the crystals from monohydrate without herbal extract to dihydrate with inhibitor. Furthermore, the resulting data from Raman and infrared absorption support the possibilities of the influences, in this complex process, of NDGA and its derivative compounds from Larrea tridentata, and of the bonding of the magnesium of the inhibitor with the oxalate ion on the surface of the calculi crystals. This assumption corroborates well with the micrographs obtained under higher magnification, which show that the separated small crystallites consist of darker brownish cores, which we attribute to the dominance of growth inhibition by NDGA, surrounded by light transparent thin shells, which possibly correspond to passivation of the crystals by magnesium oxalate. The SEM results reveal the transformation from the dominant monoclinic structure of the calcium oxalate crystals grown alone to the tetragonal

  16. Antilithiatic Activity of phlorotannin rich extract of Sarghassum Wightii on Calcium Oxalate Urolithiais – In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sujatha, D.; Singh, Kiranpal; Vohra, Mursalin; Kumar, K. Vijay; Sunitha, S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Urolithiasis is a common urological disorder responsible for serious human affliction and cost to the society with a high recurrence rate. The aim of the present study was to systematically evaluate the phlorotannin rich extract of Sargassum wightii using suitable in vitro and in vivo models to provide scientific evidence for its antilithiatic activity. Materials and Methods: To explore the effect of Sargassum wightii on calcium oxalate crystallization, in vitro assays like crystal nucleation, aggregation and crystal growth were performed. Calcium oxalate urolithiasis was induced in male Sprague dawley rats using a combination of gentamicin and calculi producing diet (5% ammonium oxalate and rat pellet feed). The biochemical parameters like calcium, oxalate, magnesium, phosphate, sodium and potassium were evaluated in urine, serum and kidney homogenates. Histopathological studies were also done to confirm the biochemical findings. Results: The yield of Sargassum wightii extract was found to be 74.5 gm/kg and confirmed by quantitative analysis. In vitro experiments with Sargassum wightii showed concentration dependent inhibition of calcium oxalate nucleation, aggregation and growth supported by SEM analysis. In the in vivo model, Sargassum wightii reduced both calcium and oxalate supersaturation in urine, serum and deposition in the kidney. The biochemical results were supported by histopathological studies. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that Sargassum wightii has the ability to prevent nucleation, aggregation and growth of calcium oxalate crystals. Sargassum wightii has better preventive effect on calcium oxalate stone formation indicating its strong potential to develop as a therapeutic option to prevent recurrence of urolithiasis. PMID:26200544

  17. Substituting milk for apple juice does not increase kidney stone risk in most normocalciuric adults who form calcium oxalate stones.

    PubMed

    Massey, L K; Kynast-Gales, S A

    1998-03-01

    Increasing intake of dietary calcium from less than 400 mg to 800 mg daily may decrease the absorption of dietary oxalate, which in turn would decrease urinary oxalate excretion. The effect of substituting milk for apple juice on urine composition and risk of calcium oxalate precipitability was studied. Twenty-one normocalciuric adults with a history of at least 1 calcium oxalate stone and urinary oxalate excretion exceeding 275 micromol/day on their self-selected diet. Randomized crossover trial. Each participant consumed two moderate-oxalate (2,011 micromol/day) study diets, which were identical except that one contained 360 mL milk and the other contained 540 mL apple juice as the beverage with meals. Four days free-living then 2 days in the metabolic unit of a university nutrition department. Tiselius risk index for calcium oxalate precipitability calculated from urine composition. Paired t tests. Twenty-four hour urinary oxalate excretion was 18% lower (P<.0001) on the milk diet vs the juice diet: 423 vs 514 micromol, respectively. Calcium excretion was 17% higher (P<.05) on the milk vs juice diet: 4.7 vs 3.9 mmol, respectively. Urinary magnesium and citrate excretion, volume, and Tiselius risk index did not differ between diets. Substituting 360 mL milk daily for apple juice with meals in a diet containing moderate amounts of dietary oxalate from whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables does not increase the risk index of calcium oxalate precipitability in most normocalciuric adults who form stones.

  18. Evidence for net renal tubule oxalate secretion in patients with calcium kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, Anna L.; Asplin, John R.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Coe, Fredric L.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the renal handling of oxalate in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH). To explore the role of tubular oxalate handling in IH and to evaluate whether differences exist between IH and normal controls, we studied 19 IH subjects, 8 normal subjects, and 2 bariatric stone formers (BSF) during a 1-day General Clinical Research Center protocol utilizing a low-oxalate diet. Urine and blood samples were collected at 30- to 60-min intervals while subjects were fasting and after they ate three meals providing known amounts of calcium, phosphorus, sodium, protein, oxalate, and calories. Plasma oxalate concentrations and oxalate-filtered loads were similar between patients (includes IH and BSF) and controls in both the fasting and fed states. Urinary oxalate excretion was significantly higher in patients vs. controls regardless of feeding state. Fractional excretion of oxalate (FEOx) was >1, suggesting tubular secretion of oxalate, in 6 of 19 IH and both BSF, compared with none of the controls (P < 0.00001). Adjusted for water extraction along the nephron, urine oxalate rose more rapidly among patients than normal subjects with increases in plasma oxalate. Our findings identify tubular secretion of oxalate as a key mediator of hyperoxaluria in calcium stone formers, potentially as a means of maintaining plasma oxalate in a tight range. PMID:21123489

  19. Novel porcine model for calcium oxalate stone formation.

    PubMed

    Trojan, Brandon P; Trojan, Sara J; Navetta, Andrew; Staches, Bryce; Sutton, Bryan; Filleur, Stephanie; Nelius, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Mechanisms for calcium-based stone formation are not clearly delineated. Porcine are the most anatomically and physiologically congruent mammal to humans. Our objectives were to develop a cost-effective and easily reproducible porcine model for the study of calcium-based nephrolithiasis. Crossbred male pigs (n = 16) were assigned randomly to one of the following treatments: (1) control; (2) ethylene glycol (EG) + vitamin D (VD); (3) EG + ammonium chloride (AC); (4) EG + gentamicin (G); (5) EG + Lasix; (6) EG + VD + AC; (7) EG + VD + G. Treatments were administered for 28 days; blood and urine were collected on day 0, 14, and 28. At the endpoint of the study, renal tissue was collected for gross and microscopic analysis of crystal stone formation and inflammation. Stone-forming parameters were observed in serum and urine. For control versus all other treatments, by day 28, serum BUN and creatinine were less (P < 0.01), urinary creatinine, citrate and pH were greater (P < 0.01), and urinary oxalate was less (P < 0.01). Histopathological analysis of H&E staining and stone analysis revealed formation of calcium oxalate stones and crystal formation within the renal cortex and medulla for all animals except control. Nephrotoxicity was observed in one animal from treatment EG + G. The treatments explored in this experiment provided novel examples of cost-effective porcine models for the study of nephrolithiasis. EG + VD had the strongest indicators of nephrolithiasis without nephrotoxicity.

  20. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Warren, L M; Mackenzie, A; Dance, D R; Young, K C

    2013-04-07

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image.

  1. The influence of freezer storage of urine samples on the BONN-Risk-Index for calcium oxalate crystallization.

    PubMed

    Laube, Norbert; Zimmermann, Diana J

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to quantify the effect of a 1-week freezer storage of urine on its calcium oxalate crystallization risk. Calcium oxalate is the most common urinary stone material observed in urolithiasis patients in western and affluent countries. The BONN-Risk-Index of calcium oxalate crystallization risk in human urine is determined from a crystallization experiment performed on untreated native urine samples. We tested the influence of a 1-week freezing on the BONN-Risk-Index value as well as the effect of the sample freezing on the urinary osmolality. In vitro crystallization experiments in 49 native urine samples from stone-forming and non-stone forming individuals were performed in order to determine their calcium oxalate crystallization risk according to the BONN-Risk-Index approach. Comparison of the results derived from original sample investigations with those obtained from the thawed aliquots by statistical evaluation shows that i) no significant deviation from linearity between both results exists and ii) both results are identical by statistical means. This is valid for both, the BONN-Risk-Index and the osmolality data. The differences in the BONN-Risk-Index results of both procedures of BONN-Risk-Index determination, however, exceed the clinically acceptable difference. Thus, determination of the urinary calcium oxalate crystallization risk from thawed urine samples cannot be recommended.

  2. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalenberger, A.; Duran, A. L.; Bray, A. W.; Bridge, J.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using 14CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle.

  3. Antioxidant properties of polysaccharide from the brown seaweed Sargassum graminifolium (Turn.), and its effects on calcium oxalate crystallization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao-Yan; Wu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Jue; Lan, Min-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Sargassum graminifolium (Turn.) (SGP) on calcium oxalate crystallization, and determined its antioxidant activities. To examine the effects of SGP on calcium oxalate crystallization, we monitored nucleation and aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, using trisodium citrate as a positive control. We assessed antioxidant activities of SGP by determining its reducing power, its ability to scavenge superoxide radicals, and its activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The nucleation inhibition ratio of trisodium citrate and SGP was 58.5 and 69.2%, respectively, and crystal aggregation was inhibited by 71.4 and 76.8%, respectively. Increasing concentrations of SGP resulted in increased scavenging of superoxide anions and DPPH radicals (IC₅₀ = 1.9 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively). These results suggest that SGP could be a candidate for treating urinary stones because of its ability to inhibit calcium oxalate crystallization and its antioxidant properties.

  4. Antioxidant Properties of Polysaccharide from the Brown Seaweed Sargassum graminifolium (Turn.), and Its Effects on Calcium Oxalate Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao-Yan; Wu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Jue; Lan, Min-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Sargassum graminifolium (Turn.) (SGP) on calcium oxalate crystallization, and determined its antioxidant activities. To examine the effects of SGP on calcium oxalate crystallization, we monitored nucleation and aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, using trisodium citrate as a positive control. We assessed antioxidant activities of SGP by determining its reducing power, its ability to scavenge superoxide radicals, and its activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The nucleation inhibition ratio of trisodium citrate and SGP was 58.5 and 69.2%, respectively, and crystal aggregation was inhibited by 71.4 and 76.8%, respectively. Increasing concentrations of SGP resulted in increased scavenging of superoxide anions and DPPH radicals (IC50 = 1.9 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively). These results suggest that SGP could be a candidate for treating urinary stones because of its ability to inhibit calcium oxalate crystallization and its antioxidant properties. PMID:22363225

  5. Reinjury risk of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals on injured renal epithelial cells: aggravation of crystal adhesion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Sun, Xin-Yuan; Bhadja, Poonam; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal epithelial cell injury facilitates crystal adhesion to cell surface and serves as a key step in renal stone formation. However, the effects of cell injury on the adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate crystals and the nano-crystal-induced reinjury risk of injured cells remain unclear. Methods African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were injured with H2O2 to establish a cell injury model. Cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malonaldehyde (MDA) content, propidium iodide staining, hematoxylin–eosin staining, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were determined to examine cell injury during adhesion. Changes in the surface structure of H2O2-injured cells were assessed through atomic force microscopy. The altered expression of hyaluronan during adhesion was examined through laser scanning confocal microscopy. The adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals to Vero cells was observed through scanning electron microscopy. Nano-COM and COD binding was quantitatively determined through inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. Results The expression of hyaluronan on the cell surface was increased during wound healing because of Vero cell injury. The structure and function of the cell membrane were also altered by cell injury; thus, nano-crystal adhesion occurred. The ability of nano-COM to adhere to the injured Vero cells was higher than that of nano-COD crystals. The cell viability, SOD activity, and Δψm decreased when nano-crystals attached to the cell surface. By contrast, the MDA content, reactive oxygen species production, and cell death rate increased. Conclusion Cell injury contributes to crystal adhesion to Vero cell surface. The attached nano-COM and COD crystals can aggravate Vero cell injury. As a consequence, crystal adhesion and aggregation are enhanced. These findings provide further insights into kidney stone

  6. Calcium oxalate syntheses in a solution containing glucose by the atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoko; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has been attracted attention because of its characteristic high reactivity even in a low temperature so that various phenomena by the NEAPP such as a sterilization, growth promotion and so forth have been reported around the world. Previously, we reported the NEAPP irradiation generated the calcium oxalate crystals in the medium, which contains 31 kinds of organics and inorganics. The Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) which was used in previous study is composed of no oxalate. Interestingly, not only crystallization but also synthesis of the oxalate was occurred by the NEAPP irradiation. Also the crystallization details were analyzed with the X-ray diffraction (XRD). In this study, we have clarified the mechanism on the crystallization due that D-glucose, calcium ion and bicarbonate ions are minimum essential components. The oxalate synthesis was proved by the gas chromatography and mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Finally, we conclude that a supersaturation of oxalic acid synthesized in those 3 species by the NEAPP.

  7. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals

    PubMed Central

    Schmalenberger, A.; Duran, A. L.; Bray, A. W.; Bridge, J.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using 14CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle. PMID:26197714

  8. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants.

  9. Stone size limits the use of Hounsfield units for prediction of calcium oxalate stone composition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Gregory; Johnson, Lewis; Ganesh, Halemane; Davenport, Daniel; Smelser, Woodson; Crispen, Paul; Venkatesh, Ramakrishna

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the role of stone size in predicting urinary calculus composition using Hounsfield units on noncontrasted computed tomography (CT) scan. A retrospective review was performed for all patients who underwent ureteroscopy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy during a 1-year period, had a stone analysis performed, and had CT imaging available for review. All CT scans were reviewed by a board-certified radiologist. Variables evaluated included age, sex, body mass index, stone size, stone location, Hounsfield units (HUs), and stone composition. We identified a total of 91 patients (41 men and 50 women) with CT imaging and stone analysis available for review. Stone analysis showed 41 calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaOxMH), 13 calcium oxalate dihydrate, 29 calcium phosphate, 5 uric acid, 2 struvite, and 1 cystine stone. Average age was 46 years, and average body mass index was 32 kg/m2. Measured HUs varied significantly with size for CaOxMH and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones (P values <.05), but not for calcium phosphate stones (P = .126). Using a CaOxMH identification value of 700-1000 HUs, 28 of 41 stone compositions (68%) would not have been correctly identified, including all 10 (100%) small (<5 mm) stones, 13 of 22 (59%) medium (5-10 mm) stones, and 5 of 9 large (>10 mm) stones (55%). For calcium stones, the ability of CT HUs to predict stone composition was limited, likely due to the mixed stone composition. Within a cohort of CaOxMH stone formers, measured HUs varied linearly with stone size. All stones <5 mm were below thresholds for CaOxMH composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of calcium oxalate defective (cod) 6 mutant from Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many plants invest a considerable amount of resources and energy into the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. A number of roles for crystal formation in plant growth and development have been assigned based on their prevalence, spatial distribution, and variety of crystal shapes. These assigned...

  11. Calcium oxalate stone formation in the inner ear as a result of an Slc26a4 mutation.

    PubMed

    Dror, Amiel A; Politi, Yael; Shahin, Hashem; Lenz, Danielle R; Dossena, Silvia; Nofziger, Charity; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Paulmichl, Markus; Weiner, Steve; Avraham, Karen B

    2010-07-09

    Calcium oxalate stone formation occurs under pathological conditions and accounts for more than 80% of all types of kidney stones. In the current study, we show for the first time that calcium oxalate stones are formed in the mouse inner ear of a genetic model for hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in humans. The vestibular system within the inner ear is dependent on extracellular tiny calcium carbonate minerals for proper function. Thousands of these biominerals, known as otoconia, are associated with the utricle and saccule sensory maculae and are vital for mechanical stimulation of the sensory hair cells. We show that a missense mutation within the Slc26a4 gene abolishes the transport activity of its encoded protein, pendrin. As a consequence, dramatic changes in mineral composition, size, and shape occur within the utricle and saccule in a differential manner. Although abnormal giant carbonate minerals reside in the utricle at all ages, in the saccule, a gradual change in mineral composition leads to a formation of calcium oxalate in adult mice. By combining imaging and spectroscopy tools, we determined the profile of mineral composition and morphology at different time points. We propose a novel mechanism for the accumulation and aggregation of oxalate crystals in the inner ear.

  12. Determinants of calcium and oxalate excretion in subjects with calcium nephrolithiasis: the role of metabolic syndrome traits.

    PubMed

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Guerra, Angela; Allegri, Franca; Nouvenne, Antonio; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2018-06-01

    The association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) traits with urinary calcium (UCE) or oxalate excretion (UOE) is uncertain in calcium stone formers (CSFs). Our aim was to investigate this association in a large group of Caucasian CSFs. We retrospectively reviewed data of CSFs evaluated at our Kidney Stone Clinic from 1984 to 2015. Data on body mass index (BMI), MetS traits defined according to international consensus, family history of urolithiasis, anti-hypertensive treatments, calcemia, renal function, and 24-h urinary profile of lithogenic risk were collected. The association between MetS traits and UCE or UOE was tested with multivariate linear regression models accounting for a long list of potential confounders. We included 3003 CSFs, aged 44 ± 14 years. The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ) and dyslipidemia was 17, 2, 42 and 38%, respectively. Median values of UCE and UOE were 211 mg/24 h (IQR 143-296) and 28 mg/24 h (IQR 22-34), respectively. At a multivariate model, including age, sex, date of examination, drug treatments, family history, renal function, blood calcium and urinary factors as covariates, hypertension was a significant positive determinant of UCE (β ± SE 0.23 ± 0.07, p = 0.003), but overweight, dyslipidemia and diabetes were not. No MetS trait was significantly associated with UOE in multivariate models. In a large group of Caucasian CSFs, hypertension was the only MetS trait significantly associated with UCE, while no MetS trait was associated with oxalate excretion.

  13. The effect of ascorbic acid ingestion on the biochemical and physicochemical risk factors associated with calcium oxalate kidney stone formation.

    PubMed

    Auer, B L; Auer, D; Rodgers, A L

    1998-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of ingestion of large doses of vitamin C on urinary oxalate excretion and on a number of other biochemical and physicochemical risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. A further objective was to determine urinary ascorbate excretion and to relate it qualitatively to ingested levels of the vitamin and oxalate excretion. Ten healthy males participated in a protocol in which 4 g ascorbic acid was ingested for 5 days. Urines (24 h) were collected prior to, during and after the protocol. The urine collection procedure was designed to allow for the analysis of oxalate in the presence and absence of an EDTA preservative and for the analysis of ascorbic acid by manual titration using 2,6 dichlorophenolindophenol. Physicochemical risk factors such as the calcium oxalate relative supersaturation and Tiselius risk index were calculated from urine composition. The results showed that erroneously high analytical oxalate levels occur in the asence of preservative. In the preserved samples there was no significant increase in oxalate excretion at any stage of the protocol. Ascorbate excretion increased when vitamin C ingestion commenced but levelled out after 24 hours suggesting that saturation of the metabolic pool is reached within 24 hours after which ingested ascorbic acid is excreted unmetabolized in the urine. While transient statistically significant changes occurred in some of the biochemical risk factors, they were not regarded as being clinically significant. There were no changes in either the calcium oxalate relative supersaturation or Tiselius risk index. It is concluded that ingestion of large doses of ascorbic acid does not affect the principal risk factors associated with calcium oxalate kidney stone formation.

  14. Synthesis of calcium oxalate crystals in culture medium irradiated with non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoko; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Octahedral particulates several tens of microns in size were synthesized in a culture medium irradiated through contact with a plume of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (NEAPP). The particulates were identified in the crystalline phase as calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). The original medium contained constituents such as NaCl, d-glucose, CaCl2, and NaHCO3 but not oxalate or oxalic acid. The oxalate was clearly synthesized and crystallized in the medium as thermodynamically unstable COD crystals after the NEAPP irradiation.

  15. Structural and chemical insect defenses in calcium oxalate defective mutants of Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant structures can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. are effective deterrents of lepidopteran feeding, and they inhibit conversion of leaves into insect ...

  16. Using MRI to detect and differentiate calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in air-bubble-free phantom

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Peng, Bo; Foxley, Sean; Palgen, Jeremy; Newstead, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOX) crystals and calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) crystals were commonly associated with breast benign and malignant lesions, respectively. In this research, CaOX (n = 6) and CaHA (n = 6) crystals in air-bubble-free agarose phantom were studied and characterized by using MRI at 9.4 Tesla scanner. Calcium micro-crystals sizes ranged from 200 – 500 microns were made with either 99% pure CaOX or CaHA powder and embedded in agar to mimic the dimensions and calcium content of breast microcalcifications in vivo. MRI data were acquired with high spatial resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images and gradient echo images with five different echo times (TEs). The crystals areas were determined by setting the threshold relative to agarose signal. The ratio of crystals areas were calculated by the measurements from gradient echo images divided by T2W images. Then the ratios as a function of TE were fitted with the radical function. The results showed that the blooming artifacts due to magnetic susceptibility between agar and CaHA crystals were more than twice as large as the susceptibility in CaOX crystals (p < 0.05). In addition, larger bright rings were observed on gradient echo images around CaHA crystals compared to CaOX crystals. Our results suggest that MRI may provide useful information regarding breast microcalcifications by evaluating the apparent area of crystals ratios obtained between gradient echo and T2W images. PMID:26392170

  17. A simple method for quantitating the propensity for calcium oxalate crystallization in urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wabner, C. L.; Pak, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the propensity for spontaneous crystallization of calcium oxalate in urine, the permissible increment in oxalate is calculated. The previous method required visual observation of crystallization with the addition of oxalate, this warranted the need for a large volume of urine and a sacrifice in accuracy in defining differences between small incremental changes of added oxalate. Therefore, this method has been miniaturized and spontaneous crystallization is detected from the depletion of radioactive oxalate. The new "micro" method demonstrated a marked decrease (p < 0.001) in the permissible increment in oxalate in urine of stone formers versus normal subjects. Moreover, crystallization inhibitors added to urine, in vitro (heparin or diphosphonate) or in vivo (potassium citrate administration), substantially increased the permissible increment in oxalate. Thus, the "micro" method has proven reliable and accurate in discriminating stone forming from control urine and in distinguishing changes of inhibitory activity.

  18. Organic Selenium Alleviated the Formation of Ethylene Glycol-Induced Calcium Oxalate Renal Calculi by Improving Osteopontin Expression and Antioxidant Capability in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongwang; Xu, Haibin; Zhong, Wenting; Shen, Qingpeng; Zhuang, Tenghan; Huang, Kehe

    2015-12-01

    Twenty one-year-old local male dogs were randomly assigned into four groups (five dogs per group). The control and the ethylene glycol (EG) groups were fed basal diets without and with EG, and the EG+sodium selenite (EG+SS) and EG+selenium yeast (EG+SY) groups were fed basal diets with EG containing SS and SY, respectively. Blood, urine, and renal samples were taken after 18 weeks of feeding. The results showed that compared with the control group, the serum calcium levels and antioxidase activities significantly decreased in the EG group. Serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and urine calcium and oxalate levels significantly increased. Calcium oxalate crystal deposition and osteopontin (OPN) messenger RNA and protein expression in the renal tissues significantly increased. These changes above in the EG group were reversed within limits by adding selenium in the diets (both EG+SS and EG+SY groups). Further, compared with the EG+SS group, the EG+SY group showed better effects in decreasing the formation of EG-induced calcium oxalate renal calculi and OPN expression and improving antioxidant capability in dogs. It indicates that organic selenium has the potential value to alleviate the formation of EG-induced calcium oxalate renal calculi.

  19. Reevaluation of the plant "gemstones": Calcium oxalate crystals sustain photosynthesis under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Tooulakou, Georgia; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Bresta, Panagiota; Dotsika, Elissavet; Orkoula, Malvina G; Kontoyannis, Christos G; Fasseas, Costas; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Klapa, Maria I; Karabourniotis, George

    2016-09-01

    Land plants face the perpetual dilemma of using atmospheric carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and losing water vapors, or saving water and reducing photosynthesis and thus growth. The reason behind this dilemma is that this simultaneous exchange of gases is accomplished through the same minute pores on leaf surfaces, called stomata. In a recent study we provided evidence that pigweed, an aggressive weed, attenuates this problem exploiting large crystals of calcium oxalate as dynamic carbon pools. This plant is able to photosynthesize even under drought conditions, when stomata are closed and water losses are limited, using carbon dioxide from crystal decomposition instead from the atmosphere. Abscisic acid, an alarm signal that causes stomatal closure seems to be implicated in this function and for this reason we named this path "alarm photosynthesis." The so-far "enigmatic," but highly conserved and widespread among plant species calcium oxalate crystals seem to play a crucial role in the survival of plants.

  20. Determination of urine oxalate level in rats with renal calcium oxalate calculus by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiu-shi; Ba, Yuan-ming; Luo, Jun-hua; Dai, Qi

    2015-02-01

    To establish a method of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for determining the urine oxalate levle in rats with renal calcium oxalate calculus. Totally 24 SPF Wistar healthy male rats were randomly divided into control group(n=12)and ethylene glycol (EG) group (n=12). Rats in EG group were administered intragastrically with 2% ammonium chloride (AC)2 ml/rat per day+1% ethylene glycol (EG), along with free access to drinking water.The control group was fed with deionized water, along with the intragastric administration of normal saline (1 ml per day). Twenty-eight days after modelling, the 24-hour urine samples were collected, and the urine oxalic acid levels were determined using HPLC and the results were compared with those of catalytic spectrophotometry using oxidation of methyl. During the HPLC, the samples were separated on Aglient 5TC-C18 (250×4.6 mm,5 Μm), eluted with mixture of methanol (0.1 mol/L) and ammonium acetate (15:85) at 1.2 ml/min, and detected at 314 nm, with the column temperature being 20 ℃. The standard curves of high and low concentrations of oxalic acid were y=5909.1x+378730, R² =0.9984 and y=7810.5x-16635, R² =0.9967,respectively. The lowest detectable concentration in this method was 5 Μg/ml. The linear high concentration range of oxalate stood at 62.50-2000.00 Μg/ml, and the linear low concentration range of oxalate stood at 6.25-100.00 Μg/ml. Its average recovery was 95.1%, and its within-day and day-to-day precisions were 3.4%-10.8% and 3.8%-9.4%. Both HPLC and catalytic spectrophotometry showed significantly higher urinary oxalic acid concentration and 24 h urine oxalate level in EG group compared with the control group [urinary oxalic acid concentration: (736.35 ± 254.52) Μg/ml vs.(51.56 ± 36.34) Μg/ml,(687.35 ± 234.53) Μg/ml vs.(50.24 ± 42.34) Μg/ml;24 h urine oxalate level: (11.23 ± 4.12)mg vs.(0.87 ± 0.45)mg,(9.89 ± 3.55)mg vs. (0.77 ± 0.65)mg; all P<0.01]. No statistically significant difference

  1. Effects of Orthosiphon grandiflorus, Hibiscus sabdariffa and Phyllanthus amarus extracts on risk factors for urinary calcium oxalate stones in rats.

    PubMed

    Woottisin, Surachet; Hossain, Rayhan Zubair; Yachantha, Chatchai; Sriboonlue, Pote; Ogawa, Yoshihide; Saito, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the antilithic effect of Orthosiphon grandiflorus, Hibiscus sabdariffa and Phyllanthus amarus extracts on known risk factors for calcium oxalate stones in rats. We divided 30 male Wistar rats into 5 equal groups. Controls were fed a standard diet and the remaining groups received a 3% glycolate diet for 4 weeks to induce hyperoxaluria. One glycolate fed group served as the untreated group and the others were given oral extracts of Orthosiphon grandiflorus, Hibiscus sabdariffa or Phyllanthus amarus at a dose of 3.5 mg daily. We collected 24-hour urine and blood samples. Kidneys were harvested for histological examination. We measured the renal tissue content of calcium and oxalate. The Hibiscus sabdariffa group showed significantly decreased serum oxalate and glycolate, and higher oxalate urinary excretion. The Phyllanthus amarus group showed significantly increased urinary citrate vs the untreated group. Histological examination revealed less CaOx crystal deposition in the kidneys of Hibiscus sabdariffa and Phyllanthus amarus treated rats than in untreated rats. Those rats also had significantly lower renal tissue calcium content than untreated rats. All parameters in the Orthosiphon grandiflorus treated group were comparable to those in the untreated group. Hibiscus sabdariffa and Phyllanthus amarus decreased calcium crystal deposition in the kidneys. The antilithic effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa may be related to decreased oxalate retention in the kidney and more excretion into urine while that of Phyllanthus amarus may depend on increased urinary citrate. In contrast, administering Orthosiphon grandiflorus had no antilithic effect. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors affecting calcium oxalate dihydrate fragmented calculi regrowth

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Bauzá, A; Perelló, J; Isern, B; Sanchis, P; Grases, F

    2006-01-01

    Background The use of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) to treat calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) renal calculi gives excellent fragmentation results. However, the retention of post-ESWL fragments within the kidney remains an important health problem. This study examined the effect of various urinary conditions and crystallization inhibitors on the regrowth of spontaneously-passed post-ESWL COD calculi fragments. Methods Post-ESWL COD calculi fragments were incubated in chambers containing synthetic urine varying in pH and calcium concentration: pH = 5.5 normocalciuria (3.75 mM), pH = 5.5 hypercalciuria (6.25 mM), pH = 6.5 normocalciuria (3.75 mM) or pH = 6.5 hypercalciuria (6.25 mM). Fragment growth was evaluated by measuring increases in weight. Fragment growth was standardized by calculating the relative mass increase. Results Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals formed on COD renal calculi fragments under all conditions. Under pH = 5.5 normocalciuria conditions, only COM crystals formed (growth rate = 0.22 ± 0.04 μg/mg·h). Under pH = 5.5 hypercalciuria and under pH = 6.5 normocalciuria conditions, COM crystals and a small number of new COD crystals formed (growth rate = 0.32 ± 0.03 μg/mg·h and 0.35 ± 0.05 μg/mg·h, respectively). Under pH = 6.5 hypercalciuria conditions, large amounts of COD, COM, hydroxyapatite and brushite crystals formed (growth rate = 3.87 ± 0. 34 μg/mg·h). A study of three crystallization inhibitors demonstrated that phytate completely inhibited fragment growth (2.27 μM at pH = 5.5 and 4.55 μM at pH = 6.5, both under hypercalciuria conditions), while 69.0 μM pyrophosphate caused an 87% reduction in mass under pH = 6.5 hypercalciuria conditions. In contrast, 5.29 mM citrate did not inhibit fragment mass increase under pH = 6.5 hypercalciuria conditions. Conclusion The growth rate of COD calculi fragments under pH = 6.5 hypercalciuria conditions was approximately ten times that observed under the other three

  3. Calcium oxalate crystal related kidney injury in a patient receiving Roux-en Y hepaticojejunostomy due to gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2017-03-29

    Calcium oxalate nephropathy is rare in current practice. It was a common complication during jejunoileal bypass, but much less seen in modern gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. The major cause of it is enteric hyperoxaluria. We report on a patient here with acute kidney disease due to calcium oxalate nephropathy, rather than the conditions mentioned above. The male patient received a Roux-en Y hepaticojejunostomy and common bile duct drainage. In addition to enteric hyperoxaluria, chronic kidney disease related metabolic acidosis, chronic diarrhea related volume depletion, a high oxalate and low potassium diet, long term ascorbic acid intake and long term exposure to antibiotics, all predisposed him to having oxalate nephropathy. This is the first case with such conditions and we recommend that similarly diagnosed patients avoid all these predisposing factors, in order to avoid this rare disease and its undesired outcome.

  4. Physical characteristics of Medicago truncatula calcium oxalate crystals determine their effectiveness in insect defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant structural traits can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feeding. They ar...

  5. Reevaluation of the plant “gemstones”: Calcium oxalate crystals sustain photosynthesis under drought conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tooulakou, Georgia; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Bresta, Panagiota; Dotsika, Elissavet; Orkoula, Malvina G.; Kontoyannis, Christos G.; Fasseas, Costas; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Klapa, Maria I.; Karabourniotis, George

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Land plants face the perpetual dilemma of using atmospheric carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and losing water vapors, or saving water and reducing photosynthesis and thus growth. The reason behind this dilemma is that this simultaneous exchange of gases is accomplished through the same minute pores on leaf surfaces, called stomata. In a recent study we provided evidence that pigweed, an aggressive weed, attenuates this problem exploiting large crystals of calcium oxalate as dynamic carbon pools. This plant is able to photosynthesize even under drought conditions, when stomata are closed and water losses are limited, using carbon dioxide from crystal decomposition instead from the atmosphere. Abscisic acid, an alarm signal that causes stomatal closure seems to be implicated in this function and for this reason we named this path “alarm photosynthesis.” The so-far “enigmatic,” but highly conserved and widespread among plant species calcium oxalate crystals seem to play a crucial role in the survival of plants. PMID:27471886

  6. Calcium oxalate crystal growth modification; investigations with confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMulkin, Calum J.; Massi, Massimiliano; Jones, Franca

    2017-06-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) in combination with a photophysical investigation has been employed to give insight into the interaction between calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and a series of tetrazole containing crystal growth modifier's (CGM's), in conjunction with characterisation of morphological changes using scanning electron and optical microscopy. The tetrazole CGM's were found to interact by surface adsorption with minimal morphological changes to the COM crystals however, significant interactions via chemisorption were observed; it was discovered that the chemisorption is sufficiently strong for aggregation of the tetrazole species to occur within the crystal during crystallisation.

  7. Influence of acidifying or alkalinizing diets on bone mineral density and urine relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate and struvite in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Bartges, Joseph W; Kirk, Claudia A; Cox, Sherry K; Moyers, Tamberlyn D

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of acidifying or alkalinizing diets on bone mineral density and urine relative supersaturation (URSS) with calcium oxalate and struvite in healthy cats. 6 castrated male and 6 spayed female cats. 3 groups of 4 cats each were fed diets for 12 months that differed only in acidifying or alkalinizing properties (alkalinizing, neutral, and acidifying). Body composition was estimated by use of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and 48-hour urine samples were collected for URSS determination. Urine pH differed significantly among diet groups, with the lowest urine pH values in the acidifying diet group and the highest values in the alkalinizing diet group. Differences were not observed in other variables except urinary ammonia excretion, which was significantly higher in the neutral diet group. Calcium oxalate URSS was highest in the acidifying diet group and lowest in the alkalinizing diet group; struvite URSS was not different among groups. Diet was not significantly associated with bone mineral content or density. Urinary undersaturation with calcium oxalate was achieved by inducing alkaluria. Feeding an alkalinizing diet was not associated with URSS with struvite. Bone mineral density and calcium content were not adversely affected by diet; therefore, release of calcium from bone caused by feeding an acidifying diet may not occur in healthy cats.

  8. MRP-1 and BCRP Promote the Externalization of Phosphatidylserine in Oxalate-treated Renal Epithelial Cells: Implications for Calcium Oxalate Urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Li, YiFu; Yu, ShiLiang; Gan, XiuGuo; Zhang, Ze; Wang, Yan; Wang, YingWei; An, RuiHua

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the possible involvement of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in the oxalate-induced redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) in renal epithelial cell membranes. A western blot analysis was used to examine the MRP-1 and BCRP expression levels. Surface-expressed PS was detected by the annexin V-binding assay. The cell-permeable fluorogenic probe 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used to measure the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. A rat model of hyperoxaluria was obtained using 0.5% ethylene glycol and 1.0% ammonium chloride. In addition, certain animals received verapamil (50 mg/kg body weight), which is a common inhibitor of MRP-1 and BCRP. The degree of nephrolithiasis was assessed histomorphometrically using sections stained by Pizzolato method and by measuring the calcium oxalate crystal content in the renal tissue. Oxalate produced a concentration-dependent increase in the synthesis of MRP-1 and BCRP. Treatment with MK571 and Ko143 (MRP-1- and BCRP-specific inhibitors, respectively) significantly attenuated the oxalate-induced PS externalization. Adding the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine significantly reduced MRP-1 and BCRP expression. In vivo, markedly decreased nephrocalcinosis was observed compared with that in the rat model of hyperoxaluria without verapamil treatment. Oxalate induces the upregulation of MRP-1 and BCRP, which act as phospholipid floppases causing PS externalization in the renal epithelial cell membrane. The process is mediated by intracellular ROS production. The ROS-mediated increase in the synthesis of MRP-1 and BCRP can play an important role in hyperoxaluria-promoted calcium oxalate urolithiasis by facilitating phosphatidylserine redistribution in renal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of metabolic network of oxalic acid biosynthesis through RNA seq data analysis of developing spikes of finger millet (Eleusine coracana): Deciphering the role of key genes involved in oxalate formation in relation to grain calcium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Naved; Gupta, Supriya; Tiwari, Apoorv; Singh, K P; Kumar, Anil

    2018-04-05

    In the present study, we identified seven major genes of oxalic acid biosynthesis pathway (SGAT, GGAT, ICL, GLO, MHAR, APO and OXO) from developing spike transcriptome of finger millet using rice as a reference. Sequence alignment of identified genes showed high similarity with their respective homolog in rice except for OXO and GLO. Transcript abundance (FPKM) reflects the higher accumulation of identified genes in GP-1 (low calcium genotype) as compared to GP-45 (high calcium genotype) which was further confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis, indicating differential oxalate formation in both genotypes. Determination of oxalic acid and tartaric acid content in developing spikes explain that higher oxalic acid content in GP-1 however, tartaric acid content was more in GP-45. Higher calcium content in GP-45 and lower oxalate accumulation may be due to the diversion of more ascorbic acid into tartaric acid and may correspond to less formation of calcium oxalate. Our results suggest that more than one pathway for oxalic acid biosynthesis might be present in finger millet with probable predominance of ascorbate-tartarate pathway rather than glyoxalate-oxalate conversion. Thus, finger millet can be use as an excellent model system for understanding more specific role of nutrients-antinutrients interactions, as evident from the present study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Potassium Citrate on Calcium Phosphate Stones in a Model of Hypercalciuria

    PubMed Central

    Asplin, John R.; Frick, Kevin K.; Granja, Ignacio; Culbertson, Christopher D.; Ng, Adeline; Grynpas, Marc D.; Bushinsky, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium citrate is prescribed to decrease stone recurrence in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Citrate binds intestinal and urine calcium and increases urine pH. Citrate, metabolized to bicarbonate, should decrease calcium excretion by reducing bone resorption and increasing renal calcium reabsorption. However, citrate binding to intestinal calcium may increase absorption and renal excretion of both phosphate and oxalate. Thus, the effect of potassium citrate on urine calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation and stone formation is complex and difficult to predict. To study the effects of potassium citrate on urine supersaturation and stone formation, we utilized 95th-generation inbred genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats. Rats were fed a fixed amount of a normal calcium (1.2%) diet supplemented with potassium citrate or potassium chloride (each 4 mmol/d) for 18 weeks. Urine was collected at 6, 12, and 18 weeks. At 18 weeks, stone formation was visualized by radiography. Urine citrate, phosphate, oxalate, and pH levels were higher and urine calcium level was lower in rats fed potassium citrate. Furthermore, calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation were higher with potassium citrate; however, uric acid supersaturation was lower. Both groups had similar numbers of exclusively calcium phosphate stones. Thus, potassium citrate effectively raises urine citrate levels and lowers urine calcium levels; however, the increases in urine pH, oxalate, and phosphate levels lead to increased calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation. Potassium citrate induces complex changes in urine chemistries and resultant supersaturation, which may not be beneficial in preventing calcium phosphate stone formation. PMID:25855777

  11. Distinguishing characteristics of idiopathic calcium oxalate kidney stone formers with low amounts of Randall's plaque.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangling; Krambeck, Amy E; Williams, James C; Tang, Xiaojing; Rule, Andrew D; Zhao, Fang; Bergstralh, Eric; Haskic, Zejfa; Edeh, Samuel; Holmes, David R; Herrera Hernandez, Loren P; Lieske, John C

    2014-10-07

    Overgrowth of calcium oxalate on Randall's plaque is a mechanism of stone formation among idiopathic calcium oxalate stone-formers (ICSFs). It is less clear how stones form when there is little or no plaque. Participants were a consecutive cohort of ICSFs who underwent percutaneous nephroscopic papillary mapping in the kidney or kidneys containing symptomatic stones and a papillary tip biopsy from a representative calyx during a stone removal procedure between 2009 and 2013. The distribution of Randall's plaque coverage was analyzed and used to divide ICSFs into those with a high (≥5%; mean, 10.5%; n=10) versus low (<5%; mean, 1.5%; n=32) amount of plaque coverage per papilla. Demographic and laboratory features were compared between these two groups. Low-plaque stone formers tended to be obese (50% versus 10%; P=0.03) and have a history of urinary tract infection (34% versus 0%; P=0.04). They were less likely to have multiple prior stone events (22% versus 80%; P=0.002) and had a lower mean 24-hour urine calcium excretion (187±86 mg versus 291±99 mg; P<0.01). Morphologically, stones from patients with low amounts of plaque lacked a calcium phosphate core by microcomputed tomography. Papillary biopsies from low plaque stone-formers revealed less interstitial and basement membrane punctate crystallization. These findings suggest that other pathways independent of Randall's plaque may contribute to stone pathogenesis among a subgroup of ICSFs who harbor low amounts of plaque. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Size-dependent cellular uptake mechanism and cytotoxicity toward calcium oxalate on Vero cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Urinary crystals with various sizes are present in healthy individuals and patients with kidney stone; however, the cellular uptake mechanism of calcium oxalate of various sizes has not been elucidated. This study aims to compare the internalization of nano-/micron-sized (50 nm, 100 nm, and 1 μm) calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals in African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells. The internalization and adhesion of COM and COD crystals to Vero cells were enhanced with decreasing crystal size. Cell death rate was positively related to the amount of adhered and internalized crystals and exhibited higher correlation with internalization than that with adhesion. Vero cells mainly internalized nano-sized COM and COD crystals through clathrin-mediated pathways as well as micron-sized crystals through macropinocytosis. The internalized COM and COD crystals were distributed in the lysosomes and destroyed lysosomal integrity to some extent. The results of this study indicated that the size of crystal affected cellular uptake mechanism, and may provide an enlightenment for finding potential inhibitors of crystal uptake, thereby decreasing cell injury and the occurrence of kidney stones.

  13. Discrimination of clinically significant calcium salts using MARS spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkbride, T. E.; Raja, A.; Mueller, K.; Bateman, C. J.; Becce, F.; Anderson, N.

    2017-03-01

    Calcium compounds within tissues are usually a sign of pathology, and calcium crystal type is often a pointer to the diagnosis. There are clinical advantages in being able to determine the quantity and type of calcifications non-invasively in cardiovascular, genitourinary and musculoskeletal disorders, and treatment differs depending on the crystal type and quantity. The problem arises when trying to distinguish between different calcium compounds within the same image due to their similar attenuation properties. There are spectroscopic differences between calcium salts at very low energies. As calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite can co-exist in breast and musculoskeletal pathologies of the breast, we wished to determine whether Spectral CT could distinguish between them in the same image at clinical X-ray energy ranges. Energy thresholds of 15, 22, 29 and 36keV and tube voltages of 50, 80 and 110kVp were chosen, and images were analysed to determine the percentage difference in the attenuation coefficients of calcium hydroxyapatite samples at concentrations of 54.3, 211.7, 808.5 and 1169.3mg/ml, and calcium oxalate at a concentration of 2000 mg/ml. The two lower concentrations of calcium hydroxyapatite were distinguishable from calcium oxalate at all energies and all tube voltages, whereas the ability to discriminate oxalate from hydroxyapatite at higher concentrations was dependent on the threshold energy but only mildly dependent on the tube voltage used. Spectral CT shows promise for distinguishing clinically important calcium salts.

  14. Nanouric acid or nanocalcium phosphate as central nidus to induce calcium oxalate stone formation: a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study on urinary nanocrystallites

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xu, Meng; Gui, Bao-Song; Wang, Feng-Xin; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to accurately analyze the relationship between calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formation and the components of urinary nanocrystallites. Method High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction, fast Fourier transformation of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were performed to analyze the components of these nanocrystallites. Results The main components of CaOx stones are calcium oxalate monohydrate and a small amount of dehydrate, while those of urinary nanocrystallites are calcium oxalate monohydrate, uric acid, and calcium phosphate. The mechanism of formation of CaOx stones was discussed based on the components of urinary nanocrystallites. Conclusion The formation of CaOx stones is closely related both to the properties of urinary nanocrystallites and to the urinary components. The combination of HRTEM, fast Fourier transformation, selected area electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy could be accurately performed to analyze the components of single urinary nanocrystallites. This result provides evidence for nanouric acid and/or nanocalcium phosphate crystallites as the central nidus to induce CaOx stone formation. PMID:25258530

  15. Correlation between the development of calcium oxalate stones and polymorphisms in the fibronectin gene in the Uighur population of the Xinjiang region of China.

