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Sample records for calcium regulate nuclear

  1. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  2. Calcium-regulated nuclear enzymes: potential mediators of phytochrome-induced changes in nuclear metabolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium ions have been proposed to serve as important regulatory elements in stimulus-response coupling for phytochrome responses. An important test of this hypothesis will be to identify specific targets of calcium action that are required for some growth or development process induced by the photoactivated form of phytochrome (Pfr). Initial studies have revealed that there are at least two enzymes in pea nuclei that are stimulated by Pfr in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, a calmodulin-regulated nucleoside triphosphatase and a calmodulin-independent but Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase. The nucleoside triphosphatase appears to be associated with the nuclear envelope, while the protein kinase co-purifies with a nuclear fraction highly enriched for chromatin. This short review summarizes the latest findings on these enzymes and relates them to what is known about Pfr-regulated nuclear metabolism.

  3. Calcium-regulated nuclear enzymes: potential mediators of phytochrome-induced changes in nuclear metabolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium ions have been proposed to serve as important regulatory elements in stimulus-response coupling for phytochrome responses. An important test of this hypothesis will be to identify specific targets of calcium action that are required for some growth or development process induced by the photoactivated form of phytochrome (Pfr). Initial studies have revealed that there are at least two enzymes in pea nuclei that are stimulated by Pfr in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, a calmodulin-regulated nucleoside triphosphatase and a calmodulin-independent but Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase. The nucleoside triphosphatase appears to be associated with the nuclear envelope, while the protein kinase co-purifies with a nuclear fraction highly enriched for chromatin. This short review summarizes the latest findings on these enzymes and relates them to what is known about Pfr-regulated nuclear metabolism.

  4. Nuclear BK Channels Regulate Gene Expression via the Control of Nuclear Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Boxing; Jie, Wei; Huang, Lianyan; Wei, Peng; Li, Shuji; Luo, Zhengyi; Friedman, Allyson K.; Meredith, Andrea L.; Han, Ming-Hu; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the regulation of neuronal functions. The significance of plasma membrane, mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum, and lysosomal ion channels in the regulation of Ca2+ is well established. In contrast, surprisingly less is known about the function of ion channels on the nuclear envelope (NE). Here we demonstrate the presence of functional large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK channels) on the NE of rodent hippocampal neurons. Functionally blockade of nuclear BK channels (nBK channels) induces NE-derived Ca2+ release, nucleoplasmic Ca2+ elevation, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. More importantly, blockade of nBK channels regulates nuclear Ca2+-sensitive gene expression and promotes dendritic arborization in a nuclear Ca2+-dependent manner. These results suggest that nBK channel functions as a molecular linker between neuronal activity and nuclear Ca2+ to convey the signals from synapse to nucleus and is a new modulator for synaptic activity-dependent neuronal functions at the NE level. PMID:24952642

  5. Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate-dependent nuclear calcium signals regulate angiogenesis and cell motility in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Erika; Machado, Rodrigo; Fonseca, Matheus de Castro; França, Andressa; Carvalho, Clarissa; Araújo E Silva, Ana Cândida; Almeida, Brígida; Cassini, Puebla; Hissa, Bárbara; Drumond, Luciana; Gonçalves, Carlos; Fernandes, Gabriel; De Brot, Marina; Moraes, Márcio; Barcelos, Lucíola; Ortega, José Miguel; Oliveira, André; Leite, M Fátima

    2017-01-01

    Increases in nuclear calcium concentration generate specific biological outcomes that differ from those resulting from increased cytoplasmic calcium. Nuclear calcium effects on tumor cell proliferation are widely appreciated; nevertheless, its involvement in other steps of tumor progression is not well understood. Therefore, we evaluated whether nuclear calcium is essential in other additional stages of tumor progression, including key steps associated with the formation of the primary tumor or with the metastatic cascade. We found that nuclear calcium buffering impaired 4T1 triple negative breast cancer growth not just by decreasing tumor cell proliferation, but also by enhancing tumor necrosis. Moreover, nuclear calcium regulates tumor angiogenesis through a mechanism that involves the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10-IP10). In addition, nuclear calcium buffering regulates breast tumor cell motility, culminating in less cell invasion, likely due to enhanced vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Together, our results show that nuclear calcium is essential for triple breast cancer angiogenesis and cell migration and can be considered as a promising strategic target for triple negative breast cancer therapy.

  6. Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate-dependent nuclear calcium signals regulate angiogenesis and cell motility in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Matheus de Castro; França, Andressa; Carvalho, Clarissa; Araújo e Silva, Ana Cândida; Almeida, Brígida; Cassini, Puebla; Hissa, Bárbara; Drumond, Luciana; Gonçalves, Carlos; Fernandes, Gabriel; De Brot, Marina; Moraes, Márcio; Barcelos, Lucíola; Ortega, José Miguel; Oliveira, André; Leite, M. Fátima

    2017-01-01

    Increases in nuclear calcium concentration generate specific biological outcomes that differ from those resulting from increased cytoplasmic calcium. Nuclear calcium effects on tumor cell proliferation are widely appreciated; nevertheless, its involvement in other steps of tumor progression is not well understood. Therefore, we evaluated whether nuclear calcium is essential in other additional stages of tumor progression, including key steps associated with the formation of the primary tumor or with the metastatic cascade. We found that nuclear calcium buffering impaired 4T1 triple negative breast cancer growth not just by decreasing tumor cell proliferation, but also by enhancing tumor necrosis. Moreover, nuclear calcium regulates tumor angiogenesis through a mechanism that involves the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10-IP10). In addition, nuclear calcium buffering regulates breast tumor cell motility, culminating in less cell invasion, likely due to enhanced vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Together, our results show that nuclear calcium is essential for triple breast cancer angiogenesis and cell migration and can be considered as a promising strategic target for triple negative breast cancer therapy. PMID:28376104

  7. Cross-talk between ROS and calcium in regulation of nuclear activities.

    PubMed

    Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice; Lamotte, Olivier; Bourque, Stéphane

    2010-07-01

    Calcium and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are acknowledged as crucial second messengers involved in the response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However, it is still not clear how these two compounds can play a role in different signaling pathways leading the plant to a variety of processes such as root development or defense against pathogens. Recently, it has been shown that the concept of calcium and ROS signatures, initially discovered in the cytoplasm, can also be extended to the nucleus of plant cells. In addition, it has been clearly proved that both ROS and calcium signals are intimately interconnected. How this cross-talk can finally modulate the translocation and/or the activity of nuclear proteins leading to the control of specific genes expression is the main focus of this review. We will especially focus on how calcium and ROS interact at the molecular level to modify their targets.

  8. A nuclear calcium-sensing pathway is critical for gene regulation and salt stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingmei; Wu, Jianmin; Yue, Xiule; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhu, Jianhua

    2013-08-01

    Salt stress is an important environmental factor that significantly limits crop productivity worldwide. Studies on responses of plants to salt stress in recent years have identified novel signaling pathways and have been at the forefront of plant stress biology and plant biology in general. Thus far, research on salt stress in plants has been focused on cytoplasmic signaling pathways. In this study, we discovered a nuclear calcium-sensing and signaling pathway that is critical for salt stress tolerance in the reference plant Arabidopsis. Through a forward genetic screen, we found a nuclear-localized calcium-binding protein, RSA1 (SHORT ROOT IN SALT MEDIUM 1), which is required for salt tolerance, and identified its interacting partner, RITF1, a bHLH transcription factor. We show that RSA1 and RITF1 regulate the transcription of several genes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species generated by salt stress and that they also regulate the SOS1 gene that encodes a plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter essential for salt tolerance. Together, our results suggest the existence of a novel nuclear calcium-sensing and -signaling pathway that is important for gene regulation and salt stress tolerance.

  9. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    PubMed Central

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  10. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S.; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  12. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-01-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain. PMID:806311

  13. Extracellular magnesium regulates nuclear and perinuclear free ionized calcium in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: possible relation to alcohol and central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Altura, B M; Zhang, A; Cheng, T P; Altura, B T

    2001-02-01

    Quantitative digital imaging microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and multiple molecular fluorescent probes were utilized to test the hypothesis that cerebral vascular muscle cell nuclear ([Ca(2+)](n)), perinuclear ([Ca(2+)](pn)), and cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) levels are regulated by the concentration of extracellular free magnesium ions ([Mg(2+)](o)). Primary cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells were loaded with either fura-2/AM, indo-1/AM, or fluo-3/AM, and the subcellular Ca(2+) responses to stepwise reduction in [Mg(2+)](o) (i.e., from 1.36 to 0.17 mM) were analyzed over time. With normal 1.36 mM [Mg(2+)](o)-containing incubation media, basal mean [Ca(2+)](i) was 89.6+/-15 nM. Lowering [Mg(2+)](o) to 1.07, 0.88, 0.48, and 0.17 mM resulted in rapid (<4 min) increments in [Ca(2+)](i) going to 213+/-43, 368+/-67, 471+/-77, and 642+/-98 nM, respectively; the longer the exposure time (up to 30 min) to lowered [Mg(2+)](o), the higher the [Ca(2+)](i). Restoration of [Mg(2+)](o) to normal caused decreases in [Ca(2+)](i) to 215.9+/-42.3 nM, but only complete removal of [Ca(2+)](o) returned [Ca(2+)](i) to basal levels. Results show that basal [Ca(2+)](pn) (282+/-92 nM) exceeds basal cytoplasmic Ca(2+) (61+/-27.8 nM) and [Ca(2+)](n) (20+/-7.6 nM). However, reduction of normal [Mg(2+)](o) to 0.48 mM resulted in dramatic, rapid rises in all subcellular compartments, where [Ca(2+)](pn) (1503+/-102 nM)>cytoplasmic Ca(2+) (688+/-49 nM) approximately equal to [Ca(2+)](n) (674+/-12 nM). Nuclear Ca(2+) rose dramatically (e.g., 35-40 times basal levels). Both verapamil (1 microM) and Ni(2+) (5 mM) prevented, completely, the rises in Ca(2+) in all compartments, suggesting that Mg(2+)-dependent Ca(2+) accumulation may be dependent on nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi, and cytoplasmic L-type voltage membrane-regulated Ca(2+) channels. The normally low [Ca(2+)](n) suggests that Ca(2+) does not transport passively across the nuclear

  14. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} subunit in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S.; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca{sub v}) β{sub 1a} subunit (Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}) plays an important role in excitation–contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160–244 aa) and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} NH{sub 2}-terminus (1–99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. - Highlights: • Previously, we demonstrated that Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} is a gene transcription regulator. • Here, we show that TnT3 interacts with Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}. • We mapped TnT3 and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} interaction domain. • TnT3 facilitates Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} nuclear enrichment. • The two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation.

  15. Restructuring nuclear regulations.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Kenneth L

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear regulations are a subset of social regulations (laws to control activities that may negatively impact the environment, health, and safety) that concern control of ionizing radiation from radiation-producing equipment and from radioactive materials. The impressive safety record among nuclear technologies is due, in no small part, to the work of radiation safety professionals and to a protection system that has kept pace with the rapid technologic advancements in electric power generation, engineering, and medicine. The price of success, however, has led to a regulatory organization and philosophy characterized by complexity, confusion, public fear, and increasing economic costs. Over the past 20 years, regulatory costs in the nuclear sector have increased more than 250% in constant 1995 U.S. dollars. Costs of regulatory compliance can be reduced sharply, particularly when health and environmental benefits of risk reduction are questionable. Three key regulatory areas should be closely examined and modified to improve regulatory effectiveness and efficiency: a) radiation protection should be changed from a risk-based to dose-based system; b) the U.S. government should adopt the modern metric system (International System of Units), and radiation quantities and units should be simplified to facilitate international communication and public understanding; and c) a single, independent office is needed to coordinate nuclear regulations established by U.S. federal agencies and departments.

  16. 5-Flurouracil disrupts nuclear export and nuclear pore permeability in a calcium dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Higby, Kelly J; Bischak, Melissa M; Campbell, Christina A; Anderson, Rebecca G; Broskin, Sarah A; Foltz, Lauren E; Koper, Jarrett A; Nickle, Audrey C; Resendes, Karen K

    2017-03-01

    Regulation of nuclear transport is an essential component of apoptosis. As chemotherapy induced cell death progresses, nuclear transport and the nuclear pore complex (NPC) are slowly disrupted and dismantled. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and the camptothecin derivatives irinotecan and topotecan, are linked to altered nuclear transport of specific proteins; however, their general effects on the NPC and transport during apoptosis have not been characterized. We demonstrate that 5-FU, but not topotecan, increases NPC permeability, and disrupts Ran-mediated nuclear transport before the disruption of the NPC. This increased permeability is dependent on increased cellular calcium, as the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM, abolishes the effect. Furthermore, increased calcium alone was sufficient to disrupt the Ran gradient. Combination treatments of 5-FU with topotecan or irinotecan, similarly disrupted nuclear transport before disassembly of the NPC. In both single and combination treatments nuclear transport was disrupted before caspase 9 activation, indicating that 5-FU induces an early caspase-independent increase in NPC permeability and alteration of nuclear transport. Because Crm1-mediated nuclear export of tumor suppressors is linked to drug resistance we also examined the effect of 5-FU on the nuclear export of a specific target, topoisomerase. 5-FU treatment led to accumulation of topoisomerase in the nucleus and recovered the loss nuclear topoisomerase induced by irinotecan or topotecan, a known cause of drug resistance. Furthermore, 5-FU retains its ability to cause nuclear accumulation of p53 in the presence of irinotecan or topotecan. Our results reveal a new mechanism of action for these therapeutics during apoptosis, opening the door to other potential combination chemotherapies that employ 5-FU as a calcium mediated inhibitor of Crm1-induced nuclear export of tumor suppressors.

  17. Calcium regulation in endosymbiotic organelles of plants.

    PubMed

    Bussemer, Johanna; Vothknecht, Ute C; Chigri, Fatima

    2009-09-01

    In plant cells calcium-dependent signaling pathways are involved in a large array of biological processes in response to hormones, biotic/abiotic stress signals and a variety of developmental cues. This is generally achieved through binding of calcium to diverse calcium-sensing proteins, which subsequently control downstream events by activating or inhibiting biochemical reactions. Regulation by calcium is considered as a eukaryotic trait and has not been described for prokaryotes. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence indicating that organelles of prokaryotic origin, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria, are integrated into the calcium-signaling network of the cell. An important transducer of calcium in these organelles appears to be calmodulin. In this review we want to give an overview over present data showing that endosymbiotic organelles harbour calcium-dependent biological processes with a focus on calmodulin-regulation.

  18. Regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy by calcium.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Soni; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; García, Lorena; Morselli, Eugenia; Cifuentes, Mariana; Quest, Andrew F G; Hill, Joseph A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2016-04-15

    Calcium signaling plays a crucial role in a multitude of events within the cardiomyocyte, including cell cycle control, growth, apoptosis, and autophagy. With respect to calcium-dependent regulation of autophagy, ion channels and exchangers, receptors, and intracellular mediators play fundamental roles. In this review, we discuss calcium-dependent regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy, a lysosomal mechanism that is often cytoprotective, serving to defend against disease-related stress and nutrient insufficiency. We also highlight the importance of the subcellular distribution of calcium and related proteins, interorganelle communication, and other key signaling events that govern cardiomyocyte autophagy.

  19. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  20. Calcium Regulation of an Actin Spring

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Barney K.; Shin, Jennifer H.; Pfeiffer, Emily; Matsudaira, P.; Mahadevan, L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Calcium is essential for many biological processes involved in cellular motility. However, the pathway by which calcium influences motility, in processes such as muscle contraction and neuronal growth, is often indirect and complex. We establish a simple and direct mechanochemical link that shows how calcium quantitatively regulates the dynamics of a primitive motile system, the actin-based acrosomal bundle of horseshoe crab sperm. The extension of this bundle requires the continuous presence of external calcium. Furthermore, the extension rate increases with calcium concentration, but at a given concentration, we find that the volumetric rate of extension is constant. Our experiments and theory suggest that calcium sequentially binds to calmodulin molecules decorating the actin filaments. This binding leads to a collective wave of untwisting of the actin filaments that drives bundle extension. PMID:19686660

  1. Nuclear calcium sensors reveal that repetition of trains of synaptic stimuli boosts nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, C Peter; Freitag, H Eckehard; Weislogel, Jan-Marek; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-12-15

    Nuclear calcium is a key signal in the dialogue between synapse and nucleus that controls the genomic responses required for persistent adaptations, including memory and acquired neuroprotection. The amplitude and duration of nuclear calcium transients specify activity-induced transcriptional changes. However, the precise relationship between synaptic input and nuclear calcium output is unknown. Here, we used stereotaxic delivery to the rat brain of recombinant adeno-associated viruses encoding nuclear-targeted calcium sensors to assess nuclear calcium transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons after stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals. We show that in acute hippocampal slices, a burst of synaptic activity elicits a nuclear calcium signal with a regenerative component at above-threshold stimulation intensities. Using classical stimulation paradigms (i.e., high-frequency stimulation (HFS) and θ burst stimulation (TBS)) to induce early LTP (E-LTP) and transcription-dependent late LTP (L-LTP), we found that the magnitude of nuclear calcium signals and the number of action potentials activated by synaptic stimulation trains are greatly amplified by their repetition. Nuclear calcium signals and action potential generation were reduced by blockade of either NMDA receptors or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, but not by procedures that lead to internal calcium store depletion or by blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptors. These findings identify a repetition-induced switch in nuclear calcium signaling that correlates with the transition from E-LTP to L-LTP, and may explain why the transcription-dependent phase of L-LTP is not induced by a single HFS or TBS but requires repeated trains of activity. Recombinant, nuclear-targeted indicators may prove useful for further analysis of nuclear calcium signaling in vivo.

  2. Nuclear Calcium Sensors Reveal that Repetition of Trains of Synaptic Stimuli Boosts Nuclear Calcium Signaling in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bengtson, C. Peter; Freitag, H. Eckehard; Weislogel, Jan-Marek; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear calcium is a key signal in the dialogue between synapse and nucleus that controls the genomic responses required for persistent adaptations, including memory and acquired neuroprotection. The amplitude and duration of nuclear calcium transients specify activity-induced transcriptional changes. However, the precise relationship between synaptic input and nuclear calcium output is unknown. Here, we used stereotaxic delivery to the rat brain of recombinant adeno-associated viruses encoding nuclear-targeted calcium sensors to assess nuclear calcium transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons after stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals. We show that in acute hippocampal slices, a burst of synaptic activity elicits a nuclear calcium signal with a regenerative component at above-threshold stimulation intensities. Using classical stimulation paradigms (i.e., high-frequency stimulation (HFS) and θ burst stimulation (TBS)) to induce early LTP (E-LTP) and transcription-dependent late LTP (L-LTP), we found that the magnitude of nuclear calcium signals and the number of action potentials activated by synaptic stimulation trains are greatly amplified by their repetition. Nuclear calcium signals and action potential generation were reduced by blockade of either NMDA receptors or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, but not by procedures that lead to internal calcium store depletion or by blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptors. These findings identify a repetition-induced switch in nuclear calcium signaling that correlates with the transition from E-LTP to L-LTP, and may explain why the transcription-dependent phase of L-LTP is not induced by a single HFS or TBS but requires repeated trains of activity. Recombinant, nuclear-targeted indicators may prove useful for further analysis of nuclear calcium signaling in vivo. PMID:21156150

  3. Nuclear translocation of the cardiac L-type calcium channel C-terminus is regulated by sex and 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodzadeh, S; Haase, H; Sporbert, A; Rharass, T; Panáková, D; Morano, I

    2016-08-01

    The cardiac voltage gated l-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav1.2) constitutes the main entrance gate for Ca(2+) that triggers cardiac contraction. Several studies showed that the distal C-terminus fragment of Cav1.2 α1C subunit (α1C-dCT) is proteolytically cleaved and shuttles between the plasma membrane and the nucleus, which is regulated both developmentally and by Ca(2+). However, the effects of sex and sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2, estrogen) on α1C-dCT nuclear translocation are still unexplored. To investigate the sexual disparity in the α1C-dCT nuclear translocation, we first generated an antibody directed against a synthetic peptide (GRRASFHLE) located in α1C-dCT, and used it to probe ventricular myocytes from adult female and male mice. Immunocytochemistry of isolated mouse primary adult ventricular myocytes revealed both nuclear staining and cytosolic punctuate staining around the T-tubules. The ratio of nuclear to cytosolic intensity (Inuc/Icyt) was significantly higher in isolated female cardiomyocytes (1.42±0.05) compared to male cardiomyocytes (1.05±0.02). Western blot analysis of nuclear fraction confirmed these data. Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in nuclear staining intensity of α1C-dCT in both female and male cardiomyocytes upon serum withdrawal for 18h (Inuc/Icyt 1.05±0.02 and 0.89±0.02, respectively). Interestingly, subsequent E2 treatment (10(-8)M) for 8h normalized the intracellular distribution of α1C-dCT in male cardiomyocytes (Inuc/Icyt 1.04±0.02), but not in female cardiomyocytes. Acute treatment of male cardiomyocytes with E2 for 45min revealed a similar effect. This effect of E2 was revised by ICI indicating the involvement of ER in this signaling pathway. Taken together, our results showed that the shuttling of α1C-CT in cardiomyocytes is regulated in a sex-dependent manner, and E2-activated ER may play a role in the nuclear shuttling of α1C-dCT in male cardiomyocytes. This may explain, at least partly, the observed

  4. Optical control of calcium-regulated exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Serra, Mercè; Trauner, Dirk; Llobet, Artur; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-03-01

    Neurons signal to each other and to non-neuronal cells as those in muscle or glands, by means of the secretion of neurotransmitters at chemical synapses. In order to dissect the molecular mechanisms of neurotransmission, new methods for directly and reversibly triggering neurosecretion at the presynaptic terminal are necessary. Here we exploit the calcium permeability of the light-gated channel LiGluR in order to reversibly manipulate cytosolic calcium concentration, thus controlling calcium-regulated exocytosis. Bovine chromaffin cells expressing LiGluR were stimulated with light. Exocytic events were detected by amperometry or by whole-cell patch-clamp to quantify membrane capacitance and calcium influx. Amperometry reveals that optical stimulation consistently triggers exocytosis in chromaffin cells. Secretion of catecholamines can be adjusted between zero and several Hz by changing the wavelength of illumination. Differences in secretion efficacy are found between the activation of LiGluR and native voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Our results show that the distance between sites of calcium influx and vesicles ready to be released is longer when calcium influx is triggered by LiGluR instead of native VGCCs. LiGluR activation directly and reversibly increases the intracellular calcium concentration. Light-gated calcium influx allows for the first time to control calcium-regulated exocytosis without the need of applying depolarizing solutions or voltage clamping in chromaffin cells. LiGluR is a useful tool to study the secretory mechanisms and their spatiotemporal patterns in neurotransmission, and opens a window to study other calcium-dependent processes such as muscular contraction or cell migration.

  5. Calcium regulates FGF-23 expression in bone.

    PubMed

    David, Valentin; Dai, Bing; Martin, Aline; Huang, Jinsong; Han, Xiaobin; Quarles, L Darryl

    2013-12-01

    Calcium has recently been shown to regulate fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), a bone-derived phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone. To better understand the regulation of FGF-23 by calcium, phosphorus, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D], and PTH, we examined FGF-23 expression under basal conditions and in response to PTH, doxercalciferol, or high-calcium diet treatment in Gcm2(-/-) and Cyp27b1(-/-) mutant mice. Gcm2(-/-) mice exhibited low serum PTH and 1,25(OH)2D concentrations, hypocalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia, whereas Cyp27b1(-/-) mice had high PTH, undetectable 1,25(OH)2D, hypocalcemia, and hypophosphatemia. Serum FGF-23 levels were decreased in both mutant models. Doxercalciferol administration increased serum FGF-23 levels in both mutant models. PTH administration to Gcm2(-/-) mice also increased serum FGF-23 levels, in association with an increase in both 1,25(OH)2D and calcium concentrations. Multiple regression analysis of pooled data indicated that changes in FGF-23 were positively correlated with serum calcium and 1,25(OH)2D but not related to changes in serum phosphate concentrations. A high-calcium diet also increased serum FGF-23 concentrations in Cyp27b1(-/-) mice in the absence of 1,25(OH)2D and in Gcm2(-/-) mice with low PTH. The addition of calcium to the culture media also stimulated FGF-23 message expression in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In addition, FGF-23 promoter activity in cultured osteoblasts was inhibited by the L-calcium-channel inhibitor nifedipine and stimulated by calcium ionophores. The effects of chronic low calcium to prevent 1,25(OH)2D and PTH stimulation of FGF-23 in these mutant mouse models suggest that suppression of FGF-23 plays an important physiological adaptive response to hypocalcemia.

  6. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations.

  8. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  9. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  10. Essential infrastructure: national nuclear regulation.

    PubMed

    Paperiello, Carl J

    2011-01-01

    In order for nuclear power to expand to many countries that do not currently have it, it will be essential for these countries to have laws, regulations, guidance and organizations that can license or permit nuclear power plants and support nuclear facilities, ensure compliance by inspection, and enforce nuclear regulations. The viability of nuclear power worldwide depends on an extremely high level of safety everywhere, and compliance with a number of international treaties is required before supplier nations will provide the material, both hardware and software, to build and operate nuclear power plants. While infrastructure support can be obtained from the IAEA and other countries, an essential core of expertise must exist in the country seeking to establish domestic nuclear power generation. While some reliance can be placed on the safety reviews of standard reactor designs by the nuclear regulators in supplier nations, the certification of fuel design, the quality of instruments, and the matching of a new reactor to a proposed site in the importing nation will require site-specific reviews. National arrangements are also needed for emergency preparedness, environmental protection, fuel transportation and the storage, transportation and disposal of radioactive waste. If foreign contractors and consultants are engaged to perform much of the technical work for the regulatory body(s) that has to be performed by the importing nation, that nation must have a core cadre of technically knowledgeable regulators and an organization to provide management and oversight of the contractors and consultants. Consistency in national nuclear regulations, the deployment of standardized nuclear power plant designs and standardized supporting material infrastructure can promote the safe and secure worldwide growth in nuclear power. Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  11. Calcium Regulates FGF-23 Expression in Bone

    PubMed Central

    David, Valentin; Dai, Bing; Martin, Aline; Huang, Jinsong; Han, Xiaobin

    2013-01-01

    Calcium has recently been shown to regulate fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), a bone-derived phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone. To better understand the regulation of FGF-23 by calcium, phosphorus, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D], and PTH, we examined FGF-23 expression under basal conditions and in response to PTH, doxercalciferol, or high-calcium diet treatment in Gcm2−/− and Cyp27b1−/− mutant mice. Gcm2−/− mice exhibited low serum PTH and 1,25(OH)2D concentrations, hypocalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia, whereas Cyp27b1−/− mice had high PTH, undetectable 1,25(OH)2D, hypocalcemia, and hypophosphatemia. Serum FGF-23 levels were decreased in both mutant models. Doxercalciferol administration increased serum FGF-23 levels in both mutant models. PTH administration to Gcm2−/− mice also increased serum FGF-23 levels, in association with an increase in both 1,25(OH)2D and calcium concentrations. Multiple regression analysis of pooled data indicated that changes in FGF-23 were positively correlated with serum calcium and 1,25(OH)2D but not related to changes in serum phosphate concentrations. A high-calcium diet also increased serum FGF-23 concentrations in Cyp27b1−/− mice in the absence of 1,25(OH)2D and in Gcm2−/− mice with low PTH. The addition of calcium to the culture media also stimulated FGF-23 message expression in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In addition, FGF-23 promoter activity in cultured osteoblasts was inhibited by the L-calcium-channel inhibitor nifedipine and stimulated by calcium ionophores. The effects of chronic low calcium to prevent 1,25(OH)2D and PTH stimulation of FGF-23 in these mutant mouse models suggest that suppression of FGF-23 plays an important physiological adaptive response to hypocalcemia. PMID:24140714

  12. Sumoylation regulates nuclear localization of repressor DREAM.

    PubMed

    Palczewska, Malgorzata; Casafont, Iñigo; Ghimire, Kedar; Rojas, Ana M; Valencia, Alfonso; Lafarga, Miguel; Mellström, Britt; Naranjo, Jose R

    2011-05-01

    DREAM is a Ca(2+)-binding protein with specific functions in different cell compartments. In the nucleus, DREAM acts as a transcriptional repressor, although the mechanism that controls its nuclear localization is unknown. Yeast two-hybrid assay revealed the interaction between DREAM and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and bioinformatic analysis identified four sumoylation-susceptible sites in the DREAM sequence. Single K-to-R mutations at positions K26 and K90 prevented in vitro sumoylation of recombinant DREAM. DREAM sumoylation mutants retained the ability to bind to the DRE sequence but showed reduced nuclear localization and failed to regulate DRE-dependent transcription. In PC12 cells, sumoylated DREAM is present exclusively in the nucleus and neuronal differentiation induced nuclear accumulation of sumoylated DREAM. In fully differentiated trigeminal neurons, DREAM and SUMO-1 colocalized in nuclear domains associated with transcription. Our results show that sumoylation regulates the nuclear localization of DREAM in differentiated neurons. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear phosphoinositide regulation of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Bree L; Blind, Raymond D

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipid signaling has clear connections to a wide array of cellular processes, particularly in gene expression and in controlling the chromatin biology of cells. However, most of the work elucidating how phospholipid signaling pathways contribute to cellular physiology have studied cytoplasmic membranes, while relatively little attention has been paid to the role of phospholipid signaling in the nucleus. Recent work from several labs has shown that nuclear phospholipid signaling can have important roles that are specific to this cellular compartment. This review focuses on the nuclear phospholipid functions and the activities of phospholipid signaling enzymes that regulate metazoan chromatin and gene expression. In particular, we highlight the roles that nuclear phosphoinositides play in several nuclear-driven physiological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and gene expression. Taken together, the recent discovery of several specifically nuclear phospholipid functions could have dramatic impact on our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that enable tight control of cellular physiology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  15. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces.

    PubMed

    Wienholtz, F; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-06-20

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes (40)Ca and (48)Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of (51)Ca and (52)Ca have been validated by direct measurements, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes (53)Ca and (54)Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our theoretical calculations. These results increase our understanding of neutron-rich matter and pin down the subtle components of nuclear forces that are at the forefront of theoretical developments constrained by quantum chromodynamics.

  16. [Calcium-regulated photoproteins of marine coelenterates].

    PubMed

    Vysotskiĭ, E S; Markova, S V; Frank, L A

    2006-01-01

    Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins are bioluminescent proteins responsible for bioluminescence of marine coelenterates. The photoprotein molecule is a stable enzyme-substrate complex consisting of a single polypeptide chain and an oxygen "pre-activated" substrate, 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine, which is tightly but non-covalently bound with a protein. The bioluminescence is triggered by calcium ions and originates from an oxidative decarboxylation of a protein bound substrate. The review provides current data on the photoproteins structure, the mechanism of bioluminescent reaction, the function of some amino acid residues of an active site in the catalysis and the formation of the emitter, as well as on applications of these proteins in a bioluminescent analysis.

  17. Regulation of calcium metabolism during prolonged antiorthostatic hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigoryev, A. I.; Morukov, B. V.; Dorokhova, B. R.; Rustamyan, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of the regulation of calcium exchange in healthy persons exposed to 182 days of antiorthostatic hypokinesia are investigated. Total calcium concentrations, ionized calcium activities and parathyroid hormone concentrations in blood serum were determined, before, during, and up to 15 days after a 182-day period of strict bed rest at a head down tilt of 4 deg; and tests of blood urine responses to a calcium lactate stress were performed to study the role of the kidneys. An increase in calcium ion activity is observed during the period of hypokinesia, while total calcium concentrations changed to a lesser degree. Plasma parathyroid hormone levels are found to significantly exceed background levels during hypokinesia and in the recovery period immediately following. Finally, the increase in calcium excretion in the urine during prolonged limitations of muscular activity is found to be connected with both an enhancement of calcium filtration and a decrease in its reabsorption in the kidneys, possibly due to changes in hormonal regulation.

  18. Regulation of protein degradation in muscle by calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Kameyama, Tsuneo; Matsumoto, Kazue; Bernstein, Paul; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulation of intracellular protein degradation was studied in isolated rat skeletal muscles incubated in vitro in the presence of a large variety of agents known to affect calcium movement and distribution. The effect of different classes of protease inhibitors was tested to determine the responsible proteolytic systems involved in calcium-dependent degradation. The results suggest that nonlysosomal leupetin- and E-64-c-sensitive proteases are resposible for calcium-dependent proteolysis in muscle.

  19. Regulation of protein degradation in muscle by calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Kameyama, Tsuneo; Matsumoto, Kazue; Bernstein, Paul; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulation of intracellular protein degradation was studied in isolated rat skeletal muscles incubated in vitro in the presence of a large variety of agents known to affect calcium movement and distribution. The effect of different classes of protease inhibitors was tested to determine the responsible proteolytic systems involved in calcium-dependent degradation. The results suggest that nonlysosomal leupetin- and E-64-c-sensitive proteases are resposible for calcium-dependent proteolysis in muscle.

  20. Sodium–calcium exchangers contribute to the regulation of cytosolic calcium levels in mouse taste cells

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Agnieszka I; Medler, Kathryn F

    2009-01-01

    Taste cells use multiple signalling mechanisms to generate unique calcium responses to distinct taste stimuli. Some taste stimuli activate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that cause calcium release from intracellular stores while other stimuli depolarize taste cells to cause calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). We recently demonstrated that a constitutive calcium influx exists in taste cells that is regulated by mitochondrial calcium transport and that the magnitude of this calcium influx correlates with the signalling mechanisms used by the taste cells. In this study, we used calcium imaging to determine that sodium–calcium exchangers (NCXs) also routinely contribute to the regulation of basal cytosolic calcium and that their relative role correlates with the signalling mechanisms used by the taste cells. RT-PCR analysis revealed that multiple NCXs and sodium–calcium–potassium exchangers (NCKXs) are expressed in taste cells. Thus, a dynamic relationship exists between calcium leak channels and calcium regulatory mechanisms in taste cells that functions to keep cytosolic calcium levels in the appropriate range for cell function. PMID:19581381

  1. Dopaminergic regulation of dendritic calcium: fast multisite calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Oikonomou, Katerina D; Short, Shaina M; Antic, Srdjan D

    2013-01-01

    Optimal dopamine tone is required for the normal cortical function; however it is still unclear how cortical-dopamine-release affects information processing in individual cortical neurons. Thousands of glutamatergic inputs impinge onto elaborate dendritic trees of neocortical pyramidal neurons. In the process of ensuing synaptic integration (information processing), a variety of calcium transients are generated in remote dendritic compartments. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms of dopaminergic modulation it is important to know whether and how dopaminergic signals affect dendritic calcium transients. In this chapter, we describe a relatively inexpensive method for monitoring dendritic calcium fluctuations at multiple loci across the pyramidal dendritic tree, at the same moment of time (simultaneously). The experiments have been designed to measure the amplitude, time course and spatial extent of action potential-associated dendritic calcium transients before and after application of dopaminergic drugs. In the examples provided here the dendritic calcium transients were evoked by triggering the somatic action potentials (backpropagation-evoked), and puffs of exogenous dopamine were applied locally onto selected dendritic branches.

  2. Calcium-containing crystals enhance receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-mediated osteoclastogenesis via extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and p38 pathways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Ching; Tsai, Yu-Hui; Liu, Yu; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2015-10-01

    Diseases associated with calcium-containing crystal deposition can lead to local bone erosion. We aimed to determine whether calcium-containing crystal-hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate and CPPD enhanced osteoclastogenesis and to define underlying mechanisms of action. Osteoclastogenesis was studied by culturing murine RAW 264.7 osteoclast precursor cells with RANK ligand (RANKL)/ M-CSF and/or calcium-containing crystals, and observing the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells and TRAP activity. Resorption pit formation was used to evaluate osteoclast activity. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed osteoclast marker genes, including TRAP, cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor (CTR). Western blotting was used to analyse the phosphorylation levels of signal transduction molecules. Three kinds of calcium-containing crystal significantly enhanced RANKL/M-CSF-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells, as evidenced by the increased number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells, TRAP activity and resorption pit formation in a dose-dependent manner. Hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate and CPPD treatments significantly enhanced RANKL/M-CSF-induced mRNA expression of TRAP, cathepsin K and CTR. Moreover, the three kinds of calcium-containing crystal enhanced the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and p38 in RANKL/M-CSF-treated cells. We concluded that calcium-containing crystals can promote osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption through the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and p38 pathways. Together with synovial activation, this mechanism may be important in the pathogenesis of destructive arthropathies triggered by calcium-containing crystals. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Biotic Nitrogen Enrichment Regulates Calcium Sources to Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.; Hynicka, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient in forest ecosystems that is susceptible to leaching loss and depletion. Calcium depletion can affect plant and animal productivity, soil acid buffering capacity, and fluxes of carbon and water. Excess nitrogen supply and associated soil acidification are often implicated in short-term calcium loss from soils, but the long-term role of nitrogen enrichment on calcium sources and resupply is unknown. Here we use strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) as a proxy for calcium to investigate how soil nitrogen enrichment from biological nitrogen fixation interacts with bedrock calcium to regulate both short-term available supplies and the long-term sources of calcium in montane conifer forests. Our study examines 22 sites in western Oregon, spanning a 20-fold range of bedrock calcium on sedimentary and basaltic lithologies. In contrast to previous studies emphasizing abiotic control of weathering as a determinant of long-term ecosystem calcium dynamics and sources (via bedrock fertility, climate, or topographic/tectonic controls) we find instead that that biotic nitrogen enrichment of soil can strongly regulate calcium sources and supplies in forest ecosystems. For forests on calcium-rich basaltic bedrock, increasing nitrogen enrichment causes calcium sources to shift from rock-weathering to atmospheric dominance, with minimal influence from other major soil forming factors, despite regionally high rates of tectonic uplift and erosion that can rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. For forests on calcium-poor sedimentary bedrock, we find that atmospheric inputs dominate regardless of degree of nitrogen enrichment. Short-term measures of soil and ecosystem calcium fertility are decoupled from calcium source sustainability, with fundamental implications for understanding nitrogen impacts, both in natural ecosystems and in the context of global change. Our finding that long-term nitrogen enrichment increases forest reliance on atmospheric

  4. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Groen, Christopher M.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5–9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved. PMID:27535426

  5. PTH-independent regulation of blood calcium concentration by the calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Loupy, Alexandre; Ramakrishnan, Suresh Krishna; Wootla, Bharath; Chambrey, Régine; de la Faille, Renaud; Bourgeois, Soline; Bruneval, Patrick; Mandet, Chantal; Christensen, Erik Ilso; Faure, Hélène; Cheval, Lydie; Laghmani, Kamel; Collet, Corinne; Eladari, Dominique; Dodd, Robert H.; Ruat, Martial; Houillier, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of calcium levels is required for many critical biological functions. The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) expressed by parathyroid cells controls blood calcium concentration by regulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. However, CaSR is also expressed in other organs, such as the kidney, but the importance of extraparathyroid CaSR in calcium metabolism remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of extraparathyroid CaSR using thyroparathyroidectomized, PTH-supplemented rats. Chronic inhibition of CaSR selectively increased renal tubular calcium absorption and blood calcium concentration independent of PTH secretion change and without altering intestinal calcium absorption. CaSR inhibition increased blood calcium concentration in animals pretreated with a bisphosphonate, indicating that the increase did not result from release of bone calcium. Kidney CaSR was expressed primarily in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL). As measured by in vitro microperfusion of cortical TAL, CaSR inhibitors increased calcium reabsorption and paracellular pathway permeability but did not change NaCl reabsorption. We conclude that CaSR is a direct determinant of blood calcium concentration, independent of PTH, and modulates renal tubular calcium transport in the TAL via the permeability of the paracellular pathway. These findings suggest that CaSR inhibitors may provide a new specific treatment for disorders related to impaired PTH secretion, such as primary hypoparathyroidism. PMID:22886306

  6. The role of calcium in the regulation of renin secretion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Renin is the enzyme which is the rate-limiting step in the formation of the hormone angiotensin II. Therefore, the regulation of renin secretion is critical in understanding the control of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and its many biological and pathological actions. Renin is synthesized, stored in, and released from the juxtaglomerular (JG) cells of the kidney. While renin secretion is positively regulated by the “second messenger” cAMP, unlike most secretory cells, renin secretion from the JG cell is inversely related to the extracellular and intracellular calcium concentrations. This novel relationship is referred to as the “calcium paradox.” This review will address observations made over the past 30 years regarding calcium and the regulation of renin secretion, and focus on recent observations which address this scientific conundrum. These include 1) receptor-mediated pathways for changing intracellular calcium; 2) the discovery of a calcium-inhibitable isoform of adenylyl cyclase associated with renin in the JG cells; 3) calcium-sensing receptors in the JG cells; 4) calcium-calmodulin-mediated signals; 5) the role of phosphodiesterases; and 6) connexins, gap junctions, calcium waves, and the cortical extracellular calcium environment. While cAMP is the dominant second messenger for renin secretion, calcium appears to modulate the integrated activities of the enzymes, which balance cAMP synthesis and degradation. Thus this review concludes that calcium modifies the amplitude of cAMP-mediated renin-signaling pathways. While calcium does not directly control renin secretion, increased calcium inhibits and decreased calcium amplifies cAMP-stimulated renin secretion. PMID:19640903

  7. Brain calcium - Role in temperature regulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanegan, J. L.; Williams, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Perfusion of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus with excess calcium ion in ground squirrels produces a drop in core temperature. The magnitude of the drop is directly dependent on ambient temperature. Respiration, heart rate, and oxygen consumption are also reduced during perfusion of calcium ion. It is concluded that the depression of body temperature during calcium ion perfusion is due to generalized depression of the neurons of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus.

  8. Brain calcium - Role in temperature regulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanegan, J. L.; Williams, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Perfusion of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus with excess calcium ion in ground squirrels produces a drop in core temperature. The magnitude of the drop is directly dependent on ambient temperature. Respiration, heart rate, and oxygen consumption are also reduced during perfusion of calcium ion. It is concluded that the depression of body temperature during calcium ion perfusion is due to generalized depression of the neurons of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus.

  9. Transcriptional regulation at the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Babett; Sazer, Shelley; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome inside the nucleus affects many nuclear processes, such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. In metazoans, the nuclear periphery harbors mainly repressed genes that associate with the nuclear lamina. This review discusses how peripheral positioning is connected to transcriptional regulation in yeasts. Tethering of reporter genes to the nuclear envelope was found to result in transcriptional silencing. Similarly, repression of the silent mating type loci and subtelomeric genes is influenced by their position close to the nuclear envelope. In contrast, active genes are bound by nucleoporins and inducible genes associate with the nuclear pore complex upon activation. Taken together, these results portray the nuclear envelope as a platform for transcriptional regulation, both through activation at nuclear pores and silencing at the nuclear envelope. PMID:24021962

  10. Frequency-modulated nuclear localization bursts coordinate gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Long; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the transcription factor Crz1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus in response to extracellular calcium. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Crz1 exhibited short bursts of nuclear localization (∼2 minutes) that occurred stochastically in individual cells and propagated to the expression of downstream genes. Strikingly, calcium concentration controlled the frequency, but not duration, of localization bursts. Using an analytic model, we found that this frequency modulation (FM) of bursts ensures proportional expression of multiple target genes across a wide dynamic range of expression levels, independent of promoter characteristics. We experimentally confirmed this theory with natural and synthetic Crz1 target promoters. Another stress response transcription factor, Msn2, exhibits similar, but largely uncorrelated, localization bursts under calcium stress. These results suggest that FM regulation of localization bursts may be a general control strategy utilized by the cell to coordinate multi-gene responses to external signals. PMID:18818649

  11. 229Thorium-doped calcium fluoride for nuclear laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dessovic, P; Mohn, P; Jackson, R A; Winkler, G; Schreitl, M; Kazakov, G; Schumm, T

    2014-03-12

    The (229)thorium isotope presents an extremely low-energy isomer state of the nucleus which is expected around 7.8 eV, in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regime. This unique system may bridge between atomic and nuclear physics, enabling coherent manipulation and precision spectroscopy of nuclear quantum states using laser light. It has been proposed to implant (229)thorium into VUV transparent crystal matrices to facilitate laser spectroscopy and possibly realize a solid-state nuclear clock. In this work, we validate the feasibility of this approach by computer modelling of thorium doping into calcium fluoride single crystals. Using atomistic modelling and full electronic structure calculations, we find a persistent large band gap and no additional electronic levels emerging in the middle of the gap due to the presence of the dopant, which should allow direct optical interrogation of the nuclear transition.Based on the electronic structure, we estimate the thorium nuclear quantum levels within the solid-state environment. Precision laser spectroscopy of these levels will allow the study of a broad range of crystal field effects, transferring Mössbauer spectroscopy into the optical regime.

  12. Emerin plays a crucial role in nuclear invagination and in the nuclear calcium transient.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Masaya; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Motoda, Chikaaki; Yozu, Gakuto; Nagai, Toshihiro; Ito, Shogo; Lachmann, Mark; Kashimura, Shin; Takei, Makoto; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Seki, Tomohisa; Tohyama, Shugo; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kodaira, Masaki; Egashira, Toru; Hayashi, Kenshi; Nakanishi, Chiaki; Sakata, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2017-03-14

    Alteration of the nuclear Ca(2+) transient is an early event in cardiac remodeling. Regulation of the nuclear Ca(2+) transient is partly independent of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient in cardiomyocytes. One nuclear membrane protein, emerin, is encoded by EMD, and an EMD mutation causes Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). It remains unclear whether emerin is involved in nuclear Ca(2+) homeostasis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of emerin in rat cardiomyocytes by means of hypertrophic stimuli and in EDMD induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiomyocytes in terms of nuclear structure and the Ca(2+) transient. The cardiac hypertrophic stimuli increased the nuclear area, decreased nuclear invagination, and increased the half-decay time of the nuclear Ca(2+) transient in cardiomyocytes. Emd knockdown cardiomyocytes showed similar properties after hypertrophic stimuli. The EDMD-iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes showed increased nuclear area, decreased nuclear invagination, and increased half-decay time of the nuclear Ca(2+) transient. An autopsied heart from a patient with EDMD also showed increased nuclear area and decreased nuclear invagination. These data suggest that Emerin plays a crucial role in nuclear structure and in the nuclear Ca(2+) transient. Thus, emerin and the nuclear Ca(2+) transient are possible therapeutic targets in heart failure and EDMD.

  13. Emerin plays a crucial role in nuclear invagination and in the nuclear calcium transient

    PubMed Central

    Shimojima, Masaya; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Motoda, Chikaaki; Yozu, Gakuto; Nagai, Toshihiro; Ito, Shogo; Lachmann, Mark; Kashimura, Shin; Takei, Makoto; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Seki, Tomohisa; Tohyama, Shugo; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kodaira, Masaki; Egashira, Toru; Hayashi, Kenshi; Nakanishi, Chiaki; Sakata, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Alteration of the nuclear Ca2+ transient is an early event in cardiac remodeling. Regulation of the nuclear Ca2+ transient is partly independent of the cytosolic Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes. One nuclear membrane protein, emerin, is encoded by EMD, and an EMD mutation causes Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). It remains unclear whether emerin is involved in nuclear Ca2+ homeostasis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of emerin in rat cardiomyocytes by means of hypertrophic stimuli and in EDMD induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiomyocytes in terms of nuclear structure and the Ca2+ transient. The cardiac hypertrophic stimuli increased the nuclear area, decreased nuclear invagination, and increased the half-decay time of the nuclear Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes. Emd knockdown cardiomyocytes showed similar properties after hypertrophic stimuli. The EDMD-iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes showed increased nuclear area, decreased nuclear invagination, and increased half-decay time of the nuclear Ca2+ transient. An autopsied heart from a patient with EDMD also showed increased nuclear area and decreased nuclear invagination. These data suggest that Emerin plays a crucial role in nuclear structure and in the nuclear Ca2+ transient. Thus, emerin and the nuclear Ca2+ transient are possible therapeutic targets in heart failure and EDMD. PMID:28290476

  14. Nuclear calcium controls the apoptotic-like cell death induced by d-erythro-sphinganine in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Christophe; Da Silva, Daniel; Cotelle, Valérie; Thuleau, Patrice; Xiong, Tou Cheu; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Graziana, Annick; Bellec, Yannick; Faure, Jean-Denis; Ranjeva, Raoul; Mazars, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Studies performed in animals have highlighted the major role of sphingolipids in regulating the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Sphingolipids have also been shown to induce cell death in plants via calcium-based signalling pathways but the contribution of free cytosolic and/or nuclear calcium in the overall process has never been evaluated. Here, we show that increase in tobacco BY-2 cells of the endogenous content of Long Chain Bases (LCBs) caused by external application of d-erythro-sphinganine (DHS) is followed by immediate dose-dependent elevations of cellular free calcium concentration within the first minute in the cytosol and 10min later in the nucleus. Cells challenged with DHS enter a death process through apoptotic-like mechanisms. Lanthanum chloride, a general blocker of calcium entry, suppresses the cellular calcium variations and the PCD induced by DHS. Interestingly, dl-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5) and [(+)-dizocilpine] (MK801), two inhibitors of animal and plant ionotropic glutamate receptors, suppress DHS-induced cell death symptoms by selectively inhibiting the variations of nuclear calcium concentration. The selective action of these compounds demonstrates the crucial role of nuclear calcium signature in controlling DHS-induced cell death in tobacco cells. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulator 1 (MCUR1) regulates the calcium threshold for the mitochondrial permeability transition

    PubMed Central

    Artiga, Daniel J.; Abiria, Sunday A.; Clapham, David E.

    2016-01-01

    During the mitochondrial permeability transition, a large channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane opens, leading to the loss of multiple mitochondrial solutes and cell death. Key triggers include excessive reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial calcium overload, factors implicated in neuronal and cardiac pathophysiology. Examining the differential behavior of mitochondrial Ca2+ overload in Drosophila versus human cells allowed us to identify a gene, MCUR1, which, when expressed in Drosophila cells, conferred permeability transition sensitive to electrophoretic Ca2+ uptake. Conversely, inhibiting MCUR1 in mammalian cells increased the Ca2+ threshold for inducing permeability transition. The effect was specific to the permeability transition induced by Ca2+, and such resistance to overload translated into improved cell survival. Thus, MCUR1 expression regulates the Ca2+ threshold required for permeability transition. PMID:26976564

  17. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulator 1 (MCUR1) regulates the calcium threshold for the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Dipayan; Artiga, Daniel J; Abiria, Sunday A; Clapham, David E

    2016-03-29

    During the mitochondrial permeability transition, a large channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane opens, leading to the loss of multiple mitochondrial solutes and cell death. Key triggers include excessive reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial calcium overload, factors implicated in neuronal and cardiac pathophysiology. Examining the differential behavior of mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload in Drosophila versus human cells allowed us to identify a gene, MCUR1, which, when expressed in Drosophila cells, conferred permeability transition sensitive to electrophoretic Ca(2+) uptake. Conversely, inhibiting MCUR1 in mammalian cells increased the Ca(2+) threshold for inducing permeability transition. The effect was specific to the permeability transition induced by Ca(2+), and such resistance to overload translated into improved cell survival. Thus, MCUR1 expression regulates the Ca(2+) threshold required for permeability transition.

  18. Regulation of adiposity by dietary calcium.

    PubMed

    Zemel, M B; Shi, H; Greer, B; Dirienzo, D; Zemel, P C

    2000-06-01

    Recent data from this laboratory demonstrate that increasing adipocyte intracellular Ca(2+) results in a coordinated stimulation of lipogenesis and inhibition of lipolysis. We have also noted that increasing dietary calcium of obese patients for 1 year resulted in a 4.9 kg loss of body fat (P<0.01). Accordingly, we tested the possibility that calcitrophic hormones may act on adipocytes to increase Ca(2+) and lipid metabolism by measuring the effects of 1, 25-(OH)(2)-D in primary cultures of human adipocytes, and found significant, sustained increases in intracellular Ca(2+) and a corresponding marked inhibition of lipolysis (EC(50) approximately 50 pM; P<0.001), suggesting that dietary calcium could reduce adipocyte mass by suppressing 1,25-(OH)(2)-D. To test this hypothesis, we placed transgenic mice expressing the agouti gene specifically in adipocytes on a low (0.4%) Ca/high fat/high sucrose diet either unsupplemented or with 25 or 50% of the protein replaced by non-fat dry milk or supplemented to 1.2% Ca with CaCO(3) for 6 wk. Weight gain and fat pad mass were reduced by 26-39% by the three high calcium diets (P<0.001). The high calcium diets exerted a corresponding 51% inhibition of adipocyte fatty acid synthase expression and activity (P<0.002) and stimulation of lipolysis by 3. 4- to 5.2-fold (P<0.015). This concept of calcium modulation of adiposity was further evaluated epidemiologically in the NHANES III data set. After controlling for energy intake, relative risk of being in the highest quartile of body fat was set to 1.00 for the lowest quartile of Ca intake and was reduced to 0.75, 0.40, and 0.16 for the second, third, and fourth quartiles, respectively, of calcium intake for women (n=380;P<0.0009); a similar inverse relationship was also noted in men (n=7114; P<0.0006). Thus, increasing dietary calcium suppresses adipocyte intracellular Ca(2+) and thereby modulates energy metabolism and attenuates obesity risk.