    PubMed

    Murat, M; Aekeper, A; Yuan, L Y; Alim, T; Du, G J; Abdusamat, A; Wu, G W; Aniwer, Y

    2015-10-29

    Here, we have investigated the correlation between calcium oxalate stone formation and Fn gene polymorphisms in urinary calculi patients among the Uighur population (Xinjiang region). In this case control study, genomic DNA extracted from the peripheral blood of 129 patients with calcium oxalate stones (patient group) and 94 normal people (control group) was used to genotype polymorphisms in the rs6725958, rs10202709, and rs35343655 sites of the Fn gene by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Subsequently, the association between different genotypes and susceptibility to calcium oxalate stone formation was compared among the patient and control groups. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the rs6725958, rs10202709, and rs35343655 sites of the Fn gene among the patient and control groups. The genotype distributions of the three loci complied with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The results of allele frequencies of the patient/control group for polymorphisms in the rs6725958 site of the Fn gene were C = 179 (69.92%)/119 (63.30%) and A = 77 (30.08%)/69 (36.70%), in the rs10202709 site were C = 245 (95.70%)/176 (93.63%) and T = 11 (4.30%)/12 (6.38%), and in the rs35343655 site of the Fn gene were A = 139 (54.30%)/87 (46.28%) and G = 117 (45.70%)/101 (53.72%). We observed no significant differences between the three SNPs and development of calcium oxalate stones. Polymorphisms in rs6725958, rs10202709, and rs35343655 of the Fn gene had no obvious effect on the susceptibility to the development of calcium oxalate stones in the Uighur population, residing in the Xinjiang region of China.

  16. Idiopathic hypercalciuria and formation of calcium renal stones

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2018-01-01

    The most common presentation of nephrolithiasis is idiopathic calcium stones in patients without systemic disease. Most stones are primarily composed of calcium oxalate and form on a base of interstitial apatite deposits, known as Randall’s plaque. By contrast some stones are composed largely of calcium phosphate, as either hydroxyapatite or brushite (calcium monohydrogen phosphate), and are usually accompanied by deposits of calcium phosphate in the Bellini ducts. These deposits result in local tissue damage and might serve as a site of mineral overgrowth. Stone formation is driven by supersaturation of urine with calcium oxalate and brushite. The level of supersaturation is related to fluid intake as well as to the levels of urinary citrate and calcium. Risk of stone formation is increased when urine citrate excretion is <400 mg per day, and treatment with potassium citrate has been used to prevent stones. Urine calcium levels >200 mg per day also increase stone risk and often result in negative calcium balance. Reduced renal calcium reabsorption has a role in idiopathic hypercalciuria. Low sodium diets and thiazide-type diuretics lower urine calcium levels and potentially reduce the risk of stone recurrence and bone diseas PMID:27452364

  17. Phase transformation of calcium oxalate dihydrate-monohydrate: Effects of relative humidity and new spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Claudia; Casati, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Brambilla, Luigi; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    New data on vibrational properties of calcium oxalates and their controversial transformation mechanism are presented. We have focused on whewellite (CaC2O4·H2O) and weddellite [CaC2O4·(2 + x) H2O], the most common phases of calcium oxalate; these compounds occur in many organisms, in kidney stones and in particular kinds of films found on the surface of many works of art. Low temperature experiments carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have highlighted both the high structural order in the crystalline state of whewellite and the disordered distribution of the zeolitic water molecules in weddellite. The synthesised nanocrystals of weddellite have been kept under different hygrometric conditions in order to study, by X-ray powder diffraction, the role of “external” water molecules on their stability. Moreover, in order to identify the different kinds of water molecules, a re-investigation, supported by quantum chemical calculations, of the observed vibrational spectra (IR and Raman) of whewellite has been conducted.

  18. Physical characteristics of calcium oxalate crystals as determinants in structural defense against chewing insects in Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In addition to the numerous chemical defenses that plants employ to fend off insect herbivores, simple structural components can also play important roles in effective protection. Our investigations have shown that plant crystals of calcium oxalate can function in insect defense. The isolation of ca...

  19. Influence of gamma-irradiation on the non-isothermal decomposition of calcium-gadolinium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moharana, S. C.; Praharaj, J.; Bhatta, D.

    Thermal decomposition of co-precipitated unirradiated and irradiated Ca-Gd oxalate has been studied by adopting differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetric (TG) techniques. The reaction occurs through two stages corresponding to the decomposition of gadolinium oxalate (Gd-Ox) followed by that of calcium oxalate (Ca-Ox). The kinetic parameters for both the stages are calculated by using solid state reaction models and Coats-Redfern's equation. The co-precipitation as well as irradiation alter the DTA peak temperatures and the kinetic parameters of Ca-Ox. The decomposition of Gd-Ox follows the two dimensional Contracting area (R-2) mechanism, while that of Ca-Ox follows the Avrami-Erofeev (A(2)) mechanism (n =2), which are also exhibited by the co-precipitated and irradiated samples. Co-precipitation decreases the energy of activation and the pre-exponential factor of the individual components but the reverse phenomenon takes place upon irradiation of the co-precipitate. The mechanisms underlying the phenomena are explored.

  20. Synthesis of glycoside derivatives of hydroxyanthraquinone with ability to dissolve and inhibit formation of crystals of calcium oxalate. Potential compounds in kidney stone therapy.

    PubMed

    Frackowiak, Anna; Skibiński, Przemysław; Gaweł, Wiesław; Zaczyńska, Ewa; Czarny, Anna; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-03-01

    Synthesis of glycosyl derivatives of hydroxyanthraquinones (6-10) potentially useful for kidney stone therapy is presented. These compounds were analyzed as inhibitors of calcium oxalate crystals formation as well as substances with the ability of dissolving crystalline calcium oxalate. In addition, the effect of the compounds obtained on real kidney stones was analyzed by ex vivo tests. The tests on L929 and A545 cell lines have shown that the compounds obtained were not cytotoxic. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Biosynthesis of l-Ascorbic Acid and Conversion of Carbons 1 and 2 of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid Occurs within Individual Calcium Oxalate Crystal Idioblasts1

    PubMed Central

    Kostman, Todd A.; Tarlyn, Nathan M.; Loewus, Frank A.; Franceschi, Vincent R.

    2001-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid (AsA) and its metabolic precursors give rise to oxalic acid (OxA) found in calcium oxalate crystals in specialized crystal idioblast cells in plants; however, it is not known if AsA and OxA are synthesized within the crystal idioblast cell or transported in from surrounding mesophyll cells. Isolated developing crystal idioblasts from Pistia stratiotes were used to study the pathway of OxA biosynthesis and to determine if idioblasts contain the entire path and are essentially independent in OxA synthesis. Idioblasts were supplied with various 14C-labeled compounds and examined by micro-autoradiography for incorporation of 14C into calcium oxalate crystals. [14C]OxA gave heavy labeling of crystals, indicating the isolated idioblasts are functional in crystal formation. Incubation with [1-14C]AsA also gave heavy labeling of crystals, whereas [6-14C]AsA gave no labeling. Labeled precursors of AsA (l-[1-14C]galactose; d-[1-14C]mannose) also resulted in crystal labeling, as did the ascorbic acid analog, d-[1-14C]erythorbic acid. Intensity of labeling of isolated idioblasts followed the pattern OxA > AsA (erythorbic acid) > l-galactose > d-mannose. Our results demonstrate that P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts synthesize the OxA used for crystal formation, the OxA is derived from the number 1 and 2 carbons of AsA, and the proposed pathway of ascorbic acid synthesis via d-mannose and l-galactose is operational in individual P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts. These results are discussed with respect to fine control of calcium oxalate precipitation and the concept of crystal idioblasts as independent physiological compartments. PMID:11161021

  2. Medicago truncatula-derived calcium oxalate crystals have a negative impact on chewing insect performance via their physical properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant structural traits often act as defenses against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (Fabaceae) leaves have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feedi...

  3. [Calcium kidney stones. Diagnostic and preventive prospects].

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, T; Terranegra, A; Biasion, R; Soldati, L; Vezzoli, G

    2007-01-01

    Kidney stone disease is one of the main causes of hospitalization in Italy. Its prevalence increased in the last century and is probably still increasing. The pathogenesis of the disease is not known, although two main theories have been elaborated. The first hypothesizes that hydroxyapatite deposition in the interstitium of the renal papillae (Randall's plaque) precedes urinary calcium oxalate precipitation on the ulcered surface of the papilla to form a stone. The second presumes the tubular lumen of Bellini's duct to be the site where calcium-oxalate salts precipitate to form the nucleus for stone formation within the urinary tract. These pathogenetic processes may be favored by different dietary and genetic factors. The genes involved are not known, although many studies have been performed. Polymorphisms of genes coding for the vitamin D receptor, calcium-sensing receptor, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and urokinase were found to be associated with kidney stones, but these results have not been replicated. Different nutrients are suspected to predispose patients to calcium kidney stone disease. A high intake of animal proteins, sodium, vitamin C and oxalate has been implicated in stone formation, whereas calcium, alkalis and phytate may have a protective effect. The prevention of calcium stone formation is based on the recognition of risk factors like those already mentioned here. Furthermore, a family history of kidney stones may be useful in identifying subjects predisposed to become calcium stone formers. However, the expectations of the scientific community are turned to the advances in genetics and to the findings of genetic studies, which may provide diagnostic tools and criteria to define the risk profile of the single individual.

  4. Antiurolithiatic Potential of Neeri against Calcium-Oxalate Stones by Crystallization Inhibition, Free Radicals Scavenging, and NRK-52E Cell Protection from Oxalate Injury.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Parveen Kumar; Verma, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Anil Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Neeri is a well-established polyherbal formulation prescribed for renal stones by the physicians but has not been experimentally evaluated for its antiurolithiatic potential using cell-lines. This study is aimed to scientifically substantiate the antiurolithiatic effect of Neeri extract (NRE) through calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallization inhibition, scavenging of free radicals, and protection of renal tubular epithelial NRK-52E cells from oxalate-induced injury. The crystallization inhibition was studied by turbidimetric assay while the free radical scavenging potential was determined for superoxide and nitric oxide (NO) radicals. The cytoprotective effect against oxalate-induced injury was assessed by estimating lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and determining cell viability using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. NRE significantly inhibited the CaOx crystallization in a concentration-dependent manner and also scavenged superoxide (IC 50 302.88 μg/ml) and NO (IC 50 300.45 μg/ml) free radicals. It did not show any significant cytotoxicity for NRK-52E cells till the highest dose (500 μg/ml) and found to be safe. When NRK-52E cells, injured by exposing to oxalate crystals for 24 h, were treated with NRE, it appreciably prevented the cell injury in a dose-dependent manner. It significantly decreased the elevated LDH leakage toward normal range and improved renal cell viability (82.37% ± 0.87%), hence, prevented growth and retention of crystals. The experimental findings concluded that Neeri is a potent antiurolithiatic formulation that inhibited CaOx crystallization and prevented tubular retention of crystals by protecting the renal cells against oxalate-induced injury as well as reducing the oxidative stress by scavenging free radicals. Neeri extract significantly ( P < 0.001) inhibited the in vitro crystallization (88.11% ± 7.70%) of calcium oxalateIt reduced oxidative stress by scavenging superoxide and nitric oxide free

  5. Externalization of phosphatidylserine via multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein in oxalate-treated renal epithelial cells: implications for calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Hang; Yu, Shi-Liang; Gan, Xiu-Guo; Pan, Shang-Ha; Teng, Yue-Qiu; An, Rui-Hua

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the possible involvement of multidrug resistance protein 1 P-glycoprotein (MDR1 P-gp) in the oxalate-induced redistribution of phosphatidylserine in renal epithelial cell membranes. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used to examine MDR1 expression in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, whereas surface-expressed phosphatidylserine was detected by the annexin V-binding assay. Oxalate treatment resulted in increased synthesis of MDR1, which resulted in phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization in the renal epithelial cell membrane. Treatment with the MDR1 inhibitor PSC833 significantly attenuated phosphatidylserine externalization. Transfection of the human MDR1 gene into renal epithelial cells significantly increased PS externalization. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show that oxalate increases the synthesis of MDR1 P-gp, which plays a key role in hyperoxaluria-promoted calcium oxalate urolithiasis by facilitating phosphatidylserine redistribution in renal epithelial cells.

  6. Contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Goodman, H. O.; Assimos, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate excreted in urine has a significant impact on calcium oxalate supersaturation and stone formation. Dietary oxalate is believed to make only a minor (10 to 20%) contribution to the amount of oxalate excreted in urine, but the validity of the experimental observations that support this conclusion can be questioned. An understanding of the actual contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion is important, as it is potentially modifiable. METHODS: We varied the amount of dietary oxalate consumed by a group of adult individuals using formula diets and controlled, solid-food diets with a known oxalate content, determined by a recently developed analytical procedure. Controlled solid-food diets were consumed containing 10, 50, and 250 mg of oxalate/2500 kcal, as well as formula diets containing 0 and 180 mg oxalate/2500 kcal. Changes in the content of oxalate and other ions were assessed in 24-hour urine collections. RESULTS: Urinary oxalate excretion increased as dietary oxalate intake increased. With oxalate-containing diets, the mean contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion ranged from 24.4 +/- 15.5% on the 10 mg/2500 kcal/day diet to 41.5 +/- 9.1% on the 250 mg/2500 kcal/day diet, much higher than previously estimated. When the calcium content of a diet containing 250 mg of oxalate was reduced from 1002 mg to 391 mg, urinary oxalate excretion increased by a mean of 28.2 +/- 4.8%, and the mean dietary contribution increased to 52.6 +/- 8.6%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary oxalate makes a much greater contribution to urinary oxalate excretion than previously recognized, that dietary calcium influences the bioavailability of ingested oxalate, and that the absorption of dietary oxalate may be an important factor in calcium oxalate stone formation.

  7. Cooperation of phosphates and carboxylates controls calcium oxalate crystallization in ultrafiltered urine.

    PubMed

    Grohe, Bernd; Chan, Brian P H; Sørensen, Esben S; Lajoie, Gilles; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hunter, Graeme K

    2011-10-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is one of a group of proteins found in urine that are believed to limit the formation of kidney stones. In the present study, we investigate the roles of phosphate and carboxylate groups in the OPN-mediated modulation of calcium oxalate (CaOx), the principal mineral phase found in kidney stones. To this end, crystallization was induced by addition of CaOx solution to ultrafiltered human urine containing either human kidney OPN (kOPN; 7 consecutive carboxylates, 8 phosphates) or synthesized peptides corresponding to residues 65-80 (pSHDHMDDDDDDDDDGD; pOPAR) or 220-235 (pSHEpSTEQSDAIDpSAEK; P3) of rat bone OPN. Sequence 65-80 was also synthesized without the phosphate group (OPAR). Effects on calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) formation were studied by scanning electron microscopy. We found that controls form large, partly intergrown COM platelets; COD was never observed. Adding any of the polyelectrolytes was sufficient to prevent intergrowth of COM platelets entirely, inhibiting formation of these platelets strongly, and inducing formation of the COD phase. Strongest effects on COM formation were found for pOPAR and OPAR followed by kOPN and then P3, showing that acidity and hydrophilicity are crucial in polyelectrolyte-affected COM crystallization. At higher concentrations, OPAR also inhibited COD formation, while P3, kOPN and, in particular, pOPAR promoted COD, a difference explainable by the variations of carboxylate and phosphate groups present in the molecules. Thus, we conclude that carboxylate groups play a primary role in inhibiting COM formation, but phosphate and carboxylate groups are both important in initiating and promoting COD formation.

  8. Contrasting calcium localization and speciation in leaves of Medicago trunculata mutant COD5 analyzed via synchrotron X-ray techniques

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxalate-producing plants accumulate calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx(C)) in the range of 3-80%(w/w) of their dry weight, reducing calcium (Ca) bioavailability. The calcium oxalate deficient 5 (cod5) mutant of Medicago truncatula has been previously shown to contain similar Ca, but lower oxalate and Ca...

  9. The effect of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic factors and the addition of citric acid on the precipitation of calcium oxalate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Šter, Anamarija; Šafranko, Silvija; Bilić, Katarina; Marković, Berislav; Kralj, Damir

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of experimental conditions relevant for spontaneous precipitation of significant amount of pure calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). For this purpose, the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic parameters, such as mode of agitation, temperature, supersaturation and concentration of additives (citrate ions), have been studied. The results show that in the model systems, without the citrate addition and applied mechanical stirring, calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) was observed as dominant modification after 20 min of aging, while the magnetic stirring resulted in a formation of a mixture of COM and calcium oxalate trihydrate (COT), regardless of the temperature applied. In the mechanically stirred systems, the addition of citrate ions in the range of concentrations, 0.001 mol dm -3  < c i (Na 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 ) < 0.012 mol dm -3 , caused the formation of COM and COD mixture at all temperatures. At the same conditions and in the magnetically stirred systems formation of COD, in a mixture with COT or COM, has been observed. The highest COD content in the mechanically stirred system was obtained at 45 °C and c i (Na 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 ) = 0.001 mol dm -3 (w = 89.5%), while in the magnetically stirred system almost pure COD was obtained at 37 °C and c i (Na 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 ) = 0.008 mol dm -3 (w = 96.5%).

  10. Effects of diet on urine composition of cats with calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Lulich, Jody P; Osborne, Carl A; Lekcharoensuk, Chalermpol; Kirk, Claudia A; Bartges, Joseph W

    2004-01-01

    Ten client-owned cats with calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolithiasis were evaluated to determine the effect of diet on urine CaOx saturation. Two dietary treatments were evaluated in each cat: the diet consumed just prior to urolith detection and a canned diet formulated to prevent CaOx uroliths. This study revealed that hypercalciuria is a consistent abnormality in cats with CaOx urolith formation. When urolith-forming cats consumed a diet formulated to prevent urolith formation, activity product ratios for CaOx (which estimate the degree to which urine is saturated with CaOx) were significantly lower. These results suggest that consumption of an appropriately formulated urolith-prevention diet will reduce recurrence of CaOx urolithiasis.

  11. Peeping into Human Renal Calcium Oxalate Stone Matrix: Characterization of Novel Proteins Involved in the Intricate Mechanism of Urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing number of patients suffering from urolithiasis represents one of the major challenges which nephrologists face worldwide today. For enhancing therapeutic outcomes of this disease, the pathogenic basis for the formation of renal stones is the need of hour. Proteins are found as major component in human renal stone matrix and are considered to have a potential role in crystal–membrane interaction, crystal growth and stone formation but their role in urolithiasis still remains obscure. Methods Proteins were isolated from the matrix of human CaOx containing kidney stones. Proteins having MW>3 kDa were subjected to anion exchange chromatography followed by molecular-sieve chromatography. The effect of these purified proteins was tested against CaOx nucleation and growth and on oxalate injured Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) renal epithelial cells for their activity. Proteins were identified by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS) followed by database search with MASCOT server. In silico molecular interaction studies with CaOx crystals were also investigated. Results Five proteins were identified from the matrix of calcium oxalate kidney stones by MALDI-TOF MS followed by database search with MASCOT server with the competence to control the stone formation process. Out of which two proteins were promoters, two were inhibitors and one protein had a dual activity of both inhibition and promotion towards CaOx nucleation and growth. Further molecular modelling calculations revealed the mode of interaction of these proteins with CaOx at the molecular level. Conclusions We identified and characterized Ethanolamine-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, Ras GTPase-activating-like protein, UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 2, RIMS-binding protein 3A, Macrophage-capping protein as novel proteins from the matrix of human calcium oxalate stone which play a critical role in kidney stone formation. Thus, these

  12. Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystal deposition on kidneys of urolithiatic rats by Hibiscus sabdariffa L. extract.

    PubMed

    Laikangbam, Reena; Damayanti Devi, M

    2012-06-01

    The present study aims at systematic evaluation of the calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa to establish its scientific validity for anti-urolithiatic property using ethylene glycol-induced hyperoxaluria model in male albino rats. Administration of a mixture of 0.75% ethylene glycol and 2% ammonium chloride resulted in hyperoxaluria as well as increased renal excretion of calcium and phosphate. The decrease in the serum calcium concentration indicates an increased calcium oxalate formation. Supplementation of aqueous extract of H. sabdariffa at different doses (250, 500 and 750 mg/kg body weight) significantly lowered the deposition of stone-forming constituents in the kidneys and serum of urolithiatic rats. These findings have been confirmed through histological investigations. Results of in vivo genotoxicity testing showed no significant chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells of ethylene glycol-induced rats. The plant extracts at the doses investigated induced neither toxic nor lethal effects and are safe. It can be concluded that the calyces of H. sabdariffa are endowed with anti-urolithiatic activity and do not have genotoxic effects. Thus, it can be introduced in clinical practices and medicine in the form of orally administered syrup after further investigations and clinical trials.

  13. Extraction and estimation of the quantity of calcium oxalate crystals in the foliage of conifer and hardwood trees

    Treesearch

    Rakesh Minocha; Bradley Chamberlain; Stephanie Long; Swathi A. Turlapati; Gloria Quigley

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a method for the extraction and indirect estimation of the quantity of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the foliage of trees. Foliar tissue was collected from a single tree of each species (five conifers and five hardwoods) for comparison of extractions in different solvents using 10 replicates per species from the same pool of...

  14. Herbal extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata inhibit growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V. S.; Parekh, B. B.; Joshi, M. J.; Vaidya, A. B.

    2005-02-01

    A large number of people in this world are suffering from urinary stone problem. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) containing stones (calculi) are commonly found. In the present study, COM crystals were grown by a double diffusion gel growth technique using U-tubes. The gel was prepared from hydrated sodium metasilicate solution. The gel framework acts like a three-dimensional crucible in which the crystal nuclei are delicately held in the position of their formation, and nutrients are supplied for the growth. This technique can be utilized as a simplified screening static model to study the growth, inhibition and dissolution of urinary stones in vitro. The action of putative litholytic medicinal plants, Tribulus terrestris Linn. ( T.t) and Bergenia ligulata Linn. ( B.l.), has been studied in the growth of COM crystals. Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata are commonly used as herbal medicines for urinary calculi in India. To verify the inhibitive effect, aqueous extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata were added along with the supernatant solutions. The growth was measured and compared, with and without the aqueous extracts. Inhibition of COM crystal growth was observed in the herbal extracts. Maximum inhibition was observed in Bergenia ligulata followed by Tribulus terrestris. The results are discussed.

  15. Osteopontin regulates adhesion of calcium oxalate crystals to renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Takahiro; Fujita, Keiji; Asai, Kiyofumi; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2002-02-01

    The association of calcium crystals with renal tubular cells is an important factor during the formation of urinary stones. We previously reported the strong expression of osteopontin (OPN) on renal tubular cells in the stone-forming kidney, suggesting that OPN plays a role in the crystal-cell interaction. In the present study, we examined the biological consequences of inhibiting OPN expression at the translational level on the formation and adhesion of crystals. We synthesized antisense OPN expression vector (pTet-OPNas) using the tetracycline-regulated expression system. The pTet-OPNas was constructed using a mouse OPN cDNA sequence in an inverted (antisense) orientation. Two clones (NRK-52E/ASs) were identified by transfection of pTet-OPNas into NRK-52E cells and they showed a marked reduction of OPN synthesis in the absence of tetracycline. Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal suspension was spread homogeneously on top of the NRK-52E cells. After incubation, the association of CaOx crystals and cells was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Intact NRK-52E cells, NRK-52E cells transfected with empty vector and tetracycline-treated antisense clones (NRK-52E/ASs), under identical conditions, were associated with CaOx crystals. In contrast, the expression of antisense OPN prevented the association of CaOx crystals with NRK-52E cells. Osteopontin plays a crucial role in the adhesion process of CaOx crystals to renal tubular cells in stone formation.

  16. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate gout and other crystal deposition diseases.

    PubMed

    Reginato, A J

    1991-08-01

    The number of crystal or birefringent particles associated with arthritis is increasing, and a uniform taxonomy is needed. The term gout has been proposed as a generic term for these diseases based on historical, clinical, and crystallographic reasons. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate gout follows monosodium urate gout in frequency, and its spectrum of clinical manifestations continues to grow. Familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate gout was described for the first time in kindreds studied in England and Tunisia; new Jewish and Spanish kindreds were also reported. Type I collagen was shown to nucleate nativelike calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals, and pyrophosphate elaboration was explored in cartilage explants in an attempt to reproduce the in vivo metabolic or endocrine disorders associated with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate gout. The effect of pyrophosphatase and different cofactors such as magnesium in dissolving calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals was investigated. High-resolution electron microscopy was used to study the interrelation between apatite and other basic calcium phosphate crystals in apatite gout. Raman microscopy was applied for the first time to identify crystals in biologic specimens. A simple and specific technique for basic calcium phosphate crystal identification is necessary to understand the relationship between different calcium phosphate crystals and osteoarthritis. Several reports about children and young patients with primary oxalate gout described the effect of oxalate on eyes, periodontal tissues, and bone. Multicenter studies showed poor results of renal transplantation, but favored combined liver and renal transplantation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Novel Peptide with Specific Calcium-Binding Capacity from Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and Calcium Bioavailability in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xixi; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Shaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-calcium can probably be a suitable supplement to improve calcium absorption in the human body. In this study, a specific peptide Phe-Tyr (FY) with calcium-binding capacity was purified from Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. The calcium-binding capacity of FY reached 128.77 ± 2.57 μg/mg. Results of ultraviolet spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy showed that carboxyl groups, amino groups, and amido groups were the major chelating sites. FY-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which were beneficial to be absorbed and transported in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium bioavailability in Caco-2 cells showed that FY-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency by more than three times when compared with CaCl2, and protect calcium ions against dietary inhibitors, such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate, and Zn2+. Our findings further the progress of algae-based peptide-calcium, suggesting that FY-Ca has the potential to be developed as functionally nutraceutical additives. PMID:28036002

  18. Kidney stone matrix proteins ameliorate calcium oxalate monohydrate induced apoptotic injury to renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Narula, Shifa; Tandon, Simran; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2016-11-01

    Kidney stone formation is a highly prevalent disease, affecting 8-10% of the human population worldwide. Proteins are the major constituents of human kidney stone's organic matrix and considered to play critical role in the pathogenesis of disease but their mechanism of modulation still needs to be explicated. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effect of human kidney stone matrix proteins on the calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) mediated cellular injury. The renal epithelial cells (MDCK) were exposed to 200μg/ml COM crystals to induce injury. The effect of proteins isolated from human kidney stone was studied on COM injured cells. The alterations in cell-crystal interactions were examined by phase contrast, polarizing, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, its effect on the extent of COM induced cell injury, was quantified by flow cytometric analysis. Our study indicated the antilithiatic potential of human kidney stone proteins on COM injured MDCK cells. Flow cytometric analysis and fluorescence imaging ascertained that matrix proteins decreased the extent of apoptotic injury caused by COM crystals on MDCK cells. Moreover, the electron microscopic studies of MDCK cells revealed that matrix proteins caused significant dissolution of COM crystals, indicating cytoprotection against the impact of calcium oxalate injury. The present study gives insights into the mechanism implied by urinary proteins to restrain the pathogenesis of kidney stone disease. This will provide a better understanding of the formation of kidney stones which can be useful for the proper management of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenotypic and functional analysis of human SLC26A6 variants in patients with familial hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Monico, Carla G; Weinstein, Adam; Jiang, Zhirong; Rohlinger, Audrey L; Cogal, Andrea G; Bjornson, Beth B; Olson, Julie B; Bergstralh, Eric J; Milliner, Dawn S; Aronson, Peter S

    2008-12-01

    Urinary oxalate is a major risk factor for calcium oxalate stones. Marked hyperoxaluria arises from mutations in 2 separate loci, AGXT and GRHPR, the causes of primary hyperoxaluria (PH) types 1 (PH1) and 2 (PH2), respectively. Studies of null Slc26a6(-/-) mice have shown a phenotype of hyperoxaluria, hyperoxalemia, and calcium oxalate urolithiasis, leading to the hypothesis that SLC26A6 mutations may cause or modify hyperoxaluria in humans. Cross-sectional case-control. Cases were recruited from the International Primary Hyperoxaluria Registry. Control DNA samples were from a pool of adult subjects who identified themselves as being in good health. PH1, PH2, and non-PH1/PH2 genotypes in cases. Homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for SLC26A6 variants. Functional expression of oxalate transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 80 PH1, 6 PH2, 8 non-PH1/PH2, and 96 control samples were available for SLC26A6 screening. A rare variant, c.487C-->T (p.Pro163Ser), was detected solely in 1 non-PH1/PH2 pedigree, but this variant failed to segregate with hyperoxaluria, and functional studies of oxalate transport in Xenopus oocytes showed no transport defect. No other rare variant was identified specifically in non-PH1/PH2. Six additional missense variants were detected in controls and cases. Of these, c.616G-->A (p.Val206Met) was most common (11%) and showed a 30% reduction in oxalate transport. To test p.Val206Met as a potential modifier of hyperoxaluria, we extended screening to PH1 and PH2. Heterozygosity for this variant did not affect plasma or urine oxalate levels in this population. We did not have a sufficient number of cases to determine whether homozygosity for p.Val206Met might significantly affect urine oxalate. SLC26A6 was effectively ruled out as the disease gene in this non-PH1/PH2 cohort. Taken together, our studies are the first to identify and characterize SLC26A6 variants in patients with hyperoxaluria. Phenotypic and functional analysis excluded a

  20. Phenotypic and Functional Analysis of Human SLC26A6 Variants in Patients With Familial Hyperoxaluria and Calcium Oxalate Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Monico, Carla G.; Weinstein, Adam; Jiang, Zhirong; Rohlinger, Audrey L.; Cogal, Andrea G.; Bjornson, Beth B.; Olson, Julie B.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Milliner, Dawn S.; Aronson, Peter S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Urinary oxalate is a major risk factor for calcium oxalate stones. Marked hyperoxaluria arises from mutations in two separate loci, AGXT and GRHPR, the causes of primary hyperoxaluria (PH) types 1 and 2, respectively. Studies of null Slc26a6 (−/−) mice have revealed a phenotype of hyperoxaluria, hyperoxalemia and calcium oxalate urolithiasis, leading to the hypothesis that SLC26A6 mutations may cause or modify hyperoxaluria in humans. Study Design Cross-sectional, case-control. Setting & Participants Cases were recruited from the International Primary Hyperoxaluria Registry. Control DNA samples were from a pool of adult subjects who identified themselves as being in good health. Predictor PH1, PH2, non-PH1/PH2 genotypes in cases. Outcomes & Measures Homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for SLC26A6 variants. Functional expression of oxalate transport in Xenopus oocytes. Results A total of 80 PH1, 6 PH2, 8 non-PH1/PH2 and 96 control samples were available for SLC26A6 screening. A rare variant, c.487C>T (p.Pro163Ser) was detected solely in one non-PH1/PH2 pedigree but this variant failed to segregate with hyperoxaluria, and functional studies of oxalate transport in Xenopus oocytes revealed no transport defect. No other rare variant was identified specifically in non-PH1/PH2. Six additional missense variants were detected in controls and in cases. Of these, c.616G>A (p.Val206Met) was most common (11%), and showed a 30% reduction in oxalate transport. To test p.Val206Met as a potential modifier of hyperoxaluria, we extended screening to PH1 and PH2. Heterozygosity for this variant did not affect plasma or urine oxalate in this population. Limitations We did not have a sufficient number of cases to determine whether homozygosity for p.Val206Met might significantly affect urine oxalate. Conclusions SLC26A6 was effectively ruled out as the disease gene in this non-PH1/PH2 cohort. Taken together, our studies are the first to identify and characterize SLC

  1. Association Study of Klotho Gene Polymorphism With Calcium Oxalate Stones in The Uyghur Population of Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abdusamat; Tursun, Halmurat; Talat, Alim; Abla, Akpar; Muhtar, Erpan; Zhang, Tao; Mahmut, Murat

    2017-01-18

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between Klotho gene polymorphisms andcalcium oxalate stones in Xinjiang Uyghur people. We compared 128 patients with calcium oxalate stones (case group) and 94 healthypeople (control group), detected the genotype and allele distributions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)of the Klotho gene (rs3752472, rs650439, and rs1207568) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The distributions of the genotype and allele frequencies of the SNPs were consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the two groups. There were statistically significant differences between the genotype andallele distributions of rs3752472 between the case and control groups; the allele frequencies in the case/controlgroups were C = 240 (93.7%)/151 (80.3%) and T = 16 (6.3%)/37 (19.7%). There was no statistically significantdifference in the genotype distribution of rs650439 between the case and control groups, but there was a differencein the allele distribution; the allele frequencies in the case/control groups were A = 202 (78.9%)/143 (57.2%) andT = 54 (21.1%)/107 (42.8%). There were no statistically significant differences in genotype and allele distributionsbetween the case and control groups of rs1207568; the allele frequencies in the case/control groups were C = 194(71.3%)/145 (77.1%) and T = 78 (28.7%)/43 (22.9%). In rs3752472, the risk for patients with the C and A allelesincreased by 3.675 and 2.799 times, respectively. The rs3752472 and rs650439 SNPs are related to the risk of calcium oxalate stones in Xinjiang Uyghurpeople, and might be one of the risk factors.

  2. Serum Estradiol and Testosterone Levels in Kidney Stones Disease with and without Calcium Oxalate Components in Naturally Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Lili; Duan, Xiaolu; Zeng, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Objective Epidemiological data reveal that the overall risk for kidney stones disease is lower for women compared to age-matched men. However, the beneficial effect for the female sex is lost upon menopause, a time corresponding to the onset of fall in estrogen levels. The aim of this study was to describe the serum estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) characteristics of naturally postmenopausal women with kidney stones. Methods 113 naturally postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed kidney stones (aged 57.4±4.98 years) and 84 age frequency matched stone-free controls (56.9±4.56 years) were validly recruited in the case-control study. The odds ratios (ORs) for the associations between sex hormones and kidney stones were estimated with logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic data and medical history. Patients were also stratified analyzed according to stone components (calcium oxalate stones [COS]; non-calcium oxalate stones [NCOS]). Results Serum E2 (21.1 vs. 31.1 pg/ml) was significantly lower in kidney stones patients compared to controls. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that this effect was driven by COS patients (p<0.001). According to tertiles of the E2 levels, a significant higher frequency of COS was seen in the lowest E2 group (p <0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis identified E2 level as a strong factor that was independently associated with the risk for COS (per 1 SD increase, OR=0.951, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.919-0.985; highest: lowest tertile, OR=0.214, 95%CI = 0.069-0.665). However, serum T levels did not significantly differ among the groups. Conclusions Naturally postmenopausal women with higher remaining estradiol levels appear less likely to suffer from kidney calcium oxalate stones. However, no correlation was found between serum T level and kidney stones. These findings support the hypothesis that higher postmenopausal endogenous estrogens may protect against kidney stones with ageing. PMID:24086550

  3. Serum estradiol and testosterone levels in kidney stones disease with and without calcium oxalate components in naturally postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhijian; Mai, Zanlin; Ou, Lili; Duan, Xiaolu; Zeng, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data reveal that the overall risk for kidney stones disease is lower for women compared to age-matched men. However, the beneficial effect for the female sex is lost upon menopause, a time corresponding to the onset of fall in estrogen levels. The aim of this study was to describe the serum estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) characteristics of naturally postmenopausal women with kidney stones. 113 naturally postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed kidney stones (aged 57.4±4.98 years) and 84 age frequency matched stone-free controls (56.9±4.56 years) were validly recruited in the case-control study. The odds ratios (ORs) for the associations between sex hormones and kidney stones were estimated with logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic data and medical history. Patients were also stratified analyzed according to stone components (calcium oxalate stones [COS]; non-calcium oxalate stones [NCOS]). Serum E2 (21.1 vs. 31.1 pg/ml) was significantly lower in kidney stones patients compared to controls. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that this effect was driven by COS patients (p<0.001). According to tertiles of the E2 levels, a significant higher frequency of COS was seen in the lowest E2 group (p <0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis identified E2 level as a strong factor that was independently associated with the risk for COS (per 1 SD increase, OR=0.951, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.919-0.985; highest: lowest tertile, OR=0.214, 95%CI = 0.069-0.665). However, serum T levels did not significantly differ among the groups. Naturally postmenopausal women with higher remaining estradiol levels appear less likely to suffer from kidney calcium oxalate stones. However, no correlation was found between serum T level and kidney stones. These findings support the hypothesis that higher postmenopausal endogenous estrogens may protect against kidney stones with ageing.

  4. Changes in urinary risk profile after short-term low sodium and low calcium diet in recurrent Swiss kidney stone formers.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Harald; Kaelin, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro M; Weber, Damian; Jaeger, Philippe; Ambuehl, Patrice; Robertson, William G; Unwin, Robert; Wagner, Carsten A; Mohebbi, Nilufar

    2017-12-04

    Kidney stone disease is common in industrialized countries. Recently, it has attracted growing attention, because of its significant association with adverse renal outcomes, including end stage renal disease. Calcium-containing kidney stones are frequent with high recurrence rates. While hypercalciuria is a well-known risk factor, restricted intake of animal protein and sodium, combined with normal dietary calcium, has been shown to be more effective in stone prevention compared with a low-calcium diet. Notably, the average sodium intake in Switzerland is twice as high as the WHO recommendation, while the intake of milk and dairy products is low. We retrospectively analyzed Swiss recurrent kidney stone formers (rKSF) to test the impact of a low-sodium in combination with a low-calcium diet on the urinary risk profile. In patients with recurrent calcium oxalate containing stones, we investigated both, the consequence of a low-sodium diet on urinary volume and calcium excretion, and the influence of a low-sodium low-calcium diet on urinary oxalate excretion. Of the 169 patients with CaOx stones, 49 presented with hypercalciuria at baseline. The diet resulted in a highly significant reduction in 24-h urinary sodium and calcium excretion: from 201 ± 89 at baseline to 128 ± 88 mmol/d for sodium (p < 0.0001), and from 5.67 ± 3.01 to 4.06 ± 2.46 mmol/d (p < 0.0001) for calcium, respectively. Urine volume remained unchanged. Notably, no increase in oxalate excretion occurred on the restricted diet (0.39 ± 0.26 vs 0.39 ± 0.19 mmol/d, p = 0.277). Calculated Psf (probability of stone formation) values were only predictive for the risk of calcium phosphate stones. A diet low in sodium and calcium in recurrent calcium oxalate stone formers resulted in a significant reduction of urinary calcium excretion, but no change in urine volume. In this population with apparently low intake of dairy products, calcium restriction does not

  5. Oxalate Content of Taro Leaves Grown in Central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Du Thanh, Hang; Phan Vu, Hai; Vu Van, Hai; Le Duc, Ngoan; Le Minh, Tuan; Savage, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Leaves were harvested from four different cultivars of Colocasia esculenta and three cultivars of Alocasia odora that were growing on nine different farms in central Vietnam. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the leaves were extracted and measured using HPLC chromatography. Total calcium determinations were also carried out on the same samples. The total oxalate content of the leaves ranged from 433.8 to 856.1 mg/100 g wet matter (WM) while the soluble oxalate ranged from 147.8 to 339.7 mg/100 g WM. The proportion of soluble oxalate ranged from 28% to 41% (overall mean 35%) of the total oxalate content of the leaves. The equivalent insoluble oxalate proportion ranged from 59% to 72% of the total (overall mean 65%). There was little difference between the Colocasia esculenta and Alocasia odora taro cultivars, although the total oxalate content was significantly higher in Alocasia odora cultivars. The overall mean total calcium content was 279.5 mg/100 WM and the percentage of insoluble calcium bound as calcium oxalate ranged from 31.7% to 57.3% of the total calcium content (overall mean 47.1%). The oxalate content in taro leaves is a major factor to consider when different cultivars of taro are recommended for human or animal consumption.

  6. Calcium activation of frog slow muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Costantin, L. L.; Podolsky, R. J.; Tice, Lois W.

    1967-01-01

    1. Skinned muscle fibres were prepared from the tonus bundle of the frog iliofibularis muscle and the contractile response elicited by applied calcium ions was studied. The fibre type was determined by electron microscopy. 2. Fast fibres shortened many times more rapidly than slow fibres, indicating that the slow contraction of slow fibres is an inherent property of the contractile mechanism. 3. The extent of spread of contraction following local calcium application was much greater in slow than in fast fibres, a difference which is consistent with the relative sparsity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in slow fibres. 4. The ability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum of slow fibres to accumulate calcium was demonstrated by the in situ immobilization of calcium when oxalate solutions were added to the skinned fibre. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3Plate 4Plate 5AB PMID:6030519

  7. Diminution of oxalate induced renal tubular epithelial cell injury and inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization in vitro by aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A; Tandon, S; Singla, S K; Tandon, C

    2010-01-01

    Recurrence and persistent side effects of present day treatment for urolithiasis restrict their use, so an alternate solution, using phytotherapy is being sought. The present study attempted to evaluate the antilithiatic properties of Tribulus terrestris commonly called as "gokhru" which is often used in ayurveda to treat various urinary diseases including urolithiasis. The activity of Tribulus terrestris was investigated on nucleation and the growth of the calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals as well as on oxalate induced cell injury of NRK 52E renal epithelial cells. Tribulus terrestris extract exhibited a concentration dependent inhibition of nucleation and the growth of CaOx crystals. When NRK-52E cells were injured by exposure to oxalate for 72 h, Tribulus terrestris extract prevented the injury in a dose-dependent manner. On treatment with the different concentrations of the plant, the cell viability increased and lactate dehydrogenase release decreased in a concentration dependent manner. The current data suggests that Tribulus terrestris extract not only has a potential to inhibit nucleation and the growth of the CaOx crystals but also has a cytoprotective role. Our results indicate that it could be a potential candidate for phytotherapy against urolithiasis.

  8. An assessment of engineered calcium oxalate crystal formation on plant growth and development as a step toward evaluating its use to enhance plant defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill ...

  9. Sulfate and thiosulfate inhibit oxalate transport via a dPrestin (Slc26a6)-dependent mechanism in an insect model of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Landry, Greg M; Hirata, Taku; Anderson, Jacob B; Cabrero, Pablo; Gallo, Christopher J R; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2016-01-15

    Nephrolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract disorders, with the majority of kidney stones composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx). Given its prevalence (US occurrence 10%), it is still poorly understood, lacking progress in identifying new therapies because of its complex etiology. Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) is a recently developed model of CaOx nephrolithiasis. Effects of sulfate and thiosulfate on crystal formation were investigated using the Drosophila model, as well as electrophysiological effects on both Drosophila (Slc26a5/6; dPrestin) and mouse (mSlc26a6) oxalate transporters utilizing the Xenopus laevis oocyte heterologous expression system. Results indicate that both transport thiosulfate with a much higher affinity than sulfate Additionally, both compounds were effective at decreasing CaOx crystallization when added to the diet. However, these results were not observed when compounds were applied to Malpighian tubules ex vivo. Neither compound affected CaOx crystallization in dPrestin knockdown animals, indicating a role for principal cell-specific dPrestin in luminal oxalate transport. Furthermore, thiosulfate has a higher affinity for dPrestin and mSlc26a6 compared with oxalate These data indicate that thiosulfate's ability to act as a competitive inhibitor of oxalate via dPrestin, can explain the decrease in CaOx crystallization seen in the presence of thiosulfate, but not sulfate. Overall, our findings predict that thiosulfate or oxalate-mimics may be effective as therapeutic competitive inhibitors of CaOx crystallization. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Crystallization of calcium oxalates is controlled by molecular hydrophilicity and specific polyanion-crystal interactions.

    PubMed

    Grohe, Bernd; Taller, Adam; Vincent, Peter L; Tieu, Long D; Rogers, Kem A; Heiss, Alexander; Sørensen, Esben S; Mittler, Silvia; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hunter, Graeme K

    2009-10-06

    To gain more insight into protein structure-function relationships that govern ectopic biomineralization processes in kidney stone formation, we have studied the ability of urinary proteins (Tamm-Horsfall protein, osteopontin (OPN), prothrombin fragment 1 (PTF1), bikunin, lysozyme, albumin, fetuin-A), and model compounds (a bikunin fragment, recombinant-, milk-, bone osteopontin, poly-L-aspartic acid (poly asp), poly-L-glutamic acid (poly glu)) in modulating precipitation reactions of kidney stone-related calcium oxalate mono- and dihydrates (COM, COD). Combining scanning confocal microscopy and fluorescence imaging, we determined the crystal faces of COM with which these polypeptides interact; using scanning electron microscopy, we characterized their effects on crystal habits and precipitated volumes. Our findings demonstrate that polypeptide adsorption to COM crystals is dictated first by the polypeptide's affinity for the crystal followed by its preference for a crystal face: basic and relatively hydrophobic macromolecules show no adsorption, while acidic and more hydrophilic polypeptides adsorb either nonspecifically to all faces of COM or preferentially to {100}/{121} edges and {100} faces. However, investigating calcium oxalates grown in the presence of these polypeptides showed that some acidic proteins that adsorb to crystals do not affect crystallization, even if present in excess of physiological concentrations. These proteins (albumin, bikunin, PTF1, recombinant OPN) have estimated total hydrophilicities from 200 to 850 kJ/mol and net negative charges from -9 to -35, perhaps representing a "window" in which proteins adsorb and coat urinary crystals (support of excretion) without affecting crystallization. Strongest effects on crystallization were observed for polypeptides that are either highly hydrophilic (>950 kJ/mol) and highly carboxylated (poly asp, poly glu), or else highly hydrophilic and highly phosphorylated (native OPN isoforms), suggesting

  11. [Calcium and magnesium concentrations in "Healthy" and lithiasic human kidney (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Terhorst, B; Stoeppler, M

    1976-07-01

    Calcium and magnesium levels in the cortex, medulla, and papilla of human kidney from 32 so-called healthy patients and from eleven patients with calcium-oxalate lithiasis were determined by atom-absorption spectralphotometry. A positive calcium gradient with the highest calcium concentration in the papilla was found in all kidneys. Compared to the control group, that calcium concentration in the lithiasic kidneys was reduced by 50% in the papilla, but in the cortex and medulla, the levels were the same. A relative depletion of calcium in the papilla in hypercalciuria goes against the theory that the papilla is the main center of development of calcium-containing stones. The magnesium concentration was practically the same in cortex, medulla, and papilla, and no significant difference was found between lithiasic and healthy kidneys. These findings underline the central role of calcium in the genesis of calcium-containing stones.

  12. Autophagy inhibition attenuates hyperoxaluria-induced renal tubular oxidative injury and calcium oxalate crystal depositions in the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaolu; Kong, Zhenzhen; Mai, Xin; Lan, Yu; Liu, Yang; Yang, Zhou; Zhao, Zhijian; Deng, Tuo; Zeng, Tao; Cai, Chao; Li, Shujue; Zhong, Wen; Wu, Wenqi; Zeng, Guohua

    2018-06-01

    Hyperoxaluria-induced oxidative injury of renal tubular epithelial cell is a casual and essential factor in kidney calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formation. Autophagy has been shown to be critical for the regulation of oxidative stress-induced renal tubular injury; however, little is known about its role in kidney CaOx stone formation. In the present study, we found that the autophagy antagonist chloroquine could significantly attenuate oxalate-induced autophagy activation, oxidative injury and mitochondrial damage of renal tubular cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as hyperoxaluria-induced CaOx crystals depositions in rat kidney, whereas the autophagy agonist rapamycin exerted contrasting effects. In addition, oxalate-induced p38 phosphorylation was significantly attenuated by chloroquine pretreatment but was markedly enhanced by rapamycin pretreatment, whereas the protective effect of chloroquine on rat renal tubular cell oxidative injury was partly reversed by a p38 protein kinase activator anisomycin. Furthermore, the knockdown of Beclin1 represented similar effects to chloroquine on oxalate-induced cell oxidative injury and p38 phosphorylation in vitro. Taken together, our results revealed that autophagy inhibition could attenuate oxalate-induced oxidative injury of renal tubular cell and CaOx crystal depositions in the rat kidney via, at least in part, inhibiting the activation of p38 signaling pathway, thus representing a novel role of autophagy in the regulation of oxalate-induced renal oxidative injury and CaOx crystal depositions for the first time. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. In Idiopathic Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers, Unattached Stones Show Evidence of Having Originated as Attached Stones on Randall’s Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nicole L.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.; Bledsoe, Sharon B.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Munch, Larry C.; Handa, Shelly E.; Lingeman, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze the structure and composition of unattached stones in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF) and compare them to attached stones from the same cohort in order to investigate whether more than one pathogenic mechanism exists for stone formation in ICSF. Patients and methods ICSF undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy or ureteroscopy for treatment of nephrolithiasis were consented for this study. All accessible renal papillae were endoscopically imaged using a digital endoscope. All stones were removed and determined by the operating surgeon to be attached or unattached to the underlying papilla. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), which provides three-dimensional analysis of entire stones, was used to compare the structure and composition of attached versus unattached stones. Results Of 115 stones collected from 9 patients (12 renal units), only 25 stones were found not to be attached to renal papillae. Of these 25 stones, 4 were lost and 12 showed definite morphological evidence of having been attached to tissue, probably having been knocked off of papillae during access. For the remaining 9 stones, micro-CT analysis revealed at least one internal region of calcium phosphate within each of these unattached calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. That is, the internal structure of the unattached stones is consistent with their having originated attached to RP, and then having become detached but retained in the kidney, with new layers of CaOx eventually covering the original attachment site. Conclusions Micro CT analysis supports the hypothesis that in ICSF, both attached and unattached stones occur as a result of a common pathogenic mechanism. That is, in this type of stone former, CaOx stones—even those not showing morphology that betrays attachment—all originate attached to interstitial plaque on the renal papilla. PMID:19549258

  14. A study of calcium intake and sources of calcium in adolescent boys and girls from two socioeconomic strata, in Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Sanwalka, Neha J; Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Mughal, M Zulf; Sayyad, Mehmood G; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Shirole, Shilpa C; Divate, Uma P; Bhandari, Dhanshari R

    2010-01-01

    Adequate intake of calcium is important for skeletal growth. Low calcium intake during childhood and adolescence may lead to decreased bone mass accrual thereby increasing the risk of osteoporotic fractures. Our aim was to study dietary calcium intake and sources of calcium in adolescents from lower and upper economic strata in Pune, India. We hypothesized that children from lower economic strata would have lower intakes of calcium, which would predominantly be derived from non-dairy sources. Two hundred male and female adolescents, from lower and upper economic stratum were studied. Semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to evaluate intakes of calcium, phosphorus, oxalic acid, phytin, energy and protein. The median calcium intake was significantly different in all four groups, with maximum intake in the upper economic strata boys (893 mg, 689-1295) and lowest intake in lower economic strata girls (506 mg, 380-674). The median calcium intake in lower economic strata boys was 767 mg (585-1043) and that in upper economic strata girls was 764 mg (541-959). The main source of calcium was dairy products in upper economic strata adolescents while it was dark green leafy vegetables in lower economic strata adolescents. The median calcium intake was much lower in lower economic strata than in the upper economic strata both in boys and girls. Girls from both groups had less access to dairy products as compared to boys. Measures need to be taken to rectify low calcium intake in lower economic strata adolescents and to address gender inequality in distribution of dairy products in India.

  15. Mimicking the biomolecular control of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth: effect of contiguous glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Grohe, Bernd; Hug, Susanna; Langdon, Aaron; Jalkanen, Jari; Rogers, Kem A; Goldberg, Harvey A; Karttunen, Mikko; Hunter, Graeme K

    2012-08-21

    Scanning confocal interference microscopy (SCIM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate the adsorption of the synthetic polypeptide poly(l-glutamic acid) (poly-glu) to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals and its effect on COM formation. At low concentrations (1 μg/mL), poly-glu inhibits growth most effectively in ⟨001⟩ directions, indicating strong interactions of the polypeptide with {121} crystal faces. Growth in <010> directions was inhibited only marginally by 1 μg/mL poly-glu, while growth in <100> directions did not appear to be affected. This suggests that, at low concentrations, poly-glu inhibits lattice-ion addition to the faces of COM in the order {121} > {010} ≥ {100}. At high concentrations (6 μg/mL), poly-glu resulted in the formation of dumbbell-shaped crystals featuring concave troughs on the {100} faces. The effects on crystal growth indicate that, at high concentrations, poly-glu interacts with the faces of COM in the order {100} > {121} > {010}. This mirrors MD simulations, which predicted that poly-glu will adsorb to a {100} terrace plane (most calcium-rich) in preference to a {121} (oblique) riser plane but will adsorb to {121} riser plane in preference to an {010} terrace plane (least calcium-rich). The effects of different poly-glu concentration on COM growth (1-6 μg/mL) may be due to variations between the faces in terms of growth mechanism and/or (nano)roughness, which can affect surface energy. In addition, 1 μg/mL might not be adequate to reach the critical concentration for poly-glu to significantly pin step movement on {100} and {010} faces. Understanding the mechanisms involved in these processes is essential for the development of agents to reduce recurrence of kidney stone disease.

  16. Oxalate and phytate of soy foods.

    PubMed

    Al-Wahsh, Ismail A; Horner, Harry T; Palmer, Reid G; Reddy, Manju B; Massey, Linda K

    2005-07-13

    The consumption of foods made from soybeans is increasing because of their desirable nutritional value. However, some soy foods contain high concentrations of oxalate and/or phytate. Oxalate is a component of calcium oxalate kidney stones, whereas phytate is an inhibitor of calcium kidney stone formation. Thirty tested commercial soy foods exhibited ranges of 0.02-2.06 mg oxalate/g and 0.80-18.79 mg phytate/g. Commercial soy foods contained 2-58 mg of total oxalate per serving and 76-528 mg phytate per serving. Eighteen of 19 tofu brands and two soymilk brands contained less than 10 mg oxalate per serving, defined as a low oxalate food. Soy flour, textured vegetable soy protein, vegetable soybeans, soy nuts, tempeh, and soynut butter exhibited greater than 10 mg per serving. The correlation between oxalate and phytate in the soy foods was significant (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) indicating that oxalate-rich soy foods also contain higher concentrations of phytate. There also was a significant correlation, based on molar basis, between the divalent ion binding potential of oxalate plus phytate and calcium plus magnesium (r = 0.90, P < 0.001) in soy foods. Soy foods containing small concentrations of oxalate and moderate concentrations of phytate may be advantageous for kidney stone patients or persons with a high risk of kidney stones.

  17. Influence of a low- and a high-oxalate vegetarian diet on intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary excretion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E; von Unruh, G E; Hesse, A

    2008-09-01

    To compare quantitatively the effect of a low- and a high-oxalate vegetarian diet on intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary excretion. Eight healthy volunteers (three men and five women, mean age 28.6+/-6.3) were studied. Each volunteer performed the [(13)C(2)]oxalate absorption test thrice on a low-oxalate mixed diet, thrice on a low-oxalate vegetarian diet and thrice on a high-oxalate vegetarian diet. For each test, the volunteers had to adhere to an identical diet and collect their 24-h urines. In the morning of the second day, a capsule containing [(13)C(2)]oxalate was ingested. On the low-oxalate vegetarian diet, mean intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary oxalate excretion increased significantly to 15.8+/-2.9% (P=0.012) and 0.414+/-0.126 mmol/day (P=0.012), compared to the mixed diet. On the high-oxalate vegetarian diet, oxalate absorption (12.5+/-4.6%, P=0.161) and urinary excretion (0.340+/-0.077 mmol/day, P=0.093) did not change significantly, compared to the mixed diet. A vegetarian diet can only be recommended for calcium oxalate stone patients, if the diet (1) contains the recommended amounts of divalent cations such as calcium and its timing of ingestion to a meal rich in oxalate is considered and (2) excludes foodstuffs with a high content of nutritional factors, such as phytic acid, which are able to chelate calcium.

  18. Sulfate but not thiosulfate reduces calculated and measured urinary ionized calcium and supersaturation: implications for the treatment of calcium renal stones.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Allen; Gauvin, Daniel; Edeh, Samuel; Allie-Hamdulay, Shameez; Jackson, Graham; Lieske, John C

    2014-01-01

    Urinary sulfate (SO4(2-)) and thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)) can potentially bind with calcium and decrease kidney stone risk. We modeled the effects of these species on the concentration of ionized calcium (iCa) and on supersaturation (SS) of calcium oxalate (CaOx) and calcium phosphate (CaP), and measured their in vitro effects on iCa and the upper limit of stability (ULM) of these salts. Urine data from 4 different types of stone patients were obtained from the Mayo Nephrology Clinic (Model 1). A second data set was obtained from healthy controls and hypercalciuric stone formers in the literature who had been treated with sodium thiosulfate (STS) (Model 2). The Joint Expert Speciation System (JESS) was used to calculate iCa and SS. In Model 1, these parameters were calculated as a function of sulfate and thiosulfate concentrations. In Model 2, data from pre- and post STS urines were analyzed. ULM and iCa were determined in human urine as a function of sulfate and thiosulfate concentrations. Calculated iCa and SS values for all calcium salts decreased with increasing sulfate concentration. Thiosulfate had no effect on these parameters. In Model 2, calculated iCa and CaOx SS increased after STS treatment, but CaP SS decreased, perhaps due to a decrease in pH after STS treatment. In confirmatory in vitro experiments supplemental sulfate, but not thiosulfate, significantly increased the calcium needed to achieve the ULM of CaP and tended to increase the oxalate needed to reach the ULM of CaOx. Sulfate also significantly decreased iCa in human urine, while thiosulfate had no effect. Increasing urinary sulfate could theoretically reduce CaOx and CaP stone risk. Although STS may reduce CaP stone risk by decreasing urinary pH, it might also paradoxically increase iCa and CaOx SS. As such, STS may not be a viable treatment option for stone disease.

  19. Biomimetic Mineralization of the Alginate/Gelatin/Calcium Oxalate Matrix for Immobilization of Pectinase: Influence of Matrix on the Pectinolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Bustamante-Vargas, Cindy Elena; de Oliveira, Débora; Valduga, Eunice; Venquiaruto, Luciana Dornelles; Paroul, Natalia; Backes, Geciane Toniazzo; Dallago, Rogério Marcos

    2016-07-01

    Pectinases catalyze the degradation of pectic substances and are used in several processes, mainly in food and textile industries. In this study, a biomimetic matrix of alginate/gelatin/calcium oxalate (AGOCa) was synthesized for the in situ immobilization via encapsulation of crude pectinase from Aspergillus niger ATCC 9642, obtaining an immobilization efficiency of about 61.7 %. To determine the performance of AGOCa matrix, this was compared to control matrices of alginate/calcium oxalate (AOxal) and alginate/water (ACa). By the evaluation of pH and temperature effects on the enzyme activity, it was observed an increase on pectinolytic activity for both three tested matrices with an increase on pH and temperature. The kinetic parameters for pectinase immobilized in the three matrices were determined using citric pectin as substrate. Values of K m of 0.003, 0.0013, and 0.0022 g mL(-1) and V max of 3.85, 4.32, and 3.17 μmol min(-1) g(-1) for AGOCa, AOxal, and ACa matrices were obtained, respectively. After 33 days of storage, the pectinase immobilized in the three different matrices kept its initial activity, but that immobilized in AGOCa presented high stability to the storage with a relative activity of about 160 %. The enzyme immobilized in AGOCa, AOxal, and ACa could be used in 10, 8, and 7 cycles, respectively, keeping 40 % of its initial activity.

  20. Calcium bioavailability and kinetics of calcium ascorbate and calcium acetate in rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jianwei; Zhang, Qinmin; Wastney, Meryl E; Weaver, Connie M

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the bioavailability and mechanism of calcium absorption of calcium ascorbate (ASC) and calcium acetate (AC). A series of studies was performed in adult Sprague-Dawley male rats. In the first study, each group of rats (n = 10/group) was assigned to one of the five test meals labeled with (45)Ca: (i) 25 mg calcium as heated ASC or (ii) unheated ASC, (iii) 25 mg calcium as unheated AC, (iv) 3.6 mg Ca as unheated ASC, or (v) unheated AC. Femur uptake indicated better calcium bioavailability from ASC than AC at both calcium loads. A 5-min heat treatment partly reduced bioavailability of ASC. Kinetic studies were performed to further investigate the mechanism of superior calcium bioavailability from ASC. Two groups of rats (n = 10/group) received oral doses of 25 mg Ca as ASC or AC. Each dose contained 20 micro Ci (45)Ca. Two additional groups of rats (n = 10/group) received an intravenous injection (iv) of 10 micro Ci (45)Ca after receiving an unlabeled oral dose of 25 mg calcium as ASC or AC. Sequential blood samples were collected over 48 hrs. Urine and fecal samples were collected every 12 hrs for 48 hrs and were analyzed for total calcium and (45)Ca content. Total calcium and (45)Ca from serum, urine, and feces were fitted by a compartment kinetics model with saturable and nonsaturable absorption pathways by WinSAAM (Windows-based Simulation Analysis and Modeling). The difference in calcium bioavailability between the two salts was due to differences in saturable rather than passive intestinal absorption and not to endogenous secretion or calcium deposition rate. The higher bioavailability of calcium ascorbate was due to a longer transit time in the small intestine compared with ASC.

  1. Microstructures of Randall's plaques and their interfaces with calcium oxalate monohydrate kidney stones reflect underlying mineral precipitation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sethmann, Ingo; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar; Knoll, Thomas; Enzmann, Frieder; Simon, Ludwig; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim

    2017-06-01

    Randall's plaques (RP) are preferred sites for the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) kidney stones. However, although processes of interstitial calcium phosphate (CaP) plaque formation are not well understood, the potential of plaque microstructures as indicators of CaP precipitation conditions received only limited attention. We investigated RP-associated COM stones for structural details of the calcified tissues and microstructural features of plaque-stone interfaces as indicators of the initial processes of stone formation. Significantly increased CaP supersaturation can be expected for interstitial fluid, if reabsorbed ions from the tubular system continuously diffuse into the collagenous connective tissue. Densely packed, fine-grained CaP particles were found in dense textures of basement membranes while larger, laminated particles were scattered in coarse-meshed interstitial tissue, which we propose to be due to differential spatial confinements and restrictions of ion diffusion. Particle morphologies suggest an initial precipitation as metastable amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). Morphologies and arrangements of first COM crystals at the RP-stone interface ranged from stacked euhedral platelets to skeletal morphologies and even porous, dendritic structures, indicating, in this order, increasing levels of COM supersaturation. Furthermore, these first COM crystals were often coated with CaP. On this basis, we propose that ions from CaP-supersaturated interstitial fluid may diffuse through porous RP into the urine, where a resulting local increase in COM supersaturation could trigger crystal nucleation and, hence, initiate stone formation. Ion-depleted fluid in persistent pores of initial COM layers may get replenished from interstitial fluid, leading to CaP precipitation in porous COM.

  2. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-08-15

    Dissolution therapy of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) kidney stone disease has not yet been implemented due to a lack of well characterized COM dissolution agents. The present study therefore aimed to identify potential COM crystal dissolution compounds. COM crystals were treated with deionized water (negative control), 5 mM EDTA (positive control), 5 mM sodium citrate, or 5mM sodium phosphate. COM crystal dissolution activities of these compounds were evaluated by phase-contrast and video-assisted microscopic examinations, semi-quantitative analysis of crystal size, number and total mass, and spectrophotometric oxalate-dissolution assay. In addition, effects of these compounds on detachment of COM crystals, which adhered tightly onto renal tubular cell surface, were also investigated. The results showed that citrate, not phosphate, had a significant dissolution effect on COM crystals as demonstrated by significant reduction of crystal size (approximately 37% decrease), crystal number (approximately 53% decrease) and total crystal mass (approximately 72% decrease) compared to blank and negative controls. Spectrophotometric oxalate-dissolution assay successfully confirmed the COM crystal dissolution property of citrate. Moreover, citrate could detach up to 85% of the adherent COM crystals from renal tubular cell surface. These data indicate that citrate is better than phosphate for dissolution and detachment of COM crystals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultracytochemical visualization of calcium distribution in heart cells and erythrocytes of zebrafish Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Niksirat, Hamid; Steinbach, Christoph

    2018-05-24

    Detection of patterns of subcellular calcium distribution in the cardiovascular system can contribute to understanding its role in cardiac and blood function. The present study localized calcium in heart atrium, ventricle, and bulbus arteriosus as well as in erythrocytes of zebrafish Danio rerio using an oxalate-pyroantimonate technique combined with transmission electron microscopy. Intracellular calcium stores were detected in caveolae, mitochondria, and the nuclei of several zebrafish cardiac cell types. Melanin pigmentation containing calcium stores was detected in the pericardial cavity. Melanin might be an extracellular source of calcium for heart beating and/or a lubricant to prevent friction during beating process. Calcium deposits were also detected in the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus of erythrocytes as well as in blood plasma. Possible exchange of calcium between erythrocytes and blood plasma was observed. Interactions of such calcium stores and possible contribution of extracellular calcium stores such as melanin pigmentation to supply calcium for vital functions of heart cells should be addressed in future studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Association of Household Food Insecurity and the Risk of Calcium Oxalate Stones.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Hamid; Dorosty Motlagh, Ahmad-Reza; Bagherniya, Mohammad; Daeezadeh, Atefeh; Safarian, Mohammad

    2017-08-29

    Food insecurity has been defined as 'limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods', which associated with adverse health consequences in human. Another alarming condition, which is related to several comorbidities is kidney stone. This study aimed to determine the association of household food insecurity and developing kidney stones (calcium oxalate) in adults referred to medical centers of Babol. This case-control study included 200 participants 18-65 years of ages (100 cases, 100 controls). An 18-items food insecurity questionnaire (USDA), a valid and reliable 147-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and demographic characteristics were obtained via interviewing. Sixty eight percent of cases and 40% of controls were food insecure, respectively. Food insecurity was significantly associated with the risk of kidney stone (P < .05). Furthermore, body mass index (BMI) and family history of kidney stone were significantly associated with the risk of kidney stones (P < .05). Food insecurity and BMI were significantly associated with the kidney stone, which shows the importance of availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods in prevention of the kidney stone.

  5. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Findings Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Conclusion Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance. PMID:28182142

  6. Calcium Oxalate Urolithiasis: A Case of Missing Microbes?

    PubMed

    Batagello, Carlos Alfredo; Monga, Manoj; Miller, Aaron W

    2018-05-29

    Urinary stone disease (USD) has known associations with the gut microbiota. Approximately 80% of kidney stones contain oxalate as a primary constituent and diverse oxalate-degrading bacteria exist within the human gut that may protect against USD. While bacteriotherapy represents a promising strategy to eliminate oxalate and reduce the risk of USD, oxalate-degrading probiotics have had limited success. To identify limitations of oxalate-degrading probiotics and refine development of bacteriotherapies to prevent USD, we review the literature associated with the gut microbiota and USD. A literature search was performed to identify publications that examine the role of oxalate-degrading bacteria or the whole gut microbiota in oxalate metabolism and the pathophysiology of USD. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies that examined the association of the whole gut microbiota with USD. In addition, we evaluated the gut microbiota of healthy individuals and those with co-morbidities related to USD using publically available data from the American Gut Project (AGP). Studies on O. formigenes reveal that colonization by this species is not a good predictor of USD risk nor urinary oxalate excretion. The species of oxalate-degrading bacteria used in probiotics and duration of administration does not impact efficacy or persistence. Studies focused on the whole gut microbiota reveal broad shifts in the gut microbiota associated with USD and a diverse microbial network is associated with oxalate metabolism. AGP data analysis demonstrated a strong overlap in microbial genera depleted in diseased individuals among USD and co-morbidities. The associations between the gut microbiota and USD extend beyond individual functional microbial species. Common shifts in the gut microbiota may facilitate the onset of USD and/or co-morbidities. The successful development of bacteriotherapies to inhibit USD will need to incorporate strategies that target a broad diversity of bacteria rather than

  7. Response surface methodology based extraction of Tribulus terrestris leads to an upsurge of antilithiatic potential by inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization processes.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Jyoti; Tandon, Simran; Gupta, Varun; Nayyar, Jasamrit; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2017-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris has significant antilithiatic efficacy established via both in vitro as well as in vivo studies and is used in numerous anti-urolithiatic herbal formulations viz. Cystone, Uriflow, Uritone and Neeri. However, to fully utilize its antilithiatic potential, the influence of different extraction parameters on antilithiatic ability of T. terrestris aqueous extract needs elucidation. Thus, the current study was undertaken using statistically optimized extraction conditions for aqueous extract preparation. Response surface methodology was employed to observe the influence of three variables i.e. temperature (°C), time (h) and solid: liquid ratio (S: L) on the extraction yield (%) and protein content (mg/g) of T. terrestris aqueous extract. RSM results revealed that the high S:L ratio, low temperature and reduced incubation time were optimal conditions for aqueous extraction. Under such extraction conditions the protein content reached the value of 26.6±1.22 mg/g and the obtained extraction yield was 27.32±1.62%. The assessment of antilithiatic activity of 4 selected extracts (AE1-4), revealed enhanced nucleation and aggregation inhibition of calcium oxalate crystals with AE1 and AE2, which in addition significantly altered the size and morphology of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals compared to AE3 and AE4. In vitro cell culture based studies on renal epithelial cells (MDCK, NRK-52E and PK 15) proved that the AE1 showed higher cytoprotective potency by increasing cell viability as compared to the oxalate treated group. The free radical scavenging activity of aqueous extract lowered the reactive oxygen specie's induced damage and potentially reduced the signals of programmed cell death due to oxalate injury. In addition, modulation of the COM crystal morphology was enhanced by AE1 as compared to AE2. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis of AE1, showed the presence of biomolecules which could aid in the attenuation of lithiatic process. In the light

  8. Response surface methodology based extraction of Tribulus terrestris leads to an upsurge of antilithiatic potential by inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization processes

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Jyoti; Tandon, Simran; Gupta, Varun; Nayyar, Jasamrit; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2017-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris has significant antilithiatic efficacy established via both in vitro as well as in vivo studies and is used in numerous anti-urolithiatic herbal formulations viz. Cystone, Uriflow, Uritone and Neeri. However, to fully utilize its antilithiatic potential, the influence of different extraction parameters on antilithiatic ability of T. terrestris aqueous extract needs elucidation. Thus, the current study was undertaken using statistically optimized extraction conditions for aqueous extract preparation. Response surface methodology was employed to observe the influence of three variables i.e. temperature (°C), time (h) and solid: liquid ratio (S: L) on the extraction yield (%) and protein content (mg/g) of T. terrestris aqueous extract. RSM results revealed that the high S:L ratio, low temperature and reduced incubation time were optimal conditions for aqueous extraction. Under such extraction conditions the protein content reached the value of 26.6±1.22 mg/g and the obtained extraction yield was 27.32±1.62%. The assessment of antilithiatic activity of 4 selected extracts (AE1-4), revealed enhanced nucleation and aggregation inhibition of calcium oxalate crystals with AE1 and AE2, which in addition significantly altered the size and morphology of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals compared to AE3 and AE4. In vitro cell culture based studies on renal epithelial cells (MDCK, NRK-52E and PK 15) proved that the AE1 showed higher cytoprotective potency by increasing cell viability as compared to the oxalate treated group. The free radical scavenging activity of aqueous extract lowered the reactive oxygen specie’s induced damage and potentially reduced the signals of programmed cell death due to oxalate injury. In addition, modulation of the COM crystal morphology was enhanced by AE1 as compared to AE2. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis of AE1, showed the presence of biomolecules which could aid in the attenuation of lithiatic process. In the light

  9. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    PubMed Central

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate PTHrP secretion and milk calcium transport with calcium availability. To test this idea genetically, we bred BLG-Cre mice with CaSR-floxed mice to ablate the CaSR specifically from mammary epithelial cells only at the onset of lactation (CaSR-cKO mice). Loss of the CaSR in the lactating mammary gland did not disrupt alveolar differentiation or milk production. However, it did increase the secretion of PTHrP into milk and decreased the transport of calcium from the circulation into milk. CaSR-cKO mice did not show accelerated bone resorption, but they did have a decrease in bone formation. Loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in hypercalcemia, decreased PTH secretion, and increased renal calcium excretion in lactating mothers. Finally, loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in decreased calcium accrual by suckling neonates, likely due to the combination of increased milk PTHrP and decreased milk calcium. These results demonstrate that the mammary gland CaSR coordinates maternal bone and calcium metabolism, calcium transport into milk, and neonatal calcium accrual during lactation. PMID:23782944

  10. Inhibition of Glycolate Oxidase With Dicer-substrate siRNA Reduces Calcium Oxalate Deposition in a Mouse Model of Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Chaitali; Avitahl-Curtis, Nicole; Pursell, Natalie; Larsson Cohen, Marita; Holmes, Benjamin; Diwanji, Rohan; Zhou, Wei; Apponi, Luciano; Koser, Martin; Ying, Bo; Chen, Dongyu; Shui, Xue; Saxena, Utsav; Cyr, Wendy A; Shah, Anee; Nazef, Naim; Wang, Weimin; Abrams, Marc; Dudek, Henryk; Salido, Eduardo; Brown, Bob D; Lai, Chengjung

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an autosomal recessive, metabolic disorder caused by mutations of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a key hepatic enzyme in the detoxification of glyoxylate arising from multiple normal metabolic pathways to glycine. Accumulation of glyoxylate, a precursor of oxalate, leads to the overproduction of oxalate in the liver, which accumulates to high levels in kidneys and urine. Crystalization of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the kidney ultimately results in renal failure. Currently, the only treatment effective in reduction of oxalate production in patients who do not respond to high-dose vitamin B6 therapy is a combined liver/kidney transplant. We explored an alternative approach to prevent glyoxylate production using Dicer-substrate small interfering RNAs (DsiRNAs) targeting hydroxyacid oxidase 1 (HAO1) mRNA which encodes glycolate oxidase (GO), to reduce the hepatic conversion of glycolate to glyoxylate. This approach efficiently reduces GO mRNA and protein in the livers of mice and nonhuman primates. Reduction of hepatic GO leads to normalization of urine oxalate levels and reduces CaOx deposition in a preclinical mouse model of PH1. Our results support the use of DsiRNA to reduce liver GO levels as a potential therapeutic approach to treat PH1. PMID:26758691

  11. Urine risk factors in children with calcium kidney stones and their siblings

    PubMed Central

    Bergsland, Kristin J.; Coe, Fredric L.; White, Mark D.; Erhard, Michael J.; DeFoor, William R.; Mahan, John D.; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Asplin, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium nephrolithiasis in children is increasing in prevalence and tends to be recurrent. Although children have a lower incidence of nephrolithiasis than adults, its etiology in children is less well understood; hence treatments targeted for adults may not be optimal in children. To better understand metabolic abnormalities in stone forming children, we compared chemical measurements and the crystallization properties of 24-hour urine collections from 129 stone formers matched to 105 non-stone forming siblings and 183 normal, healthy children with no family history of stones; all aged 6 to 17 years. The principal risk factor for calcium stone formation was hypercalciuria. Stone formers have strikingly higher calcium excretion along with high supersaturation for calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate, and a reduced distance between the upper limit of metastability and supersaturation for calcium phosphate, indicating increased risk of calcium phosphate crystallization. Other differences in urine chemistry that exist between adult stone formers and normal individuals such as hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia, abnormal urine pH and low urine volume were not found in these children. Hence, hypercalciuria and a reduction in the gap between calcium phosphate upper limit of metastability and supersaturation are crucial determinants of stone risk. This highlights the importance of managing hypercalciuria in children with calcium stones. PMID:22358148

  12. Urine risk factors in children with calcium kidney stones and their siblings.

    PubMed

    Bergsland, Kristin J; Coe, Fredric L; White, Mark D; Erhard, Michael J; DeFoor, William R; Mahan, John D; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Asplin, John R

    2012-06-01

    Calcium nephrolithiasis in children is increasing in prevalence and tends to be recurrent. Although children have a lower incidence of nephrolithiasis than adults, its etiology in children is less well understood; hence, treatments targeted for adults may not be optimal in children. To better understand metabolic abnormalities in stone-forming children, we compared chemical measurements and the crystallization properties of 24-h urine collections from 129 stone formers matched to 105 non-stone-forming siblings and 183 normal, healthy children with no family history of stones, all aged 6 to 17 years. The principal risk factor for calcium stone formation was hypercalciuria. Stone formers have strikingly higher calcium excretion along with high supersaturation for calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate, and a reduced distance between the upper limit of metastability and supersaturation for calcium phosphate, indicating increased risk of calcium phosphate crystallization. Other differences in urine chemistry that exist between adult stone formers and normal individuals such as hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia, abnormal urine pH, and low urine volume were not found in these children. Hence, hypercalciuria and a reduction in the gap between calcium phosphate upper limit of metastability and supersaturation are crucial determinants of stone risk. This highlights the importance of managing hypercalciuria in children with calcium stones.

  13. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometers (SIMS) for calcium isotope measurements as an application to biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, S. M.; Hoenigman, J. R.; Moddeman, W. E.

    1981-11-01

    The potential use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to analyze biological samples for calcium isotopes is discussed. Comparison of UTI and Extranuclear based quadrupole systems is made on the basis of the analysis of CaO and calcium metal. The Extranuclear quadrupole based system is superior in resolution and sensitivity to the UTI system and is recommended. For determination of calcium isotopes to within an accuracy of a few percent a high resolution quadrupole, such as the Extranuclear, and signal averaging capability are required. Charge neutralization will be mandated for calcium oxide, calcium nitrate, or calcium oxalate. SIMS is not capable of the high precision and high accuracy results possible by thermal ionization methods, but where faster analysis is desirable with an accuracy of a few percent, SIMS is a viable alternative.

  14. Calcium nephrolithiasis: effect of water hardness on urinary electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Bradley F; Schenkman, Noah S; Bruce, Jeremy E; Leslie, Stephen W; Stoller, Marshall L

    2002-07-01

    To analyze the impact of water hardness from public water supplies on calcium stone incidence and 24-hour urine chemistries in patients with known calcium urinary stone formation. Patients are frequently concerned that their public water supply may contribute to urinary stone disease. Investigators have documented an inverse relationship between water hardness and calcium lithogenesis. Others have found no such association. Patients who form calcium stones (n = 4833) were identified geographically by their zip code. Water hardness information from distinct geographic public water supplies was obtained, and patient 24-hour urine chemistries were evaluated. Drinking water hardness was divided into decile rankings on the basis of the public water supply information obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency. These data were compared with patient questionnaires and 24-hour urine chemistries. The calcium and magnesium levels in the drinking water were analyzed as independent variables. The number of total lifetime stone episodes was similar between patients residing in areas with soft public water and hard public water. Patients consuming the softest water decile formed 3.4 lifetime stones and those who consumed the hardest water developed 3.0 lifetime stones (P = 0.0017). The 24-hour urine calcium, magnesium, and citrate levels increased directly with drinking water hardness, and no significant change was found in urinary oxalate, uric acid, pH, or volume. The impact of water hardness on urinary stone formation remains unclear, despite a weak correlation between water hardness and urinary calcium, magnesium, and citrate excretion. Tap water, however, can change urinary electrolytes in patients who form calcium stones.

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... You'll also find calcium in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables (especially collard and turnip greens, ... can enjoy good sources of calcium such as dark green, leafy vegetables, broccoli, chickpeas, and calcium-fortified ...

  16. Prediction of calcium level in melamine-related urinary calculi with helical CT: diagnostic performance evaluation and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Xiaorui, Ru; Gang, Huang; Xinsheng, Xi; Xiaogang, Huang; Li, Dong; Yirong, Chen

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between CT-attenuation and stone calcium level in melamine-related urinary calculi (MRUC). A total of 25 MRUC with known composition and calcium level were included (11 uric acid stones, 2 calcium oxalate stones and 12 mixture stones of uric acid and calcium oxalate). Of all, 18 renal stones accepted alkalization therapy except for 5 lower urinary tract stones and 2 stones of unknown position. With well-matched composition, 61 adult urinary stones were included as controls. Every stone was scanned by helical CT (80 kV/120 kV, 300 mA, pitch 0.625 mm) and the highest CT-attenuation value measured. CT-attenuation values of MRUC increased gradually from uric acid stones, mixture stones to calcium oxalate stones, but were always lower than the values of controls. Furthermore, a strong positive correlation was found between stone CT-attenuation value and stone calcium level (n = 25, r (80kV) = 0.883, p = 0.000; r (120kV) = 0.855, p = 0.000). Compared with alkalization-therapy-alone group, stone CT-attenuation values and stone calcium level in the comprehensive-therapy group were significantly greater (CT(80kV) 1,057 ± 639 vs. 172 ± 61 HU, p = 0.001; CT(120kV) 783 ± 476 vs. 162 ± 60 HU, p = 0.001; Ca 19.83 ± 7.48% vs. 1.30 ± 1.51%, p = 0.000). Fisher's exact test suggested that the stones with higher CT-attenuation values tended to resist alkalization when 400 HU served as the cutoff value (P (80kV) = 0.002, P (120kV) = 0.000). In conclusion, the study was the first to illustrate that the CT-attenuation value could reflect calcium level in MRUC and found that stones with higher CT-attenuation value were not amenable to alkalization because they probably contained greater calcium. For those patients, we believe that comprehensive therapy will be the best choice.

  17. Long-term, low-dose, intravenous vitamin C leads to plasma calcium oxalate supersaturation in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Canavese, Caterina; Petrarulo, Michele; Massarenti, Paola; Berutti, Silvia; Fenoglio, Roberta; Pauletto, Daniela; Lanfranco, Giacomo; Bergamo, Daniela; Sandri, Luisa; Marangella, Martino

    2005-03-01

    Ascorbate supplementation for patients on regular dialysis treatment (RDT) is advised to obviate deficiency and improve epoetin response in those with functional iron deficiency. However, clear-cut safety concerns regarding hyperoxalemia are still poorly understood. This study tries to establish safety/efficacy profiles of ascorbate and oxalate during long-term intravenous ascorbate supplementation. A prospective study was performed in 30 patients on RDT showing ascorbate deficiency (plasma ascorbate < 2.6 mg/L [<15 micromol/L]): 18 patients were administered intravenous ascorbate during 18 months (250 mg/wk, subsequently increased to 500 mg), and 12 patients were taken as reference untreated cases. Plasma ascorbate and oxalate assays and dialytic balance determinations were performed (ion chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively) at baseline, during treatment, and 12 months after withdrawal. Plasma ascorbate levels increased dose dependently with supplementation (1.6 +/- 0.8 mg/L [9.1 +/- 4.6 mumol/L] at baseline, 2.8 +/- 1.8 mg/L [15.9 +/- 10.1 micromol/L]) with 250 mg of ascorbate, and 6.6 +/- 2.8 mg/L [37.5 +/- 16.0 micromol/L] with 500 mg/wk of ascorbate), but only normalized with greater dosages for several months in 94% of patients. Baseline plasma oxalate levels increased from 3.2 +/- 0.8 mg/L (35.8 +/- 8.8 micromol/L) to 3.6 +/- 0.8 mg/L (39.5 +/- 9.1 micromol/L) and 4.5 +/- 0.9 mg/L (50.3 +/- 10.4 micromol/L) with 250 and 500 mg, respectively ( P < 0.001). The calcium oxalate saturation threshold was exceeded by 7 of 18 patients (40%) during 6 months therapy with 500 mg/wk. Ascorbate dialysis removal increased from 37.8 +/- 23.2 mg (215 +/- 132 micromol) to 99.6 +/- 51.7 mg (566 +/- 294 micromol) during supplementation (P < 0.001), with corresponding increases in oxalate removal from 82.5 +/- 33.2 mg (917 +/- 369 micromol) to 111.2 +/- 32.6 mg/L (1,236 +/- 362 micromol; P < 0.01). Withdrawal reverted plasma

  18. OXALATE DEPOSITION ON ASBESTOS BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical and histopathologic findings in three patients with a deposition of calcium oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos are provided. In addition, we test the hypothesis that this oxalate can be generated through a nonenzymatic o...

  19. Specific Adsorption of Osteopontin and Synthetic Polypeptides to Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Taller, Adam; Grohe, Bernd; Rogers, Kem A.; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Hunter, Graeme K.

    2007-01-01

    Protein-crystal interactions are known to be important in biomineralization. To study the physicochemical basis of such interactions, we have developed a technique that combines confocal microscopy of crystals with fluorescence imaging of proteins. In this study, osteopontin (OPN), a protein abundant in urine, was labeled with the fluorescent dye AlexaFluor-488 and added to crystals of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), the major constituent of kidney stones. In five to seven optical sections along the z axis, scanning confocal microscopy was used to visualize COM crystals and fluorescence imaging to map OPN adsorbed to the crystals. To quantify the relative adsorption to different crystal faces, fluorescence intensity was measured around the perimeter of the crystal in several sections. Using this method, it was shown that OPN adsorbs with high specificity to the edges between {100} and {121} faces of COM and much less so to {100}, {121}, or {010} faces. By contrast, poly-L-aspartic acid adsorbs preferentially to {121} faces, whereas poly-L-glutamic acid adsorbs to all faces approximately equally. Growth of COM in the presence of rat bone OPN results in dumbbell-shaped crystals. We hypothesize that the edge-specific adsorption of OPN may be responsible for the dumbbell morphology of COM crystals found in human urine. PMID:17496021

  20. Calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) analysis for the identification of decayed tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Huang, Linpei

    2014-10-24

    The history of tea is poorly known, mainly due to the questionable identification of decayed tea plants in archaeological samples. This paper attempts to test the utility of calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) for the identification of tea in archaeological samples. It provides the first survey of the macropatterns of calciphytoliths in several species of Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants. Crystals were extracted from 45 samples of tea, Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants, and detected microscopically between crossed polarizers. In tea plants, druse and trichome base are the most distinctive crystals. Druses have the smallest diameter (11.65 ± 3.64 μm), and trichome bases have four distinctive straight and regular cracks, similar to a regular extinction cross. The results provide morphological criteria for distinguishing tea from other plants, specifically the presence of identifiable druses together with calcified trichome bases. The implications are significant for understanding the history of tea and plant exploitation, especially for plants for which the preservation of macrofossils is poor.

  1. Secondary ion mass spectrometers (SIMS) for calcium isotope measurements as an application to biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, S.M.; Hoenigman, J.R.; Moddeman, W.E.

    1981-11-20

    The potential use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to analyze biological samples for calcium isotopes is discussed. Comparison of UTI and Extranuclear based quadrupole systems is made on the basis of the analysis of CaO and calcium metal. The Extranuclear quadrupole based system is superior in resolution and sensitivity to the UTI system and is recommended. For determination of calcium isotopes to within an accuracy of a few percent a high resolution quadrupole, such as the Extranuclear, and signal averaging capability are required. Charge neutralization will be mandated for calcium oxide, calcium nitrate, or calcium oxalate. SIMS is notmore » capable of the high precision and high accuracy results possible by thermal ionization methods, but where faster analysis is desirable with an accuracy of a few percent, SIMS is a viable alternative.« less

  2. Determination of thermodynamic parameters for complexation of calcium and magnesium with chondroitin sulfate isomers using isothermal titration calorimetry: Implications for calcium kidney-stone research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Allen L.; Jackson, Graham E.

    2017-04-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) occurs in human urine. It has several potential binding sites for calcium and as such may play an inhibitory role in calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate (kidney stone disease by reducing the supersaturation (SS) and crystallization of these salts. Urinary magnesium is also a role player in determining speciation in stone forming processes. This study was undertaken to determine the thermodynamic parameters for binding of the disaccharide unit of two different CS isomers with calcium and magnesium. These included the binding constant K. Experiments were performed using an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) at 3 different pH levels in the physiological range in human urine. Data showed that interactions between the CS isomers and calcium and magnesium occur via one binding site, thought to be sulfate, and that log K values are 1.17-1.93 and 1.77-1.80 for these two metals respectively. Binding was significantly stronger in Mg-CS than in Ca-CS complexes and was found to be dependent on pH in the latter but not in the former. Furthermore, binding in Ca-CS complexes was dependent on the location of the sulfate binding site. This was not the case in the Mg-CS complexes. Interactions were shown to be entropy driven and enthalpy unfavourable. These findings can be used in computational modeling studies to predict the effects of the calcium and magnesium CS complexes on the speciation of calcium and the SS of calcium salts in real urine samples.

  3. Variability of protein content in calcium oxalate monohydrate stones.

    PubMed

    Williams, James C; Zarse, Chad A; Jackson, Molly E; Witzmann, Frank A; McAteer, James A

    2006-08-01

    Urinary stones are heterogeneous in their fragility to lithotripter shockwaves. As a first step in gaining a better understanding of the role of matrix in stone fragility, we measured extractible protein in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones that were extensively characterized by micro-computed tomography (micro CT). Stones were scanned using micro CT (Scanco mCT20, 34 microm). They were ground, and the protein extracted using four methods: 0.25M EDTA, 2% SDS reducing buffer, 9M urea buffer, and 10% acetic acid. Protein was measured using NanoOrange. The SDS extracts were also examined using polyacrylamide electrophoresis (PAGE). Extracted protein was highest with the SDS or urea methods (0.28% +/- 0.13% and 0.24% +/- 0.11%, respectively) and lower using the EDTA method (0.17% +/- 0.05%; P < 0.02). Acetic acid extracted little protein (0.006 +/- 0.002%; P < 0.001). Individual stones were significantly different in extractability of protein by the different methods, and SDS-PAGE revealed different protein patterns for individual stones. Extracted protein did not correlate with X-ray-lucent void percentage, which ranged from 0.06% to 2.8% of stone volume, or with apatite content. Extractible stone-matrix protein differs for individual COM stones, and yield is dependent on the extraction method. The presence of X-ray-lucent voids or minor amounts of apatite in stones did not correlate with protein content. The amounts of protein recovered were much lower than reported by Boyce, showing that these methods extracted only a fraction of the protein bound up in the stones. The results suggest that none of the methods tested will be useful for helping to answer the question of whether matrix content differs among stones of differing fragility to lithotripter shockwaves.