  19. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  20. Calcium-mediated histone modifications regulate alternative splicing in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Nguyen, Hieu; Geng, Cuiyu; Hinman, Melissa N; Luo, Guangbin; Lou, Hua

    2014-11-18

    In cardiomyocytes, calcium is known to control gene expression at the level of transcription, whereas its role in regulating alternative splicing has not been explored. Here we report that, in mouse primary or embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, increased calcium levels induce robust and reversible skipping of several alternative exons from endogenously expressed genes. Interestingly, we demonstrate a calcium-mediated splicing regulatory mechanism that depends on changes of histone modifications. Specifically, the regulation occurs through changes in calcium-responsive kinase activities that lead to alterations in histone modifications and subsequent changes in the transcriptional elongation rate and exon skipping. We demonstrate that increased intracellular calcium levels lead to histone hyperacetylation along the body of the genes containing calcium-responsive alternative exons by disrupting the histone deacetylase-to-histone acetyltransferase balance in the nucleus. Consequently, the RNA polymerase II elongation rate increases significantly on those genes, resulting in skipping of the alternative exons. These studies reveal a mechanism by which calcium-level changes in cardiomyocytes impact on the output of gene expression through altering alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns.

  1. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca2+]i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca2+]i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca2+]i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P < 0.01) when the external calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca2+]i. We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. PMID:27980039

  2. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    SciTech Connect

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  3. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Huda Ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D; McGiff, John C; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca(2+) (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca(2+) were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  4. [The peculiarities of calcium metabolism regulation in different periods of growth and development].

    PubMed

    Moĭsa, S S; Nozdrachev, A D

    2014-01-01

    The review contains literature data about calcium metabolism regulation in different periods of growth and development. The analyses of retrospective and current sources of information about the regulation of calcium homeostasis under the theory of functional systems, the regulation of calcium metabolism in prenatal and postnatal periods of the development, the significance of calcium metabolism disturbances in the development of pathological conditions were showed.

  5. Sumoylation and transcription regulation at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Texari, Lorane; Stutz, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that besides promoters, enhancers, and epigenetic modifications, nuclear organization is another parameter contributing to optimal control of gene expression. Although differences between species exist, the influence of gene positioning on expression seems to be a conserved feature from yeast to Drosophila and mammals. The nuclear periphery is one of the nuclear compartments implicated in gene regulation. It consists of the nuclear envelope (NE) and the nuclear pore complexes (NPC), which have distinct roles in the control of gene expression. The NPC has recently been shown to tether proteins involved in the sumoylation pathway. Here, we will focus on the importance of gene positioning and NPC-linked sumoylation/desumoylation in transcription regulation. We will mainly discuss observations made in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system and highlight potential parallels in metazoan species.

  6. Calcium permeability of the neuronal nuclear envelope: evaluation using confocal volumes and intracellular perfusion.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, D M

    1994-10-01

    In many calcium-imaging studies, the nuclear envelope appears to maintain a gradient of free calcium between the nucleus and cytosol. This issue was examined by loading amphibian sympathetic neurons with the calcium indicator fluo 3 via whole-cell patch clamping. Confocal optical sectioning allowed acquisition of independent calibration curves for the nucleus and cytoplasm. Cells were loaded with free calcium levels ranging from 10 nM to 50 microM, using 10 mM BAPTA to control free calcium. The nuclear fluorescence was usually about 130% brighter than the cytoplasmic fluorescence. Had the increased nuclear fluorescence been due to a calcium gradient, then, as fluo 3 was saturated with calcium in both compartments, the fluorescence gradient should have gradually disappeared. Instead, with free-calcium in the pipette set at 50 microM, about five times the level required to nearly saturate fluo 3, the nuclear/cytoplasmic (N/C) fluorescence ratio was not decreased but instead increased slightly. Perfusion of the patch pipette was used in conjunction with imaging to confirm that cytoplasmic fluo 3 was saturated with calcium. After loading cells with 10 nM free calcium, the patch pipette was perfused with high calcium (10 microM). Again, the N/C fluorescence ratio increased at high calcium. The effectiveness of patch-pipette perfusion in changing cellular free calcium levels was indicated by the degree of fluorescence increase--both nuclear and cytosolic compartments showed a roughly 20-fold increase in fluorescence, that is, most of the dynamic range observed in test droplets. To confirm further that cytoplasmic fluo 3 was saturated, cells were perfused with manganese, which binds with very high affinity to fluo 3. Manganese rapidly entered the cytoplasm and nucleus, causing a large increase in fluorescence, but the N/C fluorescence ratio remained relatively constant. Because free manganese in the pipette was 50,000 times the amount required to saturate fluo 3, the

  7. Local calcium changes regulate the length of growth cone filopodia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su; Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2002-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in growth cones can act as an important regulator of growth cone behavior. Here we investigated whether there is a spatial and temporal correlation between [Ca(2+)](i) and one particular aspect of growth cone behavior, namely the regulation of growth cone filopodia. Calcium was released from the caged compound NP-EGTA (o-nitrophenyl EGTA tetrapotassium salt) to simulate a signaling event in the form of a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In three different experimental paradigms, we released calcium either globally (within an entire growth cone), regionally (within a small area of the lamellipodium), or locally (within a single filopodium). We demonstrate that global photolysis of NP-EGTA in growth cones caused a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) throughout the growth cone and elicited subsequent filopodial elongation that was restricted to the stimulated growth cone. Pharmacological blockage of either calmodulin or the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, inhibited the effect of uncaging calcium, suggesting that these enzymes are acting downstream of calcium. Regional uncaging of calcium in the lamellipodium caused a regional increase in [Ca(2+)](i), but induced filopodial elongation on the entire growth cone. Elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) locally within an individual filopodium resulted in the elongation of only the stimulated filopodium. These findings suggest that the effect of an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) on filopodial behavior depends on the spatial distribution of the calcium signal. In particular, calcium signals within filopodia can cause filopodial length changes that are likely a first step towards directed filopodial steering events seen during pathfinding in vivo.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of human Paraoxonase 1 by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Ruiz, N; Murillo-González, F E; Rojas-García, A E; Mackness, Mike; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; González-Arias, C A; Medina-Díaz, I M

    2017-02-20

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a calcium-dependent lactonase synthesized primarily in the liver and secreted into the plasma, where it is associates with high density lipoproteins (HDL). PON1 acts as antioxidant preventing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, a process considered critical in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Additionally, PON1 hydrolyzes and detoxifies some toxic metabolites of organophosphorus compounds (OPs). Thus, PON1 activity and expression levels are important for determining susceptibility to OPs intoxication and risk of developing diseases related to inflammation and oxidative stress. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the modulation of PON1 expression by many factors is due to interaction with nuclear receptors (NRs). Here, we briefly review the studies in this area and discuss the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of PON1 expression, as well as how understanding these mechanisms may allow us to manipulate PON1 levels to improve drug efficacy and treat disease.

  9. Cell Shape Dependent Regulation of Nuclear Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that actin filaments are essential in how a cell controls its nuclear shape. However, little is known about the relative importance of membrane tension in determining nuclear morphology. In this study, we used adhesive micropatterned substrates to alter the cellular geometry (aspect ratio, size, and shape) that allowed direct membrane tension or without membrane lateral contact with the nucleus and investigate nuclear shape remodeling and orientation on a series of rectangular shapes. Here we showed that at low cell aspect ratios the orientation of the nucleus was regulated by actin filaments while cells with high aspect ratios can maintain nuclear shape and orientation even when actin polymerization was blocked. A model adenocarcinoma cell showed similar behavior in the regulation of nuclear shape in response to changes in cell shape but actin filaments were essential in maintaining cell shape. Our results highlight the two distinct mechanisms to regulate nuclear shape through cell shape control and the difference between fibroblasts and a model cancerous cell in cell adhesion and cell shape control. PMID:26210179

  10. Cell shape dependent regulation of nuclear morphology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that actin filaments are essential in how a cell controls its nuclear shape. However, little is known about the relative importance of membrane tension in determining nuclear morphology. In this study, we used adhesive micropatterned substrates to alter the cellular geometry (aspect ratio, size, and shape) that allowed direct membrane tension or without membrane lateral contact with the nucleus and investigate nuclear shape remodeling and orientation on a series of rectangular shapes. Here we showed that at low cell aspect ratios the orientation of the nucleus was regulated by actin filaments while cells with high aspect ratios can maintain nuclear shape and orientation even when actin polymerization was blocked. A model adenocarcinoma cell showed similar behavior in the regulation of nuclear shape in response to changes in cell shape but actin filaments were essential in maintaining cell shape. Our results highlight the two distinct mechanisms to regulate nuclear shape through cell shape control and the difference between fibroblasts and a model cancerous cell in cell adhesion and cell shape control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  12. Regulation of neurogenesis by calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna B.; Shum, Andrew K.; Prakriya, Murali

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling has essential roles in the development of the nervous system from neural induction to the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural cells. Ca2+ signaling pathways are shaped by interactions among metabotropic signaling cascades, intracellular Ca2+ stores, ion channels, and a multitude of downstream effector proteins that activate specific genetic programs. The temporal and spatial dynamics of Ca2+ signals are widely presumed to control the highly diverse yet specific genetic programs that establish the complex structures of the adult nervous system. Progress in the last two decades has led to significant advances in our understanding of the functional architecture of Ca2+ signaling networks involved in neurogenesis. In this review, we assess the literature on the molecular and functional organization of Ca2+ signaling networks in the developing nervous system and its impact on neural induction, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Particular emphasis is placed on the growing evidence for the involvement of store-operated Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in these processes. PMID:27020657

  13. alpha-Klotho: a regulator that integrates calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Imura, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Intensive study on calcium homeostasis regulation over the past several decades has established a systematized construal of its role in living phenomena, leaving us with the impression that this field is fairly defined and understood. However, the unveiling of the molecular function of alpha-Klotho has recently given new insight into this field. alpha-Klotho is a unique molecule that plays pivotal roles in: (i) the rapid tuning of extracellular Ca(2+) concentration through transepithelial Ca(2+) transport; (ii) parathyroid hormone secretion and subsequent Ca(2+) increase in the serum, and (iii) the signal transduction of FGF23 that adjusts the calcium concentration by downregulating the production of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). Through these pathways, alpha-Klotho participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis of the CSF and blood/body fluids by its actions in the choroid plexus, parathyroid glands and DCT nephrons. In this regard, alpha-Klotho is a key player that integrates 'a multi-step regulatory system of calcium homeostasis' that rapidly adjusts the extracellular calcium concentration and continuously maintains its concentration within a narrow physiological range. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hynicka, Justin D.; Pett-Ridge, Julie C; Perakis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that shapes cycles of other essential elements in forests, including calcium (Ca). When N availability exceeds ecosystem demands, excess N can stimulate Ca leaching and deplete Ca from soils. Over the long term, these processes may alter the proportion of available Ca that is derived from atmospheric deposition vs. bedrock weathering, which has fundamental consequences for ecosystem properties and nutrient supply. We evaluated how landscape variation in soil N, reflecting long-term legacies of biological N fixation, influenced plant and soil Ca availability and ecosystem Ca sources across 22 temperate forests in Oregon. We also examined interactions between soil N and bedrock Ca using soil N gradients on contrasting basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock that differed 17-fold in underlying Ca content. We found that low-N forests on Ca-rich basaltic bedrock relied strongly on Ca from weathering, but that soil N enrichment depleted readily weatherable mineral Ca and shifted forest reliance toward atmospheric Ca. Forests on Ca-poor sedimentary bedrock relied more consistently on atmospheric Ca across all levels of soil N enrichment. The broad importance of atmospheric Ca was unexpected given active regional uplift and erosion that are thought to rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. Despite different Ca sources to forests on basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock, we observed consistent declines in plant and soil Ca availability with increasing N, regardless of the Ca content of underlying bedrock. Thus, traditional measures of Ca availability in foliage and soil exchangeable pools may poorly reflect long-term Ca sources that sustain soil fertility. We conclude that long-term soil N enrichment can deplete available Ca and cause forests to rely increasingly on Ca from atmospheric deposition, which may limit ecosystem Ca supply in an increasingly N-rich world.

  15. Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests.

    PubMed

    Hynicka, Justin D; Pett-Ridge, Julie C; Perakis, Steven S

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that shapes cycles of other essential elements in forests, including calcium (Ca). When N availability exceeds ecosystem demands, excess N can stimulate Ca leaching and deplete Ca from soils. Over the long term, these processes may alter the proportion of available Ca that is derived from atmospheric deposition vs. bedrock weathering, which has fundamental consequences for ecosystem properties and nutrient supply. We evaluated how landscape variation in soil N, reflecting long-term legacies of biological N fixation, influenced plant and soil Ca availability and ecosystem Ca sources across 22 temperate forests in Oregon. We also examined interactions between soil N and bedrock Ca using soil N gradients on contrasting basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock that differed 17-fold in underlying Ca content. We found that low-N forests on Ca-rich basaltic bedrock relied strongly on Ca from weathering, but that soil N enrichment depleted readily weatherable mineral Ca and shifted forest reliance toward atmospheric Ca. Forests on Ca-poor sedimentary bedrock relied more consistently on atmospheric Ca across all levels of soil N enrichment. The broad importance of atmospheric Ca was unexpected given active regional uplift and erosion that are thought to rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. Despite different Ca sources to forests on basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock, we observed consistent declines in plant and soil Ca availability with increasing N, regardless of the Ca content of underlying bedrock. Thus, traditional measures of Ca availability in foliage and soil exchangeable pools may poorly reflect long-term Ca sources that sustain soil fertility. We conclude that long-term soil N enrichment can deplete available Ca and cause forests to rely increasingly on Ca from atmospheric deposition, which may limit ecosystem Ca supply in an increasingly N-rich world. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Regulation of nuclear pore complex conformation by IP(3) receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Nichols, David; Arnott, Anne; Dunn, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, both the molecular architecture and functional dynamics of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have been revealed with increasing detail. These large, supramolecular assemblages of proteins form channels that span the nuclear envelope of cells, acting as crucial regulators of nuclear import and export. From the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes exhibit an eightfold symmetric ring structure encompassing a central lumen. The lumen often appears occupied by an additional structure alternatively referred to as the central granule, nuclear transport complex, or nuclear plug. Previous studies have suggested that the central granule may play a role in mediating calcium-dependent regulation of diffusion across the nuclear envelope for intermediate sized molecules (10-40 kDa). Using atomic force microscopy to measure the surface topography of chemically fixed Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes, we present measurements of the relative position of the central granule within the NPC lumen under a variety of conditions known to modify nuclear Ca(2+) stores. These measurements reveal a large, approximately 9-nm displacement of the central granule toward the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope under calcium depleting conditions. Additionally, activation of nuclear inositol triphosphate (IP(3)) receptors by the specific agonist, adenophostin A, results in a concentration-dependent displacement of central granule position with an EC(50) of ~1.2 nM. The displacement of the central granule within the NPC is observed on both the cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic faces of the nuclear envelope. The displacement is blocked upon treatment with xestospongin C, a specific inhibitor of IP(3) receptor activation. These results extend previous models of NPC conformational dynamics linking central granule position to depletion of IP(3) sensitive nuclear envelope calcium stores. PMID:12202368

  17. Rho kinase regulates neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via calcium dependent cytoskeleton regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhisheng; Cai, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Nannuan; Chen, Jing; Tan, Minghui; Lin, Hongsheng; Guo, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether calcium is involved in downstream signal transduction in neurite outgrowth regulated by Rho kinase. Methods: In vitro primary hippocampal neurons were cultured and treated with Rho kinase agonist (LPA) or antagonist (Y-27632). Then, the cytoskeleton and neurite outgrowth were observed. After addition of calcium antagonist BAPTA/AM to reduce intracellular calcium, the cytoskeleton distribution and neurite outgrowth were observed. Results: The activation or inhibition of Rho kinase could significantly alter the number and length of neurites of hippocampal neurons. Rho kinase regulated the cytoskeleton to regulate the neurite outgrowth, and LPA could significantly increase intracellular calcium. After BAPTA/AM treatment, the length and branch number of neurites of neurons reduced markedly. BAPTA/AM was able to reduce intracellular calcium and decrease neuronal cytoskeleton. Treatment with both BAPTA/AM and LPA could stop the retraction of neurites, but the length and branch number of neurites remained unchanged after treatment with Y-27632 and LPA. Conclusion: Calcium may affect the cytoskeleton arrangement to regulate neurite outgrowth, and calcium is involved in the downstream signal transduction of Rho kinase regulated neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. PMID:28337305

  18. Reduced Renal Calcium Excretion in the Absence of Sclerostin Expression: Evidence for a Novel Calcium-Regulating Bone Kidney Axis

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The kidneys contribute to calcium homeostasis by adjusting the reabsorption and excretion of filtered calcium through processes that are regulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25[OH]2D3). Most of the filtered calcium is reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, primarily by paracellular mechanisms that are not sensitive to calcium-regulating hormones in physiologically relevant ways. In the distal tubule, however, calcium is reabsorbed by channels and transporters, the activity or expression of which is highly regulated and increased by PTH and 1α,25(OH)2D3. Recent research suggests that other, heretofore unrecognized factors, such as the osteocyte-specific protein sclerostin, also regulate renal calcium excretion. Clues in this regard have come from the study of humans and mice with inactivating mutations of the sclerostin gene that both have increased skeletal density, which would necessitate an increase in intestinal absorption and/or renal reabsorption of calcium. Deletion of the sclerostin gene in mice significantly diminishes urinary calcium excretion and increases fractional renal calcium reabsorption. This is associated with increased circulating 1α,25(OH)2D3 levels, whereas sclerostin directly suppresses 1α-hydroxylase in immortalized proximal tubular cells. Thus, evidence is accumulating that sclerostin directly or indirectly reduces renal calcium reabsorption, suggesting the presence of a novel calcium-excreting bone-kidney axis. PMID:24876121

  19. Expression and regulated nuclear transport of transducers of regulated CREB 1 in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, J; Zhang, X-L; Wang, J-W; Teng, L-L; Ge, J; Takemori, H; Xiong, Z-Q; Zhou, Y

    2009-03-31

    Calcium- and cAMP-dependent activation of CREB and transcription of cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-target genes play critical roles in various physiological and pathological conditions. TORCs (transducers of regulated CREB) represent a new family of conserved CREB coactivators that function as intracellular calcium- and cAMP-sensitive coincidence detectors, controlling the kinetics of CRE-mediated responses and long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Here we examined the expression and activity-dependent translocation of TORCs in adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the primary target of acute retinal ischemic injury as well as chronic retinal degenerative diseases. We found that both mRNAs of TORC1 and TORC2, but not TORC3, were enriched in adult rat retina. Comparing with TORC2, TORC1 protein was highly and selectively expressed in RGCs. At resting condition, TORC1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm but not nucleus of RGCs. Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by intravitreous injection of NMDA or increase of cAMP signaling by administration of forskolin triggered nuclear accumulation of TORC1. Furthermore, transient retinal ischemic injury resulted in peri-nuclear and nuclear accumulation of TORC1 as well as transcription of BDNF in RGCs. Our results demonstrate that TORC1 is enriched in RGCs and its subcellular location could be regulated by Ca(2+) and cAMP, suggesting that manipulation of TORC1 activity may promote survival of RGCs in some optic disease conditions.

  20. Regulation of Calreticulin Gene Expression by Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Waser, Mathilde; Mesaeli, Nasrin; Spencer, Charlotte; Michalak, Marek

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a 12-kb mouse genomic DNA fragment containing the entire calreticulin gene and 2.14 kb of the promoter region. The mouse calreticulin gene consists of nine exons and eight introns, and it spans 4.2 kb of genomic DNA. A 1.8-kb fragment of the calreticulin promoter was subcloned into a reporter gene plasmid containing chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. This construct was then used in transient and stable transfection of NIH/ 3T3 cells. Treatment of transfected cells either with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, or with the ER Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin, resulted in a five- to sevenfold increase of the expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase protein. Transactivation of the calreticulin promoter was also increased by fourfold in NIH/3T3 cells treated with bradykinin, a hormone that induces Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ stores. Analysis of the promoter deletion constructs revealed that A23187- and thapsigargin-responsive regions are confined to two regions (−115 to −260 and −685 to −1,763) in the calreticulin promoter that contain the CCAAT nucleotide sequences. Northern blot analysis of cells treated with A23187, or with thapsigargin, revealed a fivefold increase in calreticulin mRNA levels. Thapsigargin also induced a fourfold increase in calreticulun protein levels. Importantly, we show by nuclear run-on transcription analysis that calreticulin gene transcription is increased in NIH/3T3 cells treated with A23187 and thapsigargin in vivo. This increase in gene expression required over 4 h of continuous incubation with the drugs and was also sensitive to treatment with cycloheximide, suggesting that it is dependent on protein synthesis. Changes in the concentration of extracellular and cytoplasmic Ca2+ did not affect the increased expression of the calreticulin gene. These studies suggest that stress response to the depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores induces expression of the calreticulin gene in vitro

  1. Regulation of PKC Mediated Signaling by Calcium during Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  2. Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator - the γ-TuRC complex - and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic.

  3. Nuclear Transport Factors: Global Regulation of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Douglass J.; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear transport receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator the γ-TuRC complex and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores towards the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic. PMID:25982429

  4. Expanding the range of free calcium regulation in biological solutions.

    PubMed

    Dweck, David; Reyes-Alfonso, Avelino; Potter, James D

    2005-12-15

    Many biological systems use ethylene glycol bis (beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) to regulate the free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](free)) in the presence of physiological levels of free Mg(2+) ([Mg(2+)](free)). Frequently, it is necessary to work at [Ca(2+)](free) beyond EGTA's buffering capabilities. Therefore, we have developed methods to extend the buffering range by adding nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) to solutions containing EGTA. This extension results from NTA having a lower K'(dCa) than EGTA. Such equilibria are solved by pCa Calculator, a computer program designed to aid in the study of Ca(2+)-dependent physiological processes while accounting for the effects of pH, temperature, and ionic strength. With multiple chelators and pH buffers from which to choose, pCa Calculator calculates the total concentration of each species required to achieve specified free concentrations of Ca(2+), ATP, and Mg(2+). The program is intuitive, user-friendly, and flexible enough to fix or vary the [Mg-ATP(2-)] and ionic strength. Moreover, it can account for increases in experimental volume from calcium addition. A comparative analysis is reported for testing solutions in the presence and absence of NTA by measuring the calcium binding affinity of fluorescent cardiac troponin C. These findings demonstrate that EGTA, when used in conjunction with NTA, improves and expands the regulation of free calcium in solution.

  5. Calcium Sparks in the Heart: Dynamics and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hoang-Trong, Tuan M.; Ullah, Aman; Jafri, M. Saleet

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a central role in the contraction of the heart. It is the bi-directional link between electrical excitation of the heart and contraction. Electrical excitation initiates Ca2+influx across the sarcolemma and T-tubular membrane that triggered calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Ca2+sparks are the elementary events of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of Ca2+sparks is essential for understanding the function of the heart. To this end, numerous experimental and computational studies have focused on this topic, exploring the mechanisms of calcium spark initiation, termination, and regulation and what role these play in normal and patho-physiology. The proper understanding of Ca2+ spark regulation and dynamics serves as the foundation for our insights into a multitude of pathological conditions may develop that can be the result of structural and/or functional changes at the cellular or subcellular level. Computational modeling of Ca2+ spark dynamics has proven to be a useful tool to understand Ca2+ spark dynamics. This review addresses our current understanding of Ca2+ sparks and how synchronized SR Ca2+ release, in which Ca2+ sparks is a major pathway, is linked to the different cardiac diseases, especially arrhythmias. PMID:27212876

  6. MECHANICAL REGULATION OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Rui P.; Finan, John D.; Guilak, Farshid; Lee, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading induces both nuclear distortion and alterations in gene expression in a variety of cell types. Mechanotransduction is the process by which extracellular mechanical forces can activate a number of well-studied cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Inevitably such signals are transduced to the nucleus and induce transcription factor-mediated changes in gene expression. However, gene expression can be also regulated through alterations in nuclear architecture, providing direct control of genome function. One putative transduction mechanism for this phenomenon involves alterations in nuclear architecture that result from the mechanical perturbation of the cell. This perturbation is associated with direct mechanical strain or osmotic stress, which is transferred to the nucleus. This review describes the current state of knowledge relating the nuclear architecture and the transfer of mechanical forces to the nucleus mediated by the cytoskeleton, the nucleoskeleton, and the LINC (linker of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex. Moreover, remodeling of the nucleus induces alterations in nuclear stiffness, which may be associated with cell differentiation. These phenomena are discussed in relation to the potential influence of nuclear architecture-mediated mechanoregulation of transcription and cell fate. PMID:22655599

  7. Mechanical regulation of nuclear structure and function.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rui P; Finan, John D; Guilak, Farshid; Lee, David A

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical loading induces both nuclear distortion and alterations in gene expression in a variety of cell types. Mechanotransduction is the process by which extracellular mechanical forces can activate a number of well-studied cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Inevitably, such signals are transduced to the nucleus and induce transcription factor-mediated changes in gene expression. However, gene expression also can be regulated through alterations in nuclear architecture, providing direct control of genome function. One putative transduction mechanism for this phenomenon involves alterations in nuclear architecture that result from the mechanical perturbation of the cell. This perturbation is associated with direct mechanical strain or osmotic stress, which is transferred to the nucleus. This review describes the current state of knowledge relating the nuclear architecture and the transfer of mechanical forces to the nucleus mediated by the cytoskeleton, the nucleoskeleton, and the LINC (linker of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex. Moreover, remodeling of the nucleus induces alterations in nuclear stiffness, which may be associated with cell differentiation. These phenomena are discussed in relation to the potential influence of nuclear architecture-mediated mechanoregulation of transcription and cell fate.

  8. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance study of the complexation of calcium by taurine

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Hammer, B.E.; Danyluk, S.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-01-01

    /sup 13/C Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts, /sup 1/J/sub c-c/ scalar coupling constants, spin-lattice relaxation times, and nuclear Overhauser effects were determined for taurine-(1, 2 /sup 13/C) and a taurine-(1 /sup 13/C) and taurine-(2 /sup 13/C) mixture in the presence and absence of calcium. Comparison of taurine titration shifts to values for related compounds reveals some unusual electronic properties of the taurine molecule. Stability constants of 1:1 calcium complexes with taurine zwitterions and anions, as well as their /sup 13/C chemical shifts, were obtained by least squares analysis of titration curves measured in the presence of calcium. The stability constants of calcium-taurine complexes were significantly lower than previous values and led to estimates that only approximately one percent of intracellular calcium of mammalian myocardial cells would exist in a taurine complex.

  9. Ultralow calcium requirements of fungi facilitate use of calcium regulating agents to suppress host calcium-dependent defenses, synergizing infection by a mycoherbicide.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Jonathan; Michaeli, Daphna; Kampel, Vladimir; Amsellem, Ziva; Warshawsky, Abraham

    2002-10-23

    Infection by many fungi activates a variety of calcium dependent defenses in the hosts, slowing or suppressing the attacker and limiting the efficacy of mycoherbicides. The calcium requirement for fungal growth is so low that it could only be implied based on fungi containing calcium-dependent signaling enzymes. Analytical grade media contain <2 microM calcium, and the addition of specific chelators does not affect fungal growth. Hydrophobic derivatives of the calcium-specific chelator BAPTA designed to traverse plant cuticles were synthesized in order to chelate calcium internally during fungal attack. Some chelators as well as calcium precipitating oxalate and channel blocker verapamil were applied with a weakly mycoherbicidal Colletotrichum coccodes to cotyledons of compatible Abutilon threophrasti. They suppressed calcium dependent callose biosynthesis in the weed and increased virulence but may have affected other calcium-dependent processes that facilitate virulence. The low calcium requirement of fungi, and their high affinity for calcium, allows the application of calcium-regulating agents as synergists for mycoherbicides where the weed uses calcium-dependent defenses.

  10. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... health and safety, the environment, or the safeguarding of nuclear reactor facilities; (c) Assesses and... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43... Program Offices § 1.43 Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation— (a...

  11. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... health and safety, the environment, or the safeguarding of nuclear reactor facilities; (c) Assesses and... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43... Program Offices § 1.43 Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation— (a...

  12. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... health and safety, the environment, or the safeguarding of nuclear reactor facilities; (c) Assesses and... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43... Program Offices § 1.43 Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation— (a...

  13. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... health and safety, the environment, or the safeguarding of nuclear reactor facilities; (c) Assesses and... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43... Program Offices § 1.43 Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation— (a...

  14. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... health and safety, the environment, or the safeguarding of nuclear reactor facilities; (c) Assesses and... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43... Program Offices § 1.43 Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation— (a...

  15. Reciprocal Interaction of Dendrite Geometry and Nuclear Calcium-VEGFD Signaling Gates Memory Consolidation and Extinction.

    PubMed

    Hemstedt, Thekla J; Bengtson, C Peter; Ramírez, Omar; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-07-19

    Nuclear calcium is an important signaling end point in synaptic excitation-transcription coupling that is critical for long-term neuroadaptations. Here, we show that nuclear calcium acting via a target gene, VEGFD, is required for hippocampus-dependent fear memory consolidation and extinction in mice. Nuclear calcium-VEGFD signaling upholds the structural integrity and complexity of the dendritic arbor of CA1 neurons that renders those cells permissive for the efficient generation of synaptic input-evoked nuclear calcium transients driving the expression of plasticity-related genes. Therefore, the gating of memory functions rests on the reciprocally reinforcing maintenance of an intact dendrite geometry and a functional synapse-to-nucleus communication axis. In psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic application of VEGFD may help to stabilize dendritic structures and network connectivity, which may prevent cognitive decline and could boost the efficacy of extinction-based exposure therapies.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study uncovers a reciprocal relationship between dendrite geometry, the ability to generate nuclear calcium transients in response to synaptic inputs, and the subsequent induction of expression of plasticity-related and dendritic structure-preserving genes. Insufficient nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 hippocampal neurons and, consequently, reduced expression of the nuclear calcium target gene VEGFD, a dendrite maintenance factor, leads to reduced-complexity basal dendrites of CA1 neurons, which severely compromises the animals' consolidation of both memory and extinction memory. The structure-protective function of VEGFD may prove beneficial in psychiatric disorders as well as neurodegenerative and aging-related conditions that are associated with loss of neuronal structures, dysfunctional excitation-transcription coupling, and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376946-10$15.00/0.

  16. The physical mechanism of calcium pump regulation in the heart.

    PubMed Central

    Voss, J; Jones, L R; Thomas, D D

    1994-01-01

    The Ca-ATPase in the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane is regulated by an amphipathic transmembrane protein, phospholamban. We have used time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy to detect the microsecond rotational dynamics, and thereby the self-association, of the Ca-ATPase as a function of phospholamban phosphorylation and physiologically relevant calcium levels. The phosphorylation of phospholamban increases the rotational mobility of the Ca-ATPase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum bilayer, due to a decrease in large-scale protein association, with a [Ca2+] dependence parallel to that of enzyme activation. These results support a model in which phospholamban phosphorylation or calcium free the enzyme from a kinetically unfavorable associated state. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7918987

  17. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; O'Malley, Bert W; Elmquist, Joel K

    2017-04-03

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essential roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Understanding the role and the underlying mechanisms of NRs in the context of energy balance control may facilitate the identification of novel targets to treat obesity. Notably, NRs are abundantly expressed in the brain, and emerging evidence indicates that a number of these brain NRs regulate multiple aspects of energy balance, including feeding, energy expenditure and physical activity. In this Review we summarize some of the recent literature regarding effects of brain NRs on body weight regulation and discuss mechanisms underlying these effects.

  18. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  19. Role of intracellular calcium in cellular volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.M.; Chase, H.S. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular calcium in epithelial cell volume regulation using cells isolated from the toad urinary bladder. A suspension of cells was prepared by treatment of the bladder with collagenase followed by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. The cells retained their ion-transporting capabilities: ouabain (1 mM) and amiloride (10 microM) inhibited cellular uptake of /sup 86/Rb and /sup 22/Na, respectively. Using a Coulter counter to measure cellular volume, we found that we could swell cells either by reducing the extracellular osmolality or by adding the permeant solute urea (45 mM) isosmotically. Under both conditions, cells first swelled and then returned to their base-line volume, in spite of the continued presence of the stimulus to swell. Volume regulation was inhibited when cells were swelled at low extracellular (Ca) (100 nM) and was retarded in cells preloaded with the calcium buffer quin 2. Swelling increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ((Ca)i), as measured by quin 2 fluorescence: (Ca)i increased 35 +/- 9 nM (n = 6) after hypotonic swelling and 42 +/- 3 nM (n = 3) after urea swelling. Reducing extracellular (Ca) to less than 100 nM prevented the swelling-induced increase in (Ca)i, suggesting that the source of the increase in (Ca)i was extracellular. This result was confirmed in measurements of cellular uptake of 45Ca: the rate of uptake was significantly higher in swollen cells compared with control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 fmol . cell-1 X 5 min-1). Our experiments provide the first demonstration that cellular swelling increases (Ca)i. This increase is likely to play a critical role in cellular volume regulation.

  20. Calreticulin secures calcium-dependent nuclear pore competency required for cardiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Randolph S; Behfar, Atta; Groenendyk, Jody; Wyles, Saranya P; Niederlander, Nicolas; Reyes, Santiago; Puceat, Michel; Michalak, Marek; Terzic, Andre; Perez-Terzic, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Calreticulin deficiency causes myocardial developmental defects that culminate in an embryonic lethal phenotype. Recent studies have linked loss of this calcium binding chaperone to failure in myofibrillogenesis through an as yet undefined mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to identify cellular processes corrupted by calreticulin deficiency that precipitate dysregulation of cardiac myofibrillogenesis related to acquisition of cardiac phenotype. In an embryonic stem cell knockout model, calreticulin deficit (crt(-/-)) compromised nucleocytoplasmic transport of nuclear localization signal-dependent and independent pathways, disrupting nuclear import of the cardiac transcription factor MEF2C. The expression of nucleoporins and associated nuclear transport proteins in derived crt(-/-) cardiomyocytes revealed an abnormal nuclear pore complex (NPC) configuration. Altered protein content in crt(-/-) cells resulted in remodeled NPC architecture that caused decreased pore diameter and diminished probability of central channel occupancy versus wild type counterparts. Ionophore treatment of impaired calcium handling in crt(-/-) cells corrected nuclear pore microarchitecture and rescued nuclear import resulting in normalized myofibrillogenesis. Thus, calreticulin deficiency alters nuclear pore function and structure, impeding myofibrillogenesis in nascent cardiomyocytes through a calcium dependent mechanism. This essential role of calreticulin in nucleocytoplasmic communication competency ties its regulatory action with proficiency of cardiac myofibrillogenesis essential for proper cardiac development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... You'll also find calcium in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables (especially collard and turnip greens, ... can enjoy good sources of calcium such as dark green, leafy vegetables, broccoli, chickpeas, and calcium-fortified ...

  2. Regulation of voltage gated calcium channels by GPCRs and post-translational modification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junting; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-10-18

    Calcium entry via voltage gated calcium channels mediates a wide range of physiological functions, whereas calcium channel dysregulation has been associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions. There are myriad cell signaling pathways that act on voltage gated calcium channels to fine tune their activities and to regulate their cell surface expression. These regulatory mechanisms include the activation of G protein-coupled receptors and downstream phosphorylation events, and their control over calcium channel trafficking through direct physical interactions. Calcium channels also undergo post-translational modifications that alter both function and density of the channels in the plasma membrane. Here we focus on select aspects of these regulatory mechanisms and highlight recent developments.

  3. Calcium transport in strongly calcifying laying birds: mechanisms and regulation.

    PubMed

    Bar, Arie

    2009-04-01

    Birds that lay long clutches (series of eggs laid sequentially before a "pause day"), among them the high-producing, strongly-calcifying Gallus gallus domesticus (domestic hen) and Coturnix coturnix japonica (Japanese quail), transfer about 10% of their total body calcium daily. They appear, therefore, to be the most efficient calcium-transporters among vertebrates. Such intensive transport imposes severe demands on ionic calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis, and activates at least two extremely effective mechanisms for Ca2+ transfer from food and bone to the eggshell. This review focuses on the development, action and regulation of the mechanisms associated with paracellular and transcellular Ca2+ transport in the intestine and the eggshell gland (ESG); it also considers some of the proteins (calbindin, Ca2+ATPase, Na+/Ca2+ exchange, epithelial calcium channels (TRPVs), osteopontin and carbonic anhydrase (CA) associated with this phenomenon. Calbindins are discussed in some detail, as they appear to be a major component of the transcellular transport system, and as only they have been studied extensively in birds. The review aims to gather old and new knowledge, which could form a conceptual basis, albeit not a completely accepted one, for our understanding of the mechanisms associated with this phenomenon. In the intestine, the transcellular pathway appears to compensate for low Ca2+ intake, but in birds fed adequate calcium the major drive for calcium absorption remains the electrochemical potential difference (ECPD) that facilitates paracellular transport. However, the mechanisms involved in Ca2+ transport into the ESG lumen are not yet established. In the ESG, the presence of Ca2+-ATPase and calbindin--two components of the transcellular transport pathway--and the apparently uphill transport of Ca2+ support the idea that Ca2+ is transported via the transcellular pathway. However, the positive (plasma with respect to mucosa) electrical potential difference (EPD) in the

  4. Developmental regulation of calcium-dependent feedback in Xenopus rods

    PubMed Central

    Solessio, Eduardo; Mani, Shobana S.; Cuenca, Nicolas; Engbretson, Gustav A.; Barlow, Robert B.; Knox, Barry E.

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of activation and inactivation in the phototransduction pathway of developing Xenopus rods were studied. The gain of the activation steps in transduction (amplification) increased and photoresponses became more rapid as the rods matured from the larval to the adult stage. The time to peak was significantly shorter in adults (1.3 s) than tadpoles (2 s). Moreover, adult rods recovered twice as fast from saturating flashes than did larval rods without changes of the dominant time constant (2.5 s). Guanylate cyclase (GC) activity, determined using IBMX steps, increased in adult rods from ∼1.1 s−1 to 3.7 s−1 5 s after a saturating flash delivering 6,000 photoisomerizations. In larval rods, it increased from 1.8 s−1 to 4.0 s−1 9 s after an equivalent flash. However, the ratio of amplification to the measured dark phosphodiesterase activity was constant. Guanylate cyclase–activating protein (GCAP1) levels and normalized Na+/Ca2+, K+ exchanger currents were increased in adults compared with tadpoles. Together, these results are consistent with the acceleration of the recovery phase in adult rods via developmental regulation of calcium homeostasis. Despite these large changes, the single photon response amplitude was ∼0.6 pA throughout development. Reduction of calcium feedback with BAPTA increased adult single photon response amplitudes threefold and reduced its cutoff frequency to that observed with tadpole rods. Linear mathematical modeling suggests that calcium-dependent feedback can account for the observed differences in the power spectra of larval and adult rods. We conclude that larval Xenopus maximize sensitivity at the expense of slower response kinetics while adults maximize response kinetics at the expense of sensitivity. PMID:15504902

  5. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, James R. Thirumurugan, Kavitha; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hammer, John A.; Knight, Peter J.

    2008-04-25

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins.

  6. Autoacetylation regulates P/CAF nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Blanco-García, Noemí; Asensio-Juan, Elena; de la Cruz, Xavier; Martínez-Balbás, Marian A

    2009-01-16

    Acetylation is a posttranslational modification that alters the biological activities of proteins by affecting their association with other proteins or DNA, their catalytic activities, or their subcellular distribution. The acetyltransferase P/CAF is autoacetylated and acetylated by p300 in vivo. P/CAF autoacetylation is an intramolecular or intermolecular event. Intramolecular acetylation targets five lysines within the nuclear localization signal at the P/CAF C terminus. We analyzed how the subcellular distribution of P/CAF is regulated by intramolecular autoacetylation and found that a P/CAF mutant lacking histone acetyltransferase activity accumulated primarily in the cytoplasm. This cytoplasmic fraction of P/CAF is enriched for nonautoacetylated P/CAF. In addition, P/CAF deacetylation by HDAC3 and in a minor degree by HDAC1, HDAC2, or HDAC4 leads to cytoplasmic accumulation of P/CAF. Importantly, our data show that P/CAF accumulates in the cytoplasm during apoptosis. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of autoacetylation control of P/CAF nuclear translocation and suggest a novel pathway by which P/CAF activity is controlled in vivo.

  7. cPKC regulates interphase nuclear size during Xenopus development

    PubMed Central

    Edens, Lisa J.

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic changes in cell and nuclear size occur during development and differentiation, and aberrant nuclear size is associated with many disease states. However, the mechanisms that regulate nuclear size are largely unknown. A robust system for investigating nuclear size is early Xenopus laevis development, during which reductions in nuclear size occur without changes in DNA content. To identify cellular factors that regulate nuclear size during development, we developed a novel nuclear resizing assay wherein nuclei assembled in Xenopus egg extract become smaller in the presence of cytoplasmic interphase extract isolated from post-gastrula Xenopus embryos. We show that nuclear shrinkage depends on conventional protein kinase C (cPKC). Increased nuclear cPKC localization and activity and decreased nuclear association of lamins mediate nuclear size reductions during development, and manipulating cPKC activity in vivo during interphase alters nuclear size in the embryo. We propose a model of steady-state nuclear size regulation whereby nuclear expansion is balanced by an active cPKC-dependent mechanism that reduces nuclear size. PMID:25135933

  8. The regulation of neuronal mitochondrial metabolism by calcium

    PubMed Central

    Llorente-Folch, I; Rueda, C B; Pardo, B; Szabadkai, G; Duchen, M R; Satrustegui, J

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signalling is fundamental to the function of the nervous system, in association with changes in ionic gradients across the membrane. Although restoring ionic gradients is energetically costly, a rise in intracellular Ca2+ acts through multiple pathways to increase ATP synthesis, matching energy supply to demand. Increasing cytosolic Ca2+ stimulates metabolite transfer across the inner mitochondrial membrane through activation of Ca2+-regulated mitochondrial carriers, whereas an increase in matrix Ca2+ stimulates the citric acid cycle and ATP synthase. The aspartate–glutamate exchanger Aralar/AGC1 (Slc25a12), a component of the malate–aspartate shuttle (MAS), is stimulated by modest increases in cytosolic Ca2+ and upregulates respiration in cortical neurons by enhancing pyruvate supply into mitochondria. Failure to increase respiration in response to small (carbachol) and moderate (K+-depolarization) workloads and blunted stimulation of respiration in response to high workloads (veratridine) in Aralar/AGC1 knockout neurons reflect impaired MAS activity and limited mitochondrial pyruvate supply. In response to large workloads (veratridine), acute stimulation of respiration occurs in the absence of MAS through Ca2+ influx through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) and a rise in matrix [Ca2+]. Although the physiological importance of the MCU complex in work-induced stimulation of respiration of CNS neurons is not yet clarified, abnormal mitochondrial Ca2+ signalling causes pathology. Indeed, loss of function mutations in MICU1, a regulator of MCU complex, are associated with neuromuscular disease. In patient-derived MICU1 deficient fibroblasts, resting matrix Ca2+ is increased and mitochondria fragmented. Thus, the fine tuning of Ca2+ signals plays a key role in shaping mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:25809592

  9. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  10. Regulation of nuclear radiation exposures in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, U C

    2004-01-01

    India has a long-term program of wide spread applications of nuclear radiations and radioactive sources for peaceful applications in medicine, industry, agriculture and research and is already having several thousand places in the country where such sources are being routinely used. These places are mostly outside the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) installations. DAE supplies such sources. The most important application of nuclear energy in DAE is in electricity generation through nuclear power plants. Fourteen such plants are operating and many new plants are at various stages of construction. In view of the above mentioned wide spread applications, Indian parliament through an Act, called Atomic Energy Act, 1964 created an autonomous body called Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) with comprehensive authority and powers. This Board issues codes, guides, manuals, etc., to regulate such installations so as to ensure safe use of such sources and personnel engaged in such installations and environment receives radiation exposures within the upper bounds prescribed by them. Periodic reports are submitted to AERB to demonstrate compliance of its directives. Health, Safety and Environment Group of Bhabha Atomic Research Centres, Mumbai carries out necessary surveillance and monitoring of all installations of the DAE on a routine basis and also periodic inspections of other installations using radiation sources. Some of the nuclear fuel cycle plants like nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing involve large radioactive source inventories and have potential of accidental release of radioactivity into the environment, an Environmental Surveillance Laboratory (ESL) is set up at each such site much before the facility goes into operation. These ESL's collect baseline data and monitor the environment throughout the life of the facilities including the decommissioning stage. The data is provided to AERB and is available to members of the public. In addition, a multi

  11. New Insights into Mechanisms and Functions of Nuclear Size Regulation.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Lidija D; Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear size is generally maintained within a defined range in a given cell type. Changes in cell size that occur during cell growth, development, and differentiation are accompanied by dynamic nuclear size adjustments in order to establish appropriate nuclear-to-cytoplasmic volume relationships. It has long been recognized that aberrations in nuclear size are associated with certain disease states, most notably cancer. Nuclear size and morphology must impact nuclear and cellular functions. Understanding these functional implications requires an understanding of the mechanisms that control nuclear size. In this review, we first provide a general overview of the diverse cellular structures and activities that contribute to nuclear size control, including structural components of the nucleus, effects of DNA amount and chromatin compaction, signaling, and transport pathways that impinge on the nucleus, extranuclear structures, and cell cycle state. We then detail some of the key mechanistic findings about nuclear size regulation that have been gleaned from a variety of model organisms. Lastly, we review studies that have implicated nuclear size in the regulation of cell and nuclear function and speculate on the potential functional significance of nuclear size in chromatin organization, gene expression, nuclear mechanics, and disease. With many fundamental cell biological questions remaining to be answered, the field of nuclear size regulation is still wide open. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Visinin-like neuronal calcium sensor proteins regulate the slow calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizing current in the rat cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, Claudio; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    Many neurons in the nervous systems express afterhyperpolarizations that are mediated by a slow calcium-activated potassium current. This current shapes neuronal firing and is inhibited by neuromodulators, suggesting an important role in the regulation of neuronal function. Surprisingly, very little is currently known about the molecular basis for this current or how it is gated by calcium. Recently, the neuronal calcium sensor protein hippocalcin was identified as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current in the hippocampus. However, while hippocalcin is very strongly expressed in the hippocampus, this protein shows a relatively restricted distribution in the brain. Furthermore, the genetic deletion of this protein only partly reduces the slow hyperpolarizing current in hippocampus. These considerations question whether hippocalcin can be the sole calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current. Here we use loss of function and overexpression strategies to show that hippocalcin functions as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current in the cerebral cortex, an area where hippocalcin is expressed at much lower levels than in hippocampus. In addition we show that neurocalcin δ, but not VILIP-2, can also act as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current. Finally we show that hippocalcin and neurocalcin δ both increase the calcium sensitivity of the afterhyperpolarizing current but do not alter its sensitivity to inhibition by carbachol acting through the Gαq-11-PLCβ signaling cascade. These results point to a general role for a subgroup of visinin-like neuronal calcium sensor proteins in the activation of the slow calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizing current. PMID:20980592

  13. Regulation of intestinal calcium absorption by luminal calcium content: role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Brun, Lucas R; Brance, María L; Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Di Loreto, Verónica E; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2014-07-01

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase is a brush border enzyme that is stimulated by calcium. Inhibition of intestinal alkaline phosphatase increases intestinal calcium absorption. We hypothesized that intestinal alkaline phosphatase acts as a minute-to-minute regulatory mechanism of calcium entry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanism by which intestinal luminal calcium controls intestinal calcium absorption. We performed kinetic studies with purified intestinal alkaline phosphatase and everted duodenal sacs and showed that intestinal alkaline phosphatase modifies the luminal pH as a function of enzyme concentration and calcium luminal content. A decrease in pH occurred simultaneously with a decrease in calcium absorption. The inhibition of intestinal alkaline phosphatase by l-phenylalanine caused an increase in calcium absorption. This effect was also confirmed in calcium uptake experiments with isolated duodenal cells. Changes in luminal pH arising from intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity induced by luminal calcium concentration modulate intestinal calcium absorption. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Subcellular localization of calcium and Ca-ATPase activity during nuclear maturation in Bufo arenarum oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Inés; Cisint, Susana B; Crespo, Claudia A; Medina, Marcela F; Fernández, Silvia N

    2009-08-01

    The localization of calcium and Ca-ATPase activity in Bufo arenarum oocytes was investigated by ultracytochemical techniques during progesterone-induced nuclear maturation, under in vitro conditions. No Ca2+ deposits were detected in either control oocytes or progesterone-treated ones for 1-2 h. At the time when nuclear migration started, electron dense deposits of Ca2+ were visible in vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum cisternae and in the space between the annulate lamellae membranes. Furthermore, Ca-ATPase activity was also detected in these membrane structures. As maturation progressed, the cation deposits were observed in the cytomembrane structures, which underwent an important reorganization and redistribution. Thus, they moved from the subcortex and became located predominantly in the oocyte cortex area when nuclear maturation ended. Ca2+ stores were observed in vesicles surrounding or between the cortical granules, which are aligned close to the plasma membrane. The positive Ca-ATPase reaction in these membrane structures could indicate that the calcium deposit is an ATP-dependent process. Our results suggest that during oocyte maturation calcium would be stored in membrane structures where it remains available for release at the time of fertilization. Data obtained under our experimental conditions indicate that calcium from the extracellular medium would be important for the oocyte maturation process.

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. previous continue Working Calcium ... drinks, and cereals. Other Considerations for Building Bones Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption, so it's ...

  16. Unilateral vestibular deafferentation-induced changes in calcium signaling-related molecules in the rat vestibular nuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Masumura, Chisako; Horii, Arata; Mitani, Kenji; Kitahara, Tadashi; Uno, Atsuhiko; Kubo, Takeshi

    2007-03-23

    Inquiries into the neurochemical mechanisms of vestibular compensation, a model of lesion-induced neuronal plasticity, reveal the involvement of both voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC) and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Indeed, our previous microarray analysis showed an up-regulation of some calcium signaling-related genes such as the alpha2 subunit of L-type calcium channels, calcineurin, and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase 1 (PMCA1) in the ipsilateral vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) following unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD). To further elucidate the role of calcium signaling-related molecules in vestibular compensation, we used a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to confirm the microarray results and investigated changes in expression of these molecules at various stages of compensation (6 h to 2 weeks after UVD). We also investigated the changes in gene expression during Bechterew's phenomenon and the effects of a calcineurin inhibitor on vestibular compensation. Real-time PCR showed that genes for the alpha2 subunit of VGCC, PMCA2, and calcineurin were transiently up-regulated 6 h after UVD in ipsilateral VNC. A subsequent UVD, which induced Bechterew's phenomenon, reproduced a complete mirror image of the changes in gene expressions of PMCA2 and calcineurin seen in the initial UVD, while the alpha2 subunit of VGCC gene had a trend to increase in VNC ipsilateral to the second lesion. Pre-treatment by FK506, a calcineurin inhibitor, decelerated the vestibular compensation in a dose-dependent manner. Although it is still uncertain whether these changes in gene expression are causally related to the molecular mechanisms of vestibular compensation, this observation suggests that after increasing the Ca(2+) influx into the ipsilateral VNC neurons via up-regulated VGCC, calcineurin may be involved in their synaptic plasticity. Conversely, an up-regulation of PMCA2, a brain-specific Ca(2+) pump, would increase an efflux of Ca

  17. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  18. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as canned sardines and salmon Calcium-enriched foods such as breakfast cereals, fruit juices, soy and rice drinks, and tofu. Check the product labels. The exact amount of calcium you need depends on your age and other factors. Growing children and teenagers need more calcium than ...

  19. Manufacturing of calcium, lithium and molybdenum targets for use in nuclear physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheswa, N. Y.; Papka, P.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Lieder, R. M.; Neveling, R.; Newman, R. T.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes methods used in the manufacturing of chemically reactive targets such as calcium ( natCa), lithium-6 ( 6Li) and molybdenum-97 ( 97Mo) for nuclear physics experiments at the iThemba LABS cyclotron facility (Faure, South Africa). Due to the chemical properties of these materials a suitable and controlled environment was established in order to minimize oxygen contamination of targets. Calcium was prepared by means of vacuum evaporation while lithium was cold rolled to a desired thickness. In the case of molybdenum, the metallic powder was melted under vacuum using an e-gun followed by cold rolling of the metal bead to a desired thickness. In addition, latest developments toward the establishment of a dedicated nuclear physics target laboratory are discussed.

  20. NEUROD2 Regulates Stim1 Expression and Store-Operated Calcium Entry in Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Cansu; Bayam, Efil

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Calcium signaling controls many key processes in neurons, including gene expression, axon guidance, and synaptic plasticity. In contrast to calcium influx through voltage- or neurotransmitter-gated channels, regulatory pathways that control store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in neurons are poorly understood. Here, we report a transcriptional control of Stim1 (stromal interaction molecule 1) gene, which is a major sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium levels and a regulator of SOCE. By using a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing approach in mice, we find that NEUROD2, a neurogenic transcription factor, binds to an intronic element within the Stim1 gene. We show that NEUROD2 limits Stim1 expression in cortical neurons and consequently fine-tunes the SOCE response upon depletion of ER calcium. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism that regulates neuronal calcium homeostasis during cortical development. PMID:28303257

  1. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  2. Intrinsic and extrinsic negative regulators of nuclear protein transport processes

    PubMed Central

    Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear–cytoplasmic protein transport is a critical process in cellular events. The identification of transport signals (nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal) and their receptors has facilitated our understanding of this expanding field. Nuclear transport must be appropriately regulated to deliver proteins through the nuclear pore when their functions are required in the nucleus, and to export them into the cytoplasm when they are not needed in the nucleus. Altered nuclear transport processes have been observed in stressed cells, which would change gene expressions. Some viruses interfere with nuclear transport in host cells to evade immune defense. Moreover, certain transport factors negatively regulate nuclear protein transport in cells. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of nuclear–cytoplasmic trafficking not only provides important information about cellular processes, but also is of use for developing specific inhibitors for transport pathways. PMID:22672474

  3. Molecular basis of calcium regulation in connexin-32 hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, Juan M; de Miguel, Marta; Larrosa, Belen; González, Daniel; Barrio, Luis C

    2003-12-23

    In addition to forming gap-junction channels, a subset of connexins (Cxs) also form functional hemichannels. Most hemichannels are activated by depolarization, and opening depends critically on the external Ca2+ concentration. Here we describe the mechanisms of action and the structural determinants underlying the Ca2+ regulation of Cx32 hemichannels. At millimolar calcium concentrations, hemichannel voltage gating to the full open state of approximately 90 pS is inhibited, and ion conduction at negative voltages of the partially open hemichannels ( approximately 18 pS) is blocked. Thus, divalent cation blockage should be considered as a physiological mechanism to protect the cell from the potentially adverse effects of leaky hemichannels. A ring of 12 Asp residues within the external vestibule of the pore is responsible for the binding of Ca2+ that accounts for both pore occlusion and blockage of gating. The residue Asp-169 of one subunit and the Asp-178 of an adjacent subunit must be arranged precisely to allow interactions with Ca2+ to occur. Interestingly, a naturally occurring mutation (D178Y) that causes an inherited peripheral neuropathy induces a complete Ca2+ deregulation of Cx32 hemichannel activity, suggesting that this dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of the neuropathy.