  4. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  5. Ozone-Induced Responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): Metabolic Cross-Talk between Volatile Organic Compounds and Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Bolsoni, Vanessa Palermo; de Oliveira, Debora Pinheiro; Guaratini, Maria Tereza Gromboni; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Marabesi, Mauro Alexandre; Alves, Edenise Segala; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA) regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3) that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3. PMID:25165889

  6. In vitro inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization and crystal adherence to renal tubular epithelial cells by Terminalia arjuna.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Tandon, S; Singla, S K; Tandon, C

    2016-04-01

    Urolithiasis is a multifactorial disease and remains a public health problem around the world. Of all types of renal stones, calcium oxalate (CaOx) is the most common composition formed in the urinary system of the patients with urolithiasis. The present study is aimed at evaluating the antiurolithiatic properties of the Tris-Cl extract (TE) of Terminalia arjuna (T. arjuna). The antilithiatic activity of TE of T. arjuna was investigated on nucleation, aggregation, and growth of the CaOx crystals, as well as its protective potency was tested on oxalate-induced cell injury of NRK-52E renal epithelial cells. Also, in vitro antioxidant activity of TE T. arjuna bark was also determined. The TE of T. arjuna exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition of nucleation and growth of CaOx crystals. Inhibition of aggregation of CaOx crystals remains constant. When NRK-52E cells were injured by exposure to oxalate for 48 h, the TE prevented the cells from injury and CaOx crystal adherence resulting in increased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. The TE also scavenged the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals with an IC50 at 51.72 µg/mL. The results indicated that T. arjuna is a potential candidate for phytotherapy against urolithiasis as it attains the ability to inhibit CaOx crystallization and scavenge DPPH free radicals in vitro along with a cytoprotective role.

  7. NALP3-mediated inflammation is a principal cause of progressive renal failure in oxalate nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Felix; Asplin, John R.; Granja, Ignacio; Schmidt, Insa M.; Moeckel, Gilbert; David, Rachel; Flavell, Richard A.; Aronson, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate nephropathy with renal failure is caused by multiple disorders causing hyperoxaluria due to either overproduction of oxalate (primary hyperoxaluria) or excessive absorption of dietary oxalate (enteric hyperoxaluria). To study the etiology of renal failure in crystal-induced kidney disease, we created a model of progressive oxalate nephropathy by feeding mice a diet high in soluble oxalate (high oxalate in the absence of dietary calcium). Renal histology was characterized by intratubular calcium-oxalate crystal deposition with an inflammatory response in the surrounding interstitium. Oxalate nephropathy was not found in mice fed a high oxalate diet that also contained calcium. NALP3, also known as cryopyrin, has been implicated in crystal-associated diseases such as gout and silicosis. Mice fed the diet high in soluble oxalate demonstrated increased NALP3 expression in the kidney. Nalp3-null mice were completely protected from the progressive renal failure and death that occurred in wild-type mice fed the diet high in soluble oxalate. NALP3-deficiency did not affect oxalate homeostasis, thereby excluding differences in intestinal oxalate handling to explain the observed phenotype. Thus, progressive renal failure in oxalate nephropathy results primarily from NALP3-mediated inflammation. PMID:23739234

  8. Calcium deprivation increases the palatability of calcium solutions in rats.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Stuart A; Forestell, Catherine A; Tordoff, Michael G

    2005-02-15

    Calcium-deprived rats have elevated intakes of CaCl2, other calcium salts, and some non-calcium compounds. We used taste reactivity to examine the effects of calcium deprivation on the palatability of CaCl2 and other solutions. Nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were calcium-deprived by maintenance on a low-calcium diet, and eight replete rats were used as controls. All rats were videotaped during intraoral infusion of the following solutions: 30 and 300 mM CaCl2, 30 mM calcium lactate, 100 and 600 mM NaCl, 30 mM MgCl2, 1 mM quinine.HCl, 2.5 mM sodium saccharin, and deionized water. We counted individual orofacial and somatic movements elicited by the infusions and used them to calculate total ingestive and aversive scores. Relative to controls, calcium-deprived rats gave a significantly larger number of tongue protrusions and had higher total ingestive scores for CaCl2, calcium lactate, NaCl, and MgCl2. Our results suggest that CaCl2, calcium lactate, NaCl, and MgCl2 taste more palatable to rats when they are calcium-deprived than replete, and this may be responsible for the increased intake of these solutions following calcium deprivation.

  9. Calcium oxalate monohydrate aggregation induced by aggregation of desialylated Tamm-Horsfall protein

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Pragasam; Rimer, Jeffrey D.; Kolbach, Ann M.; Kleinman, Jack G.

    2011-01-01

    Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) is thought to protect against calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stone formation by inhibiting COM aggregation. Several studies reported that stone formers produce THP with reduced levels of glycosylation, particularly sialic acid levels, which leads to reduced negative charge. In this study, normal THP was treated with neuraminidase to remove sialic acid residues, confirmed by an isoelectric point shift to higher pH. COM aggregation assays revealed that desialylated THP (ds-THP) promoted COM aggregation, while normal THP inhibited aggregation. The appearance of protein aggregates in solutions at ds-THP concentrations ≥1 µg/mL in 150 mM NaCl correlated with COM aggregation promotion, implying that ds-THP aggregation induced COM aggregation. The aggregation-promoting effect of the ds-THP was independent of pH above its isoelectric point, but was substantially reduced at low ionic strength, where protein aggregation was much reduced. COM aggregation promotion was maximized at a ds-THP to COM mass ratio of ~0.025, which can be explained by a model wherein partial COM surface coverage by ds-THP aggregates promotes crystal aggregation by bridging opposing COM surfaces, whereas higher surface coverage leads to repulsion between adsorbed ds-THP aggregates. Thus, desialylation of THP apparently abrogates a normal defensive action of THP by inducing protein aggregation, and subsequently COM aggregation, a condition that favors kidney stone formation. PMID:21229239

  10. Calcium ionization balance and argon/calcium abundance in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, E.; Marocchi, D.; Gabriel, A. H.; Doschek, G. A.

    1987-12-01

    An earlier analysis of solar flare calcium spectra from XRP and P78-1 aimed at measuring the calcium ionization balance resulted in an ambiguity due to a line blend between the calcium q line and an Ar XVII line. In the present work the calcium line 'r' is included in the analysis in order to resolve this problem. It is shown that the correct calcium ionization balance is that indicated in the earlier paper as corresponding to an argon/calcium abundance ratio of 0.2. The argon/calcium abundance ratio in the group of solar flares studied is shown to be 0.2 + or - 0.2. It is further argued that while the abundance of heavy elements may be enhanced in energetic flare events, this enhancement is less for argon than for calcium, leading to an argon/calcium ratio smaller than that present in the quiet sun.

  11. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Maalox® (as a combination product containing Calcium Carbonate, Simethicone) ... Relief (as a combination product containing Calcium Carbonate, Simethicone) ... Plus (as a combination product containing Calcium Carbonate, Simethicone)

  12. Calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) analysis for the identification of decayed tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Huang, Linpei

    2014-01-01

    The history of tea is poorly known, mainly due to the questionable identification of decayed tea plants in archaeological samples. This paper attempts to test the utility of calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) for the identification of tea in archaeological samples. It provides the first survey of the macropatterns of calciphytoliths in several species of Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants. Crystals were extracted from 45 samples of tea, Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants, and detected microscopically between crossed polarizers. In tea plants, druse and trichome base are the most distinctive crystals. Druses have the smallest diameter (11.65 ± 3.64 μm), and trichome bases have four distinctive straight and regular cracks, similar to a regular extinction cross. The results provide morphological criteria for distinguishing tea from other plants, specifically the presence of identifiable druses together with calcified trichome bases. The implications are significant for understanding the history of tea and plant exploitation, especially for plants for which the preservation of macrofossils is poor. PMID:25342006

  13. Oxalobacter formigenes Colonization and Oxalate Dynamics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingsheng; Ellis, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Animal and human studies have provided compelling evidence that colonization of the intestine with Oxalobacter formigenes reduces urinary oxalate excretion and lowers the risk of forming calcium oxalate kidney stones. The mechanism providing protection appears to be related to the unique ability of O. formigenes to rely on oxalate as a major source of carbon and energy for growth. However, much is not known about the factors that influence colonization and host-bacterium interactions. We have colonized mice with O. formigenes OxCC13 and systematically investigated the impacts of diets with different levels of calcium and oxalate on O. formigenes intestinal densities and urinary and intestinal oxalate levels. Measurement of intestinal oxalate levels in mice colonized or not colonized with O. formigenes demonstrated the highly efficient degradation of soluble oxalate by O. formigenes relative to other microbiota. The ratio of calcium to oxalate in diets was important in determining colonization densities and conditions where urinary oxalate and fecal oxalate excretion were modified, and the results were consistent with those from studies we have performed with colonized and noncolonized humans. The use of low-oxalate purified diets showed that 80% of animals retained O. formigenes colonization after a 1-week dietary oxalate deprivation. Animals not colonized with O. formigenes excreted two times more oxalate in feces than they had ingested. This nondietary source of oxalate may play an important role in the survival of O. formigenes during periods of dietary oxalate deprivation. These studies suggest that the mouse will be a useful model to further characterize interactions between O. formigenes and the host and factors that impact colonization. PMID:25979889

  14. FT-Raman spectroscopic study of calcium-rich and magnesium-rich carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Villar, Susana E Jorge; Jehlicka, Jan; Munshi, Tasnim

    2005-08-01

    Calcium and magnesium carbonates are important minerals found in sedimentary environments. Although sandstones are the most common rock colonized by endolith organisms, the production of calcium and magnesium carbonates is important in survival strategies of organisms and as a source for the removal of oxalate ions. Extremophile organisms in some situations may convert or destroy carbonates of calcium and magnesium, which gives important information about the conditions under which these organisms can survive. The identification on the surface of Mars of 'White Rock' formations, in Juventae Chasma or Sabaea Terra, as possibly carbonate rocks makes the study of these minerals a prerequisite of remote Martian exploration. Here, we show the protocol for the identification by Raman spectroscopy of different calcium and magnesium carbonates and we present a database of relevance in the search for life, extinct or extant, on Mars; this will be useful for the assessment of data obtained from remote, miniaturized Raman spectrometers now proposed for Mars exploration.

  15. Oxalate content of cereals and cereal products.

    PubMed

    Siener, Roswitha; Hönow, Ruth; Voss, Susanne; Seidler, Ana; Hesse, Albrecht

    2006-04-19

    Detailed knowledge of food oxalate content is of essential importance for dietary treatment of recurrent calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Dietary oxalate can contribute considerably to the amount of urinary oxalate excretion. Because cereal foods play an important role in daily nutrition, the soluble and total oxalate contents of various types of cereal grains, milling products, bread, pastries, and pasta were analyzed using an HPLC-enzyme-reactor method. A high total oxalate content (>50 mg/100 g) was found in whole grain wheat species Triticum durum (76.6 mg/100 g), Triticum sativum (71.2 mg/100 g), and Triticum aestivum (53.3 mg/100 g). Total oxalate content was comparably high in whole grain products of T. aestivum, that is, wheat flakes and flour, as well as in whole grain products of T. durum, that is, couscous, bulgur, and pasta. The highest oxalate content was demonstrated for wheat bran (457.4 mg/100 g). The higher oxalate content in whole grain than in refined grain cereals suggests that oxalic acid is primarily located in the outer layers of cereal grains. Cereals and cereal products contribute to the daily oxalate intake to a considerable extent. Vegetarian diets may contain high amounts of oxalate when whole grain wheat and wheat products are ingested. Recommendations for prevention of recurrence of calcium oxalate stone disease have to take into account the oxalate content of these foodstuffs.

  16. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  17. Pre-treatment of soybean plants with calcium stimulates ROS responses and mitigates infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Arfaoui, Arbia; El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Daayf, Fouad

    2018-01-01

    Considering the high incidence of white mold caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in a variety of field crops and vegetables, different control strategies are needed to keep the disease under economical threshold. This study assessed the effect of foliar application of a calcium formulation on disease symptoms, oxalic acid production, and on the oxidative stress metabolism in soybean plants inoculated with each of two isolates of the pathogen that have contrasting aggressiveness (HA, highly-aggressive versus WA, weakly-aggressive). Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in soybean plants inoculated with S. sclerotiorum isolates were assessed at 6, 24, 48 and 72 h post inoculation (hpi). Generation of ROS including hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), anion superoxide (O 2 - ) and hydroxyl radical (OH) was evaluated. Inoculation with the WA isolate resulted in more ROS accumulation compared to the HA isolate. Pre-treatment with the calcium formulation restored ROS production in plants inoculated with the HA isolate. We also noted a marked decrease in oxalic acid content in the leaves inoculated with the HA isolate in presence of calcium, which coincided with an increase in plant ROS production. The expression patterns of genes involved in ROS detoxification in response to the calcium treatments and/or inoculation with S. Sclerotiorum isolates were monitored by RT-qPCR. All of the tested genes showed a higher expression in response to inoculation with the WA isolate. The expression of most genes tested peaked at 6 hpi, which preceded ROS accumulation in the soybean leaves. Overall, these data suggest that foliar application of calcium contributes to a decrease in oxalic acid production and disease, arguably via modulation of the ROS metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  19. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  20. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  1. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  2. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for special...

  3. Mucin 4 Gene Silencing Reduces Oxidative Stress and Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells Through the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Pathway in Nephrolithiasis Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling; Zou, Lu-Xi; Wang, Jie; Chen, Ting; Han, Yu-Chen; Zhu, Dong-Dong; Zhuo, Shi-Chao

    2018-05-25

    Nephrolithiasis plagues a great number of patients all over the world. Increasing evidence shows that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and renal tubular epithelial cell (RTEC) dysfunction and attrition are central to the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Mucin 4 (MUC4) is reported as an activator of ERK signaling pathway in epithelial cells. In this study, using rat models of calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephrolithiasis, the present study aims to define the roles of MUC4 and ERK signaling pathway as contributors to oxidative stress and CaOx crystal formation in RTEC. Data sets of nephrolithiasis were searched using GEO database and a heat flow map was drawn. Then MUC4 function was predicted. Wistar rats were prepared for the purpose of model establishment of ethylene glycol and ammonium chloride induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. In order to assess the detailed regulatory mechanism of MUC4 silencing on the ERK signaling pathway and RTEC, we used recombinant plasmid to downregulate MUC4 expression in Wistar rat-based models. Samples from rat urine, serum and kidney tissues were reviewed to identify oxalic acid and calcium contents, BUN, Cr, Ca2+ and P3+ levels, calcium crystal formation in renal tubules and MUC4 positive expression rate. Finally, RT-qPCR, Western blot analysis, and ELISA were employed to access oxidative stress state and CaOx crystal formation in RTEC. Initially, MUC4 was found to have an influence on the process of nephrolithiasis. MUC4 was upregulated in the CaOx nephrolithiasis model rats. We proved that the silencing of MUC4 triggered the inactivation of ERK signaling pathway. Following the silencing of MUC4 or the inhibition of ERK signaling pathway, the oxalic acid and calcium contents in rat urine, BUN, Cr, Ca2+ and P3+ levels in rat serum, p-ERK1/2, MCP-1 and OPN expressions in RTEC and H2O2 and MDA levels in the cultured supernatant were downregulated, but the GSH-Px, CAT and SOD levels in the cultured supernatant were

  4. Calcium waves.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  5. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    Urinary Ca+2; Kidney stones - calcium in urine; Renal calculi - calcium in your urine; Parathyroid - calcium in urine ... A 24-hour urine sample is most often needed: On day 1, urinate into the toilet when you wake up in the morning. ...

  6. Degradation of oxalate in rats implanted with immobilized oxalate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, K G; Tarachand, U

    1986-01-20

    Accumulation of oxalate leads to hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in man. Since oxalate is a metabolic end product in mammals, the feasibility of its enzymic degradation has been tested in vivo in rats by administering exogenous oxalate oxidase. Oxalate oxidase, isolated from banana fruit peels, in its native form was found to be non-active at the physiological pH of the recipient animal. However, its functional viability in the recipient animal was ensured by its prior binding with ethylenemaleic anhydride, thus shifting its pH activity curve towards the alkaline range. Rats implanted with dialysis membrane capsules containing such immobilized oxalate oxidase in their peritoneal cavities effectively metabolized intraperitoneally injected [14C]oxalate as well as its precursor [14C]glyoxalate. The implantation of capsules containing coentrapped multienzyme preparations of oxalate oxidase, catalase and peroxidase led to a further degradation of administered [14C]oxalate in rats.

  7. Genetically Encoded Calcium Indicators For Studying Long-Term Calcium Dynamics During Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, M. Iveth; Chen, Jessica J.; Boehning, Darren

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium release is essential for regulating almost all cellular functions. Specific spatio-temporal patterns of cytosolic calcium elevations are critical determinants of cell fate in response to pro-apoptotic cellular stressors. As the apoptotic program can take hours or days, measurement of long-term calcium dynamics are essential for understanding the mechanistic role of calcium in apoptotic cell death. Due to the technical limitations of using calcium-sensitive dyes to measure cytosolic calcium little is known about long-term calcium dynamics in living cells after treatment with apoptosis-inducing drugs. Genetically encoded calcium indicators could potentially overcome some of the limitations of calcium-sensitive dyes. Here, we compared the performance of the genetically encoded calcium indicators GCaMP6s and GCaMP6f with the ratiometric dye Fura-2. GCaMP6s performed as well or better than Fura-2 in detecting agonist-induced calcium transients. We then examined the utility of GCaMP6s for continuously measuring apoptotic calcium release over the course of ten hours after treatment with staurosporine. We found that GCaMP6s was suitable for measuring apoptotic calcium release over long time courses and revealed significant heterogeneity in calcium release dynamics in individual cells challenged with staurosporine. Our results suggest GCaMP6s is an excellent indicator for monitoring long-term changes cytosolic calcium during apoptosis. PMID:28073595

  8. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  9. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + O (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: Δ G° = -64,300(±700) + 19.8(±3.5) T J/mol (1373 to 1623 K) The activities of calcium in the CaOsatd-Ca- MF2 ( M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaOsatd-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF2, BaF2, and MgF2 at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  10. Genetically encoded calcium indicators for studying long-term calcium dynamics during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Iveth; Chen, Jessica J; Boehning, Darren

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium release is essential for regulating almost all cellular functions. Specific spatio-temporal patterns of cytosolic calcium elevations are critical determinants of cell fate in response to pro-apoptotic cellular stressors. As the apoptotic program can take hours or days, measurement of long-term calcium dynamics are essential for understanding the mechanistic role of calcium in apoptotic cell death. Due to the technical limitations of using calcium-sensitive dyes to measure cytosolic calcium little is known about long-term calcium dynamics in living cells after treatment with apoptosis-inducing drugs. Genetically encoded calcium indicators could potentially overcome some of the limitations of calcium-sensitive dyes. Here, we compared the performance of the genetically encoded calcium indicators GCaMP6s and GCaMP6f with the ratiometric dye Fura-2. GCaMP6s performed as well or better than Fura-2 in detecting agonist-induced calcium transients. We then examined the utility of GCaMP6s for continuously measuring apoptotic calcium release over the course of ten hours after treatment with staurosporine. We found that GCaMP6s was suitable for measuring apoptotic calcium release over long time courses and revealed significant heterogeneity in calcium release dynamics in individual cells challenged with staurosporine. Our results suggest GCaMP6s is an excellent indicator for monitoring long-term changes cytosolic calcium during apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  12. Calcium overloading in traumatic axonal injury by lateral head rotation: a morphological evidence in rat model.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Sheng; Xiang, Zhang; Zhou, Fei; Fu, Luo-An; Shuang, Wang

    2004-05-01

    The study investigated morphologically axonal calcium overloading and its relationship with axonal structural changes. Twelve SD rats were divided into an injury and a sham group. The rat model of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) by lateral head rotation was produced. The oxalate-pyroantimonate technique for calcium localization was used to process the rat's medulla oblongata tissues with thin sections observed electron-microscopically for axonal structure and calcium precipitates on it. The axonal damage in medulla oblongata appeared at 2 h post-injury, gradually became diffuse and severe, and continued to exist at 24 hours. At 2 hours, calcium precipitates were deposited on separated lamellae and axolemma, but were rarely distributed in the axoplasm. At 6 hours, calcium precipitates occurred on separated lamellae and axolemma in much higher density, but on axoplasm in extremely small amounts. Some axons, though lacking structural changes of the myelin sheath, sequestered plenty of calcium deposits on their swollen mitochondria. At 24 hours, damaged axons presented with much more severe lamellae separation and calcium deposits. Axonal calcium overloading developed in rat TAI model using lateral head rotation. This was significantly related to structural damage in the axons. These findings suggest the feasibility of using calcium antagonists in cope the management of human DAI in its very early stage.

  13. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidelines for Americans and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPlate . Where can I find out more about ... on food sources of calcium: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Nutrient Database Nutrient List for calcium ( ...

  14. The Roles and Mechanisms of Intestinal Oxalate Transport in Oxalate Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Marguerite; Freel, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian intestine has an important role in the dynamics of oxalate exchange and thereby is significant in the etiology of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Here we review some of the phenomenological observations that have led to the conclusion that anion exchangers (antiporters) are important mediators of secondarily active, net oxalate transport along the intestine (both absorptive and secretory). Understanding the mechanisms of transepithelial oxalate transport has been radically advanced in recent years by the identification of the SLC26 family of anion transporters which has facilitated the identification of specific proteins mediating individual apical or basolateral oxalate transport pathways. Moreover, identification of specific exchangers has underscored their relative importance to oxalate homeostasis as revealed by using knockout mouse models and facilitated studies of oxalate transport regulation in heterologous expression systems. Finally, the significance of oxalate degrading bacteria to oxalate homeostasis is considered from basic and applied perspectives. PMID:18359395

  15. A Study of Biomolecules as Growth Modifiers of Calcium Oxalate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Junha John

    Crystallization processes are ubiquitous in nature, science, and technology. Controlling crystal growth is pivotal in many industries as material properties and functions can be tailored by tuning crystal habits (e.g. size, shape, phase). In biomineralization, organisms exert excellent control over bottom-up synthesis and assembly of inorganic-organic structures (e.g. bones, teeth, exoskeletons). This is made possible by growth modifiers that range from small molecules to macromolecules, such as proteins. Molecular recognition of the mineral phase allows proteins to function as nucleation templates, matrices, and growth inhibitors or promoters. We are interested in taking a biomimetic approach to control crystallization via biomolecular growth modifiers. We investigated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), found in plants and kidney stones, as a model system of crystallization. We studied the effects of four common proteins on COM crystallization: bovine serum albumin (BSA), transferrin, lactoferrin, and lysozyme. Through kinetic studies of COM crystallization, we classified BSA and lysozyme as COM growth inhibitor and promoter respectively. Their inhibition and promotion effects were also evident in the macroscopic crystal habit. Through adsorption and microscopy experiments, we showed that BSA exhibits binding specificity for the apical surfaces of macroscopic COM crystals. Lysozyme, on the other, functions via a non-binding mechanism at the surface to accelerate the growth of the apical surfaces. We also synthesized and studied peptides derived from the protein primary sequences to identify putative domains responsible for these inhibition and promotion effects. Collectively, our study of physiologically relevant biomolecules suggests potential roles of COM modifiers in pathological crystallization and helps to develop guidelines for rational design of biomolecular growth modifiers for applications in crystal engineering.

  16. Urinary Calcium and Oxalate Excretion in Healthy Adult Cats Are Not Affected by Increasing Dietary Levels of Bone Meal in a Canned Diet

    PubMed Central

    Passlack, Nadine; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of dietary calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), derived from bone meal, on the feline urine composition and the urinary pH, allowing a risk assessment for the formation of calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths in cats. Eight healthy adult cats received 3 canned diets, containing 12.2 (A), 18.5 (B) and 27.0 g Ca/kg dry matter (C) and 16.1 (A), 17.6 (B) and 21.1 g P/kg dry matter (C). Each diet was fed over 17 days. After a 7 dayś adaptation period, urine and faeces were collected over 2×4 days (with a two-day rest between), and blood samples were taken. Urinary and faecal minerals, urinary oxalate (Ox), the urinary pH and the concentrations of serum Ca, phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were analyzed. Moreover, the urine was microscopically examined for CaOx uroliths. The results demonstrated that increasing levels of dietary Ca led to decreased serum PTH and Ca and increased faecal Ca and P concentrations, but did not affect the urinary Ca or Ox concentrations or the urinary fasting pH. The urinary postprandial pH slightly increased when the diet C was compared to the diet B. No CaOx crystals were detected in the urine of the cats. In conclusion, urinary Ca excretion in cats seems to be widely independent of the dietary Ca levels when Ca is added as bone meal to a typical canned diet, implicating that raw materials with higher contents of bones are of subordinate importance as risk factors for the formation of urinary CaOx crystals. PMID:23940588

  17. Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets in rats: potential application in a bioregenerative life-support system.

    PubMed

    Nickel, K P; Nielsen, S S; Smart, D J; Mitchell, C A; Belury, M A

    1997-01-01

    Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets containing various proportions of candidate crops for a controlled ecological life-support system (CELSS) was determined by femur 45Ca uptake. Three vegetarian diets and a control diet were labeled extrinsically with 45Ca and fed to 5-wk old male rats. A fifth group of rats fed an unlabeled control diet received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 45Ca. There was no significant difference in mean calcium absorption of vegetarian diets (90.80 +/- 5.23%) and control diet (87.85 +/- 5.25%) when calculated as the percent of an IP dose. The amounts of phytate, oxalate, and dietary fiber in the diets did not affect calcium absorption.

  18. Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets in rats: potential application in a bioregenerative life-support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickel, K. P.; Nielsen, S. S.; Smart, D. J.; Mitchell, C. A.; Belury, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets containing various proportions of candidate crops for a controlled ecological life-support system (CELSS) was determined by femur 45Ca uptake. Three vegetarian diets and a control diet were labeled extrinsically with 45Ca and fed to 5-wk old male rats. A fifth group of rats fed an unlabeled control diet received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 45Ca. There was no significant difference in mean calcium absorption of vegetarian diets (90.80 +/- 5.23%) and control diet (87.85 +/- 5.25%) when calculated as the percent of an IP dose. The amounts of phytate, oxalate, and dietary fiber in the diets did not affect calcium absorption.

  19. Aluminum hydroxide, calcium carbonate and calcium acetate in chronic intermittent hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Janssen, M J; van der Kuy, A; ter Wee, P M; van Boven, W P

    1996-02-01

    Prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism in uremia necessitates correction of hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia. In order to avoid aluminum toxicity, calcium containing phosphate binders are used increasingly, instead of aluminium hydroxide. Recent studies have shown that calcium acetate has many characteristics of an ideal phosphate binder. It is, for instance, a more readily soluble salt compared with calcium carbonate. This advantage might, however, disappear if calcium carbonate is taken on an empty stomach, a few minutes before meals. We examined the efficacy of three different phosphate binding agents in a randomized prospective study of 53 patients on regular hemodialysis. Bicarbonate dialyses were performed with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.75 mmol/l. After a three-week wash-out period, patients received either aluminum hydroxide (control group), calcium acetate, or calcium carbonate as their phosphate binder. Patients were instructed to take the calcium salts a few minutes before meals on an empty stomach, and aluminum hydroxide during meals. Serum calcium, phosphate, intact parathormone, and alkaline phosphatase levels were determined every month. Patient compliance was estimated every month by asking the patients which phosphate binder and what daily dose they had used. Aluminum hydroxide tended to be the most effective phosphate binder. The mean +/- SEM required daily dose of calcium acetate at 12 months was 5.04 +/- 0.60 g, corresponding to 10.1 +/- 1.20 tablets of 500 mg. Co-medication with aluminum hydroxide, however, was needed (1.29 +/- 0.54 g per day, corresponding to 2.6 +/- 1.08 tablets of 500 mg). The required daily calcium carbonate dose appeared to be 2.71 +/- 0.48 g, corresponding to 5.4 +/- 0.95 capsules of 500 mg, with an adjuvant daily aluminum hydroxide dose of 0.69 +/- 0.27 g, corresponding to 1.4 +/- 0.55 tablets of 500 mg (p = 0.0055). Thus, the mean daily doses of elemental calcium were comparable between the calcium

  20. Characterization of sea cucumber (stichopus japonicus) ovum hydrolysates: calcium chelation, solubility and absorption into intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Cui, Pengbo; Lin, Songyi; Yu, Cuiping; Tang, Yue; Wei, Ye; Xiong, Youling; Wu, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    Sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) ovum hydrolysates (SCOHs) chelated with calcium were produced to investigate the characteristics of calcium binding and solubility, as well as to study any effects on calcium absorption by human intestinal epithelial cells. The results of the present study show that the calcium-binding capacity of SCOHs depended greatly on the type of proteases. The maximum level of Ca binding (0.38 mmol L -1 ) occurred when trypsin was used, with a peptide yield of 85.7%. Investigation of the possible chelating modes between SCOHs and calcium ions indicated that calcium ions bound to SCOHs primarily via interactions with carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen atoms of Glu and Asp and also that the phosphoserine residues might be also responsible for SCOH-calcium chelation. Moreover, SCOH-calcium complexes maintained the solubility of calcium under simulated gastrointestinal digestion, regardless of the presence of dietary components such as oxalate. Furthermore, SCOH-Ca led to higher peak intracellular [Ca 2+ ] i in both Caco-2 cells (338.3 nmol L -1 versus 269.6 nmol L -1 ) and HT-29 cells (373.9 nmol L -1 versus 271.7 nmol L -1 ) than casein phosphopeptide-Ca. Carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen atoms in the SCOHs could bind calcium ions, forming SCOH-calcium complexes. These complexes improved calcium solubility under simulated gastrointestinal digestion and also promoted calcium absorption in Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Irritant contact dermatitis caused by needle-like calcium oxalate crystals, raphides, in Agave tequilana among workers in tequila distilleries and agave plantations.

    PubMed

    Salinas, M L; Ogura, T; Soffchi, L

    2001-02-01

    It was found that needle-like calcium oxalate crystals, raphides, are found abundantly in all tissues of Agave tequilana plants; thus, 1 droplet (0.03 ml) of juice pressed from leaves contains 100-150 crystals, 30-500 microm in length, sharpened at both ends. In tequila distilleries, 5/6 of the workers who handle the agave stems have experienced the characteristic irritation. In contrast, only 1/3 of workers in agave plantations who harvest agave plants, complain of the irritation. It is confirmed that all the irritation suffered in both distilleries and plantations takes place at bodily locations where the plants come into contact with the worker's skin in the course of their work.

  2. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  3. Calcium binding to Procambarus clarkii sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein splice variants.

    PubMed

    Rohrback, Suzanne E; Wheatly, Michele G; Gillen, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein (SCP) is a high-affinity calcium buffering protein expressed in muscle of crayfish and other invertebrates. In previous work, we identified three splice variants of Procambarus clarkii SCP (pcSCP1a, pcSCP1b, and pcSCP1c) that differ in a 37 amino acid region that lies mainly between the 2nd and 3ed EF-hand calcium binding domain. To evaluate the function of the proteins encoded by the pcSCP1 transcripts, we produced recombinant pcSCP1 and used tryptophan fluorescence to characterize calcium binding. Tryptophan fluorescence of pcSCP1a decreased in response to increased calcium, while tryptophan fluorescence of the pcSCP1b and pcSCP1c variants increased. We estimated calcium binding constants and Hill coefficients with two different equations: the standard Hill equation and a modified Hill equation that accounts for contributions from two different tryptophans. The approaches gave similar results. Steady-state calcium binding constants (Kd) ranged from 2.7±0.7×10(-8)M to 5.6±0.1×10(-7)M, consistent with previous work. Variants displayed significantly different apparent calcium affinities, which were decreased in the presence of magnesium. Calcium Kd was lowest for pcSCP1a and highest for pcSCP1c. Site-directed mutagenesis of pcSCP1c residues to the amino acids of pcSCP1b decreased the calcium Kd, identifying residues outside the EF-hand domains that contribute to calcium binding in crayfish SCP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mathematical model to estimate risk of calcium-containing renal stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, R. A.; Feiveson, A. H.; Whitson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Astronauts exposed to microgravity during the course of spaceflight undergo physiologic changes that alter the urinary environment so as to increase the risk of renal stone formation. This study was undertaken to identify a simple method with which to evaluate the potential risk of renal stone development during spaceflight. METHOD: We used a large database of urinary risk factors obtained from 323 astronauts before and after spaceflight to generate a mathematical model with which to predict the urinary supersaturation of calcium stone forming salts. RESULT: This model, which involves the fewest possible analytical variables (urinary calcium, citrate, oxalate, phosphorus, and total volume), reliably and accurately predicted the urinary supersaturation of the calcium stone forming salts when compared to results obtained from a group of 6 astronauts who collected urine during flight. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this model will simplify both routine medical monitoring during spaceflight as well as the evaluation of countermeasures designed to minimize renal stone development. This model also can be used for Earth-based applications in which access to analytical resources is limited.

  5. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator*

    PubMed Central

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations, e.g. magnesium. Its free concentration within cells can thus be maintained at the very low levels demanded by the signaling function. A large cadre of proteins has evolved to bind or transport calcium. They all contribute to buffer it within cells, but a number of them also decode its message for the benefit of the target. The most important of these “calcium sensors” are the EF-hand proteins. Calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Although essential to the correct functioning of cell processes, if not carefully controlled spatially and temporally within cells, it generates variously severe cell dysfunctions, and even cell death. PMID:27462077

  6. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as ...

  7. Antibacterial action of calcium hydroxide vehicles and calcium hydroxide pastes.

    PubMed

    Pacios, María Gabriela; Silva, Clara; López, María Elena; Cecilia, Marta

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the in vitro action of vehicles alone and with calcium hydroxide against different bacterial species. Agar plates were inoculated with the microbial suspensions, and wells were made and filled with the calcium hydroxide pastes and the vehicles used to prepare the pastes. The zones of inhibited bacterial growth were recorded, and the resulting measurements were statistically analyzed. Enterococcus faecalis was the most resistant microorganism to all medicaments. Calcium hydroxide + p-monochlorophenol; calcium hydroxide + p-monochlorophenol-propylene glycol pastes; and p-monochlorophenol, p-monochlorophenol-propylene glycol, and chlorhexidine gluconate gel alone showed the largest zones of inhibition against all the tested microorganisms. The vehicle used to prepare the calcium hydroxide paste might contribute to its antibacterial action. Chlorhexidine gluconate gel used alone, and camphorated p-monochlorophenol and camphorated p-monochlorophenol-propylene glycol as vehicles of calcium hydroxide, could be recommended, in an antimicrobial sense. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Calcium and Calcium Supplements: Achieving the Right Balance

    MedlinePlus

    ... soy products, cereal and fruit juices, and milk substitutes To absorb calcium, your body also needs vitamin ... Nutrition/default.asp. Accessed June 25, 2015. Calcium. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. http://www.naturaldatabase.com. Accessed ...

  9. Calcium content of different compositions of gallstones and pathogenesis of calcium carbonate gallstones.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Kuen; Pan, Huichin; Huang, Shing-Moo; Huang, Nan-Lan; Yao, Chung-Chin; Hsiao, Kuang-Ming; Wu, Chew-Wun

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the calcium content of different gallstone compositions and the pathogenic mechanisms of calcium carbonate gallstones. Between August 2001 and July 2007, gallstones from 481 patients, including 68 calcium carbonate gallstones, were analyzed for total calcium content. Gallbladder bile samples from 33 cases and six controls were analyzed for pH, carbonate anion level, free-ionized calcium concentration and saturation index for calcium carbonate. Total calcium content averaged 75.6 %, 11.8 %, and 4.2 % for calcium carbonate, calcium bilirubinate and cholesterol gallstones. In 29.4 % of patients, chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions were caused by polypoid lesions in the neck region and 70.6 % were caused by stones. A total of 82 % of patients had chronic low-grade inflammation of the gallbladder wall and 18.0 % had acute inflammatory exacerbations. In the bile, we found the mean pH, mean carbonate anion, free-ionized calcium concentrations, and mean saturation index for calcium carbonate to be elevated in comparison to controls. From our study, we found chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions and low-grade GB wall inflammation lead to GB epithelium hydrogen secretion dysfunction. Increased calcium ion efflux into the GB lumen combined with increased carbonate anion presence increases SI_CaCO(3) from 1 to 22.4. Thus, in an alkaline milieu with pH 7.8, calcium carbonate begins to aggregate and precipitate. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  11. The oxalate-carbonate pathway: at the interface between biology and geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junier, P.; Cailleau, G.; Martin, G.; Guggiari, M.; Bravo, D.; Clerc, M.; Aragno, M.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E.

    2012-04-01

    The formation of calcite in otherwise carbonate-free acidic soils through the biological degradation of oxalate is a mechanism termed oxalate-carbonate pathway. This pathway lies at the interface between biological and geological systems and constitutes an important, although underestimated, soil mineral carbon sink. In this case, atmospheric CO2 is fixed by the photosynthetic activity of oxalogenic plants, which is partly destined to the production of oxalate used for the chelation of metals, and particularly, calcium. Fungi are also able to produce oxalate to cope with elevated concentrations of metals. In spite of its abundance as a substrate, oxalate is a very stable organic anion that can be metabolized only by a group of bacteria that use it as carbon and energy sources. These bacteria close the biological cycle by degrading calcium oxalate, releasing Ca2+ and inducing a change in local soil pH. If parameters are favourable, the geological part of the pathway begins, because this change in pH will indirectly lead to the precipitation of secondary calcium carbonate (calcite) in unexpected geological conditions. Due to the initial acidic soil conditions, and the absence of geological carbonate in the basement, it is unexpected to find C in the form of calcite. The activity of the oxalate-carbonate pathway has now been demonstrated in several places around the world, suggesting that its importance can be even greater than expected. In addition, new roles for each of the biological players of the pathway have been revealed recently forcing us to reconsider a global biogeochemical model for oxalate cycling.

  12. The effect of habitat geology on calcium intake and calcium status of wild rodents.

    PubMed

    Shore, R F; Balment, R J; Yalden, D W

    1991-12-01

    Calcium is essential for normal physiological function, reproduction and growth in mammals but its distribution in the natural environment is heterogeneous. Spatial variation in calcium soil content is especially marked in the Peak District, United Kingdom, where both calcium-rich limestone and calcium-poor gritstone rock types occur. Wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus (L) and bank voles Clethrionomys glareolus (Schreber 1780) from limestone areas had significantly higher calcium concentrations in stomach contents and in faeces compared with their counterparts from gritstone areas. Calcium status was assessed from serum calcium concentration, femur weight, ash content of the body, calcium concentration in the femur and body ash. There was no significant difference in serum calcium concentration, femur calcium concentration and body ash calcium concentration between animals from the limestone and the gritstone. However, on the limestone, bank voles, but not wood mice, had significantly heavier femora and a greater proportion of ash in the body compared with their gritstone counterparts.

  13. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator.

    PubMed

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-09-30

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations, e.g. magnesium. Its free concentration within cells can thus be maintained at the very low levels demanded by the signaling function. A large cadre of proteins has evolved to bind or transport calcium. They all contribute to buffer it within cells, but a number of them also decode its message for the benefit of the target. The most important of these "calcium sensors" are the EF-hand proteins. Calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Although essential to the correct functioning of cell processes, if not carefully controlled spatially and temporally within cells, it generates variously severe cell dysfunctions, and even cell death. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Concave Urinary Crystallines: Direct Evidence of Calcium Oxalate Crystals Dissolution by Citrate In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yun-Feng; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Guang-Na; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The changes in urinary crystal properties in patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) calculi after oral administration of potassium citrate (K3cit) were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), and zeta potential analyzer. The AFM and SEM results showed that the surface of urinary crystals became concave, the edges and corners of crystals became blunt, the average size of urinary crystallines decreased significantly, and aggregation of urinary crystals was reduced. These changes were attributed to the significant increase in concentration of excreted citrate to 492 ± 118 mg/L after K3cit intake from 289 ± 83 mg/L before K3cit intake. After the amount of urinary citrate was increased, it complexed with Ca2+ ions on urinary crystals, which dissolved these crystals. Thus, the appearance of concave urinary crystals was a direct evidence of CaOx dissolution by citrate in vivo. The XRD results showed that the quantities and species of urinary crystals decreased after K3cit intake. The mechanism of inhibition of formation of CaOx stones by K3cit was possibly due to the complexation of Ca2+ with citrate, increase in urine pH, concentration of urinary inhibitor glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and the absolute value of zeta potential after K3cit intake. PMID:24363634

  15. Association of Urinary Calcium Excretion with Serum Calcium and Vitamin D Levels

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Anita; Bonny, Olivier; Guessous, Idris; Suter, Paolo M.; Conen, David; Erne, Paul; Binet, Isabelle; Gabutti, Luca; Gallino, Augusto; Muggli, Franco; Hayoz, Daniel; Péchère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Paccaud, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Population-based data on urinary calcium excretion are scarce. The association of serum calcium and circulating levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D2 or D3] with urinary calcium excretion in men and women from a population-based study was explored. Design, settings, participants, & measurements Multivariable linear regression was used to explore factors associated with square root–transformed 24-hour urinary calcium excretion (milligrams per 24 hours) taken as the dependent variable with a focus on month-specific vitamin D tertiles and serum calcium in the Swiss Survey on Salt Study. Results In total, 624 men and 669 women were studied with mean ages of 49.2 and 47.0 years, respectively (age range=15–95 years). Mean urinary calcium excretion was higher in men than in women (183.05 versus 144.60 mg/24 h; P<0.001). In adjusted models, the association (95% confidence interval) of square root urinary calcium excretion with protein–corrected serum calcium was 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 2.34) mg/24 h per milligram per deciliter in women and 0.59 (95% confidence interval, −0.11 to 1.29) mg/24 h per milligram per deciliter in men. Men in the third 25(OH)D3 tertile had higher square root urinary calcium excretion than men in the first tertile (0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 1.63 mg/24 h per nanogram per milliliter), and the corresponding association was 0.32 (95% confidence interval, −0.22 to 0.85) mg/24 h per nanogram per milliliter in women. These sex differences were more marked under conditions of high urinary sodium or urea excretions. Conclusions There was a positive association of serum calcium with urinary calcium excretion in women but not men. Vitamin 25(OH)D3 was associated with urinary calcium excretion in men but not women. These results suggest important sex differences in the hormonal and dietary control of urinary calcium excretion. PMID:25518946

  16. Association of urinary calcium excretion with serum calcium and vitamin D levels.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Anita; Bonny, Olivier; Guessous, Idris; Suter, Paolo M; Conen, David; Erne, Paul; Binet, Isabelle; Gabutti, Luca; Gallino, Augusto; Muggli, Franco; Hayoz, Daniel; Péchère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Paccaud, Fred; Burnier, Michel; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-06

    Population-based data on urinary calcium excretion are scarce. The association of serum calcium and circulating levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D2 or D3] with urinary calcium excretion in men and women from a population-based study was explored. Multivariable linear regression was used to explore factors associated with square root-transformed 24-hour urinary calcium excretion (milligrams per 24 hours) taken as the dependent variable with a focus on month-specific vitamin D tertiles and serum calcium in the Swiss Survey on Salt Study. In total, 624 men and 669 women were studied with mean ages of 49.2 and 47.0 years, respectively (age range=15-95 years). Mean urinary calcium excretion was higher in men than in women (183.05 versus 144.60 mg/24 h; P<0.001). In adjusted models, the association (95% confidence interval) of square root urinary calcium excretion with protein-corrected serum calcium was 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 2.34) mg/24 h per milligram per deciliter in women and 0.59 (95% confidence interval, -0.11 to 1.29) mg/24 h per milligram per deciliter in men. Men in the third 25(OH)D3 tertile had higher square root urinary calcium excretion than men in the first tertile (0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 1.63 mg/24 h per nanogram per milliliter), and the corresponding association was 0.32 (95% confidence interval, -0.22 to 0.85) mg/24 h per nanogram per milliliter in women. These sex differences were more marked under conditions of high urinary sodium or urea excretions. There was a positive association of serum calcium with urinary calcium excretion in women but not men. Vitamin 25(OH)D3 was associated with urinary calcium excretion in men but not women. These results suggest important sex differences in the hormonal and dietary control of urinary calcium excretion. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  18. Calcium ion binding properties of Medicago truncatula calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Swainsbury, David J K; Zhou, Liang; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Bornemann, Stephen

    2012-09-04

    A calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is essential in the interpretation of calcium oscillations in plant root cells for the establishment of symbiotic relationships with rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi. Some of its properties have been studied in detail, but its calcium ion binding properties and subsequent conformational change have not. A biophysical approach was taken with constructs comprising either the visinin-like domain of Medicago truncatula CCaMK, which contains EF-hand motifs, or this domain together with the autoinhibitory domain. The visinin-like domain binds three calcium ions, leading to a conformational change involving the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and a change in tertiary but not net secondary or quaternary structure. The affinity for calcium ions of visinin-like domain EF-hands 1 and 2 (K(d) = 200 ± 50 nM) was appropriate for the interpretation of calcium oscillations (~125-850 nM), while that of EF-hand 3 (K(d) ≤ 20 nM) implied occupancy at basal calcium ion levels. Calcium dissociation rate constants were determined for the visinin-like domain of CCaMK, M. truncatula calmodulin 1, and the complex between these two proteins (the slowest of which was 0.123 ± 0.002 s(-1)), suggesting the corresponding calcium association rate constants were at or near the diffusion-limited rate. In addition, the dissociation of calmodulin from the protein complex was shown to be on the same time scale as the dissociation of calcium ions. These observations suggest that the formation and dissociation of the complex between calmodulin and CCaMK would substantially mirror calcium oscillations, which typically have a 90 s periodicity.

  19. Calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium channels in cochlear hair cells of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghwan; Briklin, Olga; Hiel, Hakim; Fuchs, Paul

    2007-09-15

    Voltage-gated calcium channels support both spontaneous and sound-evoked neurotransmitter release from ribbon synapses of cochlear hair cells. A variety of regulatory mechanisms must cooperate to ensure the appropriate level of activity in the restricted pool of synaptic calcium channels ( approximately 100) available to each synaptic ribbon. One potential feedback mechanism, calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) of voltage-gated, L-type calcium channels, can be modulated by calmodulin-like calcium-binding proteins. CDI of voltage-gated calcium current was studied in hair cells of the chicken's basilar papilla (analogous to the mammalian cochlea) after blocking the predominant potassium conductances. For inactivating currents produced by 2.5 s steps to the peak of the current-voltage relation (1 mm EGTA internal calcium buffer), single exponential fits yielded an average decay time constant of 1.92 +/- 0.18 s (mean +/- s.e.m., n = 12) at 20-22 degrees C, while recovery occurred with a half-time of approximately 10 s. Inactivation produced no change in reversal potential, arguing that the observed relaxation did not result from alternative processes such as calcium accumulation or activation of residual potassium currents. Substitution of external calcium with barium greatly reduced inactivation, while inhibition of endoplasmic calcium pumps with t-benzohydroquinone (BHQ) or thapsigargin made inactivation occur faster and to a greater extent. Raising external calcium 10-fold (from 2 to 20 mm) increased peak current 3-fold, but did not alter the extent or time course of CDI. However, increasing levels of internal calcium buffer consistently reduced the rate and extent of inactivation. With 1 mm EGTA buffering and in 2 mm external calcium, the available pool of calcium channels was half-inactivated near the resting membrane potential (-50 mV). CDI may be further regulated by calmodulin-like calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs). mRNAs for several CaBPs are expressed in

  20. An overview of techniques for the measurement of calcium distribution, calcium fluxes, and cytosolic free calcium in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Borle, A B

    1990-01-01

    An array of techniques can be used to study cell calcium metabolism that comprises several calcium compartments and many types of transport systems such as ion channels, ATP-dependent pumps, and antiporters. The measurement of total cell calcium brings little information of value since 60 to 80% of total cell calcium is actually bound to the extracellular glycocalyx. Cell fractionation and differential centrifugation have been used to study intracellular Ca2+ compartmentalization, but the methods suffer from the possibility of Ca2+ loss or redistribution among cell fractions. Steady-state kinetic analyses of 45Ca uptake or desaturation curves have been used to study the distribution of Ca2+ among various kinetic pools in living cells and their rate of Ca2+ exchange, but the analyses are constrained by many limitations. Nonsteady-state tracer studies can provide information about rapid changes in calcium influx or efflux in and out of the cell. Zero-time kinetics of 45Ca uptake can detect instantaneous changes in calcium influx, while 45Ca fractional efflux ratio, can detect rapid stimulations or inhibitions of calcium efflux out of cells. Permeabilized cells have been successfully used to gauge the relative role of intracellular organelles in controlling [Ca2+]i. The measurement of the cytosolic ionized calcium ([Ca2+]i) is undoubtedly the most important and, physiologically, the most relevant method available. The choice of the appropriate calcium indicator, fluorescent, bioluminescent, metallochromic, or Ca2(+)-sensitive microelectrodes depends on the cell type and the magnitude and time constant of the event under study. Each probe has specific assets and drawbacks. The study of plasma membrane vesicles derived from baso-lateral or apical plasmalemma can also bring important information on the (Ca2(+)-Mg2+) ATPase-dependent calcium pump and on the kinetics and stoichiometry of the Na(+)-Ca2+ antiporter. The best strategy to study cell calcium metabolism is to

  1. Calcium Blood Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your health care provider may order a calcium test if you have a pre-existing condition that may affect your calcium levels. These include: Kidney disease Thyroid disease Malnutrition Certain types of cancer What happens during a calcium blood test? A health care professional will take a blood ...

  2. Determination of Oxalate Content in Herbal Remedies and Dietary Supplements Based on Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Siener, Roswitha; López-Mesas, Montserrat; Valiente, Manuel; Blanco, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Lifestyle, especially diet, is a prominent risk factor that affects the formation of calcium oxalate stones. Urinary oxalate excretion is directly related to the amount of oral intake and intestinal absorption rate of oxalate. This work evaluated the possibility of increasing oxalate ingestion, which could lead to secondary hyperoxaluria, associated with the intake of herbal remedies and dietary supplements containing plant extracts. A wide variety of 17 commercially available drugs and dietary supplements were analyzed using ion chromatography. The results showed remarkable differences in oxalate contents of the extracts. Total oxalate concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 2.2 mg/g in solid samples and from 0.005 to 0.073 mg/mL in liquid samples. The selected herbal remedies and dietary supplements containing plant extracts represent only a low risk for calcium oxalate stone formers, if the recommended daily dose is not exceeded.

  3. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yukari; Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg, and is not affected by anions. Results after oral calcium administration of 150 mg/kg showed that the intestinal absorption process was significantly different among the four calcium salts. The rank of absolute bioavailability of calcium was calcium ascorbate > calcium L-lactate ≥ calcium acetate > calcium chloride. The mean residence time (MRTab) of calcium from calcium ascorbate (32.2 minutes) in the intestinal tract was much longer than that from calcium L-lactate (9.5 minutes), calcium acetate (15.0 minutes) and calcium chloride (13.6 minutes). Furthermore, the foods di-D-fructo-furanose-1,2':2,3'-dianhydride, sudachi (Citrus sudachi) juice, and moromi-su (a Japanese vinegar) increased the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium chloride by 2.46-fold, 2.86-fold, and 1.23-fold, respectively, and prolonged MRTab by 48.5 minutes, 43.1 minutes, and 44.9 minutes, respectively. In conclusion, the prolonged MRTab of calcium in the intestinal tract by anion or food might cause the increased absorbability of calcium.

  4. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yukari; Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg, and is not affected by anions. Results after oral calcium administration of 150 mg/kg showed that the intestinal absorption process was significantly different among the four calcium salts. The rank of absolute bioavailability of calcium was calcium ascorbate > calcium L-lactate ≥ calcium acetate > calcium chloride. The mean residence time (MRTab) of calcium from calcium ascorbate (32.2 minutes) in the intestinal tract was much longer than that from calcium L-lactate (9.5 minutes), calcium acetate (15.0 minutes) and calcium chloride (13.6 minutes). Furthermore, the foods di-D-fructo-furanose-1,2′:2,3′-dianhydride, sudachi (Citrus sudachi) juice, and moromi-su (a Japanese vinegar) increased the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium chloride by 2.46-fold, 2.86-fold, and 1.23-fold, respectively, and prolonged MRTab by 48.5 minutes, 43.1 minutes, and 44.9 minutes, respectively. In conclusion, the prolonged MRTab of calcium in the intestinal tract by anion or food might cause the increased absorbability of calcium. PMID:27186137

  5. Citrate salts for preventing and treating calcium containing kidney stones in adults.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Rebecca; Hanchanale, Vishwanath S; Myatt, Andy; Somani, Bhaskar; Nabi, Ghulam; Biyani, C Shekhar

    2015-10-06

    Kidney stones affect people worldwide and have a high rate of recurrence even with treatment. Recurrences are particularly prevalent in people with low urinary citrate levels. These people have a higher incidence of calcium phosphate and calcium oxalate stones. Oral citrate therapy increases the urinary citrate levels, which in turn binds with calcium and inhibits the crystallisation thus reduces stone formation. Despite the widespread use of oral citrate therapy for prevention and treatment of calcium oxalate stones, the evidence to support its clinical efficacy remains uncertain. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy and adverse events associated with citrate salts for the treatment and prevention of calcium containing kidney stones. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register to 29 July 2015 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the efficacy and adverse events associated with citrate salts for the treatment and prevention of calcium containing kidney stones in adults treated for a minimum of six months. Two authors assessed studies for inclusion in this review. Data were extracted according to predetermined criteria. Summary estimates of effect were obtained using a random-effects model, and results were expressed as risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and mean difference (MD) and 95% CI for continuous outcomes. We included seven studies that included a total of 477 participants, most of whom had oxalate stones. Of these, three studies (247 participants) compared potassium citrate with placebo or no intervention; three (166 participants) compared potassium-sodium citrate with no intervention; and one (64 participants) compared potassium-magnesium citrate with placebo. Overall, quality of the reporting of the included studies was considered moderate to

  6. Fungi, bacteria and soil pH: the oxalate-carbonate pathway as a model for metabolic interaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gaëtan; Guggiari, Matteo; Bravo, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Cailleau, Guillaume; Aragno, Michel; Job, Daniel; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2012-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway involves the oxidation of calcium oxalate to low-magnesium calcite and represents a potential long-term terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO(2). In this pathway, bacterial oxalate degradation is associated with a strong local alkalinization and subsequent carbonate precipitation. In order to test whether this process occurs in soil, the role of bacteria, fungi and calcium oxalate amendments was studied using microcosms. In a model system with sterile soil amended with laboratory cultures of oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi, the addition of calcium oxalate induced a distinct pH shift and led to the final precipitation of calcite. However, the simultaneous presence of bacteria and fungi was essential to drive this pH shift. Growth of both oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi was confirmed by qPCR on the frc (oxalotrophic bacteria) and 16S rRNA genes, and the quantification of ergosterol (active fungal biomass) respectively. The experiment was replicated in microcosms with non-sterilized soil. In this case, the bacterial and fungal contribution to oxalate degradation was evaluated by treatments with specific biocides (cycloheximide and bronopol). Results showed that the autochthonous microflora oxidized calcium oxalate and induced a significant soil alkalinization. Moreover, data confirmed the results from the model soil showing that bacteria are essentially responsible for the pH shift, but require the presence of fungi for their oxalotrophic activity. The combined results highlight that the interaction between bacteria and fungi is essential to drive metabolic processes in complex environments such as soil. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... diuretics Thrombocytosis (high platelet count) Tumors Vitamin A excess Vitamin D excess Lower-than-normal levels may be due to: Hypoparathyroidism Malabsorption Osteomalacia Pancreatitis Renal failure Rickets Vitamin D deficiency Alternative Names Free calcium; Ionized calcium ...

  8. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca2+]i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca2+]i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca2+]i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P < 0.01) when the external calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca2+]i. We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. PMID:27980039

  9. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyuan; Bua, Peter; Capodice, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements. Objective This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women. Design A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 mg calcium) versus a single serving of calcium carbonate powder (one packet of powder=1,000 mg calcium) was performed in healthy women aged between 25 and 45. All subjects were on a calcium-restricted diet 7 days prior to testing and fasted for 12 h before being evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 4 h after oral administration of the test agents. Blood measurements for total and ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone were performed and adverse events were monitored. Results Twenty-three women were evaluable with a mean age of 33.2±8.71. Results showed that administration of a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder resulted in greater absorption in total and ionized calcium versus a single serving of calcium citrate tablets at 4 h (4.25±0.21 vs. 4.16±0.16, p=0.001). There were minimal side effects and no reported serious adverse events. Conclusions This study shows that a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder is more bioavailable than a single serving of calcium citrate tablets. This may be beneficial for long-term compliance. PMID:24772062

  10. Measuring calcium dynamics in living cells with Genetically Encodable Calcium Indicators

    PubMed Central

    McCombs, Janet E.

    2008-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow researchers to measure calcium dynamics in specific targeted locations within living cells. Such indicators enable dissection of the spatial and temporal control of calcium signaling processes. Here we review recent progress in the development of GECIs, highlighting which indicators are most appropriate for measuring calcium in specific organelles and localized domains in mammalian tissue culture cells. An overview of recent approaches that have been undertaken to ensure that the GECIs are minimally perturbed by the cellular environment is provided. Additionally, the procedures for introducing GECIs into mammalian cells, conducting calcium imaging experiments, and analyzing data are discussed. Because organelle-targeted indicators often pose an additional challenge, we underscore strategies for calibrating GECIs in these locations. PMID:18848629

  11. Calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium channels in cochlear hair cells of the chicken

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghwan; Briklin, Olga; Hiel, Hakim; Fuchs, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels support both spontaneous and sound-evoked neurotransmitter release from ribbon synapses of cochlear hair cells. A variety of regulatory mechanisms must cooperate to ensure the appropriate level of activity in the restricted pool of synaptic calcium channels (∼100) available to each synaptic ribbon. One potential feedback mechanism, calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) of voltage-gated, L-type calcium channels, can be modulated by calmodulin-like calcium-binding proteins. CDI of voltage-gated calcium current was studied in hair cells of the chicken's basilar papilla (analogous to the mammalian cochlea) after blocking the predominant potassium conductances. For inactivating currents produced by 2.5 s steps to the peak of the current–voltage relation (1 mm EGTA internal calcium buffer), single exponential fits yielded an average decay time constant of 1.92 ± 0.18 s (mean ±s.e.m., n = 12) at 20–22°C, while recovery occurred with a half-time of ∼10 s. Inactivation produced no change in reversal potential, arguing that the observed relaxation did not result from alternative processes such as calcium accumulation or activation of residual potassium currents. Substitution of external calcium with barium greatly reduced inactivation, while inhibition of endoplasmic calcium pumps with t-benzohydroquinone (BHQ) or thapsigargin made inactivation occur faster and to a greater extent. Raising external calcium 10-fold (from 2 to 20 mm) increased peak current 3-fold, but did not alter the extent or time course of CDI. However, increasing levels of internal calcium buffer consistently reduced the rate and extent of inactivation. With 1 mm EGTA buffering and in 2 mm external calcium, the available pool of calcium channels was half-inactivated near the resting membrane potential (−50 mV). CDI may be further regulated by calmodulin-like calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs). mRNAs for several CaBPs are expressed in chicken cochlear tissue, and

  12. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  13. A Specific Peptide with Calcium-Binding Capacity from Defatted Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and the Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xixi; Yang, Qian; Lin, Jiaping; Fu, Nanyan; Wang, Shaoyun

    2017-03-29

    Marine microorganisms have been proposed as a new kind of protein source. Efforts are needed in order to transform the protein-rich biological wastes left after lipid extraction into value-added bio-products. Thus, the utilization of protein recovered from defatted Schizochytrium sp. by-products presents an opportunity. A specific peptide Tyr-Leu (YL) with calcium-binding capacity was purified from defatted Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. The calcium-binding activity of YL reached 126.34 ± 3.40 μg/mg. The calcium-binding mechanism was investigated through ultraviolet, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that calcium ions could form dative bonds with carboxyl oxygen atoms and amino nitrogen atoms as well as the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of amide bonds. YL-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which was beneficial for its absorption and transport in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the cellular uptake of calcium in Caco-2 cells showed that YL-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency and protect calcium ions against precipitation caused by dietary inhibitors such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate and metal ions. The findings indicate that the by-product of Schizochytrium sp. is a promising source for making peptide-calcium bio-products as algae-based functional supplements for human beings.

  14. Calcium absorption from fortified ice cream formulations compared with calcium absorption from milk.

    PubMed

    van der Hee, Regine M; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Rietveld, Anton G; Wilkinson, Joy E; Quail, Patricia J; Berry, Mark J; Dainty, Jack R; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%+/-8%, 28%+/-5%, and 31%+/-9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium.

  15. Calcium Absorption from Fortified Ice Cream Formulations Compared with Calcium Absorption from Milk

    PubMed Central

    van der Hee, Regine M.; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S.M.J.E.; Rietveld, Anton G.; Wilkinson, Joy E.; Quail, Patricia J.; Berry, Mark J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Subjects/setting Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Statistical analysis Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Results Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%±8%, 28%±5%, and 31%±9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Conclusions Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium. PMID:19394469

  16. Calcium acetate or calcium carbonate for hyperphosphatemia of hemodialysis patients: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Xie, Guoqiang; Huang, Yuanhang; Zhang, Han; Yang, Bo; Mao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    High levels of serum phosphorus both at baseline and during follow-up are associated with increased mortality in dialysis patients, and administration of phosphate binders was independently associated with improved survival among hemodialysis population. Calcium-based phosphate binders are the most commonly used phosphate binders in developing countries for their relatively low costs. To compare the efficacy and safety between calcium carbonate and calcium acetate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google scholar and Chinese databases (Wanfang, Weipu, National Knowledge Infrastructure of China) were searched for relevant studies published before March 2014. Reference lists of nephrology textbooks and review articles were checked. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that assessed the effects and adverse events of calcium acetate and calcium carbonate in adult patients with MHD was performed using Review Manager 5.0. A total of ten studies (625 participants) were included in this meta-analysis. There was insufficient data in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for meta-analysis. Compared with calcium carbonate group, the serum phosphorus was significantly lower in calcium acetate group after4 weeks' administration (MD -0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.28 to -0.01) and after 8 weeks' administration (MD -0.25 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.11). There was no difference in serum calcium levels or the incidence of hypercalcemia between two groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks. No statistical difference was found in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels or serum calcium by phosphorus (Ca x P) product. There was significantly higher risk of intolerance with calcium acetate treatment (RR 3.46, 95% CI 1.48 to 8.26). For hyperphosphatemia treatment, calcium acetate showed better efficacy and with a higher incidence of intolerance compared with calcium carbonate. There are insufficient data to

  17. Calcium Acetate or Calcium Carbonate for Hyperphosphatemia of Hemodialysis Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Yang, Bo; Mao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Background High levels of serum phosphorus both at baseline and during follow-up are associated with increased mortality in dialysis patients, and administration of phosphate binders was independently associated with improved survival among hemodialysis population. Calcium-based phosphate binders are the most commonly used phosphate binders in developing countries for their relatively low costs. Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety between calcium carbonate and calcium acetate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google scholar and Chinese databases (Wanfang, Weipu, National Knowledge Infrastructure of China) were searched for relevant studies published before March 2014. Reference lists of nephrology textbooks and review articles were checked. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that assessed the effects and adverse events of calcium acetate and calcium carbonate in adult patients with MHD was performed using Review Manager 5.0. Results A total of ten studies (625 participants) were included in this meta-analysis. There was insufficient data in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for meta-analysis. Compared with calcium carbonate group, the serum phosphorus was significantly lower in calcium acetate group after4 weeks’ administration (MD -0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.28 to -0.01) and after 8 weeks’ administration (MD -0.25 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.11). There was no difference in serum calcium levels or the incidence of hypercalcemia between two groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks. No statistical difference was found in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels or serum calcium by phosphorus (Ca x P) product. There was significantly higher risk of intolerance with calcium acetate treatment (RR 3.46, 95% CI 1.48 to 8.26). Conclusions For hyperphosphatemia treatment, calcium acetate showed better efficacy and with a higher incidence of intolerance compared with

  18. Kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate formation from tricalcium aluminate, calcium sulfate and calcium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuerun, E-mail: xuerunli@163.com; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdshen@njut.edu.cn

    The formation kinetics of tricalcium aluminate (C{sub 3}A) and calcium sulfate yielding calcium sulfoaluminate (C{sub 4}A{sub 3}more » $$) and the decomposition kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate were investigated by sintering a mixture of synthetic C{sub 3}A and gypsum. The quantitative analysis of the phase composition was performed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis using the Rietveld method. The results showed that the formation reaction 3Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + CaSO{sub 4} → Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 6CaO was the primary reaction < 1350 °C with and activation energy of 231 ± 42 kJ/mol; while the decomposition reaction 2Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 10CaO → 6Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + 2SO{sub 2} ↑ + O{sub 2} ↑ primarily occurred beyond 1350 °C with an activation energy of 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. The optimal formation region for C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$$ was from 1150 °C to 1350 °C and from 6 h to 1 h, which could provide useful information on the formation of C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ containing clinkers. The Jander diffusion model was feasible for the formation and decomposition of calcium sulfoaluminate. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} were the diffusive species in both the formation and decomposition reactions. -- Highlights: •Formation and decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate were studied. •Decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate combined CaO and yielded C{sub 3}A. •Activation energy for formation was 231 ± 42 kJ/mol. •Activation energy for decomposition was 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. •Both the formation and decomposition were controlled by diffusion.« less

  19. An Exploration of the Calcium-Binding Mode of Egg White Peptide, Asp-His-Thr-Lys-Glu, and In Vitro Calcium Absorption Studies of Peptide-Calcium Complex.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Jin, Ziqi; Li, Dongmei; Yin, Hongjie; Lin, Songyi

    2017-11-08

    The binding mode between the pentapeptide (DHTKE) from egg white hydrolysates and calcium ions was elucidated upon its structural and thermodynamics characteristics. The present study demonstrated that the DHTKE peptide could spontaneously bind calcium with a 1:1 stoichiometry, and that the calcium-binding site corresponded to the carboxyl oxygen, amino nitrogen, and imidazole nitrogen atoms of the DHTKE peptide. Moreover, the effect of the DHTKE-calcium complex on improving the calcium absorption was investigated in vitro using Caco-2 cells. Results showed that the DHTKE-calcium complex could facilitate the calcium influx into the cytosol and further improve calcium absorption across Caco-2 cell monolayers by more than 7 times when compared to calcium-free control. This study facilitates the understanding about the binding mechanism between peptides and calcium ions as well as suggests a potential application of egg white peptides as nutraceuticals to improve calcium absorption.

  20. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kathleen M.; Martin, Berdine R.; Wastney, Meryl; McCabe, George P.; Moe, Sharon M.; Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus and reduce phosphorus retention, and to prevent negative calcium balance. Data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance in CKD to support this. The aim of this study was to determine calcium and phosphorus balance and calcium kinetics with and without calcium carbonate in CKD patients. Eight stage 3/4 CKD patients, eGFR 36 mL/min, participated in two 3-week balances in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of calcium carbonate (1500 mg/d calcium). Calcium and phosphorus balance were determined on a controlled diet. Oral and intravenous 45calcium with blood sampling and urine and fecal collections were used for calcium kinetics. Fasting blood and urine were collected at baseline and end of each week of each balance period for biochemical analyses. Results showed that patients were in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on placebo. Calcium carbonate produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance suggesting tissue deposition. Fasting biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. If they can be extrapolated to effects of chronic therapy, these data caution against the use of calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder. PMID:23254903

  1. The calcium-sensing receptor regulates mammary gland parathyroid hormone–related protein production and calcium transport

    PubMed Central

    VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; McGeoch, Grace; Brown, Edward M.; Krapcho, Karen; Neville, Margaret; Wysolmerski, John J.

    2004-01-01

    The transfer of calcium from mother to milk during lactation is poorly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that parathyroid hormone–related protein (PTHrP) production and calcium transport in mammary epithelial cells are regulated by extracellular calcium acting through the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). The CaR becomes expressed on mammary epithelial cells at the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Increasing concentrations of calcium, neomycin, and a calcimimetic compound suppress PTHrP secretion by mammary epithelial cells in vitro, whereas in vivo, systemic hypocalcemia increases PTHrP production, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with a calcimimetic. Hypocalcemia also reduces overall milk production and calcium content, while increasing milk osmolality and protein concentrations. The changes in milk calcium content, milk osmolality, and milk protein concentration were mitigated by calcimimetic infusions. Finally, in a three-dimensional culture system that recapitulates the lactating alveolus, activation of the basolateral CaR increases transcellular calcium transport independent of its effect on PTHrP. We conclude that the lactating mammary gland can sense calcium and adjusts its secretion of calcium, PTHrP, and perhaps water in response to changes in extracellular calcium concentration. We believe this defines a homeostatic system that helps to match milk production to the availability of calcium. PMID:14966569

  2. Skin Barrier and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Lee, Seung Hun

    2018-06-01

    Epidermal barrier formation and the maintenance of barrier homeostasis are essential to protect us from the external environments and organisms. Moreover, impaired keratinocytes differentiation and dysfunctional skin barrier can be the primary causes or aggravating factors for many inflammatory skin diseases including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Therefore, understanding the regulation mechanisms of keratinocytes differentiation and skin barrier homeostasis is important to understand many skin diseases and establish an effective treatment strategy. Calcium ions (Ca 2+ ) and their concentration gradient in the epidermis are essential in regulating many skin functions, including keratinocyte differentiation, skin barrier formation, and permeability barrier homeostasis. Recent studies have suggested that the intracellular Ca 2+ stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are the major components that form the epidermal calcium gradient and the ER calcium homeostasis is crucial for regulating keratinocytes differentiation, intercellular junction formation, antimicrobial barrier, and permeability barrier homeostasis. Thus, both Ca 2+ release from intracellular stores, such as the ER and Ca 2+ influx mechanisms are important in skin barrier. In addition, growing evidences identified the functional existence and the role of many types of calcium channels which mediate calcium flux in keratinocytes. In this review, the origin of epidermal calcium gradient and their role in the formation and regulation of skin barrier are focused. We also focus on the role of ER calcium homeostasis in skin barrier. Furthermore, the distribution and role of epidermal calcium channels, including transient receptor potential channels, store-operated calcium entry channel Orai1, and voltage-gated calcium channels in skin barrier are discussed.

  3. Sat1 is dispensable for active oxalate secretion in mouse duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Narae; Knauf, Felix; Jiang, Zhirong; Markovich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Mice deficient for the apical membrane oxalate transporter SLC26A6 develop hyperoxalemia, hyperoxaluria, and calcium oxalate stones due to a defect in intestinal oxalate secretion. However, the nature of the basolateral membrane oxalate transport process that operates in series with SLC26A6 to mediate active oxalate secretion in the intestine remains unknown. Sulfate anion transporter-1 (Sat1 or SLC26A1) is a basolateral membrane anion exchanger that mediates intestinal oxalate transport. Moreover, Sat1-deficient mice also have a phenotype of hyperoxalemia, hyperoxaluria, and calcium oxalate stones. We, therefore, tested the role of Sat1 in mouse duodenum, a tissue with Sat1 expression and SLC26A6-dependent oxalate secretion. Although the active secretory flux of oxalate across mouse duodenum was strongly inhibited (>90%) by addition of the disulfonic stilbene DIDS to the basolateral solution, secretion was unaffected by changes in medium concentrations of sulfate and bicarbonate, key substrates for Sat1-mediated anion exchange. Inhibition of intracellular bicarbonate production by acetazolamide and complete removal of bicarbonate from the buffer also produced no change in oxalate secretion. Finally, active oxalate secretion was not reduced in Sat1-null mice. We conclude that a DIDS-sensitive basolateral transporter is involved in mediating oxalate secretion across mouse duodenum, but Sat1 itself is dispensable for this process. PMID:22517357

  4. Calcium Signaling in Taste Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Kathryn F.

    2014-01-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. PMID:25450977

  5. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  6. Novel calcium recognition constructions in proteins: Calcium blade and EF-hand zone

    SciTech Connect

    Denesyuk, Alexander I., E-mail: adenesyu@abo.fi; Institute for Biological Instrumentation of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290; Permyakov, Sergei E.

    Metal ions can regulate various cell processes being first, second or third messengers, and some of them, especially transition metal ions, take part in catalysis in many enzymes. As an intracellular ion, Ca{sup 2+} is involved in many cellular functions from fertilization and contraction, cell differentiation and proliferation, to apoptosis and cancer. Here, we have identified and described two novel calcium recognition environments in proteins: the calcium blade zone and the EF-hand zone, common to 12 and 8 different protein families, respectively. Each of the two environments contains three distinct structural elements: (a) the well-known characteristic Dx[DN]xDG motif; (b) anmore » adjacent structurally identical segment, which binds metal ion in the same way between the calcium blade zone and the EF-hand zone; and (c) the following structurally variable segment, which distinguishes the calcium blade zone from the EF-hand zone. Both zones have sequence insertions between the last residue of the zone and calcium-binding residues in positions V or VI. The long insertion often connects the active and the calcium-binding sites in proteins. Using the structurally identical segments as an anchor, we were able to construct the classical calmodulin type EF-hand calcium-binding site out of two different calcium-binding motifs from two unrelated proteins.« less

  7. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  8. Antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Basri, Hashimah; Md Isa, Zaleha; Ahmad, Shuhaila; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Mohd Amin, Rahmah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the adequacy of antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia, and the influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among postnatal women who delivered in two tertiary hospitals. Data were collected from antenatal cards, hospital documents and diet recall on daily milk and calcium intake during pregnancy. SPSS version 19.0 was used for statistical analyses. A total of 150 women were studied. The total daily calcium intake was 834 ± 43 mg (mean ± standard error of the mean), but the calcium intake distribution curve was skewed to the right with a median intake of 725 mg daily. When calcium intake from milk and calcium supplements was excluded, the daily dietary calcium intake was only 478 ± 25 mg. Even with inclusion of milk and calcium supplements, more than a third (n=55 or 36.7%) of the women consumed less than 600 mg calcium in their daily diet. The adequacy of daily calcium intake was not influenced by maternal age, ethnicity, income or maternal job or educational status as well as parity. The daily dietary calcium intake of the Malaysian antenatal population is far from adequate without the addition of calcium supplements and milk. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Calcium metabolism in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Munro

    2010-01-01

    This brief review focuses on calcium balance and homeostasis and their relationship to dietary calcium intake and calcium supplementation in healthy subjects and patients with chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disorders (CKD-MBD). Calcium balance refers to the state of the calcium body stores, primarily in bone, which are largely a function of dietary intake, intestinal absorption, renal excretion, and bone remodeling. Bone calcium balance can be positive, neutral, or negative, depending on a number of factors, including growth, aging, and acquired or inherited disorders. Calcium homeostasis refers to the hormonal regulation of serum ionized calcium by parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and serum ionized calcium itself, which together regulate calcium transport at the gut, kidney, and bone. Hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia indicate serious disruption of calcium homeostasis but do not reflect calcium balance on their own. Calcium balance studies have determined the dietary and supplemental calcium requirements needed to optimize bone mass in healthy subjects. However, similar studies are needed in CKD-MBD, which disrupts both calcium balance and homeostasis, because these data in healthy subjects may not be generalizable to this patient group. Importantly, increasing evidence suggests that calcium supplementation may enhance soft tissue calcification and cardiovascular disease in CKD-MBD. Further research is needed to elucidate the risks and mechanisms of soft tissue calcification with calcium supplementation in both healthy subjects and CKD-MBD patients.

  10. Precipitation of calcium, magnesium, strontium and barium in tissues of four Acacia species (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae).

    PubMed

    He, Honghua; Bleby, Timothy M; Veneklaas, Erik J; Lambers, Hans; Kuo, John

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation of calcium in plants is common. There are abundant studies on the uptake and content of magnesium, strontium and barium, which have similar chemical properties to calcium, in comparison with those of calcium in plants, but studies on co-precipitation of these elements with calcium in plants are rare. In this study, we compared morphologies, distributional patterns, and elemental compositions of crystals in tissues of four Acacia species grown in the field as well as in the glasshouse. A comparison was also made of field-grown plants and glasshouse-grown plants, and of phyllodes of different ages for each species. Crystals of various morphologies and distributional patterns were observed in the four Acacia species studied. Magnesium, strontium and barium were precipitated together with calcium, mainly in phyllodes of the four Acacia species, and sometimes in branchlets and primary roots. These elements were most likely precipitated in forms of oxalate and sulfate in various tissues, including epidermis, mesophyll, parenchyma, sclerenchyma (fibre cells), pith, pith ray and cortex. In most cases, precipitation of calcium, magnesium, strontium and barium was biologically induced, and elements precipitated differed between soil types, plant species, and tissues within an individual plant; the precipitation was also related to tissue age. Formation of crystals containing these elements might play a role in regulating and detoxifying these elements in plants, and protecting the plants against herbivory.

  11. Precipitation of Calcium, Magnesium, Strontium and Barium in Tissues of Four Acacia Species (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Honghua; Bleby, Timothy M.; Veneklaas, Erik J.; Lambers, Hans; Kuo, John

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation of calcium in plants is common. There are abundant studies on the uptake and content of magnesium, strontium and barium, which have similar chemical properties to calcium, in comparison with those of calcium in plants, but studies on co-precipitation of these elements with calcium in plants are rare. In this study, we compared morphologies, distributional patterns, and elemental compositions of crystals in tissues of four Acacia species grown in the field as well as in the glasshouse. A comparison was also made of field-grown plants and glasshouse-grown plants, and of phyllodes of different ages for each species. Crystals of various morphologies and distributional patterns were observed in the four Acacia species studied. Magnesium, strontium and barium were precipitated together with calcium, mainly in phyllodes of the four Acacia species, and sometimes in branchlets and primary roots. These elements were most likely precipitated in forms of oxalate and sulfate in various tissues, including epidermis, mesophyll, parenchyma, sclerenchyma (fibre cells), pith, pith ray and cortex. In most cases, precipitation of calcium, magnesium, strontium and barium was biologically induced, and elements precipitated differed between soil types, plant species, and tissues within an individual plant; the precipitation was also related to tissue age. Formation of crystals containing these elements might play a role in regulating and detoxifying these elements in plants, and protecting the plants against herbivory. PMID:22848528

  12. The Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Elevates Cytosolic Calcium Signals by Modulating Mitochondrial Calcium Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bei

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV X protein (HBx) is thought to play an important role in the development of HBV-associated HCC. One fundamental HBx function is elevation of cytosolic calcium signals; this HBx activity has been linked to HBx stimulation of cell proliferation and transcription pathways, as well as HBV replication. Exactly how HBx elevates cytosolic calcium signals is not clear. The studies described here show that HBx stimulates calcium entry into cells, resulting in an increased plateau level of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-linked calcium signals. This increased calcium plateau can be inhibited by blocking mitochondrial calcium uptake and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Blocking SOCE also reduced HBV replication. Finally, these studies also demonstrate that there is increased mitochondrial calcium uptake in HBx-expressing cells. Cumulatively, these studies suggest that HBx can increase mitochondrial calcium uptake and promote increased SOCE to sustain higher cytosolic calcium and stimulate HBV replication. PMID:22031934

  13. Dietary Calcium Intake, Serum Calcium Level, and their Association with Preeclampsia in Rural North India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anant; Kant, Shashi; Pandav, Chandrakant S.; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Rai, Sanjay K.; Misra, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia in pregnancy has been shown to be associated with low serum calcium level. Though the evidence is abundant, it is equivocal. Objectives: The study aimed to estimate the dietary calcium intake and serum calcium status among pregnant women, and to document the association of the dietary calcium intake and serum calcium status with incidence of preeclampsia in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) site, Ballabgarh, Haryana, India. All pregnant women between 28 weeks and 36 weeks of gestation were interviewed. A semi-structured interview schedule and a 24-h dietary recall questionnaire were administered to assess the dietary calcium intake. AutoAnalyser (Biolis 24i) was used for measuring serum calcium. Results: We enrolled 217 pregnant women. The mean [standard deviation (SD)] dietary calcium intake was 858 (377) mg/day. The mean (SD) serum calcium level was 9.6 mg/dL (0.56). Incidence of preeclampsia was 13.4%. Preeclampsia was not associated with hypocalcemia [odds ratio (OR) = 1.2 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.27-3.98]. Conclusion: The majority of pregnant women had inadequate dietary calcium intake. The prevalence of hypocalcemia was low. Low serum calcium level was not associated with preeclampsia. Calcium supplementation may not reduce preeclampsia in this population. PMID:27385877

  14. Crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate at dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers in the presence of chondroitin sulfate A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Deng, Sui-Ping; Zhong, Jiu-Ping; Tieke, Bernd; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2004-10-01

    The growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals beneath dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers in the presence of chondroitin sulfate A (C4S) was systematically examined under different surface pressure. The results indicated that the addition of C4S can inhibit the crystal growth and prevent the aggregation of COM crystals. Under a DPPC monolayer, well-defined three-dimensional hexagonal prisms and three-dimensional rhombus prisms with sharply angled tips were obtained. The DPPC monolayer at a surface pressure of 10 mN/m can match the Ca2+ distance of the (1 bar 0 1) face of COM better than at 20 mN/m. The addition of C4S could cooperatively modulate the interaction strength between the monolayer (or itself) with the specific morphology determining faces such as (1 bar 0 1) and (0 2 0), and thus results in remarkable stabilization of the (1 bar 0 1) faces. The dramatic changes in morphological details were due to the strong electrostatic interactions between the Ca2+-rich (1 bar 0 1) crystal faces of COM and the polyanionic polysaccharide C4S together with the negatively charged sites of the zwitterionic DPPC monolayers. The increase of the concentration of C4S can further enhance the stabilization of the (1 bar 0 1) face.

  15. Defining and systematic analyses of aggregation indices to evaluate degree of calcium oxalate crystal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2017-12-01

    Crystal aggregation is one of the most crucial steps in kidney stone pathogenesis. However, previous studies of crystal aggregation were rarely done and quantitative analysis of aggregation degree was handicapped by a lack of the standard measurement. We thus performed an in vitro assay to generate aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals with various concentrations (25-800 µg/ml) in saturated aggregation buffer. The crystal aggregates were analyzed by microscopic examination, UV-visible spectrophotometry, and GraphPad Prism6 software to define a total of 12 aggregation indices (including number of aggregates, aggregated mass index, optical density, aggregation coefficient, span, number of aggregates at plateau time-point, aggregated area index, aggregated diameter index, aggregated symmetry index, time constant, half-life, and rate constant). The data showed linear correlation between crystal concentration and almost all of these indices, except only for rate constant. Among these, number of aggregates provided the greatest regression coefficient (r=0.997; p<0.001), whereas the equally second rank included aggregated mass index and optical density (r=0.993; p<0.001 and r=‑0.993; p<0.001, respectively) and the equally forth were aggregation coefficient and span (r=0.991; p<0.001 for both). These five indices are thus recommended as the most appropriate indices for quantitative analysis of COM crystal aggregation in vitro.

  16. Effect of urine pH and magnesium on calcium oxalate saturation.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Silvia; Grange, Jacob S; Adams-Huet Ms, Beverley; Moe, Orson W; Maalouf, Naim M

    2017-11-01

    Hypomagnesiuria is a common biochemical finding in patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephrolithiasis. Clinical trials using Mg supplements as therapy against CaOx stones have shown mixed results. We tested the effect of Mg administration in healthy subjects under conditions of controlled urine pH (UpH) on urinary Ca excretion rate (UCaV) and CaOx saturation. This is a 4-phase, double blind, placebo-controlled, metabolic crossover study performed in healthy volunteers. Mg lactate (MgLact 2 ) was used as Mg supplement. High UpH and low UpH were achieved by administration of potassium citrate (K 3 Citrate) and ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl), respectively, with potassium balance maintained by KCl. Eight participants completed 4 phases of study. The interventions successfully modulated 24-h UpH (7.0 ± 0.4 vs. 5.7 ± 0.6 in high vs low pH phases; P<0.001). Administration of MgLact 2 increased UMgV [175.8 ± 40.2 vs 93.4 ± 39.7 mg/day (7.2 ± 1.7 vs 3.8 ± 1.6 mmol/day), high vs low Mg phase; P<0.001], and increased pH both at low (5.6 ± 0.5 to 5.8 ± 0.7; P = 0.02) and high UpH (6.9 ± 0.4 to 7.0 ± 0.3; P = 0.01). At a given urine pH, Mg supplementation marginally increased UCaV, but did not alter UOxV or CaOx saturation. Provision of an alkali load significantly lowered UCaV and saturation of CaOx at any level of UMgV. Compared to changes in UMgV, changes in UpH play a more significant role in determining urine CaOx saturation in healthy subjects. Mg supplements are likely to reduce CaOx saturation if they also raise urine pH.

  17. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  18. A Closer look at calcium absorption and the benefits and risks of dietary versus supplemental calcium.

    PubMed

    Booth, Anna; Camacho, Pauline

    2013-11-01

    To perform a thorough search of the literature on calcium research and specifically address the topic of calcium absorption. PubMed and Ovid were the main engines used for primary literature searches; textbooks, review articles, and book chapters are examples of the other sources used for supplemental information. Regarding calcium absorption, it seems apparent that the absorption efficiency of all calcium salts, regardless of solubility, is fairly equivalent and not significantly less than the absorption efficiency of dietary calcium. However, dietary calcium has been shown to have greater impact in bone building than supplemental calcium. This is likely due to improved absorption with meals and the tendency of people to intake smaller amounts more frequently, which is more ideal for the body's method of absorption. In addition, the cardiovascular risks of excessive calcium intake appear to be more closely related to calcium supplements than dietary calcium; this relationship continues to be controversial in the literature. We conclude that further studies are needed for direct comparison of supplemental and dietary calcium to fully establish if one is superior to the other with regard to improving bone density. We also propose further studies on the cardiovascular risk of long-term increased calcium intake and on physician estimates of patients' daily calcium intake to better pinpoint those patients who require calcium supplementation.

  19. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  20. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... A calcium-rich diet (including dairy, nuts, leafy greens and fish) helps to build and protect your bones. Calcium is a mineral that is necessary for life. In addition to building bones and keeping them healthy, calcium enables our ...

  1. The Association Between Calcium, Magnesium, and Ratio of Calcium/Magnesium in Seminal Plasma and Sperm Quality.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hong; Miao, Maohua; Chen, Jianping; Chen, Kanglian; Wu, Bin; Dai, Qi; Wang, Jian; Sun, Fei; Shi, Huijuan; Yuan, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to examine the relationships between calcium, magnesium, and calcium/magnesium ratio in semen plasma and sperm quality. It was a cross-sectional study based on a program aiming at promoting the reproductive health in less-developed areas. A total of 515 men aged between 18 and 55 years provided semen specimens at family planning clinics in Sandu County, Guizhou Province, China. Total calcium and magnesium concentrations in semen plasma were measured with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Sperm quality, including sperm motility and concentration, was evaluated by using a computer-assisted sperm analysis method. The medians of seminal plasma calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations were 9.61, 4.41, and 2.23 mmol/l, respectively. Calcium concentration and calcium/magnesium ratio were negatively associated with sperm concentrations (β = -0.47, P = 0.0123 for calcium; β = -0.25, P = 0.0393 for calcium/magnesium ratio) after adjusting for zinc and other covariates. In stratified analyses, the association between calcium and sperm concentrations only persisted among subjects with a calcium/magnesium ratio of ≤2.5 (β = -0.71, P = 0.0268). In the same stratum, magnesium was associated with increased sperm concentration (β = 0.73, P = 0.0386). Among subjects with a calcium/magnesium ratio of >2.5, neither calcium nor magnesium was associated with sperm concentration. In conclusion, total calcium and magnesium concentrations were associated with sperm concentration among subjects with a lower calcium/magnesium ratio. The calcium and magnesium ratio had a modifying effect on the associations of calcium and magnesium with sperm concentration.

  2. Lattice model for calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisoni, Nara; de Oliveira, Mario José

    2005-06-01

    We present a simplified lattice model to study calcium dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Calcium channels and calcium ions are placed in two interpenetrating square lattices which are connected in two ways: (i) via calcium release and (ii) because transitions between channel states are calcium dependent. The opening or closing of a channel is a stochastic process controlled by two functions which depend on the calcium density on the channel neighborhood. The model is studied through mean field calculations and simulations. We show that the critical behavior of the model changes drastically depending on the opening/closing functions. For certain choices of these functions, all channels are closed at very low and high calcium densities and the model presents one absorbing state.

  3. Microdetermination of calcium and magnesium in biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, C. H.; Patston, Valerie J.