  4. Discrete-State Stochastic Models of Calcium-Regulated Calcium Influx and Subspace Dynamics Are Not Well-Approximated by ODEs That Neglect Concentration Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.; Smith, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac myocyte calcium signaling is often modeled using deterministic ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and mass-action kinetics. However, spatially restricted “domains” associated with calcium influx are small enough (e.g., 10−17 liters) that local signaling may involve 1–100 calcium ions. Is it appropriate to model the dynamics of subspace calcium using deterministic ODEs or, alternatively, do we require stochastic descriptions that account for the fundamentally discrete nature of these local calcium signals? To address this question, we constructed a minimal Markov model of a calcium-regulated calcium channel and associated subspace. We compared the expected value of fluctuating subspace calcium concentration (a result that accounts for the small subspace volume) with the corresponding deterministic model (an approximation that assumes large system size). When subspace calcium did not regulate calcium influx, the deterministic and stochastic descriptions agreed. However, when calcium binding altered channel activity in the model, the continuous deterministic description often deviated significantly from the discrete stochastic model, unless the subspace volume is unrealistically large and/or the kinetics of the calcium binding are sufficiently fast. This principle was also demonstrated using a physiologically realistic model of calmodulin regulation of L-type calcium channels introduced by Yue and coworkers. PMID:23509597

  5. Hypercalcitoninemia and hypocalcemia in acutely ill children: studies in serum calcium, blood ionized calcium, and calcium-regulating hormones.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, G J; Venkataraman, P S; Pryor, R W; Parker, M K; Fry, H D; Blick, K E

    1989-06-01

    We studied the hypotheses that serum calcium and blood ionized calcium would be low in acutely ill children and would rise with clinical improvement. In 15 children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit, the blood ionized calcium level was 4.45 +/- 0.06 mg/dl (1.11 +/- 0.015 mmol/L) on entry versus 5.17 +/- 0.03 mg/dl (1.29 +/- 0.01 mmol/L) in control subjects (p less than 0.005), rose significantly on days 2 and 3, and was 5.12 +/- 0.04 mg/dl (1.28 +/- 0.01 mmol/L) at discharge (p less than 0.005). Changes in serum calcium level were similar, whereas serum magnesium and phosphorus levels were normal and did not change. Basal serum parathyroid hormone concentrations were elevated, rose further during the study, and were normal at discharge. Serum parathyroid hormone levels correlated inversely with blood ionized calcium levels, indicating that compensatory hyperparathyroidism occurs with low blood ionized calcium concentrations. Basal serum calcitonin values were evaluated on entry and decreased with clinical improvement. Serum calcitonin levels correlated significantly with low blood ionized calcium levels, indicating that hypercalcitoninemia may play a role in the pathogenesis of hypocalcemia in these children. Urine calcium excretion was not increased in the four children studied. We speculate that with clinical improvement, a rise in serum parathyroid hormone levels and a decline in serum calcitonin levels may help restore normocalcemia in these acutely ill children.

  6. Nuclear Material Management in Russia and New Federal Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martyanov,A A; Pitel,V A; Babcock,R A; Heinberg,C L; Tynan,D M

    2001-06-25

    The Russian Federation Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom) is the federal authority empowered with the management of state-owned nuclear materials, with the exception of military applications. The Russian Federal Nuclear Materials Control and Accounting Information System (FIS) is a key component in establishing an effective nuclear materials management system in the Russian Federation. In December 2000, the Russian government issued the decree to enter into force the regulation on the accounting and control of nuclear materials and directed the State System of Accounting and Control (SSAC) of nuclear materials should begin October 2001. This regulation establishes the basic accounting documents and the requirement to report them to the FIS to launch the State Nuclear Material Registry of nuclear materials. The Nuclear Material Registry contains information on agencies and operating organizations that use nuclear material, along with the kinds, quantity and other characteristics of nuclear material. Minatom will use the Registry and the supporting database and functionality that reside in the FIS for carrying out the functions of nuclear materials management. At the same time, the FIS provides for reporting from material balance areas (MBA). With American support, 14 Russian enterprises are reporting material balance area level information to the FIS using full-function reporting (i.e., reporting inventory and inventory changes including closeout and reconciliation between the FIS and enterprises). Russian Federation regulations for nuclear material control and accounting and nuclear materials management have been or are being developed, some of which may impact the FIS, whether for full-function reporting or its support in preparing the Nuclear Material Registry. This paper discusses the role and the place of the FIS in nuclear material management, describes the goals and challenges facing the FIS based on Russian Federation regulations, and provides a brief

  7. Regulation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Honkakoski, P; Negishi, M

    2000-01-01

    Members of the nuclear-receptor superfamily mediate crucial physiological functions by regulating the synthesis of their target genes. Nuclear receptors are usually activated by ligand binding. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms often catalyse both formation and degradation of these ligands. CYPs also metabolize many exogenous compounds, some of which may act as activators of nuclear receptors and disruptors of endocrine and cellular homoeostasis. This review summarizes recent findings that indicate that major classes of CYP genes are selectively regulated by certain ligand-activated nuclear receptors, thus creating tightly controlled networks. PMID:10749660

  8. Calcium regulates cyclic compression-induced early changes in chondrocytes during in vitro cartilage tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Raizman, Igal; De Croos, J N Amritha; Pilliar, Robert; Kandel, Rita A

    2010-10-01

    A single application of cyclic compression (1kPa, 1Hz, 30min) to bioengineered cartilage results in improved tissue formation through sequential catabolic and anabolic changes mediated via cell shape changes that are regulated by α5β1 integrin and membrane-type metalloprotease (MT1-MMP). To determine if calcium was involved in this process, the role of calcium in regulating cell shape changes, MT1-MMP expression and integrin activity in response to mechanical stimulation was examined. Stimulation-induced changes in cell shape and MT1-MMP expression were abolished by chelation of extracellular calcium, and this effect was reversed by re-introduction of calcium. Spreading was inhibited by blocking stretch-activated channels (with gadolinium), while retraction was prevented by blocking the L-Type voltage-gated channel (with nifedipine); both compounds inhibited MT1-MMP upregulation. Calcium A23187 ionophore restored cellular response further supporting a role for these channels. Calcium regulated the integrin-mediated signalling pathway, which was facilitated through Src kinase. Both calcium- and integrin-mediated pathways converged on ERK-MAPK in response to stimulation. While both integrins and calcium signalling mediate chondrocyte mechanotransduction, calcium appears to play the major regulatory role. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in chondrocyte mechanotransduction may lead to the development of improved bioengineered cartilage.

  9. SIRT2 regulates nuclear envelope reassembly through ANKLE2 deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Tanja; Kukolj, Eva; Brachner, Andreas; Beltzung, Etienne; Bruno, Melania; Kostrhon, Sebastian; Opravil, Susanne; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Warren, Graham; Slade, Dea

    2016-12-15

    Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is an NAD-dependent deacetylase known to regulate microtubule dynamics and cell cycle progression. SIRT2 has also been implicated in the pathology of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and progeria. Here, we show that SIRT2 depletion or overexpression causes nuclear envelope reassembly defects. We link this phenotype to the recently identified regulator of nuclear envelope reassembly ANKLE2. ANKLE2 acetylation at K302 and phosphorylation at S662 are dynamically regulated throughout the cell cycle by SIRT2 and are essential for normal nuclear envelope reassembly. The function of SIRT2 therefore extends beyond the regulation of microtubules to include the regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. SIRT2 regulates nuclear envelope reassembly through ANKLE2 deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Tanja; Kukolj, Eva; Brachner, Andreas; Beltzung, Etienne; Bruno, Melania; Kostrhon, Sebastian; Opravil, Susanne; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Warren, Graham

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is an NAD-dependent deacetylase known to regulate microtubule dynamics and cell cycle progression. SIRT2 has also been implicated in the pathology of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and progeria. Here, we show that SIRT2 depletion or overexpression causes nuclear envelope reassembly defects. We link this phenotype to the recently identified regulator of nuclear envelope reassembly ANKLE2. ANKLE2 acetylation at K302 and phosphorylation at S662 are dynamically regulated throughout the cell cycle by SIRT2 and are essential for normal nuclear envelope reassembly. The function of SIRT2 therefore extends beyond the regulation of microtubules to include the regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics. PMID:27875273

  11. Calcium Signaling Regulates Trafficking of Familial Hypocalciuric Hypercalcemia (FHH) Mutants of the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michael P.; Stepanchick, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) regulate systemic Ca2+ homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations cause familial benign hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) or neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT). FHH/NSHPT mutations can reduce trafficking of CaSRs to the plasma membrane. CaSR signaling is potentiated by agonist-driven anterograde CaSR trafficking, leading to a new steady state level of plasma membrane CaSR, which is maintained, with minimal functional desensitization, as long as extracellular Ca2+ is elevated. This requirement for CaSR signaling to drive CaSR trafficking to the plasma membrane led us to reconsider the mechanism(s) contributing to dysregulated trafficking of FHH/NSHPT mutants. We simultaneously monitored dynamic changes in plasma membrane levels of CaSR and intracellular Ca2+, using a chimeric CaSR construct, which allowed explicit tracking of plasma membrane levels of mutant or wild-type CaSRs in the presence of nonchimeric partners. Expression of mutants alone revealed severe defects in plasma membrane targeting and Ca2+ signaling, which were substantially rescued by coexpression with wild-type CaSR. Biasing toward heterodimerization of wild-type and FHH/NSHPT mutants revealed that intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were insufficient to rescue plasma membrane targeting. Coexpression of the nonfunctional mutant E297K with the truncation CaSRΔ868 robustly rescued trafficking and Ca2+ signaling, whereas coexpression of distinct FHH/NSHPT mutants rescued neither trafficking nor signaling. Our study suggests that rescue of FHH/NSHPT mutants requires a steady state intracellular Ca2+ response when extracellular Ca2+ is elevated and argues that Ca2+ signaling by wild-type CaSRs rescues FHH mutant trafficking to the plasma membrane. PMID:23077345

  12. Nuclear factor of activated T-cell isoform expression and regulation in human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Chin-Smith, Evonne C; Willey, Frances R; Slater, Donna M; Taggart, Michael J; Tribe, Rachel M

    2015-08-04

    During pregnancy, myometrial gene and protein expression is tightly regulated to accommodate fetal growth, promote quiescence and ultimately prepare for the onset of labour. It is proposed that changes in calcium signalling, may contribute to regulating gene expression and that nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) transcription factors (isoforms c1-c4) may be involved. Currently, there is little information regarding NFAT expression and regulation in myometrium. This study examined NFAT isoform mRNA expression in human myometrial tissue and cells from pregnant women using quantitative PCR. The effects of the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 and in vitro stretch (25 % elongation, static strain; Flexercell FX-4000 Tension System) on NFAT expression were determined in cultured human myometrial cells. Human myometrial tissue and cultured cells expressed NFATc1-c4 mRNA. NFATc2 gene expression in cultured cells was increased in response to 6 h stretch (11.5 fold, P < 0.001, n = 6) and calcium ionophore (A23187, 5 μM) treatment (20.6 fold, P < 0.001, n = 6). This response to stretch was significantly reduced (90 %, P < 0.001, n = 10) in the presence of an intracellular calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM (20 μM). These data suggest that NFATc2 expression is regulated by intracellular calcium and in vitro stretch, and that the stretch response in human myometrial cells is dependent upon intracellular calcium signalling pathways. Our findings indicate a potentially unique role for NFATc2 in mediating stretch-induced gene expression per se and warrant further exploration in relation to the mechanisms promoting uterine smooth muscle growth in early pregnancy and/or labour.

  13. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. PMID:24549172

  14. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  15. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essent...

  16. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium

    SciTech Connect

    Myre, Michael A.; O'Day, Danton H. . E-mail: doday@utm.utoronto.ca

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD ({sup 171}EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF{sup 195}) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues {sup 48}KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK{sup 64} that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to {sup 48}EF{sup 49} abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the {sup 48}EF{sup 49} construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

  17. Calcium in the regulation of gravitropism by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; LaFavre, A. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    The red light requirement for positive gravitropism in roots of corn (Zea mays cv "Merit") provides an entry for examining the participation of calcium in gravitropism. Applications of calcium chelators inhibit the light response. Calcium channel blockers (verapamil, lanthanum) can also inhibit the light response, and a calcium ionophore, A23187, can substitute for light. One can substitute for red light by treatments which have elsewhere been shown to trigger Ca2+ influx into the cytosol, e.g. heat or cold shock. Agents which are known to be agonists of the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system (serotonin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, deoxycholate) can each partially substitute for the red light, and Li+ can inhibit the light effect. These experiments suggest that the induction of positive gravitropism by red light involves a rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and that a contribution to this end may be made by the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system.

  18. Calcium in the regulation of gravitropism by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; LaFavre, A. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    The red light requirement for positive gravitropism in roots of corn (Zea mays cv "Merit") provides an entry for examining the participation of calcium in gravitropism. Applications of calcium chelators inhibit the light response. Calcium channel blockers (verapamil, lanthanum) can also inhibit the light response, and a calcium ionophore, A23187, can substitute for light. One can substitute for red light by treatments which have elsewhere been shown to trigger Ca2+ influx into the cytosol, e.g. heat or cold shock. Agents which are known to be agonists of the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system (serotonin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, deoxycholate) can each partially substitute for the red light, and Li+ can inhibit the light effect. These experiments suggest that the induction of positive gravitropism by red light involves a rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and that a contribution to this end may be made by the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system.

  19. Nuclear Pore Complexes: A Scaffold Regulating Developmental Transcription?

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Brickner, Jason H

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have a conserved, but poorly understood, role in transcriptional regulation. Recently, in Developmental Cell, Raices et al. argued that tissue-specific nuclear pore proteins (Nups) act as scaffolds that recruit the transcription factor Mef2C to the NPC, promoting transcription of NPC-associated genes during muscle development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  1. Regulation of Arterial Tone by Activation of Calcium-Dependent Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayden, Joseph E.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1992-04-01

    Blood pressure and tissue perfusion are controlled in part by the level of intrinsic (myogenic) vascular tone. However, many of the molecular determinants of this response are unknown. Evidence is now presented that the degree of myogenic tone is regulated in part by the activation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in arterial smooth muscle. Tetraethylammonium ion (TEA^+) and charybdotoxin (CTX), at concentrations that block calcium-activated potassium channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from cerebral arteries, depolarized and constricted pressurized cerebral arteries with myogenic tone. Both TEA^+ and CTX had little effect on arteries when intracellular calcium was reduced by lowering intravascular pressure or by blocking calcium channels. Elevation of intravascular pressure through membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular calcium may activate calcium-activated potassium channels. Thus, these channels may serve as a negative feedback pathway to control the degree of membrane depolarization and vasoconstriction.

  2. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  3. Calcineurin-NFATc signaling pathway regulates AQP2 expression in response to calcium signals and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Song-Zhe; McDill, Bradley W; Kovach, Paul A; Ding, Li; Go, William Y; Ho, Steffan N; Chen, Feng

    2007-05-01

    The aquaporin (AQP)2 channel mediates the reabsorption of water in renal collecting ducts in response to arginine vasopressin (AVP) and hypertonicity. Here we show that AQP2 expression is induced not only by the tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP)/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)5-mediated hypertonic stress response but also by the calcium-dependent calcineurin-NFATc pathway. The induction of AQP2 expression by the calcineurin-NFATc pathway can occur in the absence of TonEBP/NFAT5. Mutational and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed the existence of functional NFAT binding sites within the proximal AQP2 promoter responsible for regulation of AQP2 by NFATc proteins and TonEBP/NFAT5. Contrary to the notion that TonEBP/NFAT5 is the only Rel/NFAT family member regulated by tonicity, we found that hypertonicity promotes the nuclear translocation of NFATc proteins for the subsequent induction of AQP2 expression. Calcineurin activity was also found to be involved in the induction of TonEBP/NFAT5 expression by hypertonicity, thus further defining the signaling mechanisms that underlie the TonEBP/NFAT5 osmotic stress response pathway. The coordinate regulation of AQP2 expression by both osmotic stress and calcium signaling appears to provide a means to integrate diverse extracellular signals into optimal cellular responses.

  4. Calcium and Iron Regulate Swarming and Type III Secretion in Vibrio parahaemolyticus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gode-Potratz, Cindy J.; Chodur, Daniel M.; McCarter, Linda L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we probe the response to calcium during growth on a surface and show that calcium influences the transcriptome and stimulates motility and virulence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Swarming (but not swimming) gene expression and motility were enhanced by calcium. Calcium also elevated transcription of one of the organism's two type III secretion systems (T3SS1 but not T3SS2) and heightened cytotoxicity toward host cells in coculture. Calcium stimulation of T3SS gene expression has not been reported before, although low calcium is an inducing signal for the T3SS of many organisms. EGTA was also found to increase T3SS1 gene expression and virulence; however, this was demonstrated to be the consequence of iron rather than calcium chelation. Ectopic expression of exsA, encoding the T3SS1 AraC-type regulator, was used to define the extent of the T3SS1 regulon and verify its coincident induction by calcium and EGTA. To begin to understand the regulatory mechanisms modulating the calcium response, a calcium-repressed, LysR-type transcription factor named CalR was identified and shown to repress swarming and T3SS1 gene expression. Swarming and T3SS1 gene expression were also demonstrated to be linked by LafK, a σ54-dependent regulator of swarming, and additionally connected by a negative-feedback loop on the swarming regulon propagated by ExsA. Thus, calcium and iron, two ions pertinent for a marine organism and pathogen, play a signaling role with global consequences on the regulation of gene sets that are relevant for surface colonization and infection. PMID:20851895

  5. Differential CaMKII regulation by voltage-gated calcium channels in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Johanna G; Wang, Xiaohan; Colbran, Roger J

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and many other functions in striatal medium spiny neurons to modulate basal ganglia function. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major calcium-dependent signaling protein that couples calcium entry to diverse cellular changes. CaMKII activation results in autophosphorylation at Thr286 and sustained calcium-independent CaMKII activity after calcium signals dissipate. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating striatal CaMKII. To address this, mouse brain slices were treated with pharmacological modulators of calcium channels and punches of dorsal striatum were immunoblotted for CaMKII Thr286 autophosphorylation as an index of CaMKII activation. KCl depolarization increased levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation ~2-fold; this increase was blocked by an LTCC antagonist and was mimicked by treatment with pharmacological LTCC activators. The chelation of extracellular calcium robustly decreased basal CaMKII autophosphorylation within 5min and increased levels of total CaMKII in cytosolic fractions, in addition to decreasing the phosphorylation of CaMKII sites in the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors and the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors. We also found that the maintenance of basal levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation requires low-voltage gated T-type calcium channels, but not LTCCs or R-type calcium channels. Our findings indicate that CaMKII activity is dynamically regulated by multiple calcium channels in the striatum thus coupling calcium entry to key downstream substrates.

  6. High calcium diet down-regulates kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pörsti, Ilkka; Fan, Meng; Kööbi, Peeter; Jolma, Pasi; Kalliovalkama, Jarkko; Vehmas, Tuija I; Helin, Heikki; Holthöfer, Harry; Mervaala, Eero; Nyman, Tuulikki; Tikkanen, Ilkka

    2004-12-01

    Calcium salts are used as phosphate binders in renal failure, while high calcium diet also improves vasorelaxation and enhances natriuresis. The influences of calcium intake on renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are largely unknown. Four weeks after NTX, rats were put on 3.0% or 0.3% calcium diet for 8 weeks (12-week study). In additional experiments, 15 weeks after NTX, rats were put on similar diets for 12 weeks (27-week study). Appropriate blood, urine, and kidney samples were taken. Renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II receptors (AT1, AT2) were examined using autoradiography, ACE also using Western blotting, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) using immunohistochemistry. In the 12-week study, albuminuria increased 5-fold in NTX rats, but only 2-fold in calcium NTX rats on 3.0% calcium. In the 27-week study, high calcium intake decreased blood pressure, retarded progression of renal failure, reduced glomerulosclerosis, interstitial damage, and aortic calcifications, and improved survival from 50% to 92% in NTX rats. In both experiments plasma parathyroid hormone and phosphate were elevated after NTX, and suppressed by high calcium diet, while kidney ACE was down-regulated by 40% or more after increased calcium intake. In the 27-week study renal CTGF was decreased and cortical AT1 receptor density reduced after high calcium diet. High calcium diet down-regulated kidney ACE, reduced albuminuria and blood pressure, and favorably influenced kidney morphology in experimental renal failure. These findings suggest a link between calcium metabolism and kidney ACE expression, which may play a role in the progression of renal damage.

  7. Space-flight simulations of calcium metabolism using a mathematical model of calcium regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a series of simulation studies of calcium matabolic changes which have been recorded during human exposure to bed rest and space flight are presented. Space flight and bed rest data demonstrate losses of total body calcium during exposure to hypogravic environments. These losses are evidenced by higher than normal rates of urine calcium excretion and by negative calcium balances. In addition, intestinal absorption rates and bone mineral content are assumed to decrease. The bed rest and space flight simulations were executed on a mathematical model of the calcium metabolic system. The purpose of the simulations is to theoretically test hypotheses and predict system responses which are occurring during given experimental stresses. In this case, hypogravity occurs through the comparison of simulation and experimental data and through the analysis of model structure and system responses. The model reliably simulates the responses of selected bed rest and space flight parameters. When experimental data are available, the simulated skeletal responses and regulatory factors involved in the responses agree with space flight data collected on rodents. In addition, areas within the model that need improvement are identified.

  8. Calcium aluminates for quick cesium trapping, application for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Capmas, A.; Dubourg, M.; Boch, P.

    1993-12-31

    It has recently been shown that cesium dissolved in water could be trapped in a solid structure by adding cementitious calcium aluminates and fume silica. Calcium aluminates are heat resistant and widely used as refractory products. Extensive studies on the rheological properties has been achieved. It is now possible to obtain flow properties to such an extent as to percolate a slurry through broken structures and give high mechanical strength in a short time. This along with the other properties of thermal shock resistance and cesium trapping makes a solution possible for nuclear building safety as a preventitive or a curative material. For example, at Chernobyl, this material could improve safety by remote casting techniques, construction of a structure which could serve as as ash tray under the coruim. Remotelly controlled equipment needed for this are in operation in more than 50 standardized PWR`s. The equipment performs maintenance and inspection tasks with low radiation exposure.

  9. Regulation of epithelial calcium transport by prolactin: from fish to mammals.

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2013-01-15

    Among the reported ∼300 biological actions, the established role of prolactin (PRL) is to act as a vertebrate hypercalcemic hormone that regulates epithelial calcium transport in several organs, such as the gills, intestine, and kidney. In fish, PRL stimulates the branchial calcium transport by increasing the activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase. Although this calciotropic hormone also induces hypercalcemia in amphibians, reptiles and birds, little has been known regarding the underlying mechanism. In contrast, the effects of PRL on the epithelial calcium transport in mammals are well documented. In rodents, PRL has been shown to stimulate the renal tubular calcium reabsorption and intestinal calcium absorption, the latter of which is mediated by the PRL-induced upregulation of calcium transporter gene expression and activities. Recently, we demonstrated that the duodenal calcium absorption in lactating rats was markedly enhanced by the suckling-induced PRL surge, presumably to provide calcium for milk production. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of the PRL-stimulated calcium transport in mammals have been elaborated in this review. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear pore complexes and regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Raices, Marcela; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2017-01-11

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), are large multiprotein channels that penetrate the nuclear envelope connecting the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Accumulating evidence shows that besides their main role in regulating the exchange of molecules between these two compartments, NPCs and their components also play important transport-independent roles, including gene expression regulation, chromatin organization, DNA repair, RNA processing and quality control, and cell cycle control. Here, we will describe the recent findings about the role of these structures in the regulation of gene expression.

  11. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, and calcium-regulating hormones in preeclamptics and controls during first day postpartum.

    PubMed

    Dalmar, Ahmed; Raff, Hershel; Chauhan, Suneet P; Singh, Maharaj; Siddiqui, Danish S

    2015-02-01

    The evidence for a link between vitamin D and preeclampsia is conflicting. There is a paucity of studies reporting simultaneous 25-hydroxyvitamin D (inactive form) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (biologically active form). We investigated if levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium-regulating hormones (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), and calcium differ significantly between preeclamptics and controls. On postpartum day one, 98 subjects (44 with preeclampsia, 54 controls) were recruited among women admitted to the postdelivery unit, and their serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, serum calcium, and serum albumin levels were prospectively measured. The majority of participants (70%) had serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level<20 ng/mL; 53% had <15 ng/mL. Mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was similar between cases and controls (p=0.50). Mean total serum calcium adjusted for albumin and magnesium was similar between cases and controls (p=0.78). Mean serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels were normal, and there were no differences between cases and controls. The only significant differences found between preeclamptic cases and controls were mean body mass index, parity, and season of blood draw. Vitamin D levels did not differ among preeclamptic cases and controls.

  12. Sphingolipid metabolites selectively elicit increases in nuclear calcium concentration in cell suspension cultures and in isolated nuclei of tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tou Cheu; Coursol, Sylvie; Grat, Sabine; Ranjeva, Raoul; Mazars, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Sphingolipids are known to interfere with calcium-based signalling pathways. Here we report that these compounds modulate nuclear calcium signalling in tobacco BY-2 cells. Nuclear protein kinase activity phosphorylated endogenous sphingoid long-chain bases (LCBs), suggesting that LCBs are actively metabolized in the nucleus of tobacco BY-2 cells. The Delta4-unsaturated LCB D-erythro-sphingosine and the saturated LCB D-ribo-phytosphingosine elicited increases in free calcium in the nucleus in a dose-dependent and structure-related manner. However, neither sphingosine-1-phosphate nor C2-ceramide was able to stimulate nuclear calcium changes. N-,N-Dimethyl-D-erythro-sphingosine, a structural analogue of D-erythro-sphingosine, was the most efficient LCB so far tested in eliciting nuclear calcium changes both in intact tobacco BY-2 cells and in isolated nuclei. TRP channel inhibitors prevent the effect of DMS, suggesting that LCBs may activate TRP-like channels located on the inner nuclear membrane Collectively, the obtained data show that nuclei respond to LCBs on their own independently of the cytosolic compartment.

  13. NCS-1 differentially regulates growth cone and somata calcium channels in Lymnaea neurons.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kwokyin; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2008-02-01

    Local voltage-gated calcium channels, which regulate intracellular Ca2+ levels by allowing Ca2+ influx, play an important role in guiding and shaping growth cones, and in regulating the outgrowth and branching of neurites. Therefore, elucidating the mechanisms that regulate the biophysical properties of whole-cell calcium currents in the growth cones and somata of growing neurons is important to improving our understanding of neuronal development and regeneration. In this study, taking advantage of the large size of the pedal A (PeA) neurons in Lymnaea stagnalis, we compared the biophysical properties of somata and growth cone whole-cell calcium channel currents using Ba2+ and Ca2+ as current carriers. We found that somata and growth cone currents exhibit similar high-voltage activation properties. However, Ba2+ and Ca2+ currents in growth cones and somata are differentially affected by a dominant-negative peptide containing the C-terminal amino acid sequence of neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1). The peptide selectively reduces the peak and sustained components of current densities and the slope conductance in growth cones, and shifts the reversal potential of the growth cone currents to more hyperpolarized voltages. In contrast, the peptide had no significant effect on the somata calcium channels. Thus, we conclude that NCS-1 differentially modulates Ca2+ currents in the somata and growth cones of regenerating neurons, and may serve as a key regulator to facilitate the growth cone calcium channel activity.

  14. Skeletal muscle sarcolemma in malignant hyperthermia: evidence for a defect in calcium regulation.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, J R; Ross, J A; Hyslop, R J; Gallant, E M; Louis, C F

    1987-03-12

    Sarcolemmal properties implicated in the skeletal muscle disorder, malignant hyperthermia (MH), were examined using sarcolemma-membrane vesicles isolated from normal and MH-susceptible (MHS) porcine skeletal muscle. MHS and normal sarcolemma did not differ in the distribution of the major proteins, cholesterol or phospholipid content, vesicle size and sidedness, (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity, ouabain binding, or adenylate cyclase activity (total and isoproterenol sensitivity). The regulation of the initial rates of MHS and normal sarcolemmal ATP-dependent calcium transport (calcium uptake after 1 min) by Ca2+ (K1/2 = 0.64-0.81 microM), calmodulin, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase were similar. However, when sarcolemmal calcium content was measured at either 2 or 20 min after the initiation of active calcium transport, a significant difference between MHS and normal sarcolemmal calcium uptake became apparent, with MHS sarcolemma accumulating approximately 25% less calcium than normal sarcolemma. Calcium transport by MHS and normal sarcolemma, at 2 or 20 min, had a similar calmodulin dependence (C1/2 = 150 nM), and was stimulated to a similar extent by cAMP-dependent protein kinase or calmodulin. Halothane inhibited MHS and normal sarcolemmal active calcium uptake in a similar fashion (half-maximal inhibition at 10 mM halothane), while dantrolene (30 microM) and nitrendipine (1 microM) had little effect on either MHS or normal sarcolemmal calcium transport. After 20 min of ATP-supported calcium uptake, 2 mM EGTA plus 10 microM sodium orthovanadate were added to initiate sarcolemmal calcium efflux. Following an initial rapid phase of calcium release, an extended slow phase of calcium efflux (k = 0.012 min-1) was similar for both MHS and normal sarcolemma vesicles. We conclude that although a number of sarcolemmal properties, including passive calcium permeability, are normal in MH, a small but significant defect in MHS sarcolemmal ATP-dependent calcium transport may

  15. Mitochondrial respiration links TOR Complex 2 signaling to calcium regulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2017-03-21

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a conserved regulator of cell growth and functions within 2 different protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, where TORC2 positively controls macroautophagy/autophagy during amino acid starvation. Under these conditions, TORC2 signaling inhibits the activity of the calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin and promotes the general amino acid control (GAAC) response and autophagy. Here we demonstrate that TORC2 regulates calcineurin by controlling the respiratory activity of mitochondria. In particular, we find that mitochondrial oxidative stress affects the calcium channel regulatory protein Mid1, which we show is an essential upstream activator of calcineurin. Thus, these findings describe a novel regulation for autophagy that involves TORC2 signaling, mitochondrial respiration, and calcium homeostasis.

  16. Computer simulation studies in fluid and calcium regulation and orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The systems analysis approach to physiological research uses mathematical models and computer simulation. Major areas of concern during prolonged space flight discussed include fluid and blood volume regulation; cardiovascular response during shuttle reentry; countermeasures for orthostatic intolerance; and calcium regulation and bone atrophy. Potential contributions of physiologic math models to future flight experiments are examined.

  17. Synaptic Calcium Regulation in Hair Cells of the Chicken Basilar Papilla

    PubMed Central

    Im, Gi Jung; Moskowitz, Howard S.; Lehar, Mohammed; Hiel, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic inhibition of hair cells occurs by activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels. A near-membrane postsynaptic cistern has been proposed to serve as a store from which calcium is released to supplement influx through the ionotropic ACh receptor. However, the time and voltage dependence of acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked potassium currents reveal a more complex relationship between calcium entry and release from stores. The present work uses voltage steps to regulate calcium influx during the application of ACh to hair cells in the chicken basilar papilla. When calcium influx was terminated at positive membrane potential, the ACh-evoked potassium current decayed exponentially over ∼100 ms. However, at negative membrane potentials, this current exhibited a secondary rise in amplitude that could be eliminated by dihydropyridine block of the voltage-gated calcium channels of the hair cell. Calcium entering through voltage-gated channels may transit through the postsynaptic cistern, since ryanodine and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase blockers altered the time course and magnitude of this secondary, voltage-dependent contribution to ACh-evoked potassium current. Serial section electron microscopy showed that efferent and afferent synaptic structures are juxtaposed, supporting the possibility that voltage-gated influx at afferent ribbon synapses influences calcium homeostasis during long-lasting cholinergic inhibition. In contrast, spontaneous postsynaptic currents (“minis”) resulting from stochastic efferent release of ACh were made briefer by ryanodine, supporting the hypothesis that the synaptic cistern serves primarily as a calcium barrier and sink during low-level synaptic activity. Hypolemmal cisterns such as that at the efferent synapse of the hair cell can play a dynamic role in segregating near-membrane calcium for short-term and long-term signaling. PMID:25505321

  18. Dynamics and regulation of nuclear import and nuclear movements of HIV-1 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, Ryan C.; Chen, Jianbo; Sastri, Jaya; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics and regulation of HIV-1 nuclear import and its intranuclear movements after import have not been studied. To elucidate these essential HIV-1 post-entry events, we labeled viral complexes with two fluorescently tagged virion-incorporated proteins (APOBEC3F or integrase), and analyzed the HIV-1 dynamics of nuclear envelope (NE) docking, nuclear import, and intranuclear movements in living cells. We observed that HIV-1 complexes exhibit unusually long NE residence times (1.5±1.6 hrs) compared to most cellular cargos, which are imported into the nuclei within milliseconds. Furthermore, nuclear import requires HIV-1 capsid (CA) and nuclear pore protein Nup358, and results in significant loss of CA, indicating that one of the viral core uncoating steps occurs during nuclear import. Our results showed that the CA-Cyclophilin A interaction regulates the dynamics of nuclear import by delaying the time of NE docking as well as transport through the nuclear pore, but blocking reverse transcription has no effect on the kinetics of nuclear import. We also visualized the translocation of viral complexes docked at the NE into the nucleus and analyzed their nuclear movements and determined that viral complexes exhibited a brief fast phase (<9 min), followed by a long slow phase lasting several hours. A comparison of the movement of viral complexes to those of proviral transcription sites supports the hypothesis that HIV-1 complexes quickly tether to chromatin at or near their sites of integration in both wild-type cells and cells in which LEDGF/p75 was deleted using CRISPR/cas9, indicating that the tethering interactions do not require LEDGF/p75. These studies provide novel insights into the dynamics of viral complex-NE association, regulation of nuclear import, viral core uncoating, and intranuclear movements that precede integration site selection. PMID:28827840

  19. Heat stress responses modulate calcium regulations and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Chun-Feng; Cheng, Chen-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2010-04-01

    Heat stress-induced responses change the ionic currents and calcium homeostasis. However, the molecular insights into the heat stress responses on calcium homeostasis remain unclear. The purposes of this study were to examine the mechanisms of heat stress responses on calcium handling and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes. We used indo-1 fluorimetric ratio technique and whole-cell patch clamp to investigate the intracellular calcium, action potentials, and ionic currents in isolated rabbit single atrial cardiomyocytes with or without (control) exposure to heat stress (43 degrees C, 15 min) 5+/-1 h before experiments. The expressions of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA2a), and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in the control and heat stress-treated atrial myocytes were evaluated by Western blot and real-time PCR. As compared with control myocytes, the heat stress-treated myocytes had larger sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content and larger intracellular calcium transient with a shorter decay portion. Heat stress-treated myocytes also had larger L-type calcium currents, transient outward potassium currents, but smaller NCX currents. Heat stress responses increased the protein expressions, SERCA2a, NCX, and heat shock protein. However, heat stress responses did not change the RNA expression of SERCA2a and NCX. In conclusion, heat stress responses change calcium handling through protein but not RNA regulation.

  20. Dolomite supplementation improves bone metabolism through modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Nagasawa, Sakae; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Michio

    2005-01-01

    Dolomite, a mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate (CaMg (CO3)2), is used as a food supplement that supplies calcium and magnesium. However, the effect of magnesium supplementation on bone metabolism in patients with osteoporosis is a matter of controversy. We examined the effects of daily supplementation with dolomite on calcium metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Dolomite was administered daily to OVX rats for 9 weeks. The same amount of magnesium chloride as that supplied by the dolomite was given to OVX rats as a positive control. Histological examination revealed that ovariectomy decreased trabecular bone and increased adipose tissues in the femoral metaphysis. Dolomite or magnesium supplementation failed to improve these bone histological features. Calcium content in the femora was decreased in OVX rats. Neither calcium nor magnesium content in the femora in OVX rats was significantly increased by dolomite or magnesium administration. Urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion was significantly increased in OVX rats, and was not affected by the magnesium supplementation. Serum concentrations of magnesium were increased, and those of calcium were decreased, in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. However, there was a tendency toward decreased parathyroid hormone secretion and increased calcitonin secretion in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and osteocalcin levels were significantly increased in the supplemented OVX rats. These results suggest that increased magnesium intake improves calcium metabolism in favor of increasing bone formation, through the modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion.

  1. Calcium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert J P

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes the chemical and biological value of the calcium ion. In calcium chemistry, our main interest is in equilibria within static, nonflowing systems. Hence, we examined the way calcium formed precipitates and complex ions in solution. We observed thereafter its uses by humankind in a vast number of materials such as minerals, e.g., marble, concrete, mortars, which parallel the biological use in shells and bones. In complex formation, we noted that many combinations were of anion interaction with calcium for example in the uses of detergents and medicines. The rates of exchange of calcium from bound states were noted but they had little application. Calcium ions do not act as catalysts of organic reactions. In biological systems, interest is in the above chemistry, but extends to the fact that Ca2+ ions can carry information by flowing in one solution or from one solution to another through membranes. Hence, we became interested in the details of rates of calcium exchange. The fast exchange of this divalent ion from most organic binding sites has allowed it to develop as the dominant second messenger. Now the flow can be examined in vitro as calcium binds particular isolated proteins, which it activates as seen in physical mechanical changes or chemical changes and this piece-by-piece study of cells is common. Here, however, we have chosen to stress the whole circuit of Ca2+ action indicating that the cell is organized both at a basal and an activated state kinetic level by the steady state flow of the ion (see Fig. 11). Different time constants of exchange utilizing very similar binding constants lead to: 1) fast responses as in the muscle of an animal; or 2) slower change as in differentiation of an egg or seed. Many other changes of state may relate to Ca2+ steady-state levels of flow in the circuitry and here we point to two: 1) dormancy in reptiles and animals; and 2) sporulation in both bacteria and lower plants. In the other chapters of

  2. Regulation of Intracellular Free Calcium in Neuronal Cells by Opioids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-19

    receptor antagonists, 7-benzylidene naltrexone (BNTX; 01)’ and naltriben (NTB; 02), were used to characterize further the subtype of o-receptors that...Specific Opioid Binding to Neuroblastoma x Dorsal Root Ganglion Neuone Hybrid Cell Lines . . .. .. . . . .... . Effect of Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and Low ...NTB NTI U69593 TMB-S antisense oligonucleotide maximum density of binding sites 7 -benzylidene naltrexone intracellular free calcium

  3. Redox regulation of the ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Zissimopoulos, S; Lai, F A

    2006-11-01

    The RyR (ryanodine receptor)/calcium release channel contains a number of highly reactive thiol groups that endow it with redox sensitivity. In general, oxidizing conditions favour channel opening, while reducing conditions have the opposite effect. Thiol modification affects the channel sensitivity to its principal effectors, Ca2+, Mg2+ and ATP, and alters RyR protein interactions. Here, we give a brief account of the major findings and prevailing views in the field.

  4. State-federal interactions in nuclear regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A.D.; Budnitz, R.J.

    1987-12-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 established, and later Congressional amendments have confirmed, that except in areas which have been explicitly granted to the states, the federal government possesses preemptive authority to regulate radiation hazards associated with the development and use of atomic energy. Since the passage of the original Act, numerous decisions by the courts have reaffirmed the legitimacy of federal preemption, and have defined and redefined its scope. In this study, the aim is to explore the underlying issues involved in federal preemption of radiation-hazard regulation, and to recommend actions that the Department of Energy and other agencies and groups should consider undertaking in the near term to protect the preemption principle. Appropriate roles of the states are discussed, as well as recent state-level activities and their rationale, and several current arenas in which state-federal conflicts about regulation of hazards are being played out. The emphasis here is on four particular arenas that are now important arenas of conflict, but the issues discussed are far broader in scope. These four arenas are: state-level moratorium activity; emergency planning for reactors; conflicts arising from state financial regulation; and inroads in federal preemption through litigation under state law.

  5. KChIP2 Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy Through Regulation of Ito and Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongwei; Hadri, Lahouaria; Palomeque, Julieta; Morel, Charlotte; Karakikes, Ioannis; Kaprielian, Roger; Hajjar, Roger; Lebeche, Djamel

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the auxiliary subunit KChIP2, which assembles with pore-forming Kv4-subunits, represents a new potential regulator of the cardiac calcium-independent transient outward potassium current (Ito) density. In hypertrophy and heart failure, KChIP2 expression has been found to be significantly decreased. Our aim was to examine the role of KChIP2 in cardiac hypertrophy and the effect of restoring its expression on electrical remodeling and cardiac mechanical function using a combination of molecular, biochemical and gene targeting approaches. KChIP2 overexpression through gene transfer of Ad.KChIP2 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in a significant increase in Ito-channel forming Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 protein levels. In vivo gene transfer of KChIP2 in aortic banded adult rats showed that, compared to sham-operated or Ad.β-gal-transduced hearts, KChIP2 significantly attenuated the developed left ventricular hypertrophy, robustly increased Ito densities, shortened action potential duration, and significantly altered myocyte mechanics by shortening contraction amplitudes and maximal rates of contraction and relaxation velocities and decreasing Ca2+ transients. Interestingly, blocking Ito with 4-aminopyridine in KChIP2-overexpressing adult cardiomyocytes significantly increased the Ca2+ transients to control levels. One-day old rat pups intracardially transduced with KChIP2 for two months then subjected to aortic banding for 6–8 weeks (to induce hypertrophy) showed similar echocardiographic, electrical and mechanical remodeling parameters. In addition, in cultured adult cardiomyocytes, KChIP2 overexpression increased the expression of Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) and sodium calcium exchanger but had no effect on ryanodine receptor 2 or phospholamban expression. In neonatal myocytes, KChIP2 notably reversed Ang II-induced hypertrophic changes in protein synthesis and MAP-kinase activation. It also significantly decreased calcineurin expression, NFATc1

  6. [Regulation of different calcium forms on the photosynthesis of tomato leaves under heat stress].

    PubMed

    Qi, Hong-yan; Wang, Dan; Qi, Ming-fang; Liu, Yu-feng; He, Yu; Li, Tian-lai

    2014-12-01

    The regulation of different calcium forms, namely CaCl2, Nano-calcium and Manntiol-calcuim, on the gas exchange and fluorescence of tomato leaves under heat stress was investigated. The results showed that all forms of calcium alleviated the decrease of chlorophyll a and carotenoid contents in leaves of tomato seedlings under heat stress, enhanced the net photosynthesis rate (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) to varying degrees, reduced the quantum yield of non-regulated energy dissipation [Y(NO)] of PSII and quantum yield of non-photochemical energy dissipation in PSI due to acceptor side limitation [Y(NA)], promoted the regulated energy dissipation [Y(NPQ)] and quantum yield of non-photochemical energy dissipation in PSI due to donor side limitation [Y(ND)], and increased the calcium content in leaves. Generally, manntiol-calcium and nano-calcium were more effective than CaCl2, and more suitable to enhance the photosynthesis of leaves oftomato seedlings under heat stress.

  7. PP2A Regulates HDAC4 Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Paroni, Gabriela; Cernotta, Nadia; Dello Russo, Claudio; Gallinari, Paola; Pallaoro, Michele; Foti, Carmela; Talamo, Fabio; Orsatti, Laura; Steinkühler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Different signal-regulated serine/threonine kinases phosphorylate class II histone deacetylases (HDACs) to promote nuclear export, cytosolic accumulation, and activation of gene transcription. However, little is known about mechanisms operating in the opposite direction, which, possibly through phosphatases, should promote class II HDACs nuclear entry and subsequent gene repression. Here we show that HDAC4 forms a complex with the PP2A holoenzyme Cα, Aα, B/PR55α. In vitro and in vivo binding studies demonstrate that the N-terminus of HDAC4 interacts with the catalytic subunit of PP2A. HDAC4 is dephosphorylated by PP2A and experiments using okadaic acid or RNA interference have revealed that PP2A controls HDAC4 nuclear import. Moreover, we identified serine 298 as a putative phosphorylation site important for HDAC4 nuclear import. The HDAC4 mutant mimicking phosphorylation of serine 298 is defective in nuclear import. Mutation of serine 298 to alanine partially rescues the defect in HDAC4 nuclear import observed in cells with down-regulated PP2A. These observations suggest that PP2A, via the dephosphorylation of multiple serines including the 14-3-3 binding sites and serine 298, controls HDAC4 nuclear import. PMID:18045992

  8. Calcium regulation of actin crosslinking is important for function of the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ruth; Maselli, Andrew; Thomson, Susanne A M; Lim, Rita W L; Stokes, John V; Fechheimer, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is sensitive to changes in calcium, which affect contractility, actin-severing proteins, actin-crosslinking proteins and calmodulin-regulated enzymes. To dissect the role of calcium control on the activity of individual proteins from effects of calcium on other processes, calcium-insensitive forms of these proteins were prepared and introduced into living cells to replace a calcium-sensitive form of the same protein. Crosslinking and bundling of actin filaments by the Dictyostelium 34 kDa protein is inhibited in the presence of micromolar free calcium. A modified form of the 34 kDa protein with mutations in the calcium binding EF hand (34 kDa deltaEF2) was prepared using site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in E. coli. Equilibrium dialysis using [(45)Ca]CaCl(2) revealed that the wild-type protein is able to bind one calcium ion with a Kd of 2.4 microM. This calcium binding is absent in the 34 kDa deltaEF2 protein. The actin-binding activity of the 34 kDa deltaEF2 protein was equivalent to wildtype but calcium insensitive in vitro. The wild-type and 34 kDa deltaEF2 proteins were expressed in 34-kDa-null and 34 kDa/alpha-actinin double null mutant Dictyostelium strains to test the hypothesis that calcium regulation of actin crosslinking is important in vivo. The 34 kDa deltaEF2 failed to supply function of the 34 kDa protein important for control of cell size and for normal growth to either of these 34-kDa-null strains. Furthermore, the distribution of the 34 kDa protein and actin were abnormal in cells expressing 34 kDa deltaEF2. Thus, calcium regulation of the formation and/or dissolution of crosslinked actin structures is required for dynamic behavior of the actin cytoskeleton important for cell structure and growth.

  9. Localization of the calcium-regulated citrate transport process in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Hering-Smith, Kathleen S; Mao, Weibo; Schiro, Faith R; Coleman-Barnett, Joycelynn; Pajor, Ana M; Hamm, L Lee

    2014-06-01

    Urinary citrate is an important inhibitor of calcium-stone formation. Most of the citrate reabsorption in the proximal tubule is thought to occur via a dicarboxylate transporter NaDC1 located in the apical membrane. OK cells, an established opossum kidney proximal tubule cell line, transport citrate but the characteristics change with extracellular calcium such that low calcium solutions stimulate total citrate transport as well as increase the apparent affinity for transport. The present studies address several fundamental properties of this novel process: the polarity of the transport process, the location of the calcium-sensitivity and whether NaDC1 is present in OK cells. OK cells grown on permeable supports exhibited apical >basolateral citrate transport. Apical transport of both citrate and succinate was sensitive to extracellular calcium whereas basolateral transport was not. Apical calcium, rather than basolateral, was the predominant determinant of changes in transport. Also 2,3-dimethylsuccinate, previously identified as an inhibitor of basolateral dicarboxylate transport, inhibited apical citrate uptake. Although the calcium-sensitive transport process in OK cells is functionally not typical NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in OK cells by Western blot and PCR. By immunolocalization studies, NaDC1 was predominantly located in discrete apical membrane or subapical areas. However, by biotinylation, apical NaDC1 decreases in the apical membrane with lowering calcium. In sum, OK cells express a calcium-sensitive/regulated dicarboxylate process at the apical membrane which responds to variations in apical calcium. Despite the functional differences of this process compared to NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in these cells, but predominantly in subapical vesicles.

  10. Lobe-Specific Calcium Binding in Calmodulin Regulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pei-Rung; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Liou, Jun-Yang; Wu, Kenneth K.; Chen, Pei-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background Human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) requires calcium-bound calmodulin (CaM) for electron transfer but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a series of CaM mutants with E to Q substitution at the four calcium-binding sites, we found that single mutation at any calcium-binding site (B1Q, B2Q, B3Q and B4Q) resulted in ∼2–3 fold increase in the CaM concentration necessary for half-maximal activation (EC50) of citrulline formation, indicating that each calcium-binding site of CaM contributed to the association between CaM and eNOS. Citrulline formation and cytochrome c reduction assays revealed that in comparison with nNOS or iNOS, eNOS was less stringent in the requirement of calcium binding to each of four calcium-binding sites. However, lobe-specific disruption with double mutations in calcium-binding sites either at N- (B12Q) or at C-terminal (B34Q) lobes greatly diminished both eNOS oxygenase and reductase activities. Gel mobility shift assay and flavin fluorescence measurement indicated that N- and C-lobes of CaM played distinct roles in regulating eNOS catalysis; the C-terminal EF-hands in its calcium-bound form was responsible for the binding of canonical CaM-binding domain, while N-terminal EF-hands in its calcium-bound form controlled the movement of FMN domain. Limited proteolysis studies further demonstrated that B12Q and B34Q induced different conformational change in eNOS. Conclusions Our results clearly demonstrate that CaM controls eNOS electron transfer primarily through its lobe-specific calcium binding. PMID:22768143

  11. Calcium signaling and cell volume regulation are altered in Sjögren's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enger, Tone Berge; Aure, Marit Høyberg; Jensen, Janicke Liaaen; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2014-10-01

    Sjögren's Syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease, leading to deficient secretion from salivary and lacrimal glands. Saliva production is normally increased by cholinergic innervation, giving rise to intracellular calcium signaling and water transport through water channels (aquaporins, AQPs). The aim of this study was to investigate possible pathophysiological changes in cell volume regulation, AQP expression and localization, and intracellular calcium signaling in glandular cells from SS patients compared to controls. A total of 35 SS patients and 41 non-SS controls were included. Real time qPCR was combined with immunohistochemistry to analyze the mRNA expression and cellular distribution of AQP1, 3 and 5. Cell volume regulation and intracellular calcium signaling were examined in fresh acinar cells. We show for the first time a reduced mRNA expression of AQP1 and 5 in SS compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease in staining intensity of AQP1, 3 and 5 in areas adjacent to local lymphocytic infiltration. Furthermore, we observed that the SS cells' capacity for volume regulation was abnormal. Similarly, the calcium response after parasympathetic agonist (carbachol) stimulation was markedly decreased in SS cells. It is concluded that mRNA expression of AQP1 and 5, protein distribution of AQP1, 3 and 5, glandular cell volume regulation and intracellular calcium signaling are all altered in SS, pointing to possible pathophysiological mechanisms in SS.

  12. Carbonic Anhydrase-8 Regulates Inflammatory Pain by Inhibiting the ITPR1-Cytosolic Free Calcium Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Gerald Z.; Keeler, Benjamin; Grant, Jeff; Bianchi, Laura; Fu, Eugene S.; Zhang, Yan Ping; Erasso, Diana M.; Cui, Jian-Guo; Wiltshire, Tim; Li, Qiongzhen; Hao, Shuanglin; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Candiotti, Keith; Wishnek, Sarah M.; Smith, Shad B.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Martin, Eden R.; Levitt, Roy C.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium dysregulation is causally linked with various forms of neuropathology including seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s, spinal cerebellar ataxia (SCA) and chronic pain. Carbonic anhydrase-8 (Car8) is an allosteric inhibitor of inositol trisphosphate receptor-1 (ITPR1), which regulates intracellular calcium release fundamental to critical cellular functions including neuronal excitability, neurite outgrowth, neurotransmitter release, mitochondrial energy production and cell fate. In this report we test the hypothesis that Car8 regulation of ITPR1 and cytoplasmic free calcium release is critical to nociception and pain behaviors. We show Car8 null mutant mice (MT) exhibit mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from MT also demonstrate increased steady-state ITPR1 phosphorylation (pITPR1) and cytoplasmic free calcium release. Overexpression of Car8 wildtype protein in MT nociceptors complements Car8 deficiency, down regulates pITPR1 and abolishes thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity. We also show that Car8 nociceptor overexpression alleviates chronic inflammatory pain. Finally, inflammation results in downregulation of DRG Car8 that is associated with increased pITPR1 expression relative to ITPR1, suggesting a possible mechanism of acute hypersensitivity. Our findings indicate Car8 regulates the ITPR1-cytosolic free calcium pathway that is critical to nociception, inflammatory pain and possibly other neuropathological states. Car8 and ITPR1 represent new therapeutic targets for chronic pain. PMID:25734498

  13. Transportin Regulates Nuclear Import of CD44

    PubMed Central

    Janiszewska, Michalina; De Vito, Claudio; Le Bitoux, Marie-Aude; Fusco, Carlo; Stamenkovic, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    CD44 is a facultative cell surface proteoglycan that serves as the principal cell surface receptor for hyaluronan (HA). Studies have shown that in addition to participating in numerous signaling pathways, CD44 becomes internalized upon engagement by ligand and that a portion of its intracellular domain can translocate to the nucleus where it is believed to play a functional role in cell proliferation and survival. However, the mechanisms whereby fragments of CD44 enter the nucleus have not been elucidated. Here we show that CD44 interacts with two import receptors of the importin β superfamily, importin β itself and transportin. Inhibition of importin β-dependent transport failed to block CD44 accumulation in the nucleus. By contrast, inhibition of the transportin-dependent pathway abrogated CD44 import. Mutagenesis of the intracellular domain of CD44 revealed that the 20 membrane-proximal residues contain sequences required for transportin-mediated nuclear transport. Our observations provide evidence that CD44 interacts with importin family members and identify the transportin-dependent pathway as the mechanism whereby full-length CD44 enters the nucleus. PMID:20663864

  14. Characterization of the role of calcium in regulating the microtubule-destabilizing activity of MDP25.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tao; Li, Jiejie; Yuan, Ming; Mao, Tonglin

    2012-07-01

    Regulation of cell elongation is important for plant morphogenesis. Many studies have shown that cortical microtubules play crucial roles during cell elongation and that microtubule stability, organization, and dynamics are regulated by microtubule regulatory proteins. Recently, we reported that a novel protein from Arabidopsis, termed microtubule-destabilizing protein 25 (MDP25), functions as a negative regulator of hypocotyl cell elongation. MDP25 destabilizes microtubules and exerts its effect on microtubules as a result of transient elevation of cytosolic calcium levels.