    1963-01-01

    The use of the dye calcon (1-(2 hydroxy-1-naphthylazo)-2-naphthol-4 sulphonic acid) for the estimation of calcium using E.D.T.A. and a commercial photoelectric titrimeter is described. The interfering effects of magnesium and phosphate have been overcome. The method has been extended to estimations on biological materials. Results on 55 sera show that the E.D.T.A./calcon method gave slightly lower results (—0·15 mg./100 ml. ± 0·029) than the oxalate precipitation method. Magnesium may also be estimated by incorporating the use of Eriochrome black T. PMID:14014590

  4. Calcium metabolism in birds.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is one of the most important plasma constituents in mammals and birds. It provides structural strength and support (bones and eggshell) and plays vital roles in many of the biochemical reactions in the body. The control of calcium metabolism in birds is highly efficient and closely regulated in a number of tissues, primarily parathyroid gland, intestine, kidney, and bone. The hormones with the greatest involvement in calcium regulation in birds are parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (calcitriol), and estrogen, with calcitonin playing a minor and uncertain role. The special characteristics of calcium metabolism in birds, mainly associated with egg production, are discussed, along with common clinical disorders secondary to derangements in calcium homeostasis.

  5. Natural Abundance 43Ca NMR as a Tool for Exploring Calcium Biomineralization: Renal Stone Formation and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2011-12-07

    Renal stone diseases are a global health issue with little effective therapeutic recourse aside from surgery and shock-wave lithotripsy, primarily because the fundamental chemical mechanisms behind calcium biomineralization are poorly understood. In this work, we show that natural abundance 43Ca NMR at 21.1 T is an effective means to probe the molecular-level Ca2+ structure in oxalate-based kidney stones. We find that the 43Ca NMR resonance of an authentic oxalate-based kidney stone cannot be explained by a single pure phase of any common Ca2+-bearing stone mineral. Combined with XRD results, our findings suggest an altered calcium oxalate monohydrate-like Ca2+ coordination environmentmore » for some fraction of Ca2+ in our sample. The evidence is consistent with existing literature hypothesizing that nonoxalate organic material interacts directly with Ca2+ at stone surfaces and is the primary driver of renal stone aggregation and growth. Our findings show that 43Ca NMR spectroscopy may provide unique and crucial insight into the fundamental chemistry of kidney stone formation, growth, and the role organic molecules play in these processes.« less

  6. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-01-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753088

  7. Loss of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Impairs Intestinal Oxalate Secretion.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Felix; Thomson, Robert B; Heneghan, John F; Jiang, Zhirong; Adebamiro, Adedotun; Thomson, Claire L; Barone, Christina; Asplin, John R; Egan, Marie E; Alper, Seth L; Aronson, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have an increased incidence of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Net intestinal absorption of dietary oxalate results from passive paracellular oxalate absorption as modified by oxalate back secretion mediated by the SLC26A6 oxalate transporter. We used mice deficient in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (Cftr) to test the hypothesis that SLC26A6-mediated oxalate secretion is defective in cystic fibrosis. We mounted isolated intestinal tissue from C57BL/6 (wild-type) and Cftr -/- mice in Ussing chambers and measured transcellular secretion of [ 14 C]oxalate. Intestinal tissue isolated from Cftr -/- mice exhibited significantly less transcellular oxalate secretion than intestinal tissue of wild-type mice. However, glucose absorption, another representative intestinal transport process, did not differ in Cftr -/- tissue. Compared with wild-type mice, Cftr -/- mice showed reduced expression of SLC26A6 in duodenum by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, coexpression of CFTR stimulated SLC26A6-mediated Cl - -oxalate exchange in Xenopus oocytes. In association with the profound defect in intestinal oxalate secretion, Cftr -/- mice had serum and urine oxalate levels 2.5-fold greater than those of wild-type mice. We conclude that defective intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by SLC26A6 may contribute to the hyperoxaluria observed in this mouse model of cystic fibrosis. Future studies are needed to address whether similar mechanisms contribute to the increased risk for calcium oxalate stone formation observed in patients with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. Subcellular localization of calcium deposits in the noble crayfish Astacus astacus spermatophore: Implications for post-mating spermatophore hardening and spermatozoon maturation.

    PubMed

    Niksirat, Hamid; Kouba, Antonín

    2016-04-01

    The freshly ejaculated spermatophore of crayfish undergoes a hardening process during post-mating storage on the body surface of female. The ultrastructural distribution of calcium deposits were studied and compared in freshly ejaculated and post-mating noble crayfish spermatophores, using the oxalate-pyroantimonate technique, to determine possible roles of calcium in post-mating spermatophore hardening and spermatozoon maturation. Small particles of sparsely distributed calcium deposits were visible in the wall of freshly ejaculated spermatophore. Also, large amount of calcium deposits were visible in the membranes of the freshly ejaculated spermatozoon. Five minutes post-ejaculation, granules in the spermatophore wall appeared as porous formations with numerous electron lucent spaces. Calcium deposits were visible within the spaces and scattered in the spermatophore wall matrix, where smaller calcium deposits combined to form globular calcium deposits. Large numbers of the globular calcium deposits were visible in the wall of the post-mating spermatophore. Smaller calcium deposits were detected in the central area of post-mating spermatophore, which contains the sperm mass, and in the extracellular matrix and capsule. While the density of calcium deposits decreased in the post-mating spermatozoon membranes, numerous small calcium deposits appeared in the subacrosomal zone and nucleus. Substantial changes in calcium deposit distribution in the crayfish spermatophore during post-mating storage on the body of female may be involved in the processes of the spermatophore hardening and spermatozoon maturation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Free-calcium distribution and calcium pulses in rat peripheral macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanhua; Xing, Da; Tang, Yonghong; Jin, Ying

    2000-10-01

    With Laser Confocal Scanning Microscope (LCSM) system, three aspects of characteristics of free cytoplasmic calcium in rat peripheral macrophages are studied. One is the Ca2+ concentration in different area in the same cell. Second is the Ca2+ concentration in the same area in different dividing stage. Third is the feature of calcium pulses evoked by Kcl or pH changing. The results show that even in one cell, the evolution of the Ca2+ concentration is not the same in a different area. In the same area, the nucleolus Ca2+ concentration in division breaking stage is much higher than that in division stage. From the experiment phenomena, we conclude that Kcl itself can not evoke calcium pulses in the unexcitable macrophage, but the change of pH can trig calcium pulses in the same cells.

  10. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Spiegel, David M

    2017-06-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balance have important implications in patients with chronic kidney disease, where negative balance may increase risk of osteoporosis and fracture and positive balance may increase risk of vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Here, we examine the state of current knowledge about calcium balance in adults throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease and discuss recommendations for clinical strategies to maintain balance as well as future research needs in this area. Recent calcium balance studies in adult patients with chronic kidney disease show that neutral calcium balance is achieved with calcium intake near the recommended daily allowance. Increases in calcium through diet or supplements cause high positive calcium balance, which may put patients at risk for vascular calcification. However, heterogeneity in calcium balance exists among these patients. Given the available calcium balance data in this population, it appears clinically prudent to aim for recommended calcium intakes around 1000 mg/day to achieve neutral calcium balance and avoid adverse effects of either negative or positive calcium balance. Assessment of patients' dietary calcium intake could further equip clinicians to make individualized recommendations for meeting recommended intakes.

  11. Lack of voltage-dependent calcium channel opening during the calcium influx induced by progesterone in human sperm. Effect of calcium channel deactivation and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Grenfell, Alberto Martín; González-Martínez, Marco T

    2004-01-01

    Progesterone induces calcium influx and acrosomal exocytosis in human sperm. Pharmacologic evidence suggests that voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) are involved. In this study, membrane potential (Vm) and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) were monitored simultaneously to assess the effect of VDCC gating on the calcium influx triggered by progesterone. Holding the Vm to values that maintained VDCCs in a deactivated (-71 mV) closed state inhibited the calcium influx induced by progesterone by approximately 40%. At this Vm, the acrosomal reaction induced by progesterone, but not by A23187, was inhibited. However, when the Vm was held at -15 mV (which maintains VDCCs in an inactivated closed state), the progesterone-induced calcium influx was stimulated. Furthermore, the progesterone and voltage-dependent calcium influxes were additive. These findings indicate that progesterone does not produce VDCC gating in human sperm.

  12. Comparison of the Absorption of Calcium Carbonate and Calcium Citrate after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Tondapu, P.; Provost, D.; Adams-Huet, B.; Sims, T.; Chang, C.; Sakhaee, K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) restricts food intake. Consequently, patients consume less calcium. In addition, food no longer passes through the duodenum, the main site of calcium absorption. Therefore, calcium absorption is significantly impaired. The goal of this study is to compare two common calcium supplements in gastric bypass patients. Method Nineteen patients were enrolled in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover study comparing the absorption of calcium from calcium carbonate and calcium citrate salts. Serum and urine calcium levels were assessed for peak values (Cmax) and cumulative calcium increment (area under the curve [AUC]). Serum PTH was assessed for minimum values (PTHmin) and cumulative PTH decrement (AUC). Statistical analysis was performed using a repeated analysis of variance model. Results Eighteen subjects completed the study. Calcium citrate resulted in a significantly higher serum Cmax (9.4+0.4 mg/dl vs. 9.2+0.3 mg/dl, p=0.02) and serum AUC (55+2 mg/dl vs. 54+2 mg/dl, p=0.02). Calcium citrate resulted in a significantly lower PTHmin (24+11 pg/ml vs. 30+13 pg/ml, p=0.01) and a higher AUC (−32+51 pg/ml vs. −3+56 pg/ml, p=0.04). There was a non-significant trend for higher urinary AUC in the calcium citrate group (76.13+36.39 mg/6 h vs. 66.04+40.82, p=0.17). Conclusion Calcium citrate has superior bioavailability than calcium carbonate in RYGB patients. PMID:19437082

  13. Calcium-Induced Calcium Release during Action Potential Firing in Developing Inner Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  14. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  15. Effect of oral calcium and calcium + fluoride treatments on mouse bone properties during suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, S. J.; Luttges, M. W.; Allen, K. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The bone effects of oral dosages of calcium chloride with or without supplementary sodium fluoride were assessed in antiorthostatically suspended mice. Two calcium dosages were used to replace half (3.1 mM) or all(6.3 mM) of the dietary calcium lost due to reduced food intake by the suspended mice. Two groups of 6.3 mM CaCl2-treated mice were additionally treated with 0.25 or 2.5 mM NaF. The results indicate that supplementation of the mouse drinking water with calcium salts prevents bone changes induced by short-term suspension, while calcium salts in combination with fluoride are less effective as fluoride dosage increases. However, the calcium supplements change the relationship between the femur mechanical properties and the mineral composition of the bone. Because of this, it appears that oral calcium supplements are effective through a mechanism other than simple dietary supplementation and may indicate a dependence of bone consistency on systemic and local fluid conditions.

  16. Imaging extracellular calcium in endolymph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strimbu, C. Elliott; Fridberger, Anders

    2018-05-01

    Hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction and adaptation are believed to be regulated by extracellular calcium. However, the majority of experiments addressing calcium's role have been performed on reduced preparations in conditions that do not mimic those present in vivo. We used confocal microscopy and a low affinity (kd ˜11 µM) ratiometric fluorescent indicator to measure the extracellular calcium concentration in scala media in an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. Microelectrodes were used to measure the cochlear microphonic potential during acoustic stimulation. The mean calcium concentration is significantly higher in the tectorial membrane (TM) than the surrounding endolymph, suggesting that the membrane acts as a calcium sink. We also observe calcium hot spots along the underside of the TM, near the outer hair cell bundles and near Hensens stripe close to the inner hair cell bundle. This suggests that the local calcium concentration near the hair bundles exceeds 100 µM, significantly higher than the bulk endolymph. These results were corroborated with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using a second calcium sensitive dye, Oregon Green 488-BAPTA. Following a brief exposure to loud sound, TM calcium drops dramatically and shows recovery on a similar timescale as the microphonic potential. Our results suggest that the extracellular calcium concentration near the hair bundles is much higher than previously believed and may also serve as a partial control parameter for temporary threshold shifts.

  17. Cameleon calcium indicator reports cytoplasmic calcium dynamics in Arabidopsis guard cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. J.; Kwak, J. M.; Chu, S. P.; Llopis, J.; Tsien, R. Y.; Harper, J. F.; Schroeder, J. I.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) acts as a stimulus-induced second messenger in plant cells and multiple signal transduction pathways regulate [Ca2+]cyt in stomatal guard cells. Measuring [Ca2+]cyt in guard cells has previously required loading of calcium-sensitive dyes using invasive and technically difficult micro-injection techniques. To circumvent these problems, we have constitutively expressed the pH-independent, green fluorescent protein-based calcium indicator yellow cameleon 2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (Miyawaki et al. 1999; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 2135-2140). This yellow cameleon calcium indicator was expressed in guard cells and accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Fluorescence ratio imaging of yellow cameleon 2.1 allowed time-dependent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt in Arabidopsis guard cells. Application of extracellular calcium or the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients in guard cells. [Ca2+]cyt changes could be semi-quantitatively determined following correction of the calibration procedure for chloroplast autofluorescence. Extracellular calcium induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients with peak values of up to approximately 1.5 microM, whereas ABA-induced [Ca2+]cyt transients had peak values up to approximately 0.6 microM. These values are similar to stimulus-induced [Ca2+]cyt changes previously reported in plant cells using ratiometric dyes or aequorin. In some guard cells perfused with low extracellular KCl concentrations, spontaneous calcium transients were observed. As yellow cameleon 2.1 was expressed in all guard cells, [Ca2+]cyt was measured independently in the two guard cells of single stomates for the first time. ABA-induced, calcium-induced or spontaneous [Ca2+]cyt increases were not necessarily synchronized in the two guard cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that that GFP-based cameleon calcium indicators are suitable to measure [Ca2+]cyt changes in guard cells and enable the pattern of [Ca

  18. Potential Pharmacologic Treatments for Cystinuria and for Calcium Stones Associated with Hyperuricosuria

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, David S.

    Two new potential pharmacologic therapies for recurrent stone disease are described. The role of hyperuricosuria in promoting calcium stones is controversial with only some but not all epidemiologic studies demonstrating associations between increasing urinary uric acid excretion and calcium stone disease. The relationship is supported by the ability of uric acid to 'salt out' (or reduce the solubility of) calcium oxalate in vitro. A randomized, controlled trial of allopurinol in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria was also effective in preventing recurrent stones. Febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (also known as xanthine dehydrogenase or xanthine oxidoreductase) may have advantagesmore » over allopurinol and is being tested in a similar protocol, with the eventual goal of determining whether urate-lowering therapy prevents recurrent calcium stones. Treatments for cystinuria have advanced little in the past 30 years. Atomic force microscopy has been used recently to demonstrate that effective inhibition of cystine crystal growth is accomplished at low concentrations of L-cystine methyl ester and L-cystine dimethyl ester, structural analogs of cystine that provide steric inhibition of crystal growth. In vitro, L-cystine dimethyl ester had a significant inhibitory effect on crystal growth. The drug's safety and effectiveness will be tested in an Slc3a1 knockout mouse that serves as an animal model of cystinuria.« less

  19. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium bindingmore » triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.« less

  20. Live Imaging of Calcium Dynamics during Axon Degeneration Reveals Two Functionally Distinct Phases of Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuya; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of axon degeneration caused by trauma and disease, but its specific spatial and temporal dynamics in injured axons remain unclear. To clarify the function of calcium in axon degeneration, we observed calcium dynamics in single injured neurons in live zebrafish larvae and tested the temporal requirement for calcium in zebrafish neurons and cultured mouse DRG neurons. Using laser axotomy to induce Wallerian degeneration (WD) in zebrafish peripheral sensory axons, we monitored calcium dynamics from injury to fragmentation, revealing two stereotyped phases of axonal calcium influx. First, axotomy triggered a transient local calcium wave originating at the injury site. This initial calcium wave only disrupted mitochondria near the injury site and was not altered by expression of the protective WD slow (WldS) protein. Inducing multiple waves with additional axotomies did not change the kinetics of degeneration. In contrast, a second phase of calcium influx occurring minutes before fragmentation spread as a wave throughout the axon, entered mitochondria, and was abolished by WldS expression. In live zebrafish, chelating calcium after the first wave, but before the second wave, delayed the progress of fragmentation. In cultured DRG neurons, chelating calcium early in the process of WD did not alter degeneration, but chelating calcium late in WD delayed fragmentation. We propose that a terminal calcium wave is a key instructive component of the axon degeneration program. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon degeneration resulting from trauma or neurodegenerative disease can cause devastating deficits in neural function. Understanding the molecular and cellular events that execute axon degeneration is essential for developing treatments to address these conditions. Calcium is known to contribute to axon degeneration, but its temporal requirements in this process have been unclear. Live calcium imaging in severed zebrafish neurons and temporally controlled

  1. Urinary and plasma oxalate during ingestion of pure ascorbic acid: a re-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fituri, N; Allawi, N; Bentley, M; Costello, J

    1983-01-01

    Daily ingestion of 8 g of pure ascorbic acid by 8 normal subjects for 7 days did not, in contrast to previous reports in the literature, significantly alter urinary or plasma oxalate during or after ingestion. When urine with raised ascorbate values was heated at 100 degrees C for 30 min, a significant increase in urinary oxalate concentration was observed. Plasma ascorbate reached a mean value during ingestion of 3.3 mg/100 ml. Urinary citrate excretion significantly decreased during the first 4 days of ascorbic acid ingestion; however, the urinary inhibitory activity of calcium oxalate crystal growth was not significantly altered. Urinary and serum urate as well as urinary calcium and magnesium were unaltered by ingestion of the vitamin supplement.

  2. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... best source. Milk and dairy products such as yogurt, cheeses, and buttermilk contain a form of calcium ... the amount of calcium in a dairy product. Yogurt, most cheeses, and buttermilk are excellent sources of ...

  3. Calcium isotope fractionation between soft and mineralized tissues as a monitor of calcium use in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Skulan, J; DePaolo, D J

    1999-11-23

    Calcium from bone and shell is isotopically lighter than calcium of soft tissue from the same organism and isotopically lighter than source (dietary) calcium. When measured as the (44)Ca/(40)Ca isotopic ratio, the total range of variation observed is 5.5 per thousand, and as much as 4 per thousand variation is found in a single organism. The observed intraorganismal calcium isotopic variations and the isotopic differences between tissues and diet indicate that isotopic fractionation occurs mainly as a result of mineralization. Soft tissue calcium becomes heavier or lighter than source calcium during periods when there is net gain or loss of mineral mass, respectively. These results suggest that variations of natural calcium isotope ratios in tissues may be useful for assessing the calcium and mineral balance of organisms without introducing isotopic tracers.

  4. Calcium isotope fractionation between soft and mineralized tissues as a monitor of calcium use in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Skulan, Joseph; DePaolo, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium from bone and shell is isotopically lighter than calcium of soft tissue from the same organism and isotopically lighter than source (dietary) calcium. When measured as the 44Ca/40Ca isotopic ratio, the total range of variation observed is 5.5‰, and as much as 4‰ variation is found in a single organism. The observed intraorganismal calcium isotopic variations and the isotopic differences between tissues and diet indicate that isotopic fractionation occurs mainly as a result of mineralization. Soft tissue calcium becomes heavier or lighter than source calcium during periods when there is net gain or loss of mineral mass, respectively. These results suggest that variations of natural calcium isotope ratios in tissues may be useful for assessing the calcium and mineral balance of organisms without introducing isotopic tracers. PMID:10570137

  5. Calcium Kinetics During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Wastney, Meryl E.; OBrien, Kimberly O.; Lane, Helen W.

    1999-01-01

    Bone loss is one of the most detrimental effects of space flight, threatening to limit the duration of human space missions. The ability to understand and counteract this loss will be critical for crew health and safety during and after extended-duration missions. The hypotheses to be tested in this project are that space flight alters calcium homeostasis and bone mineral metabolism, and that calcium homeostasis and bone mineral metabolism will return to baseline within days to weeks of return to Earth. These hypotheses will be evidenced by elevated rates of bone mineral resorption and decreased bone mineral deposition, decreased absorption of dietary calcium, altered calcitropic endocrine profiles, elevated excretion of calcium in urine and feces, and elevated excretion of markers of bone resorption. The second hypothesis will be evidenced by return of indices of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism to preflight levels within days to weeks of return to Earth. Studies will be conducted on International Space Station astronauts before, during, and after extended-duration flights. Measurements of calcium kinetics, bone mass, and endocrine/biochemical markers of bone and calcium homeostasis will be conducted. Kinetic studies utilizing dual isotope tracer kinetic studies and mathematical modeling techniques will allow for determination of bone calcium deposition, bone calcium resorption, dietary calcium absorption and calcium excretion (both urinary and endogenous fecal excretion). These studies will build upon preliminary work conducted on the Russian Mir space station. The results from this project will be critical for clarifying how microgravity affects bone and calcium homeostasis, and will provide an important control point for assessment of countermeasure efficacy. These results are expected to aid in developing countermeasures for bone loss, both for space crews and for individuals on Earth who have metabolic bone diseases.

  6. Calcium distribution in Amoeba proteus

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the distribution of cellular calcium in Amoeba proteus was undertaken. Total cellular calcium under control conditions was found to be 4.59 mmol/kg of cells. When the external Ca++ concentration is increased from the control level of 0.03 to 20 mM, a net Ca++ influx results with a new steady-state cellular calcium level being achieved in integral of 3 h. At steady state the amount of calcium per unit weight of cells is higher than the amount of calcium per unit weight of external solution when the external concentration of Ca++ is below 10 mM. At external Ca++ concentrations above this level, total cellular calcium approaches the medium level of Ca++. Steady- state calcium exchange in Amoeba proteus was determined with 45Ca. There is an immediate and rapid exchange of integral of 0.84 mmol/kg of cells or 18% of the total cellular calcium with the labelled Ca++. Following this initial exchange, there was very little if any further exchange observed. Most of this exchanged calcium could be eliminated from the cell with 1 mM La+++, suggesting that the exchanged calcium is associated with the surface of the cell. Increase in either the external Ca++ concentration of pH raise the amount of exchangeable calcium associated with the cell. Calcium may be associated with the cell surface as a co-ion in the diffuse double layer or bound to fixed negative sites on the surface of the cell. If Ca++-binding sites do exist on the cell surface, there may be more than one type and they may have different dissociation constants. The cytoplasmic Ca++ ion activity is probably maintained at very low levels. PMID:512628

  7. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: TREATMENT IS WITH CALCIUM CARBONATE OR CALCIUM CITRATE?

    PubMed Central

    BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; RODRIGUES, Arieli Luz; MENDES, Silvana Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background : Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, can cause serious nutritional complications arising from poor absorption of essential nutrients. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is one such complications that leads to increased parathyroid hormone levels due to a decrease in calcium and vitamin D, which may compromise bone health. Aim : To compare calcium carbonate and calcium citrate in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Method : Patients were selected on the basis of their abnormal biochemical test and treatment was randomly done with citrate or calcium carbonate. Results : After 60 days of supplementation, biochemical tests were repeated, showing improvement in both groups. Conclusion : Supplementation with calcium (citrate or carbonate) and vitamin D is recommended after surgery for prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26537273

  8. Relevance of dietary protein concentration and quality as risk factors for the formation of calcium oxalate stones in cats.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Burmeier, Hannes; Brenten, Thomas; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The role of dietary protein for the development of feline calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths has not been conclusively clarified. The present study evaluated the effects of a varying dietary protein concentration and quality on critical indices for the formation of CaOx uroliths. Three diets with a high protein quality (10-11 % greaves meal/diet) and a varying crude protein (CP) concentration (35, 44 and 57 % in DM) were compared. Additionally, the 57 % CP diet was compared with a fourth diet that had a similar CP concentration (55 % in DM), but a lower protein quality (34 % greaves meal/diet). The Ca and oxalate (Ox) concentrations were similar in all diets. A group of eight cats received the same diet at the same time. Each feeding period was divided into a 21 d adaptation period and a 7 d sampling period to collect urine. There were increases in urinary volume, urinary Ca concentrations, renal Ca and Ox excretion and urinary relative supersaturation (RSS) with CaOx with increasing dietary protein concentrations. Urinary pH ranged between 6·34 and 6·66 among all groups, with no unidirectional effect of dietary protein. Lower renal Ca excretion was observed when feeding the diet with the lower protein quality, however, the underlying mechanism needs further evaluation. In conclusion, although the observed higher urinary volume is beneficial, the increase in urinary Ca concentrations, renal Ca and Ox excretion and urinary RSS CaOx associated with a high-protein diet may be critical for the development of CaOx uroliths in cats.

  9. Calcium homeostasis in intraerythrocytic malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C R; Dluzewski, A R; Catalani, L H; Burting, R; Hoyland, J; Mason, W T

    1996-12-01

    The fluorescent indicator, fura-2, AM, was used to measure free calcium concentrations in the intraerythrocytic malaria parasites of Plasmodium chabaudi and Plasmodium falciparum. In both species the free cytosolic calcium concentration was maintained at low levels (between 40 and 100 nM throughout the maturation process. Digital image analysis of the indicator fluorescence was performed on parasites and evaluated with the aid of a calibration of the calcium response, based on permeabilized parasites, exposed to calcium buffers. This again revealed that free calcium concentrations in the intact parasite are maintained at a predetermined level, regardless of the free calcium in the surrounding milieu. Both species of parasites are thus capable of regulating their internal free calcium levels with high precision, presumably by means of calcium pump ATPases. A small but significant elevation of the cytosolic free calcium concentration by the tumor promoter, thapsigargin, may be taken to reflect the presence of calcium stores in the endoplasmic reticulum in P. falciparum.

  10. Inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate growth by citrate and the effect of the background electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Matthew L.; Qiu, S. Roger; Hoyer, John R.; Casey, William H.; Nancollas, George H.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2007-08-01

    Pathological mineralization is a common phenomenon in broad range of plants and animals. In humans, kidney stone formation is a well-known example that afflicts approximately 10% of the population. Of the various calcium salt phases that comprise human kidney stones, the primary component is calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). Citrate, a naturally occurring molecule in the urinary system and a common therapeutic agent for treating stone disease, is a known inhibitor of COM. Understanding the physical mechanisms of citrate inhibition requires quantification of the effects of both background electrolytes and citrate on COM step kinetics. Here we report the results of an in situ AFM study of these effects, in which we measure the effect of the electrolytes LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl, and the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration for a range of COM supersaturations. We find that varying the background electrolyte results in significant differences in the measured step speeds and in step morphology, with KCl clearly producing the smallest impact and NaCl the largest. The kinetic coefficient for the former is nearly three times larger than for the latter, while the steps change from smooth to highly serrated when KCl is changed to NaCl. The results on the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration show that citrate produces a dead zone whose width increases with citrate concentration as well as a continual reduction in kinetic coefficient with increasing citrate level. We relate these results to a molecular-scale view of inhibition that invokes a combination of kink blocking and step pinning. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the classic step-pinning model of Cabrera and Vermilyea (C-V model) does an excellent job of predicting the effect of citrate on COM step kinetics provided the model is reformulated to more realistically account for impurity adsorption, include an expression for the Gibbs-Thomson effect that is correct for all supersaturations

  11. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium pantothenate...

  12. Dietary Calcium Intake and Calcium Supplementation in Hungarian Patients with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Szamosujvári, Pál; Dombai, Péter; Csóré, Katalin; Mikófalvi, Kinga; Steindl, Tímea; Streicher, Ildikó; Tarsoly, Júlia; Zajzon, Gergely; Somogyi, Péter; Szamosújvári, Pál; Lakatos, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Adequate calcium intake is the basis of osteoporosis therapy—when this proves insufficient, even specific antiosteoporotic agents cannot exert their actions properly. Methods. Our representative survey analyzed the dietary intake and supplementation of calcium in 8033 Hungarian female and male (mean age: 68 years) (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) patients with osteoporosis. Results. Mean intake from dietary sources was 665 ± 7.9 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) daily. A significant positive relationship could be detected between total dietary calcium intake and lumbar spine BMD (P = 0.045), whereas such correlation could not be demonstrated with femoral T-score. Milk consumption positively correlated with femur (P = 0.041), but not with lumbar BMD. The ingestion of one liter of milk daily increased the T-score by 0.133. Average intake from supplementation was 558 ± 6.2 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) daily. The cumulative dose of calcium—from both dietary intake and supplementation—was significantly associated with lumbar (r = 0.024, P = 0.049), but not with femur BMD (r = 0.021, P = 0.107). The currently recommended 1000–1500 mg total daily calcium intake was achieved in 34.5% of patients only. It was lower than recommended in 47.8% of the cases and substantially higher in 17.7% of subjects. Conclusions. We conclude that calcium intake in Hungarian osteoporotic patients is much lower than the current recommendation, while routinely applied calcium supplementation will result in inappropriately high calcium intake in numerous patients. PMID:23737777

  13. [The fasting calcium/creatinine ratio in patients with calcium stones and the relation with hypercalciuria and phosphocalcium metabolism].

    PubMed

    Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel; del Carmen Cano-García, María; Arrabal-Martín, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    To determine the importance of fasting calcium/creatinine ratio in patients with calcium stones and its relation with hypercalciuria and phospho-calcium metabolism. Cross-sectional study including 143 patients divided into two groups according to fasting calcium/creatinine. Group 1: 66 patients (calcium/ creatinine<0.11); Group 2: 77 patients (calcium/ creatinine>0.11). A comparative study is performed between groups including phospho-calcium metabolism parameters and excretion of urinary lithogenic markers. Linear correlation studying calciuria and fasting calcium/ creatinine was performed. SPSS 17.0 statistical analysis software was used, considering p≤0.05. It is noteworthy that group 2 had increased 24 h urine calcium excretion in comparison to group 1 (229.3 vs 158.1; p=0.0001) and calcium/citrate (0.47 vs 0.34; p=0.001). There is a positive and significant correlation between calcium levels in 24 h urine and fasting calcium/creatinine (R=0.455; p=0.0001) and a cutoff is set at 0.127 (sensitivity 72%, specificity 66%) to determine hypercalciuria (>260 mg in 24 h). Increased fasting calcium/creatinine determines increased 24 hours calcium excretion, although the sensitivity and specificity to determine hypercalciuria is not high.

  14. PRESENILIN-NULL CELLS HAVE ALTERED TWO-PORE CALCIUM CHANNEL EXPRESSION AND LYSOSOMAL CALCIUM; IMPLICATIONS FOR LYSOSOMAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Kayala, Kara M Neely; Dickinson, George D; Minassian, Anet; Walls, Ken C; Green, Kim N; LaFerla, Frank M

    2012-01-01

    Presenilins are necessary for calcium homeostasis and also for efficient proteolysis through the autophagy/lysosome system. Presenilin regulates both endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores and autophagic proteolysis in a γ-secretase independent fashion. The endo-lysosome system can also act as a calcium store, with calcium efflux channels being recently identified as two-pore channels 1 and 2. Here we investigated lysosomal calcium content and the channels that mediate calcium release from these acidic stores in presenilin knockout cells. We report that presenilin loss leads to a lower total lysosomal calcium store despite the buildup of lysosomes found in these cells. Additionally, we find alterations in two-pore calcium channel protein expression, with loss of presenilin preventing the formation of a high molecular weight species of TPC1 and TPC2. Finally, we find that treatments that disturb lysosomal calcium release lead to a reduction in autophagy function yet lysosomal inhibitors do not alter two-pore calcium channel expression. These data indicate that alterations in lysosomal calcium in the absence of presenilins might be leading to disruptions in autophagy. PMID:23103503

  15. Effects of Hydration and Calcium Supplementation on Urine Calcium Concentration in Healthy Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Harris, Susan S; Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether calcium supplementation, compared with placebo, increases urine calcium concentrations to levels indicative of increased renal stone risk, and the role that fluid intake, as indicated by urine volume, may play in mitigating this risk. This is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized placebo-controlled trial of 500 mg/d calcium supplementation to prevent bone loss. Subjects were 240 white postmenopausal women age 40 to 70 years in good general health. Effects of supplementation on 1-year changes in 24h urine calcium concentration and urine volume were examined. Both treatment group and urine volume were strong independent predictors of urine calcium concentration (p < 0.001). Among subjects with urine volume under 2 L/24 h, more than half of placebo subjects were at lowest risk for renal stones compared with less than 35% of calcium-supplemented subjects. Among those with higher urine volumes, all placebo subjects and more than 80% of calcium supplemented subjects were at lowest risk. The increased risk of renal stones with calcium supplement use may be largely eliminated with adequate fluid intake, but older adults may not spontaneously consume adequate fluids to minimize this risk and should be counseled to do so.

  16. Calcium revisited, part III: effect of dietary calcium on BMD and fracture risk

    PubMed Central

    Burckhardt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Food can be an excellent source of calcium. Dietary calcium is in general as well absorbed as calcium supplements, and exerts the same effects on bone. The main sources are dairy products, but also some vegetables and fruits contain considerable amounts of calcium. Mineral water can serve as a supplement. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and some interventional trials have shown positive effects on bone metabolism, bone density and bone loss. But the effect on fracture incidence is less certain, and that of milk, the most studied dairy product, still unproven. PMID:26331006

  17. Use of Genetically-encoded Calcium Indicators for Live Cell Calcium Imaging and Localization in Virus-infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jacob L.; Ramachandran, Nina K.; Utama, Budi; Hyser, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is a ubiquitous and versatile process involved in nearly every cellular process, and exploitation of host calcium signals is a common strategy used by viruses to facilitate replication and cause disease. Small molecule fluorescent calcium dyes have been used by many to examine changes in host cell calcium signaling and calcium channel activation during virus infections, but disadvantages of these dyes, including poor loading and poor long-term retention, complicate analysis of calcium imaging in virus-infected cells due to changes in cell physiology and membrane integrity. The recent expansion of genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), including blue and red-shifted color variants and variants with calcium affinities appropriate for calcium storage organelles like the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), make the use of GECIs an attractive alternative for calcium imaging in the context of virus infections. Here we describe the development and testing of cell lines stably expressing both green cytoplasmic (GCaMP5G and GCaMP6s) and red ER-targeted (RCEPIAer) GECIs. Using three viruses (rotavirus, poliovirus and respiratory syncytial virus) previously shown to disrupt host calcium homeostasis, we show the GECI cell lines can be used to detect simultaneous cytoplasmic and ER calcium signals. Further, we demonstrate the GECI expression has sufficient stability to enable long-term confocal imaging of both cytoplasmic and ER calcium during the course of virus infections. PMID:26344758

  18. The influence of maternal and paternal history on stone composition and clinical course of calcium nephrolithiasis in subjects aged between 15 and 25.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Angela; Ticinesi, Andrea; Allegri, Franca; Nouvenne, Antonio; Pinelli, Silvana; Folesani, Giuseppina; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2016-11-01

    Our aim was to compare the influence of maternal history of stones (MHS) and paternal history of stones (PHS) on composition of calculi and disease course in a group of patients with calcium nephrolithiasis (CN) aged between 15 and 25, the age range with the maximal influence of family history on disease expression. One-hundred thirty-five patients (68 F) with CN and one stone-forming parent were retrospectively selected from the database of our outpatient stone clinic, and categorized according to MHS or PHS. Data about stone disease course and composition of passed calculi, determined by chemical analysis or Fourier-transformed infrared spectrophotometry, were collected together with information on blood chemistry and 24-h urinary profile of lithogenic risk. The characteristics of disease course and stone composition were compared using logistic regression tests adjusted for age, sex, and BMI or analysis of covariance where appropriate. Patients with MHS (n = 46) had significantly higher urinary calcium/creatinine ratio and ammonium, a higher prevalence of urological treatments (57 vs 27 %, p < 0.001) and mixed calcium oxalate/calcium phosphate stone composition (69 vs 35 %, p = 0.002) than those with PHS. At multivariate logistic regression models, MHS was independently associated with urological treatments (OR 4.5, 95 %CI 1.9-10.7, p < 0.001) and the formation of calculi with mixed calcium oxalate/calcium phosphate composition (OR 5.8, 95 %CI 1.9-17.9, p = 0.002). The method of stone analysis did not affect this result. In conclusion, in subjects aged 15-25, MHS is associated with mixed calcium stones and with a higher risk for urological procedures, and should be, therefore, considered in the management of urolithiasis.

  19. Calcium-Induced calcium release during action potential firing in developing inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J

    2015-03-10

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  20. Distribution of calcium oxalate crystals in floral organs of Araceae in relation to pollination strategy.

    PubMed

    Coté, Gary G; Gibernau, Marc

    2012-07-01

    Many flowers are pollinated by potentially hungry insects, yet flowers also contain gametes and embryos which must be protected from predation. Microscopic calcium oxalate crystals in plant tissues have been proposed to protect against herbivory. Aroids, which have an unusual diversity of such crystals, also exhibit diverse pollination strategies. Many species have pollinators that do not feed while visiting the flowers, while other species, especially those pollinated by beetles, offer sterile staminodia as food rewards. We examined flowers of 21 aroid species with various pollination strategies to test the hypothesis that crystals protect vital gametes and embryos while allowing consumption of food bribes. Aroid inflorescences collected from the field or from greenhouse material were sectioned, cleared, and examined by bright field and polarization microscopy. All species examined, regardless of pollination strategy, arrayed crystals around unshed pollen and ovules. Less vital tissues, such as odoriferous appendages, had few crystals. Staminodia offered as food to beetle pollinators, however, differed greatly between species in their crystal contents. Some had minimal crystals; some had crystals in patterns suggesting they limit beetle feeding; still others had abundant crystals in no obvious pattern. The results are consistent with crystals protecting against insect predation of gametes and embryos. However, the role of crystals in food-bribe staminodia is unclear. They may limit and direct feeding by beetles in some species, while in others they might have no protective role.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Calcium alginate is prepared by...

  2. Bilateral renal milk of calcium masquerading as nephrolithiasis in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M

    2007-01-01

    Milk of calcium is a viscous colloidal suspension of calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, or calcium oxalate, or a mixture of these compounds. The calcific material gravitates to the dependent portion of a cystic cavity. Crescent- or hemisphere-shaped calcium density with a sharp horizontal upper border at the milk of calcium-clear fluid interface confirms the diagnosis. Bilateral milk of calcium in the renal pelvis or in dilated calyces is very rare and has not been reported in patients with spinal cord injury. A 63-year-old male patient with T-10 paraplegia presented with recurrent urinary tract infections. X-ray of the kidneys, taken with the vertical beam while the patient lay supine, revealed a poorly defined opacity overlying the lower pole of the right kidney. Findings on ultrasonography of the kidneys were interpreted as a large, staghorn-type calculus in the dilated lower pole calyx of the right kidney. Because x-ray of the kidneys showed a poorly defined opacity overlying the lower pole of the right kidney, milk of calcium was suspected, and computed tomography (CT) of the kidneys was performed. Calcific debris with horizontal layering in the lower pole calyces of both kidneys was seen; this confirmed the diagnosis of milk of calcium. A 62-year-old female patient with C-7 tetraplegia underwent ileal conduit urinary diversion. Subsequently, she developed calculi in the right kidney, which were treated with shock wave lithotripsy. Follow-up x-ray revealed faintly opaque shadows with indistinct margins in the region of both kidneys. Intravenous urography showed cortical thinning at the upper poles and blunting of the calyces, suggestive of chronic pyelonephritis. The right renal pelvis was bulky, and bilateral renal calculi were diagnosed during ultrasonography; however, the presence of faintly radio-opaque shadows with indistinct margins raised suspicions of renal milk of calcium. A CT scan of the kidneys, which was performed in the supine and subsequently

  3. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared by... of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of...

  4. CALCIUM BINDING TO INTESTINAL MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Oschman, James L.; Wall, Betty J.

    1972-01-01

    Flame photometry reveals that glutaraldehyde and buffer solutions in routine use for electron microscopy contain varying amounts of calcium. The presence of electron-opaque deposits adjacent to membranes in a variety of tissues can be correlated with the presence of calcium in the fixative. In insect intestine (midgut), deposits occur adjacent to apical and lateral plasma membranes. The deposits are particularly evident in tissues fixed in glutaraldehyde without postosmication. They are also observed in osmicated tissue if calcium is added to wash and osmium solutions. Deposits are absent when calcium-free fixatives are used, but are present when traces of CaCl2 (as low as 5 x 10-5 M) are added. The deposits occur at regular intervals along junctional membranes, providing images strikingly similar to those obtained by other workers who have used pyroantimonate in an effort to localize sodium. Other divalent cations (Mg++, Sr++, Ba++, Mn++, Fe++) appear to substitute for calcium, while sodium, potassium, lanthanum, and mercury do not. After postfixing with osmium with calcium added, the deposits can be resolved as patches along the inner leaflet of apical and lateral plasma membranes. The dense regions may thus localize membrane constituents that bind calcium. The results are discussed in relation to the role of calcium in control of cell-to-cell communication, intestinal calcium uptake, and the pyroantimonate technique for ion localization. PMID:4569411

  5. Calcium-induced calcium release in rod photoreceptor terminals boosts synaptic transmission during maintained depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Cadetti, Lucia; Bryson, Eric J.; Ciccone, Cory A.; Rabl, Katalin; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) to synaptic transmission from rod photoreceptor terminals. Whole-cell recording and confocal calcium imaging experiments were conducted on rods with intact synaptic terminals in a retinal slice preparation from salamander. Low concentrations of ryanodine stimulated calcium increases in rod terminals, consistent with the presence of ryanodine receptors. Application of strong depolarizing steps (−70 to −10 mV) exceeding 200 ms or longer in duration evoked a wave of calcium that spread across the synaptic terminals of voltage-clamped rods. This secondary calcium increase was blocked by high concentrations of ryanodine, indicating it was due to CICR. Ryanodine (50 μM) had no significant effect on rod calcium current (Ica) although it slightly diminished rod light-evoked voltage responses. Bath application of 50 μM ryanodine strongly inhibited light-evoked currents in horizontal cells. Whether applied extracellularly or delivered into the rod cell through the patch pipette, ryanodine (50 μM) also inhibited excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked in horizontal cells by depolarizing steps applied to rods. Ryanodine caused a preferential reduction in the later portions of EPSCs evoked by depolarizing steps of 200 ms or longer. These results indicate that CICR enhances calcium increases in rod terminals evoked by sustained depolarization, which in turn acts to boost synaptic exocytosis from rods. PMID:16819987

  6. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... as you get older. This can result in brittle, fragile bones that can break easily, even without a fall or other injury. The digestive system is normally very bad at absorbing calcium. Most people absorb only 15% to 20% of the calcium ...

  7. In vivo characterization of urinary calculi on dual-energy CT: going a step ahead with sub-differentiation of calcium stones.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sudeep; Goyal, Ankur; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Sharma, Raju; Seth, Amlesh; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The role of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in characterization of urinary calculi is evolving and literature regarding differentiation of calcium calculi is sparse and confounding. To evaluate the capability of DECT in assessing the urinary calculi composition in vivo, especially in differentiating various types of calcium calculi. One hundred and twenty patients underwent DECT for characterization of urinary calculi. Seventy patients with 114 calculi, including 93 calcium stones, were retrospectively analyzed. DE ratios and attenuation differences were compared using ANOVA and receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis was done to predict cut-off values, in particular for detecting calcium-oxalate-monohydrate (COM) stones. DE ratio ≤1.14 accurately detected uric acid calculi, ≥1.29 was definitive for calcium and intermediate values were characteristic of cystine stones. DE ratios were significantly different between group 1 (COM [n = 32]; mean 1.376 ± 0.041), group 2 ([calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) + COM] [n = 51]; 1.416 ± 0.048), and group 3 ([carbonate apatite (CaP) + COD + COM] [n = 10]; 1.468 ± 0.038) (group 1 vs. 2, P = 0.001; 1 vs. 3, P = 0.000; 2 vs. 3, P = 0.004). More importantly, pure COM calculi (group 1) had significantly lower DE ratio compared with mixed calcium calculi (groups 2 and 3) (P = 0.000). Attenuation differences (between low and high kV images) could not distinguish between COM and mixed calculi. ROC analysis for detection of COM calculi yielded AUC of 0.770 with cut-off DE ratio 1.385 (sensitivity 65.6%, specificity 82%) and value <1.335 was seen only with COM calculi (100% specificity). DECT can be employed for in vivo differentiation of various types of calculi and for detection of relatively lithotripsy-resistant COM calculi. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Impact of calcium intake and intestinal calcium absorption on kidney stones in older women: the study of osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Mathew D; Eisner, Brian H; Stone, Katie L; Kahn, Arnold J; Lui, Li-Yung; Sadetsky, Natalia; Stoller, Marshall L

    2012-04-01

    Intestinal calcium absorption is thought to have a critical role in nephrolithiasis. However, to our knowledge no study has directly assessed this association. Therefore, we explored the relationship among intestinal fractional calcium absorption, calcium intake and nephrolithiasis. The Study of Osteoporotic Fractures is a prospective cohort of 9,704 postmenopausal women recruited from population based listings in 1986 and followed for more than 20 years. Secondary analyses were performed of 7,982 women who reported their history of nephrolithiasis, of which 5,452 (68%) underwent an oral radioactive calcium assay (45Ca). The impact of dietary and supplemental calcium on intestinal fractional calcium absorption was evaluated, and factors independently associated with nephrolithiasis were determined. Fractional calcium absorption decreased with increased calcium intake, with no difference between dietary and supplemental calcium. Fractional calcium absorption was higher in women with a nephrolithiasis history among all calcium intake groups. Increased dietary calcium intake reduced the likelihood of nephrolithiasis by 45% to 54% (p=0.03). Women with a history of nephrolithiasis were less likely to supplement calcium (p<0.001). In adjusted analyses women who supplemented calcium were 21% to 38% less likely to have a nephrolithiasis history (p=0.007) and there was a 24% increased risk of kidney stones for each 10% increase in fractional calcium absorption (p=0.008). Fractional calcium absorption is higher in women with a history of nephrolithiasis. Higher intestinal fractional calcium absorption is associated with a greater risk of historical nephrolithiasis. Dietary and supplemental calcium decrease fractional calcium absorption, and may protect against nephrolithiasis. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 184.1195 Section 184.1195 Food... GRAS § 184.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Calcium citrate (Ca3(C6H5O7)2·4H2O, CAS Reg. No. 813-0994-095) is the calcium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by neutralizing citric acid with calcium hydroxide or...

  10. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P < 0.001), elevated parathyroid hormone levels (P < 0.001), reduced calcitonin levels (P < 0.05), unchanged 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels, and elevated skull (P < 0.01) and reduced femur bone mineral density. Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P < 0.05). There was a tendency for indirect systolic BP to be reduced in conscious flight animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P < 0.001) after anesthesia. Dietary calcium altered all aspects of calcium metabolism (P < 0.001), as well as BP (P < 0.001), but the only interaction with flight was a relatively greater increase in ionized calcium in flight animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P < 0.05). The results indicate that 1) flight-induced disruptions of calcium metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  11. Oxalates in oca (New Zealand yam) (Oxalis tuberosa Mol.).

    PubMed

    Ross, A B; Savage, G P; Martin, R J; Vanhanen, L

    1999-12-01

    Oca (Oxalis tuberosa Mol.) or New Zealand yam, in common with other members of this genus, contains oxalate, an antinutritive factor. Twelve South American and two New Zealand cultivars of oca were analyzed for total and soluble oxalate contents of the tubers. The range of total oxalate levels was 92-221 mg/100 g of fresh weight. Levels of soluble and total oxalate extracted from the tubers were not significantly different, suggesting that no calcium oxalate is formed in the tubers. The oxalate concentrations obtained in this study for oca suggest that previously reported values are too low and that oca is a moderately high oxalate-containing food. This is the first report of a tuber crop containing moderate to high levels of soluble oxalates in the tubers and no insoluble oxalates.

  12. Studies on the in vivo sensitivity of spindle microtubules to calcium ions and evidence for a vesicular calcium-sequestering system

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    I microinjected calcium ions into echinoderm eggs during mitosis to determine the calcium sensitivity of microtubules (Mts) in vivo. Spindle birefringence (BR), a measure of the number of aligned Mts in the spindle, is locally, rapidly, and reversibly abolished by small volumes of microinjected CaCl2 (1 mM). Rapid return of BR is followed by anaphase, and subsequent divisions are normal. Similar doses of MgCl2, BaCl2, KCl, NaCl, pH buffers, distilled water, or vegetable oil have no effect on spindle BR, whereas large doses of such agents sometimes cause slow, uniform loss in BR over the course of a minute or more. Of the ions tested, only Sr++ causes effects comparable to Ca++. Ca-EGTA buffers, containing greater than micromolar free Ca++, abolishes BR in a manner similar to millimolar concentrations of injected CaCl2. Caffeine, a potent uncoupler of the Ca++-pump/ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum, causes a local, transient depression in spindle BR in the injected region. Finally, injection of potassium oxalate results in the formation of small, highly BR crystals, presumably CA- oxalate, in Triton-sensitive compartments in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that spindle Mts are sensitive to levels of free Ca++ in the physiological range, provide evidence for the existence of a strong cytoplasmic Ca++-sequestering system, and support the notion that Mt assembly and disassembly in local regions of the spindle may be orchestrated by local changes in the cytoplasmic free Ca++ concentration during mitosis. An appendix offers the design of a new chamber for immobilizing echinoderm eggs for injection, a new method for determining the volume of the injected solution, and a description of the microinjection technique, which was designed, but never fully described, by Hiramoto (Y. Hiramoto, Exp. Cell. Res., 1962, 27:416-426.). PMID:7194345

  13. Calcium signaling in taste cells: regulation required.

    PubMed

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2010-11-01

    Peripheral taste receptor cells depend on distinct calcium signals to generate appropriate cellular responses that relay taste information to the central nervous system. Some taste cells have conventional chemical synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release from stores to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Despite the importance of calcium signaling in taste cells, little is known about how these signals are regulated. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified 2 calcium clearance mechanisms expressed in taste cells, including mitochondrial calcium uptake and sodium/calcium exchangers (NCXs). These studies identified a unique constitutive calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in taste cells and the role of the mitochondria and exchangers in this process. The additional role of NCXs in the regulation of evoked calcium responses is also discussed. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and appears to be more complex than has previously been appreciated.

  14. Calcium binding properties of calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CaCDPK1) from Cicer arietinum.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ajay Kumar; Jayabaskaran, Chelliah

    2015-05-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role as a secondary messenger in all aspects of plant growth, development and survival. Calcium dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are the major calcium decoders, which couple the changes in calcium level to an appropriate physiological response. The mechanism by which calcium regulates CDPK protein is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the interactions of Ca(2+) ions with the CDPK1 isoform of Cicer arietinum (CaCDPK1) using a combination of biophysical tools. CaCDPK1 has four different EF hands as predicted by protein sequence analysis. The fluorescence emission spectrum of CaCDPK1 showed quenching with a 5 nm red shift upon addition of calcium, indicating conformational changes in the tertiary structure. The plot of changes in intensity against calcium concentrations showed a biphasic curve with binding constants of 1.29 μM and 120 μM indicating two kinds of binding sites. Isothermal calorimetric (ITC) titration with CaCl2 also showed a biphasic curve with two binding constants of 0.027 μM and 1.7 μM. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed two prominent peaks at 208 and 222 nm indicating that CaCDPK1 is a α-helical rich protein. Calcium binding further increased the α-helical content of CaCDPK1 from 75 to 81%. Addition of calcium to CaCDPK1 also increased fluorescence of 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) indicating exposure of hydrophobic surfaces. Thus, on the whole this study provides evidence for calcium induced conformational changes, exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and heterogeneity of EF hands in CaCDPK1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  16. Direct single-molecule observation of calcium-dependent misfolding in human neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    PubMed

    Heidarsson, Pétur O; Naqvi, Mohsin M; Otazo, Mariela R; Mossa, Alessandro; Kragelund, Birthe B; Cecconi, Ciro

    2014-09-09

    Neurodegenerative disorders are strongly linked to protein misfolding, and crucial to their explication is a detailed understanding of the underlying structural rearrangements and pathways that govern the formation of misfolded states. Here we use single-molecule optical tweezers to monitor misfolding reactions of the human neuronal calcium sensor-1, a multispecific EF-hand protein involved in neurotransmitter release and linked to severe neurological diseases. We directly observed two misfolding trajectories leading to distinct kinetically trapped misfolded conformations. Both trajectories originate from an on-pathway intermediate state and compete with native folding in a calcium-dependent manner. The relative probability of the different trajectories could be affected by modulating the relaxation rate of applied force, demonstrating an unprecedented real-time control over the free-energy landscape of a protein. Constant-force experiments in combination with hidden Markov analysis revealed the free-energy landscape of the misfolding transitions under both physiological and pathological calcium concentrations. Remarkably for a calcium sensor, we found that higher calcium concentrations increased the lifetimes of the misfolded conformations, slowing productive folding to the native state. We propose a rugged, multidimensional energy landscape for neuronal calcium sensor-1 and speculate on a direct link between protein misfolding and calcium dysregulation that could play a role in neurodegeneration.

  17. Chronic stress and calcium oxalate stone disease: influence on blood cortisol and urine composition.

    PubMed

    Arzoz-Fàbregas, Montserrat; Ibarz-Servio, Luis; Fernández-Castro, Jordi; Valiente-Malmagro, Manuel; Roca-Antonio, Josep; Edo-Izquierdo, Sílvia; Buisan-Rueda, Oscar

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of chronic stress (CS) on urine composition of calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone patients and controls. This case-control study enrolled 128 patients during a period of 20 months. The cases were CaOx stone formers with a recent stone episode. Controls were matched by sex and age. Dimensions of CS were evaluated in cases and controls by validated self-report questionnaires measuring stressful life events, perceived stress, anxiety, depression, burnout, and satisfaction with life. Blood and urine samples were collected to determine cortisol levels and urinary composition. More relations between CS dimensions and blood and urine parameters were observed in cases than in controls. In cases, the blood cortisol level was related positively with the number of stressful life events (P = .03), intensity of these events (P = .04), and anxiety (P = .04). In addition, urinary magnesium (P = .03) and pyrophosphate (P = .05) levels were positively related with satisfaction with life and burnout, respectively. In contrast, urinary magnesium levels were negatively related with perceived stress (P = .01), anxiety (P = .016), and depression (P = .03). In controls, the number of stressful life events and the intensity of stressful life events was related positively with magnesium (P = .06, P = .02) levels and negatively with blood cortisol levels (P = .03, P = .004). Based on the variation between cases and controls in relations between CS dimensions and biochemical parameters, we hypothesize that CS may trigger a differential biological response in CaOx stone formers and controls, which in turn may promote or protect against CaOx stone formation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase CASK modulates the L-type calcium current.

    PubMed

    Nafzger, Sabine; Rougier, Jean-Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    The L-type voltage-gated calcium channel Ca v 1.2 mediates the calcium influx into cells upon membrane depolarization. The list of cardiopathies associated to Ca v 1.2 dysfunctions highlights the importance of this channel in cardiac physiology. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK), expressed in cardiac cells, has been identified as a regulator of Ca v 2.2 channels in neurons, but no experiments have been performed to investigate its role in Ca v 1.2 regulation. Full length or the distal C-terminal truncated of the pore-forming Ca v 1.2 channel (Ca v 1.2α1c), both present in cardiac cells, were expressed in TsA-201 cells. In addition, a shRNA silencer, or scramble as negative control, of CASK was co-transfected in order to silence CASK endogenously expressed. Three days post-transfection, the barium current was increased only for the truncated form without alteration of the steady state activation and inactivation biophysical properties. The calcium current, however, was increased after CASK silencing with both types of Ca v 1.2α1c subunits suggesting that, in absence of calcium, the distal C-terminal counteracts the CASK effect. Biochemistry experiments did not reveals neither an alteration of Ca v 1.2 channel protein expression after CASK silencing nor an interaction between Ca v 1.2α1c subunits and CASK. Nevertheless, after CASK silencing, single calcium channel recordings have shown an increase of the voltage-gated calcium channel Ca v 1.2 open probability explaining the increase of the whole-cell current. This study suggests CASK as a novel regulator of Ca v 1.2 via a modulation of the voltage-gated calcium channel Ca v 1.2 open probability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of extracellular calcium on calcium transport during hyperthermia of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Anghileri, L J; Marcha, C; Crone-Escanyé, M C; Robert, J

    1985-08-01

    The effects of different concentrations of extracellular ion calcium on the transport of calcium by tumor cells have been studied by means of the uptake of radiocalcium. Tumor cells incubated at 45 degrees C take up 4-10 times the amount of radioactivity incorporated by cells incubated at 37 degrees C. The difference is still greater (up to 100 times) for the intracellular incorporation as assessed by elimination of the membrane-bound calcium by EGTA treatment. The possible mechanisms involved in this differential behavior are discussed.

  20. Calcium absorption is not increased by caseinophosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Teucher, Birgit; Majsak-Newman, Gosia; Dainty, Jack R; McDonagh, David; FitzGerald, Richard J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2006-07-01

    One of the suggested health benefits of caseinophosphopeptides (CPPs) is their ability to enhance calcium absorption. This possibility is based on the assumption that they resist proteolysis in the upper gastrointestinal tract and maintain calcium in a soluble form at alkaline pH in the distal ileum. The effects of CPP-enriched preparations (containing candidate functional food ingredients) on calcium absorption from a calcium lactate drink were tested. A randomized crossover trial was undertaken in 15 adults in whom we measured the absorption of calcium from a calcium lactate drink (drink A: 400 mg Ca as lactate) and 2 preparations enriched with forms of CPP (1.7 g each; drinks B and C). Both drinks B and C contained 400 mg Ca as calcium lactate plus approximately 100 mg CPP-derived calcium). Each volunteer received the 3 drinks in random order. Absorption was measured by the dual-label calcium stable-isotope technique. The quantity of calcium absorbed was significantly lower from drink A (103 mg) than from drink B (117 mg; P = 0.012) or drink C (121 mg; P = 0.002), which indicated a positive effect of the CPPs. However, because the CPP preparations contributed additional calcium besides that found in the calcium lactate (drink A), fractional absorption of calcium from drink B (23%) was slightly but significantly (P = 0.015) lower than that from drink A (26%). The differences in calcium absorption are unlikely to have any biological significance. CPPs are unsuitable as candidate ingredients for functional foods that are designed to deliver improved calcium nutrition.

  1. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  2. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  3. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  4. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  5. Evaluation of pH and calcium ion diffusion from calcium hydroxide pastes and MTA.

    PubMed

    Sáez, María Del M; López, Gabriela L; Atlas, Diana; de la Casa, María L

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate changes in pH and calcium ion diffusion through root dentin from calcium hydroxide (Ca (OH) 2 ) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pastes at 7, 30 and 60 days; and the relationship between pH and ion diffusion. Thirty-two human premolars were used. Crowns were sectioned and root canals instrumented and filled in with the following preparations: 1) Ca(OH) 2 + distilled water (n=7); 2) Ca(OH) 2 + 0.1% chlorhexidine gluconate (n=7); 3) MTA + distilled water (n=7); 4) MTA + 0.1% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) (n=7); 5) distilled water (n=2) (control); 6) 0.1% chlorhexidine gluconate (n=2) (control). The apex and coronary opening were sealed with IRM. Roots were placed in Eppendorf tubes with 1 ml distilled water at 37°C and 100% humidity. At baseline, 7, 30 and 60 days, pH was measured with pH meter, and calcium ion content in the solution was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, simple linear regression analysis and Pearson's correlation test. The highest pH values were achieved with calcium hydroxide pastes at 60 days (p ≤ 0.05). Calcium ions were released in all groups. The calcium hydroxide paste with distilled water at 60 days had the highest calcium ion value (p ≤ 0.01). There was a positive correlation between calcium and pH values. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  6. The calcium paradox phenomenon: a flow rate and volume response study of calcium-free perfusion.

    PubMed

    Oksendal, A N; Jynge, P; Sellevold, O F; Rotevatn, S; Saetersdal, T

    1985-10-01

    A dose-response study concerning the importance of the flow rate (0.5 to 12 ml/min) and volume (2.5 to 60 ml) of calcium-free coronary perfusion (duration 5 min) in the induction of a calcium paradox on reperfusion (duration 15 min) with calcium-containing medium has been performed in the isolated rat heart (37 degrees C). On the basis of enzymatic, physiological, and metabolic assessments three different levels of tissue injury were identified: a minimal paradox at 1.0 ml/min or 5 ml, a subtotal paradox at 2 ml/min or 10 ml and a total paradox at 9 ml/min or 45 ml. Ultrastructural examination revealed that cellular injury following calcium repletion was always severe, and that an increase in the flow rate and volume of calcium-free perfusion increased the number of severely injured cells. During calcium-free perfusion the external lamina largely remained intact over the surface coat of the sarcolemma, but variable degrees of separation of intercalated discs were observed. It is concluded that the calcium paradox model of myocardial injury presents a rather sharp threshold related to the flow rate or volume of calcium-free coronary perfusion and that on trespassing this threshold there is a narrow zone characterized by a decreasing number of viable cells. Furthermore, the study indicates that a separation of the external lamina from the surface coat of the sarcolemma is not a prerequisite for the induction of a calcium paradox, and that cell injury may occur in the presence of intact intercalated discs.

  7. Cadmium and calcium uptake in the mollusc donax rugosus and effect of a calcium channel blocker

    SciTech Connect

    Sidoumou, Z.; Gnassia-Barelli, M.; Romeo, M.

    Donax rugosus, a common bivalve mollusc in the coastal waters of Mauritania, has been studied for trace metal concentrations as a function of sampling site (from South of Mauritania to the North of this country) and of season. In this paper, the uptake of cadmium was experimentally studied in the different organs of D. rugosus. Since metals such as cadmium, copper and mercury may alter calcium homeostasis, calcium uptake was also studied in the animals treated with cadmium. Since calcium is taken up through specific channels, it appears that metals inhibit Ca uptake by interacting with these channels in themore » plasma membrane. Cadmium and calcium have very similar atomic radii, thus cadmium may be taken up through the calcium channels, particularly through voltage-dependent channels. The uptake of cadmium and calcium by D. Rugosus was therefore also studied in the presence of the calcium channel blocker verapamil. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less

  8. Estimation of the oxalate content of foods and daily oxalate intake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Kennedy, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate ingested may be an important risk factor in the development of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Reliable food tables listing the oxalate content of foods are currently not available. The aim of this research was to develop an accurate and reliable method to measure the food content of oxalate. METHODS: Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ion chromatography (IC) were compared as direct techniques for the estimation of the oxalate content of foods. Foods were thoroughly homogenized in acid, heat extracted, and clarified by centrifugation and filtration before dilution in water for analysis. Five individuals consuming self-selected diets maintained food records for three days to determine their mean daily oxalate intakes. RESULTS: Both techniques were capable of adequately measuring the oxalate in foods with a significant oxalate content. With foods of very low oxalate content (<1.8 mg/100 g), IC was more reliable than CE. The mean daily intake of oxalate by the five individuals tested was 152 +/- 83 mg, ranging from 44 to 352 mg/day. CONCLUSIONS: CE appears to be the method of choice over IC for estimating the oxalate content of foods with a medium (>10 mg/100 g) to high oxalate content due to a faster analysis time and lower running costs, whereas IC may be better suited for the analysis of foods with a low oxalate content. Accurate estimates of the oxalate content of foods should permit the role of dietary oxalate in urinary oxalate excretion and stone formation to be clarified. Other factors, apart from the amount of oxalate ingested, appear to exert a major influence over the amount of oxalate excreted in the urine.

  9. The role of calcium in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, C D; Sanchez, S D

    1990-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25-30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. The RDA for age 10-25 is 1200 mg/day. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years old). Starting at age 40-45, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D3. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Available evidence suggests that the impairments of intestinal calcium absorption observed during the menopause and aging can be overcome only by inordinately large calcium intakes (1500 to 2500 mg/day). Since this amount is difficult to derive from the diet, can cause constipation, and may not prevent trabecular bone loss, it should not be used as a substitute for sex hormone replacement. Women taking estrogen replacement should be provided the RDA for calcium of 800 mg/day at a minimum. Those who cannot or will not take estrogen should be asked to ingest at least 1000 to 1500 mg/day of calcium to delay cortical bone loss and prevent secondary hyperparathyroidism. It should be emphasized that up to 2000 mg/day of calcium is safe in teenaged children and adults. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. It is also possible that excessive intakes of phosphate could have a

  10. Occurrence and characterisation of calcium oxalate crystals in stems and fruits of Hylocereus costaricensis and Selenicereus megalanthus (Cactaceae: Hylocereeae).

    PubMed

    Viñas, María; Jiménez, Víctor M

    2016-10-01

    Detailed description about occurrence of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals in the edible vine cactus species Hylocereus costaricensis and Selenicereus megalanthus is scarce. Therefore, we evaluated and characterized the presence, morphology and composition of CaOx crystals in both species. Crystals were isolated from greenhouse and in vitro vegetative stems, and from ripe fruit peels and pulp by enzymatic digestion and density centrifugation and quantified with a haemocytometer. Morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy, elemental composition with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and salt composition with X-ray powder diffraction. Analyses conducted confirmed that isolated crystals were exclusively composed by CaOx, both mono- and dihydrated. Highest crystal contents were measured in greenhouse stems, followed by the fruit peels. While very few crystals were quantified in in vitro plants, they were not detected in the fruit pulp at all, which is of advantage for its human consumption and could be linked to mechanisms of seed dispersal through animals. Different crystal morphologies were observed, sometimes varying between genotypes and tissues analysed. This is the first work known to the authors with a detailed characterization of CaOx crystals in vine cacti. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of Calcium Intake and Intestinal Calcium Absorption on Kidney Stones in Older Women: The Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF)

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Mathew D.; Eisner, Brian H.; Stone, Katie L.; Kahn, Arnold J.; Lui, Li-Yung; Sadetsky, Natalia; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Intestinal calcium absorption is thought to play a critical role in nephrolithiasis; however, no study has directly assessed this association. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between intestinal fractional calcium absorption, calcium intake, and nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods The Study of Osteoporotic Fractures is a prospective cohort of 9704 post-menopausal women recruited from population-based listings in 1986 and followed for more than 20 years. Secondary analyses were performed of 7982 women who reported their history of nephrolithiasis, of which 5452 (68%) underwent oral radioactive calcium assay (45Ca). The impact of dietary and supplemental calcium on intestinal fractional calcium absorption was evaluated and factors independently associated with nephrolithiasis were determined. Results Fractional calcium absorption decreased with increased calcium intake, with no difference between dietary and supplemental calcium. Fractional calcium absorption was higher in women with a nephrolithiasis history among all calcium intake groups. Increased dietary calcium intake reduced the likelihood of nephrolithiasis by 45–54% (p=0.03). Women with a history of nephrolithiasis were less likely to supplement calcium (p<0.001). In adjusted analyses, women who supplemented calcium were 21–38% less likely to have a nephrolithiasis history (p=0.007) and there was a 24% increased risk of kidney stones for each 10% increase in fractional calcium absorption (p=0.008). Conclusions Fractional calcium absorption is higher in women with a history of nephrolithiasis. Higher intestinal fractional calcium absorption is associated with a greater risk of historic nephrolithiasis. Dietary and supplemental calcium decrease fractional calcium absorption and may protect against nephrolithiasis. PMID:22341269

  12. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium lactobionate. 172.720 Section 172.720 Food... Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate... additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic acid (4-(β,D-galactosido)-D-gluconic acid) produced by the...

  13. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactobionate. 172.720 Section 172.720 Food... Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate... additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic acid (4-(β,D-galactosido)-D-gluconic acid) produced by the...

  14. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  15. The effects of excess calcium on the handling and mechanical properties of hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate bone cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, N. N.; Sukardi, M. A.; Sopyan, I.; Mel, M.; Salleh, H. M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of excess calcium on the handling and mechanical properties of hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate cement (CPC) for bone filling applications. Hydroxyapatite powder was synthesized via hydrothermal method using calcium oxide, CaO and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, NH4H2PO4 as the calcium and phosphorus precursors respectively. The effects of calcium excess were evaluated by varying the CaO content at 0, 5 and 15 mole %. The precursors were then refluxed in distilled water at 90-100°C and dried overnight until the calcium phosphate powder was formed. CPC was then produced by mixing the synthesized powder with distilled water at the powder-to-liquid (P/L) ratio of 1.5. The result from the morphological properties of CPC shows the increase in agglomeration and particles size with 5 mole % of calcium excess but decreased with 15 mole % of calcium excess in CPC. This result was in agreement with the compressive strength result where the CPC increased its strength with 5 mole % of calcium excess but reduced with 15 mole % of calcium excess. The excess in calcium precursor also significantly improved the setting time but reduced the injectability of CPC.

  16. Calcium supplementation does not augment bone gain in young women consuming diets moderately low in calcium.

    PubMed

    Barger-Lux, M Janet; Davies, K Michael; Heaney, Robert P

    2005-10-01

    In earlier observational work, the dietary calcium:protein ratio was directly related to bone accrual in healthy postadolescent women. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that augmented calcium intake would increase postadolescent skeletal consolidation, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design. We recruited 152 healthy young women (age 23.1 +/- 2.7 y, BMI 22.5 +/- 3.0 kg/m2); their usual diets, as assessed by 7-d food diaries, were low in calcium (605 +/- 181 mg/d; 15.1 +/- 4.5 mmol/d) and in the calcium:protein ratio (10.1 +/- 2.0 mg/g). The subjects were randomly assigned to supplemental calcium [500 mg calcium (12.5 mmol) as the carbonate, 3 times/d, with meals] or placebo capsules identical in appearance; all participants also took a daily multivitamin, and they were followed for up to 36 mo with bone densitometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) at 6-mo intervals. A total of 121 subjects remained in the study for at least 12 mo (median time in the study, 35 mo), with a mean compliance level (observed/expected tablet consumption) of 87.7%. DXA data for these 121 subjects indicated modest but significant mean rates of increase (i.e., 0.24 to 1.10%/y) in bone mineral content (BMC; total body, total hip, and lumbar spine) and in lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) but no change in total hip BMD. None of these rates of change differed by group, i.e., calcium supplementation did not have any measurable effect on bone mass accrual. By midstudy, the calcium content of the subjects' usual diets for both groups had risen by approximately 15%. The combined effect of improved intakes of dietary calcium and the small amount of calcium added by the multivitamin tablets resulted in a mean calcium intake for the control group > 800 mg (20 mmol)/d, possibly at or near the threshold beyond which additional calcium has no further effect on bone accrual.

  17. Sulfhydryl oxidation modifies the calcium dependence of ryanodine-sensitive calcium channels of excitable cells.

    PubMed Central

    Marengo, J J; Hidalgo, C; Bull, R

    1998-01-01

    The calcium dependence of ryanodine-sensitive single calcium channels was studied after fusing with planar lipid bilayers sarcoendoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from excitable tissues. Native channels from mammalian or amphibian skeletal muscle displayed three different calcium dependencies, cardiac (C), mammalian skeletal (MS), and low fractional open times (low Po), as reported for channels from brain cortex. Native channels from cardiac muscle presented only the MS and C dependencies. Channels with the MS or low Po behaviors showed bell-shaped calcium dependencies, but the latter had fractional open times of <0.1 at all [Ca2+]. Channels with C calcium dependence were activated by [Ca2+] < 10 microM and were not inhibited by increasing cis [Ca2+] up to 0.5 mM. After oxidation with 2,2'-dithiodipyridine or thimerosal, channels with low Po or MS dependencies increased their activity. These channels modified their calcium dependencies sequentially, from low Po to MS and C, or from MS to C. Reduction with glutathione of channels with C dependence (native or oxidized) decreased their fractional open times in 0.5 mM cis [Ca2+], from near unity to 0.1-0.3. These results show that all native channels displayed at least two calcium dependencies regardless of their origin, and that these changed after treatment with redox reagents. PMID:9512024

  18. Modification of the N-Terminus of a Calcium Carbonate Precipitating Peptide Affects Calcium Carbonate Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Usui, Kenji; Yokota, Shin-Ichiro; Ozaki, Makoto; Sakashita, Shungo; Imai, Takahito; Tomizaki, Kin-Ya

    2018-01-01

    A core sequence (the 9 C-terminal residues) of calcification-associated peptide (CAP- 1) isolated from the exoskeleton of the red swamp crayfish was previously shown to control calcium carbonate precipitation with chitin. In addition, a modified core sequence in which the phosphorylated serine at the N terminus is replaced with serine exhibits was also previously shown to alter precipitation characteristics with chitin. We focused on calcium carbonate precipitation and attempted to elucidate aspects of the mechanism underlying mineralization. We attempted to evaluate in detail the effects of modifying the N-terminus in the core sequence on calcium carbonate mineralization without chitin. The peptide modifications included phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and a free or acetylated Nterminus. The peptides were synthesized manually on Wang resin using the DIPCI-DMAP method for the first residue, and Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis with HBTU-HOBt for the subsequent residues. Prior to calcium carbonate precipitation, calcium carbonate was suspended in MilliQ water. Carbon dioxide gas was bubbled into the stirred suspension, then the remaining solid CaCO3 was removed by filtration. The concentration of calcium ions in the solution was determined by standard titration with ethylenediaminetetraacetate. Calcium carbonate precipitation was conducted in a micro tube for 3 h at 37°C. We used the micro-scale techniques AFM (atomic force microscopy) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy), and the macro-scale techniques chelate titration, HPLC, gel filtration, CD (circular dichroism) and DLS (dynamic light scattering). We determined the morphologies of the calcium carbonate deposits using AFM and TEM. The pS peptide provided the best control of the shape and size of the calcium carbonate round particles. The acetylated peptides (Ac-S and Ac-pS) provided bigger particles with various shapes. S peptide provided a mixture of bigger particles and amorphous particles. We

  19. Association of calcium sensing receptor polymorphisms at rs1801725 with circulating calcium in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Widatalla, Sarrah E; Whalen, Diva S; Ochieng, Josiah; Sakwe, Amos M

    2017-08-02

    Breast cancer (BC) patients with late-stage and/or rapidly growing tumors are prone to develop high serum calcium levels which have been shown to be associated with larger and aggressive breast tumors in post and premenopausal women respectively. Given the pivotal role of the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) in calcium homeostasis, we evaluated whether polymorphisms of the CASR gene at rs1801725 and rs1801726 SNPs in exon 7, are associated with circulating calcium levels in African American and Caucasian control subjects and BC cases. In this retrospective case-control study, we assessed the mean circulating calcium levels, the distribution of two inactivating CaSR SNPs at rs1801725 and rs1801726 in 199 cases and 384 age-matched controls, and used multivariable regression analysis to determine whether these SNPs are associated with circulating calcium in control subjects and BC cases. We found that the mean circulating calcium levels in African American subjects were higher than those in Caucasian subjects (p < 0.001). As expected, the mean calcium levels were higher in BC cases compared to control subjects (p < 0.001), but the calcium levels in BC patients were independent of race. We also show that in BC cases and control subjects, the major alleles at rs1801725 (G/T, A986S) and at rs1801726 (C/G, Q1011E) were common among Caucasians and African Americans respectively. Compared to the wild type alleles, polymorphisms at the rs1801725 SNP were associated with higher calcium levels (p = 0.006) while those at rs1801726 were not. Using multivariable linear mixed-effects models and adjusting for age and race, we show that circulating calcium levels in BC cases were associated with tumor grade (p = 0.009), clinical stage (p = 0.003) and more importantly, with inactivating mutations of the CASR at the rs1801725 SNP (p = 0.038). These data suggest that decreased sensitivity of the CaSR to calcium due to inactivating polymorphisms at rs1801725, may predispose

  20. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae...

  2. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A.

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar inmore » magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.« less

  3. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation and identification of calcium-chelating peptides from Pacific cod skin gelatin and their binding properties with calcium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenfei; Li, Bafang; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhao, Xue

    2017-12-13

    A calcium-chelating peptide is considered to have the ability to improve calcium absorption. In this study, Pacific cod skin gelatin hydrolysates treated with trypsin for 120 min exhibited higher calcium-chelating activity. Sequential chromatography, involving hydroxyapatite affinity chromatography and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, was used for the purification of calcium-chelating peptides. Two novel peptides with the typical characteristics of collagen were sequenced as GDKGESGEAGER and GEKGEGGHR based on LC-HRMS/MS, which showed a high affinity to calcium. Calcium-peptide complexation was further characterized by ESI-MS (MS and MS/MS) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that the complexation of the two peptides with calcium was conducted mainly at the ratio of 1 : 1. The amino terminal group and the peptide bond of the peptide backbone as well as the amino group of the lysine side chain and the carboxylate of the glutamate side chain were the possible calcium binding sites for the two peptides. Meanwhile, several amino acid side chain groups, including the hydroxyl (Ser) and carboxylate (Asp) of GDKGESGEAGER and the imine (His) of GEKGEGGHR, were crucial in the complexation. The arginine residue in GEKGEGGHR also participated in the calcium coordination. Additionally, several active fragments with calcium-chelating activity were obtained using MS/MS spectra, including GDKGESGEAGE, GEAGER, GEK, EKG and KGE. This study suggests that gelatin-derived peptides have the potential to be used as a calcium-chelating ingredient to combat calcium deficiency.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 184.1205 Section 184.1205 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, CAS Reg. No. 1305-62-0) is also known as slaked lime or calcium hydrate. It is produced by the hydration of...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and....1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or oyster shells by calcination...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 184.1199 Section 184.1199 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1199 Calcium gluconate. (a) Calcium gluconate ([CH2OH(CHOH)4COO]2Ca, CAS Reg. No. 299-28-5) is the calcium salt of gluconic acid which may be produced by...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 184.1199 Section 184.1199 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1199 Calcium gluconate. (a) Calcium gluconate ([CH2OH(CHOH)4COO]2Ca, CAS Reg. No. 299-28-5) is the calcium salt of gluconic acid which may be produced by...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 184.1205 Section 184.1205 Food... GRAS § 184.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, CAS Reg. No. 1305-62-0) is also known as slaked lime or calcium hydrate. It is produced by the hydration of lime. (b) The ingredient...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1201 - Calcium glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium glycerophosphate. 184.1201 Section 184... as GRAS § 184.1201 Calcium glycerophosphate. (a) Calcium glycerophosphate (C3H7CaO6P, CAS Reg. No... mixture of calcium β-, and D-, and L-α-glycerophosphate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of...

  11. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Varenganayil, Muth M.; Decho, Alan W.

    2017-01-01

    Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya’s agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries. PMID:29023506

  12. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  13. The Role of Calcium in Osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, C. D.; Sanchez, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25 to 30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years). Starting at age 40 to 50, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D2. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. Generally, the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis are uncontrollable (e.g., sex, age, and race) or less controllable (e.g., disease and medications). However, several factors such as diet, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use are lifestyle related and can be modified to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  14. Vitamin D Status and Calcium Metabolism in Adolescent Black and White Girls on a Range of Controlled Calcium Intakes

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Connie M.; McCabe, Linda D.; McCabe, George P.; Braun, Michelle; Martin, Berdine R.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Peacock, Munro

    2008-01-01

    Background: There are limited data in adolescents on racial differences in relationships between dietary calcium intake, absorption, and retention and serum levels of calcium-regulating hormones. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate these relationships cross-sectionally in American White and Black adolescent girls. Methods: Calcium balance studies were conducted in 105 girls, aged 11–15 yr, on daily calcium intakes ranging from 760–2195 mg for 3-wk controlled feeding periods; 158 observations from 52 Black and 53 White girls were analyzed. Results: Black girls had lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], higher serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and higher calcium absorption and retention than White girls. Calcium intake and race, but not serum 25(OH)D, predicted net calcium absorption and retention with Black girls absorbing calcium more efficiently at low calcium intakes than White girls. The relationship between serum 25(OH)D and serum PTH was negative only in White girls. Calcium intake, race, and postmenarcheal age explained 21% of the variation in calcium retention, and serum 25(OH)D did not contribute further to the variance. Conclusions: These results suggest that serum 25(OH)D does not contribute to the racial differences in calcium absorption and retention during puberty. PMID:18682505

  15. Alpha-enolase on apical surface of renal tubular epithelial cells serves as a calcium oxalate crystal receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong-Ngern, Kedsarin; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-10-01

    To search for a strategy to prevent kidney stone formation/recurrence, this study addressed the role of α-enolase on apical membrane of renal tubular cells in mediating calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal adhesion. Its presence on apical membrane and in COM crystal-bound fraction was confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Pretreating MDCK cells with anti-α-enolase antibody, not isotype-controlled IgG, dramatically reduced cell-crystal adhesion. Immunofluorescence staining also confirmed the direct binding of purified α-enolase to COM crystals at {121} > {100} > {010} crystal faces. Coating COM crystals with urinary proteins diminished the crystal binding capacity to cells and purified α-enolase. Moreover, α-enolase selectively bound to COM, not other crystals. Chemico-protein interactions analysis revealed that α-enolase interacted directly with Ca2+ and Mg2+. Incubating the cells with Mg2+ prior to cell-crystal adhesion assay significantly reduced crystal binding on the cell surface, whereas preincubation with EDTA, a divalent cation chelator, completely abolished Mg2+ effect, indicating that COM and Mg2+ competitively bind to α-enolase. Taken together, we successfully confirmed the role of α-enolase as a COM crystal receptor to mediate COM crystal adhesion at apical membrane of renal tubular cells. It may also serve as a target for stone prevention by blocking cell-crystal adhesion and stone nidus formation.

  16. Renal papillary calcification and the development of calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary renal calculi: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Grases, Fèlix; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia; Prieto, Rafel M; Conte, Antonio; Servera, Antonio

    2013-03-11

    The objective of this study is to determine in a case series (four patients) how calcified deposits in renal papillae are associated with the development of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) papillary calculi. From the recently collected papillary calculi, we evaluated retrospectively patients, subjected to retrograde ureteroscopy, with COM papillary lithiasis. The COM papillary calculi were found to result from subepithelial injury. Many of these lesions underwent calcification by hydroxyapatite (HAP), with calculus morphology and the amount of HAP in the concave zone dependent on the location of the calcified injury. Most of these HAP deposits grew, eroding the epithelium covering the renal papillae, coming into contact with urine and starting the development of COM calculi. Subepithelial HAP plaques may alter the epithelium covering the papillae, resulting in the deposit of COM crystals directly onto the epithelium. Tissue calcification depends on a pre-existing injury, the continuation of this process is due to modulators and/or crystallization inhibitors deficiency. Since calculus morphology and the amount of detected HAP are dependent on the location and widespread of calcified injury, all types of papillary COM calculi can be found in the same patient. All patients had subepithelial calcifications, with fewer papillary calculi, demonstrating that some subepithelial calcifications did not further evolve and were reabsorbed. A high number of subepithelial calcifications increases the likelihood that some will be transformed into COM papillary calculi.

  17. Calcium carbonate gallstones in children.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Mark D; Soloway, Roger D; Taylor, Donald R; Riyad, Kallingal; Toogood, Giles

    2007-10-01

    In the United States, cholesterol stones account for 70% to 95% of adult gallstones and black pigment stones for most of the remainder. Calcium carbonate stones are exceptionally rare. A previous analysis of a small number of pediatric gallstones from the north of England showed a remarkably high prevalence of calcium carbonate stones. The aims of this study were to analyze a much larger series of pediatric gallstones from our region and to compare their chemical composition with a series of adult gallstones from the same geographic area. A consecutive series of gallbladder stones from 63 children and 50 adults from the north of England were analyzed in detail using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. Demographic and clinical data were collected on all patients. The relative proportions of each major stone component were assessed: cholesterol, protein and calcium salts of bilirubin, fatty acids, calcium carbonate, and hydroxyapatite. Thirty-nine (78%) adults had typical cholesterol stones, 7 (14%) had black pigment bilirubinate stones, and only 2 (4%) had calcium carbonate stones. In contrast, 30 (48%) children had black pigment stones, 13 (21%) had cholesterol stones, 15 (24%) had calcium carbonate stones, 3 (5%) had protein dominant stones, and 2 (3%) had brown pigment stones. In children, cholesterol stones were more likely in overweight adolescent girls with a family history of gallstones, whereas black pigment stones were equally common in boys and girls and associated with hemolysis, parenteral nutrition, and neonatal abdominal surgery. Calcium carbonate stones were more common in boys, and almost half had undergone neonatal abdominal surgery and/or required neonatal intensive care. The composition of pediatric gallstones differs significantly from that found in adults. In particular, one quarter of the children in this series had calcium carbonate stones, previously considered rare. Geographic differences are not the major reason for the high

  18. A Crash Course in Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Gerald W

    2017-12-20

    Much progress has been made in understanding the molecular physiology and pharmacology of calcium channels. Recently, there have been tremendous advances in learning about calcium channel structure and function through crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy studies. Here, I will give an overview of our knowledge about calcium channels, and highlight two recent studies that give important insights into calcium channel structure.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 184.1221 Section 184.1221 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1221 Calcium propionate. (a) Calcium propionate (C6H10CaO4, CAS Reg. No. 4075-81-4) is the calcium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as white crystals or a...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium propionate. 184.1221 Section 184.1221 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1221 Calcium propionate. (a) Calcium propionate (C6H10CaO4, CAS Reg. No. 4075-81-4) is the calcium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as white crystals or a...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 184.1221 Section 184.1221 Food... GRAS § 184.1221 Calcium propionate. (a) Calcium propionate (C6H10CaO4, CAS Reg. No. 4075-81-4) is the calcium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as white crystals or a crystalline solid, possessing not more...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared as a white precipitate by mixing...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 184.1221 Section 184.1221 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1221 Calcium propionate. (a) Calcium propionate (C6H10CaO4, CAS Reg. No. 4075-81-4) is the calcium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as white crystals or a...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 184.1221 Section 184.1221 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1221 Calcium propionate. (a) Calcium propionate (C6H10CaO4, CAS Reg. No. 4075-81-4) is the calcium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as white crystals or a...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared as...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be commercially...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared as...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 184.1199 Section 184.1199 Food... GRAS § 184.1199 Calcium gluconate. (a) Calcium gluconate ([CH2OH(CHOH)4COO]2Ca, CAS Reg. No. 299-28-5) is the calcium salt of gluconic acid which may be produced by neutralization of gluconic acid with...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be commercially...

  12. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-11-27

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC.

  13. Vasopressin regulates renal calcium excretion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hanouna, Guillaume; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Baud, Laurent; Letavernier, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone or arginine vasopressin (AVP) increases water reabsorption in the collecting ducts of the kidney. Three decades ago, experimental models have shown that AVP may increase calcium reabsorption in rat kidney. The objective of this study was to assess whether AVP modulates renal calcium excretion in humans. We analyzed calcium, potassium, and sodium fractional excretion in eight patients affected by insipidus diabetes (nephrogenic or central) under acute vasopressin receptor agonist action and in 10 patients undergoing oral water load test affected or not by inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Synthetic V2 receptor agonist (dDAVP) reduced significantly calcium fractional excretion from 1.71% to 0.58% (P < 0.05) in patients with central diabetes insipidus. In patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (resistant to AVP), calcium fractional excretion did not change significantly after injection (0.48–0.68%, P = NS). In normal subjects undergoing oral water load test, calcium fractional excretion increased significantly from 1.02% to 2.54% (P < 0.05). Patients affected by SIADH had a high calcium fractional excretion at baseline that remained stable during test from 3.30% to 3.33% (P = NS), possibly resulting from a reduced calcium absorption in renal proximal tubule. In both groups, there was a significant correlation between urine output and calcium renal excretion. In humans, dDAVP decreases calcium fractional excretion in the short term. Conversely, water intake, which lowers AVP concentration, increases calcium fractional excretion. The correlation between urine output and calcium excretion suggests that AVP-related antidiuresis increases calcium reabsorption in collecting ducts. PMID:26620256

  14. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 184.1195 Section 184.1195 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Calcium citrate (Ca3(C6H5O7)2·4H2O, CAS Reg. No. 813-0994-095) is the calcium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by neutralizing citric...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be commercially obtained as a byproduct in...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It...

  19. Fast Kinetics of Calcium Signaling and Sensor Design

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shen; Reddish, Florence; Zhuo, You; Yang, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    Fast calcium signaling is regulated by numerous calcium channels exhibiting high spatiotemporal profiles which are currently measured by fluorescent calcium sensors. There is still a strong need to improve the kinetics of genetically encoded calcium indicators (sensors) to capture calcium dynamics in the millisecond time frame. In this review, we summarize several major fast calcium signaling pathways and discuss the recent developments and application of genetically encoded calcium indicators to detect these pathways. A new class of genetically encoded calcium indicators designed with site-directed mutagenesis on the surface of beta-barrel fluorescent proteins to form a pentagonal bipyramidal-like calcium binding domain dramatically accelerates calcium binding kinetics. Furthermore, novel genetically encoded calcium indicators with significantly increased fluorescent lifetime change are advantageous in deep-field imaging with high light-scattering and notable morphology change. PMID:26151819

  20. Timing of the calcium intake and effect of calcium deficiency on behaviour and egg laying in captive great tits, Parus major.