  15. The role of research in nuclear regulation: A Korean perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Won-Hyo

    1997-01-01

    Korea has carried out a very ambitious nuclear power program since the 1970`s as part of the nation`s industrialization policy. Ever since, Korea has also maintained a strong commitment to nuclear power development as an integral part of the national energy policy which aims at reducing external vulnerability and ensuring against a global fossil fuel shortage. The introduction of nuclear power into Korea has progressed through three stages: the first was a turn-key package supplied by the manufacturer; the second involved a major contractor who was responsible for project management, and design and construction was contracted out, with Korean industry becoming more involved; the third stage has seen Korean industries involved as main contractors based on experience gained from earlier plants. The success of Korea`s nuclear power program depends in large part on how to insure safety. Safety has the highest priority in nuclear energy development. Public acceptance has been the most critical problem faced by the nuclear industry in Korea. The public demands the highest level of safety all through the design, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants. Korea has learned that a nuclear plant designed with well addressed safety, implementation of a well grounded QA program during construction, and operated with a proven record of safety, are the only ways to earn public support. Competent and efficient regulation with a strong safety culture and openness in all issues is the most desirable image for regulators to strive for. Korea established a ten year R & D program to obtain self-reliance in nuclear technology and international competitiveness by the early 2000`s in 1992. It has actively participated in coordinated research programs in safety issues with bodies including the USNRC, AECB of Canada, IAEA, and OECD/NEA.

  16. Cloning and expression of a pivotal calcium metabolism regulator: calmodulin involved in shell formation from pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata).

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Cen; Zhang, Yong; Gu, Mianzhi; Zhang, Rongqing

    2004-07-01

    The shells of bivalves are mainly composed of calcium carbonate, a product of calcium metabolism. In the process of shell formation, the uptake, transport and recruitment of calcium ion are highly regulated and involved in many factors. Among these regulatory factors, calmodulin (CaM), a pivotal multifunction regulator of calcium metabolism in nearly all organisms, is thought to play an important role in the calcium metabolism involved in shell formation. In this study, a full-length CaM cDNA was isolated from the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata). The oyster calmodulin encodes a 16.8 kDa protein which shares high similarity with vertebrate calmodulin. The oyster CaM mRNA shows the highest level of expression in the gill, a key organ involved in calcium uptake in oyster calcium metabolism. In situ hybridization results revealed that oyster CaM mRNA is expressed at the folds and the outer epithelial cells of the dorsal region of the mantle, suggesting that CaM is involved in regulation of calcium transport and secretion. Oyster CaM also showed a typical Ca2+ dependent electrophoretic shift characterization and calcium binding activity. Taken together, we have identified and characterized a pivotal calcium metabolism regulator of the oyster that may play an important role in regulation of calcium uptake, transport and secretion in the process of shell formation.

  17. Calcium-sensing receptor regulates stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in response to extracellular calcium in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Yi, Xiao-Qian; Han, Ai-Dong; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis calcium-sensing receptor CAS is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure. Free cytosolic Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) increases in response to a high extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o)) level through a CAS signalling pathway and finally leads to stomatal closure. Multidisciplinary approaches including histochemical, pharmacological, fluorescent, electrochemical, and molecular biological methods were used to discuss the relationship of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) signalling in the CAS signalling pathway in guard cells in response to Ca(2+)(o). Here it is shown that Ca(2+)(o) could induce H(2)O(2) and NO production from guard cells but only H(2)O(2) from chloroplasts, leading to stomatal closure. In addition, the CASas mutant, the atrbohD/F double mutant, and the Atnoa1 mutant were all insensitive to Ca(2+)(o)-stimulated stomatal closure, as well as H(2)O(2) and NO elevation in the case of CASas. Furthermore, it was found that the antioxidant system might function as a mediator in Ca(2+)(o) and H(2)O(2) signalling in guard cells. The results suggest a hypothetical model whereby Ca(2+)(o) induces H(2)O(2) and NO accumulation in guard cells through the CAS signalling pathway, which further triggers Ca(2+)(i) transients and finally stomatal closure. The possible cross-talk of Ca(2+)(o) and abscisic acid signalling as well as the antioxidant system are discussed.

  18. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin; Zhou, Zhansong; Ji, Guangju

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  19. MARCKS Protein Is Phosphorylated and Regulates Calcium Mobilization during Human Acrosomal Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Peña, Marcelo J.; Castillo Bennett, Jimena V.; Soler, Osvaldo M.; Mayorga, Luis S.; Michaut, Marcela A.

    2013-01-01

    Acrosomal exocytosis is a calcium-regulated exocytosis that can be triggered by PKC activators. The involvement of PKC in acrosomal exocytosis has not been fully elucidated, and it is unknown if MARCKS, the major substrate for PKC, participates in this exocytosis. Here, we report that MARCKS is expressed in human spermatozoa and localizes to the sperm head and the tail. Calcium- and phorbol ester-triggered acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized sperm was abrogated by different anti-MARCKS antibodies raised against two different domains, indicating that the protein participates in acrosomal exocytosis. Interestingly, an anti-phosphorylated MARCKS antibody was not able to inhibit secretion. Similar results were obtained using recombinant proteins and phospho-mutants of MARCKS effector domain (ED), indicating that phosphorylation regulates MARCKS function in acrosomal exocytosis. It is known that unphosphorylated MARCKS sequesters PIP2. This phospholipid is the precursor for IP3, which in turn triggers release of calcium from the acrosome during acrosomal exocytosis. We found that PIP2 and adenophostin, a potent IP3-receptor agonist, rescued MARCKS inhibition in permeabilized sperm, suggesting that MARCKS inhibits acrosomal exocytosis by sequestering PIP2 and, indirectly, MARCKS regulates the intracellular calcium mobilization. In non-permeabilized sperm, a permeable peptide of MARCKS ED also inhibited acrosomal exocytosis when stimulated by a natural agonist such as progesterone, and pharmacological inducers such as calcium ionophore and phorbol ester. The preincubation of human sperm with the permeable MARCKS ED abolished the increase in calcium levels caused by progesterone, demonstrating that MARCKS regulates calcium mobilization. In addition, the phosphorylation of MARCKS increased during acrosomal exocytosis stimulated by the same activators. Altogether, these results show that MARCKS is a negative modulator of the acrosomal exocytosis, probably by sequestering

  20. Regulation of mTORC1 by lysosomal calcium and calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruo-Jing; Xu, Jing; Fu, Chenglai; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yujun George; Jia, Hao; Liu, Jun O

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of lysosomal calcium release due to lysosomal lipid accumulation has been shown to inhibit mTORC1 signaling. However, the mechanism by which lysosomal calcium regulates mTORC1 has remained undefined. Herein we report that proper lysosomal calcium release through the calcium channel TRPML1 is required for mTORC1 activation. TRPML1 depletion inhibits mTORC1 activity, while overexpression or pharmacologic activation of TRPML1 has the opposite effect. Lysosomal calcium activates mTORC1 by inducing association of calmodulin (CaM) with mTOR. Blocking the interaction between mTOR and CaM by antagonists of CaM significantly inhibits mTORC1 activity. Moreover, CaM is capable of stimulating the kinase activity of mTORC1 in a calcium-dependent manner in vitro. These results reveal that mTOR is a new type of CaM-dependent kinase, and TRPML1, lysosomal calcium and CaM play essential regulatory roles in the mTORC1 signaling pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19360.001 PMID:27787197

  1. Calcium co-regulates oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-03-28

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio.

  2. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  3. Otoferlin is a calcium sensor that directly regulates SNARE-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Colin P.

    2010-01-01

    Otoferlin is a large multi–C2 domain protein proposed to act as a calcium sensor that regulates synaptic vesicle exocytosis in cochlear hair cells. Although mutations in otoferlin have been associated with deafness, its contribution to neurotransmitter release is unresolved. Using recombinant proteins, we demonstrate that five of the six C2 domains of otoferlin sense calcium with apparent dissociation constants that ranged from 13–25 µM; in the presence of membranes, these apparent affinities increase by up to sevenfold. Using a reconstituted membrane fusion assay, we found that five of the six C2 domains of otoferlin stimulate membrane fusion in a calcium-dependent manner. We also demonstrate that a calcium binding–deficient form of the C2C domain is incapable of stimulating membrane fusion, further underscoring the importance of calcium for the protein’s function. These results demonstrate for the first time that otoferlin is a calcium sensor that can directly regulate soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor–mediated membrane fusion reactions. PMID:20921140

  4. Renal regulation of calcium-phosphate metabolism in single- and twin pregnant goats.

    PubMed

    Michałek, Katarzyna; Ozgo, Małgorzata; Skrzypczak, Wiesław Franciszek

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was the clearance assessment of renal function in single- and twin-pregnant goats and a comparison of selected parameters associated with calcium-phosphate management in terms of litter size. Clearance studies were carried out on 16 pregnant Polish White Improved goats (8 single pregnancies and 8 twin pregnancies). It was demonstrated that the kidneys of pregnant goats regulate the calcium-phosphate balance to a great extent. In spite of observed differences in parameters of renal functions, plasma calcium and inorganic phosphorus concentrations were comparable with normal reference values in further weeks of pregnancy. Significant differences in renal function between single and twin pregnancies were not observed. Gut absorption and/or bone tissue metabolism seem important for the maintenance of appropriate calcium-phosphate status.

  5. Possible site of calcium regulation in rat exocrine pancreas cells: an X-ray microanalytical study

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, N.

    1988-03-01

    We analysed four subcellular compartments in rat exocrine pancreas cells, zymogen granules, cytoplasm surrounding the zymogen granules, mitochondria and cytoplasm in the basal part of the cells for sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, potassium and calcium content, using ultrathin frozen-dried cryosections. The highest concentrations of calcium were measured in the zymogen granules and the surrounding apical part of the cell containing Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and condensing vacuoles. Calcium concentrations in the basal part of the cells (mostly rough endoplasmic reticulum) were 60% lower than in the apical part of the cells. The lowest calcium concentrations were measured in mitochondria. The results suggest that other subcellular compartments than the rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria might be involved in the intracellular Ca2+ regulation.

  6. Nuclear envelope protein MAN1 regulates clock through BMAL1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Ting; Zhang, Luoying; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Linda Chen; Garcia, Valentina Elizabeth; Tsai, Chen-Wei; Ptáček, Louis; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks serve as internal pacemakers that influence many basic homeostatic processes; consequently, the expression and function of their components are tightly regulated by intricate networks of feedback loops that fine-tune circadian processes. Our knowledge of these components and pathways is far from exhaustive. In recent decades, the nuclear envelope has emerged as a global gene regulatory machine, although its role in circadian regulation has not been explored. We report that transcription of the core clock component BMAL1 is positively modulated by the inner nuclear membrane protein MAN1, which directly binds the BMAL1 promoter and enhances its transcription. Our results establish a novel connection between the nuclear periphery and circadian rhythmicity, therefore bridging two global regulatory systems that modulate all aspects of bodily functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02981.001 PMID:25182847

  7. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  8. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Roger S.-Y.; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D.; Whelan, Russell S.; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W.; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R.; Caldas, Carlos; Kitsis, Richard N.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent relocation of p53 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of endogenous ARC in breast cancer cells results in spontaneous tetramerization of endogenous p53, accumulation of p53 in the nucleus, and activation of endogenous p53 target genes. In primary human breast cancers with nuclear ARC, p53 is almost always WT. Conversely, nearly all breast cancers with mutant p53 lack nuclear ARC. We conclude that nuclear ARC is induced in cancer cells and negatively regulates p53. PMID:18087040

  9. Estrogen controls embryonic stem cell proliferation via store-operated calcium entry and the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT).

    PubMed

    Wong, Chun-Kit; So, Wing-Yan; Law, Sau-Kwan; Leung, Fung-Ping; Yau, Ka-Long; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Yu; Li, Xiangdong; Tsang, Suk-Ying

    2012-06-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can self-renew indefinitely and differentiate into all cell lineages. Calcium is a universal second messenger which regulates a number of cellular pathways. Previous studies showed that store-operated calcium channels (SOCCs) but not voltage-operated calcium channels are present in mouse ESCs (mESCs). In this study, store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) was found to exist in mESCs using confocal microscopy. SOCC blockers lanthanum, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and SKF-96365 reduced mESC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that SOCE is important for ESC proliferation. Pluripotent markers, Sox-2, Klf-4, and Nanog, were down-regulated by 2-APB, suggesting that self-renewal property of mESCs relies on SOCE. 17β-estradiol (E2) enhanced mESC proliferation. This enhanced proliferation was associated with an increment of SOCE. Both stimulated proliferation and increased SOCE could be reversed by SOCC blockers suggesting that E2 mediates its stimulatory effect on proliferation via enhancing SOCE. Also, cyclosporin A and INCA-6, inhibitors of calcineurin [phosphatase that de-phosphorylates and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT)], reversed the proliferative effect of E2, indicating that NFAT is involved in E2-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, E2 caused the nuclear translocation of NFATc4, and this could be reversed by 2-APB. These results suggested that NFATc4 is the downstream target of E2-induced SOCE. The present investigation provides the first line of evidence that SOCE and NFAT are crucial for ESCs to maintain their unique characteristics. In addition, the present investigation also provides novel information on the mechanisms of how E2, an important female sex hormone, affects ESC proliferation.

  10. Two-pore channels function in calcium regulation in sea star oocytes and embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Isabela; Reich, Adrian; Wessel, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Egg activation at fertilization is an excellent process for studying calcium regulation. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide-phosphate (NAADP), a potent calcium messenger, is able to trigger calcium release, likely through two-pore channels (TPCs). Concomitantly, a family of ectocellular enzymes, the ADP-ribosyl cyclases (ARCs), has emerged as being able to change their enzymatic mode from one of nucleotide cyclization in formation of cADPR to a base-exchange reaction in the generation of NAADP. Using sea star oocytes we gain insights into the functions of endogenously expressed TPCs and ARCs in the context of the global calcium signals at fertilization. Three TPCs and one ARC were found in the sea star (Patiria miniata) that were localized in the cortex of the oocytes and eggs. PmTPCs were localized in specialized secretory organelles called cortical granules, and PmARCs accumulated in a different, unknown, set of vesicles, closely apposed to the cortical granules in the egg cortex. Using morpholino knockdown of PmTPCs and PmARC in the oocytes, we found that both calcium regulators are essential for early embryo development, and that knockdown of PmTPCs leads to aberrant construction of the fertilization envelope at fertilization and changes in cortical granule pH. The calcium signals at fertilization are not significantly altered when individual PmTPCs are silenced, but the timing and shape of the cortical flash and calcium wave are slightly changed when the expression of all three PmTPCs is perturbed concomitantly, suggesting a cooperative activity among TPC isoforms in eliciting calcium signals that may influence localized physiological activities. PMID:25377554

  11. Two-pore channels function in calcium regulation in sea star oocytes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Isabela; Reich, Adrian; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-12-01

    Egg activation at fertilization is an excellent process for studying calcium regulation. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide-phosphate (NAADP), a potent calcium messenger, is able to trigger calcium release, likely through two-pore channels (TPCs). Concomitantly, a family of ectocellular enzymes, the ADP-ribosyl cyclases (ARCs), has emerged as being able to change their enzymatic mode from one of nucleotide cyclization in formation of cADPR to a base-exchange reaction in the generation of NAADP. Using sea star oocytes we gain insights into the functions of endogenously expressed TPCs and ARCs in the context of the global calcium signals at fertilization. Three TPCs and one ARC were found in the sea star (Patiria miniata) that were localized in the cortex of the oocytes and eggs. PmTPCs were localized in specialized secretory organelles called cortical granules, and PmARCs accumulated in a different, unknown, set of vesicles, closely apposed to the cortical granules in the egg cortex. Using morpholino knockdown of PmTPCs and PmARC in the oocytes, we found that both calcium regulators are essential for early embryo development, and that knockdown of PmTPCs leads to aberrant construction of the fertilization envelope at fertilization and changes in cortical granule pH. The calcium signals at fertilization are not significantly altered when individual PmTPCs are silenced, but the timing and shape of the cortical flash and calcium wave are slightly changed when the expression of all three PmTPCs is perturbed concomitantly, suggesting a cooperative activity among TPC isoforms in eliciting calcium signals that may influence localized physiological activities.

  12. Inhibition of the TEF/TEAD transcription factor activity by nuclear calcium and distinct kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M; Andrade, V A; Andrade, S J; Pusl, T; Ortega, J M; Goes, A M; Leite, M F

    2003-02-07

    Transcription enhancer factor (TEF/TEAD) is a family of four transcription factors that share a common TEA-DNA binding domain and are involved in similar cellular functions, such as cell differentiation and proliferation. All adult tissues express at least one of the four TEAD genes, so this family of transcription factors may be of widespread importance, yet little is known about their regulation. Here we examine the factors that regulate TEAD activity in CHO cells. RT-PCR indicated the presence of TEAD-1, TEAD-3, and both isoforms of TEAD-4, but not TEAD-2. Quantitative measurements showed that TEAD-4 is most abundant, followed by TEAD-3, then TEAD-1. We examined the relative effects of nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) on TEAD activity, since TEAD proteins are localized to the nucleus and since free Ca(2+) within the nucleus selectively regulates transcription in some systems. Chelation of nuclear but not cytosolic Ca(2+) increased TEAD activity two times above control. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) also increased TEAD activity, while cAMP decreased TEAD activity, and protein kinase C had no effect. Together, these results show that nuclear Ca(2+), MAPK, and cAMP each negatively regulate the activity of the TEAD transcription factor.

  13. Amyloid peptide regulates calcium homoeostasis and arrhythmogenesis in pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Weerateerangkul, Punate; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Huang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid peptides modulate cardiac calcium homoeostasis and play an important role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Pulmonary veins (PVs) are critical in the genesis of atrial fibrillation and contain abundant amyloid peptides. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate whether amyloid peptides may change the PV electrical activity through regulating calcium homoeostasis. The channel and calcium-handling protein expressions, intracellular calcium and ionic currents were studied in isolated rabbit PV cardiomyocytes in the presence and absence (control) of beta-amyloid (Aβ(25-35) ) for 4-6 h, using Western blot analysis, indo-1 fluorimetric ratio and whole-cell patch clamp techniques. Aβ(25-35) decreased the expressions of Ca(V) 1.2, total or Ser16-phosphorylated phospholamban (p-PLB), p-PLB/PLB ratio, sodium/calcium exchanger, but did not change ryanodine receptor, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) ATPase and K(+) channel proteins (Kir2.1, Kir2.3, Kv1.4, Kv1.5 and Kv4.2). Aβ(25-35) -treated cardiomyocytes had smaller calcium transient, SR calcium store, L-type calcium current and sodium/calcium exchanger current than control cardiomyocytes. Moreover, Aβ(25-35) -treated cardiomyocytes (n = 20) had shorter 90% of the action potential duration (82 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 5 ms, P < 0·05) than control cardiomyocytes (n = 16). Aβ(25-35) has direct electrophysiological effects on PV cardiomyocytes. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  14. Calcium and S100B Regulation of p53-Dependent Cell Growth Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Scotto, Christian; Deloulme, Jean Christophe; Rousseau, Denis; Chambaz, Edmond; Baudier, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    In glial C6 cells constitutively expressing wild-type p53, synthesis of the calcium-binding protein S100B is associated with cell density-dependent inhibition of growth and apoptosis in response to UV irradiation. A functional interaction between S100B and p53 was first demonstrated in p53-negative mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF cells) by sequential transfection with the S100B and the temperature-sensitive p53Val135 genes. We show that in MEF cells expressing a low level of p53Val135, S100B cooperates with p53Val135 in triggering calcium-dependent cell growth arrest and cell death in response to UV irradiation at the nonpermissive temperature (37.5°C). Calcium-dependent growth arrest of MEF cells expressing S100B correlates with specific nuclear accumulation of the wild-type p53Val135 conformational species. S100B modulation of wild-type p53Val135 nuclear translocation and functions was confirmed with the rat embryo fibroblast (REF) cell line clone 6, which is transformed by oncogenic Ha-ras and overexpression of p53Val135. Ectopic expression of S100B in clone 6 cells restores contact inhibition of growth at 37.5°C, which also correlates with nuclear accumulation of the wild-type p53Val135 conformational species. Moreover, a calcium ionophore mediates a reversible G1 arrest in S100B-expressing REF (S100B-REF) cells at 37.5°C that is phenotypically indistinguishable from p53-mediated G1 arrest at the permissive temperature (32°C). S100B-REF cells proceeding from G1 underwent apoptosis in response to UV irradiation. Our data support a model in which calcium signaling and S100B cooperate with the p53 pathways of cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. PMID:9632811

  15. Reprint of "Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis".

    PubMed

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-06-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator – the γ-TuRC complex – and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic.

  16. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Results Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27489424

  17. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-08-01

    We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation.

  18. Differential expression of calcium-regulated SlSRs in response to abiotic and biotic stresses in tomato fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium has been shown to increase stress tolerance, enhance fruit firmness and reduce decay. Previously we reported that seven tomato SlSRs encode calcium/calmodulin-regulated proteins, and that their expressions are developmentally regulated during fruit development and ripening, and are also resp...

  19. Non-classical mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by the vitamin D receptor: insights into calcium homeostasis, immune system regulation and cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Vassil; Salehi-Tabar, Reyhaneh; An, Beum-Soo; White, John H

    2014-10-01

    Hormonal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] signals through the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR), a ligand-regulated transcription factor. Gene expression profiling studies have revealed that 1,25(OH)2D signaling through the VDR can lead to activation or repression of target gene transcription in roughly equal proportions. Classically, transcriptional regulation by the VDR, similar to other nuclear receptors, has been characterized by its capacity to recognize high affinity cognate vitamin D response elements (VDREs), located in the regulatory regions of target genes. Several biochemical studies revealed that the VDRE-bound receptor recruits a series of coregulatory proteins, leading to transactivation of adjacent target genes. However, genome-wide and other analyses of VDR binding have revealed that a subset of VDR binding sites does not contain VDREs, and that VDREs are not associated with transcriptionally repressed VDR target genes. Work over the last ∼20 years and in particular recent findings have revealed a diverse array of mechanisms by which VDR can form complexes with several other classes of transcriptional activators, leading to repression of gene transcription. Moreover, these efforts have led to several insights into the molecular basis for the physiological regulation of calcium homeostasis, immune system function and cancer chemoprevention by 1,25(OH)2D/VDR signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  20. Dynamic regulation of Drosophila nuclear receptor activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Palanker, Laura; Necakov, Aleksandar S.; Sampson, Heidi M.; Ni, Ruoyu; Hu, Chun; Thummel, Carl S.; Krause, Henry M.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a large family of transcription factors that play major roles in development, metamorphosis, metabolism and disease. To determine how, where and when nuclear receptors are regulated by small chemical ligands and/or protein partners, we have used a ‘ligand sensor’ system to visualize spatial activity patterns for each of the 18 Drosophila nuclear receptors in live developing animals. Transgenic lines were established that express the ligand binding domain of each nuclear receptor fused to the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4. When combined with a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, the fusion proteins show tissue- and stage-specific patterns of activation. We show that these responses accurately reflect the presence of endogenous and exogenously added hormone, and that they can be modulated by nuclear receptor partner proteins. The amnioserosa, yolk, midgut and fat body, which play major roles in lipid storage, metabolism and developmental timing, were identified as frequent sites of nuclear receptor activity. We also see dynamic changes in activation that are indicative of sweeping changes in ligand and/or co-factor production. The screening of a small compound library using this system identified the angular psoralen angelicin and the insect growth regulator fenoxycarb as activators of the Ultraspiracle (USP) ligand-binding domain. These results demonstrate the utility of this system for the functional dissection of nuclear receptor pathways and for the development of new receptor agonists and antagonists that can be used to modulate metabolism and disease and to develop more effective means of insect control. PMID:16914501

  1. Intracellular calcium signaling regulates autophagy via calcineurin-mediated TFEB dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yanju; Song, Fuyong

    2015-01-01

    The transcription-regulating activity of TFEB is dependent on its phosphorylation modification, but the phosphatase(s) involved in TFEB dephosphorylation have remained elusive. It has now become clear that lysosomal calcium signaling activates calcineurin, an endogenous serine/threonine phosphatase, which dephosphorylate TFEB leading to upregulation of autophagy. PMID:26043755

  2. Novel nuclear localization signal regulated by ambient tonicity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H Moo

    2008-08-15

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution.

  3. Novel Nuclear Localization Signal Regulated by Ambient Tonicity in Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H. Moo

    2008-01-01

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution. PMID:18579527

  4. Aberrant Subcellular Neuronal Calcium Regulation in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    In this mini-review/opinion article we describe evidence that multiple cellular and molecular alterations in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis involve perturbed cellular calcium regulation, and that alterations in synaptic calcium handling may be early and pivotal events in the disease process. With advancing age neurons encounter increased oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, which compromise the function of proteins that control membrane excitability and subcellular calcium dynamics. Altered proteolytic cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in response to the aging process in combination with genetic and environmental factors results in the production and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ ). Aβ undergoes a self-aggregation process and concomitantly generates reactive oxygen species that can trigger membrane-associated oxidative stress which, in turn, impairs the functions of ion-motive ATPases and glutamate and glucose transporters thereby rendering neurons vulnerable to excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Mutations in presenilin-1 that cause early-onset AD increase Aβ production, but also result in an abnormal increase in the size of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Some of the events in the neurodegenerative cascade can be counteracted in animal models by manipulations that stabilize neuronal calcium homeostasis including dietary energy restriction, agonists of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors and drugs that activate mitochondrial potassium channels. Emerging knowledge of the actions of calcium upstream and downstream of Aβ provides opportunities to develop novel preventative and therapeutic interventions for AD. PMID:20950656

  5. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  6. Glucose Regulates Cyclin D2 Expression in Quiescent and Replicating Pancreatic β-Cells Through Glycolysis and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Salpeter, Seth J.; Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Porat, Shay; Granot, Zvi; Shapiro, A. M. James; Magnuson, Mark A.; Eden, Amir; Grimsby, Joseph; Glaser, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular triggers of pancreatic β-cell proliferation may facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for diabetes. Genetic studies have demonstrated an important role for cyclin D2 in β-cell proliferation and mass homeostasis, but its specific function in β-cell division and mechanism of regulation remain unclear. Here, we report that cyclin D2 is present at high levels in the nucleus of quiescent β-cells in vivo. The major regulator of cyclin D2 expression is glucose, acting via glycolysis and calcium channels in the β-cell to control cyclin D2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, cyclin D2 mRNA is down-regulated during S-G2-M phases of each β-cell division, via a mechanism that is also affected by glucose metabolism. Thus, glucose metabolism maintains high levels of nuclear cyclin D2 in quiescent β-cells and modulates the down-regulation of cyclin D2 in replicating β-cells. These data challenge the standard model for regulation of cyclin D2 during the cell division cycle and suggest cyclin D2 as a molecular link between glucose levels and β-cell replication. PMID:21521747

  7. Application of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation Equivalency to Construction of New Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    BISHOP, G.E.

    1999-06-02

    The Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office, is charged with moving 2.100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel elements left over from plutonium production into semi-permanent storage at DOE'S Hanford site in Washington state. In anticipation of eventual NRC regulation, the DOE decided to impose NRC requirements on new SNFP facility design and construction, specifically for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The SNFP implemented this policy of ''NRC equivalency'' with the goal of achieving a level of nuclear safety equivalent to that of NRC-licensed fuel processing facilities. Appropriate features of the NRC licensing process were adopted. However, the SNFP maintained applicable DOE requirements in tandem with the NRC regulations. Project work is continuing, with the first fuel movement scheduled for November, 2000.

  8. L-type calcium channels regulate filopodia stability and cancer cell invasion downstream of integrin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Baghirov, Habib; Georgiadou, Maria; Sihto, Harri; Peuhu, Emilia; Cettour-Janet, Pierre; He, Tao; Perälä, Merja; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest an important role for filopodia in driving cancer cell invasion. Using a high-throughput microscopic-based drug screen, we identify FDA-approved calcium channel blockers (CCBs) as potent inhibitors of filopodia formation in cancer cells. Unexpectedly, we discover that L-type calcium channels are functional and frequently expressed in cancer cells suggesting a previously unappreciated role for these channels during tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that, at filopodia, L-type calcium channels are activated by integrin inside-out signalling, integrin activation and Src. Moreover, L-type calcium channels promote filopodia stability and maturation into talin-rich adhesions through the spatially restricted regulation of calcium entry and subsequent activation of the protease calpain-1. Altogether we uncover a novel and clinically relevant signalling pathway that regulates filopodia formation in cancer cells and propose that cycles of filopodia stabilization, followed by maturation into focal adhesions, directs cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:27910855

  9. The Calcium-Dependent Switch Helix of L-Plastin Regulates Actin Bundling

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Jensen, Katharine V.; Woodman, Andrew G.; Hyndman, M. Eric; Vogel, Hans J.

    2017-01-01

    L-plastin is a calcium-regulated actin-bundling protein that is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin and in most metastatic cancer cells. These cell types are mobile and require the constant remodeling of their actin cytoskeleton, where L-plastin bundles filamentous actin. The calcium-dependent regulation of the actin-bundling activity of L-plastin is not well understood. We have used NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of the EF-hand calcium-sensor headpiece domain. Unexpectedly, this domain does not bind directly to the four CH-domains of L-plastin. A novel switch helix is present immediately after the calcium-binding region and it binds tightly to the EF-hand motifs in the presence of calcium. We demonstrate that this switch helix plays a major role during actin-bundling. Moreover a peptide that competitively inhibits the association between the EF-hand motifs and the switch helix was shown to deregulate the actin-bundling activity of L-plastin. Overall, these findings may help to develop new drugs that target the L-plastin headpiece and interfere in the metastatic activity of cancer cells. PMID:28145401

  10. Importin beta negatively regulates nuclear membrane fusion and nuclear pore complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J

    2003-11-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin beta negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin beta is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin beta down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Indeed, excess RanGTP (RanQ69L) alone stimulates excessive membrane fusion, leading to intranuclear membrane tubules and cytoplasmic annulate lamellae-like structures. We propose that a precise balance of importin beta to Ran is required to create a correct double nuclear membrane and simultaneously to repress undesirable fusion events. Interestingly, truncated importin beta 45-462 allows membrane fusion but produces nuclei lacking any NPCs. This reveals distinct importin beta-regulation of NPC assembly. Excess full-length importin beta and beta 45-462 act similarly when added to prefused nuclear intermediates, i.e., both block NPC assembly. The importin beta NPC block, which maps downstream of GTPgammaS and BAPTA-sensitive steps in NPC assembly, is reversible by cytosol. Remarkably, it is not reversible by 25 microM RanGTP, a concentration that easily reverses fusion inhibition. This report, using a full reconstitution system and natural chromatin substrates, significantly expands the repertoire of importin beta. Its roles now encompass negative regulation of two of the major events of nuclear assembly: membrane fusion and NPC assembly.

  11. Importance of the regulation of nuclear receptor degradation.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A P; Haq, R U; Nawaz, Z

    2001-08-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) represent a superfamily of structurally related ligand-activated transcription factors, which regulate diverse biological activities like growth, development, and homeostasis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that certain members of the NHR superfamily are degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in a ligand-dependent manner. Though the signal for the down-regulation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is not yet known, phosphorylation at specific amino acid residues or coactivator binding to receptors could lead to their degradation by the 26S proteasome. Activation and degradation seems to be an engineered cyclic mechanism, which provides tight control over diverse cellular processes. The degradation process involves extensive loss of proteins and requires expenditure of cellular ATP. That seems to be inevitable for a more important aim, that is efficient and appropriate regulation of transcription. Down-regulation of receptors would lead to an attenuated transcriptional response because the number of receptor molecules available to activate transcription would decrease over time. One of the obvious reasons for down-regulating NHRs thus seems to be to prevent the cell from overstimulation by the hormones or other activating signals. Nuclear receptor turnover may also reset the transcriptional apparatus in preparation for a subsequent response. Since inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway disturbs the transcriptional activitity of some of the nuclear receptors such as estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors, it is also possible that the degradation of NHRs may enable recycling of components of receptor-cofactor complexes and general transcriptional machinary. Understanding the mechanism of nuclear hormone receptor degradation and its relation to transcription may lead to novel insights of therapuetic intervention.

  12. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation during cardiac hypertrophy reduces sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 (SERCA2) transcription

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Joseph, Leroy C.; Gurin, Michael I.; Thorp, Edward B.; Morrow, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic cardiac hypertrophy can lead to heart failure, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. SERCA2 is critical for normal cardiac calcium handling and function and SERCA2 mRNA and protein levels are reduced by cardiac hypertrophy. We hypothesized that Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation during hypertrophy reduced SERCA2 transcription. Using a neonatal rat ventricular myocyte model of hypertrophy, we found that pharmacologic inhibitors of ERK activation preserve SERCA2 mRNA levels during hypertrophy. ERK activation is sufficient to reduce SERCA2 mRNA. We determined that ERK represses SERCA2 transcription via nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkB), and activation of NFkB is sufficient to reduce SERCA2 mRNA in cardiomyocytes. This work establishes novel connections between ERK, NFkB, and SERCA2 repression during cardiac hypertrophy. This mechanism may have implications for the progression of hypertrophy to heart failure. PMID:25008120

  13. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    PubMed

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P; Vezina, Chad M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood) into the ductal lumen (milk). Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT) is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2) and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1) membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2). Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2) are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  14. Renal function, calcium regulation, and time to hospitalization of patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease is associated with disruption of the endocrine system that distorts the balance between calcitriol, calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone in the calcium regulation system. This can lead to calcification of the arterial tree and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. In this study we develop a health metric, based on biomarkers involved in the calcium regulation system, for use in identifying patients at high risk for future high-cost complications. Methods This study is a retrospective observational study involving a secondary analysis of data from the kidney disease registry of a regional managed care organization. Chronic kidney disease patients in the registry from November 2007 through November 2011 with a complete set of observations of estimated glomerular filtration rate, calcitriol, albumin, free calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone were included in the study (n = 284). Weibull regression model was used to identify the most significant lab tests in predicting “waiting time to hospitalization”. A multivariate linear path model was then constructed to investigate direct and indirect effects of the biomarkers on this outcome. Results The results showed negative significant direct effects of phosphate and parathyroid hormone on “waiting time to hospitalization”. Base on this result, the risk of hospitalization increases 16.8% for each 0.55 mg/dl increase in phosphate level and 13.5% for each 0.467 increase in the natural logarithm of parathyroid hormone. Positive indirect effects of calcitriol surrogate (calcidiol), free calcium, albumin and estimated glomerular filtration rate were observed but were relatively small in magnitude. Conclusion Variables involved in the calcium regulation system should be included in future efforts to develop a quality of care index for Chronic Kidney disease patients. PMID:23865435

  15. Regulation of nuclear shape and size in plants.

    PubMed

    Meier, Iris; Griffis, Anna Hn; Groves, Norman R; Wagner, Alecia

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear shape and size changes have long been used by cytopathologists to diagnose, stage, and prognose cancer. However, the underlying causalities and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. The current eukaryotic tree of life groups eukaryotes into five supergroups, with all organisms between humans and yeast falling into the supergroup Opisthokonta. The emergence of model organisms with strong molecular genetic methodology in the other supergroups has recently facilitated a broader evolutionary approach to pressing biological questions. Here, we review what is known about the control of nuclear shape and size in the Archaeplastidae, the supergroup containing the higher plants. We discuss common themes as well as differences toward a more generalized model of how eukaryotic organisms regulate nuclear morphology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuronal Calcium Sensor Synaptotagmin-9 Is Not Involved in the Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis or Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Seah, Tingting; Xu, Jun; Radda, George K.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Han, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X) mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. Conclusions Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells. PMID:21085706

  17. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wang, Xiaorui; Wang, Yue; Seah, Tingting; Xu, Jun; Radda, George K; Südhof, Thomas C; Han, Weiping

    2010-11-09

    Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X) mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  18. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  19. [Hormonal regulation of calcium metabolism after space flights of different duration].

    PubMed

    Pozharskaia, L G; Noskov, V B

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of examinations of 19 cosmonauts, 12 of whom made 7-day flights and 7 took part in space flights of 150, 211 or 237 days. In plasma, parathyrin, calcitonin and gastrin concentrations were measured. A complex mosaic of hormonal regulation of bone metabolism reflects multifactorial and flexible patterns of calcium homeostasis, with individual variations included. It is probable that the specific weight of different components of the system maintaining calcium homeostasis varies depending on the exposure time and activity of related regulatory systems.

  20. Regulation of mitochondrial calcium in plants versus animals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stephan; De Bortoli, Sara; Schwarzländer, Markus; Szabò, Ildikò

    2016-06-01

    Ca(2+) acts as an important cellular second messenger in eukaryotes. In both plants and animals, a wide variety of environmental and developmental stimuli trigger Ca(2+) transients of a specific signature that can modulate gene expression and metabolism. In animals, mitochondrial energy metabolism has long been considered a hotspot of Ca(2+) regulation, with a range of pathophysiology linked to altered Ca(2+) control. Recently, several molecular players involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) signalling have been identified, including those of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter. Despite strong evidence for sophisticated Ca(2+) regulation in plant mitochondria, the picture has remained much less clear. This is currently changing aided by live imaging and genetic approaches which allow dissection of subcellular Ca(2+) dynamics and identification of the proteins involved. We provide an update on our current understanding in the regulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) and signalling by comparing work in plants and animals. The significance of mitochondrial Ca(2+) control is discussed in the light of the specific metabolic and energetic needs of plant and animal cells.

  1. MITOCHONDRIAL CALCIUM REGULATES LIVER REGENERATION THROUGH MODULATION OF APOPTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Mateus T.; Fonseca, Emerson A.; Melo, Flavia M.; Andrade, V. A; Aguiar, Carla J.; Andrade, Lídia M.; Pinheiro, Ana Cristina N.; Casteluber, Marisa F.; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Pinto, Mauro C. X.; Fernandes, Simone O. A.; Cardoso, Valbert N.; Souza–Fagundes, Elaine M.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; de Paula, Ana M.; Nathanson, Michael H.; Leite, M. Fatima

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular Ca2+ signals control a variety of responses in the liver. For example, mitochondrial Ca2+ regulates apoptosis while Ca2+ in the nucleus regulates cell proliferation. Since apoptosis and cell growth can be related, we investigated whether mitochondrial Ca2+ also affects liver regeneration. The Ca2+ buffering protein, Parvalbumin (PV), targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and fused to green fluorescent protein (PV-MITO-GFP) was expressed in the SKHep1 liver cell line. This construct properly localized to and effectively buffered Ca2+ signals in the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, expression of PV-MITO-GFP reduced apoptosis induced by both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The reduction in cell death correlated with increased expression of anti-apoptotic genes bcl-2, mcl-1, and bcl-xL, and decreased expression of the pro-apoptotic genes p53, bax, apaf-1 and caspase-6. PV-MITO-GFP was also expressed in hepatocytes in vivo using an adenoviral delivery system. Buffering mitochondrial Ca2+ in hepatocytes accelerated liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, an effect that was associated with increased expression of Bcl-2 and decreased expression of Bax. Conclusion Together, these results reveal an essential role for mitochondrial Ca2+ in hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration, which may be mediated by regulating apoptosis. PMID:21503946

  2. A G-Protein Subunit Translocation Embedded Network Motif Underlies GPCR Regulation of Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K.; Karunarathne, W.K. Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K.V.; Gautam, N.

    2014-01-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  3. Down-regulation of endogenous KLHL1 decreases voltage-gated calcium current density.

    PubMed

    Perissinotti, Paula P; Ethington, Elizabeth G; Cribbs, Leanne; Koob, Michael D; Martin, Jody; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S

    2014-05-01

    The actin-binding protein Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1) can modulate voltage-gated calcium channels in vitro. KLHL1 interacts with actin and with the pore-forming subunits of Cav2.1 and CaV3.2 calcium channels, resulting in up-regulation of P/Q and T-type current density. Here we tested whether endogenous KLHL1 modulates voltage gated calcium currents in cultured hippocampal neurons by down-regulating the expression of KLHL1 via adenoviral delivery of shRNA targeted against KLHL1 (shKLHL1). Control adenoviruses did not affect any of the neuronal properties measured, yet down-regulation of KLHL1 resulted in HVA current densities ~68% smaller and LVA current densities 44% smaller than uninfected controls, with a concomitant reduction in α(1A) and α(1H) protein levels. Biophysical analysis and western blot experiments suggest Ca(V)3.1 and 3.3 currents are also present in shKLHL1-infected neurons. Synapsin I levels, miniature postsynaptic current frequency, and excitatory and inhibitory synapse number were reduced in KLHL1 knockdown. This study corroborates the physiological role of KLHL1 as a calcium channel modulator and demonstrates a novel, presynaptic role.

  4. Variation in human cancer cell external phosphatidylserine is regulated by flippase activity and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Blanco, Víctor M; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Vallabhapurapu, Swarajya Lakshmi; Chu, Zhengtao; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2015-10-27

    Viable cancer cells expose elevated levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the exoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms leading to elevated PS exposure in viable cancer cells have not been defined. We previously showed that externalized PS may be used to monitor, target and kill tumor cells. In addition, PS on tumor cells is recognized by macrophages and has implications in antitumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular details of PS exposure on cancer cells in order to improve therapeutic targeting. Here we explored the mechanisms regulating the surface PS exposure in human cancer cells and found that differential flippase activity and intracellular calcium are the major regulators of surface PS exposure in viable human cancer cells. In general, cancer cell lines with high surface PS exhibited low flippase activity and high intracellular calcium, whereas cancer cells with low surface PS exhibited high flippase activity and low intracellular calcium. High surface PS cancer cells also had higher total cellular PS than low surface PS cells. Together, our results indicate that the amount of external PS in cancer cells is regulated by calcium dependent flippase activity and may also be influenced by total cellular PS.

  5. Reciprocal Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Phospho-CREB Regulates Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Arti; Antony, Cecil; Singhal, Jhalak; Tiwari, Brijendra K.; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB), Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Protein Kinase C (PKC) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC) or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection. PMID:24797940

  6. Coping with Stresses: Roles of Calcium- and Calcium/Calmodulin-Regulated Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anireddy S.N.; Ali, Gul S.; Celesnik, Helena; Day, Irene S.

    2011-01-01

    Abiotic and biotic stresses are major limiting factors of crop yields and cause billions of dollars of losses annually around the world. It is hoped that understanding at the molecular level how plants respond to adverse conditions and adapt to a changing environment will help in developing plants that can better cope with stresses. Acquisition of stress tolerance requires orchestration of a multitude of biochemical and physiological changes, and most of these depend on changes in gene expression. Research during the last two decades has established that different stresses cause signal-specific changes in cellular Ca2+ level, which functions as a messenger in modulating diverse physiological processes that are important for stress adaptation. In recent years, many Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) binding transcription factors (TFs) have been identified in plants. Functional analyses of some of these TFs indicate that they play key roles in stress signaling pathways. Here, we review recent progress in this area with emphasis on the roles of Ca2+- and Ca2+/CaM-regulated transcription in stress responses. We will discuss emerging paradigms in the field, highlight the areas that need further investigation, and present some promising novel high-throughput tools to address Ca2+-regulated transcriptional networks. PMID:21642548

  7. Activity-dependent regulation of T-type calcium channels by submembrane calcium ions

    PubMed Central

    Cazade, Magali; Bidaud, Isabelle; Lory, Philippe; Chemin, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are involved in numerous physiological functions and various mechanisms finely tune their activity, including the Ca2+ ion itself. This is well exemplified by the Ca2+-dependent inactivation of L-type Ca2+ channels, whose alteration contributes to the dramatic disease Timothy Syndrome. For T-type Ca2+ channels, a long-held view is that they are not regulated by intracellular Ca2+. Here we challenge this notion by using dedicated electrophysiological protocols on both native and expressed T-type Ca2+ channels. We demonstrate that a rise in submembrane Ca2+ induces a large decrease in T-type current amplitude due to a hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state inactivation. Activation of most representative Ca2+-permeable ionotropic receptors similarly regulate T-type current properties. Altogether, our data clearly establish that Ca2+ entry exerts a feedback control on T-type channel activity, by modulating the channel availability, a mechanism that critically links cellular properties of T-type Ca2+ channels to their physiological roles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22331.001 PMID:28109159

  8. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  9. Regulation of Cardiac Calcium Channels in the Fight-or-Flight Response.

    PubMed

    Catterall, William A

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular calcium transients generated by activation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels generate local signals, which initiate physiological processes such as secretion, synaptic transmission, and excitation-contraction coupling. Regulation of calcium entry through CaV channels is crucial for control of these physiological processes. In this article, I review experimental results that have emerged over several years showing that cardiac CaV1.2 channels form a local signaling complex, in which their proteolytically processed distal C-terminal domain, an A-Kinase Anchoring Protein, and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) interact directly with the transmembrane core of the ion channel through the proximal C-terminal domain. This signaling complex is the substrate for β-adrenergic up-regulation of the CaV1.2 channel in the heart during the fight-or-flight response. Protein phosphorylation of two sites at the interface between the distal and proximal C-terminal domains contributes importantly to control of basal CaV1.2 channel activity, and phosphorylation of Ser1700 by PKA at that interface up-regulates CaV1.2 activity in response to β-adrenergic signaling. Thus, the intracellular C-terminal domain of CaV1.2 channels serves as a signaling platform, mediating beat-to-beat physiological regulation of channel activity and up-regulation by β-adrenergic signaling in the fight-or-flight response.

  10. Calcium channel regulator Mid1 links TORC2-mediated changes in mitochondrial respiration to autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2016-12-19

    Autophagy is a catabolic process that recycles cytoplasmic contents and is crucial for cell survival during stress. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates autophagy as part of two distinct protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. TORC1 negatively regulates autophagy according to nitrogen availability. In contrast, TORC2 functions as a positive regulator of autophagy during amino acid starvation, via its target kinase Ypk1, by repressing the activity of the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and promoting the general amino acid control (GAAC) response. Precisely how TORC2-Ypk1 signaling regulates calcineurin within this pathway remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that activation of calcineurin requires Mid1, an endoplasmic reticulum-localized calcium channel regulatory protein implicated in the oxidative stress response. We find that normal mitochondrial respiration is perturbed in TORC2-Ypk1-deficient cells, which results in the accumulation of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species that signal to Mid1 to activate calcineurin, thereby inhibiting the GAAC response and autophagy. These findings describe a novel pathway involving TORC2, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and calcium homeostasis for autophagy regulation.

  11. Regulation of Cardiac Calcium Channels in the Fight-or-Flight Response

    PubMed Central

    Catterall, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular calcium transients generated by activation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels generate local signals, which initiate physiological processes such as secretion, synaptic transmission, and excitation-contraction coupling. Regulation of calcium entry through CaV channels is crucial for control of these physiological processes. In this article, I review experimental results that have emerged over several years showing that cardiac CaV1.2 channels form a local signaling complex, in which their proteolytically processed distal C-terminal domain, an A-Kinase Anchoring Protein, and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) interact directly with the transmembrane core of the ion channel through the proximal C-terminal domain. This signaling complex is the substrate for β-adrenergic up-regulation of the CaV1.2 channel in the heart during the fight-or-flight response. Protein phosphorylation of two sites at the interface between the distal and proximal C-terminal domains contributes importantly to control of basal CaV1.2 channel activity, and phosphorylation of Ser1700 by PKA at that interface up-regulates CaV1.2 activity in response to β-adrenergic signaling. Thus, the intracellular C-terminal domain of CaV1.2 channels serves as a signaling platform, mediating beat-to-beat physiological regulation of channel activity and up-regulation by β-adrenergic signaling in the fight-or-flight response. PMID:25966697

  12. Nucleoplasmic calcium regulation in rabbit aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Abrenica, Bernard; Pierce, Grant N; Gilchrist, James S C

    2003-03-01

    In this study, we investigated whether nucleoplasmic free Ca2+ in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) might be independently regulated from cytosolic free Ca2+. Understanding mechanisms and pathways responsible for this regulation is especially relevant given the role of a numerous intranuclear Ca2+-sensitive proteins in transcriptional regulation, apoptosis and cell division. The question of an independent regulatory mechanism remains largely unsettled because the previous use of intensitometric fluorophores (e.g., Fluo-3) has been criticized on technical grounds. To circumvent the potential problem of fluorescence artifact, we utilized confocal laser scanning microscopy to image intracellular Ca2+ movements with the ratiometric fluorophore Indo-1. In cultured rabbit VSMCs, we found sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) pumps and ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ channel proteins to be discretely arranged within a perinuclear locus, as determined by fluorescent staining patterns of BODIPY FL thapsigargin and BODIPY FL-X Ry. When intracellular Ca2+ stores were mobilized by addition of thapsigargin (5 microM) and activatory concentrations of ryanodine (1 microM), Indo-1 ratiometric signals were largely restricted to the nucleoplasm. Cytosolic signals, by comparison, were relatively small and even then its spatial distribution was largely perinuclear rather homogeneous. These observations indicate perinuclear RyR and SERCA proteins are intimately involved in regulating VSMC nucleoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations. We also observed a similar pattern of largely nucleoplasmic Ca2+ mobilization upon exposure of cells to the immunosuppressant drug FK506 (tacrolimus), which binds to the RyR-associated immunophillin-binding proteins FKBP12 and FKBP12.6. However, initial FK506-induced nucleoplasmic Ca2+ mobilization was followed by marked reduction of Indo-1 signal intensity close to pretreatment levels. This suggested FK506 exerts both activatory and inhibitory

  13. The calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK28 negatively regulates the BIK1-mediated PAMP-induced calcium burst

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Jacqueline; Matschi, Susanne; Romeis, Tina; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Plants are protected from microbial infection by a robust immune system. Two of the earliest responses mediated by surface-localized immune receptors include an increase in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) and a burst of apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The Arabidopsis plasma membrane-associated cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 is an immediate convergent substrate of multiple surface-localized immune receptors that is genetically required for the PAMP-induced Ca2+ burst and directly regulates ROS production catalyzed by the NADPH oxidase RBOHD. We recently demonstrated that Arabidopsis plants maintain an optimal level of BIK1 through a process of continuous degradation regulated by the Ca2+-dependent protein kinase CPK28. cpk28 mutants accumulate more BIK1 protein and display enhanced immune signaling, while plants over-expressing CPK28 accumulate less BIK1 protein and display impaired immune signaling. Here, we show that CPK28 additionally contributes to the PAMP-induced Ca2+ burst, supporting its role as a negative regulator of BIK1. PMID:26039480

  14. Involvement of thyrotroph embryonic factor in calcium-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Krueger, D A; Warner, E A; Dowd, D R

    2000-05-12

    In the present study, we used an expression cloning strategy to identify transcription factors that bind specifically to a limited region of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) promoter and regulate transcription. Murine thyrotroph embryonic factor (mTEF) was isolated and was shown to bind to a site located at nucleotides -117 to -108 from the transcriptional start site. Transient expression of reporter constructs containing either a consensus TEFRE or the icerTEF binding site demonstrated that TEF-dependent transcription correlated with relative binding affinities, i.e. the consensus TEFRE bound TEF more tightly and was more responsive to TEF than the icerTEFRE. Because the icerTEFRE overlapped a cAMP response element, the responsiveness of these sequences to either cAMP or Ca(2+) was tested. Although TEF expression had no effect on the cAMP-regulated transcriptional response of the ICER promoter, TEF did confer calcium responsiveness to these sequences. Calcium also modestly increased the TEF-mediated transcription from a consensus TEFRE. Additional studies using Ca(2+)-activated kinases indicate that Ca(2+)/TEF/TEFRE-regulated transcription may be mediated through Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK) IV. Moreover, studies with the icerTEFRE in a CaMK IV-deficient cell line demonstrated that these cells were transcriptionally unresponsive to thapsigargin; however, responsiveness was restored by co-expression of the active CaMK IV. These studies are the first to demonstrate that TEF is a calcium-responsive transcription factor, and they suggest that there are two classes of TEF-regulated genes. One class, represented by a consensus TEFRE, is regulated by TEF in the resting cell; the second class, represented by icerTEFRE, is regulated by TEF in the calcium-activated cell.

  15. Immunoreactivity for calcium-binding proteins defines subregions of the vestibular nuclear complex of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Baizer, Joan S.; Baker, James F.

    2005-01-01

    The vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) is classically divided into four nuclei on the basis of cytoarchitectonics. However, anatomical data on the distribution of afferents to the VNC and the distribution of cells of origin of different efferent pathways suggest a more complex internal organization. Immunoreactivity for calcium-binding proteins has proven useful in many areas of the brain for revealing structure not visible with cell, fiber or Golgi stains. We have looked at the VNC of the cat using immunoreactivity for the calcium-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin. Immunoreactivity for calretinin revealed a small, intensely stained region of cell bodies and processes just beneath the fourth ventricle in the medial vestibular nucleus. A presumably homologous region has been described in rodents. The calretinin-immunoreactive cells in this region were also immunoreactive for choline acetyltransferase. Evidence from other studies suggests that the calretinin region contributes to pathways involved in eye movement modulation but not generation. There were focal dense regions of fibers immunoreactive to calbindin in the medial and inferior nuclei, with an especially dense region of label at the border of the medial nucleus and the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi. There is anatomical evidence that suggests that the likely source of these calbindin-immunoreactive fibers is the flocculus of the cerebellum. The distribution of calbindin-immunoreactive fibers in the lateral and superior nuclei was much more uniform. Immunoreactivity to parvalbumin was widespread in fibers distributed throughout the VNC. The results suggest that neurochemical techniques may help to reveal the internal complexity in VNC organization. PMID:15662522

  16. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  17. Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C.

    1995-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

  18. Characterization of the role of calcium in regulating the microtubule-destabilizing activity of MDP25

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tao; Li, Jiejie; Yuan, Ming; Mao, Tonglin

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cell elongation is important for plant morphogenesis. Many studies have shown that cortical microtubules play crucial roles during cell elongation and that microtubule stability, organization, and dynamics are regulated by microtubule regulatory proteins.1 Recently, we reported that a novel protein from Arabidopsis, termed microtubule-destabilizing protein 25 (MDP25), functions as a negative regulator of hypocotyl cell elongation. MDP25 destabilizes microtubules and exerts its effect on microtubules as a result of transient elevation of cytosolic calcium levels.2 PMID:22751329

  19. 49 CFR 1580.111 - Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities. 1580.111 Section 1580.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... regulation of nuclear facilities. TSA will coordinate activities under this subpart with the Nuclear...

  20. 49 CFR 1580.111 - Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities. 1580.111 Section 1580.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... regulation of nuclear facilities. TSA will coordinate activities under this subpart with the Nuclear...

  1. 49 CFR 1580.111 - Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities. 1580.111 Section 1580.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... regulation of nuclear facilities. TSA will coordinate activities under this subpart with the Nuclear...

  2. 49 CFR 1580.111 - Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities. 1580.111 Section 1580.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... regulation of nuclear facilities. TSA will coordinate activities under this subpart with the Nuclear...

  3. 49 CFR 1580.111 - Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harmonization of federal regulation of nuclear facilities. 1580.111 Section 1580.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... regulation of nuclear facilities. TSA will coordinate activities under this subpart with the Nuclear...

  4. Synergy of cAMP and calcium signaling pathways in CFTR regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bozoky, Zoltan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Milman, Tal; Kim, Tae Hun; Du, Kai; Di Paola, Michelle; Pasyk, Stan; Pekhletski, Roman; Keller, Jacob P.; Bear, Christine E.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, leading to defective apical chloride transport. Patients also experience overactivation of inflammatory processes, including increased calcium signaling. Many investigations have described indirect effects of calcium signaling on CFTR or other calcium-activated chloride channels; here, we investigate the direct response of CFTR to calmodulin-mediated calcium signaling. We characterize an interaction between the regulatory region of CFTR and calmodulin, the major calcium signaling molecule, and report protein kinase A (PKA)-independent CFTR activation by calmodulin. We describe the competition between calmodulin binding and PKA phosphorylation and the differential effects of this competition for wild-type CFTR and the major F508del mutant, hinting at potential therapeutic strategies. Evidence of CFTR binding to isolated calmodulin domains/lobes suggests a mechanism for the role of CFTR as a molecular hub. Together, these data provide insights into how loss of active CFTR at the membrane can have additional consequences besides impaired chloride transport. PMID:28242698

  5. Physiological role of gap-junctional hemichannels. Extracellular calcium-dependent isosmotic volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Quist, A P; Rhee, S K; Lin, H; Lal, R

    2000-03-06

    Hemichannels in the overlapping regions of apposing cells plasma membranes join to form gap junctions and provide an intercellular communication pathway. Hemichannels are also present in the nonjunctional regions of individual cells and their activity is gated by several agents, including calcium. However, their physiological roles are unknown. Using techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescent dye uptake assay, and laser confocal immunofluorescence imaging, we have examined the extracellular calcium-dependent modulation of cell volume. In response to a change in the extracellular physiological calcium concentration (1.8 to calcium to the normal level. We conclude that nongap-junctional hemichannels regulate cell volume in response to the change in extracellular physiological calcium in an otherwise isosmotic situation.

  6. Synergy of cAMP and calcium signaling pathways in CFTR regulation.

    PubMed

    Bozoky, Zoltan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Milman, Tal; Kim, Tae Hun; Du, Kai; Di Paola, Michelle; Pasyk, Stan; Pekhletski, Roman; Keller, Jacob P; Bear, Christine E; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2017-02-27

    Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, leading to defective apical chloride transport. Patients also experience overactivation of inflammatory processes, including increased calcium signaling. Many investigations have described indirect effects of calcium signaling on CFTR or other calcium-activated chloride channels; here, we investigate the direct response of CFTR to calmodulin-mediated calcium signaling. We characterize an interaction between the regulatory region of CFTR and calmodulin, the major calcium signaling molecule, and report protein kinase A (PKA)-independent CFTR activation by calmodulin. We describe the competition between calmodulin binding and PKA phosphorylation and the differential effects of this competition for wild-type CFTR and the major F508del mutant, hinting at potential therapeutic strategies. Evidence of CFTR binding to isolated calmodulin domains/lobes suggests a mechanism for the role of CFTR as a molecular hub. Together, these data provide insights into how loss of active CFTR at the membrane can have additional consequences besides impaired chloride transport.

  7. Calcium regulates vesicle replenishment at the cone ribbon synapse.

    PubMed

    Babai, Norbert; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2010-11-24

    Cones release glutamate-filled vesicles continuously in darkness, and changing illumination modulates this release. Because sustained release in darkness is governed by vesicle replenishment rates, we analyzed how cone membrane potential regulates replenishment. Synaptic release from cones was measured by recording postsynaptic currents in Ambystoma tigrinum horizontal or OFF bipolar cells evoked by depolarization of simultaneously voltage-clamped cones. We measured replenishment after attaining a steady state between vesicle release and replenishment using trains of test pulses. Increasing Ca(2+) currents (I(Ca)) by changing the test step from -30 to -10 mV increased replenishment. Lengthening -30 mV test pulses to match the Ca(2+) influx during 25 ms test pulses to -10 mV produced similar replenishment rates. Reducing Ca(2+) driving force by using test steps to +30 mV slowed replenishment. Using UV flashes to reverse inhibition of I(Ca) by nifedipine accelerated replenishment. Increasing [Ca(2+)](i) by flash photolysis of caged Ca(2+) also accelerated replenishment. Replenishment, but not the initial burst of release, was enhanced by using an intracellular Ca(2+) buffer of 0.5 mm EGTA rather than 5 mm EGTA, and diminished by 1 mm BAPTA. This suggests that although release and replenishment exhibited similar Ca(2+) dependencies, release sites are <200 nm from Ca(2+) channels but replenishment sites are >200 nm away. Membrane potential thus regulates replenishment by controlling Ca(2+) influx, principally by effects on replenishment mechanisms but also by altering releasable pool size. This in turn provides a mechanism for converting changes in light intensity into changes in sustained release at the cone ribbon synapse.

  8. Regulation of spent nuclear fuel shipment: A state perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Halstead, R.J.; Sinderbrand, C.; Woodbury, D.

    1987-01-01

    In 1985, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) sought to regulate rail shipments of spent nuclear fuel through the state, because federal regulations did not adequately protect the environmentally sensitive corridor along the route of the shipments. A state interagency working group identified five serious deficiencies in overall federal regulatory scheme: 1) failure to consider the safety or environmental risks associated with selected routes; 2) abscence of route-specific emergency response planning; 3) failure of the NRC to regulate the carrier of spent nuclear fuel or consider its safety record; 4) abscence of requirements for determination of need for, or the propriety of, specific shipments of spent nuclear fuel; and 5) the lack of any opportunity for meaningful public participation with respect to the decision to transport spent nuclear fuel. Pursuant to Wisconsin's hazardous substance statutes, the WDNR issues an order requiring the utility to file a spill prevention and mitigation plan or cease shipping through Wisconsin. A state trial court judge upheld the utility's challenge to Wisconsin's spill plan requirements, based on federal preemption of state authority. The state is now proposing federal legislation which would require: 1) NRC determination of need prior to approval of offsite shipment of spent fuel by the licensees; 2) NRC assessment of the potential environmental impacts of shipments along the proposed route, and comparative evaluation of alternative modes and routes; and 3) NRC approval of a route-specific emergency response and mitigation plan, including local training and periodic exercises. Additionally, the proposed legislation would authorize States and Indian Tribes to establish regulatory programs providing for permits, inspection, contingency plans for monitoring, containments, cleanup and decontamination, surveillance, enforcement and reasonable fees. 15 refs.

  9. Headpiece Domain of Dematin Regulates Calcium Mobilization and Signaling in Platelets*

    PubMed Central

    Wieschhaus, Adam J.; Le Breton, Guy C.; Chishti, Athar H.

    2012-01-01

    Dematin is a broadly expressed membrane cytoskeletal protein that has been well characterized in erythrocytes and to a lesser extent in non-erythroid cells. However, dematin's function in platelets is not known. Here, we show that dematin is abundantly expressed in both human and mouse platelets. Platelets harvested from the dematin headpiece knock-out (HPKO) mouse model exhibit a striking defect in the mobilization of calcium in response to multiple agonists of platelet activation. The reduced calcium mobilization in HPKO platelets is associated with concomitant inhibition of platelet aggregation and granule secretion. Integrin αIIbβ3 activation in response to agonists is attenuated in the HPKO platelets. The mutant platelets show nearly normal spreading on fibrinogen and an unaltered basal cAMP level; however, the clot retraction was compromised in the mutant mice. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that dematin is present both at the dense tubular system and plasma membrane fractions of platelets. Proteomic analysis of dematin-associated proteins in human platelets identified inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase isoform B (IP3KB) as a binding partner, which was confirmed by immunoprecipitation analysis. IP3KB, a dense tubular system protein, is a major regulator of calcium homeostasis. Loss of the dematin headpiece resulted in a decrease of IP3KB at the membrane and increased levels of IP3KB in the cytosol. Collectively, these findings unveil dematin as a novel regulator of internal calcium mobilization in platelets affecting multiple signaling and cytoskeletal functions. Implications of a conserved role of dematin in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in other cell types will be discussed. PMID:23060452

  10. Regulation of Store-Operated Calcium Entry by FK506-Binding Immunophilins

    PubMed Central

    Kadeba, Pierre I.; Vasauskas, Audrey A.; Chen, Hairu; Wu, Songwei; Scammell, Jonathan G.; Cioffi, Donna L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium entry from the extracellular space into cells is an important signaling mechanism in both physiological and pathophysiological functions. In non-excitable cells, store-operated calcium (SOC) entry represents a principal mode of calcium entry. Activation of SOC entry in pulmonary artery endothelial cells leads to the formation of inter-endothelial cell gaps and subsequent endothelial barrier disruption. Regulation of endothelial SOC entry is poorly understood. In this work, we identify two large molecular weight immunophilins, FKBP51 and FKBP52, as novel regulators of SOC entry in endothelial cells. Using cell fractionation studies and immunocytochemistry we determined that a fraction of these largely cytosolic proteins localize to the plasma membrane where SOC entry channels are found. That FKBP51 and FKBP52 associate with SOC entry channel protein complexes was supported by co-precipitation of the immunophilins with TRPC4, a subunit of the calcium-selective, SOC entry channel ISOC. Dexamethasone-induced upregulation of FKBP51 expression in pulmonary artery endothelial cells reduced global SOC entry as well as ISOC. Similar results were observed when FKBP51 was over-expressed in an inducible HEK293 cell line. On the other hand, when FKBP52 was over-expressed SOC entry was enhanced. When expression of FKBP52 was inhibited, SOC entry was decreased. Collectively, our observations support regulatory roles for these large molecular weight immunophilins in which FKBP51 inhibits, whereas FKBP52 enhances, SOC entry in endothelial cells. PMID:23375350

  11. Distinct regulation of dopamine D2S and D2L autoreceptor signaling by calcium

    PubMed Central

    Gantz, Stephanie C; Robinson, Brooks G; Buck, David C; Bunzow, James R; Neve, Rachael L; Williams, John T; Neve, Kim A

    2015-01-01

    D2 autoreceptors regulate dopamine release throughout the brain. Two isoforms of the D2 receptor, D2S and D2L, are expressed in midbrain dopamine neurons. Differential roles of these isoforms as autoreceptors are poorly understood. By virally expressing the isoforms in dopamine neurons of D2 receptor knockout mice, this study assessed the calcium-dependence and drug-induced plasticity of D2S and D2L receptor-dependent G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) currents. The results reveal that D2S, but not D2L receptors, exhibited calcium-dependent desensitization similar to that exhibited by endogenous autoreceptors. Two pathways of calcium signaling that regulated D2 autoreceptor-dependent GIRK signaling were identified, which distinctly affected desensitization and the magnitude of D2S and D2L receptor-dependent GIRK currents. Previous in vivo cocaine exposure removed calcium-dependent D2 autoreceptor desensitization in wild type, but not D2S-only mice. Thus, expression of D2S as the exclusive autoreceptor was insufficient for cocaine-induced plasticity, implying a functional role for the co-expression of D2S and D2L autoreceptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09358.001 PMID:26308580

  12. Regulation of AKAP-membrane interactions by calcium.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Shumay, Elena; McLaughlin, Stuart; Wang, Hsien-yu; Malbon, Craig C

    2006-08-18

    The AKAP gravin is a scaffold for protein kinases, phosphatases, and adaptor molecules obligate for resensitization and recycling of beta2-adrenergic receptors. Gravin binds to the receptor through well characterized protein-protein interactions. These interactions are facilitated approximately 1000-fold when gravin is anchored to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Although the N-terminal region (approximately 550 residues) is highly negatively charged and probably natively unfolded, it could anchor gravin to the inner leaflet through hydrophobic insertion of its N-terminal myristate and electrostatic binding of three short positively charged domains (PCDs). Loss of the site of N-myristoylation was found to affect neither AKAP macroscopic localization nor AKAP function. Synthetic peptides corresponding to PCD1-3 bound in vitro to unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with high affinity, a binding reversed by calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+. In vivo gravin localization is regulated by intracellular Ca2+, a function mapping to the N terminus of the protein harboring PCD1, PCD2, and PCD3. Mutation of any two PCDs eliminates membrane association of the non-myristoylated gravin, the sensitivity to Ca2+/calmodulin, and the ability of this scaffold to catalyze receptor resensitization and recycling.

  13. Calcium regulation in the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Alleva, L M; Kirk, K

    2001-10-01

    The regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) in the intraerythrocytic form of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, was investigated using parasites 'isolated' from their host cells by saponin-permeabilisation of the erythrocyte membrane. The isolated parasites maintained tight control over their resting cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration which ranged from approximately 100 nM in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) to approximately 700 nM in the presence of 1 mM extracellular Ca(2+). The parasite has two functionally discrete intracellular Ca(2+) stores. One is an 'endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-like' store, the other an 'acidic store'. The ER-like store was discharged by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an inhibitor of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCAs) of animal and plant cells, but not by thapsigargin (TG), a more specific inhibitor of SERCAs of animal cells. The acidic store was discharged by nigericin and by NH(4)(+). The amount of Ca(2+) in the ER-like store increased with increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of Ca(2+) in the acidic store did not. Ca(2+) released from the ER-like store by CPA was cleared from the parasite cytosol by uptake into the acidic store (over a range of extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations), consistent with the acidic store serving as a Ca(2+) reservoir within the intracellular parasite.

  14. Calcium regulation in the protozoan model, Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Early in eukaryotic evolution, the cell has evolved a considerable inventory of proteins engaged in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, not only to avoid toxic effects but beyond that to exploit the signaling capacity of Ca(2+) by small changes in local concentration. Among protozoa, the ciliate Paramecium may now be one of the best analyzed models. Ciliary activity and exo-/endocytosis are governed by Ca(2+) , the latter by Ca(2+) mobilization from alveolar sacs and a superimposed store-operated Ca(2+) -influx. Paramecium cells possess plasma membrane- and endoplasmic reticulum-resident Ca(2+) -ATPases/pumps (PMCA, SERCA), a variety of Ca(2+) influx channels, including mechanosensitive and voltage-dependent channels in the plasma membrane, furthermore a plethora of Ca(2+) -release channels (CRC) of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ryanodine receptor type in different compartments, notably the contractile vacuole complex and the alveolar sacs, as well as in vesicles participating in vesicular trafficking. Additional types of CRC probably also occur but they have not been identified at a molecular level as yet, as is the equivalent of synaptotagmin as a Ca(2+) sensor for exocytosis. Among established targets and sensors of Ca(2+) in Paramecium are calmodulin, calcineurin, as well as Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, all with multiple functions. Thus, basic elements of Ca(2+) signaling are available for Paramecium. © 2013 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2013 International Society of Protistologists.

  15. Role of calcium in regulation of phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Patel, J; Keith, R A; Salama, A I; Moore, W C

    1991-01-01

    Using primary neuronal cultures we have examined the role of extracellular Ca2+ in a receptor-regulated phosphoinositide turnover. We report that receptor (glutamic acid and acetylcholine)-activated phosphoinositide turnover requires the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (EC50 = 21.1 microM). The requirement for Ca2+ appears to be at an intracellular level and is highly selective for Ca2+. We also found that several inorganic and organic Ca2+ channel blockers, including La3+ and verapamil, inhibit phosphoinositide turnover. However, the pharmacological profile of these agents in this regard was distinct from their actions at the voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. To explain the above requirement for extracellular Ca2+ in agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover and its sensitivity to Ca(2+)-channel blockers, we propose a hypothetical model suggesting that Ca2+, following IP-3-mediated mobilization, exerts a facilitatory action on the activity of receptor-phospholipase C complex. We further propose that in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or in the presence of certain Ca(2+)-channel blockers, refilling of calciosomes is ineffectual or inhibited, causing its depletion and subsequent inactivation of agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover.

  16. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  17. Nuclear receptor regulation of stemness and stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yangsik

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells include a diverse number of toti-, pluri-, and multi-potent cells that play important roles in cellular genesis and differentiation, tissue development, and organogenesis. Genetic regulation involving various transcription factors results in the self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily is composed of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors involved in diverse physiological functions such as metabolism, development, and reproduction. Increasing evidence shows that certain NRs function in regulating stemness or differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and tissue-specific adult stem cells. Here, we review the role of the NR superfamily in various aspects of stem cell biology, including their regulation of stemness, forward- and trans-differentiation events; reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells; and interspecies differences. These studies provide insights into the therapeutic potential of the NR superfamily in stem cell therapy and in treating stem cell-associated diseases (e.g., cancer stem cell). PMID:19696553

  18. Spontaneous Calcium Oscillations Regulate Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Martins, João; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Tugal, Derin; Korn, Justin A; Rizzi, Roberto; Padin-Iruegas, Maria Elena; Ottolenghi, Sergio; De Angelis, Antonella; Urbanek, Konrad; Iwata, Noriko; D’Amario, Domenico; Hosoda, Toru; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero; Rota, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    Rationale The adult heart possesses a pool of progenitor cells stored in myocardial niches but the mechanisms involved in the activation of this cell compartment are currently unknown. Objective Ca2+ promotes cell growth raising the possibility that changes in intracellular Ca2+ initiate division of c-kit-positive human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) and determine their fate. Methods and Results Ca2+ oscillations were identified in hCPCs and these events occurred independently from coupling with cardiomyocytes or the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These findings were confirmed in the heart of transgenic mice in which EGFP was under the control of the c-kit-promoter. Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs were regulated by the release of Ca2+ from the ER through activation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and the re-uptake of Ca2+ by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump (SERCA). IP3Rs and SERCA were highly expressed in hCPCs while ryanodine receptors were not detected. Although Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, store-operated Ca2+-channels and plasma membrane Ca2+-pump were present and functional in hCPCs, they had no direct effects on Ca2+ oscillations. Conversely, Ca2+ oscillations and their frequency markedly increased with ATP and histamine which activated purinoceptors and histamine-1 receptors highly expressed in hCPCs. Importantly, Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs were coupled with the entry of cells into the cell cycle and BrdUrd incorporation. Induction of Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs prior to their intramyocardial delivery to infarcted hearts was associated with enhanced engraftment and expansion of these cells promoting the generation of a large myocyte progeny. Conclusion IP3R-mediated Ca2+ mobilization control hCPC growth and their regenerative potential. PMID:19745162

  19. Volume regulation by human lymphocytes. Role of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, S.; Dupre, A.; Rothstein, A.

    1982-05-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes regulate their volumes in hypotonic solutions. In hypotonic media in which Na+ is the predominant cation, an initial swelling phase is followed by a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) associated with a net loss of cellular K+. In media in which K+ is the predominant cation, the rapid initial swelling is followed by a slower second swelling phase. /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes increased during RVD and returned to normal when the original volume was approximately regained. Effects similar to those induced by hypotonic stress could also be produced by raising the intracellular Ca++ level. In isotonic, Ca++-containing media cells were found to shrink upon addition of the Ca++ ionophore A23187 in K+-free media, but to swell in K+-rich media. Exposure to Ca++ plus A23187 also increased /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes. Quinine (75 microM), an inhibitor of the Ca++-activated K+ pathway in other systems blocked RVD, the associated K+ loss, and the increase in /sup 86/Rb+ efflux. Quinine also inhibited the volume changes and the increased /sup 86/Rb fluxes induced by Ca++ plus ionophore. The calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, pimozide and chlorpromazine blocked RVD as well as Ca++ plus A23187-induced volume changes. Trifluoperazine also prevented the increase in /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes and K+ loss induced by hypotonicity. Chlorpromazine sulfoxide, a relatively ineffective calmodulin antagonist, was considerably less potent as an inhibitor of RVD than chlorpromazine. It is suggested than an elevation in cytoplasmic (Ca++), triggered by cell swelling, increases the plasma membrane permeability to K+, the ensuing increased efflux of K+, associated anions, and osmotically obliged water, leading to cell shrinking (RVD).

  20. Revised seismic and geologic siting regulations for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, A.J.; Chokshi, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    The primary regulatory basis governing the seismic design of nuclear power plants is contained in Appendix A to Part 50, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). General Design Criteria (GDC) 2 defines requirements for design bases for protection against natural phenomena. GDC 2 states the performance criterion that {open_quotes}Structures, systems, and components important to safety shall be designed to withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, . . . without loss of capability to perform their safety functions. . .{close_quotes}. Appendix A to Part 100, Seismic and Geologic Siting Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, has been the principal document which provided detailed criteria to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites and suitability of the plant design basis established in consideration of the seismic and geologic characteristics of the proposed sites. Appendix A defines required seismological and geological investigations and requirements for other design conditions such as soil stability, slope stability, and seismically induced floods and water waves, and requirements for seismic instrumentation. The NRC staff is in the process of revising Appendix A. The NRC has recently revised seismic siting and design regulations for future applications. These revisions are discussed in detail in this paper.

  1. A conserved phosphatase cascade that regulates nuclear membrane biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjun; Gentry, Matthew S; Harris, Thurl E; Wiley, Sandra E; Lawrence, John C; Dixon, Jack E

    2007-04-17

    A newly emerging family of phosphatases that are members of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily contains the catalytic motif DXDX(T/V). A member of this DXDX(T/V) phosphatase family known as Dullard was recently shown to be a potential regulator of neural tube development in Xenopus [Satow R, Chan TC, Asashima M (2002) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 295:85-91]. Herein, we demonstrate that human Dullard and the yeast protein Nem1p perform similar functions in mammalian cells and yeast cells, respectively. In addition to similarity in primary sequence, Dullard and Nem1p possess similar domains and show similar substrate preferences, and both localize to the nuclear envelope. Additionally, we show that human Dullard can rescue the aberrant nuclear envelope morphology of nem1Delta yeast cells, functionally replacing Nem1p. Finally, Nem1p, has been shown to deposphorylate the yeast phosphatidic acid phosphatase Smp2p [Santos-Rosa H, Leung J, Grimsey N, Peak-Chew S, Siniossoglou S (2005) EMBO J 24:1931-1941], and we show that Dullard dephosphorylates the mammalian phospatidic acid phosphatase, lipin. Therefore, we propose that Dullard participates in a unique phosphatase cascade regulating nuclear membrane biogenesis, and that this cascade is conserved from yeast to mammals.

  2. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  3. IGF-1 induces IP3 -dependent calcium signal involved in the regulation of myostatin gene expression mediated by NFAT during myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Juan A; Flores, Sylvia; Fuentes, Eduardo N; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Jaimovich, Enrique; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is a complex and highly regulated process characterized by cell cycle arrest, which is associated with morphological changes including myoblast alignment, elongation, and fusion into multinucleated myotubes. This is a balanced process dynamically coordinated by positive and negative signals such as the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) and myostatin (MSTN), respectively. In this study, we report that the stimulation of skeletal myoblasts during differentiation with IGF-1 induces a rapid and transient calcium increase from intracellular stores, which are principally mediated through the phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ)/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 )-dependent signaling pathways. This response was completely blocked when myoblasts were incubated with LY294002 or transfected with the dominant-negative p110 gamma, suggesting a fundamental role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in PLCγ activation. Additionally, we show that calcium released via IP3 and induced by IGF-1 stimulates NFAT-dependent gene transcription and nuclear translocation of the GFP-labeled NFATc3 isoform. This activation was independent of extracellular calcium influx and calcium release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR). Finally, we examined mstn mRNA levels and mstn promoter activity in myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents and in reporter activity, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A, 11R-VIVIT, and by inhibitors of the PI3Kγ, PLCγ, and IP3 receptor. Our results strongly suggest that IGF-1 regulates myostatin transcription through the activation of the NFAT transcription factor in an IP3 /calcium-dependent manner. This is the first study to demonstrate a role of calcium-dependent signaling pathways in the mRNA expression of myostatin.

  4. Using Calcium Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonate Veins to Assess the Roles of Vein Formation and Seafloor Alteration in Regulation of the Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Coggon, R. M.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Turchyn, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Calcium carbonate vein formation in the oceanic crust has been proposed as a climate-sensitive feedback mechanism that regulates the carbon cycle on million-year timescales. The suggestion has been that higher pCO2 levels may drive changes in ocean temperature and pH that increase seafloor alteration, releasing more calcium from oceanic basalt. This results in more removal of carbon from Earth's surface through calcium carbonate formation, which includes calcium carbonate vein formation in oceanic crust. The importance of this feedback mechanism remains enigmatic. Measurements of the δ44Ca of calcium carbonate veins in the oceanic crust may constrain the sources of calcium and timing of vein formation. Seawater and basalt are the only sources present shortly after crustal formation, whereas other sources, such as anhydrite dissolution and sedimentary carbonates become available when the crust ages, at which point carbonate veins may form far from the ridge axis. We report the calcium isotopic composition of 65 calcium carbonate veins, ranging from 108 to 1.2 million years old, in hydrothermally altered basalt from the Mid-Atlantic and Juan de Fuca ridges. We also present 43 δ44Ca measurements of 5.9 million year old basalts and dikes from the Costa Rica Rift that have undergone hydrothermal alteration over a range of conditions in upper crust. The δ44Ca of the calcium carbonate veins ranges from -1.59 to 1.01‰ (versus Bulk Silicate Earth), whereas the δ44Ca of altered basalts ranges from -0.18 to 0.28‰. Depth and temperature of formation seem to be major influences on calcium carbonate vein δ44Ca, with veins formed at cool, shallower depths having higher δ44Ca, closer to seawater. In contrast, we note no temporal variation in δ44Ca of calcium carbonate veins when comparing samples from older and younger crust. The majority of veins (54 out of 65) have δ44Ca between that of seawater and basalt, which implies that they may have formed quite soon after

  5. Power spectra and cooperativity of a calcium-regulated cation channel.

    PubMed

    McGeoch, M W; McGeoch, J E

    1994-01-01

    In this article we show that a channel complex of cooperatively interacting subunits can produce a power law spectrum with the slope of the spectrum depending on the strength of the cooperative interaction. The effects of cooperativity are explored via a computational model of a calcium-regulated cation channel for which new data is presented. The results, which concern "flickering" conductances, are correlated with prior work on critical fluctuations in the Ising model of ferromagnetism.

  6. A Change In Nuclear Pore Complex Composition Regulates Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Gomez-Cavazos, J. Sebastian; Mei, Arianna; Lackner, Daniel H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are built from ~30 different proteins called nucleoporins. Previous studies have shown that several Nups exhibit cell-type-specific expression and that mutations in NPC components result in tissue-specific diseases. Here we show that a specific change in NPC composition is required for both myogenic and neuronal differentiation. The transmembrane nucleoporin Nup210 is absent in proliferating myoblasts and embryonic stem (ES) cells but becomes expressed and incorporated into NPCs during cell differentiation. Preventing Nup210 production by RNAi blocks myogenesis and the differentiation of ES cells into neuroprogenitors. We found that the addition of Nup210 to NPCs does not affect nuclear transport but is required for the induction of genes that are essential for cell differentiation. Our results identify a single change in NPC composition as an essential step in cell differentiation and establish a role for Nup210 in gene expression regulation and cell fate determination. PMID:22264802

  7. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA genes are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wound...

  8. Calcium Induced Regulation of Skeletal Troponin — Computational Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Genchev, Georgi Z.; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi; Lu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between calcium and the regulatory site(s) of striated muscle regulatory protein troponin switches on and off muscle contraction. In skeletal troponin binding of calcium to sites I and II of the TnC subunit results in a set of structural changes in the troponin complex, displaces tropomyosin along the actin filament and allows myosin-actin interaction to produce mechanical force. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the calcium dependent dynamics of the fast skeletal troponin molecule and its TnC subunit in the calcium saturated and depleted states. We focused on the N-lobe and on describing the atomic level events that take place subsequent to removal of the calcium ion from the regulatory sites I and II. A main structural event - a closure of the A/B helix hydrophobic pocket results from the integrated effect of the following conformational changes: the breakage of H-bond interactions between the backbone nitrogen atoms of the residues at positions 2, 9 and sidechain oxygen atoms of the residue at position 12 (N2-OE12/N9-OE12) in sites I and II; expansion of sites I and II and increased site II N-terminal end-segment flexibility; strengthening of the β-sheet scaffold; and the subsequent re-packing of the N-lobe hydrophobic residues. Additionally, the calcium release allows the N-lobe to rotate relative to the rest of the Tn molecule. Based on the findings presented herein we propose a novel model of skeletal thin filament regulation. PMID:23554884

  9. Bone Is a Major Target of PTH/PTHrP Receptor Signaling in Regulation of Fetal Blood Calcium Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Nishimori, Shigeki; Karaplis, Andrew C; Goltzman, David; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-08-01

    The blood calcium concentration during fetal life is tightly regulated within a narrow range by highly interactive homeostatic mechanisms that include transport of calcium across the placenta and fluxes in and out of bone; the mechanisms of this regulation are poorly understood. Our findings that endochondral bone-specific PTH/PTHrP receptor (PPR) knockout (KO) mice showed significant reduction of fetal blood calcium concentration compared with that of control littermates at embryonic day 18.5 led us to focus on bone as a possibly major determinant of fetal calcium homeostasis. We found that the fetal calcium concentration of Runx2 KO mice was significantly higher than that of control littermates, suggesting that calcium flux into bone had a considerable influence on the circulating calcium concentration. Moreover, Runx2:PTH double mutant fetuses showed calcium levels similar to those of Runx2 KO mice, suggesting that part of the fetal hypocalcemia in PTH KO mice was caused by the increment of the mineralized bone mass allowed by the formation of osteoblasts. Finally, Rank:PTH double mutant mice had a blood calcium concentration even lower than that of the either Rank KO or PTH KO mice alone at embryonic day 18.5. These observations in our genetic models suggest that PTH/PTHrP receptor signaling in bones has a significant role of the regulation of fetal blood calcium concentration and that both placental transport and osteoclast activation contribute to PTH's hypercalcemic action. They also show that PTH-independent deposition of calcium in bone is the major controller of fetal blood calcium level.

  10. Interactions between calcium and phosphorus in the regulation of the production of fibroblast growth factor 23 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Stephen J.; Thomsen, Alex R. B.; Pang, Jian L.; Kantham, Lakshmi; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Pollak, Martin; Goltzman, David

    2013-01-01

    Calcium and phosphorus homeostasis are highly interrelated and share common regulatory hormones, including FGF23. However, little is known about calcium's role in the regulation of FGF23. We sought to investigate the regulatory roles of calcium and phosphorus in FGF23 production using genetic mouse models with targeted inactivation of PTH (PTH KO) or both PTH and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR; PTH-CaSR DKO). In wild-type, PTH KO, and PTH-CaSR DKO mice, elevation of either serum calcium or phosphorus by intraperitoneal injection increased serum FGF23 levels. In PTH KO and PTH-CaSR DKO mice, however, increases in serum phosphorus by dietary manipulation were accompanied by severe hypocalcemia, which appeared to blunt stimulation of FGF23 release. Increases in dietary phosphorus in PTH-CaSR DKO mice markedly decreased serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] despite no change in FGF23, suggesting direct regulation of 1,25(OH)2D3 synthesis by serum phosphorus. Calcium-mediated increases in serum FGF23 required a threshold level of serum phosphorus of about 5 mg/dl. Analogously, phosphorus-elicited increases in FGF23 were markedly blunted if serum calcium was less than 8 mg/dl. The best correlation between calcium and phosphorus and serum FGF23 was found between FGF23 and the calcium × phosphorus product. Since calcium stimulated FGF23 production in the PTH-CaSR DKO mice, this effect cannot be mediated by the full-length CaSR. Thus the regulation of FGF23 by both calcium and phosphorus appears to be fundamentally important in coordinating the serum levels of both mineral ions and ensuring that the calcium × phosphorus product remains within a physiological range. PMID:23233539

  11. The fragile X mental retardation protein developmentally regulates the strength and fidelity of calcium signaling in Drosophila mushroom body neurons.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Charles R; Broadie, Kendal

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a broad-spectrum neurological disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli, hyperactivity and severe cognitive impairment. FXS is caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene, whose FMRP product regulates mRNA translation downstream of synaptic activity to modulate changes in synaptic architecture, function and plasticity. Null Drosophila FMR1 (dfmr1) mutants exhibit reduced learning and loss of protein synthesis-dependent memory consolidation, which is dependent on the brain mushroom body (MB) learning and memory center. We targeted a transgenic GFP-based calcium reporter to the MB in order to analyze calcium dynamics downstream of neuronal activation. In the dfmr1 null MB, there was significant augmentation of the calcium transients induced by membrane depolarization, as well as elevated release of calcium from intracellular organelle stores. The severity of these calcium signaling defects increased with developmental age, although early stages were characterized by highly variable, low fidelity calcium regulation. At the single neuron level, both calcium transient and calcium store release defects were exhibited by dfmr1 null MB neurons in primary culture. Null dfmr1 mutants exhibit reduced brain mRNA expression of calcium-binding proteins, including calcium buffers calmodulin and calbindin, predicting that the inability to appropriately sequester cytosolic calcium may be the common mechanistic defect causing calcium accumulation following both influx and store release. Changes in the magnitude and fidelity of calcium signals in the absence of dFMRP likely contribute to defects in neuronal structure/function, leading to the hallmark learning and memory dysfunction of FXS.

  12. Value-impact analysis of regulations for the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.; Judd, B.; Huntsman, J.

    1980-06-23

    This paper summarizes a quantitative tool developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to aid the NRC in establishing Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) regulations for safeguarding Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Illustrative Value-Impact results of demonstrating the methodology at a facility handling SNM to evaluate alternative safeguards rules is given. The methodology developed also offers a useful framework for facility designers to choose safeguards measures that meet the NRC's criteria in a cost-effective manner. Furthermore, the methodology requires very modest computing capability and is straightforward to apply.

  13. Leptin regulated calcium channels of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin neurons by activation of different signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-H; Wang, F; Yang, M-J; Yu, D-F; Wu, W-N; Liu, J; Ma, L-Q; Cai, F; Chen, J-G

    2008-09-22

    The fat-derived hormone leptin regulates food intake and body weight in part by modulating the activity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). To investigate the electrophysiological activity of these neurons and their responses to leptin, we recorded whole-cell calcium currents on NPY and POMC neurons in the ARC of rats, which we identified by morphologic features and immunocytochemical identification at the end of recording. Leptin decreased the peak amplitude of high voltage-activated calcium currents (I(HVA)) in the isolated neurons from ARC, which were subsequently shown to be immunoreactive for NPY. The inhibition was prevented by pretreatment with inhibitors of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). In contrast, leptin increased the amplitude of I(HVA) in POMC-containing neurons. The stimulations of I(HVA) were inhibited by blockers of JAK2 and phosphatidylino 3-kinase (PI3-k). Both of these effects were counteracted by the L-type calcium channel antagonist nifedipine, suggesting that L-type calcium channels were involved in the regulation induced by leptin. These data indicated that leptin exerted opposite effects on these two classes of neurons. Leptin directly inhibited I(HVA) in NPY neurons via leptin receptor (LEPR) -JAK2-MAPK pathways, whereas evoked I(HVA) in POMC neurons by LEPR-JAK2-PI3-k pathways. These neural pathways and intracellular signaling mechanisms may play key roles in regulating NPY and POMC neuron activity, anorectic action of leptin and, thereby, feeding.

  14. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development

    PubMed Central

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  15. Selenoprotein K modulate intracellular free Ca(2+) by regulating expression of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Ruimin; Huang, Yalan; Wang, Miao; Yang, Fan; Huang, Dana; Wu, Chunli; Li, Yue; Tang, Yijun; Zhang, Renli; Cheng, Jinquan

    2017-03-18

    Selenoprotein K (SelK) is an 11-kDa selenoprotein, which may be involved in the regulation of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and immune response. To explore the function of SelK in the process of immune response, several short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA) were designed for the construction of recombinant plasmids to down-regulate the expression of SelK gene in vitro. These shRNAs specifically and efficiently interfered with the expression of SelK at both mRNA and protein levels. The expression of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP) and the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration were significantly down-regulated in anti-CD3 stimulated SelK-knockdown cells. The expression of Interleukin 2 receptor alpha chain (IL-2Rα) and the secretion of Interleukin 4 (IL-4), which play a significant role in the process of T cell activation and proliferation, were also reduced in SelK-knockdown cells. Selenomethionine (Se-Met) at an optimum concentration of 5 μM could up-regulate SelK expression and reverse the change of the expression of CHERP and the intracellular free calcium caused by SelK-knockdown. These results hereby imply SelK may regulate the release of Ca(2+) by CHERP and play an important role in the proliferation and differentiation of T cell by TCR stimulation.

  16. Nuclear Export Signal Masking Regulates HIV-1 Rev Trafficking and Viral RNA Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Ryan T.; Aligeti, Mounavya; Pocock, Ginger M.; Higgins, Christina A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1's Rev protein forms a homo-oligomeric adaptor complex linking viral RNAs to the cellular CRM1/Ran-GTP nuclear export machinery through the activity of Rev's prototypical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). In this study, we used a functional fluorescently tagged Rev fusion protein as a platform to study the effects of modulating Rev NES identity, number, position, or strength on Rev subcellular trafficking, viral RNA nuclear export, and infectious virion production. We found that Rev activity was remarkably tolerant of diverse NES sequences, including supraphysiological NES (SNES) peptides that otherwise arrest CRM1 transport complexes at nuclear pores. Rev's ability to tolerate a SNES was both position and multimerization dependent, an observation consistent with a model wherein Rev self-association acts to transiently mask the NES peptide(s), thereby biasing Rev's trafficking into the nucleus. Combined imaging and functional assays also indicated that NES masking underpins Rev's well-known tendency to accumulate at the nucleolus, as well as Rev's capacity to activate optimal levels of late viral gene expression. We propose that Rev multimerization and NES masking regulates Rev's trafficking to and retention within the nucleus even prior to RNA binding. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infects more than 34 million people worldwide causing >1 million deaths per year. Infectious virion production is activated by the essential viral Rev protein that mediates nuclear export of intron-bearing late-stage viral mRNAs. Rev's shuttling into and out of the nucleus is regulated by the antagonistic activities of both a peptide-encoded N-terminal nuclear localization signal and C-terminal nuclear export signal (NES). How Rev and related viral proteins balance strong import and export activities in order to achieve optimal levels of viral gene expression is incompletely understood. We provide evidence that multimerization provides a mechanism by which Rev transiently masks

  17. The regulation and functions of the nuclear RNA exosome complex.

    PubMed

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Wittmann, Sina; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    The RNA exosome complex is the most versatile RNA-degradation machine in eukaryotes. The exosome has a central role in several aspects of RNA biogenesis, including RNA maturation and surveillance. Moreover, it is emerging as an important player in regulating the expression levels of specific mRNAs in response to environmental cues and during cell differentiation and development. Although the mechanisms by which RNA is targeted to (or escapes from) the exosome are still not fully understood, general principles have begun to emerge, which we discuss in this Review. In addition, we introduce and discuss novel, previously unappreciated functions of the nuclear exosome, including in transcription regulation and in the maintenance of genome stability.

  18. Nuclear Export Signal Masking Regulates HIV-1 Rev Trafficking and Viral RNA Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Ryan T; Aligeti, Mounavya; Pocock, Ginger M; Higgins, Christina A; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1's Rev protein forms a homo-oligomeric adaptor complex linking viral RNAs to the cellular CRM1/Ran-GTP nuclear export machinery through the activity of Rev's prototypical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). In this study, we used a functional fluorescently tagged Rev fusion protein as a platform to study the effects of modulating Rev NES identity, number, position, or strength on Rev subcellular trafficking, viral RNA nuclear export, and infectious virion production. We found that Rev activity was remarkably tolerant of diverse NES sequences, including supraphysiological NES (SNES) peptides that otherwise arrest CRM1 transport complexes at nuclear pores. Rev's ability to tolerate a SNES was both position and multimerization dependent, an observation consistent with a model wherein Rev self-association acts to transiently mask the NES peptide(s), thereby biasing Rev's trafficking into the nucleus. Combined imaging and functional assays also indicated that NES masking underpins Rev's well-known tendency to accumulate at the nucleolus, as well as Rev's capacity to activate optimal levels of late viral gene expression. We propose that Rev multimerization and NES masking regulates Rev's trafficking to and retention within the nucleus even prior to RNA binding.

  19. Structural Basis for Calcium and Magnesium Regulation of a Large Conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel with β1 Subunits*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Wen; Hou, Pan-Pan; Guo, Xi-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-Wen; Hu, Bin; Li, Xia; Wang, Lu-Yang; Ding, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels, composed of pore-forming α subunits and auxiliary β subunits, play important roles in diverse physiological activities. The β1 is predominately expressed in smooth muscle cells, where it greatly enhances the Ca2+ sensitivity of BK channels for proper regulation of smooth muscle tone. However, the structural basis underlying dynamic interaction between BK mSlo1 α and β1 remains elusive. Using macroscopic ionic current recordings in various Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations, we identified two binding sites on the cytosolic N terminus of β1, namely the electrostatic enhancing site (mSlo1(K392,R393)-β1(E13,T14)), increasing the calcium sensitivity of BK channels, and the hydrophobic site (mSlo1(L906,L908)-β1(L5,V6,M7)), passing the physical force from the Ca2+ bowl onto the enhancing site and S6 C-linker. Dynamic binding of these sites affects the interaction between the cytosolic domain and voltage-sensing domain, leading to the reduction of Mg2+ sensitivity. A comprehensive structural model of the BK(mSlo1 α-β1) complex was reconstructed based on these functional studies, which provides structural and mechanistic insights for understanding BK gating. PMID:24764303

  20. Horizontal cell feedback regulates calcium currents and intracellular calcium levels in rod photoreceptors of salamander and mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Babai, Norbert; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether horizontal cells (HCs) provide feedback that regulates the Ca2+ current (ICa) of rods in salamander and mouse retinas. In both species, hyperpolarizing HCs by puffing a glutamate antagonist, 6,7-dinitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), onto HC processes caused a negative shift in the voltage dependence of rod ICa and increased its peak amplitude. Conversely, depolarizing HCs by puffing kainic acid (KA) into the outer plexiform layer (OPL) caused a positive voltage shift and decreased rod ICa. Experiments on salamander retina showed that these effects were blocked by addition of the pH buffer, Hepes. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was examined in rods by confocal microscopy after loading salamander and mouse retinal slices with Fluo-4. Rods were depolarized to near the dark resting potential by bath application of high K+ solutions. Hyperpolarizing HCs with 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline (NBQX) enhanced high K+-evoked Ca2+ increases whereas depolarizing HCs with KA inhibited Ca2+ increases. In both species these effects of NBQX and KA were blocked by addition of Hepes. Thus, like HC feedback in cones, changes in HC membrane potential modulate rod ICa thereby regulating rod [Ca2+]i at physiological voltages, in both mouse and salamander retinas. By countering the reduced synaptic output that accompanies hyperpolarization of rods to light, HC feedback will subtract spatially averaged luminance levels from the responses of individual rods to local changes. The finding that HC to rod feedback is present in both amphibian and mammalian species shows that this mechanism is highly conserved across vertebrate retinas. PMID:19332495

  1. Horizontal cell feedback regulates calcium currents and intracellular calcium levels in rod photoreceptors of salamander and mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Babai, Norbert; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2009-05-15

    We tested whether horizontal cells (HCs) provide feedback that regulates the Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) of rods in salamander and mouse retinas. In both species, hyperpolarizing HCs by puffing a glutamate antagonist, 6,7-dinitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), onto HC processes caused a negative shift in the voltage dependence of rod I(Ca) and increased its peak amplitude. Conversely, depolarizing HCs by puffing kainic acid (KA) into the outer plexiform layer (OPL) caused a positive voltage shift and decreased rod I(Ca.) Experiments on salamander retina showed that these effects were blocked by addition of the pH buffer, Hepes. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was examined in rods by confocal microscopy after loading salamander and mouse retinal slices with Fluo-4. Rods were depolarized to near the dark resting potential by bath application of high K(+) solutions. Hyperpolarizing HCs with 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline (NBQX) enhanced high K(+)-evoked Ca(2+) increases whereas depolarizing HCs with KA inhibited Ca(2+) increases. In both species these effects of NBQX and KA were blocked by addition of Hepes. Thus, like HC feedback in cones, changes in HC membrane potential modulate rod I(Ca) thereby regulating rod [Ca(2+)](i) at physiological voltages, in both mouse and salamander retinas. By countering the reduced synaptic output that accompanies hyperpolarization of rods to light, HC feedback will subtract spatially averaged luminance levels from the responses of individual rods to local changes. The finding that HC to rod feedback is present in both amphibian and mammalian species shows that this mechanism is highly conserved across vertebrate retinas.

  2. Long term regulation of cardiac L-type calcium channel by small G proteins.

    PubMed

    Magyar, J; Jenes, A; Kistamás, K; Ruzsnavszky, F; Nánási, P P; Satin, J; Szentandrássy, N; Bányász, T

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ions are crucial elements of excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac myocytes. The intracellular Ca(2+ ) concentration changes continously during the cardiac cycle, but the Ca(2+ ) entering to the cell serves as an intracellular second messenger, as well. The Ca(2+ ) as a second messenger influences the activity of many intracellular signalling pathways and regulates gene expression. In cardiac myocytes the major pathway for Ca(2+ ) entry into cells is L-type calcium channel (LTCC). The precise control of LTCC function is essential for maintaining the calcium homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. Dysregulation of LTCC may result in different diseases like cardiac hypertrophy, arrhytmias, heart failure. The physiological and pathological structural changes in the heart are induced in part by small G proteins. These proteins are involved in wide spectrum of cell biological functions including protein transport, regulation of cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Understanding the crosstalk between small G proteins and LTCC may help to understand the pathomechanism of different cardiac diseases and to develop a new generation of genetically-encoded Ca(2+ ) channel inhibitors.

  3. Ryanodine receptors, calcium signaling and regulation of vascular tone in the cerebral parenchymal microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Nelson, Mark T.; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral blood supply is delivered by a surface network of pial arteries and arterioles from which arise (parenchymal) arterioles that penetrate into the cortex and terminate in a rich capillary bed. The critical regulation of cerebral blood flow, locally and globally, requires precise vasomotor regulation of the intracerebral microvasculature. This vascular region is anatomically unique as illustrated by the presence of astrocytic processes that envelope almost the entire basolateral surface of parenchymal arterioles. There are, moreover, notable functional differences between pial arteries and parenchymal arterioles. For example, in pial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), local calcium release events (“calcium sparks”) through ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane activate large conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium (BK) channels to modulate vascular diameter. In contrast, VSMCs in parenchymal arterioles express functional RyR and BK channels, but under physiological conditions these channels do not oppose pressure-induced vasoconstriction. Here we summarize the roles of ryanodine receptors in the parenchymal microvasculature under physiologic and pathologic conditions, and discuss their importance in the control of cerebral blood flow. PMID:23216877

  4. Regulation of hepatic energy metabolism by the nuclear receptor PXR.

    PubMed

    Hakkola, Jukka; Rysä, Jaana; Hukkanen, Janne

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is traditionally thought to be specialized for sensing xenobiotic exposure. In concurrence with this feature PXR was originally identified to regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. During the last ten years it has become clear that PXR harbors broader functions. Evidence obtained both in experimental animals and humans indicate that ligand-activated PXR regulates hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism and affects whole body metabolic homeostasis. Currently, the consequences of PXR activation on overall metabolic health are not yet fully understood and varying results on the effect of PXR activation or knockout on metabolic disorders and weight gain have been published in mouse models. Rifampicin and St. John's wort, the prototypical human PXR agonists, impair glucose tolerance in healthy volunteers. Chronic exposure to PXR agonists could potentially represent a risk factor for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie.

  5. Intracellular calcium signals regulate growth of hepatic stellate cells via specific effects on cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Elwy M; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Sheung, Nina; Yu, Jin; Amaya, Maria Jimina; Nathanson, Michael H; Dranoff, Jonathan A

    2009-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are important mediators of liver fibrosis. Hormones linked to downstream intracellular Ca(2+) signals upregulate HSC proliferation, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. Nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) signals may have distinct effects on cell proliferation, so we expressed plasmid and adenoviral constructs containing the Ca(2+) chelator parvalbumin (PV) linked to either a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES) to block Ca(2+) signals in distinct compartments within LX-2 immortalized human HSC and primary rat HSC. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs each targeted to the appropriate intracellular compartment and blocked Ca(2+) signals only within that compartment. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs inhibited HSC growth. Furthermore, blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca(2+) signals arrested growth at the G2/mitosis (G2/M) cell-cycle interface and prevented the onset of mitosis. Blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca(2+) signals downregulated phosphorylation of the G2/M checkpoint phosphatase Cdc25C. Inhibition of calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) had identical effects on LX-2 growth and Cdc25C phosphorylation. We propose that nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) are critical signals that regulate HSC growth at the G2/M checkpoint via CaMK II-mediated regulation of Cdc25C phosphorylation. These data provide a new logical target for pharmacological therapy directed against progression of liver fibrosis.

  6. PKCι regulates nuclear YAP1 localization and ovarian cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Justilien, Verline; Brennan, Katharyn I.; Jamieson, Lee; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atypical protein kinase Cι (PKCι) is an oncogene in lung and ovarian cancer. The PKCι gene PRKCI is targeted for frequent tumor-specific copy number gain (CNG) in both lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC). We recently demonstrated that in LSCC cells PRKCI CNG functions to drive transformed growth and tumorigenicity by activating PKCι-dependent cell autonomous Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Here, we assessed whether OSC cells harboring PRKCI CNG exhibit similar PKCι-dependent Hh signaling. Surprisingly, we find that whereas PKCι is required for the transformed growth for OSC cells harboring PRKCI CNG, these cells do not exhibit PKCι-dependent Hh signaling or Hh-dependent proliferation. Rather, transformed growth of OSC cells is regulated by PKCι-dependent nuclear localization of the oncogenic transcription factor, YAP1. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated knock down (KD) of PKCι leads to decreased nuclear YAP1 and increased YAP1 binding to angiomotin (AMOT), which sequesters YAP1 in the cytoplasm. Biochemical analysis reveals that PKCι directly phosphorylates AMOT at a unique site, Thr750, whose phosphorylation inhibits YAP1 binding. Pharmacologic inhibition of PKCι decreases YAP1 nuclear localization and blocks OSC tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals a strong positive correlation between tumor PKCι expression and nuclear YAP1 in primary OSC tumor samples, indicating the clinical relevance of PKCι-YAP1 signaling. Our results uncover a novel PKCι-AMOT-YAP1 signaling axis that promotes OSC tumor growth, and provide a rationale for therapeutic targeting of this pathway for treatment of OSC. PMID:27321186

  7. Regulation of the cytosolic sulfotransferases by nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Runge-Morris, Melissa; Kocarek, Thomas A.; Falany, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) are a multigene family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sulfonate group from the physiologic sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, to a nucleophilic substrate to generate a polar product that is more amenable to elimination from the body. As catalysts of both xenobiotic and endogenous metabolism, the SULTs are major points of contact between the external and physiological environments, and modulation of SULT-catalyzed metabolism can not only affect xenobiotic disposition, but it can also alter endogenous metabolic processes. Therefore, it is not surprising that SULT expression is regulated by numerous members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that function as sensors of xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules, such as fatty acids, bile acids, and oxysterols. These NRs include the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, liver X receptors, farnesoid X receptor, retinoid-related orphan receptors, and estrogen-related receptors. This review summarizes current information about NR regulation of SULT expression. Because species differences in SULT subfamily composition and tissue-, sex-, development-, and inducer-dependent regulation are prominent, these differences will be emphasized throughout the review. In addition, because of the central role of the SULTs in cellular physiology, the effect of NR-mediated SULT regulation on physiological and pathophysiological processes will be discussed. Gaps in current knowledge that require further investigation are also highlighted. PMID:23330539

  8. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  9. The release rate of curcumin from calcium alginate beads regulated by food emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Song, Shili; Wang, Zhen; Qian, Yuhua; Zhang, Lijie; Luo, Erfeng

    2012-05-02

    Curcumin-loaded alginate beads, which contain different food emulsifiers, have been prepared using CaCl₂ as the cross-linking agent. The controlled release of the curcumin from the beads was investigated at room temperature. For calcium alginate/Span-80/Tween-80 (A/S/T) formulations, almost all of the curcumin loaded in the beads was released into the medium within about 20 h, and the release rates could be regulated by changing the concentration of both Tween-80 and Span-80. However, for the systems of calcium alginate/Q-12A/F-18A (A/Q/F), about 60% of the curcumin loaded in the beads was released at the end of experiments. The studies of scanning electron microscopy indicated that the microstructure of the walls of beads could significantly vary with the concentration or type of emulsifiers. The Fourier transform infrared spectral measurements confirmed that the interactions between calcium alginate and polyglycerol fatty acid esters were stronger than that between calcium alginate and Tween-80/Span-80. The results of swelling studies demonstrated that the initial rates of water uptake for A/Q/F beads were higher than that for A/S/T beads. Moreover, the data of release rates were fitted by an empirical equation, which showed that the release mechanism of curcumin from the alginate gels varied with the composition of emulsifiers for the A/S/T systems. This work provides an important insight into the effect of food emulsifiers on the release rates of the curcumin from calcium alginate beads and will be helpful for the application of the systems in controlled release of other hydrophobic drug.

  10. Activity-dependent regulation of calcium and ribosomes in the chick cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Call, C L; Hyson, R L

    2016-03-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of 20-30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Two potentially cytotoxic events, a dramatic rise in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and a decline in the integrity of ribosomes are observed within 1h of deafferentation. Glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve has been shown to preserve NM neuron health by activating metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), maintaining both normal [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. One interpretation of these results is that a common mGluR-activated signaling cascade is required for the maintenance of both [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. This could happen if both responses are influenced directly by a common messenger, or if the loss of mGluR activation causes changes in one component that secondarily causes changes in the other. The present studies tested this common-mediator hypothesis in slice preparations by examining activity-dependent regulation of [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomes in the same tissue after selectively blocking group I mGluRs (1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)) or group II mGluRs (LY 341495) during unilateral auditory nerve stimulation. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i of NM neurons were measured using fura-2 ratiometric calcium imaging and the tissue was subsequently processed for Y10B immunoreactivity (Y10B-ir), an antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. The group I mGluR antagonist blocked the activity-dependent regulation of both [Ca(2+)]i and Y10B-ir, but the group II antagonist blocked only the activity-dependent regulation of Y10B-ir. That is, even when group II receptors were blocked, stimulation continued to maintain low [Ca(2+)]i, but it did not maintain Y10B-ir. These results suggest a dissociation in how calcium and ribosomes are regulated in NM neurons and that ribosomes can be regulated through a mechanism that is independent of calcium regulation.

  11. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tejwani, Vickram; Qian, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD) population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD). CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD. PMID:23760058

  12. Multiple roles of calcium ions in the regulation of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Neher, Erwin; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2008-09-25

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]) has important roles in the triggering of neurotransmitter release and the regulation of short-term plasticity (STP). Transmitter release is initiated by quite high concentrations within microdomains, while short-term facilitation is strongly influenced by the global buildup of "residual calcium." A global rise in [Ca(2+)] also accelerates the recruitment of release-ready vesicles, thereby controlling the degree of short-term depression (STD) during sustained activity, as well as the recovery of the vesicle pool in periods of rest. We survey data that lead us to propose two distinct roles of [Ca(2+)] in vesicle recruitment: one accelerating "molecular priming" (vesicle docking and the buildup of a release machinery), the other promoting the tight coupling between releasable vesicles and Ca(2+) channels. Such coupling is essential for rendering vesicles sensitive to short [Ca(2+)] transients, generated during action potentials.

  13. α-SNAP regulates dynamic, on-site assembly and calcium selectivity of Orai1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peiyao; Miao, Yong; Dani, Adish; Vig, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Orai1 forms a highly calcium-selective pore of the calcium release activated channel, and α-SNAP is necessary for its function. Here we show that α-SNAP regulates on-site assembly of Orai1 dimers into calcium-selective multimers. We find that Orai1 is a dimer in resting primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts but displays variable stoichiometry in the plasma membrane of store-depleted cells. Remarkably, α-SNAP depletion induces formation of higher-order Orai1 oligomers, which permeate significant levels of sodium via Orai1 channels. Sodium permeation in α-SNAP–deficient cells cannot be corrected by tethering multiple Stim1 domains to Orai1 C-terminal tail, demonstrating that α-SNAP regulates functional assembly and calcium selectivity of Orai1 multimers independently of Stim1 levels. Fluorescence nanoscopy reveals sustained coassociation of α-SNAP with Stim1 and Orai1, and α-SNAP–depleted cells show faster and less constrained mobility of Orai1 within ER-PM junctions, suggesting Orai1 and Stim1 coentrapment without stable contacts. Furthermore, α-SNAP depletion significantly reduces fluorescence resonance energy transfer between Stim1 and Orai1 N-terminus but not C-terminus. Taken together, these data reveal a unique role of α-SNAP in the on-site functional assembly of Orai1 subunits and suggest that this process may, in part, involve enabling crucial low-affinity interactions between Orai1 N-terminus and Stim1. PMID:27335124

  14. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ziying; Madara, Jonathan J.; Herbert, Andrew; Prugar, Laura I.; Ruthel, Gordon; Lu, Jianhong; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaohong; Wrobel, Jay E.; Reitz, Allen B.; Dye, John M.; Harty, Ronald N.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses), are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1) and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms. PMID:26513362

  15. 78 FR 71675 - Update of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation's Electronic Operating Reactor Correspondence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Update of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation's Electronic Operating Reactor Correspondence... Regulatory Commission. Michele G. Evans, Director, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of...

  16. Regulation of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic function by cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Su, Susan C.; Seo, Jinsoo; Pan, Jen Q.; Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Rudenko, Andrii; Ericsson, Maria; Neve, Rachael L.; Yue, David T.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) localize to presynaptic nerve terminals and mediate key events including synaptogenesis and neurotransmission. While several kinases have been implicated in the modulation of calcium channels, their impact on presynaptic functions remains unclear. Here we report that the N-type calcium channel is a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The pore-forming α1 subunit of the N-type calcium channel is phosphorylated in the C-terminal domain, and phosphorylation results in enhanced calcium influx due to increased channel open probability. Phosphorylation of the N-type calcium channel by Cdk5 facilitates neurotransmitter release and alters presynaptic plasticity by increasing the number of docked vesicles at the synaptic cleft. These effects are mediated by an altered interaction between N-type calcium channels and RIM1, which tethers presynaptic calcium channels to the active zone. Collectively, our results highlight a molecular mechanism by which N-type calcium channels are regulated by Cdk5 to affect presynaptic functions. PMID:22920258

  17. Self-regulated viscous channel in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiong; Goryaynov, Alexander; Sarma, Ashapurna; Yang, Weidong

    2012-05-08

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), the sole gateway for nucleocytoplasmic exchange in eukaryotic cells, allows for the passive diffusion of small molecules and transport-receptor-facilitated translocation of signal-dependent cargo molecules. Whether small molecules passively diffuse through a single central channel or through multiple holes of a hydrogel network is a subject of debate. Additionally, whether the passive and facilitated transport systems occupy distinct or overlapping physical regions of the NPC remains unclear. Here, we directly test these models using three-dimensional super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of human cells. This approach reveals that a single viscous central channel in the NPC acts as the sole pathway for passive diffusion of various small molecules; transport receptors and their cargo complexes take distinct transport routes in the periphery, which is occluded by phenylalanine-glycine filaments. Furthermore, the passive and facilitated passageways in the NPC are closely correlated, and their conformations can be simultaneously regulated by Importin β1 (a major transport receptor) and RanGTP (a critical regulator of transport directionality). These results strongly favor a self-regulated viscous channel configuration in native NPCs over the porous hydrogel meshwork model.

  18. Cav3-type α1T calcium channels mediate transient calcium currents that regulate repetitive firing in Drosophila antennal lobe PNs.

    PubMed

    Iniguez, Jorge; Schutte, Soleil S; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2013-10-01

    Projection neurons (PNs), located in the antennal lobe region of the insect brain, play a key role in processing olfactory information. To explore how activity is regulated at the level of single PNs within this central circuit we have recorded from these neurons in adult Drosophila melanogaster brains. Our previous study demonstrated that PNs express voltage-gated calcium currents with a transient and sustained component. We found that the sustained component is mediated by cac gene-encoded Cav2-type channels involved in regulating action potential-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses. The function of the transient calcium current and the gene encoding the underlying channels, however, were unknown. Here we report that the transient current blocked by prepulse inactivation is sensitive to amiloride, a vertebrate Cav3-type channel blocker. In addition PN-specific RNAi knockdown of α1T, the Drosophila Cav3-type gene, caused a dramatic reduction in the transient current without altering the sustained component. These data demonstrate that the α1T gene encodes voltage-gated calcium channels underlying the amiloride-sensitive transient current. Alterations in evoked firing and spontaneous burst firing in the α1T knockdowns demonstrate that the Cav3-type calcium channels are important in regulating excitability in adult PNs.

  19. Activation of the adenosine A3 receptor in RAW 264.7 cells inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release by reducing calcium-dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lynn; Pingle, Sandeep C; Hallam, Daniel M; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the immune system and promotes inflammation via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, which regulates the synthesis and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and other inflammatory cytokines. Previous studies have shown that the nucleoside adenosine suppresses LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release in human UB939 macrophages by activating an adenosine A(3) receptor (A(3)AR) subtype on these cells. In this study, we examined the mechanism(s) underlying A(3)AR-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha release in a mouse (RAW 264.7) cell line. Treatment of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS (3 mug/ml) increased TNF-alpha release, which was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by adenosine analogs N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and R-phenylisopropyladenosine and reversed by selective A(3)AR blockade. The increase in TNF-alpha release was preceded by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release by IB-MECA, a selective agonist of the A(3)AR, or with BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, reduced LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release. Activation of the A(3)AR or inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release also reduced LPS-stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Similar inhibition by A(3)AR was observed for LPS-stimulated inducible nitric-oxide synthase. These data support the contention that inhibition of LPS-stimulated release of inflammatory molecules, such as TNF-alpha and NO via the A(3)AR, involves suppression of intracellular Ca(2+)signaling, leading to suppression of NF-kappaB and ERK1/2 pathways.

  20. A TRPC5-regulated calcium signaling pathway controls dendrite patterning in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Puram, Sidharth V; Riccio, Antonio; Koirala, Samir; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Kim, Albert H; Corfas, Gabriel; Bonni, Azad

    2011-12-15

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been implicated as sensors of diverse stimuli in mature neurons. However, developmental roles for TRP channels in the establishment of neuronal connectivity remain largely unexplored. Here, we identify an essential function for TRPC5, a member of the canonical TRP subfamily, in the regulation of dendrite patterning in the mammalian brain. Strikingly, TRPC5 knockout mice harbor long, highly branched granule neuron dendrites with impaired dendritic claw differentiation in the cerebellar cortex. In vivo RNAi analyses suggest that TRPC5 regulates dendrite morphogenesis in the cerebellar cortex in a cell-autonomous manner. Correlating with impaired dendrite patterning in the cerebellar cortex, behavioral analyses reveal that TRPC5 knockout mice have deficits in gait and motor coordination. Finally, we uncover the molecular basis of TRPC5's function in dendrite patterning. We identify the major protein kinase calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II β (CaMKIIβ) as a critical effector of TRPC5 function in neurons. Remarkably, TRPC5 forms a complex specifically with CaMKIIβ, but not the closely related kinase CaMKIIα, and thereby induces the CaMKIIβ-dependent phosphorylation of the ubiquitin ligase Cdc20-APC at the centrosome. Accordingly, centrosomal CaMKIIβ signaling mediates the ability of TRPC5 to regulate dendrite morphogenesis in neurons. Our findings define a novel function for TRPC5 that couples calcium signaling to a ubiquitin ligase pathway at the centrosome and thereby orchestrates dendrite patterning and connectivity in the brain.

  1. Ischemic postconditioning and pinacidil suppress calcium overload in anoxia-reoxygenation cardiomyocytes via down-regulation of the calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shengli; Yao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning (IPC) and ATP sensitive potassium channel (KATP) agonists (e.g. pinacidil and diazoxide) postconditioning are effective methods to defeat myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, but their specific mechanisms of reducing I/R injury are not fully understood. We observed an intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) overload in Anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) cardiomyocytes, which can be reversed by KATP agonists diazoxide or pinacidil. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis. CaSR was reported to be involved in the I/R-induced apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes. We therefore hypothesize that IPC and pinacidil postconditioning (PPC) reduce calcium overload in I/R cardiomyocytes by the down-regulation of CaSR. A/R model was established with adult rat caridomyocyte. mRNA and protein expression of CaSR were detected, IPC, PPC and KATP’s effects on [Ca2+]i concentration was assayed too. IPC and PPC ameliorated A/R insult induced [Ca2+]i overload in cardiomyocytes. In addition, they down-regulated the mRNA and protein level of CaSR as we expected. CaSR agonist spermine and KATP blocker glibenclamide offset IPC’s effects on CaSR expression and [Ca2+]i modulation. Our data indicate that CaSR down-regulation contributes to the mitigation of calcium overload in A/R cardiomyocytes, which may partially represents IPC and KATP’s myocardial protective mechanism under I/R circumstances. PMID:27833799

  2. Atypical calcium regulation of the PKD2-L1 polycystin ion channel

    PubMed Central

    DeCaen, Paul G; Liu, Xiaowen; Abiria, Sunday; Clapham, David E

    2016-01-01

    Native PKD2-L1 channel subunits are present in primary cilia and other restricted cellular spaces. Here we investigate the mechanism for the channel's unusual regulation by external calcium, and rationalize this behavior to its specialized function. We report that the human PKD2-L1 selectivity filter is partially selective to calcium ions (Ca2+) moving into the cell, but blocked by high internal Ca2+concentrations, a unique feature of this transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family member. Surprisingly, we find that the C-terminal EF-hands and coiled-coil domains do not contribute to PKD2-L1 Ca2+-induced potentiation and inactivation. We propose a model in which prolonged channel activity results in calcium accumulation, triggering outward-moving Ca2+ ions to block PKD2-L1 in a high-affinity interaction with the innermost acidic residue (D523) of the selectivity filter and subsequent long-term channel inactivation. This response rectifies Ca2+ flow, enabling Ca2+ to enter but not leave small compartments such as the cilium. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13413.001 PMID:27348301

  3. Dynamics and regulation of endocytotic fission pores: role of calcium and dynamin.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, José María; Acosta, Jorge; Alés, Eva

    2010-12-01

    Although endocytosis involves the fission pore, a transient structure that produces the scission between vesicle and plasma membranes, the dimensions and dynamics of fission pores remain unclear. Here we report that the pore resistance changes proceed in three distinct phases: an initial phase where the resistance increases at 31.7 ± 2.9 GΩ/second, a slower linear phase with an overall slope of 11.7 ± 1.9 GΩ/second and a final increase in resistance more steeply (1189 ± 136 GΩ/second). The kinetics of these changes was calcium dependent. These sequential stages of the fission pore may be interpreted in terms of pore geometry as changes, first in pore diameter and then in pore length, according to which, before fission, the pore diameter consistently decreased to a value near 4 nm, whereas the pore length ranged between 20 and 300 nm. Dynamin, a mechanochemical GTPase, plays an important role in accelerating the fission event, preferentially in endocytotic vesicles of regular size, by increasing the rates of pore closure during the first and second phases of the fission pore, but hardly affected larger and longer-lived endocytotic events. These results suggest that fission pores are dynamic structures that form thin and long membrane necks regulated by intracellular calcium. Between calcium mediators, dynamin functions as a catalyst to increase the speed of single vesicle endocytosis.

  4. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Osteoclast and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zixue; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells essential for skeletal remodeling and regeneration. However, excessive osteoclasts often contribute to prevalent bone degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, and cancer bone metastasis. Osteoclast dysregulation is also associated with rare disorders such as osteopetrosis, pycnodysostosis, Paget's disease, and Gorham-Stout syndrome. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors functions as metabolic sensors that control a variety of physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis and serves as attractive therapeutic targets for many diseases. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the new players and the new mechanisms for how NRs regulate osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. An enhanced understanding of NR functions in osteoclastogenesis will facilitate the development of not only novel osteoprotective medicine but also prudent strategies to minimize the adverse skeletal effects of certain NR-targeting drugs for a better treatment of cancer and metabolic diseases. PMID:25549044

  5. A change in nuclear pore complex composition regulates cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Maximiliano A; Gomez-Cavazos, J Sebastian; Mei, Arianna; Lackner, Daniel H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2012-02-14

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are built from ∼30 different proteins called nucleoporins or Nups. Previous studies have shown that several Nups exhibit cell-type-specific expression and that mutations in NPC components result in tissue-specific diseases. Here we show that a specific change in NPC composition is required for both myogenic and neuronal differentiation. The transmembrane nucleoporin Nup210 is absent in proliferating myoblasts and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) but becomes expressed and incorporated into NPCs during cell differentiation. Preventing Nup210 production by RNAi blocks myogenesis and the differentiation of ESCs into neuroprogenitors. We found that the addition of Nup210 to NPCs does not affect nuclear transport but is required for the induction of genes that are essential for cell differentiation. Our results identify a single change in NPC composition as an essential step in cell differentiation and establish a role for Nup210 in gene expression regulation and cell fate determination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Karyopherins regulate nuclear pore complex barrier and transport function.

    PubMed

    Kapinos, Larisa E; Huang, Binlu; Rencurel, Chantal; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2017-09-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is sustained by karyopherins (Kaps) and a Ran guanosine triphosphate (RanGTP) gradient that imports nuclear localization signal (NLS)-specific cargoes (NLS-cargoes) into the nucleus. However, how nuclear pore complex (NPC) barrier selectivity, Kap traffic, and NLS-cargo release are systematically linked and simultaneously regulated remains incoherent. In this study, we show that Kapα facilitates Kapβ1 turnover and occupancy at the NPC in a RanGTP-dependent manner that is directly coupled to NLS-cargo release and NPC barrier function. This is underpinned by the binding affinity of Kapβ1 to phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups), which is comparable with RanGTP·Kapβ1, but stronger for Kapα·Kapβ1. On this basis, RanGTP is ineffective at releasing standalone Kapβ1 from NPCs. Depleting Kapα·Kapβ1 by RanGTP further abrogates NPC barrier function, whereas adding back Kapβ1 rescues it while Kapβ1 turnover softens it. Therefore, the FG Nups are necessary but insufficient for NPC barrier function. We conclude that Kaps constitute integral constituents of the NPC whose barrier, transport, and cargo release functionalities establish a continuum under a mechanism of Kap-centric control. © 2017 Kapinos et al.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of foetal development in nuclear transfer animal models.

    PubMed

    Dinnyes, A; Tian, X C; Yang, X

    2008-07-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, 'cloning') holds great potential for agricultural applications, generation of medical model animals, transgenic farm animals or by 'therapeutic cloning' for generating human embryonic stem cells for the treatment of human diseases. However, the low survival rate of SCNT-derived pregnancies represents a serious limitation of the current technology. In order to overcome this hurdle, a deeper understanding of the epigenetic reprogramming of the somatic cell nuclei and its effect on the pregnancy is needed. Here we review the literature on nuclear reprogramming by SCNT, including studies of gene expression, DNA methylation, chromatin remodelling, genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. Reprogramming of genes expressed in the inner cell mass, from which the body of the foetus is formed, seems to be highly efficient. Defects in the extra-embryonic tissues are probably the major cause of the low success rate of reproductive cloning. Methods to partially overcome such problems exist, yet more future research is needed to find practical and efficient methods to remedy this problem. Improvement of the survival of foetuses is a central issue for the future of agricultural SCNT not only for its economic viability, but also because in lack of improvements in animal welfare current regulations can block the use of the method in the EU and several other countries.

  8. Regulation of renin release by calcium and ammonium ions in normal man.

    PubMed

    Kisch, E S; Dluhy, R G; Williams, G H

    1976-12-01

    The effect of infusing calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, sodium lactate, and ammonium chloride on renin secretion was compared to equimolar infusions of hypotonic and normal saline in sodium-deplete normal subjects. The infusion of 75 mEq of ammonium chloride for 60 min in 6 normal, sodium-deplete subjects suppressed plasma renin activity significantly (P less than 0.01) from 4.4 +/- 0.8 to 2.1 +/- 0.2 ng/ml/h, an effect comparable to that produced by normal saline. Sodium lactate (75 mEq sodium/hr) also significantly reduced renin levels at 20-30 min (P less than 0.01). The infusion of 1/3 normal saline (25 mEq sodium/h for 2 h) produced a significant reduction (P less than 0.01) in plasma renin activity (from control levels of 5.2 +/- 0.8 to 3.1 +/- 0.6 ng/ml/h at 90 min). On the other hand, comparable infusions of 50 mEq of magnesium sulfate over 2 h had no effect on renin release (4.6 +/- 0.8 to 4.6 +/- 0.9 ng/ml/h at 2 h), while the infusion of calcium chloride produced an intermediate reduction (5.2 +/- 1.2 to 3.7 +/- 0.8 ng/ml/h at 2 h (P less than 0.05). The observed effects of the hydrogen and calcium ions on suppressing renin release may be secondary to their known actions on renal sodium excretion. Since the infusions of calcium and hydrogen ions both result in an increased delivery of sodium to the distal segment of the nephron, the results may reflect the regulation of renin by the macula densa, a sensitive intrarenal sensor of renal tubular sodium.

  9. Nuclear life of the voltage-gated Cacnb4 subunit and its role in gene transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Ronjat, Michel; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Barbado, Maud; De Waard, Michel; Mori, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    The pore-forming subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is associated to auxiliary subunits among which the cytoplasmic β subunit. The different isoforms of this subunit control both the plasma membrane targeting and the biophysical properties of the channel moiety. In a recent study, we demonstrated that the Cacnb4 (β 4) isoform is at the center of a new signaling pathway that connects neuronal excitability and gene transcription. This mechanism relies on nuclear targeting of β 4 triggered by neuronal electrical stimulation. This re-localization of β 4 is promoted by its interaction with Ppp2r5d a regulatory subunit of PP2A in complex with PP2A itself. The formation, as well as the nuclear translocation, of the β 4/ Ppp2r5d/ PP2A complex is totally impaired by the premature R482X stops mutation of β 4 that has been previously associated with juvenile epilepsy. Taking as a case study the tyrosine hydroxylase gene that is strongly upregulated in brain of lethargic mice, deficient for β 4 expression, we deciphered the molecular steps presiding to this signaling pathway. Here we show that expression of wild-type β 4 in HEK293 cells results in the regulation of several genes, while expression of the mutated β 4 (β 1-481) produces a different set of gene regulation. Several genes regulated by β 4 in HEK293 cells were also regulated upon neuronal differentiation of NG108-15 cells that induces nuclear translocation of β 4 suggesting a link between β 4 nuclear targeting and gene regulation.

  10. Calcium and bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C.; Robinson, Lisa J.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Sun, Li; Friedman, Peter A.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Zaidi, Mone

    2013-01-01

    Calcium transport and calcium signaling are of basic importance in bone cells. Bone is the major store of calcium and a key regulatory organ for calcium homeostasis. Bone, in major part, responds to calcium-dependent signals from the parathyroids and via vitamin D metabolites, although bone retains direct response to extracellular calcium if parathyroid regulation is lost. Improved understanding of calcium transporters and calcium-regulated cellular processes has resulted from analysis of genetic defects, including several defects with low or high bone mass. Osteoblasts deposit calcium by mechanisms including phosphate and calcium transport with alkalinization to absorb acid created by mineral deposition; cartilage calcium mineralization occurs by passive diffusion and phosphate production. Calcium mobilization by osteoclasts is mediated by acid secretion. Both bone forming and bone resorbing cells use calcium signals as regulators of differentiation and activity. This has been studied in more detail in osteoclasts, where both osteoclast differentiation and motility are regulated by calcium. PMID:21674636

  11. Oxidative Stress in the Hypothalamus: the Importance of Calcium Signaling and Mitochondrial ROS in Body Weight Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gyengesi, Erika; Paxinos, George; Andrews, Zane B

    2012-12-01

    A considerable amount of evidence shows that reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mammalian brain are directly responsible for cell and tissue function and dysfunction. Excessive reactive oxygen species contribute to various conditions including inflammation, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation, and mental disorders such as depression. Increased intracellular calcium levels have toxic roles leading to cell death. However, the exact connection between reactive oxygen production and high calcium stress is not yet fully understood. In this review, we focus on the role of reactive oxygen species and calcium stress in hypothalamic arcuate neurons controlling feeding. We revisit the role of NPY and POMC neurons in the regulation of appetite and energy homeostasis, and consider how ROS and intracellular calcium levels affect these neurons. These novel insights give a new direction to research on hypothalamic mechanisms regulating energy homeostasis and may offer novel treatment strategies for obesity and type-2 diabetes.

  12. The mobility of Bach2 nuclear foci is regulated by SUMO-1 modification

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, Kazuteru; Harano, Yumi; Hoshino, Hideto; Kobayashi, Masao; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Muto, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Tashiro, Satoshi

    2008-02-15

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO-1) modulates the functions of nuclear proteins by changing their structure and/or subnuclear localization. Several nuclear proteins form dynamic higher order nuclear structures, termed non-chromatin nuclear domains, which are involved in the regulation of nuclear function. However, the role that SUMO modification of the component proteins plays in the regulation of the activity and function of nuclear domains is unclear. Here we demonstrate that nuclear domains formed by Bach2, a transcription repressor, show restricted movement and undergo fusion events upon oxidative stress. Mutation of the SUMO-acceptor lysines in Bach2 alters the behavior of these nuclear foci and results in a decreased frequency of fusion events. We propose that SUMO modification is an important regulatory system for the mobility of the nuclear domains formed by Bach2.

  13. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Francis, Dailia B; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620-800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Dailia B.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620 to 800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. PMID:24984242

  15. Regulation of mouse lung development by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaR.

    PubMed

    Finney, Brenda A; del Moral, Pierre M; Wilkinson, William J; Cayzac, Sebastien; Cole, Martin; Warburton, David; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2008-12-15

    Postnatal lung function is critically dependent upon optimal embryonic lung development. As the free ionized plasma calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](o)) of the fetus is higher than that of the adult, the process of lung development occurs in a hypercalcaemic environment. In the adult, [Ca(2+)](o) is monitored by the G-protein coupled, extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), but neither its ontogeny nor its potential role in lung development are known. Here, we demonstrate that CaR is expressed in the mouse lung epithelium, and that its expression is developmentally regulated, with a peak of expression at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and a subsequent decrease by E18, after which the receptor is absent. Experiments carried out using the lung explant culture model in vitro show that lung branching morphogenesis is sensitive to [Ca(2+)](o), being maximal at physiological adult [Ca(2+)](o) (i.e. 1.0-1.3 mM) and lowest at the higher, fetal (i.e. 1.7 mM) [Ca(2+)](o). Administration of the specific CaR positive allosteric modulator, the calcimimetic R-568, mimics the suppressive effects of high [Ca(2+)](o) on branching morphogenesis while both phospholipase C and PI3 kinase inhibition reverse these effects. CaR activation suppresses cell proliferation while it enhances intracellular calcium signalling, lung distension and fluid secretion. Conditions which are restrictive either to branching or to secretion can be rescued by manipulating [Ca(2+)](o) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fetal Ca(2+)(o), acting through a developmentally regulated CaR, is an important extrinsic factor that modulates the intrinsic lung developmental programme. Our observations support a novel role for the CaR in preventing hyperplastic lung disease in utero.

  16. Forskolin Regulates L-Type Calcium Channel through Interaction between Actinin 4 and β3 Subunit in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Fangping; Guo, Lin; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Peng, Wen; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels that permit cellular calcium influx are essential in calcium-mediated modulation of cellular signaling. Although the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels is linked to many factors including cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity and actin cytoskeleton, little is known about the detailed mechanisms underlying the regulation in osteoblasts. Our present study investigated the modulation of L-type calcium channel activities through the effects of forskolin on actin reorganization and on its functional interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4. The results showed that forskolin did not significantly affect the trafficking of pore forming α1c subunit and its interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4, whereas it significantly increased the expression of β3 subunit and its interaction with actinin 4 in osteoblast cells as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down assay, and immunostaining. Further mapping showed that the ABD and EF domains of actinin 4 were interaction sites. This interaction is independent of PKA phosphorylation. Knockdown of actinin 4 significantly decreased the activities of L-type calcium channels. Our study revealed a new aspect of the mechanisms by which the forskolin activation of adenylyl cyclase - cAMP cascade regulates the L-type calcium channel in osteoblast cells, besides the PKA mediated phosphorylation of the channel subunits. These data provide insight into the important role of interconnection among adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, PKA, the actin cytoskeleton, and the channel proteins in the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in osteoblast cells.

  17. Calcium-dependent protein kinases regulate the production of reactive oxygen species by potato NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michie; Ohura, Ikuko; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Yokota, Naohiko; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Shimamoto, Ko; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2007-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in plant innate immunity. NADPH oxidase (RBOH; for Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog) plays a central role in the oxidative burst, and EF-hand motifs in the N terminus of this protein suggest possible regulation by Ca(2+). However, regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. We identified Ser-82 and Ser-97 in the N terminus of potato (Solanum tuberosum) St RBOHB as potential phosphorylation sites. An anti-phosphopeptide antibody (pSer82) indicated that Ser-82 was phosphorylated by pathogen signals in planta. We cloned two potato calcium-dependent protein kinases, St CDPK4 and St CDPK5, and mass spectrometry analyses showed that these CDPKs phosphorylated only Ser-82 and Ser-97 in the N terminus of St RBOHB in a calcium-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of the constitutively active mutant of St CDPK5, St CDPK5VK, provoked ROS production in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The CDPK-mediated ROS production was disrupted by knockdown of Nb RBOHB in N. benthamiana. The loss of function was complemented by heterologous expression of wild-type potato St RBOHB but not by a mutant (S82A/S97A). Furthermore, the heterologous expression of St CDPK5VK phosphorylated Ser-82 of St RBOHB in N. benthamiana. These results suggest that St CDPK5 induces the phosphorylation of St RBOHB and regulates the oxidative burst.

  18. Improved workability of injectable calcium sulfate bone cement by regulation of self-setting properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zonggang; Liu, Huanye; Liu, Xi; Lian, Xiaojie; Guo, Zhongwu; Jiang, Hong-Jiang; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2013-04-01

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) powder as an injectable bone cement was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). The prepared materials showed X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to the CSH structure without any secondary phases, implying complete conversion from CSD phase to CSH phase. Thermogravimetric (TG) analyses showed the crystal water content of CSH was about 6.0% (wt.), which is near to the theoretic crystal water value of CSH. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, sheet crystal structure of CSD was observed to transform into rod-like crystal structure of CSH. Most interesting and important of all, CSD as setting accelerator was also introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of injectable CSH paste, and thus the self-setting time of CSH paste can be regulated from near 30 min to less than 5 min by adding various amounts of setting accelerator. Because CSD is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, the setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials, such as mechanical properties. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies have demonstrated that the materials have good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration. All these will further improve the workability of CSH in clinic applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. TRPC6 is the endothelial calcium channel that regulates leukocyte transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Evan W.; Han, Fei; Tauseef, Mohammad; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated, multistep process that is critical to the inflammatory response. A transient increase in endothelial cytosolic free calcium ion concentration (↑[Ca2+]i) is required for TEM. However, the mechanism by which endothelial ↑[Ca2+]i regulates TEM and the channels mediating this ↑[Ca2+]i are unknown. Buffering ↑[Ca2+]i in endothelial cells does not affect leukocyte adhesion or locomotion but selectively blocks TEM, suggesting a role for ↑[Ca2+]i specifically for this step. Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a Ca2+ channel expressed in endothelial cells, colocalizes with platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM) to surround leukocytes during TEM and clusters when endothelial PECAM is engaged. Expression of dominant-negative TRPC6 or shRNA knockdown in endothelial cells arrests neutrophils apically over the junction, similar to when PECAM is blocked. Selectively activating endothelial TRPC6 rescues TEM during an ongoing PECAM blockade, indicating that TRPC6 functions downstream of PECAM. Furthermore, endothelial TRPC6 is required for trafficking of lateral border recycling compartment membrane, which facilitates TEM. Finally, mice lacking TRPC6 in the nonmyeloid compartment (i.e., endothelium) exhibit a profound defect in neutrophil TEM with no effect on leukocyte trafficking. Our findings identify endothelial TRPC6 as the calcium channel mediating the ↑[Ca2+]i required for TEM at a step downstream of PECAM homophilic interactions. PMID:26392222

  20. The regulation of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPases (SERCA).

    PubMed

    Stammers, Andrew N; Susser, Shanel E; Hamm, Naomi C; Hlynsky, Michael W; Kimber, Dustin E; Kehler, D Scott; Duhamel, Todd A

    2015-10-01

    The sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) is responsible for transporting calcium (Ca(2+)) from the cytosol into the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) following muscular contraction. The Ca(2+) sequestering activity of SERCA facilitates muscular relaxation in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. There are more than 10 distinct isoforms of SERCA expressed in different tissues. SERCA2a is the primary isoform expressed in cardiac tissue, whereas SERCA1a is the predominant isoform expressed in fast-twitch skeletal muscle. The Ca(2+) sequestering activity of SERCA is regulated at the level of protein content and is further modified by the endogenous proteins phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN). Additionally, several novel mechanisms, including post-translational modifications and microRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as integral regulators of Ca(2+) transport activity. These regulatory mechanisms are clinically relevant, as dysregulated SERCA function has been implicated in the pathology of several disease states, including heart failure. Currently, several clinical trials are underway that utilize novel therapeutic approaches to restore SERCA2a activity in humans. The purpose of this review is to examine the regulatory mechanisms of the SERCA pump, with a particular emphasis on the influence of exercise in preventing the pathological conditions associated with impaired SERCA function.

  1. Myoscape controls cardiac calcium cycling and contractility via regulation of L-type calcium channel surface expression.

    PubMed

    Eden, Matthias; Meder, Benjamin; Völkers, Mirko; Poomvanicha, Montatip; Domes, Katrin; Branchereau, M; Marck, P; Will, Rainer; Bernt, Alexander; Rangrez, Ashraf; Busch, Matthias; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Heymes, Christophe; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Most, Patrick; Hofmann, Franz; Frey, Norbert

    2016-04-28

    Calcium signalling plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here we describe a cardiac protein named Myoscape/FAM40B/STRIP2, which directly interacts with the L-type calcium channel. Knockdown of Myoscape in cardiomyocytes decreases calcium transients associated with smaller Ca(2+) amplitudes and a lower diastolic Ca(2+) content. Likewise, L-type calcium channel currents are significantly diminished on Myoscape ablation, and downregulation of Myoscape significantly reduces contractility of cardiomyocytes. Conversely, overexpression of Myoscape increases global Ca(2+) transients and enhances L-type Ca(2+) channel currents, and is sufficient to restore decreased currents in failing cardiomyocytes. In vivo, both Myoscape-depleted morphant zebrafish and Myoscape knockout (KO) mice display impairment of cardiac function progressing to advanced heart failure. Mechanistically, Myoscape-deficient mice show reduced L-type Ca(2+)currents, cell capacity and calcium current densities as a result of diminished LTCC surface expression. Finally, Myoscape expression is reduced in hearts from patients suffering of terminal heart failure, implying a role in human disease.

  2. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yaqin; Liu, Jiane; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s) underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA) treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade. PMID:26263390

  3. Two Chromogranin A-Derived Peptides Induce Calcium Entry in Human Neutrophils by Calmodulin-Regulated Calcium Independent Phospholipase A2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Shooshtarizadeh, Peiman; Laventie, Benoît-Joseph; Colin, Didier André; Chich, Jean-François; Vidic, Jasmina; de Barry, Jean; Chasserot-Golaz, Sylvette; Delalande, François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schneider, Francis; Helle, Karen; Aunis, Dominique; Prévost, Gilles; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Hélène

    2009-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides derived from the natural processing of chromogranin A (CgA) are co-secreted with catecholamines upon stimulation of chromaffin cells. Since PMNs play a central role in innate immunity, we examine responses by PMNs following stimulation by two antimicrobial CgA-derived peptides. Methodology/Principal Findings PMNs were treated with different concentrations of CgA-derived peptides in presence of several drugs. Calcium mobilization was observed by using flow cytometry and calcium imaging experiments. Immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy have shown the intracellular localization of the peptides. The calmodulin-binding and iPLA2 activating properties of the peptides were shown by Surface Plasmon Resonance and iPLA2 activity assays. Finally, a proteomic analysis of the material released after PMNs treatment with CgA-derived peptides was performed by using HPLC and Nano-LC MS-MS. By using flow cytometry we first observed that after 15 s, in presence of extracellular calcium, Chromofungin (CHR) or Catestatin (CAT) induce a concentration-dependent transient increase of intracellular calcium. In contrast, in absence of extra cellular calcium the peptides are unable to induce calcium depletion from the stores after 10 minutes exposure. Treatment with 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate), a store operated channels (SOCs) blocker, inhibits completely the calcium entry, as shown by calcium imaging. We also showed that they activate iPLA2 as the two CaM-binding factors (W7 and CMZ) and that the two sequences can be aligned with the two CaM-binding domains reported for iPLA2. We finally analyzed by HPLC and Nano-LC MS-MS the material released by PMNs following stimulation by CHR and CAT. We characterized several factors important for inflammation and innate immunity. Conclusions/Significance For the first time, we demonstrate that CHR and CAT, penetrate into PMNs, inducing extracellular calcium entry by a CaM-regulated iPLA2 pathway. Our

  4. Influence of calcium hydroxide-loaded microcapsules on osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jiguang; Liang, Fuxin; Qu, Xiaozhong; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gao, Xuejun

    2014-12-01

    Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) microcapsules were synthesized to allow controlled release of Ca(OH)2. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of Ca(OH)2 microcapsules on osteoprotegerin (OPG) activity, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) activity, and the OPG/RANKL ratio compared with pure Ca(OH)2 powder and Vitapex (Neo Dental Chemical Products Co Ltd, Tokyo, Japan). One formula of Ca(OH)2 microcapsules was evaluated, and pure Ca(OH)2 powder was used as a control. A commonly used Ca(OH)2 medication containing an oily vehicle (Vitapex) was also evaluated, and the in vitro release profile of Vitapex was studied. The human osteosarcoma cell line MG63 was used to evaluate the influence of Ca(OH)2 microcapsules, pure Ca(OH)2 powder, and Vitapex on OPG and RANKL activity. The relative messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of OPG and RANKL was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of OPG and RANKL in supernatants was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Vitapex prolonged the release of Ca(OH)2 compared with pure Ca(OH)2 powder, and the release rate of Vitapex was faster than that of the microcapsules. The OPG/RANKL ratio in the microcapsules group was up-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels compared with the negative control group and the pure Ca(OH)2 powder group. The ratio in the Vitapex group was lower than the microcapsule group both at the mRNA and protein levels. Ca(OH)2 microcapsules increased the expression of OPG although they did not increase the expression of RANKL compared with pure Ca(OH)2 powder and Vitapex. This increase in expression led to an increase in the OPG/RANKL ratio and eventual inhibition of osteoclast activity. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Contribution of presynaptic calcium-activated potassium currents to transmitter release regulation in cultured Xenopus nerve-muscle synapses.

    PubMed

    Pattillo, J M; Yazejian, B; DiGregorio, D A; Vergara, J L; Grinnell, A D; Meriney, S D

    2001-01-01

    Using Xenopus nerve-muscle co-cultures, we have examined the contribution of calcium-activated potassium (K(Ca)) channels to the regulation of transmitter release evoked by single action potentials. The presynaptic varicosities that form on muscle cells in these cultures were studied directly using patch-clamp recording techniques. In these developing synapses, blockade of K(Ca) channels with iberiotoxin or charybdotoxin decreased transmitter release by an average of 35%. This effect would be expected to be caused by changes in the late phases of action potential repolarization. We hypothesize that these changes are due to a reduction in the driving force for calcium that is normally enhanced by the local hyperpolarization at the active zone caused by potassium current through the K(Ca) channels that co-localize with calcium channels. In support of this hypothesis, we have shown that when action potential waveforms were used as voltage-clamp commands to elicit calcium current in varicosities, peak calcium current was reduced only when these waveforms were broadened beginning when action potential repolarization was 20% complete. In contrast to peak calcium current, total calcium influx was consistently increased following action potential broadening. A model, based on previously reported properties of ion channels, faithfully reproduced predicted effects on action potential repolarization and calcium currents. From these data, we suggest that the large-conductance K(Ca) channels expressed at presynaptic varicosities regulate transmitter release magnitude during single action potentials by altering the rate of action potential repolarization, and thus the magnitude of peak calcium current.

  6. Transcriptional expression analysis of genes involved in regulation of calcium translocation and storage in finger millet (Eleusine coracana L. Gartn.).

    PubMed

    Mirza, Neelofar; Taj, Gohar; Arora, Sandeep; Kumar, Anil

    2014-10-25

    Finger millet (Eleusine coracana) variably accumulates calcium in different tissues, due to differential expression of genes involved in uptake, translocation and accumulation of calcium. Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter (CAX1), two pore channel (TPC1), CaM-stimulated type IIB Ca(2+) ATPase and two CaM dependent protein kinase (CaMK1 and 2) homologs were studied in finger millet. Two genotypes GP-45 and GP-1 (high and low calcium accumulating, respectively) were used to understand the role of these genes in differential calcium accumulation. For most of the genes higher expression was found in the high calcium accumulating genotype. CAX1 was strongly expressed in the late stages of spike development and could be responsible for accumulating high concentrations of calcium in seeds. TPC1 and Ca(2+) ATPase homologs recorded strong expression in the root, stem and developing spike and signify their role in calcium uptake and translocation, respectively. Calmodulin showed strong expression and a similar expression pattern to the type IIB ATPase in the developing spike only and indicating developing spike or even seed specific isoform of CaM affecting the activity of downstream target of calcium transportation. Interestingly, CaMK1 and CaMK2 had expression patterns similar to ATPase and TPC1 in various tissues raising a possibility of their respective regulation via CaM kinase. Expression pattern of 14-3-3 gene was observed to be similar to CAX1 gene in leaf and developing spike inferring a surprising possibility of CAX1 regulation through 14-3-3 protein. Our results provide a molecular insight for explaining the mechanism of calcium accumulation in finger millet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation by thapsigargin and carbachol of the intracellular calcium concentration in rat submandibular glands.

    PubMed

    Métioui, M; Grosfils, K; Dehaye, J P

    1994-11-01

    1. Carbachol and thapsigargin both increased the intracellular calcium concentration in rat submandibular cells in the presence and in the absence of extracellular calcium. Depletion of intracellular calcium pools with thapsigargin prevented the response to carbachol. 2. The two agents also increased the influx of calcium. The muscarinic agonist stimulated the efflux of calcium outside the cell. 3. From these results it is concluded that submandibular cells possess several intracellular calcium pools sensitive to thapsigargin, among which some are sensitive to IP3. Depletion of these pools increase the uptake of extracellular calcium.

  8. Roscovitine: a novel regulator of P/Q-type calcium channels and transmitter release in central neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhen; Chi, Ping; Bibb, James A; Ryan, Timothy A; Greengard, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Roscovitine is widely used for inhibition of cdk5, a cyclin-dependent kinase expressed predominantly in the brain. A novel function of roscovitine, i.e. an effect on Ca2+ channels and transmitter release in central neurons, was studied by whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings and time-lapse fluorescence imaging techniques. Extracellular application of roscovitine markedly enhanced the tail calcium current following repolarization from depolarized voltages. This effect was rapid, reversible and dose dependent. Roscovitine dramatically slowed the deactivation kinetics of calcium channels. The deactivation time constant was increased 3- to 6-fold, suggesting that roscovitine could prolong the channel open state and increase the calcium influx. The potentiation of tail calcium currents caused by roscovitine and by the L-channel activator Bay K 8644 was not occluded but additive. Roscovitine-induced potentiation of tail calcium currents was significantly blocked by the P/Q-channel blocker CgTx-MVIIC, indicating that the major target of roscovitine is the P/Q-type calcium channel. In mutant mice with targeted deletion of p35, a neuronal specific activator of cdk5, roscovitine regulated calcium currents in a manner similar to that observed in wild-type mice. Moreover, intracellular perfusion of roscovitine failed to modulate calcium currents. These results suggest that roscovitine acts on extracellular site(s) of calcium channels via a cdk5-independent mechanism. Roscovitine potentiated glutamate release at presynaptic terminals of cultured hippocampal neurons detected with the vesicle trafficking dye FM1–43, consistent with the positive effect of roscovitine on the P/Q-type calcium channel, the major mediator of action potential-evoked transmitter release in the mammalian CNS. PMID:11986366

  9. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: Regulating Nuclear Weapons around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Tiffany Willey

    2010-01-01

    In May 2010, scientists, national security experts, and state delegates from nations around the world will convene in New York for the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. They will review current guidelines for nuclear testing and possession of nuclear weapons in accordance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968,…

  10. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: Regulating Nuclear Weapons around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Tiffany Willey

    2010-01-01

    In May 2010, scientists, national security experts, and state delegates from nations around the world will convene in New York for the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. They will review current guidelines for nuclear testing and possession of nuclear weapons in accordance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968,…

  11. Regulation of the L-type calcium channel by alpha 5beta 1 integrin requires signaling between focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Davis, G E; Meininger, G A; Wilson, E; Davis, M J

    2001-08-10

    The L-type calcium channel is the major calcium influx pathway in vascular smooth muscle and is regulated by integrin ligands, suggesting an important link between extracellular matrix and vascular tone regulation in tissue injury and remodeling. We examined the role of integrin-linked tyrosine kinases and focal adhesion proteins in regulation of L-type calcium current in single vascular myocytes. Soluble tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked the increase in current produced by alpha(5) integrin antibody or fibronectin, whereas tyrosine phosphatase inhibition enhanced the effect. Cell dialysis with an antibody to focal adhesion kinase or with FRNK, the C-terminal noncatalytic domain of focal adhesion kinase, produced moderate (24 or 18%, respectively) inhibition of basal current but much greater inhibition (63 or 68%, respectively) of integrin-enhanced current. A c-Src antibody and peptide inhibitors of the Src homology-2 domain or a putative Src tyrosine phosphorylation site on the channel produced similar inhibition. Antibodies to the cytoskeletal proteins paxillin and vinculin, but not alpha-actinin, inhibited integrin-dependent current by 65-80%. Therefore, alpha(5)beta(1) integrin appears to regulate a tyrosine phosphorylation cascade involving Src and various focal adhesion proteins that control the function of the L-type calcium channel. This interaction may represent a novel mechanism for control of calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types.

  12. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Ginger Binds with Importin-α through Its Junction Domain for Nuclear Localization, and Further Interacts with NAC Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Sreekumar, Sweda; Sivakumar, K. C.; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are important sensors of Ca2+ elevations in plant cells regulating the gene expression linked with various cellular processes like stress response, growth and development, metabolism, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Ginger is an extensively used spice due to its unique flavor and immense medicinal value. The two major threats that interfere with the large scale production of ginger are the salinity and drought stress. ZoCDPK1 (Zingiber officinale Calcium-dependent protein kinase 1) is a salinity and drought-inducible CDPK gene isolated from ginger and undergoes dynamic subcellular localization during stress conditions. ZoCDPK1, with signature features of a typical Ca2+ regulated kinase, also possesses a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in its junction domain (JD). A striking feature in ZoCDPK1 is the rare occurrence of a coupling between the NLS in JD and consensus sequences in regulatory domain. Here, we further identified its nature of nuclear localization and its interaction partners. In the homology model generated for ZoCDPK1, the regulatory domain mimics the crystal structure of the regulatory domain in Arabidopsis CDPK1. Molecular docking simulation of importin (ZoIMPα), an important protein involved in nuclear translocation, into the NLS of ZoCDPK1 was well-visualized. Furthermore, the direct interaction of ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα proteins was studied by the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) system, which confirmed that junction domain (JD) is an important interaction module required for ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα binding. The probable interacting partners of ZoCDPK1 were also identified using Y2H experiment. Of the 10 different stress-related interacting partners identified for ZoCDPK1, NAC transcription factor (TF) needs special mention, especially in the context of ZoCDPK1 function. The interaction between ZoCDPK1 and NAC TF, in fact, corroborate with the results of gene expression and over-expression studies of ZoCDPK1. Hence

  13. Divergent Soybean Calmodulins Respond Similarly to Calcium Transients: Insight into Differential Target Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Shane D.; Chakravarthy, Harshini; Shettigar, Vikram; O’Neil, Andrew J.; Siddiqui, Jalal K.; Jones, Benjamin R.; Tikunova, Svetlana B.; Davis, Jonathan P.

    2017-01-01

    Plants commonly respond to stressors by modulating the expression of a large family of calcium binding proteins including isoforms of the ubiquitous signaling protein calmodulin (CaM). The various plant CaM isoforms are thought to differentially regulate the activity of specific target proteins to modulate cellular stress responses. The mechanism(s) behind differential target activation by the plant CaMs is unknown. In this study, we used steady-state and stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the strategy by which two soybean CaMs (sCaM1 and sCaM4) have evolved to differentially regulate NAD kinase (NADK), which is activated by sCaM1 but inhibited by sCaM4. Although the isolated proteins have different cation binding properties, in the presence of Mg2+ and the CaM binding domains from proteins that are differentially regulated, the two plant CaMs respond nearly identically to rapid and slow Ca2+ transients. Our data suggest that the plant CaMs have evolved to bind certain targets with comparable affinities, respond similarly to a particular Ca2+ signature, but achieve different structural states, only one of which can activate the enzyme. Understanding the basis for differential enzyme regulation by the plant CaMs is the first step to engineering a vertebrate CaM that will selectively alter the CaM signaling network. PMID:28261258

  14. Molecular mechanism of calcium channel regulation in the fight-or-flight response.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew D; Emrick, Michelle A; Sadilek, Martin; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2010-09-28

    During the fight-or-flight response, the sympathetic nervous system stimulates L-type calcium ion (Ca2+) currents conducted by Ca(V)1 channels through activation of β-adrenergic receptors, adenylyl cyclase, and phosphorylation by adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-dependent protein kinase [also known as protein kinase A (PKA)], increasing contractility of skeletal and cardiac muscles. We reconstituted this regulation of cardiac Ca(V)1.2 channels in non-muscle cells by forming an autoinhibitory signaling complex composed of Ca(V)1.2Δ1800 (a form of the channel truncated at the in vivo site of proteolytic processing), its noncovalently associated distal carboxyl-terminal domain, the auxiliary α₂δ₁ and β(2b) subunits, and A-kinase anchoring protein 15 (AKAP15). A factor of 3.6 range of Ca(V)1.2 channel activity was observed from a minimum in the presence of protein kinase inhibitors to a maximum upon activation of adenylyl cyclase. Basal Ca(V)1.2 channel activity in unstimulated cells was regulated by phosphorylation of serine-1700 and threonine-1704, two residues located at the interface between the distal and the proximal carboxyl-terminal regulatory domains, whereas further stimulation of channel activity through the PKA signaling pathway only required phosphorylation of serine-1700. Our results define a conceptual framework for Ca(V)1.2 channel regulation and identify sites of phosphorylation that regulate channel activity.

  15. Calcium regulation in wild populations of a freshwater cartilaginous fish, the lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Allen, Peter J; Webb, Molly A H; Cureton, Eli; Bruch, Ronald M; Barth, Cameron C; Peake, Stephan J; Anderson, W Gary

    2009-12-01

    Lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, are one of a few species of cartilaginous fishes that complete their life cycle entirely in freshwater. Sturgeons maintain very low concentrations of circulating calcium (Ca(2+)) compared with other vertebrates, and therefore, face unique challenges in regard to Ca(2+) regulation, which are likely to be magnified during vitellogenic stages of the reproductive cycle. In the present study, Ca(2+) concentrations and associated hormones of female and male lake sturgeon were examined in two wild populations, and were related to reproductive stage. In both populations, free, bound and total Ca(2+) were low, peaking in mid-late vitellogenic females. Internal Ca(2+) and phosphate (PO(4)(3-)) concentrations were inversely related to environmental concentrations, suggesting that these ions are preferentially retained and that mechanisms for mobilization are up-regulated under diminished environmental concentrations. Plasma 17beta-estradiol, 11-ketotestosterone and testosterone, peaked in mid-late vitellogenic females, while the androgens peaked in spawning males. Urine Ca(2+) was more tightly regulated than other divalent ions and decreased in spawning fish. Therefore, the increases in free plasma Ca(2+), the very low circulating concentrations of free and total Ca(2+), and the increase in PO(4)(3-) and bound Ca(2+) in low Ca(2+) environments indicate unique adaptations to Ca(2+) regulation in the lake sturgeon.

  16. Role of AQP2 in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity: implications in cell volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Galizia, L; Flamenco, M P; Rivarola, V; Capurro, C; Ford, P

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported in a rat cortical collecting duct cell line (RCCD(1)) that the presence of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the cell membrane is critical for the rapid activation of regulatory volume decrease mechanisms (RVD) (Ford et al. Biol Cell 97: 687-697, 2005). The aim of our present work was to investigate the signaling pathway that links AQP2 to this rapid RVD activation. Since it has been previously described that hypotonic conditions induce intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in different cell types, we tested the hypothesis that AQP2 could have a role in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity and its implication in cell volume regulation. Using a fluorescent probe technique, we studied [Ca(2+)](i) and cell volume changes in response to a hypotonic shock in WT-RCCD(1) (not expressing aquaporins) and in AQP2-RCCD(1) (transfected with AQP2) cells. We found that after a hypotonic shock only AQP2-RCCD(1) cells exhibit a substantial increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase is strongly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and is partially inhibited by thapsigargin (1 muM) indicating that the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) reflects both influx from the extracellular medium and release from intracellular stores. Exposure of AQP2-RCCD(1) cells to 100 muM gadolinium reduced the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) suggesting the involvement of a mechanosensitive calcium channel. Furthermore, exposure of cells to all of the above described conditions impaired rapid RVD. We conclude that the expression of AQP2 in the cell membrane is critical to produce the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) which is necessary to activate RVD in RCCD(1) cells.

  17. [Regulation of potential-dependant calcium channels by 5-HT1B serotonin receptors in various populations of hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Kononov, A V; Ivanov, S V; Zinchenko, V P

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic serotonin receptors of 5HT1-type in brain neurons participate in regulation of such human emotional states as aggression, fear and dependence on alcohol. Activated presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors suppress the Ca2+ influx through the potential-dependent calcium channels in certain neurons. The Ca2+ influx into the cells has been measured by increase of calcium ions concentration in cytoplasm in reply to the depolarization caused by 35mM KC1. Using system of image analysis in hippocampal cells culture we found out that Ca2+-signals to depolarization oin various populations of neurons differed in form, speed and amplitude. 5HT1B receptor agonists in 86 +/- 3 % of neurons slightly suppressed the activity of potential-dependent calcium channels. Two minor cell populations (5-8 % of cells each) were found out, that strongly differed in Ca2+ signal desensitization. Calcium signal caused by depolarization in one cells population differed in characteristic delay and high rate of decay. 5HT1B receptor agonists strongly inhibited the amplitude of the Ca2+ response on KCl only in this population of neurons. The calcium signal in second cell population differed by absence desensitization and smaller amplitude which constantly increased during depolarization. 5HT 1 B receptor agonists increased the calcium response amplitude to depolarization in this population of neurons. Thus we show various sensitivity of potential-dependent calcium channels of separate neurons to 5HTB1 receptor agonist.

  18. Activation of thin-filament-regulated muscle by calcium ion: considerations based on nearest-neighbor lattice statistics.

    PubMed Central

    Shiner, J S; Solaro, R J

    1982-01-01

    We discuss the activation of thin-filament-regulated muscles by calcium ion in terms of a qualitative model based on nearest-neighbor lattice statistics. For the most part, the model takes into account only the essential features of the phenomenon--that there must be an interaction between calcium adsorption to troponin and crossbridge reaction with actin for calcium ion to activate contraction and that the relevant stationary states are nonequilibrium ones. Even so, the model predicts the following features which are seen experimentally but have generally not been considered in previous models: (i) the relative activations of stationary-state isometric force and ATPase are not equal; (ii) in general, neither activation of force nor that of ATPase is proportional to calcium adsorption to the activating sites; and (iii) the slopes of the relations between the activations and the logarithm of the calcium ion concentration generally depend on the necessary interaction between calcium ion adsorption and crossbridge reaction with actin. Thus, these relations show cooperative effects even if these is no interaction between calcium adsorption sites. PMID:6956882

  19. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility

    SciTech Connect

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D.L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-09-21

    Several bacterial pathogens require the 'twitching' motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified {beta}-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner - by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility.

  20. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility

    PubMed Central

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens require the “twitching” motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 Å resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified β-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner—by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility. PMID:20080557

  1. Transcription factor Foxo3a prevents apoptosis by regulating calcium through the apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Daoyuan; Liu, Jinping; Jiao, Jianqin; Long, Bo; Li, Qian; Tan, Weiqi; Li, Peifeng

    2013-03-22

    Apoptosis can occur in the myocardium under a variety of pathological conditions, including myocardial infarction and heart failure. The forkhead family of transcription factor Foxo3a plays a pivotal role in apoptosis; however, its role in regulating cardiac apoptosis remains to be fully elucidated. We showed that enforced expression of Foxo3a inhibits cardiomyocyte apoptosis, whereas knockdown of endogenous Foxo3a sensitizes cardiomyocytes to undergo apoptosis. The apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) is a potent anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we demonstrate that it attenuates the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and inhibits calcium elevations in the cytoplasm and mitochondria provoked by oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, Foxo3a is shown to maintain cytoplasmic and mitochondrial calcium homeostasis through ARC. We observed that Foxo3a knock-out mice exhibited enlarged myocardial infarction sizes upon ischemia/reperfusion, and ARC transgenic mice demonstrated reduced myocardial infarction and balanced calcium levels in mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we showed that Foxo3a activates ARC expression by directly binding to its promoter. This study reveals that Foxo3a maintains calcium homeostasis and inhibits cardiac apoptosis through trans-activation of the ARC promoter. These findings provided novel evidence that Foxo3a and ARC constitute an anti-apoptotic pathway that regulates calcium homeostasis in the heart.

  2. Topography of calcium phosphate ceramics regulates primary cilia length and TGF receptor recruitment associated with osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Dalbay, Melis T; Luo, Xiaoman; Vrij, Erik; Barbieri, Davide; Moroni, Lorenzo; de Bruijn, Joost D; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Chapple, J Paul; Knight, Martin M; Yuan, Huipin

    2017-07-15

    The surface topography of synthetic biomaterials is known to play a role in material-driven osteogenesis. Recent studies show that TGFβ signalling also initiates osteogenic differentiation. TGFβ signalling requires the recruitment of TGFβ receptors (TGFβR) to the primary cilia. In this study, we hypothesize that the surface topography of calcium phosphate ceramics regulates stem cell morphology, primary cilia structure and TGFβR recruitment to the cilium associated with osteogenic differentiation. We developed a 2D system using two types of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic discs with identical chemistry. One sample had a surface topography at micron-scale (TCP-B, with a bigger surface structure dimension) whilst the other had a surface topography at submicron scale (TCP-S, with a smaller surface structure dimension). In the absence of osteogenic differentiation factors, human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were more spread on TCP-S than on TCP-B with alterations in actin organization and increased primary cilia prevalence and length. The cilia elongation on TCP-S was similar to that observed on glass in the presence of osteogenic media and was followed by recruitment of transforming growth factor-β RII (p-TGFβ RII) to the cilia axoneme. This was associated with enhanced osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs on TCP-S, as shown by alkaline phosphatase activity and gene expression for key osteogenic markers in the absence of additional osteogenic growth factors. Similarly, in vivo after a 12-week intramuscular implantation in dogs, TCP-S induced bone formation while TCP-B did not. It is most likely that the surface topography of calcium phosphate ceramics regulates primary cilia length and ciliary recruitment of p-TGFβ RII associated with osteogenesis and bone formation. This bioengineering control of osteogenesis via primary cilia modulation may represent a new type of biomaterial-based ciliotherapy for orthopedic, dental and maxillofacial surgery

  3. Role of histone deacetylases in gene regulation at nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Milon, Beatrice C; Cheng, Haibo; Tselebrovsky, Mikhail V; Lavrov, Sergei A; Nenasheva, Valentina V; Mikhaleva, Elena A; Shevelyov, Yuri Y; Nurminsky, Dmitry I

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest that gene silencing at the nuclear periphery may involve "closing" of chromatin by transcriptional repressors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here we provide experimental evidence confirming these predictions. Histone acetylation, chromatin compactness, and gene repression in lamina-interacting multigenic chromatin domains were analyzed in Drosophila S2 cells in which B-type lamin, diverse HDACs, and lamina-associated proteins were downregulated by dsRNA. Lamin depletion resulted in decreased compactness of the repressed multigenic domain associated with its detachment from the lamina and enhanced histone acetylation. Our data reveal the major role for HDAC1 in mediating deacetylation, chromatin compaction, and gene silencing in the multigenic domain, and an auxiliary role for HDAC3 that is required for retention of the domain at the lamina. These findings demonstrate the manifold and central involvement of class I HDACs in regulation of lamina-associated genes, illuminating a mechanism by which these enzymes can orchestrate normal and pathological development.

  4. Role of Histone Deacetylases in Gene Regulation at Nuclear Lamina

    PubMed Central

    Milon, Beatrice C.; Cheng, Haibo; Tselebrovsky, Mikhail V.; Lavrov, Sergei A.; Nenasheva, Valentina V.; Mikhaleva, Elena A.; Shevelyov, Yuri Y.; Nurminsky, Dmitry I.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest that gene silencing at the nuclear periphery may involve “closing” of chromatin by transcriptional repressors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here we provide experimental evidence confirming these predictions. Histone acetylation, chromatin compactness, and gene repression in lamina-interacting multigenic chromatin domains were analyzed in Drosophila S2 cells in which B-type lamin, diverse HDACs, and lamina-associated proteins were downregulated by dsRNA. Lamin depletion resulted in decreased compactness of the repressed multigenic domain associated with its detachment from the lamina and enhanced histone acetylation. Our data reveal the major role for HDAC1 in mediating deacetylation, chromatin compaction, and gene silencing in the multigenic domain, and an auxiliary role for HDAC3 that is required for retention of the domain at the lamina. These findings demonstrate the manifold and central involvement of class I HDACs in regulation of lamina-associated genes, illuminating a mechanism by which these enzymes can orchestrate normal and pathological development. PMID:23226217

  5. Mitochondrial regulation of cancer associated nuclear DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Chenghui; Naito, Akihiro; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Evans, Teresa T.; Douglas, Michael G.; Cooney, Craig A.; Fan Chunyang; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2007-12-21

    The onset and progression of cancer is associated with the methylation-dependent silencing of specific genes, however, the mechanism and its regulation have not been established. We previously demonstrated that reduction of mitochondrial DNA content induces cancer progression. Here we found that mitochondrial DNA-deficient LN{rho}0-8 activates the hypermethylation of the nuclear DNA promoters including the promoter CpG islands of the endothelin B receptor, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and E-cadherin. These are unmethylated and the corresponding gene products are expressed in the parental LNCaP containing mitochondrial DNA. The absence of mitochondrial DNA induced DNA methyltransferase 1 expression which was responsible for the methylation patterns observed. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase eliminated hypermethylation and expressed gene products in LN{rho}0-8. These studies demonstrate loss or reduction of mitochondrial DNA resulted in the induction of DNA methyltransferase 1, hypermethylation of the promoters of endothelin B receptor, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and E-cadherin, and reduction of the corresponding gene products.

  6. Structures and regulation of non-X orphan nuclear receptors: A retinoid hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear receptors are defined as a family of ligand regulated transcription factors [1-6]. While this definition reflects that ligand binding is a key property of nuclear receptors, it is still a heated subject of debate if all the nuclear receptors (48 human members) can bind ligands (ligands referred here to both physiological and synthetic ligands). Recent studies in nuclear receptor structure biology and pharmacology have undoubtedly increased our knowledge of nuclear receptor functions and their regulation. As a result, they point to new avenues for the discovery and development of nuclear receptor regulators, including nuclear receptor ligands. Here we review the recent literature on orphan nuclear receptor structural analysis and ligand identification, particularly on the orphan nuclear receptors that do not heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors, which we term as non-X orphan receptors. We also propose a speculative "retinoid hypothesis" for a subset of non-X orphan nuclear receptors, which we hope to help shed light on orphan nuclear receptor biology and drug discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Orphan Nuclear Receptors'.

  7. TFEB-mediated increase in peripheral lysosomes regulates store-operated calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Sbano, Luigi; Bonora, Massimo; Marchi, Saverio; Baldassari, Federica; Medina, Diego L.; Ballabio, Andrea; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles mainly involved in catabolic processes. In addition, lysosomes can expel their contents outside of the cell via lysosomal exocytosis. Some of the key steps involved in these important cellular processes, such as vesicular fusion and trafficking, require calcium (Ca2+) signaling. Recent data show that lysosomal functions are transcriptionally regulated by transcription factor EB (TFEB) through the induction of genes involved in lysosomal biogenesis and exocytosis. Given these observations, we investigated the roles of TFEB and lysosomes in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. We studied the effect of transient modulation of TFEB expression in HeLa cells by measuring the cytosolic Ca2+ response after capacitative Ca2+ entry activation and Ca2+ dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and directly in lysosomes. Our observations show that transient TFEB overexpression significantly reduces cytosolic Ca2+ levels under a capacitative influx model and ER re-uptake of calcium, increasing the lysosomal Ca2+ buffering capacity. Moreover, lysosomal destruction or damage abolishes these TFEB-dependent effects in both the cytosol and ER. These results suggest a possible Ca2+ buffering role for lysosomes and shed new light on lysosomal functions during intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:28084445

  8. Controlling the strontium-doping in calcium phosphate microcapsules through yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miaojun; Li, Tianjie; Pan, Ting; Zhao, Naru; Yao, Yongchang; Zhai, Zhichen; Zhou, Jiaan; Du, Chang; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-10-01

    Yeast cells have controllable biosorption on metallic ions during metabolism. However, few studies were dedicated to using yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization process to control the strontium-doped positions in calcium phosphate microcapsules. In this study, the yeast cells were allowed to pre-adsorb strontium ions metabolically and then served as sacrificing template for the precipitation and calcination of mineral shell. The pre-adsorption enabled the microorganism to enrich of strontium ions into the inner part of the microcapsules, which ensured a slow-release profile of the trace element from the microcapsule. The co-culture with human marrow stromal cells showed that gene expressions of alkaline phosphatase and Collagen-I were promoted. The promotion of osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed in the 3D culture of cell-material complexes. The strategy using living microorganism as 'smart doping apparatus' to control incorporation of trace element into calcium phosphate paved a pathway to new functional materials for hard tissue regeneration.

  9. Human VAT-1: a calcium-regulated activation marker of human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koch, Judith; Foekens, John; Timmermans, Mieke; Fink, Wolfram; Wirzbach, Alexander; Kramer, Michael D; Schaefer, Birgit M

    2003-09-01

    Human VAT-1 (hVAT-1) is a homologue of the synaptic vesicle membrane protein of Torpedo californica. Its coding gene is located near the BRCA1 locus and thus hVAT-1 may be linked to an inherited predisposition to breast and ovary cancer. However, the hVAT-1 protein expression pattern in normal epithelial tissues such as skin, mammary gland and ovary, as well as in tumours of the mammary gland and ovary, has not been studied. To address this issue, an immunohistological analysis of biopsies of normal epidermis and lesional epidermis of bullous pemphigoid and pemphigus vulgaris patients was undertaken. hVAT-1-expression was observed in basal keratinocytes of lesional epidermis of bullous pemphigoid patients but not in normal epidermis or in lesional epidermis of pemphigus vulgaris patients. Moreover, hVAT-1 expression in HaCaT cells was found to be calcium-dependent. Normal and malignant mammary and ovary epithelium were found to be hVAT-1-negative. Our results indicate that hVAT-1 exerts a specific function in keratinocyte physiology, in particular in calcium-regulated processes, with no evident deregulation in malignancies of the breast and ovary.

  10. Controlling the strontium-doping in calcium phosphate microcapsules through yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Miaojun; Li, Tianjie; Pan, Ting; Zhao, Naru; Yao, Yongchang; Zhai, Zhichen; Zhou, Jiaan; Du, Chang; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells have controllable biosorption on metallic ions during metabolism. However, few studies were dedicated to using yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization process to control the strontium-doped positions in calcium phosphate microcapsules. In this study, the yeast cells were allowed to pre-adsorb strontium ions metabolically and then served as sacrificing template for the precipitation and calcination of mineral shell. The pre-adsorption enabled the microorganism to enrich of strontium ions into the inner part of the microcapsules, which ensured a slow-release profile of the trace element from the microcapsule. The co-culture with human marrow stromal cells showed that gene expressions of alkaline phosphatase and Collagen-I were promoted. The promotion of osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed in the 3D culture of cell-material complexes. The strategy using living microorganism as ‘smart doping apparatus’ to control incorporation of trace element into calcium phosphate paved a pathway to new functional materials for hard tissue regeneration. PMID:27699057

  11. Identification of the nuclear localisation signal of O-GlcNAc transferase and its nuclear import regulation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon Gyu; Kim, Han Byeol; Kang, Min Jueng; Ryum, Joo Hwan; Yi, Eugene C.; Cho, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) attaches a single GlcNAc to hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine residues. Although the cellular localisation of OGT is important to regulate a variety of cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear localisation of OGT is unclear. Here, we characterised three amino acids (DFP; residues 451–453) as the nuclear localisation signal of OGT and demonstrated that this motif mediated the nuclear import of non-diffusible β-galactosidase. OGT bound the importin α5 protein, and this association was abolished when the DFP motif of OGT was mutated or deleted. We also revealed that O-GlcNAcylation of Ser389, which resides in the tetratricopeptide repeats, plays an important role in the nuclear localisation of OGT. Our findings may explain how OGT, which possesses a NLS, exists in the nucleus and cytosol simultaneously. PMID:27713473

  12. Analysis of gene expression and regulation implicates C2H9orf152 has an important role in calcium metabolism and chicken reproduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Fan, Yanfeng; Zhang, Zhenhe; Yang, Chan; Geng, Tuoyu; Gong, Daoqing; Hou, Zhuocheng; Ning, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    The reproductive system of a female bird is responsible for egg production. The genes highly expressed in oviduct are potentially important. From RNA-seq analysis, C2H9orf152 (an orthologous gene of human C9orf152) was identified as highly expressed in chicken uterus. To infer its function, we obtained and characterized its complete cDNA sequence, determined its spatiotemporal expression, and probed its transcription factor(s) through pharmaceutical approach. Data showed that the complete cDNA sequence was 1468bp long with a 789bp of open reading frame. Compared to other tested tissues, this gene was highly expressed in the oviduct and liver tissues, especially uterus. Its expression in uterus was gradually increased during developmental and reproductive periods, which verified its involvement in the growth and maturity of reproductive system. In contrast, its expression was not significant different between active and quiescent uterus, suggesting the role of C2H9orf152 in reproduction is likely due to its long-term effect. Moreover, based on its 5'-flanking sequence, Foxd3 and Hnf4a were predicted as transcription factors of C2H9orf152. Using berberine or retinoic acid (which can regulate the activities of Hnf4a and Foxd3, respectively), we demonstrated suppression of C2H9orf152 by the chemicals in chicken primary hepatocytes. As retinoic acid regulates calcium metabolism, and Hnf4a is a key nuclear factor to liver, these findings suggest that C2H9orf152 is involved in liver function and calcium metabolism of reproductive system. In conclusion, C2H9orf152 may have a long-term effect on chicken reproductive system by regulating calcium metabolism, suggesting this gene has an important implication in the improvement of egg production and eggshell quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Human water, sodium, and calcium regulation during space flight and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, S. E.; Seagrave, R. C.

    2000-05-01

    When one is exposed to microgravity, fluid which is normally pooled in the lower extremities is redistributed headward and weight bearing bones begin to demineralize due to reduced mechanical stresses. The kidney, which is the primary regulator of body fluid volume and composition, responds to the fluid shift and bone demineralization by increasing the urinary output of water, sodium, and calcium. This research involves developing a mathematical description of how water and electrolytes are internally redistributed and exchanged with the environment during space flight. This model consequently involves kidney function and the associated endocrine system. The model agrees well with actual data, including that a low sodium diet can prevent bone demineralization. Therefore, assumptions made to develop the model are most likely valid. Additionally, various levels of activity are also considered in the model since exercise may help to eliminate some of the undesired effects of space flight such as muscle atrophy and bone demineralization.

  14. Human water, sodium, and calcium regulation during space flight and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, S. E.; Seagrave, R. C.

    When one is exposed to microgravity, fluid which is normally pooled in the lower extremities is redistributed headward and weight bearing bones begin to demineralize due to reduced mechanical stresses. The kidney, which is the primary regulator of body fluid volume and composition, responds to the fluid shift and bone demineralization by increasing the urinary output of water, sodium, and calcium. This research involves developing a mathematical description of how water and electrolytes are internally redistributed and exchanged with the environment during space flight. This model consequently involves kidney function and the associated endocrine system. The model agrees well with actual data, including that a low sodium diet can prevent bone demineralization. Therefore, assumptions made to develop the model are most likely valid. Additionally, various levels of activity are also considered in the model since exercise may help to eliminate some of the undesired effects of space flight such as muscle atrophy and bone demineralization.

  15. Luminal fluid tonicity regulates airway ciliary beating by altering membrane stretch and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Horváth, György; Sorscher, Eric J

    2008-06-01

    The coordinated, directional beating of airway cilia drives airway mucociliary clearance. Here we explore the hypothesis that airway surface liquid osmolarity is a key regulator of ciliary beating. Cilia in freshly isolated human and murine airways visualized with streaming video-microscopy exhibited a reciprocal dependence on a physiological range of luminal fluid osmolarities, across the entire range of ciliary activity (0-20 beats per sec). Increasing osmolarity slowed or completely abrogated, while lower osmolarity dramatically stimulated ciliary beating. In parallel, epithelial cell height and importantly, intracellular calcium levels (as judged by fluorescence imaging) also changed. Moreover, ciliary beating was stimulated by isosmotic solutions containing membrane permeant osmolytes, suggesting that cell size and membrane stretch (governed by apical fluid tonicity), rather than osmolarity itself, contribute to the activation. These findings shed light on the pathophysiology of diseases of mucociliary clearance such as cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Shank is a dose-dependent regulator of Cav1 calcium current and CREB target expression

    PubMed Central

    Pym, Edward; Sasidharan, Nikhil; Thompson-Peer, Katherine L; Simon, David J; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Hall, Qi; Nurrish, Stephen; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2017-01-01

    Shank is a post-synaptic scaffolding protein that has many binding partners. Shank mutations and copy number variations (CNVs) are linked to several psychiatric disorders, and to synaptic and behavioral defects in mice. It is not known which Shank binding partners are responsible for these defects. Here we show that the C. elegans SHN-1/Shank binds L-type calcium channels and that increased and decreased shn-1 gene dosage alter L-channel current and activity-induced expression of a CRH-1/CREB transcriptional target (gem-4 Copine), which parallels the effects of human Shank copy number variations (CNVs) on Autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. These results suggest that an important function of Shank proteins is to regulate L-channel current and activity induced gene expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18931.001 PMID:28477407

  17. Shank is a dose-dependent regulator of Cav1 calcium current and CREB target expression.

    PubMed

    Pym, Edward; Sasidharan, Nikhil; Thompson-Peer, Katherine L; Simon, David J; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Hall, Qi; Nurrish, Stephen; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2017-05-06

    Shank is a post-synaptic scaffolding protein that has many binding partners. Shank mutations and copy number variations (CNVs) are linked to several psychiatric disorders, and to synaptic and behavioral defects in mice. It is not known which Shank binding partners are responsible for these defects. Here we show that the C. elegans SHN-1/Shank binds L-type calcium channels and that increased and decreased shn-1 gene dosage alter L-channel current and activity-induced expression of a CRH-1/CREB transcriptional target (gem-4 Copine), which parallels the effects of human Shank copy number variations (CNVs) on Autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. These results suggest that an important function of Shank proteins is to regulate L-channel current and activity induced gene expression.

  18. Regulation of human myometrial contractility during pregnancy and labour: are calcium homeostatic pathways important?

    PubMed

    Tribe, R M

    2001-03-01

    If we are to develop new strategies for the treatment and management of preterm and dysfunctional term labour, it is imperative that we improve current understanding of the control of human uterine activity. Despite many studies of animal pregnancy, there is a paucity of knowledge relating to the complex control of human myometrium during pregnancy. It is hypothesized that human myometrium is relatively quiescent during the majority of pregnancy and that as term approaches there is cascade of molecular events that prepare the uterus for labour. This review will consider the cellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of human myometrial activity and the modulation of these by hormonal and mechanical signals. In particular, the contribution of calcium homeostatic pathways to the control of human myometrial contractility during gestation will be discussed. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.2, 247-254.

  19. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 regulates rhythmic synthesis of mouse Nfil3 protein via IRES-mediated translation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor, interleukin 3, regulated (Nfil3, also known as E4 Promoter-Binding Protein 4 (E4BP4)) protein is a transcription factor that binds to DNA and generally represses target gene expression. In the circadian clock system, Nfil3 binds to a D-box element residing in the promoter of clock genes and contributes to their robust oscillation. Here, we show that the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of Nfil3 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and that IRES-mediated translation occurs in a phase-dependent manner. We demonstrate that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) binds to a specific region of Nfil3 mRNA and regulates IRES-mediated translation. Knockdown of hnRNP A1 almost completely abolishes protein oscillation without affecting mRNA oscillation. Moreover, we observe that intracellular calcium levels, which are closely related to bone formation, depend on Nfil3 levels in osteoblast cell lines. We suggest that the 5′-UTR mediated cap-independent translation of Nfil3 mRNA contributes to the rhythmic expression of Nfil3 by interacting with the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1. These data provide new evidence that the posttranscriptional regulation of clock gene expression is important during bone metabolism. PMID:28220845

  20. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 regulates rhythmic synthesis of mouse Nfil3 protein via IRES-mediated translation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2017-02-21

    Nuclear factor, interleukin 3, regulated (Nfil3, also known as E4 Promoter-Binding Protein 4 (E4BP4)) protein is a transcription factor that binds to DNA and generally represses target gene expression. In the circadian clock system, Nfil3 binds to a D-box element residing in the promoter of clock genes and contributes to their robust oscillation. Here, we show that the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of Nfil3 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and that IRES-mediated translation occurs in a phase-dependent manner. We demonstrate that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) binds to a specific region of Nfil3 mRNA and regulates IRES-mediated translation. Knockdown of hnRNP A1 almost completely abolishes protein oscillation without affecting mRNA oscillation. Moreover, we observe that intracellular calcium levels, which are closely related to bone formation, depend on Nfil3 levels in osteoblast cell lines. We suggest that the 5'-UTR mediated cap-independent translation of Nfil3 mRNA contributes to the rhythmic expression of Nfil3 by interacting with the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1. These data provide new evidence that the posttranscriptional regulation of clock gene expression is important during bone metabolism.

  1. The E646D-ATP13A4 mutation associated with autism reveals a defect in calcium regulation.

    PubMed

    Vallipuram, Janaki; Grenville, Jeffrey; Crawford, Dorota A

    2010-03-01

    ATP13A4 is a member of the subfamily of P5-type ATPases. P5-type ATPases are the least studied of the P-type ATPase subfamilies with no ion specificities assigned to them. In order to elucidate ATP13A4 function, we studied the protein's subcellular localization and tested whether it is involved in calcium regulation. The intracellular calcium concentration was measured in COS-7 cells over-expressing mouse ATP13A4 using ratiometric calcium imaging with fura-2 AM as a calcium indicator. The results of this study show that ATP13A4 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Furthermore, we demonstrate that over-expression of ATP13A4 in COS-7 cells caused a significant increase in the intracellular calcium level. Interestingly, over-expression of the sequence variant containing a substitution of aspartic acid for a glutamic acid (E646D), previously found in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), did not increase the free cellular calcium likely due to the mutation. In this study, we also describe the expression of ATP13A4 during mouse embryonic development. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that ATP13A4 was highly expressed at embryonic days 15-17, when neurogenesis takes place. The present study is the first to provide further insights into the biological role of a P5-type ATPase. Our results demonstrate that ATP13A4 may be involved in calcium regulation and that its expression is developmentally regulated. Overall, this study provides support for the hypothesis that ATP13A4 may play a vital role in the developing nervous system and its impairment can contribute to the symptoms seen in ASD.

  2. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation.

    PubMed

    Chafe, Shawn C; Pierce, Jacqueline B; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-01-01

    NTF2 is a cytosolic protein responsible for nuclear import of Ran, a small Ras-like GTPase involved in a number of critical cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation, chromatin organization during mitosis, reformation of the nuclear envelope following mitosis, and controlling the directionality of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we provide evidence for the first time that translocation of the mammalian NTF2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm to collect Ran in the GDP form is subjected to regulation. Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import of proteins. Inhibition of the export processes by polysorbitan monolaurate is specific and reversible, and is caused by accumulation of Ran in the cytoplasm because of a block in translocation of NTF2 to the cytoplasm. Nuclear import of Ran and the nuclear export processes are restored in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells overproducing NTF2. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of a phospho-tyrosine protein and several phospho-threonine proteins was observed in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that nucleocytoplasmic translocation of NTF2 is regulated in mammalian cells, and may involve a tyrosine and/or threonine kinase-dependent signal transduction mechanism(s).

  3. Domain III regulates N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channel closing kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yarotskyy, Viktor; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z.

    2012-01-01

    CaV2.2 (N-type) and CaV1.2 (L-type) calcium channels gate differently in response to membrane depolarization, which is critical to the unique physiological functions mediated by these channels. We wondered if the source for these differences could be identified. As a first step, we examined the effect of domain exchange between N-type and L-type channels on activation-deactivation kinetics, which were significantly different between these channels. Kinetic analysis of chimeric channels revealed N-channel-like deactivation for all chimeric channels containing N-channel domain III, while activation appeared to be a more distributed function across domains. This led us to hypothesize that domain III was an important regulator of N-channel closing. This idea was further examined with R-roscovitine, which is a trisubstituted purine that slows N-channel deactivation by exclusively binding to activated N-channels. L-channels lack this response to roscovitine, which allowed us to use N-L chimeras to test the role of domain III in roscovitine modulation of N-channel deactivation. In support of our hypothesis, all chimeric channels containing the N-channel domain III responded to roscovitine with slowed deactivation, while those chimeric channels with L-channel domain III did not. Thus a combination of kinetic and pharmacological evidence supports the hypothesis that domain III is an important regulator of N-channel closing. Our results support specialization of gating functions among calcium channel domains. PMID:22205645

  4. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neuronal Activity via Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lei Ray; Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons. PMID:24236040

  5. Calcium regulation of HCN channels supports persistent activity in a multiscale model of neocortex

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Robert A.; Bulanova, Anna S.; Zeki, Mustafa; Lakatos, Peter; Terman, David; Hines, Michael L.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. The network contained 776 compartmental neurons arranged in the cortical layers, connected using synapses containing AMPA/NMDA/GABAA/GABAB receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) produced inositol triphosphate (IP3) which caused release of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores, with reuptake by sarco/ER Ca2+-ATP-ase pumps (SERCA), and influence on HCN channels. Stimulus-induced depolarization led to Ca2+ influx via NMDA and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs). After a delay, mGluR activation led to ER Ca2+ release via IP3 receptors. These factors increased HCN channel conductance and produced firing lasting for ~1 minute. The model displayed inter-scale synergies among synaptic weights, excitation/inhibition balance, firing rates, membrane depolarization, calcium levels, regulation of HCN channels, and induction of persistent activity. The interaction between inhibition and Ca2+ at the HCN channel nexus determined a limited range of inhibition strengths for which intracellular Ca2+ could prepare population-specific persistent activity. Interactions between metabotropic and ionotropic inputs to the neuron demonstrated how multiple pathways could contribute in a complementary manner to persistent activity. Such redundancy and complementarity via multiple pathways is a critical feature of biological systems. Mediation of activation at different time scales, and through different pathways, would be expected to protect against disruption, in this case providing

  6. Regulation of the reserve carbohydrate metabolism by alkaline pH and calcium in Neurospora crassa reveals a possible cross-regulation of both signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Ambrosio, Daniela Luz; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2017-06-09

    Glycogen and trehalose are storage carbohydrates and their levels in microorganisms vary according to environmental conditions. In Neurospora crassa, alkaline pH stress highly influences glycogen levels, and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the response to pH stress also involves the calcineurin signaling pathway mediated by the Crz1 transcription factor. Recently, in yeast, pH stress response genes were identified as targets of Crz1 including genes involved in glycogen and trehalose metabolism. In this work, we present evidence that in N. crassa the glycogen and trehalose metabolism is modulated by alkaline pH and calcium stresses. We demonstrated that the pH signaling pathway in N. crassa controls the accumulation of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose via the PAC-3 transcription factor, which is the central regulator of the signaling pathway. The protein binds to the promoters of most of the genes encoding enzymes of glycogen and trehalose metabolism and regulates their expression. We also demonstrated that the reserve carbohydrate levels and gene expression are both modulated under calcium stress and that the response to calcium stress may involve the concerted action of PAC-3. Calcium activates growth of the Δpac-3 strain and influences its glycogen and trehalose accumulation. In addition, calcium stress differently regulates glycogen and trehalose metabolism in the mutant strain compared to the wild-type strain. While glycogen levels are decreased in both strains, the trehalose levels are significantly increased in the wild-type strain and not affected by calcium in the mutant strain when compared to mycelium not exposed to calcium. We previously reported the role of PAC-3 as a transcription factor involved in glycogen metabolism regulation by controlling the expression of the gsn gene, which encodes an enzyme of glycogen synthesis. In this work, we extended the investigation by studying in greater detail the effects of pH on the metabolism of the

  7. Essential regulation of cell bioenergetics in Trypanosoma brucei by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guozhong; Vercesi, Anibal E.; Docampo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of regulation of mitochondrial metabolism in trypanosomes are not completely understood. Here we present evidence that the Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial calcium uniporter (TbMCU) is essential for regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics, autophagy, and cell death, even in the bloodstream forms that are devoid of a functional respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Localization studies reveal its co-localization with MitoTracker staining. TbMCU overexpression increases mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation in intact and permeabilized trypanosomes, generates excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), and sensitizes them to apoptotic stimuli. Ablation of TbMCU in RNAi or conditional knockout trypanosomes reduces mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake without affecting their membrane potential, increases the AMP/ATP ratio, stimulates autophagosome formation, and produces marked defects in growth in vitro and infectivity in mice, revealing its essentiality in these parasites. The requirement of TbMCU for proline and pyruvate metabolism in procyclic and bloodstream forms, respectively, reveals its role in regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:24305511

  8. The Large Conductance, Calcium-activated K+ (BK) Channel is regulated by Cysteine String Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Barry D.; Ahrendt, Eva; Braun, Andrew P.; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Large-conductance, calcium-activated-K+ (BK) channels are widely distributed throughout the nervous system, where they regulate action potential duration and firing frequency, along with presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Our recent efforts to identify chaperones that target neuronal ion channels have revealed cysteine string protein (CSPα) as a key regulator of BK channel expression and current density. CSPα is a vesicle-associated protein and mutations in CSPα cause the hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, adult-onset autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL). CSPα null mice show 2.5 fold higher BK channel expression compared to wild type mice, which is not seen with other neuronal channels (i.e. Cav2.2, Kv1.1 and Kv1.2). Furthermore, mutations in either CSPα's J domain or cysteine string region markedly increase BK expression and current amplitude. We conclude that CSPα acts to regulate BK channel expression, and consequently CSPα-associated changes in BK activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as ANCL. PMID:23945775

  9. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  10. Nonequilibrium Calcium Dynamics Regulate the Autonomous Firing Pattern of Rat Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua A.; Teagarden, Mark A.; Foehring, Robert C.; Wilson, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons discharge rhythmically in two patterns associated with different afterhyperpolarization timescales, each dictated by a different calcium-dependent potassium current. Single spiking depends on a medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) generated by rapid SK currents that are associated with N-type calcium channels. Periodic bursting is driven by a delayed and slowly decaying afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) current associated with L-type channels. Using calcium imaging we show that the calcium transients underlying these currents exhibit two corresponding timescales throughout the somatodendritic tree. This result is not consistent with spatial compartmentalization of calcium entering through the two calcium channels and acting on the two potassium currents, or with differences in channel gating kinetics of the calcium dependent potassium currents. Instead, we show that nonequilibrium dynamics of calcium redistribution among cytoplasmic binding sites with different calcium binding kinetics can give rise to multiple timescales within the same cytoplasmic volume. The resulting independence of mAHP and sAHP currents allows cytoplasmic calcium to control two different and incompatible firing patterns (single spiking or bursting and pausing), depending on whether calcium influx is pulsatile or sustained. During irregular firing, calcium entry at both timescales can be detected, suggesting that an interaction between the medium and slow calcium-dependent afterhyperpolarizations may underlie this firing pattern. PMID:19571130

  11. Calcium-Regulated in Vivo Protein Phosphorylation in Zea mays L. Root Tips 1

    PubMed Central

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Friedmann, Michael; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(β-aminoethyl ether)-N-N′-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:11539029

  12. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  13. Nonequilibrium calcium dynamics regulate the autonomous firing pattern of rat striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joshua A; Teagarden, Mark A; Foehring, Robert C; Wilson, Charles J

    2009-07-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons discharge rhythmically in two patterns associated with different afterhyperpolarization timescales, each dictated by a different calcium-dependent potassium current. Single spiking depends on a medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) generated by rapid SK currents that are associated with N-type calcium channels. Periodic bursting is driven by a delayed and slowly decaying afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) current associated with L-type channels. Using calcium imaging we show that the calcium transients underlying these currents exhibit two corresponding timescales throughout the somatodendritic tree. This result is not consistent with spatial compartmentalization of calcium entering through the two calcium channels and acting on the two potassium currents, or with differences in channel gating kinetics of the calcium dependent potassium currents. Instead, we show that nonequilibrium dynamics of calcium redistribution among cytoplasmic binding sites with different calcium binding kinetics can give rise to multiple timescales within the same cytoplasmic volume. The resulting independence of mAHP and sAHP currents allows cytoplasmic calcium to control two different and incompatible firing patterns (single spiking or bursting and pausing), depending on whether calcium influx is pulsatile or sustained. During irregular firing, calcium entry at both timescales can be detected, suggesting that an interaction between the medium and slow calcium-dependent afterhyperpolarizations may underlie this firing pattern.

  14. Glutamate regulation of calcium and IP3 oscillating and pulsating dynamics in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    De Pittà, Maurizio; Goldberg, Mati; Volman, Vladislav; Berry, Hugues

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increasing interest in neuron–glia communication. This interest stems from the realization that glia participate in cognitive functions and information processing and are involved in many brain disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. An important process in neuron–glia communications is astrocyte encoding of synaptic information transfer—the modulation of intracellular calcium (Ca2 + ) dynamics in astrocytes in response to synaptic activity. Here, we derive and investigate a concise mathematical model for glutamate-induced astrocytic intracellular Ca2 +  dynamics that captures the essential biochemical features of the regulatory pathway of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). Starting from the well-known two-variable (intracellular Ca2 +  and inactive IP3 receptors) Li–Rinzel model for calcium-induced calcium release, we incorporate the regulation of IP3 production and phosphorylation. Doing so, we extend it to a three-variable model (which we refer to as the ChI model) that could account for Ca2 +  oscillations with endogenous IP3 metabolism. This ChI model is then further extended into the G-ChI model to include regulation of IP3 production by external glutamate signals. Compared with previous similar models, our three-variable models include a more realistic description of IP3 production and degradation pathways, lumping together their essential nonlinearities within a concise formulation. Using bifurcation analysis and time simulations, we demonstrate the existence of new putative dynamical features. The cross-couplings between IP3 and Ca2 +  pathways endow the system with self-consistent oscillatory properties and favor mixed frequency–amplitude encoding modes over pure amplitude–modulation ones. These and additional results of our model are in general agreement with available experimental data and may have important implications for the role of astrocytes in the synaptic transfer of information

  15. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  16. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  17. Interactions of Mitochondria/Metabolism and Calcium Regulation in Alzheimer's Disease: A Calcinist Point of View.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gary E; Thakkar, Ankita

    2017-02-08

    Decades of research suggest that alterations in calcium are central to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Highly reproducible changes in calcium dynamics occur in cells from patients with both genetic and non-genetic forms of AD relative to controls. The most robust change is an exaggerated release of calcium from internal stores. Detailed analysis of these changes in animal and cell models of the AD-causing presenilin mutations reveal robust changes in ryanodine receptors, inositol tris-phosphate receptors, calcium leak channels and store activated calcium entry. Similar anomalies in calcium result when AD-like changes in mitochondrial enzymes or oxidative stress are induced experimentally. The calcium abnormalities can be directly linked to the altered tau phosphorylation, amyloid precursor protein processing and synaptic dysfunction that are defining features of AD. A better understanding of these changes is required before using calcium abnormalities as therapeutic targets.

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of MicroRNAs Controlling CLDN14 Expression as a Mechanism for Renal Calcium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongfeng; Himmerkus, Nina; Plain, Allein; Bleich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The kidney has a major role in extracellular calcium homeostasis. Multiple genetic linkage and association studies identified three tight junction genes from the kidney—claudin-14, -16, and -19—as critical for calcium imbalance diseases. Despite the compelling biologic evidence that the claudin-14/16/19 proteins form a regulated paracellular pathway for calcium reabsorption, approaches to regulate this transport pathway are largely unavailable, hindering the development of therapies to correct calcium transport abnormalities. Here, we report that treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors downregulates renal CLDN14 mRNA and dramatically reduces urinary calcium excretion in mice. Furthermore, treatment of mice with HDAC inhibitors stimulated the transcription of renal microRNA-9 (miR-9) and miR-374 genes, which have been shown to repress the expression of claudin-14, the negative regulator of the paracellular pathway. With renal clearance and tubule perfusion techniques, we showed that HDAC inhibitors transiently increase the paracellular cation conductance in the thick ascending limb. Genetic ablation of claudin-14 or the use of a loop diuretic in mice abrogated HDAC inhibitor-induced hypocalciuria. The genetic mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor from patients with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) repressed the transcription of miR-9 and miR-374 genes, and treatment with an HDAC inhibitor rescued the phenotypes of cell and animal models of ADH. Furthermore, systemic treatment of mice with antagomiRs against these miRs relieved claudin-14 gene silencing and caused an ADH-like phenotype. Together, our findings provide proof of concept for a novel therapeutic principle on the basis of epigenetic regulation of renal miRs to treat hypercalciuric diseases. PMID:25071082

  19. MYB30 transcription factor regulates oxidative and heat stress responses through ANNEXIN-mediated cytosolic calcium signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chancan; Zheng, Yuan; Guo, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Cytosolic calcium signaling is critical for regulating downstream responses in plants encountering unfavorable environmental conditions. In a genetic screen for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in stress-induced cytosolic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+) ]cyt ) elevations, we identified the R2R3-MYB transcription factor MYB30 as a regulator of [Ca(2+) ]cyt in response to H2 O2 and heat stresses. Plants lacking MYB30 protein exhibited greater elevation of [Ca(2+) ]cyt in response to oxidative and heat stimuli. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results indicated that the expression of a number of ANNEXIN (ANN) genes, which encode Ca(2+) -regulated membrane-binding proteins modulating cytosolic calcium signatures, were upregulated in myb30 mutants. Further analysis showed that MYB30 bound to the promoters of ANN1 and ANN4 and repressed their expression. myb30 mutants were sensitive to methyl viologen (MV) and heat stresses. The H2 O2 - and heat-induced abnormal [Ca(2+) ]cyt in myb30 was dependent on the function of ANN proteins. Moreover, the MV and heat sensitivity of myb30 was suppressed in mutants lacking ANN function or by application of LaCl3 , a calcium channel blocker. These results indicate that MYB30 regulates oxidative and heat stress responses through calcium signaling, which is at least partially mediated by ANN1 and ANN4. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. The GAR-3 muscarinic receptor cooperates with calcium signals to regulate muscle contraction in the Caenorhabditis elegans pharynx.

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Katherine A; Avery, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors regulate the activity of neurons and muscle cells through G-protein-coupled cascades. Here, we identify a pathway through which the GAR-3 muscarinic receptor regulates both membrane potential and excitation-contraction coupling in the Caenorhabditis elegans pharyngeal muscle. GAR-3 signaling is enhanced in worms overexpressing gar-3 or lacking GPB-2, a G-protein beta-subunit involved in RGS-mediated inhibition of G(o)alpha- and G(q)alpha-linked pathways. High levels of signaling through GAR-3 inhibit pharyngeal muscle relaxation and impair feeding--but do not block muscle repolarization--when worms are exposed to arecoline, a muscarinic agonist. Loss of gar-3 function results in shortened action potentials and brief muscle contractions in the pharyngeal terminal bulb. High levels of calcium entry through voltage-gated channels also impair terminal bulb relaxation and sensitize worms to the toxic effects of arecoline. Mutation of gar-3 reverses this sensitivity, suggesting that GAR-3 regulates calcium influx or calcium-dependent processes. Because the effects of GAR-3 signaling on membrane depolarization and muscle contraction can be separated, we conclude that GAR-3 regulates multiple calcium-dependent processes in the C. elegans pharyngeal muscle. PMID:15238517

  1. Activation of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), the central regulator of plant root endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sylvia; Parniske, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The key molecular event during the development of arbuscular mycorrhiza and the root nodule symbiosis is the activation of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK). Its regulation is complex and involves positive as well as negative regulation facilitated by autophosphorylation of two conserved sites. Deregulated versions of CCaMK are sufficient for mediating both organogenesis and infection processes. Epistasis tests demonstrated that a main function of signaling components upstream of calcium spiking is the activation of CCaMK. Despite CCaMK being a central signaling hub, specificity for both symbioses exists, resulting in differential transcriptional gene expression patterns. While the specificity upstream of CCaMK can be conceptualized by the specific perception of rhizobial and fungal lipo-chitooligosaccharides via cognate LysM receptors, the mechanisms conferring transcriptional specificity downstream of CCaMK are likely conferred by a variety of transcriptional regulators, mediating symbiosis appropriate gene regulation.

  2. Nuclear actin and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; Han, Mei; Bernier, Michel; Wen, Jin-kun

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear actin is involoved in transcription of all three RNA polymerases, chromatin remodeling, and formation of hnRNP complexes as well as recruitment of histone modifier to the active gene. In addition, actin-binding proteins (ABPs) control actin nucleation, bundling, filament capping, fragmentation, and monomer availability in the cytoplasm. In recent years, more and more attention is on the role of actin and ABPs in the modulation of the subcellular localization of transcriptional regulators. This review focuses on the recent developments about transcription and transcriptional regulation by nuclear actin, regulation of muscle-specific gene expression, nuclear receptor and transcription complexes by ABPs. Among them, STARS and ABLIM regulate actin dynamics and SRF-dependent muscle-specific gene expression. Functionally and structurally unrelated cytoplasmic ABPs interact cooperatively with nuclear receptor and regulate its transactivation. Furthermore, ABPs also participate in the formation of transcription complexes. PMID:19459931

  3. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the “status” of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  4. Control of the light-regulated current in rod photoreceptors by cyclic GMP, calcium, and l-cis-diltiazem.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, J H; Kaupp, U B; MacLeish, P R

    1986-01-01

    The effect of calcium ions on the cGMP-activated current of outer segment membrane was examined by the excised-patch technique. Changes in the extracellular calcium concentration had marked effects on the cGMP-activated current, while changes in intracellular calcium concentration were ineffective. Changes in calcium concentration in the absence of cGMP had little, if any, effect on membrane conductance. These results suggest that both intracellular cGMP and extracellular calcium can directly affect the conductance underlying the light response in rod cells. The pharmacological agent l-cis-diltiazem reversibly inhibited the cGMP-activated current when applied to the intracellular side of an excised patch. When superfused over intact rod cells, l-cis-diltiazem reversibly blocked much of the normal light response. The isomer, d-cis-diltiazem, did not significantly affect either patches or intact rod cells. Thus, the light-regulated conductance has binding sites for both calcium and cGMP that may interact during the normal light response in rod cells and a site specific for l-cis-diltiazem that can be used to identify and further study the conductance mechanism. PMID:3006029

  5. Control of the light-regulated current in rod photoreceptors by cyclic GMP, calcium, and l-cis-diltiazem.

    PubMed

    Stern, J H; Kaupp, U B; MacLeish, P R

    1986-02-01

    The effect of calcium ions on the cGMP-activated current of outer segment membrane was examined by the excised-patch technique. Changes in the extracellular calcium concentration had marked effects on the cGMP-activated current, while changes in intracellular calcium concentration were ineffective. Changes in calcium concentration in the absence of cGMP had little, if any, effect on membrane conductance. These results suggest that both intracellular cGMP and extracellular calcium can directly affect the conductance underlying the light response in rod cells. The pharmacological agent l-cis-diltiazem reversibly inhibited the cGMP-activated current when applied to the intracellular side of an excised patch. When superfused over intact rod cells, l-cis-diltiazem reversibly blocked much of the normal light response. The isomer, d-cis-diltiazem, did not significantly affect either patches or intact rod cells. Thus, the light-regulated conductance has binding sites for both calcium and cGMP that may interact during the normal light response in rod cells and a site specific for l-cis-diltiazem that can be used to identify and further study the conductance mechanism.

  6. Differential Effect of Renal Cortical and Medullary Interstitial Fluid Calcium on Blood Pressure Regulation in Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Eley, Shaleka; Anderson, Lauren; Waters, Brittany; Royall, Brittany; Nichols, Sheena; Wells, Candace

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypercalciuria is a frequent characteristic of hypertension. In this report we extend our earlier studies investigating the role of renal interstitial fluid calcium (ISFCa)2+ as a link between urinary calcium excretion and blood pressure in the Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) hypertensive model. METHODS Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant (DR) rats were placed on control (0.45%) and high (8%) salt diets to determine if changes in renal cortical and medullary ISFCa 2+correlated with changes in urinary calcium excretion and blood pressure. RESULTS We observed that renal ISFCa 2+ was predicted by urinary calcium excretion (P < 0.05) in DS rats but not DR rats. Renal cortical ISFCa 2+ was negatively associated with blood pressure (P < 0.03) while renal medullary ISFCa 2+ was positively associated with blood pressure in DS rats (P < 0.04). In contrast, neither urinary calcium excretion nor renal ISFCa 2+ was associated with blood pressure in the DR rats under the conditions of this study. CONCLUSION We interpret these findings to suggest that decreased renal cortical ISFCa 2+ plays a role in the increase in blood pressure following a high salt diet in salt hypertension perhaps by mediating renal vasoconstriction; the role of medullary calcium remains to be fully understood. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism of the altered renal ISFCa 2+ and its role in blood pressure regulation. PMID:25552516

  7. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses.

  8. Calcium regulation of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier SLC25A24 uses a locking pin mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Harborne, Steven P. D.; King, Martin S.; Crichton, Paul G.; Kunji, Edmund R. S.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carriers import adenine nucleotides into the mitochondrial matrix and export phosphate to the cytosol. They are calcium-regulated to control the size of the matrix adenine nucleotide pool in response to cellular energetic demands. They consist of three domains: an N-terminal regulatory domain containing four calcium-binding EF-hands, a linker loop domain with an amphipathic α-helix and a C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain for the transport of substrates. Here, we use thermostability assays to demonstrate that the carrier is regulated by calcium via a locking pin mechanism involving the amphipathic α-helix. When calcium levels in the intermembrane space are high, the N-terminus of the amphipathic α-helix is bound to a cleft in the regulatory domain, leading to substrate transport by the carrier domain. When calcium levels drop, the cleft closes, and the amphipathic α-helix is released to bind to the carrier domain via its C-terminus, locking the carrier in an inhibited state. PMID:28350015

  9. Vacuolar H+-ATPase in the nuclear membranes regulates nucleo-cytosolic proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julianna Maria; Martínez-Zaguilán, Raul; Facanha, Arnoldo Rocha; Hussain, Fazle; Sennoune, Souad R

    2016-10-01

    The regulation of the luminal pH of each organelle is crucial for its function and must be controlled tightly. Nevertheless, it has been assumed that the nuclear pH is regulated by the cytoplasmic proton transporters via the diffusion of H(+) across the nuclear pores because of their large diameter. However, it has been demonstrated that ion gradients exist between cytosol and nucleus, suggesting that the permeability of ions across the nuclear pores is restricted. Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-H(+)-ATPase) is responsible for the creation and maintenance of trans-membrane electrochemical gradient. We hypothesize that V-H(+)-ATPase located in the nuclear membranes functions as the primary mechanism to regulate nuclear pH and generate H(+) gradients across the nuclear envelope. We studied the subcellular heterogeneity of H(+) concentration in the nucleus and cytosol using ratio imaging microscopy and SNARF-1, a pH indicator, in prostate cells. Our results indicate that there are proton gradients across the nuclear membranes that are generated by V-H(+)-ATPase located in the outer and inner nuclear membranes. We demonstrated that these gradients are mostly dissipated by inhibiting V-H(+)-ATPase. Immunoblots and V-H(+)-ATPase activity corroborated the existence of V-H(+)-ATPase in the nuclear membranes. This study demonstrates that V-H(+)-ATPase is functionally expressed in nuclear membranes and is responsible for nuclear H(+) gradients that may promote not only the coupled transport of substrates, but also most electrochemically driven events across the nuclear membranes. This study represents a paradigm shift that the nucleus can regulate its own pH microenvironment, providing new insights into nuclear ion homeostasis and signaling.

  10. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  11. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheehy, Sean P; Goss, Josue A; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal-nuclear-chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  12. Regulation of melatonin production and intracellular calcium concentrations in the trout pineal organ.

    PubMed

    Meissl, H; Kroeber, S; Yáñez, J; Korf, H W

    1996-12-01

    The present in vitro study correlates measurements of the melatonin production from trout pineal organs with those of the intracellular calcium concentration in pinealocytes. Melatonin production increases with decreasing irradiance and shows maximal values in darkness. Some pinealocytes exhibit spontaneous calcium oscillations, although most of them have a stable basal calcium concentration. Diminishing extracellular calcium and enhancing magnesium reduces melatonin release in the light-and dark-adapted state. The application of Co2+ decreases melatonin secretion in the mesopic and scotopic range, reversibly blocks spontaneous calcium oscillations, reduces the basal intracellular calcium concentration in non-oscillating pinealocytes, and inhibits the KCl-induced rise in intracellular calcium. Application of glutamate, norepinephrine, isoproterenol, or dopamine has no significant effect on melatonin secretion. Norepinephrine does not influence the calcium concentration in any of the trout pinealocytes. Treatment with the GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol causes a slight reduction of melatonin release in the mesopic and scotopic range of illumination, without affecting intracellular calcium concentrations. Thus, Co2+ and low calcium/high magnesium buffer reduce melatonin release through an action on the calcium concentration in trout pinealocytes and not through a blockade of synaptic transmission. All the data show that the trout pineal organ synthesizes and releases melatonin in relation to the irradiance of the incident light and that neuronal inputs have a minor, if any, influence on melatonin synthesis.

  13. Calcium regulates glutamate dehydrogenase and poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis in Bacillus natto.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yonghong; Dong, Guiru; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yuling; Chen, Weifeng

    2016-04-01

    To study the effect of Ca(2+) on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and its role in poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) synthesis in Bacillus natto HSF 1410. When the concentration of Ca(2+) varied from 0 to 0.1 g/l in the growth medium of B. natto HSF 1410, γ-PGA production increased from 6.8 to 9.7 g/l, while GDH specific activity and NH4Cl consumption improved from 183 to 295 U/mg and from 0.65 to 0.77 g/l, respectively. GDH with α-ketoglutarate as substrate primarily used NADPH as coenzyme with a K m of 0.08 mM. GDH was responsible for the synthesis of endogenous glutamate. The specific activity of GDH remained essentially unchanged in the presence of CaCl2 (0.05-0.2 g/l) in vitro. However, the specific activity of GDH and its expression was significantly increased by CaCl2 in vivo. Therefore, the regulation of GDH and PGA synthesis by Ca(2+) is an intracellular process. Calcium regulation may be an effective approach for producing γ-PGA on an industrial scale.

  14. Calcium Signaling During Meiotic Cell Cycle Regulation and Apoptosis in Mammalian Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Meenakshi; Prasad, Shilpa; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2017-05-01

    Calcium (Ca(++) ) is one of the major signal molecules that regulate various aspects of cell functions including cell cycle progression, arrest, and apoptosis in wide variety of cells. This review summarizes current knowledge on the differential roles of Ca(++) in meiotic cell cycle resumption, arrest, and apoptosis in mammalian oocytes. Release of Ca(++) from internal stores and/or Ca(++) influx from extracellular medium causes moderate increase of intracellular Ca(++) ([Ca(++) ]i) level and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increase of Ca(++) as well as ROS levels under physiological range trigger maturation promoting factor (MPF) destabilization, thereby meiotic resumption from diplotene as well as metaphase-II (M-II) arrest in oocytes. A sustained increase of [Ca(++) ]i level beyond physiological range induces generation of ROS sufficient enough to cause oxidative stress (OS) in aging oocytes. The increased [Ca(++) ]i triggers Fas ligand-mediated oocyte apoptosis. Further, OS triggers mitochondria-mediated oocyte apoptosis in several mammalian species. Thus, Ca(++) exerts differential roles on oocyte physiology depending upon its intracellular concentration. A moderate increase of [Ca(++) ]i as well as ROS mediate spontaneous resumption of meiosis from diplotene as well as M-II arrest, while their high levels cause meiotic cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by operating both mitochondria- as well as Fas ligand-mediated apoptotic pathways. Indeed, Ca(++) regulates cellular physiology by modulating meiotic cell cycle and apoptosis in mammalian oocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 976-981, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cdk9 T-loop Phosphorylation is Regulated by the Calcium Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Rajesh; Rice, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation is a tightly regulated process and is dependent upon positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb). The core P-TEFb complex is composed of Cdk9 and Cyclin T and is essential for the expression of most protein coding genes. Cdk9 kinase function is dependent upon phosphorylation of Thr186 in its T-loop. In this study, we examined kinases and signaling pathways that influence Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation. Using an RNAi screen in HeLa cells, we found that Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation is regulated by Calcium/Calmodulin- dependent kinase 1D (CaMK1D). Using small molecules inhibitors in HeLa cells and primary CD4+ T lymphocytes, we found that the Ca2+ signaling pathway is required for Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation. Inhibition of Ca2+ signaling led to dephosphorylation of Thr186 on Cdk9. In reporter plasmid assays, inhibition of the Ca2+ signaling pathway repressed the PCNA promoter and HIV-1 Tat transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR, but not HTLV-1 Tax transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR, suggesting that perturbation of the Ca2+ pathway and reduction of Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation inhibits transcription units that have a rigorous requirement for P-TEFb function. PMID:21448926

  16. Cortical cytoskeleton dynamics regulates plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform-2 (PMCA2) activity.

    PubMed

    Dalghi, Marianela G; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Montalbetti, Nicolás; Simonin, Alexandre; Strehler, Emanuel E; Hediger, Matthias A; Rossi, Juan Pablo

    2017-08-01

    We have previously shown that purified actin can directly bind to human plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase 4b (hPMCA4b) and exert a dual modulation on its Ca(2+)-ATPase activity: F-actin inhibits PMCA while short actin oligomers may contribute to PMCA activation. These studies had to be performed with purified proteins given the nature of the biophysical and biochemical approaches used. To assess whether a functional interaction between the PMCAs and the cortical cytoskeleton is of physiological relevance, we characterized this phenomenon in the context of a living cell by monitoring in real-time the changes in the cytosolic calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]CYT). In this study, we tested the influence of drugs that change the actin and microtubule polymerization state on the activity and membrane expression of the PMCA transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, which allowed us to observe and quantify these relationships in a live cell, for the first time. We found that disrupting the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D significantly increased PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) extrusion (~50-100%) whereas pre-treatment with the F-actin stabilizing agent jasplakinolide caused its full inhibition. When the microtubule network was disrupted by pretreatment of the cells with colchicine, we observed a significant decrease in PMCA activity (~40-60% inhibition) in agreement with the previously reported role of acetylated tubulin on the calcium pump. In none of these cases was there a difference in the level of expression of the pump at the cell surface, thus suggesting that the specific activity of the pump was the regulated parameter. Our results indicate that PMCA activity is profoundly affected by the polymerization state of the cortical cytoskeleton in living cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Serotonin Regulates Calcium Homeostasis in Lactation by Epigenetic Activation of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P.; Weaver, Samantha R.; Cronick, Callyssa M.; Prichard, Austin P.; Crenshaw, Thomas D.; Heyne, Galen W.; Vezina, Chad M.; Lipinski, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. We previously showed that nonneuronal/peripheral serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] causes the lactating mammary gland to synthesize and secrete PTHrP in an acute fashion. Here, using a mouse model, we found that genetic inactivation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in peripheral 5-HT synthesis, reduced circulating and mammary PTHrP expression, osteoclast activity, and maternal circulating calcium concentrations during the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Tph1 inactivation also reduced sonic hedgehog signaling in the mammary gland during lactation. Each of these deficiencies was rescued by daily injections of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (an immediate precursor of 5-HT) to Tph1-deficient dams. We used immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts to demonstrate that 5-HT induces PTHrP through a sonic hedgehog-dependent signal transduction mechanism. We also found that 5-HT altered DNA methylation of the Shh gene locus, leading to transcriptional initiation at an alternate start site and formation of a variant transcript in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in mammary tissue in vivo. These results support a new paradigm of 5-HT-mediated Shh regulation involving DNA methylation remodeling and promoter switching. In addition to having immediate implications for lactation biology, identification and characterization of a novel functional regulatory relationship between nonneuronal 5-HT, hedgehog signaling, and PTHrP offers new avenues for the study of these important factors in development and disease. PMID:25192038

  18. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheehy, Sean P; Goss, Josue A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal–nuclear–chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. PMID:25908635

  19. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1.

  20. Phosphorylation sites required for regulation of cardiac calcium channels in the fight-or-flight response.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2013-11-26

    L-type Ca(2+) currents conducted by CaV1.2 channels initiate excitation-contraction coupling in the heart. Their activity is increased by β-adrenergic/cAMP signaling via phosphorylation by PKA in the fight-or-flight response, but the sites of regulation are unknown. We describe the functional role of phosphorylation of Ser1700 and Thr1704-sites of phosphorylation by PKA and casein kinase II at the interface between the proximal and distal C-terminal regulatory domains. Mutation of both residues to Ala in STAA mice reduced basal L-type Ca(2+) currents, due to a small decrease in expression and a substantial decrease in functional activity. The increase in L-type Ca(2+) current caused by isoproterenol was markedly reduced at physiological levels of stimulation (3-10 nM). Maximal increases in calcium current at nearly saturating concentrations of isoproterenol (100 nM) were also significantly reduced, but the mutation effects were smaller, suggesting that alternative regulatory mechanisms are engaged at maximal levels of stimulation. The β-adrenergic increase in cell contraction was also diminished. STAA ventricular myocytes exhibited arrhythmic contractions in response to isoproterenol, and up to 20% of STAA cells failed to sustain contractions when stimulated at 1 Hz. STAA mice have reduced exercise capacity, and cardiac hypertrophy is evident at 3 mo. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser1700 and Thr1704 is essential for regulation of basal activity of CaV1.2 channels and for up-regulation by β-adrenergic signaling at physiological levels of stimulation. Disruption of phosphorylation at those sites leads to impaired cardiac function in vivo, as indicated by reduced exercise capacity and cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. Intracellular calcium and cAMP regulate directional pigment movements in teleost erythrophores

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Teleost pigment cells (erythrophores and melanophores) are useful models for studying the regulation of rapid, microtubule-dependent organelle transport. Previous studies suggest that melanophores regulate the direction of pigment movements via changes in intracellular cAMP (Rozdzial and Haimo, 1986a; Sammak et al., 1992), whereas erythrophores may use calcium- (Ca(2+)-) based regulation (Luby- Phelps and Porter, 1982; McNiven and Ward, 1988). Despite these observations, there have been no direct measurements in intact erythrophores or any cell type correlating changes of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) with organelle movements. Here we demonstrate that extracellular Ca2+ is necessary and that a Ca2+ influx via microinjection is sufficient to induce pigment aggregation in erythrophores, but not melanophores of squirrel fish. Using the Ca(2+)- sensitive indicator, Fura-2, we demonstrate that [Ca2+]i rises dramatically concomitant with aggregation of pigment granules in erythrophores, but not melanophores. In addition, we find that an erythrophore stimulated to aggregate pigment will immediately transmit a rise in [Ca2+]i to neighboring cells, suggesting that these cells are electrically coupled. Surprisingly, we find that a fall in [Ca2+]i is not sufficient to induce pigment dispersion in erythrophores, contrary to the findings obtained with the ionophore and lysed-cell models (Luby- Phelps and Porter, 1982; McNiven and Ward, 1988). We find that a rise in intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]i) induces pigment dispersion, and that this dispersive stimulus can be overridden by an aggregation stimulus, suggesting that both high [cAMP]i and low [Ca2+]i are necessary to produce pigment dispersion in erythrophores. PMID:8106546

  2. Reconstitution of constitutive secretion using semi-intact cells: regulation by GTP but not calcium

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis in many permeabilized cells can be triggered by calcium and nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues. Here we examine the role of these effectors in exocytosis of constitutive vesicles using a system that reconstitutes transport between the trans-Golgi region and the plasma membrane. Transport is assayed by two independent methods: the movement of a transmembrane glycoprotein (vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein [VSV G protein]) to the cell surface; and the release of a soluble marker, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, that have been synthesized and radiolabeled in the trans-Golgi. The plasma membrane of CHO cells was selectively perforated with the bacterial cytolysin streptolysin-O. These perforated cells allow exchange of ions and cytosolic proteins but retain intracellular organelles and transport vesicles. Incubation of the semi-intact cells with ATP and a cytosolic fraction results in transport of VSV G protein and GAG chains to the cell surface. The transport reaction is temperature dependent, requires hydrolyzable ATP, and is inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide. Nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs such as GTP gamma S, which stimulate the fusion of regulated secretory granules, completely abolish constitutive secretion. The rate and extent of constitutive transport between the trans-Golgi and the plasma membrane is independent of free Ca2+ concentrations. This is in marked contrast to fusion of regulated secretory granules with the plasma membrane, and transport between the ER and the cis-Golgi (Beckers, C. J. M., and W. E. Balch. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:1245-1256; Baker, D., L. Wuestehube, R. Schekman, and D. Botstein. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:355-359). PMID:1986006

  3. The nuclear import of ribosomal proteins is regulated by mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Kazyken, Dubek; Kaz, Yelimbek; Kiyan, Vladimir; Zhylkibayev, Assylbek A.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Agarwal, Nitin K.; Sarbassov, Dos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central component of the essential signaling pathway that regulates cell growth and proliferation by controlling anabolic processes in cells. mTOR exists in two distinct mTOR complexes known as mTORC1 and mTORC2 that reside mostly in cytoplasm. In our study, the biochemical characterization of mTOR led to discovery of its novel localization on nuclear envelope where it associates with a critical regulator of nuclear import Ran Binding Protein 2 (RanBP2). We show that association of mTOR with RanBP2 is dependent on the mTOR kinase activity that regulates the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins. The mTOR kinase inhibitors within thirty minutes caused a substantial decrease of ribosomal proteins in the nuclear but not cytoplasmic fraction. Detection of a nuclear accumulation of the GFP-tagged ribosomal protein rpL7a also indicated its dependence on the mTOR kinase activity. The nuclear abundance of ribosomal proteins was not affected by inhibition of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) by rapamycin or deficiency of mTORC2, suggesting a distinctive role of the nuclear envelope mTOR complex in the nuclear import. Thus, we identified that mTOR in association with RanBP2 mediates the active nuclear import of ribosomal proteins. PMID:25294810

  4. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase pump is up-regulated in calcium-transporting dental enamel cells: a non-housekeeping role for SERCA2b.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, I K; Winz, R A; Hubbard, M J

    2001-01-01

    Dental enamel-forming cells face a major challenge to avoid the cytotoxic effects of excess calcium. We have characterized sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase pumps (SERCA) in rat enamel cells to address the proposal that non-mitochondrial calcium stores play a dominant role in transcellular calcium transport. A single major isoform, SERCA2b, was detected during the protein-secretory and calcium-transport stages of enamel formation using reverse-transcriptase PCR, cDNA cloning, Northern analysis and immunoblotting. Most importantly, SERCA2b exhibited a specific 3-fold up-regulation to high expression levels during calcium transport, as determined by quantitative immunoblotting and ATPase assays. Sensitivity of the calcium-dependent ATPase to thapsigargin and three other SERCA inhibitors was characterized. These findings indicate that enamel cells are well-equipped to sequester calcium in endoplasmic reticulum stores and so protect against calcium toxicity, associate SERCA with transcellular calcium transport for the first time, and establish SERCA2b as a molecular and pharmacological target for future investigations of calcium transcytosis. The observed physiological regulation in enamel cells contradicts the widespread perception that SERCA2b is restricted to general housekeeping duties. PMID:11485570

  6. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission at the Caenorhabditis elegans M4 Neuromuscular Junction by an Antagonistic Relationship Between Two Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Steciuk, Mark; Cheong, Mi Cheong; Waite, Christopher; You, Young-Jai; Avery, Leon

    2014-01-01

    In wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans, the synapse from motor neuron M4 to pharyngeal terminal bulb (TB) muscles is silent, and the muscles are instead excited by gap junction connections from adjacent muscles. An eat-5 innexin mutant lacking this electrical connection has few TB contractions and is unable to grow well on certain foods. We showed previously that this defect can be overcome by activation of the M4 → TB synapse. To identify genes that negatively regulate synaptic transmission, we isolated new suppressors of eat-5. To our surprise, these suppressors included null mutations in NPQR-type calcium channel subunit genes unc-2 and unc-36. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Ca2+ entry through the NPQR-type channel inhibits synaptic transmission by activating the calcium-activated K+ channel SLO-1, thus antagonizing the EGL-19 L-type calcium channel. PMID:25378475

  7. Regulation of synaptic transmission at the Caenorhabditis elegans M4 neuromuscular junction by an antagonistic relationship between two calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Steciuk, Mark; Cheong, Mi; Waite, Christopher; You, Young-Jai; Avery, Leon

    2014-11-04

    In wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans, the synapse from motor neuron M4 to pharyngeal terminal bulb (TB) muscles is silent, and the muscles are instead excited by gap junction connections from adjacent muscles. An eat-5 innexin mutant lacking this electrical connection has few TB contractions and is unable to grow well on certain foods. We showed previously that this defect can be overcome by activation of the M4 → TB synapse. To identify genes that negatively regulate synaptic transmission, we isolated new suppressors of eat-5. To our surprise, these suppressors included null mutations in NPQR-type calcium channel subunit genes unc-2 and unc-36. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Ca(2+) entry through the NPQR-type channel inhibits synaptic transmission by activating the calcium-activated K(+) channel SLO-1, thus antagonizing the EGL-19 L-type calcium channel.

  8. Opposing roles of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in neuronal calcium signalling and BDNF gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2003-06-01

    Neuronal responses to electrical activity-induced calcium signals are specified by the localization of the calcium entry site and the spatial properties of the calcium transient. Calcium flux through NMDA receptors located in the synapse initiates changes in synaptic efficacy and promotes pro-survival events, whereas calcium flux through extrasynaptic NMDA receptors is coupled to cell death pathways. The dialogue between the synaptic NMDA receptors and the nucleus is also modulated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, which shut down activity of CRE-binding protein (CREB) and antagonize the increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression induced by synaptic NMDA receptors. The specification of the biological response by the localization of the receptor activated is a new concept in neuronal calcium signalling that can explain many of the opposing roles of NMDA receptors.

  9. Transportin Regulates Major Mitotic Assembly Events: From Spindle to Nuclear Pore Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Corine K.; Delmar, Valerie A.; Chan, Rene C.; Phung, Quang; Bernis, Cyril; Fichtman, Boris; Rasala, Beth A.

    2009-01-01

    Mitosis in higher eukaryotes is marked by the sequential assembly of two massive structures: the mitotic spindle and the nucleus. Nuclear assembly itself requires the precise formation of both nuclear membranes and nuclear pore complexes. Previously, importin alpha/beta and RanGTP were shown to act as dueling regulators to ensure that these assembly processes occur only in the vicinity of the mitotic chromosomes. We now find that the distantly related karyopherin, transportin, negatively regulates nuclear envelope fusion and nuclear pore assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that transportin—and importin beta—initiate their regulation as early as the first known step of nuclear pore assembly: recruitment of the critical pore-targeting nucleoporin ELYS/MEL-28 to chromatin. Indeed, each karyopherin can interact directly with ELYS. We further define the nucleoporin subunit targets for transportin and importin beta and find them to be largely the same: ELYS, the Nup107/160 complex, Nup53, and the FG nucleoporins. Equally importantly, we find that transportin negatively regulates mitotic spindle assembly. These negative regulatory events are counteracted by RanGTP. We conclude that the interplay of the two negative regulators, transportin and importin beta, along with the positive regulator RanGTP, allows precise choreography of multiple cell cycle assembly events. PMID:19641022

  10. Transportin regulates major mitotic assembly events: from spindle to nuclear pore assembly.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corine K; Delmar, Valerie A; Chan, Rene C; Phung, Quang; Bernis, Cyril; Fichtman, Boris; Rasala, Beth A; Forbes, Douglass J

    2009-09-01

    Mitosis in higher eukaryotes is marked by the sequential assembly of two massive structures: the mitotic spindle and the nucleus. Nuclear assembly itself requires the precise formation of both nuclear membranes and nuclear pore complexes. Previously, importin alpha/beta and RanGTP were shown to act as dueling regulators to ensure that these assembly processes occur only in the vicinity of the mitotic chromosomes. We now find that the distantly related karyopherin, transportin, negatively regulates nuclear envelope fusion and nuclear pore assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that transportin-and importin beta-initiate their regulation as early as the first known step of nuclear pore assembly: recruitment of the critical pore-targeting nucleoporin ELYS/MEL-28 to chromatin. Indeed, each karyopherin can interact directly with ELYS. We further define the nucleoporin subunit targets for transportin and importin beta and find them to be largely the same: ELYS, the Nup107/160 complex, Nup53, and the FG nucleoporins. Equally importantly, we find that transportin negatively regulates mitotic spindle assembly. These negative regulatory events are counteracted by RanGTP. We conclude that the interplay of the two negative regulators, transportin and importin beta, along with the positive regulator RanGTP, allows precise choreography of multiple cell cycle assembly events.

  11. Dystrophin/α1-syntrophin scaffold regulated PLC/PKC-dependent store-operated calcium entry in myotubes.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Jessica; Harisseh, Rania; Harnois, Thomas; Magaud, Christophe; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    In skeletal muscles from patient suffering of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and from mdx mice, the absence of the cytoskeleton protein dystrophin has been shown to be essential for maintaining a normal calcium influx. We showed that a TRPC store-dependent cation influx is increased by loss of dystrophin or a scaffolding protein α1-syntrophin, however the mechanisms of this calcium mishandling are incompletely understood. First of all, we confirmed that TRPC1 but also STIM1 and Orai1 are supporting the store-operated cation entry which is enhanced in dystrophin-deficient myotubes. Next, we demonstrated that inhibition of PLC or PKC in dystrophin-deficient myotubes restores elevated cation entry to normal levels similarly to enforced minidystrophin expression. In addition, silencing α1-syntrophin also increased cation influx in a PLC/PKC dependent pathway. We also showed that α1-syntrophin and PLCβ are part of a same protein complex reinforcing the idea of their inter-relation in calcium influx regulation. This elevated cation entry was decreased to normal levels by chelating intracellular free calcium with BAPTA-AM. Double treatments with BAPTA-AM and PLC or PKC inhibitors suggested that the elevation of cation influx by PLC/PKC pathway is dependent on cytosolic calcium. All these results demonstrate an involvement in dystrophin-deficient myotubes of a specific calcium/PKC/PLC pathway in elevation of store-operated cation influx supported by the STIM1/Orai1/TRPC1 proteins, which is normally regulated by the α1-syntrophin/dystrophin scaffold.

  12. Effect of Lead Nanoparticles Inhalation on Bone Calcium Sensing Receptor, Hydroxyapatite Crystal and Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Leonas, Rendra; Noor, Zairin; Rasyid, Hermawan Nagar; Madjid, Tita Husnitawati; Tanjung, Fachry Ambia

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether Pb nanoparticle exposure affects the bone calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), hydroxyapatite crystal, and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (RANK) in rats exposed to subchronic and chronic inhalation. Thirty two rats were randomly divided into eight groups. One group is a non-exposed group. While three groups were exposed to nanoparticles Pb at the following doses 6.25; 12.5; or 25 mg/m3 an hour daily for 28 days. Another three groups were exposed to nanoparticles Pb at following doses 6.25; 12.5; and 25 mg/m3 one hour daily for 6 months. The expression of trabecular CaSR was significantly decreased at the all doses subchronic exposure compared to the control group (P < 0.05). The CaSR expression significantly decreased in second and third doses subchronic exposure groups compared to the control groups (P < 0.05). With subchronic exposure, the crystal size was increased in second dose group and decreased in lowest and highest doses compared to the control (untreated) group. The crystal size and c-axis were decreased in all dose chronic exposures compared to the control (untreated) group. The expression of cortical RANK was significantly lower at the two lowest dose chronic exposures compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Pb nanoparticle inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth at least a part via down regulation of CaSR and RANK. PMID:28077890

  13. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  14. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  15. Mechanism of the calcium-regulation of muscle contraction — In pursuit of its structural basis —

    PubMed Central

    WAKABAYASHI, Takeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The author reviewed the research that led to establish the structural basis for the mechanism of the calcium-regulation of the contraction of striated muscles. The target of calcium ions is troponin on the thin filaments, of which the main component is the double-stranded helix of actin. A model of thin filament was generated by adding tropomyosin and troponin. During the process to provide the structural evidence for the model, the troponin arm was found to protrude from the calcium-depleted troponin and binds to the carboxyl-terminal region of actin. As a result, the carboxyl-terminal region of tropomyosin shifts and covers the myosin-binding sites of actin to block the binding of myosin. At higher calcium concentrations, the troponin arm changes its partner from actin to the main body of calcium-loaded troponin. Then, tropomyosin shifts back to the position near the grooves of actin double helix, and the myosin-binding sites of actin becomes available to myosin resulting in force generation through actin-myosin interactions. PMID:26194856

  16. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  17. Nuclear test lobbying: DOE regulations for contractors need reevaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Allegations had been made that the Department of Energy was improperly employing contractors to assist in lobbying the Congress on nuclear weapons testing issues. The antilobbying criminal statute has been interpreted by the Department of Justice as allowing federal officials to provide information to the Congress and to state their views on proposed legislation but prohibits ''grass-roots'' lobbying by federal employees. Thus, DOE's extensive briefings of congressional Members and staff to influence their views on nuclear weapons testing issues did not violate applicable statutory provisions.

  18. Computational Characterization of Modes of Transcriptional Regulation of Nuclear Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yogita; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Bakke, Marit; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq) and histone modification (ChIP-seq) data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We further examine the

  19. Computational characterization of modes of transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Yogita; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Bakke, Marit; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq) and histone modification (ChIP-seq) data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We further examine the combinatorial patterns of histone maps

  20. Extracellular NAD+ regulates intracellular calcium levels and induces activation of human granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    β-NAD+e (extracellular β-NAD+), present at nanomolar levels in human plasma, has been implicated in the regulation of [Ca2+]i (the intracellular calcium concentration) in various cell types, including blood cells, by means of different mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that micromolar NAD+e (both the α and the β extracellular NAD+ forms) induces a sustained [Ca2+]i increase in human granulocytes by triggering the following cascade of causally related events: (i) activation of adenylate cyclase and overproduction of cAMP; (ii) activation of protein kinase A; (iii) stimulation of ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity and consequent overproduction of cADP-ribose, a universal Ca2+ mobilizer; and (iv) influx of extracellular Ca2+. The NAD+e-triggered [Ca2+]i elevation translates into granulocyte activation, i.e. superoxide and nitric oxide generation, and enhanced chemotaxis in response to 0.1–10 μM NAD+e. Thus extracellular β-NAD+e behaves as a novel pro-inflammatory cytokine, stimulating human granulocytes and potentially recruiting them at sites of inflammation. PMID:16225456

  1. Calcium-Modulating Cyclophilin Ligand Regulates Membrane Trafficking of Postsynaptic GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xu; Yao, Jun; Norris, David; Tran, David D.; Bram, Richard J.; Chen, Gong; Luscher, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) at GABAergic synapses requires the cytoplasmic loop region and C-terminal transmembrane domain of the receptor γ2 subunit. We here report a novel interaction of γ2 with Calcium-Modulating cyclophilin Ligand (CAML), an integral membrane protein that regulates this mechanism. Interaction of GABAARs with CAML depends on both the cytoplasmic region and fourth transmembrane domain of the γ2 subunit, CAML immunoprecipitates with GABAARs from transfected cells and brain lysates and colocalizes with γ2 in ER vesicles in soma and dendrites of neurons. CAML shRNA treatment results in reduced expression of postsynaptic GABAARs, along with significant reductions in GABA-evoked whole-cell currents and GABAergic synaptic function, while glutamatergic transmission is unaffected. Reduced surface expression of GABAARs in CAML mutant neurons is associated with selective deficits in recycling of endocytosed GABAARs to the cell surface. Our results indicate a specific role of CAML in functional expression and endocytic recycling of postsynaptic GABAARs. PMID:18424167

  2. Weft, warp, and weave: the intricate tapestry of calcium channels regulating T lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Omilusik, Kyla D; Nohara, Lilian L; Stanwood, Shawna; Jefferies, Wilfred A

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a universal second messenger important for T lymphocyte homeostasis, activation, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The events surrounding Ca(2+) mobilization in lymphocytes are tightly regulated and involve the coordination of diverse ion channels, membrane receptors, and signaling molecules. A mechanism termed store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), causes depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement and triggers a sustained influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels in the plasma membrane. The ER Ca(2+) sensing molecule, stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), and a pore-forming plasma membrane protein, ORAI1, have been identified as important mediators of SOCE. Here, we review the role of several additional families of Ca(2+) channels expressed on the plasma membrane of T cells that likely contribute to Ca(2+) influx following TCR engagement, particularly highlighting an important role for voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (CaV) in T lymphocyte biology.

  3. Mitochondria Are Linked to Calcium Stores in Striated Muscle by Developmentally Regulated Tethering Structures

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Simona; Rossi, Ann E.; Micaroni, Massimo; Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Dirksen, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Bi-directional calcium (Ca2+) signaling between mitochondria and intracellular stores (endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum) underlies important cellular functions, including oxidative ATP production. In striated muscle, this coupling is achieved by mitochondria being located adjacent to Ca2+ stores (sarcoplasmic reticulum [SR]) and in proximity of release sites (Ca2+ release units [CRUs]). However, limited information is available with regard to the mechanisms of mitochondrial-SR coupling. Using electron microscopy and electron tomography, we identified small bridges, or tethers, that link the outer mitochondrial membrane to the intracellular Ca2+ stores of muscle. This association is sufficiently strong that treatment with hypotonic solution results in stretching of the SR membrane in correspondence of tethers. We also show that the association of mitochondria to the SR is 1) developmentally regulated, 2) involves a progressive shift from a longitudinal clustering at birth to a specific CRU-coupled transversal orientation in adult, and 3) results in a change in the mitochondrial polarization state, as shown by confocal imaging after JC1 staining. Our results suggest that tethers 1) establish and maintain SR–mitochondrial association during postnatal maturation and in adult muscle and 2) likely provide a structural framework for bi-directional signaling between the two organelles in striated muscle. PMID:19037102

  4. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation.

  5. Mitochondria are linked to calcium stores in striated muscle by developmentally regulated tethering structures.

    PubMed

    Boncompagni, Simona; Rossi, Ann E; Micaroni, Massimo; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Polishchuk, Roman S; Dirksen, Robert T; Protasi, Feliciano

    2009-02-01

    Bi-directional calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling between mitochondria and intracellular stores (endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum) underlies important cellular functions, including oxidative ATP production. In striated muscle, this coupling is achieved by mitochondria being located adjacent to Ca(2+) stores (sarcoplasmic reticulum [SR]) and in proximity of release sites (Ca(2+) release units [CRUs]). However, limited information is available with regard to the mechanisms of mitochondrial-SR coupling. Using electron microscopy and electron tomography, we identified small bridges, or tethers, that link the outer mitochondrial membrane to the intracellular Ca(2+) stores of muscle. This association is sufficiently strong that treatment with hypotonic solution results in stretching of the SR membrane in correspondence of tethers. We also show that the association of mitochondria to the SR is 1) developmentally regulated, 2) involves a progressive shift from a longitudinal clustering at birth to a specific CRU-coupled transversal orientation in adult, and 3) results in a change in the mitochondrial polarization state, as shown by confocal imaging after JC1 staining. Our results suggest that tethers 1) establish and maintain SR-mitochondrial association during postnatal maturation and in adult muscle and 2) likely provide a structural framework for bi-directional signaling between the two organelles in striated muscle.

  6. CO2/HCO3(-)- and calcium-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase as a physiological ATP sensor.

    PubMed

    Zippin, Jonathan H; Chen, Yanqiu; Straub, Susanne G; Hess, Kenneth C; Diaz, Ana; Lee, Dana; Tso, Patrick; Holz, George G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2013-11-15

    The second messenger molecule cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. In mammalian cells, cAMP can be generated from hormone- and G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases or via the widely expressed and structurally and biochemically distinct enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). sAC activity is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate ions, and in cells, sAC functions as a physiological carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and pH sensor. sAC activity is also stimulated by calcium, and its affinity for its substrate ATP suggests that it may be sensitive to physiologically relevant fluctuations in intracellular ATP. We demonstrate here that sAC can function as a cellular ATP sensor. In cells, sAC-generated cAMP reflects alterations in intracellular ATP that do not affect transmembrane AC-generated cAMP. In β cells of the pancreas, glucose metabolism generates ATP, which corresponds to an increase in cAMP, and we show here that sAC is responsible for an ATP-dependent cAMP increase. Glucose metabolism also elicits insulin secretion, and we further show that sAC is necessary for normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo.

  7. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor regulates human fetal lung development via CFTR.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah C; Wilkinson, William J; Tseng, Hsiu-Er; Finney, Brenda; Monk, Bethan; Dibble, Holly; Quilliam, Samantha; Warburton, David; Galietta, Luis J; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2016-02-25

    Optimal fetal lung growth requires anion-driven fluid secretion into the lumen of the developing organ. The fetus is hypercalcemic compared to the mother and here we show that in the developing human lung this hypercalcaemia acts on the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaSR, to promote fluid-driven lung expansion through activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. Several chloride channels including TMEM16, bestrophin, CFTR, CLCN2 and CLCA1, are also expressed in the developing human fetal lung at gestational stages when CaSR expression is maximal. Measurements of Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion in organ explant cultures show that pharmacological CaSR activation by calcimimetics stimulates lung fluid secretion through CFTR, an effect which in humans, but not mice, was also mimicked by fetal hypercalcemic conditions, demonstrating that the physiological relevance of such a mechanism appears to be species-specific. Calcimimetics promote CFTR opening by activating adenylate cyclase and we show that Ca(2+)-stimulated type I adenylate cyclase is expressed in the developing human lung. Together, these observations suggest that physiological fetal hypercalcemia, acting on the CaSR, promotes human fetal lung development via cAMP-dependent opening of CFTR. Disturbances in this process would be expected to permanently impact lung structure and might predispose to certain postnatal respiratory diseases.

  8. Rem-GTPase regulates cardiac myocyte L-type calcium current

    PubMed Central

    Magyar, Janos; Kiper, Carmen E.; Sievert, Gail; Cai, Weikang; Shi, Geng-Xian; Crump, Shawn M.; Li, Liren; Niederer, Steven; Smith, Nic; Andres, Douglas A.; Satin, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The L-type calcium channels (LTCC) are critical for maintaining Ca2+-homeostasis. In heterologous expression studies, the RGK-class of Ras-related G-proteins regulates LTCC function; however, the physiological relevance of RGK–LTCC interactions is untested. Objective: In this report we test the hypothesis that the RGK protein, Rem, modulates native Ca2+ current (ICa,L) via LTCC in murine cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results: Rem knockout mice (Rem−/−) were engineered, and ICa,L and Ca2+-handling properties were assessed. Rem−/− ventricular cardiomyocytes displayed increased ICa,L density. ICa,L activation was shifted positive on the voltage axis, and β-adrenergic stimulation normalized this shift compared with wild-type ICa,L. Current kinetics, steady-state inactivation, and facilitation was unaffected by Rem−/−. Cell shortening was not significantly different. Increased ICa,L density in the absence of frank phenotypic differences motivated us to explore putative compensatory mechanisms. Despite the larger ICa,L density, Rem−/− cardiomyocyte Ca2+ twitch transient amplitude was significantly less than that compared with wild type. Computer simulations and immunoblot analysis suggests that relative dephosphorylation of Rem−/− LTCC can account for the paradoxical decrease of Ca2+ transients. Conclusions: This is the first demonstration that loss of an RGK protein influences ICa,L in vivo in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22854599

  9. Regulation of calcium transport in the early life stages of an ancient fish, Acipenser fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Genz, Janet; Shute, Lauren; Anderson, W Gary

    2014-01-01

    The freshwater, cartilaginous lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) encounters its greatest calcium (Ca(2+)) demand in the early life stages. In this study we examined Ca(2+) regulation of lake sturgeon larvae reared at three levels of environmental [Ca(2+)]-0.1, 0.2, and 1.5 mmol L(-1)-from hatch until after the transition to exogenous feeding. Examination of skin, gill, and yolk sac with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the density and surface area of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) varies over developmental time but that availability of environmental Ca(2+) affected only MRC density. SEM results also demonstrated that Ca(2+) transport is adjusted in localization over the course of development, with the transition to primarily branchial uptake occurring earlier in the highest environmental [Ca(2+)]. Net whole-animal Ca(2+) flux was primarily dependent on influx rate. The increase in whole-body Ca(2+) uptake following the transition to exogenous feeding was greatest in larval lake sturgeon acclimated to low environmental [Ca(2+)], and it suggests that intestinal absorption may supplement enhanced branchial uptake in Ca(2+)-limited fish.

  10. Anomalies in Proposed Regulations for the Release of Redundant Material from Nuclear and Non-nuclear Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.

    2002-02-26

    Now that increasing numbers of nuclear power stations are reaching the end of their commercially useful lives, the management of the large quantities of very low level radioactive material that arises during their decommissioning has become a major subject of discussion, with very significant economic implications. Much of this material can, in an environmentally advantageous manner, be recycled for reuse without radiological restrictions. Much larger quantities--2-3 orders of magnitude larger--of material, radiologically similar to the candidate material for recycling from the nuclear industry, arise in non-nuclear industries like coal, fertilizer, oil and gas, mining, etc. In such industries, naturally occurring radioactivity is artificially concentrated in products, by-products or waste to form TENORM (Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material). It is only in the last decade that the international community has become aware of the prevalence of T ENORM, specially the activity levels and quantities arising in so many nonnuclear industries. The first reaction of international organizations seems to have been to propose ''double'' standards for the nuclear and non-nuclear industries, with very stringent release criteria for radioactive material from the regulated nuclear industry and up to a hundred times more liberal criteria for the release/exemption of TENORM from the as yet unregulated non-nuclear industries. There are, however, many significant strategic issues that need to be discussed and resolved. An interesting development, for both the nuclear and non-nuclear industries, is the increased scientific scrutiny that the populations of naturally high background dose level areas of the world are being subject to. Preliminary biological studies have indicated that the inhabitants of such areas, exposed to many times the permitted occupational doses for nuclear workers, have not shown any differences in cancer mortality, life expectancy

  11. Wnt11-R signaling regulates a calcium sensitive EMT event essential for dorsal fin development of Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Garriock, Robert J.; Krieg, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    In the frog embryo, a sub-population of trunk neural crest (NC) cells undergoes a dorsal route of migration to contribute to the mesenchyme in the core of the dorsal fin. Here we show that a second population of cells, originally located in the dorsomedial region of the somite, also contributes to the fin mesenchyme. We find that the frog orthologue of Wnt11 (Wnt11-R) is expressed in both the NC and somite cell populations that migrate into the fin matrix. Wnt11-R is expressed prior to migration and persists in the mesenchymal cells after they have distributed throughout the fin. Loss of function studies demonstrate that Wnt11-R activity is required for an epithelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT) event that precedes migration of cells into the fin matrix. In Wnt11-R depleted embryos, the absence of fin core cells leads to defective dorsal fin development and to collapse of the fin structure. Experiments using small molecule inhibitors indicate that dorsal migration of fin core cells depends on calcium signaling through calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). In Wnt11-R depleted embryos, normal migration of NC cells and dorsal somite cells into the fin and normal fin development can be rescued by stimulation of calcium release. These studies are consistent with a model in which Wnt11-R signaling, via a downstream calcium pathway, regulates fin cell migration and, more generally, indicates a role for non-canonical Wnt signaling in regulation of EMT. PMID:17240368

  12. Chondrocyte calcium signaling in response to fluid flow is regulated by matrix adhesion in 3-D alginate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Degala, Satish; Zipfel, Warren R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between chondrocytes and their surrounding extracellular matrix plays an important role in regulating cartilage metabolism in response to environmental cues. This study characterized the role of cell adhesion on the calcium signaling response of chondrocytes to fluid flow. Bovine chondrocytes were suspended in alginate hydrogels functionalized with RGD at concentrations of 0-400μM. The hydrogels were perfused and the calcium signaling response of the cells was measured over a range of fluid velocities from 0 to 68μm/s. Attachment to RGD-alginate doubled the sensitivity of chondrocytes to flows in the range of 8-13μm/s, but at higher fluid velocities, the contribution of cell adhesion to the observed calcium signaling response was no longer apparent. The enhanced sensitivity to flow was dependent on the density of RGD-ligand present in the scaffolds. The RGD-enhanced sensitivity to flow was completely inhibited by the addition of soluble RGD which acted as a competitive inhibitor. The results of this study indicate a role for matrix adhesion in regulating chondrocyte response to fluid flow through a calcium dependent mechanism.

  13. Inhibition of Calcium Influx Reduces Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Lipotoxic Pancreatic β-Cells via Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang; Wang, Heyao

    2015-01-01

    Lipotoxicity plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell failure during the development of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged exposure of β-cells to elevated free fatty acids level could cause deterioration of β-cell function and induce cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of fatty acids-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis might provide benefit for the therapy of type 2 diabetes. The present study examined whether regulation of fatty acids-triggered calcium influx could protect pancreatic β-cells from lipotoxicity. Two small molecule compounds, L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine and potassium channel activator diazoxide were used to inhibit palmitic acid-induced calcium influx. And whether the compounds could reduce palmitic acid-induced β-cell failure and the underlying mechanism were also investigated. It was found that both nifedipine and diazoxide protected MIN6 pancreatic β-cells and primary cultured murine islets from palmitic acid-induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, the impaired insulin secretion was also recovered to varying degrees by these two compounds. Our results verified that nifedipine and diazoxide could reduce palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress to generate protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. More importantly, it suggested that regulation of calcium influx by small molecule compounds might provide benefits for the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26147439

  14. An Unconventional Diacylglycerol Kinase That Regulates Phospholipid Synthesis and Nuclear Membrane Growth*♦

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gil-Soo; O'Hara, Laura; Carman, George M.; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2008-01-01

    Changes in nuclear size and shape during the cell cycle or during development require coordinated nuclear membrane remodeling, but the underlying molecular events are largely unknown. We have shown previously that the activity of the conserved phosphatidate phosphatase Pah1p/Smp2p regulates nuclear structure in yeast by controlling phospholipid synthesis and membrane biogenesis at the nuclear envelope. Two screens for novel regulators of phosphatidate led to the identification of DGK1. We show that Dgk1p is a unique diacylglycerol kinase that uses CTP, instead of ATP, to generate phosphatidate. DGK1 counteracts the activity of PAH1 at the nuclear envelope by controlling phosphatidate levels. Overexpression of DGK1 causes the appearance of phosphatidate-enriched membranes around the nucleus and leads to its expansion, without proliferating the cortical endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Mutations that decrease phosphatidate levels decrease nuclear membrane growth in pah1Δ cells. We propose that phosphatidate metabolism is a critical factor determining nuclear structure by regulating nuclear membrane biogenesis. PMID:18458075

  15. BKCa channel regulates calcium oscillations induced by alpha-2-macroglobulin in human myometrial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wakle-Prabagaran, Monali; Lorca, Ramón A.; Ma, Xiaofeng; Stamnes, Susan J.; Amazu, Chinwendu; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Hyrc, Krzysztof L.; Wright, Michael E.; England, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, voltage-gated, calcium (Ca2+)-activated potassium channel (BKCa) plays an important role in regulating Ca2+ signaling and is implicated in the maintenance of uterine quiescence during pregnancy. We used immunopurification and mass spectrometry to identify proteins that interact with BKCa in myometrium samples from term pregnant (≥37 wk gestation) women. From this screen, we identified alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2M). We then used immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot and the proximity ligation assay to confirm the interaction between BKCa and both α2M and its receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), in cultured primary human myometrial smooth muscle cells (hMSMCs). Single-channel electrophysiological recordings in the cell-attached configuration demonstrated that activated α2M (α2M*) increased the open probability of BKCa in an oscillatory pattern in hMSMCs. Furthermore, α2M* caused intracellular levels of Ca2+ to oscillate in oxytocin-primed hMSMCs. The initiation of oscillations required an interaction between α2M* and LRP1. By using Ca2+-free medium and inhibitors of various Ca2+ signaling pathways, we demonstrated that the oscillations required entry of extracellular Ca2+ through store-operated Ca2+ channels. Finally, we found that the specific BKCa blocker paxilline inhibited the oscillations, whereas the channel opener NS11021 increased the rate of these oscillations. These data demonstrate that α2M* and LRP1 modulate the BKCa channel in human myometrium and that BKCa and its immunomodulatory interacting partners regulate Ca2+ dynamics in hMSMCs during pregnancy. PMID:27044074

  16. High Glucose Enhances Isoflurane-Induced Neurotoxicity by Regulating TRPC-Dependent Calcium Influx.

    PubMed

    Liu, ZhongJie; Ma, ChangQing; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, QingGuo; Xu, Rui; Zhang, HongFei; Lei, HongYi; Xu, ShiYuan

    2017-01-06

    Isoflurane is a commonly used inhalational anesthetic that can induce neurotoxicity via elevating cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)). High glucose regulates the expression of a family of non-selective cation channels termed transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels that may contribute to Ca(2+) influx. In the present study, we investigated whether high glucose enhances isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity by regulating TRPC-dependent Ca(2+) influx. First, we evaluated toxic damage in mice primary cultured hippocampal neurons and human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cells) after hyperglycemia and isoflurane exposure. Next, we investigated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, TRPC mRNA expression levels and tested the effect of the TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cells treated with high glucose or/and isoflurane. Finally, we employed knocked down TRPC6 to demonstrate the role of TRPC in high glucose-mediated enhancement of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that high glucose could enhance isoflurane-induecd toxic damage in primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose enhanced the isoflurane-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) in SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose elevated TRPC mRNA expression, especially that of TRPC6. SKF96365 and knock down of TRPC6 were able to inhibit the high glucose-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) and decrease isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells cultured with high glucose. Our findings indicate that high glucose could elevate TRPC expression, thus increasing Ca(2+) influx and enhancing isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase activity is regulated by actin oligomers through direct interaction.

    PubMed

    Dalghi, Marianela G; Fernández, Marisa M; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Strehler, Emanuel E; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2013-08-09

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca(2+) with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[(125)I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca(2+) and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  18. Retinoic Acid Regulates Calcium Signaling to Promote Mouse Ovarian Granulosa Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Demczuk, Michael; Huang, Huiya; White, Carl; Kipp, Jingjing L

    2016-09-01

    Normal development of ovarian follicles is critical for female reproduction and endocrine function. We have identified retinoic acid (RA) and the RA-degrading enzyme CYP26B1 as regulators of ovarian follicle development and showed that RA and a CYP26 inhibitor stimulated ovarian granulosa cell proliferation. The mechanism underpinning RA-dependent proliferation, however, is not known. The current study was designed to examine the role of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling in mediating the effects of RA on primary mouse granulosa cell proliferation. In single-cell Ca(2+) imaging experiments, treatment of cultured granulosa cells with RA increased the steady-state Ca(2+) content of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores. This correlated with increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and enhanced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-dependent Ca(2+) release. In proliferation assays, RA treatment or Cyp26b1 knockdown stimulated proliferation, whereas Cyp26b1 overexpression inhibited proliferation. When RA was given together with 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2-APB), a blocker of IP3R-dependent ER Ca(2+) release and SOCE, with xestospongin C, a selective IP3R- receptor antagonist, or with 3,5-bis (trifluoromethyl)pyrazole (BTP-2), a specific SOCE blocker, the stimulatory effect of RA on cell proliferation was abolished. Further investigation showed that treatment with 2-APB or BTP-2 inhibited RA induction of RA response element (RARE) activation in granulosa cells, confirming an important role for Ca(2+) signaling in mediating RA actions. Overall, these data support a model in which RA regulates ovarian follicle development by stimulating granulosa cell proliferation and that this stimulatory effect is at least in part driven by the modulation of Ca(2+) signaling.

  19. TgCDPK3 Regulates Calcium-Dependent Egress of Toxoplasma gondii from Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, James M.; Whitehead, Lachlan; van Dooren, Giel G.; Tonkin, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa comprises a group of obligate intracellular parasites of broad medical and agricultural significance, including Toxoplasma gondii and the malaria-causing Plasmodium spp. Key to their parasitic lifestyle is the need to egress from an infected cell, actively move through tissue, and reinvade another cell, thus perpetuating infection. Ca2+-mediated signaling events modulate key steps required for host cell egress, invasion and motility, including secretion of microneme organelles and activation of the force-generating actomyosin-based motor. Here we show that a plant-like Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase (CDPK) in T. gondii, TgCDPK3, which localizes to the inner side of the plasma membrane, is not essential to the parasite but is required for optimal in vitro growth. We demonstrate that TgCDPK3, the orthologue of Plasmodium PfCDPK1, regulates Ca2+ ionophore- and DTT-induced host cell egress, but not motility or invasion. Furthermore, we show that targeting to the inner side of the plasma membrane by dual acylation is required for its activity. Interestingly, TgCDPK3 regulates microneme secretion when parasites are intracellular but not extracellular. Indeed, the requirement for TgCDPK3 is most likely determined by the high K+ concentration of the host cell. Our results therefore suggest that TgCDPK3's role differs from that previously hypothesized, and rather support a model where this kinase plays a role in rapidly responding to Ca2+ signaling in specific ionic environments to upregulate multiple processes required for gliding motility. PMID:23226109

  20. Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase Activity Is Regulated by Actin Oligomers through Direct Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Dalghi, Marianela G.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2013-01-01

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca2+ with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca2+-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca2+ and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:23803603

  1. Calcium regulation of HCN channels supports persistent activity in a multiscale model of neocortex.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, S A; McDougal, R A; Bulanova, A S; Zeki, M; Lakatos, P; Terman, D; Hines, M L; Lytton, W W

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. The network contained 776 compartmental neurons arranged in the cortical layers, connected using synapses containing AMPA/NMDA/GABAA/GABAB receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) produced inositol triphosphate (IP3) which caused the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores, with reuptake by sarco/ER Ca(2+)-ATP-ase pumps (SERCA), and influence on HCN channels. Stimulus-induced depolarization led to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). After a delay, mGluR activation led to ER Ca(2+) release via IP3 receptors. These factors increased HCN channel conductance and produced firing lasting for ∼1min. The model displayed inter-scale synergies among synaptic weights, excitation/inhibition balance, firing rates, membrane depolarization, Ca(2+) levels, regulation of HCN channels, and induction of persistent activity. The interaction between inhibition and Ca(2+) at the HCN channel nexus determined a limited range of inhibition strengths for which intracellular Ca(2+) could prepare population-specific persistent activity. Interactions between metabotropic and ionotropic inputs to the neuron demonstrated how multiple pathways could contribute in a complementary manner to persistent activity. Such redundancy and complementarity via multiple pathways is a critical feature of biological systems. Mediation of activation at different time scales, and through different pathways, would be expected to protect against disruption, in

  2. Regulation of the Drosophila hypoxia-inducible factor alpha Sima by CRM1-dependent nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Romero, Nuria M; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Roth, Peggy; Cauerhff, Ana; Samakovlis, Christos; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-05-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-alpha) proteins are regulated by oxygen levels through several different mechanisms that include protein stability, transcriptional coactivator recruitment, and subcellular localization. It was previously reported that these transcription factors are mainly nuclear in hypoxia and cytoplasmic in normoxia, but so far the molecular basis of this regulation is unclear. We show here that the Drosophila melanogaster HIF-alpha protein Sima shuttles continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We identified the relevant nuclear localization signal and two functional nuclear export signals (NESs). These NESs are in the Sima basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and promote CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Site-directed mutagenesis of either NES provoked Sima nuclear retention and increased transcriptional activity, suggesting that nuclear export contributes to Sima regulation. The identified NESs are conserved and probably functional in the bHLH domains of several bHLH-PAS proteins. We propose that rapid nuclear export of Sima regulates the duration of cellular responses to hypoxia.

  3. Ultrasound enhances calcium absorption of jujube fruit by regulating the cellular calcium distribution and metabolism of cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Huanhuan; Liu, Qiqi; Xu, Juan; Dong, Yu; Liu, Mengpei; Zong, Wei

    2017-04-26

    Ultrasound has been applied in fruit pre-washing processes. However, it is not sufficient to protect fruit from pathogenic infection throughout the entire storage period, and sometimes ultrasound causes tissue damage. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of calcium chloride (CaCl2 , 10 g L(-1) ) and ultrasound (350 W at 40 kHz), separately and in combination, on jujube fruit quality, antioxidant status, tissue Ca(2+) content and distribution along with cell wall metabolism at 20 °C for 6 days. All three treatments significantly maintained fruit firmness and peel color, reduced respiration rate, decay incidence, superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde and preserved higher enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbic acid and glutathione) antioxidants compared with the control. Moreover, the combined treatment was more effective in increasing tissue Ca(2+) content and distribution, inhibiting the generation of water-soluble and CDTA-soluble pectin fractions, delaying the solubilization of Na2 CO3 -soluble pectin and having lower activities of cell wall-modifying enzymes (polygalacturonase and pectate lyase) during storage. These results demonstrated that the combination of CaCl2 and ultrasound has potential commercial application to extend the shelf life of jujube fruit by facilitating Ca(2+) absorption and stabilizing the cell wall structure. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Regulating by the Numbers: Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Nuclear Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Elizabeth; Wildavsky, Aaron

    1988-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment has been promoted within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a means of judging risk to the public and of determining regulatory measures. Interviews with engineers and other technically trained personnel reveal the difficulties created by expectations that this form of assessment should be applied. (TJH)

  5. Regulating by the Numbers: Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Nuclear Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Elizabeth; Wildavsky, Aaron

    1988-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment has been promoted within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a means of judging risk to the public and of determining regulatory measures. Interviews with engineers and other technically trained personnel reveal the difficulties created by expectations that this form of assessment should be applied. (TJH)

  6. Regulation of nuclear reactors by duplexed control rods; Linearized analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, N.H.S. ); Diab, H.B. )

    1991-10-01

    In this paper the dynamic behavior of a duplex control rod for a nuclear reactor is analyzed by linearized modeling. A simulation-aided design for this duplex, which has performance and safety characteristics that are improved over those of conventional single control rods with the same stability margins, is reported.

  7. Reg