    PubMed

    Graveland, J; Berends, A E

    1997-01-01

    The calcium demand of egg-laying birds is much higher than in other vertebrates during reproduction. We showed elsewhere that a low level of calcium availability can greatly affect the eggshell quality and reproduction of free-living passerines. However, there are few data on calcium demand and calcium intake in relation to egg laying and behaviour and egg-laying performance under conditions of calcium shortage in nondomesticated birds. We examined these aspects in an experiment with captive great tits, Parus major, on a diet deficient in calcium, with or without snail shells as an additional calcium source. More than 90% of the calcium intake for egg production took place during the egg-laying period. Females ingested about 1.7 times as much calcium as they deposited in eggshells. Removing the snail shells after the first egg resulted in eggshell defects and interruptions of laying after 1-3 d. Females without snail shells doubled their searching effort and started to burrow in the soil and to eat sand, small stones, and their own eggs. Most calcium was consumed in the evening, probably to supplement the calcium available from the medullary bone with an additional calcium source in the gut during eggshell formation. The results demonstrated that eggshell formation requires accurate timing of the calcium intake and that obtaining sufficient calcium is time-consuming, even in calcium-rich environments. These factors pertaining to calcium intake greatly affect the ability of birds to collect sufficient calcium for eggshell formation in calcium-poor areas.

  1. Calcium requirements for Asian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Warren Tak Keung; Jiang, Ji

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is important for bone health. Over the last 15 years, reference calcium intakes in Western countries have been revised upwards for maximizing bone mass at skeletal maturity and for prevention of osteoporotic fractures. Some of these reference figures have also been adopted for use in Asian countries. However, the scientific data based on for revising reference calcium intakes in the West was largely based on Caucasians. Limited human studies relating to calcium requirements and bone mineralization have been conducted in Asians in Asia. In children and adolescents, a trial has confirmed no effects of calcium supplementation on bone gains in adolescent girls after 7 years. A meta-analysis has also revealed that calcium supplementation has little beneficial effects on bone gain. Given that genetic factors, hormonal status, body size, bone structure, diets, physical activity, vitamin D status and adaptation could modify calcium retention and bone integrity, these factors need to be considered collectively to promote bone health in Asian populations. Furthermore, studies to identify indigenous foods rich in calcium and high in bioavailability are needed to widen sources of dietary calcium. Ethnic differences in calcium retention, hormonal status, bone structure, bone mineral accretion and peak bone mass are evident among Asians, Caucasians and Blacks in USA. Hence, reference calcium intakes for Asians are likely to be unique and different from those of Caucasians. More research has to be conducted in Asian populations in order to develop appropriate reference calcium intakes for the region.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., CAS Reg. No. 813-0994-095) is the calcium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by neutralizing citric acid with calcium hydroxide or calcium carbonate. It occurs as a fine white, odorless powder and...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., CAS Reg. No. 813-0994-095) is the calcium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by neutralizing citric acid with calcium hydroxide or calcium carbonate. It occurs as a fine white, odorless powder and...

  4. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium citrate. 184.1195 Section 184.1195 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Calcium citrate (Ca3(C6H5O7)2·4H2O, CAS Reg. No. 813-0994-095) is the calcium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by neutralizing citric acid with...

  6. Electrophoretic mobility shift in native gels indicates calcium-dependent structural changes of neuronal calcium sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Viviano, Jeffrey; Krishnan, Anuradha; Wu, Hao; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2016-02-01

    In proteins of the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) family, changes in structure as well as function are brought about by the binding of calcium. In this article, we demonstrate that these structural changes, solely due to calcium binding, can be assessed through electrophoresis in native gels. The results demonstrate that the NCS proteins undergo ligand-dependent conformational changes that are detectable in native gels as a gradual decrease in mobility with increasing calcium but not other tested divalent cations such as magnesium, strontium, and barium. Surprisingly, such a gradual change over the entire tested range is exhibited only by the NCS proteins but not by other tested calcium-binding proteins such as calmodulin and S100B, indicating that the change in mobility may be linked to a unique NCS family feature--the calcium-myristoyl switch. Even within the NCS family, the changes in mobility are characteristic of the protein, indicating that the technique is sensitive to the individual features of the protein. Thus, electrophoretic mobility on native gels provides a simple and elegant method to investigate calcium (small ligand)-induced structural changes at least in the superfamily of NCS proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd by phosphate materials and calcium carbonate in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyong; Su, Xiaojuan; Rizwan, Muhammad Shahid; Zhu, Yifei; Hu, Hongqing

    2016-08-01

    Soil contamination with toxic metals has increasingly become a global concern over the past few decades. Phosphate and carbonate compounds are good passivation materials for Pb immobilization, while the effect of phosphate and carbonate on the immobilization of multiple heavy metals (Pb, Cu, and Cd) in contaminated soils was seldom investigated. In this study, bone meal (BM), phosphate rock (PR), oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock (APR), super phosphate (SP), and calcium carbonate (CC) were added to the contaminated soils to evaluate the effect of phosphate materials and calcium carbonate on the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd. The results showed that the pH of the treated soils increased 1.3-2.7, except SP which decreased 0.5 at most. Compared to the control treatment, all phosphates and calcium carbonate added to the polluted soils increased the fraction of residual metals, and the application of APR, PR, BM, and CC significantly reduced exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction metals. PR and APR were the most effective for the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd in the soils among these materials. Moreover, the concentrations of all metals in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachate decreased with increasing amounts of amendments, and the concentrations of Pb in the TCLP leachate for soils treated with PR and APR were below the nonhazardous regulatory limit of 5 mg L(-1) (US Environmental Protection Agency). Based on our results, phosphate rock and oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock are effective in the immobilization of multiple metals by reducing their mobility in the co-contaminated soils.

  8. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  9. Space-flight simulations of calcium metabolism using a mathematical model of calcium regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a series of simulation studies of calcium matabolic changes which have been recorded during human exposure to bed rest and space flight are presented. Space flight and bed rest data demonstrate losses of total body calcium during exposure to hypogravic environments. These losses are evidenced by higher than normal rates of urine calcium excretion and by negative calcium balances. In addition, intestinal absorption rates and bone mineral content are assumed to decrease. The bed rest and space flight simulations were executed on a mathematical model of the calcium metabolic system. The purpose of the simulations is to theoretically test hypotheses and predict system responses which are occurring during given experimental stresses. In this case, hypogravity occurs through the comparison of simulation and experimental data and through the analysis of model structure and system responses. The model reliably simulates the responses of selected bed rest and space flight parameters. When experimental data are available, the simulated skeletal responses and regulatory factors involved in the responses agree with space flight data collected on rodents. In addition, areas within the model that need improvement are identified.

  10. Calcium at fertilization and in early development

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Fertilization calcium waves are introduced and the evidence from which we can infer general mechanisms of these waves is presented. The two main classes of hypothesis put forward to explain the generation of the fertilization calcium wave are set out and it is concluded that initiation of the fertilization calcium wave can be most generally explained in inverterbrates by a mechanism in which an activating substance enters the egg from the sperm on sperm-egg fusion, activating the egg by stimulating phospholipase C activation through a src family kinase pathway and in mammals by the diffusion of a sperm-specific phospholipase C from sperm to egg on sperm-egg fusion. The fertilization calcium wave is then set into the context of cell cycle control and the mechanism of repetitive calcium spiking in mammalian eggs is investigated. Evidence that calcium signals control cell division in early embryos is reviewed, and it is concluded that calcium signals are essential at all three stages of cell division in early embryos. Evidence that phosphoinositide signalling pathways control the resumption of meiosis during oocyte maturation is considered. It is concluded on balance that the evidence points to a need for phosphoinositide/calcium signalling during resumption of meiosis. Changes to the calcium signalling machinery occur during meiosis to enable the production of a calcium wave in the mature oocyte when it is fertilized; evidence that the shape and structure of the endoplasmic reticulum alters dynamically during maturation and after fertilization is reviewed and the link between ER dynamics and the cytoskeleton is discussed. There is evidence that calcium signalling plays a key part in the development of patterning in early embryos. Morphogenesis in ascidian, frog and zebrafish embryos is briefly described to provide the developmental context in which calcium signals act. Intracellular calcium waves that may play a role in axis formation in ascidian are discussed

  11. Calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Xuan; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2017-02-01

    Compared with other inorganic materials such as silica, metal oxides, noble metals and carbon, calcium silicate-based materials, especially nanostructured calcium silicate materials, have high biocompatibility, bioactivity and biodegradability, high specific surface area, nanoporous/hollow structure, high drug-loading capacity, pH-responsive drug release behavior and desirable drug release properties, and thus they are promising for the application in drug delivery. Calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems have a long drug-release time, which can significantly prolong the therapeutic effect of drugs. Another advantage of calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems is their pH-responsive drug release property, which can act as an ideal platform for targeted drug delivery. Areas covered: In recent years, studies have been carried out on calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems, and important results and insights have been documented. This article is not intended to offer a comprehensive review on the research on calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems, but presents some examples reported in the literature, and includes new insights obtained by tracking the interactions between drug molecules and calcium silicate carriers on the molecular level using the synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopy. Expert opinion: Finally, our opinions on calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems are provided, and several research directions for the future studies are proposed.

  12. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  13. Signaling complexes of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ray W; Anderson, Dustin

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are key mediators of depolarization induced calcium entry into electrically excitable cells. There is increasing evidence that voltage-gated calcium channels, like many other types of ionic channels, do not operate in isolation, but instead form complexes with signaling molecules, G protein coupled receptors, and other types of ion channels. Furthermore, there appears to be bidirectional signaling within these protein complexes, thus allowing not only for efficient translation of calcium signals into cellular responses, but also for tight control of calcium entry per se. In this review, we will focus predominantly on signaling complexes between G protein-coupled receptors and high voltage activated calcium channels, and on complexes of voltage-gated calcium channels and members of the potassium channel superfamily. PMID:21832880

  14. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  15. Calcium movements and the cellular basis of gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, S. J.; Biro, R. L.; Hale, C. C.

    An early gravity-transduction event in oat coleoptiles which precedes any noticeable bending is the accumulation of calcium on their prospective slower-growing side. Sub-cellular calcium localization studies indicate that the gravity-stimulated redistribution of calcium results in an increased concentration of calcium in the walls of responding cells. Since calcium can inhibit the extension growth of plant cell walls, this selective accumulation of calcium in walls may play a role in inducing the asymmetry of growth which characterizes gravitropism. The active transport of calcium from cells into walls is performed by a calcium-dependent ATPase localized in the plasma membrane. Evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that this calcium pump is regulated by a feed-back mechanism which includes the participation of calmodulin.

  16. Biotic Nitrogen Enrichment Regulates Calcium Sources to Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.; Hynicka, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient in forest ecosystems that is susceptible to leaching loss and depletion. Calcium depletion can affect plant and animal productivity, soil acid buffering capacity, and fluxes of carbon and water. Excess nitrogen supply and associated soil acidification are often implicated in short-term calcium loss from soils, but the long-term role of nitrogen enrichment on calcium sources and resupply is unknown. Here we use strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) as a proxy for calcium to investigate how soil nitrogen enrichment from biological nitrogen fixation interacts with bedrock calcium to regulate both short-term available supplies and the long-term sources of calcium in montane conifer forests. Our study examines 22 sites in western Oregon, spanning a 20-fold range of bedrock calcium on sedimentary and basaltic lithologies. In contrast to previous studies emphasizing abiotic control of weathering as a determinant of long-term ecosystem calcium dynamics and sources (via bedrock fertility, climate, or topographic/tectonic controls) we find instead that that biotic nitrogen enrichment of soil can strongly regulate calcium sources and supplies in forest ecosystems. For forests on calcium-rich basaltic bedrock, increasing nitrogen enrichment causes calcium sources to shift from rock-weathering to atmospheric dominance, with minimal influence from other major soil forming factors, despite regionally high rates of tectonic uplift and erosion that can rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. For forests on calcium-poor sedimentary bedrock, we find that atmospheric inputs dominate regardless of degree of nitrogen enrichment. Short-term measures of soil and ecosystem calcium fertility are decoupled from calcium source sustainability, with fundamental implications for understanding nitrogen impacts, both in natural ecosystems and in the context of global change. Our finding that long-term nitrogen enrichment increases forest reliance on atmospheric

  17. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibilitymore » issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].« less

  18. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Nachum; Shaltiel, Galit; Daniely, Michal; Meiron, Oren E; Shechter, Assaf; Abrams, Steven A; Niv, Eva; Shapira, Yami; Sagi, Amir

    2014-10-01

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (CCC) using the dual stable isotope technique. The study was conducted in the Unit of Clinical Nutrition, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel. The study population included 15 early postmenopausal women aged 54.9 ± 2.8 (mean ± SD) years with no history of major medical illness or metabolic bone disorder, excess calcium intake, or vitamin D deficiency. Standardized breakfast was followed by randomly provided CCC or ACC capsules containing 192 mg elemental calcium labeled with 44Ca at intervals of at least 3 weeks. After swallowing the capsules, intravenous CaCl2 labeled with 42Ca on was administered on each occasion. Fractional calcium absorption (FCA) of ACC and CCC was calculated from the 24-hour urine collection following calcium administration. The results indicated that FCA of ACC was doubled (± 0.96 SD) on average compared to that of CCC (p < 0.02). The higher absorption of the synthetic stable ACC may serve as a more efficacious way of calcium supplementation. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Effect of calcium chloride treatments on calcium content, anthracnose severity and antioxidant activity in papaya fruit during ambient storage.

    PubMed

    Madani, Babak; Mirshekari, Amin; Yahia, Elhadi

    2016-07-01

    There have been no reports on the effects of preharvest calcium application on anthracnose disease severity, antioxidant activity and cellular changes during ambient storage of papaya, and therefore the objective of this study was to investigate these effects. Higher calcium concentrations (1.5 and 2% w/v) increased calcium concentration in the peel and pulp tissues, maintained firmness, and reduced anthracnose incidence and severity. While leakage of calcium-treated fruit was lower for 1.5 and 2% calcium treatments compared to the control, microscopic results confirmed that pulp cell wall thickness was higher after 6 days in storage, for the 2% calcium treatment compared to the control. Calcium-treated fruit also had higher total antioxidant activity and total phenolic compounds during storage. Calcium chloride, especially at higher concentrations, is effective in maintaining papaya fruit quality during ambient storage. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Specific Inhibition of Hepatic Lactate Dehydrogenase Reduces Oxalate Production in Mouse Models of Primary Hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chengjung; Pursell, Natalie; Gierut, Jessica; Saxena, Utsav; Zhou, Wei; Dills, Michael; Diwanji, Rohan; Dutta, Chaitali; Koser, Martin; Nazef, Naim; Storr, Rachel; Kim, Boyoung; Martin-Higueras, Cristina; Salido, Eduardo; Wang, Weimin; Abrams, Marc; Dudek, Henryk; Brown, Bob D

    2018-06-15

    Primary hyperoxalurias (PHs) are autosomal recessive disorders caused by the overproduction of oxalate leading to calcium oxalate precipitation in the kidney and eventually to end-stage renal disease. One promising strategy to treat PHs is to reduce the hepatic production of oxalate through substrate reduction therapy by inhibiting liver-specific glycolate oxidase (GO), which controls the conversion of glycolate to glyoxylate, the proposed main precursor to oxalate. Alternatively, diminishing the amount of hepatic lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression, the proposed key enzyme responsible for converting glyoxylate to oxalate, should directly prevent the accumulation of oxalate in PH patients. Using RNAi, we provide the first in vivo evidence in mammals to support LDH as the key enzyme responsible for converting glyoxylate to oxalate. In addition, we demonstrate that reduction of hepatic LDH achieves efficient oxalate reduction and prevents calcium oxalate crystal deposition in genetically engineered mouse models of PH types 1 (PH1) and 2 (PH2), as well as in chemically induced PH mouse models. Repression of hepatic LDH in mice did not cause any acute elevation of circulating liver enzymes, lactate acidosis, or exertional myopathy, suggesting further evaluation of liver-specific inhibition of LDH as a potential approach for treating PH1 and PH2 is warranted. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological and medical significance of calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V; Epple, Matthias

    2002-09-02

    The inorganic part of hard tissues (bones and teeth) of mammals consists of calcium phosphate, mainly of apatitic structure. Similarly, most undesired calcifications (i.e. those appearing as a result of various diseases) of mammals also contain calcium phosphate. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood-vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium phosphate. Dental caries result in a replacement of less soluble and hard apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Osteoporosis is a demineralization of bone. Therefore, from a chemical point of view, processes of normal (bone and teeth formation and growth) and pathological (atherosclerosis and dental calculus) calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium phosphate. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis can be considered to be in vivo dissolution of calcium phosphates. On the other hand, because of the chemical similarity with biological calcified tissues, all calcium phosphates are remarkably biocompatible. This property is widely used in medicine for biomaterials that are either entirely made of or coated with calcium phosphate. For example, self-setting bone cements made of calcium phosphates are helpful in bone repair and titanium substitutes covered with a surface layer of calcium phosphates are used for hip-joint endoprostheses and tooth substitutes, to facilitate the growth of bone and thereby raise the mechanical stability. Calcium phosphates have a great biological and medical significance and in this review we give an overview of the current knowledge in this subject.

  2. Multiparameter imaging of calcium and abscisic acid and high-resolution quantitative calcium measurements using R-GECO1-mTurquoise in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Krebs, Melanie; Kudla, Jörg; Schumacher, Karin

    2017-10-01

    Calcium signals occur in specific spatio-temporal patterns in response to various stimuli and are coordinated with, for example, hormonal signals, for physiological and developmental adaptations. Quantification of calcium together with other signalling molecules is required for correlative analyses and to decipher downstream calcium-decoding mechanisms. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of calcium and abscisic acid has been performed here to investigate the interdependence of the respective signalling processes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Advanced ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicators have been generated and in vivo calcium calibration protocols were established to determine absolute calcium concentration changes in response to auxin and ATP. In roots, abscisic acid induced long-term basal calcium concentration increases, while auxin triggered rapid signals in the elongation zone. The advanced ratiometric calcium indicator R-GECO1-mTurquoise exhibited an increased calcium signal resolution compared to commonly used Förster resonance energy transfer-based indicators. Quantitative calcium measurements in Arabidopsis root tips using R-GECO1-mTurquoise revealed detailed maps of absolute calcium concentration changes in response to auxin and ATP. Calcium calibration protocols using R-GECO1-mTurquoise enabled high-resolution quantitative imaging of resting cytosolic calcium concentrations and their dynamic changes that revealed distinct hormonal and ATP responses in roots. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Stone clearance after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in patients with solitary pure calcium oxalate stones smaller than 1.0 cm in the proximal ureter, with special reference to monohydrate and dihydrate content.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Osamu; Nagaoka, Akira; Izumi, Takuji; Kawamura, Yuko; Tsukigi, Masaaki; Ishii, Tatsuya; Ohji, Hiroshi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Tomita, Yoshihiko

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess stone-free rates following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) of pure calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones in the proximal ureter. The investigators retrospectively examined 53 patients with 5-10 mm pure CaOx stones in the proximal ureter from the medical archives of 593 consecutive patients treated with ESWL. The compositions of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) in a given stone were determined by infrared spectrometry. Stone size, attenuation number and stone-to-skin distance (SSD) were measured using plain radiography and computed tomography (CT). ESWL success was evaluated by stone-free status after the first single session. On average, calculi were 8.0 × 5.3 mm in size, with an SSD of 11.0 cm. The mean CT attenuation value was 740.1 HU. Attenuation numbers correlated significantly with stone diameter (r = 0.49), but had no correlation with the stone content of COM or COD. A negative correlation was observed between COM and COD content (r = -0.925). With regard to patients' physical characteristics and COM and COD content, no differences were found between study subgroups with stone-free and residual status (n = 38 and 15, respectively). There were also no differences in clinical features between patient subgroups with COM- or COD-predominant stones (n = 22 and 31, respectively). The findings indicated that the differences in COM and COD content of CaOx stones had no impact on stone clearance after ESWL and that a favorable stone-free rate of the stones treated with ESWL may be achieved independently of CaOx hydration.

  4. Quantifying Calcium Intake in School Age Children: Development and Validation of the Calcium Counts!© Food Frequency Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    ZEMEL, BABETTE S.; CAREY, LISA B.; PAULHAMUS, DONNA R.; STALLINGS, VIRGINIA A.; ITTENBACH, RICHARD F.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying dietary behavior is difficult and can be intrusive. Calcium, an essential mineral for skeletal development during childhood, is difficult to assess. Few studies have examined the use of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) for assessing calcium intake in school-age children. This study evaluated the validity and reliability of the Calcium Counts!© FFQ (CCFFQ) for estimating calcium intake in school children in the US. Healthy children, aged 7–10 years (n = 139) completed the CCFFQ and 7-day weighed food records. A subset of subjects completed a second CCFFQ within 3.6 months. Concurrent validity was determined using Pearson correlations between the CCFFQ and food record estimates of calcium intake, and the relationship between quintiles for the two measures. Predictive validity was determined using generalized linear regression models to explore the effects of age, race, and gender. Inter- and intra-individual variability in calcium intake was high (>300 mg/day). Calcium intake was ~300 mg/day higher by CCFFQ compared to food records. Concurrent validity was moderate (r = 0.61) for the entire cohort and higher for selected subgroups. Predictive validity estimates yielded significant relationships between CCFFQ and food record estimates of calcium intake alone and in the presence of such potential effect modifiers as age group, race, and gender. Test–retest reliability was high (r = 0.74). Although calcium intake estimated by the CCFFQ was greater than that measured by food records, the CCFFQ provides valid and reliable estimates of calcium intake in children. The CCFFQ is especially well-suited as a tool to identify children with low calcium intakes. PMID:19621431

  5. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Polowczyk, Izabela; Bastrzyk, Anna; Fiedot, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquired to monitor the kinetics of the calcium carbonate structure’s growth in the investigated system. In this study, samples of CaCO3 particles obtained with individual proteins, such as ovalbumin, lysozyme, and a mixture of the proteins, were characterized and compared with a control sample, i.e., synthesized without proteins. The obtained data indicated that the addition of ovalbumin to the reaction changed the morphology of crystals from rhombohedral to ‘stack-like’ structures. Lysozyme, however, did not affect the morphology of calcium carbonate, yet the presence of the protein mixture led to the creation of more complex composites in which the calcium carbonate crystals were constructed in protein matrices formed by the ovalbumin-lysozyme interaction. It was also observed that in the protein mixture, ovalbumin has a major influence on the CaCO3 formation through a strong interaction with calcium ions, which leads to the coalescence and creation of a steric barrier reducing particle growth. The authors proposed a mechanism of calcium carbonate grain growth in the presence of both proteins, taking into account the interaction of calcium ions with the protein. PMID:28774065

  6. Cholinergic signaling inhibits oxalate transport by human intestinal T84 cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ming; Aronson, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Urolithiasis remains a very common disease in Western countries. Seventy to eighty percent of kidney stones are composed of calcium oxalate, and minor changes in urinary oxalate affect stone risk. Intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by anion exchanger SLC26A6 plays a major constitutive role in limiting net absorption of ingested oxalate, thereby preventing hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Using the relatively selective PKC-δ inhibitor rottlerin, we had previously found that PKC-δ activation inhibits Slc26a6 activity in mouse duodenal tissue. To identify a model system to study physiologic agonists upstream of PKC-δ, we characterized the human intestinal cell line T84. Knockdown studies demonstrated that endogenous SLC26A6 mediates most of the oxalate transport by T84 cells. Cholinergic stimulation with carbachol modulates intestinal ion transport through signaling pathways including PKC activation. We therefore examined whether carbachol affects oxalate transport in T84 cells. We found that carbachol significantly inhibited oxalate transport by T84 cells, an effect blocked by rottlerin. Carbachol also led to significant translocation of PKC-δ from the cytosol to the membrane of T84 cells. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we observed that carbachol inhibits oxalate transport through the M3 muscarinic receptor and phospholipase C. Utilizing the Src inhibitor PP2 and phosphorylation studies, we found that the observed regulation downstream of PKC-δ is partially mediated by c-Src. Biotinylation studies revealed that carbachol inhibits oxalate transport by reducing SLC26A6 surface expression. We conclude that carbachol negatively regulates oxalate transport by reducing SLC26A6 surface expression in T84 cells through signaling pathways including the M3 muscarinic receptor, phospholipase C, PKC-δ, and c-Src. PMID:21956166

  7. 21 CFR 582.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 582.6203 Section 582.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 182.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium hexametaphosphate. 182.6203 Section 182.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 182.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 182.6203 Section 182.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 582.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 582.6203 Section 582.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 582.6203 Section 582.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 182.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 182.6203 Section 182.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 582.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 582.6203 Section 582.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 582.6203 Section 582.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. Ion release and mechanical properties of calcium silicate and calcium hydroxide materials used for pulp capping.

    PubMed

    Natale, L C; Rodrigues, M C; Xavier, T A; Simões, A; de Souza, D N; Braga, R R

    2015-01-01

    To compare the ion release and mechanical properties of a calcium hydroxide (Dycal) and two calcium silicate (MTA Angelus and Biodentine) cements. Calcium and hydroxyl ion release in water from 24-h set cements were calculated from titration with HCl (n = 3). Calcium release after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days at pH 5.5 and 7.0 was measured using ICP-OES (n = 6). Flexural strength (FS) and modulus (E) were tested after 48-h storage, and compressive strength (CS) was tested after 48 h and 7 days (n = 10). Ion release and mechanical data were subjected to anova/Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α = 0.05). Titration curves revealed that Dycal released significantly fewer ions in solution than calcium silicates (P < 0.001). Calcium release remained constant at pH 7.0, whilst at pH 5.5, it dropped significantly by 24% after 21 days (P < 0.05). At pH 5.5, MTA Angelus released significantly more calcium than Dycal (P < 0.01), whilst Biodentine had superior ion release than Dycal at pH 7.0 (P < 0.01). Biodentine had superior flexural strength, flexural modulus and compressive strength than the other cements, whilst MTA Angelus had higher modulus than Dycal (P < 0.001). Immediate calcium and hydroxyl ion release in solution was significantly lower for Dycal. In general, all materials released constant calcium levels over 28 days, but release from Dycal was significantly lower than Biodentine and MTA Angelus depending on pH conditions. Biodentine had substantially higher strength and modulus than MTA Angelus and Dycal, both of which demonstrated low stress-bearing capabilities. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Calcium Intake in Elderly Australian Women Is Inadequate

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xingqiong; Kerr, Deborah A.; Zhu, Kun; Devine, Amanda; Solah, Vicky; Binns, Colin W.; Prince, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The role of calcium in the prevention of bone loss in later life has been well established but little data exist on the adequacy of calcium intakes in elderly Australian women. The aim of this study was to compare the dietary intake including calcium of elderly Australian women with the Australian dietary recommendation, and to investigate the prevalence of calcium supplement use in this population. Community-dwelling women aged 70–80 years were randomly recruited using the Electoral Roll for a 2-year protein intervention study in Western Australia. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline by a 3-day weighed food record and analysed for energy, calcium and other nutrients. A total of 218 women were included in the analysis. Mean energy intake was 7,140 ± 1,518 kJ/day and protein provided 19 ± 4% of energy. Mean dietary calcium intake was 852 ± 298 mg/day, which is below Australian recommendations. Less than one quarter of women reported taking calcium supplements and only 3% reported taking vitamin D supplements. Calcium supplements by average provided calcium 122 ± 427 mg/day and when this was taken into account, total calcium intake increased to 955 ± 504 mg/day, which remained 13% lower than the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR, 1,100 mg/day) for women of this age group. The women taking calcium supplements had a higher calcium intake (1501 ± 573 mg) compared with the women on diet alone (813 ± 347 mg). The results of this study indicate that the majority of elderly women were not meeting their calcium requirements from diet alone. In order to achieve the recommended dietary calcium intake, better strategies for promoting increased calcium, from both diet and calcium supplements appears to be needed. PMID:22254072

  17. Self-Setting Calcium Orthophosphate Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2013-01-01

    In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are bioactive and biodegradable grafting bioceramics in the form of a powder and a liquid. After mixing, both phases form pastes, which set and harden forming either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite or brushite. Since both of them are remarkably biocompartible, bioresorbable and osteoconductive, self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations appear to be promising bioceramics for bone grafting. Furthermore, such formulations possess excellent molding capabilities, easy manipulation and nearly perfect adaptation to the complex shapes of bone defects, followed by gradual bioresorption and new bone formation. In addition, reinforced formulations have been introduced, which might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The discovery of self-setting properties opened up a new era in the medical application of calcium orthophosphates and many commercial trademarks have been introduced as a result. Currently such formulations are widely used as synthetic bone grafts, with several advantages, such as pourability and injectability. Moreover, their low-temperature setting reactions and intrinsic porosity allow loading by drugs, biomolecules and even cells for tissue engineering purposes. In this review, an insight into the self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations, as excellent bioceramics suitable for both dental and bone grafting applications, has been provided. PMID:24956191

  18. Effects of nicergoline on calcium and magnesium deposition in the central nervous system tissues of rats maintained on low-calcium diets.

    PubMed

    Yasui, M; Kihira, T; Tsujimoto, M; Ota, K

    1992-11-01

    Reduction of calcium intake leads to the mobilization of calcium and magnesium from the bone pool and to calcium deposition in the soft tissues, especially in the central nervous system (CNS). The effects of 10 alpha-methoxy-1,6-dimethylergoline-8 beta-methanol 5-bromonicotinate (nicergoline), an ameliorator of cerebral circulation and metabolism, on the deposition of calcium and magnesium in the CNS, heart, liver, kidney, muscle, abdominal aorta and bones were studied in rats maintained on standard and low-calcium diets. Rats were fed the following diets for 90 days: standard calcium (12.5 g/kg); standard calcium with 60 mg/kg nicergoline; low-calcium (30 mg/kg); and low-calcium with 60 mg/kg nicergoline. The presence of nicergoline did not affect blood chemistry but magnesium concentrations in the liver were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in rats fed standard diet with nicergoline. Magnesium concentrations in the occipital cortex, pons, cerebellum, liver, kidney, muscle and femur of nicergoline-treated rats fed low-calcium diet were significantly (P < 0.01-0.05) higher compared with those in the corresponding controls, whereas the calcium concentrations in the femur of nicergoline-treated rats fed both standard and low-calcium diets were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those in the corresponding controls. In general, nicergoline tended to preserve the calcium content in the bone of rats fed a standard diet. Nicergoline may be implicated in calcium metabolism in rats fed low-calcium diets and may activate cerebral metabolism through the maintenance of magnesium concentrations in the CNS and soft tissues.

  19. 21 CFR 182.8223 - Calcium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pyrophosphate. 182.8223 Section 182.8223... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8223 Calcium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  20. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the Food...

  1. 21 CFR 182.8223 - Calcium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pyrophosphate. 182.8223 Section 182.8223... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8223 Calcium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  2. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate... additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic acid (4-(β,D-galactosido)-D-gluconic acid) produced by the...

  3. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate... additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic acid (4-(β,D-galactosido)-D-gluconic acid) produced by the...

  4. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic...

  5. 21 CFR 182.8223 - Calcium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pyrophosphate. 182.8223 Section 182.8223 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8223 Calcium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium...

  6. 21 CFR 182.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 182.6203 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  7. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the Food...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5201 - Calcium glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium glycerophosphate. 582.5201 Section 582.5201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5201 Calcium glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium glycerophosphate. (b...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5201 - Calcium glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium glycerophosphate. 582.5201 Section 582.5201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5201 Calcium glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium glycerophosphate. (b...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5201 - Calcium glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium glycerophosphate. 582.5201 Section 582.5201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5201 Calcium glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium glycerophosphate. (b...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5201 - Calcium glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium glycerophosphate. 582.5201 Section 582.5201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5201 Calcium glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium glycerophosphate. (b...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5201 - Calcium glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium glycerophosphate. 582.5201 Section 582.5201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5201 Calcium glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium glycerophosphate. (b...

  13. Seasonal Variations in Mercury's Dayside Calcium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MESSENGER spacecraft has observed calcium emission in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis since March 2011. During MESSENGER's primary and first extended missions (March 2011 - March 2013) the dayside calcium exosphere was measured over eight Mercury years. We have simulated these data with a Monte Carlo model of exospheric source processes to show that (a) there is a persistent source of energetic calcium located in the dawn equatorial region, (b) there is a seasonal dependence in the calcium source rate, and (c) there are no obvious year-to-year variations in the near-surface dayside calcium exosphere. Although the precise mechanism responsible for ejecting the calcium has not yet been determined, the most likely process is the dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules produced in micrometeoroid impact plumes to form energetic, escaping calcium atoms.

  14. Effect of potential renal acid load of foods on urinary citrate excretion in calcium renal stone formers.

    PubMed

    Trinchieri, Alberto; Lizzano, Renata; Marchesotti, Federica; Zanetti, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the potential renal acid load (PRAL) of the diet on the urinary risk factors for renal stone formation. The present series comprises 187 consecutive renal calcium stone patients (114 males, 73 females) who were studied in our stone clinic. Each patient was subjected to an investigation including a 24-h dietary record and 24-h urine sample taken over the same period. Nutrients and calories were calculated by means of food composition tables using a computerized procedure. Daily PRAL was calculated considering the mineral and protein composition of foods, the mean intestinal absorption rate for each nutrient and the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphate, oxalate, urate, citrate, and creatinine levels were measured in the urine. The mean daily PRAL was higher in male than in female patients (24.1+/-24.0 vs 16.1+/-20.1 mEq/day, P=0.000). A significantly (P=0.01) negative correlation (R=-0.18) was found between daily PRAL and daily urinary citrate, but no correlation between PRAL and urinary calcium, oxalate, and urate was shown. Daily urinary calcium (R=0.186, P=0.011) and uric acid (R=0.157, P=0.033) were significantly related to the dietary intake of protein. Daily urinary citrate was significantly related to the intakes of copper (R=0.178, P=0.015), riboflavin (R=0.20, P=0.006), piridoxine (R=0.169, P=0.021) and biotin (R=0.196, P=0.007). The regression analysis by stepwise selection confirmed the significant negative correlation between PRAL and urinary citrate (P=0.002) and the significant positive correlation between riboflavin and urinary citrate (P=0.000). Urinary citrate excretion of renal stone formers (RSFs) is highly dependent from dietary acid load. The computation of the renal acid load is advisable to investigate the role of diet in the pathogenesis of calcium stone disease and it is also a useful tool to evaluate the lithogenic potential of

  15. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J; Olgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/L and a fixed alfacalcidol dose for at least 2 months. All had previously tolerated therapy with calcium carbonate. Of the 19 patients included, 10 completed both treatment arms. After 12 weeks of therapy, the mean (+/-SEM) plasma ionized calcium level was significantly lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms. Supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate was not required during calcium ketoglutarate treatment, while two patients needed this supplement when treated with calcium carbonate. Five of 17 (29%) patients were withdrawn from calcium ketoglutarate therapy within 1 to 2 weeks due to intolerance (anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion into the study. Calculations based on median doses after 12 weeks showed that the cost of the therapy in Denmark was 10 times higher for calcium ketoglutarate compared with calcium

  16. Calcium Pumps and Interacting BON1 Protein Modulate Calcium Signature, Stomatal Closure, and Plant Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yongmei; Yang, Ziyuan; Yu, Huiyun; Li, Yun; Wang, Shu; Zou, Baohong; Xu, Dachao; Ma, Zhiqi

    2017-01-01

    Calcium signaling is essential for environmental responses including immune responses. Here, we provide evidence that the evolutionarily conserved protein BONZAI1 (BON1) functions together with autoinhibited calcium ATPase10 (ACA10) and ACA8 to regulate calcium signals in Arabidopsis. BON1 is a plasma membrane localized protein that negatively regulates the expression of immune receptor genes and positively regulates stomatal closure. We found that BON1 interacts with the autoinhibitory domains of ACA10 and ACA8, and the aca10 loss-of-function (LOF) mutants have an autoimmune phenotype similar to that of the bon1 LOF mutants. Genetic evidences indicate that BON1 positively regulates the activities of ACA10 and ACA8. Consistent with this idea, the steady level of calcium concentration is increased in both aca10 and bon1 mutants. Most strikingly, cytosolic calcium oscillation imposed by external calcium treatment was altered in aca10, aca8, and bon1 mutants in guard cells. In addition, calcium- and pathogen-induced stomatal closure was compromised in the aca10 and bon1 mutants. Taken together, this study indicates that ACA10/8 and BON1 physically interact on plasma membrane and function in the generation of cytosol calcium signatures that are critical for stomatal movement and impact plant immunity. PMID:28701352

  17. Calcium Overload Accelerates Phosphate-Induced Vascular Calcification Via Pit-1, but not the Calcium-Sensing Receptor.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Asuka; Sonou, Tomohiro; Ohya, Masaki; Yashiro, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Yuri; Okuda, Kouji; Iwashita, Yuko; Mima, Toru; Negi, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder is an important problem in patients with renal failure. Abnormal levels of serum phosphate and calcium affect CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder and contribute to bone disease, VC, and cardiovascular disease. Hypercalcemia is a contributing factor in progression of VC in patients with CKD. However, the mechanisms of how calcium promotes intracellular calcification are still unclear. This study aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcification in a rat aortic tissue culture model. Aortic segments from 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in serum-supplemented medium for 10 days. We added high calcium (HiCa; calcium 3.0 mM) to high phosphate (HPi; phosphate 3.8 mM) medium to accelerate phosphate and calcium-induced VC. We used phosphonoformic acid and the calcimimetic R-568 to determine whether the mechanism of calcification involves Pit-1 or the calcium-sensing receptor. Medial VC was significantly augmented by HPi+HiCa medium compared with HPi alone (300%, p<0.05), and was associated with upregulation of Pit-1 protein. Pit-1 protein concentrations in HPi+HiCa medium were greater than those in HPi medium. Phosphonoformic acid completely negated the augmentation of medial VC induced by HPi+HiCa. R-568 had no additive direct effect on medial VC. These results indicated that exposure to HPi+HiCa accelerates medial VC, and this is mediated through Pit-1, not the calcium-sensing receptor.

  18. Total flavonoids of Desmodium styracifolium attenuates the formation of hydroxy-L-proline-induced calcium oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianfu; Jin, Jing; Li, Xiong; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Qian; Li, Jing; Zhang, Qiuhong; Xiang, Songtao

    2018-06-01

    Desmosium styracifolium (D. styracifolium), which is considered as a Chinese herbal medicine, has been reported to treat the kidney stone diseases. However, the potential phytochemically active components and the underlying mechanisms associated with its efficacy in targeting urolithiasis remain to be elucidated. This study aims to investigate the anti-urolithiatic effect of total flavonoids of D. styracifolium (TFDS) on calcium oxalate (CaOx) renal stones in Sprague-Dawley rats. Animal models of CaOx urolithiasis were established in male Sprague-Dawley rats by adding 5% w/w hydroxy-L-proline (HLP) in regular rat chow. The TFDS orally at 100, 400 mg/kg, respectively, were administered along with HLP for 28 days. At the end of 28 days of treatment, urine and serum samples were collected for crystalluria determination and various biochemical analysis. Kidney tissues were isolated and processed for antioxidant parameters measurement and histopathological examinations. HLP-induced hyperoxaluria alone reliably caused CaOx nephrolithiasis in rats. We showed that TFDS significantly reduced crystalluria and CaOx crystal deposits in the kidney sections as compared to untreated HLP group. Also, TFDS was observed to decrease urinary oxalate excretion, alleviate the pro-acidosis condition, improve the impaired renal functions and renal epithelial cell injury. Moreover, TFDS protected against the oxidative stress changes via reducing MDA content, increasing CAT and GSH-Px activities in renal homogenate, as well as attenuating the expression of MCP-1, OPN and TGF-β proteins. These results indicated that TFDS had beneficial effect on inhibition of CaOx formation in the rat kidney probably through a combination of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, urine alkalinizing activities, and lowering the concentration of urinary stone-forming constituents. Thus, TFDS might have clinical implications in preventing oxidative renal cell injury and, ultimately, kidney stone formation. The

  19. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  20. Renal papillary calcification and the development of calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary renal calculi: a case series study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to determine in a case series (four patients) how calcified deposits in renal papillae are associated with the development of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) papillary calculi. Methods From the recently collected papillary calculi, we evaluated retrospectively patients, subjected to retrograde ureteroscopy, with COM papillary lithiasis. Results The COM papillary calculi were found to result from subepithelial injury. Many of these lesions underwent calcification by hydroxyapatite (HAP), with calculus morphology and the amount of HAP in the concave zone dependent on the location of the calcified injury. Most of these HAP deposits grew, eroding the epithelium covering the renal papillae, coming into contact with urine and starting the development of COM calculi. Subepithelial HAP plaques may alter the epithelium covering the papillae, resulting in the deposit of COM crystals directly onto the epithelium. Tissue calcification depends on a pre-existing injury, the continuation of this process is due to modulators and/or crystallization inhibitors deficiency. Conclusions Since calculus morphology and the amount of detected HAP are dependent on the location and widespread of calcified injury, all types of papillary COM calculi can be found in the same patient. All patients had subepithelial calcifications, with fewer papillary calculi, demonstrating that some subepithelial calcifications did not further evolve and were reabsorbed. A high number of subepithelial calcifications increases the likelihood that some will be transformed into COM papillary calculi. PMID:23497010

  1. 21 CFR 582.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 582.3189 Section 582.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3189 Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 582.3189 Section 582.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3189 Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 182.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 182.3189 Section 182.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. 21 CFR 182.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 182.3189 Section 182.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  5. 21 CFR 582.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 582.3189 Section 582.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3189 Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 182.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 182.3225 Section 182.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  7. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  8. 21 CFR 582.6219 - Calcium phytate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phytate. 582.6219 Section 582.6219 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium phytate. (a) Product. Calcium phytate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  9. 21 CFR 582.6197 - Calcium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium diacetate. 582.6197 Section 582.6197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium diacetate. (a) Product. Calcium diacetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  10. 21 CFR 182.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium sorbate. 182.3225 Section 182.3225 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  11. 21 CFR 582.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 582.3189 Section 582.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3189 Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  13. 21 CFR 582.6219 - Calcium phytate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phytate. 582.6219 Section 582.6219 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium phytate. (a) Product. Calcium phytate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  14. 21 CFR 582.3221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 582.3221 Section 582.3221 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3221 Calcium propionate. (a) Product. Calcium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.6197 - Calcium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium diacetate. 582.6197 Section 582.6197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium diacetate. (a) Product. Calcium diacetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Product. Calcium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 582.1199 Section 582.1199 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1199 Calcium gluconate. (a) Product. Calcium gluconate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. 21 CFR 582.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 582.3189 Section 582.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3189 Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  2. 21 CFR 582.6199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 582.6199 Section 582.6199 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium gluconate. (a) Product. Calcium gluconate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  3. 21 CFR 582.6199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 582.6199 Section 582.6199 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium gluconate. (a) Product. Calcium gluconate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. 21 CFR 182.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 182.3189 Section 182.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  5. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  8. 21 CFR 182.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium ascorbate. 182.3189 Section 182.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  9. 21 CFR 582.6195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.6195 Section 582.6195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  10. 21 CFR 182.6197 - Calcium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium diacetate. 182.6197 Section 182.6197 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6197 Calcium diacetate. (a) Product. Calcium diacetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  12. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  14. 21 CFR 582.3221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 582.3221 Section 582.3221 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3221 Calcium propionate. (a) Product. Calcium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.6195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.6195 Section 582.6195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  16. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  17. 21 CFR 182.6197 - Calcium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium diacetate. 182.6197 Section 182.6197 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6197 Calcium diacetate. (a) Product. Calcium diacetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  18. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono...

  19. 21 CFR 582.6199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 582.6199 Section 582.6199 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium gluconate. (a) Product. Calcium gluconate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  20. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  1. 21 CFR 582.6197 - Calcium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium diacetate. 582.6197 Section 582.6197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium diacetate. (a) Product. Calcium diacetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  3. 21 CFR 582.3221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 582.3221 Section 582.3221 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3221 Calcium propionate. (a) Product. Calcium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  5. 21 CFR 582.6219 - Calcium phytate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phytate. 582.6219 Section 582.6219 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium phytate. (a) Product. Calcium phytate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  6. 21 CFR 182.6197 - Calcium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium diacetate. 182.6197 Section 182.6197 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6197 Calcium diacetate. (a) Product. Calcium diacetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  7. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  8. 21 CFR 582.6199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 582.6199 Section 582.6199 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium gluconate. (a) Product. Calcium gluconate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  10. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  11. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  12. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  13. 21 CFR 582.6195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.6195 Section 582.6195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  14. 21 CFR 582.6199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 582.6199 Section 582.6199 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium gluconate. (a) Product. Calcium gluconate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  15. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  16. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  17. 21 CFR 582.6219 - Calcium phytate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phytate. 582.6219 Section 582.6219 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium phytate. (a) Product. Calcium phytate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.6195 Section 582.6195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  19. 21 CFR 582.6195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.6195 Section 582.6195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  20. 21 CFR 182.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 182.3225 Section 182.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate...