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Sample records for calcium transients delayed

  1. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, John C.; Jackson, Joshua G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mitochondria have been localized to astrocytic processes where they shape Ca2+ signaling; this relationship has not been examined in models of ischemia/reperfusion. We biolistically transfected astrocytes in rat hippocampal slice cultures to facilitate fluorescent confocal microscopy, and subjected these slices to transient oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) that causes delayed excitotoxic death of CA1 pyramidal neurons. This insult caused a delayed loss of mitochondria from astrocytic processes and increased colocalization of mitochondria with the autophagosome marker LC3B. The losses of neurons in area CA1 and mitochondria in astrocytic processes were blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists, tetrodotoxin, ziconotide (Ca2+ channel blocker), two inhibitors of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange (KB-R7943, YM-244769), or two inhibitors of calcineurin (cyclosporin-A, FK506). The effects of OGD were mimicked by NMDA. The glutamate uptake inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-l-aspartate increased neuronal loss after OGD or NMDA, and blocked the loss of astrocytic mitochondria. Exogenous glutamate in the presence of iGluR antagonists caused a loss of mitochondria without a decrease in neurons in area CA1. Using the genetic Ca2+ indicator Lck-GCaMP-6S, we observed two types of Ca2+ signals: (1) in the cytoplasm surrounding mitochondria (mitochondrially centered) and (2) traversing the space between mitochondria (extramitochondrial). The spatial spread, kinetics, and frequency of these events were different. The amplitude of both types was doubled and the spread of both types changed by ∼2-fold 24 h after OGD. Together, these data suggest that pathologic activation of glutamate transport and increased astrocytic Ca2+ through reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange triggers mitochondrial loss and dramatic increases in Ca2+ signaling in astrocytic processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the

  2. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2005-07-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium oscillations in vivo (10-20/h). The expression of calcium transients is up regulated during pupal development. Although the ability to generate transients is a property intrinsic to Kenyon cells, transients can be modulated by bath application of nicotine and GABA. Calcium transients are blocked, and baseline calcium levels reduced, by removal of external calcium, addition of cobalt, or addition of Plectreurys toxin (PLTX), an insect-specific calcium channel antagonist. Transients do not require calcium release from intracellular stores. Whole cell recordings reveal that the majority of voltage-gated calcium channels in Kenyon cells are PLTX-sensitive. Together these data show that influx of calcium through PLTX-sensitive voltage-gated calcium channels mediates spontaneous calcium transients and regulates basal calcium levels in cultured Kenyon cells. The data also suggest that these calcium transients represent cellular events underlying calcium oscillations in the intact mushroom bodies. However, spontaneous calcium transients are not unique to Kenyon cells as they are present in approximately 60% of all cultured central brain neurons. This suggests the calcium transients play a more general role in maturation or function of adult brain neurons.

  3. TRANSIENT AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE IN FORMING ENAMEL

    PubMed Central

    Beniash, Elia; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Lam, Raymond S.K.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, begins as a three-dimensional network of nanometer size mineral particles, suspended in a protein gel. This mineral network serves as a template for mature enamel formation. To further understand the mechanisms of enamel formation we characterized the forming enamel mineral at an early secretory stage using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectromicroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR microspectroscopy and polarized light microscopy. We show that the newly formed enamel mineral is amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), which eventually transforms into apatitic crystals. Interestingly, the size, shape and spatial organization of these amorphous mineral particles and older crystals are essentially the same, indicating that the mineral morphology and organization in enamel is determined prior to its crystallization. Mineralization via transient amorphous phases has been previously reported in chiton teeth, mollusk shells, echinoderm spicules and spines, and recent reports strongly suggest the presence transient amorphous mineral in forming vertebrate bones. The present finding of transient ACP in murine tooth enamel suggests that this strategy might be universal. PMID:19217943

  4. Calcium transients and calcium release in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J; Schneider, M F

    1993-01-01

    1. Calcium transients were recorded from cut segments of fast-twitch rat skeletal muscle fibres stretched to 3.7-4.0 microns per sarcomere and voltage clamped at a holding potential of -80 mV using the double Vaseline-gap technique. Calcium transients were monitored simultaneously with the two calcium indicators antipyrylazo III (AP III) and fura-2. AP III was used to record the calcium changes in response to 10-200 ms depolarizing pulses to different membrane potentials while fura-2 monitored the slow decay of the transient (during 16-20 s) and the resting calcium concentration. Experiments were performed at 14-17 degrees C. 2. For 50-100 ms depolarizing pulses calcium transients were first detected between -30 and -20 mV in a total of twenty-one fibres. The transients recorded with AP III showed a plateau for small pulses (-20 mV) and a steady increase during stronger pulses (-10 mV and more positive). Upon repolarization the transients decayed towards the baseline. The signal recorded simultaneously with fura-2 showed a continuous increase of the transient during the pulses at all membrane potentials. The amplitude of the calcium transients for the large pulses could not be followed with fura-2 due to saturation of the dye. 3. The signals obtained with both dyes were used to determine the kinetics of the calcium-fura-2 reaction inside the fibres. The mean values of the kinetic parameters were: the on rate constant (kon) = 5.1 x 10(8) M-1s-1, the off rate constant (koff) = 26 s-1, and koff/kon (KD) = 69.7 nM. 4. The fast phase of decay of the calcium transients after the pulses was studied from the records obtained with AP III. For depolarizing pulses of the same duration, the rate of decay of the transients after the pulse was slower the stronger the depolarization. For pulses to the same membrane potential, the rate of decay was slower the longer the pulse duration. Both stimulating patterns indicated saturation of the removal system in the muscle fibres due to

  5. CALCIUM-RICH GAP TRANSIENTS: SOLVING THE CALCIUM CONUNDRUM IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Mulchaey, John S.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2014-01-10

    X-ray measurements suggest that the abundance of calcium in the intracluster medium is higher than can be explained using favored models for core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae alone. We investigate whether the ''calcium conundrum'' in the intracluster medium can be alleviated by including a contribution from the recently discovered subclass of supernovae known as calcium-rich gap transients. Although the calcium-rich gap transients make up only a small fraction of all supernovae events, we find that their high calcium yields are sufficient to reproduce the X-ray measurements found for nearby rich clusters. We find the χ{sup 2} goodness-of-fit metric improves from 84 to 2 by including this new class. Moreover, calcium-rich supernovae preferentially occur in the outskirts of galaxies making it easier for the nucleosynthesis products of these events to be incorporated in the intracluster medium via ram-pressure stripping. The discovery of calcium-rich gap transients in clusters and groups far from any individual galaxy suggests that supernovae associated with intracluster stars may play an important role in enriching the intracluster medium. Calcium-rich gap transients may also help explain anomalous calcium abundances in many other astrophysical systems including individual stars in the Milky Way, the halos of nearby galaxies, and the circumgalactic medium. Our work highlights the importance of considering the diversity of supernovae types and corresponding yields when modeling the abundance of the intracluster medium and other gas reservoirs.

  6. Delayed, transient, postsolar truncal pruritus: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Salako, K B; Anstey, A A; Logan, R A

    2014-08-01

    We present two cases of a rare clinical condition presenting as a delayed and transient pruritus of the trunk following sun exposure. These cases differ from previously reported conditions such as brachioradial pruritus because of the transient nature and anatomical location of the itching. These two cases extend the clinical spectrum of sun-induced pruritus. The patients' initial response to rigorous sun protection is good, but the specific treatment and natural history of the condition have yet to be determined.

  7. Numerical methods to determine calcium release flux from calcium transients in muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Timmer, J; Müller, T; Melzer, W

    1998-01-01

    Several methods are currently in use to estimate the rate of depolarization-induced calcium release in muscle cells from measured calcium transients. One approach first characterizes calcium removal of the cell. This is done by determining parameters of a reaction scheme from a fit to the decay of elevated calcium after the depolarizing stimulus. In a second step, the release rate during depolarization is estimated based on the fitted model. Using simulated calcium transients with known underlying release rates, we tested the fidelity of this analysis in determining the time course of calcium release under different conditions. The analysis reproduced in a satisfactory way the characteristics of the input release rate, even when the assumption that release had ended before the start of the fitting interval was severely violated. Equally good reconstructions of the release rate time course could be obtained when the model used for the analysis differed in structure from the one used for simulating the data. We tested the application of a new strategy (multiple shooting) for fitting parameters in nonlinear differential equation systems. This procedure rendered the analysis less sensitive to ill-chosen initial guesses of the parameters and to noise. A locally adaptive kernel estimator for calculating numerical derivatives allowed good reconstructions of the original release rate time course from noisy calcium transients when other methods failed. PMID:9545033

  8. Transient response of the calcium homeostatic system of the conscious pig to bolus calcium injections.

    PubMed

    Járos, G G; Maier, H; Podzuweit, T; von Gülich, M; Schindler, J G

    1982-07-01

    Calcium injection in the pig elicits a fast transient response which reinstates the calcium concentration to within normal limits between 30 and 40 min after injection. Although the fate of the calcium that disappeared is not known, the present experiments eliminate the kidneys and the bone remodeling cells as the main short-term regulators. The fast response is independent of parathyroid hormone but is greatly dependent of calcitonin. Further experiments are being performed to discover the nature and site of the regulating mechanisms.

  9. Analysis of spontaneous and nerve-evoked calcium transients in intact extraocular muscles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Hennig, Grant W; Corrigan, Robert D; Smith, Terence K; von Bartheld, Christopher S

    2012-07-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) have unique calcium handling properties, yet little is known about the dynamics of calcium events underlying ultrafast and tonic contractions in myofibers of intact EOMs. Superior oblique EOMs of juvenile chickens were dissected with their nerve attached, maintained in oxygenated Krebs buffer, and loaded with fluo-4. Spontaneous and nerve stimulation-evoked calcium transients were recorded and, following calcium imaging, some EOMs were double-labeled with rhodamine-conjugated alpha-bungarotoxin (rhBTX) to identify EOM myofiber types. EOMs showed two main types of spontaneous calcium transients, one slow type (calcium waves with 1/2(max) duration of 2-12 s, velocity of 25-50 μm/s) and two fast "flash-like" types (Type 1, 30-90 ms; Type 2, 90-150 ms 1/2(max) duration). Single pulse nerve stimulation evoked fast calcium transients identical to the fast (Type 1) calcium transients. Calcium waves were accompanied by a local myofiber contraction that followed the calcium transient wavefront. The magnitude of calcium-wave induced myofiber contraction far exceeded those of movement induced by nerve stimulation and associated fast calcium transients. Tetrodotoxin eliminated nerve-evoked transients, but not spontaneous transients. Alpha-bungarotoxin eliminated both spontaneous and nerve-evoked fast calcium transients, but not calcium waves, and caffeine increased wave activity. Calcium waves were observed in myofibers lacking spontaneous or evoked fast transients, suggestive of multiply-innervated myofibers, and this was confirmed by double-labeling with rhBTX. We propose that the abundant spontaneous calcium transients and calcium waves with localized contractions that do not depend on innervation may contribute to intrinsic generation of tonic functions of EOMs.

  10. Analysis of Spontaneous and Nerve-Evoked Calcium Transients in Intact Extraocular Muscles in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Hennig, Grant W.; Corrigan, Robert D.; Smith, Terence K.; von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) have unique calcium handling properties, yet little is known about the dynamics of calcium events underlying ultrafast and tonic contractions in myofibers of intact EOMs. Superior oblique EOMs of juvenile chickens were dissected with their nerve attached, maintained in oxygenated Krebs buffer, and loaded with fluo-4. Spontaneous and nerve stimulation-evoked calcium transients were recorded and, following calcium imaging, some EOMs were double-labeled with rhodamine-conjugated alpha-bungarotoxin (rhBTX) to identify EOM myofiber types. EOMs showed two main types of spontaneous calcium transients, one slow type (calcium waves with 1/2max duration of 2–12 s, velocity of 25–50 μm/s) and two fast “flash-like” types (Type 1, 30–90 ms; Type 2, 90–150 ms 1/2max duration). Single pulse nerve stimulation evoked fast calcium transients identical to the fast (Type 1) calcium transients. Calcium waves were accompanied by a local myofiber contraction that followed the calcium transient wavefront. The magnitude of calcium-wave induced myofiber contraction far exceeded those of movement induced by nerve stimulation and associated fast calcium transients. Tetrodotoxin eliminated nerve-evoked transients, but not spontaneous transients. Alpha-bungarotoxin eliminated both spontaneous and nerve-evoked fast calcium transients, but not calcium waves, and caffeine increased wave activity. Calcium waves were observed in myofibers lacking spontaneous or evoked fast transients, suggestive of multiply-innervated myofibers, and this was confirmed by double-labeling with rhBTX. We propose that the abundant spontaneous calcium transients and calcium waves with localized contractions that do not depend on innervation may contribute to intrinsic generation of tonic functions of EOMs. PMID:22579493

  11. High bandwidth optical coherent transient true-time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Randy Ray

    An approach to reaching high bandwidth optical coherent transient (OCT) true-time delay (TTD) is described and demonstrated in this thesis. Utilizing the stimulated photon echo process in rare-earth ion doped crystals, such as Tm3+:YAG, TTD of optical signals with bandwidths >20 GHz and high time bandwidth products >104 are possible. TTD regenerators using OCT's have been demonstrated at low bandwidths (<40 MHz) showing picosecond delay resolutions with microsecond delays. With the advent of high bandwidth chirped lasers and high bandwidth electro-optic phase modulators, OCT TTD of broadband optical signals is now possible in the multi-gigahertz regime. To achieve this goal, several theoretical and technical aspects had to be explored. Theoretical discussions and numerical simulations are given using the Maxwell-Bloch equations with arbitrary phase. These simulations show good signal fidelity and high (60%) power efficiencies on echoes produced from gratings programmed with linear frequency chirps. New approaches for programming spectral gratings were also examined that utilized high bandwidth electro-optic modulators. In this technique, the phase modulation sidebands on an optical carrier are linearly chirped, creating an analog to the common linear frequency chirp. This approach allows multi-gigahertz true-time delay spectral grating programming. These new programming approaches are examined and characterized, both through simulation and experiment. A high bandwidth injection locked amplifier, based on semiconductor diode lasers, had to be developed and characterized to boost optical powers from both electro-optic phase modulators as well as chirped lasers. The injection locking system in conjunction with acousto-optic modulators were used in high bandwidth TTD demonstrations in Tm3+:YAG. Ultimately, high bandwidth binary phase shift keyed probe pulses were used in a demonstration of broadband true-time delay at a data rate of 1 GBit/s. The techniques, theory

  12. An Analysis of the Transient Responses of Acoustic Delay Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Tatsuo; Tominaga, Goroh

    1981-09-01

    Transient responses of acoustic delay lines (ADLs) were simulated on the assumptions that gas molecules in each segment of an ADL were in thermal equilibrium and that the straight-through component in the intruding gas was negligibly small. The flow rate of gas through an orifice was evaluated by using expressions of orifice conductance applicable in a wide pressure range. In order to examine the adequateness of the present method, the results of simulations were compared with several experimental data. The influence of the location of vacuum pumps and of arranging a high speed shutter at the entrance of an ADL were also simulated.

  13. Calcium and Potassium Channels in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Transient Global Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Marcel A.; Dibué, Maxine; Schneider, Toni; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Healthy cerebrovascular myocytes express members of several different ion channel families which regulate resting membrane potential, vascular diameter, and vascular tone and are involved in cerebral autoregulation. In animal models, in response to subarachnoid blood, a dynamic transition of ion channel expression and function is initiated, with acute and long-term effects differing from each other. Initial hypoperfusion after exposure of cerebral vessels to oxyhemoglobin correlates with a suppression of voltage-gated potassium channel activity, whereas delayed cerebral vasospasm involves changes in other potassium channel and voltage-gated calcium channels expression and function. Furthermore, expression patterns and function of ion channels appear to differ between main and small peripheral vessels, which may be key in understanding mechanisms behind subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vasospasm. Here, changes in calcium and potassium channel expression and function in animal models of subarachnoid hemorrhage and transient global ischemia are systematically reviewed and their clinical significance discussed. PMID:23251831

  14. Decreasing motion artifacts in calcium-dependent fluorescence transients from the perfused mouse heart using frequency filtering.

    PubMed

    Du, Congwu; Pan, Yingtian; MacGowan, Guy A; Koretsky, Alan P

    2004-02-01

    A strategy has been developed for the removal of motion artifact and noise in calcium-dependent fluorescence transients from the perfused mouse heart using frequency filtering. An analytical model indicates that the spectral removal of motion artifacts is independent of the phase shift of the motion waveform in the frequency domain, and thus to the time shift (or delay) of motion in the time domain. This is based on the "shift theorem" of Fourier analysis, which avoids erroneous correction of motion artifact when using the motion signal obtained using reflectance from the heart. Several major steps are adopted to implement this model for elimination of motion as well as detection noise from the fluorescence transient signals from the calcium-sensitive probe Rhod-2. These include (1) extracting the fluorescence calcium transient signal from the raw data by using power spectrum density (PSD) in the frequency domain by subtracting the motion recorded using the reflectance of excitation light, (2) digitally filtering out the random noise using multiple bandpass filters centralized at harmonic frequencies of the transients, and (3) extracting high frequency noise with a Gaussian Kernel filter method. The processed signal of transients acquired with excessive motion artifact is comparable to transients acquired with minimal motion obtained by immobilizing the heart against the detection window, demonstrating the usefulness of this technique.

  15. [Transient brain ischemia: NMDA receptor modulation and delayed neuronal death].

    PubMed

    Benquet, Pascal; Gee, Christine E; Gerber, Urs

    2008-02-01

    Transient global ischemia induces delayed neuronal death in certain cell types and brain regions while sparing cells in other areas. A key process through which oxygen-glucose deprivation triggers cell death is the excessive accumulation of the neurotransmitter glutamate leading to over excitation of neurons. In certain neurons this increase in glutamate will potentiate the NMDA type of glutamate receptor, which can then initiate cell death. This review provides an update of the neurophysiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing post-ischemic plasticity of NMDA receptors, focusing on the sensitive CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus as compared to the relatively resistant neighboring CA3 neurons. Both a change in the equilibrium between protein tyrosine kinases/phosphatases and an increased density of surface NMDA receptors in response to ischemia may explain the selective vulnerability of specific cell types. Implications for the treatment of stroke and reasons for the failures of human clinical trials utilizing NMDA receptor antagonists are also discussed.

  16. Super-transient scaling in time-delay autonomous Boolean network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Huys, Otti; Lohmann, Johannes; Haynes, Nicholas D.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous Boolean networks are commonly used to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks and allow for the prediction of stable dynamical attractors. However, most models do not account for time delays along the network links and noise, which are crucial features of real biological systems. Concentrating on two paradigmatic motifs, the toggle switch and the repressilator, we develop an experimental testbed that explicitly includes both inter-node time delays and noise using digital logic elements on field-programmable gate arrays. We observe transients that last millions to billions of characteristic time scales and scale exponentially with the amount of time delays between nodes, a phenomenon known as super-transient scaling. We develop a hybrid model that includes time delays along network links and allows for stochastic variation in the delays. Using this model, we explain the observed super-transient scaling of both motifs and recreate the experimentally measured transient distributions.

  17. Super-transient scaling in time-delay autonomous Boolean network motifs.

    PubMed

    D'Huys, Otti; Lohmann, Johannes; Haynes, Nicholas D; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous Boolean networks are commonly used to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks and allow for the prediction of stable dynamical attractors. However, most models do not account for time delays along the network links and noise, which are crucial features of real biological systems. Concentrating on two paradigmatic motifs, the toggle switch and the repressilator, we develop an experimental testbed that explicitly includes both inter-node time delays and noise using digital logic elements on field-programmable gate arrays. We observe transients that last millions to billions of characteristic time scales and scale exponentially with the amount of time delays between nodes, a phenomenon known as super-transient scaling. We develop a hybrid model that includes time delays along network links and allows for stochastic variation in the delays. Using this model, we explain the observed super-transient scaling of both motifs and recreate the experimentally measured transient distributions.

  18. Quantum shutter transient solutions and the delay time for the {delta} potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Alberto; Garcia-Calderon, Gaston

    2003-07-01

    The analytical solution to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for tunneling using cutoff plane-wave initial conditions is in general given by the sum of two types of terms that exhibit a transient behavior. The time evolution of the probability density for the {delta} potential is compared with the free case to investigate in this case the role of these transient terms for the delay time. We find, by a dynamical calculation, that the delay time arises from the interference between these transient terms and we show that at very long times it goes into the phase delay time, given by the energy derivative of the phase of the transmission amplitude.

  19. Sound-evoked network calcium transients in mouse auditory cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grienberger, Christine; Adelsberger, Helmuth; Stroh, Albrecht; Milos, Ruxandra-Iulia; Garaschuk, Olga; Schierloh, Anja; Nelken, Israel; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-02-15

    Population calcium signals generated by the action potential activity of local clusters of neurons have been recorded in the auditory cortex of mice using an optical fibre-based approach. These network calcium transients (NCaTs) occurred spontaneously as well as in response to sound stimulation. Two-photon calcium imaging experiments suggest that neurons and neuropil contribute about equally to the NCaT. Sound-evoked calcium signals had two components: an early, fast increase in calcium concentration, which corresponds to the short-latency spiking responses observed in electrophysiological experiments, and a late, slow calcium transient which lasted for at least 1 s. The slow calcium transients evoked by sound were essentially identical to spontaneous NCaTs. Their sizes were dependent on the spontaneous activity level at sound onset, suggesting that spontaneous and sensory-evoked NCaTs excluded each other. When using pure tones as stimulus, the early evoked calcium transients were more narrowly tuned than the slow NCaTs. The slow NCaTs were correlated with global ‘up states' recorded with epidural potentials, and sound presented during an epidural ‘down state' triggered a calcium transient that was associated with an epidural ‘up state'. Essentially indistinguishable calcium transients were evoked by optogenetic activation of local clusters of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the auditory cortex, indicating that these neurons play an important role in the generation of the calcium signal. Taken together, our results identify sound-evoked slow NCaTs as an integral component of neuronal signalling in the mouse auditory cortex, reflecting the prolonged neuronal activity of local clusters of neurons that can be activated even by brief stimuli.

  20. Selective inhibition of sodium–calcium exchanger by SEA-0400 decreases early and delayed afterdepolarization in canine heart

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Zsolt A; Virág, László; Tóth, András; Biliczki, Péter; Acsai, Károly; Bányász, Tamás; Nánási, Péter; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András

    2004-01-01

    The sodium–calcium exchanger (NCX) was considered to play an important role in arrhythmogenesis under certain conditions such as heart failure or calcium overload. In the present study, the effect of SEA-0400, a selective inhibitor of the NCX, was investigated on early and delayed afterdepolarizations in canine ventricular papillary muscles and Purkinje fibres by applying conventional microelectrode techniques at 37°C. The amplitude of both early and delayed afterdepolarizations was markedly decreased by 1 μM SEA-0400 from 26.6±2.5 to 14.8±1.8 mV (n=9, P<0.05) and from 12.5±1.7 to 5.9±1.4 mV (n=3, P<0.05), respectively. In enzymatically isolated canine ventricular myocytes, SEA-0400 did not change significantly the L-type calcium current and the intracellular calcium transient, studied using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique and Fura-2 ratiometric fluorometry. It is concluded that, through the reduction of calcium overload, specific inhibition of the NCX current by SEA-0400 may abolish triggered arrhythmias. PMID:15504749

  1. Selective inhibition of sodium-calcium exchanger by SEA-0400 decreases early and delayed after depolarization in canine heart.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsolt A; Virág, László; Tóth, András; Biliczki, Péter; Acsai, Károly; Bányász, Tamás; Nánási, Péter; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András

    2004-12-01

    The sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) was considered to play an important role in arrhythmogenesis under certain conditions such as heart failure or calcium overload. In the present study, the effect of SEA-0400, a selective inhibitor of the NCX, was investigated on early and delayed afterdepolarizations in canine ventricular papillary muscles and Purkinje fibres by applying conventional microelectrode techniques at 37 degrees C. The amplitude of both early and delayed afterdepolarizations was markedly decreased by 1 microM SEA-0400 from 26.6+/-2.5 to 14.8+/-1.8 mV (n=9, P<0.05) and from 12.5+/-1.7 to 5.9+/-1.4 mV (n=3, P<0.05), respectively. In enzymatically isolated canine ventricular myocytes, SEA-0400 did not change significantly the L-type calcium current and the intracellular calcium transient, studied using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique and Fura-2 ratiometric fluorometry. It is concluded that, through the reduction of calcium overload, specific inhibition of the NCX current by SEA-0400 may abolish triggered arrhythmias.

  2. Sub-Surface Excavation of Transient Craters in Porous Targets: Explaining the Impact Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, T. J.; Melosh, H. J.

    2012-03-01

    We numerically investigate the subsurface excavation of the transient crater in the earliest moments after the Deep Impact event. At high target porosities the crater remains hidden from observation long enough to explain the "impact delay."

  3. Voltage and calcium transients in basal dendrites of the rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Milojkovic, Bogdan A; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Antic, Srdjan D

    2007-01-01

    Higher cortical functions (perception, cognition, learning and memory) are in large part based on the integration of electrical and calcium signals that takes place in thin dendritic branches of neocortical pyramidal cells (synaptic integration). The mechanisms underlying the synaptic integration in thin basal dendrites are largely unexplored. We use a recently developed technique, multisite voltage–calcium imaging, to compare voltage and calcium transients from multiple locations along individual dendritic branches. Our results reveal characteristic electrical transients (plateau potentials) that trigger and shape dendritic calcium dynamics and calcium distribution during suprathreshold glutamatergic synaptic input. We regularly observed three classes of voltage–calcium interactions occurring simultaneously in three different zones of the same dendritic branch: (1) proximal to the input site, (2) at the input site, and (3) distal to the input site. One hundred micrometers away from the synaptic input site, both proximally and distally, dendritic calcium transients are in tight temporal correlation with the dendritic plateau potential. However, on the same dendrite, at the location of excitatory input, calcium transients outlast local dendritic plateau potentials by severalfold. These Ca2+ plateaus (duration 0.5–2 s) are spatially restricted to the synaptic input site, where they cause a brief down-regulation of dendritic excitability. Ca2+ plateaus are not mediated by Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, but rather by an NMDA-dependent small-amplitude depolarization, which persists after the collapse of the dendritic plateau potential. These unique features of dendritic voltage and calcium distributions may provide distinct zones for simultaneous long-term (bidirectional) modulation of synaptic contacts along the same basal branch. PMID:17932150

  4. Calcium transients in developing mouse skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Capote, Joana; Bolaños, Pura; Schuhmeier, Ralph Peter; Melzer, Werner; Caputo, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    Ca2+ transients elicited by action potentials were measured using MagFluo-4, at 20–22°C, in intact muscle fibres enzymatically dissociated from mice of different ages (7, 10, 15 and 42 days). The rise time of the transient (time from 10 to 90% of the peak) was 2.4 and 1.1 ms in fibres of 7- and 42-day-old mice, respectively. The decay of the transient was described by a double exponential function, with time constants of 1.8 and 16.4 ms in adult, and of 4.6 and 105 ms in 7-day-old animals. The fractional recovery of the transient peak amplitude after 10 ms, F2(10)/F1, determined using twin pulses, was 0.53 for adult fibres and ranged between 0.03 and 0.60 in fibres of 7-day-old animals This large variance may indicate differences in the extent of inactivation of Ca2+ release, possibly related to the difference in ryanodine receptor composition between young and old fibres. At the 7 and 10 day stages, fibres responded to Ca2+-free solutions with a larger decrease in the transient peak amplitude (25%versus 11% in adult fibres), possibly indicating a contribution of Ca2+ influx to the Ca2+ transient in younger animals. Cyclopiazonic acid (1 μm), an inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-ATPase, abolished the Ca2+ transient decay in fibres of 7- and 10-day-old animals and significantly reduced its rate in older animals. Analysis of the transients with a Ca2+ removal model showed that the results are consistent with a larger relative contribution of the SR Ca2+ pump and a lower expression of myoplasmic Ca2+ buffers in fibres of young versus old animals. PMID:15731192

  5. Transient dynamics and their control in time-delay autonomous Boolean ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Johannes; D'Huys, Otti; Haynes, Nicholas D.; Schöll, Eckehard; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical systems with switch-like interactions, such as gene regulatory networks, are well modeled by autonomous Boolean networks. Specifically, the topology and logic of gene interactions can be described by systems of continuous piecewise-linear differential equations, enabling analytical predictions of the dynamics of specific networks. However, most models do not account for time delays along links associated with spatial transport, mRNA transcription, and translation. To address this issue, we have developed an experimental test bed to realize a time-delay autonomous Boolean network with three inhibitory nodes, known as a repressilator, and use it to study the dynamics that arise as time delays along the links vary. We observe various nearly periodic oscillatory transient patterns with extremely long lifetime, which emerge in small network motifs due to the delay, and which are distinct from the eventual asymptotically stable periodic attractors. For repeated experiments with a given network, we find that stochastic processes give rise to a broad distribution of transient times with an exponential tail. In some cases, the transients are so long that it is doubtful the attractors will ever be approached in a biological system that has a finite lifetime. To counteract the long transients, we show experimentally that small, occasional perturbations applied to the time delays can force the trajectories to rapidly approach the attractors.

  6. Transient dynamics and their control in time-delay autonomous Boolean ring networks.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Johannes; D'Huys, Otti; Haynes, Nicholas D; Schöll, Eckehard; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical systems with switch-like interactions, such as gene regulatory networks, are well modeled by autonomous Boolean networks. Specifically, the topology and logic of gene interactions can be described by systems of continuous piecewise-linear differential equations, enabling analytical predictions of the dynamics of specific networks. However, most models do not account for time delays along links associated with spatial transport, mRNA transcription, and translation. To address this issue, we have developed an experimental test bed to realize a time-delay autonomous Boolean network with three inhibitory nodes, known as a repressilator, and use it to study the dynamics that arise as time delays along the links vary. We observe various nearly periodic oscillatory transient patterns with extremely long lifetime, which emerge in small network motifs due to the delay, and which are distinct from the eventual asymptotically stable periodic attractors. For repeated experiments with a given network, we find that stochastic processes give rise to a broad distribution of transient times with an exponential tail. In some cases, the transients are so long that it is doubtful the attractors will ever be approached in a biological system that has a finite lifetime. To counteract the long transients, we show experimentally that small, occasional perturbations applied to the time delays can force the trajectories to rapidly approach the attractors.

  7. Diffuse dispersive delay and the time convolution/attenuation of transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittner, Burt J.

    1991-01-01

    Test data and analytic evaluations are presented to show that relatively poor 100 KHz shielding of 12 Db can effectively provide an electromagnetic pulse transient reduction of 100 Db. More importantly, several techniques are shown for lightning surge attenuation as an alternative to crowbar, spark gap, or power zener type clipping which simply reflects the surge. A time delay test method is shown which allows CW testing, along with a convolution program to define transient shielding effectivity where the Fourier phase characteristics of the transient are known or can be broadly estimated.

  8. Computational reconstitution of spine calcium transients from individual proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bartol, Thomas M.; Keller, Daniel X.; Kinney, Justin P.; Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Harris, Kristen M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    We have built a stochastic model in the program MCell that simulates Ca2+ transients in spines from the principal molecular components believed to control Ca2+ entry and exit. Proteins, with their kinetic models, are located within two segments of dendrites containing 88 intact spines, centered in a fully reconstructed 6 × 6 × 5 μm3 cube of hippocampal neuropil. Protein components include AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, L- and R-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases, smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases, immobile Ca2+ buffers, and calbindin. Kinetic models for each protein were taken from published studies of the isolated proteins in vitro. For simulation of electrical stimuli, the time course of voltage changes in the dendritic spine was generated with the desired stimulus in the program NEURON. Voltage-dependent parameters were then continuously re-adjusted during simulations in MCell to reproduce the effects of the stimulus. Nine parameters of the model were optimized within realistic experimental limits by a process that compared results of simulations to published data. We find that simulations in the optimized model reproduce the timing and amplitude of Ca2+ transients measured experimentally in intact neurons. Thus, we demonstrate that the characteristics of individual isolated proteins determined in vitro can accurately reproduce the dynamics of experimentally measured Ca2+ transients in spines. The model will provide a test bed for exploring the roles of additional proteins that regulate Ca2+ influx into spines and for studying the behavior of protein targets in the spine that are regulated by Ca2+ influx. PMID:26500546

  9. Characterization and functional consequences of delayed rectifier current transient in ventricular repolarization.

    PubMed

    Gintant, G A

    2000-03-01

    Although inactivation of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) limits outward current on depolarization, the role of I(Kr) (and recovery from inactivation) during repolarization is uncertain. To characterize I(Kr) during ventricular repolarization (and compare with the inward rectifier current, I(K1)), voltage-clamp waveforms simulating the action potential were applied to canine ventricular, atrial, and Purkinje myocytes. In ventricular myocytes, I(Kr) was minimal at plateau potentials but transiently increased during repolarizing ramps. The I(Kr) transient was unaffected by repolarization rate and maximal after 150-ms depolarizations (+25 mV). Action potential clamps revealed the I(Kr) transient terminating the plateau. Although peak I(Kr) transient density was relatively uniform among myocytes, potentials characterizing the peak transients were widely dispersed. In contrast, peak inward rectifier current (I(K1)) density during repolarization was dispersed, whereas potentials characterizing I(K1) defined a narrower (more negative) voltage range. In summary, rapidly activating I(Kr) provides a delayed voltage-dependent (and functionally time-independent) outward transient during ventricular repolarization, consistent with rapid recovery from inactivation. The heterogeneous voltage dependence of I(Kr) provides a novel means for modulating the contribution of this current during repolarization.

  10. Microscopic heat pulses induce contraction of cardiomyocytes without calcium transients

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Kotaro; Mizuno, Akari; Shintani, Seine A.; Itoh, Hideki; Serizawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Norio; Suzuki, Madoka

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infra-red laser beam generates microscopic heat pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat pulses induce contraction of cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca{sup 2+} transients during the contraction were not detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Skinned cardiomyocytes in free Ca{sup 2+} solution also contracted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat pulses regulated the contractions without Ca{sup 2+} dynamics. -- Abstract: It was recently demonstrated that laser irradiation can control the beating of cardiomyocytes and hearts, however, the precise mechanism remains to be clarified. Among the effects induced by laser irradiation on biological tissues, temperature change is one possible effect which can alter physiological functions. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which heat pulses, produced by infra-red laser light under an optical microscope, induce contractions of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that microscopic heat pulses induce contraction of rat adult cardiomyocytes. The temperature increase, {Delta}T, required for inducing contraction of cardiomyocytes was dependent upon the ambient temperature; that is, {Delta}T at physiological temperature was lower than that at room temperature. Ca{sup 2+} transients, which are usually coupled to contraction, were not detected. We confirmed that the contractions of skinned cardiomyocytes were induced by the heat pulses even in free Ca{sup 2+} solution. This heat pulse-induced Ca{sup 2+}-decoupled contraction technique has the potential to stimulate heart and skeletal muscles in a manner different from the conventional electrical stimulations.

  11. Imaging of calcium transients in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, J; DiFranco, M; Compagnon, D; Suarez-Isla, B A

    1991-01-01

    Epifluorescence images of Ca2+ transients elicited by electrical stimulation of single skeletal muscle fibers were studied with fast imaging techniques that take advantage of the large fluorescence signals emitted at relatively long wavelengths by the dyes fluo-3 and rhod-2 in response to binding of Ca2+ ions, and of the suitable features of a commercially available CCD video camera. The localized release of Ca2+ in response to microinjection of InsP3 was also monitored to demonstrate the adequate space and time resolutions of the imaging system. The time resolution of the imager system, although limited to the standard video frequency response, still proved to be adequate to investigate the fast Ca2+ release process in skeletal muscle fibers at low temperatures. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:2015378

  12. Two New Calcium-Rich Gap Transients in Group and Cluster Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunnan, Ragnhild; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Cao, Yi; Hangard, Laura; Yaron, Ofer; Parrent, Jerod; Masafumi, Yagi; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-rich gap transients are a recently discovered class of transients, characterized by peak luminosities in the “gap” between supernovae and novae, rapid photometric and spectroscopic evolution, and a nebular spectrum dominated by [Ca II] emisison. We present two new events discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory: PTF11kmb and PTF12bho. A striking feature of both transients are their host environments: PTF12bho is an intra-cluster transient in the Coma Cluster, while PTF11kmb is located in a loose galaxy group, and both are offset >20 kpc from any plausible host galaxy. Deep imaging from Subaru and the Hubble Space Telescope constrains the presence of any underlying faint galaxies or globular clusters at the locations of the transients. We discuss the offset distribution and host galaxy demographics of Ca-rich gap transients as a class, showing that both are more extreme than that observed for either Type Ia SNe and even short-duration gamma-ray bursts, and that the majority of events found to date are found in galaxy groups or clusters. Finally, we discuss the implications for the progenitor systems of Ca-rich gap transients.

  13. Impaired mitochondria and intracellular calcium transients in the salivary glands of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Ittichaicharoen, Jitjiroj; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Tanajak, Pongpan; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-04-01

    Long-term consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) causes not only obese-insulin resistance, but is also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in several organs. However, the effect of obese-insulin resistance on salivary glands has not been investigated. We hypothesized that obese-insulin resistance induced by HFD impaired salivary gland function by reducing salivation, increasing inflammation, and fibrosis, as well as impairing mitochondrial function and calcium transient signaling. Male Wistar rats (200-220 g) were fed either a ND or an HFD (n = 8/group) for 16 weeks. At the end of week 16, salivary flow rates, metabolic parameters, and plasma oxidative stress were determined. Rats were then sacrificed and submandibular glands were removed to determine inflammation, fibrosis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and dynamics, and intracellular calcium transient signaling. Long-term consumption of an HFD caused obese-insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress, fibrosis, inflammation, and apoptosis in the salivary glands. In addition, impaired mitochondrial function, as indicated by increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and mitochondrial swelling in salivary glands and impaired intracellular calcium regulation, as indicated by a reduced intracellular calcium transient rising rate, decay rates, and amplitude of salivary acinar cells, were observed in HFD-fed rats. However, salivary flow rate and level of aquaporin 5 protein were not different between both groups. Although HFD consumption did not affect salivation, it caused obese-insulin resistance, leading to pathophysiological alteration of salivary glands, including impaired intracellular calcium transients, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, and salivary mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. Fura-2 calcium transients in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S

    1988-01-01

    1. Intact single twitch fibres from frog muscle were mounted at long sarcomere spacing (3.5-4.2 microns) on an optical bench apparatus for the measurement of absorbance and fluorescence signals following the myoplasmic injection of either or both of the Ca2+ indicator dyes Fura-2 and Antipyrylazo III. Dye-related signals were measured at 16-17 degrees C in fibres at rest and stimulated electrically to give a single action potential or brief train of action potentials. 2. The apparent diffusion constant of Fura-2 in myoplasm, Dapp, was estimated from Fura-2 fluorescence measured as a function of time and distance from the site of dye injection. On average (N = 7), Dapp was 0.36 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1, a value nearly 3-fold smaller than expected if all the Fura-2 was freely dissolved in the myoplasmic solution. The small value of Dapp is explained if approximately 60-65% of the Fura-2 molecules were bound to relatively immobile sites in myoplasm. 3. In resting fibres the fraction of Fura-2 in the Ca2+-bound form was estimated to be small, on average (N = 11) 0.06 of total dye. However, because of the large fraction of Fura-2 not freely dissolved in myoplasm, and the indirect method employed for estimating Ca2+-bound dye, calibration of the resting level of myoplasmic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]) from the fraction of Ca2+-bound dye was not considered reliable. 4. In response to a single action potential, large changes in Fura-2 fluorescence (delta F) and absorbance (delta A) were detected, which had identical time courses. As expected, the directions of these transients corresponded to an increase in Ca2+-dye complex. For wavelengths, lambda, between 380 and 460 nm, peak delta A(lambda) was closely similar to the Ca2+-dye difference spectrum for Fura-2 determined in in vitro calibrations. Beer's law was used to calibrate the concentration of Ca2+-dye complex formed during activity (delta[CaFura-2]) from the delta A(lambda) signal. Peak delta[CaFura-2] was found to vary between 0

  15. Calcium transients in asymmetrically activated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Trube, G; Lopez, J R; Taylor, S R

    1981-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers of the frog Rana temporaria were held just taut and stimulated transversely by unidirectional electrical fields. We observed the reversible effects of stimulus duration (0.1-100 ms) and strength on action potentials, intracellular Ca2+ transients (monitored by aequorin), and contractile force during fixed-end contractions. Long duration stimuli (e.g., 10 ms) induced a maintained depolarization on the cathodal side of a cell and a maintained hyperpolarization on its anodal side. The hyperpolarization of the side facing the anode prevented the action potential from reaching mechanical threshold during strong stimuli. Variation of the duration or strength of a stimulus changed the luminescent response from a fiber injected with aequorin. Thus, the intracellular Ca2+ released during excitation-contraction coupling could be changed by the stimulus parameters. Prolongation of a stimulus at field strengths above 1.1 x rheobase decreased the amplitude of aequorin signals and the force of contractions. The decreases in aequorin and force signals from a given fiber paralleled one another and depended on the stimulus strength, but not on the stimulus polarity. These changes were completely reversible for stimulus strengths up to at least 4.2 x rheobase. The graded decreases in membrane depolarization, aequorin signals, and contractile force were correlated with the previously described folding of myofibrils in fibers allowed to shorten in response to the application of a long duration stimulus. The changes in aequorin signals and force suggest an absence of myofilament activation by Ca2+ in the section of the fiber closest to the anode. The results imply that injected aequorin distributes circumferentially in frog muscle with a coefficient of at least 10(-7) cm2/s, which is not remarkably different from the previously measured coefficient of 5 x 10(-8) cm2/s for its diffusion lengthwise. PMID:6976801

  16. Label-Free Imaging of Dynamic and Transient Calcium Signaling in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Li, Jinghong

    2015-11-09

    Cell signaling consists of diverse events that occur at various temporal and spatial scales, ranging from milliseconds to hours and from single biomolecules to cell populations. The pathway complexities require the development of new techniques that detect the overall signaling activities and are not limited to quantifying a single event. A plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance microscope (P-EIM) that can provide such data with excellent temporal and spatial resolution and does not require the addition of any labels for detection has now been developed. The highly dynamic and transient calcium signaling activities at the early stage of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation were thus studied. It could be shown that a subpopulation of cells is more responsive towards agonist stimulation, and the heterogeneity of the local distributions and the transient activities of the ion channels during agonist-activated calcium flux in single HeLa cells were investigated.

  17. Characterization of action potential-evoked calcium transients in mouse postganglionic sympathetic axon bundles.

    PubMed

    Jackson, V M; Trout, S J; Brain, K L; Cunnane, T C

    2001-11-15

    1. Action potential-evoked Ca(2+) transients in postganglionic sympathetic axon bundles in mouse vas deferens have been characterized using confocal microscopy and Ca(2+) imaging. 2. Axonal Ca(2+) transients were tetrodotoxin sensitive. The amplitude depended on both the frequency of stimulation and the number of stimuli in a train. 3. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) abolished the Ca(2+) transient. Cd(2+)(100 microM) inhibited the Ca(2+) transient by 78 +/- 10 %. The N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA (0.1 microM) reduced the amplitude by -35 +/-4 %, whereas nifedipine (10 microM; L-type) and omega-conotoxin MVIIC (0.1 microM; P/Q type) were ineffective. 4. Caffeine (10 mM), ryanodine (10 microM), cyclopiazonic acid (30 microM) or CCCP (10 microM) had no detectable effects. 5. Blockade of large and small conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels with iberiotoxin (0.1 microM) and apamin (1 microM), respectively, or Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels by niflumic acid (100 microM) did not alter Ca(2+) transients. 6. In contrast, the non-specific K+ channel blockers tetraethylammonium (10 mM) and 4-aminopyridine (10 mM) markedly increased the amplitude of the Ca(2+) transient. Blockade of delayed rectifiers and A-like K+ channels, by tityustoxin-K (alpha) (0.1 microM) and pandinustoxin-K (alpha) (10 nM), respectively, also increased the Ca(2+) transient amplitude. 7. Thus, Ca(2+) transients are evoked by Na(+)-dependent action potentials in axons. These transients originate mainly from Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (80 % Cd(2+) sensitive of which 40 % was attributable to N-type). Twenty per cent of the Ca(2+) transient was not due to Ca(2+) entry through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular stores and mitochondria were not involved in the generation of the transient. Ca(2+) transients are modulated by A-like K+ channels and delayed rectifiers (possibly K(V)1.2) but not by Ca(2+)-activated ion channels.

  18. Mechanical transients of single toad stomach smooth muscle cells. Effects of lowering temperature and extracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Smooth muscle's slow, economical contractions may relate to the kinetics of the crossbridge cycle. We characterized the crossbridge cycle in smooth muscle by studying tension recovery in response to a small, rapid length change (i.e., tension transients) in single smooth muscle cells from the toad stomach (Bufo marinus). To confirm that these tension transients reflect crossbridge kinetics, we examined the effect of lowering cell temperature on the tension transient time course. Once this was confirmed, cells were exposed to low extracellular calcium [( Ca2+]o) to determine whether modulation of the cell's shortening velocity by changes in [Ca2+]o reflected the calcium sensitivity of one or more steps in the crossbridge cycle. Single smooth muscle cells were tied between an ultrasensitive force transducer and length displacement device after equilibration in temperature-controlled physiological saline having either a low (0.18 mM) or normal (1.8 mM) calcium concentration. At the peak of isometric force, after electrical stimulation, small, rapid (less than or equal to 1.8% cell length in 3.6 ms) step stretches and releases were imposed. At room temperature (20 degrees C) in normal [Ca2+]o, tension recovery after the length step was described by the sum of two exponentials with rates of 40-90 s-1 for the fast phase and 2-4 s-1 for the slow phase. In normal [Ca2+]o but at low temperature (10 degrees C), the fast tension recovery phase slowed (apparent Q10 = 1.9) for both stretches and releases whereas the slow tension recovery phase for a release was only moderately affected (apparent Q10 = 1.4) while unaffected for a stretch. Dynamic stiffness was determined throughout the time course of the tension transient to help correlate the tension transient phases with specific step(s) in the crossbridge cycle. The dissociation of tension and stiffness, during the fast tension recovery phase after a release, was interpreted as evidence that this recovery phase resulted from

  19. Contribution of downregulation of L-type calcium currents to delayed neuronal death in rat hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, De-Hui; Hou, Feng-Qing; Zhao, Miao; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Wang, Ying; Li, Jian-Guo; Hu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Qin, Lu-Ning; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2007-05-09

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms are as yet unclear, but it is known that activation of L-type Ca2+ channels specifically increases the expression of a group of genes required for neuronal survival. Accordingly, we examined temporal changes in L-type calcium-channel activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia by patch-clamp techniques. In vulnerable CA1 neurons, L-type Ca2+-channel activity was persistently downregulated after ischemic insult, whereas in invulnerable CA3 neurons, no change occurred. Downregulation of L-type calcium channels was partially caused by oxidation modulation in postischemic channels. Furthermore, L-type but neither N-type nor P/Q-type Ca2+-channel antagonists alone significantly inhibited the survival of cultured hippocampal neurons. In contrast, specific L-type calcium-channel agonist remarkably reduced neuronal cell death and restored the inhibited channels induced by nitric oxide donor. More importantly, L-type calcium-channel agonist applied after reoxygenation or reperfusion significantly decreased neuronal injury in in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation ischemic model and in animals subjected to forebrain ischemia-reperfusion. Together, the present results suggest that ischemia-induced inhibition of L-type calcium currents may give rise to delayed death of neurons in the CA1 region, possibly via oxidation mechanisms. Our findings may lead to a new perspective on neuronal death after ischemic insult and suggest that a novel therapeutic approach, activation of L-type calcium channels, could be tested at late stages of reperfusion for stroke treatment.

  20. Differences of calcium binding proteins immunoreactivities in the young hippocampal CA1 region from the adult following transient ischemic damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Joo; Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae-Chul; Lee, Hui Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Cho, Jun Hwi

    2013-03-15

    It has been reported that the young were much more resistant to transient cerebral ischemia than in the adult. In the present study, we examined that about 90% of CA1 pyramidal cells in the adult gerbil hippocampus died at 4days after ischemia-reperfusion; however, in the young hippocampus, about 56% of them died at 7days after ischemia-reperfusion. We compared immunoreactivities and levels of calcium binding proteins (CBPs), such as calbindin 28k (CB-D28k), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV). The immunoreactivities and protein levels of all the CBPs in the young sham were higher than those in the adult sham. In the adult, the immunoreactivities and protein levels of all the CBPs were markedly decreased at 4days after ischemia-reperfusion, however, in the young, they were apparently maintained. At 7days after ischemia-reperfusion, they were decreased in the young, however, they were much higher than those in the adult. In brief, the immunoreactivities and levels of CBPs were not decreased in the ischemic CA1 region of the young 4days after transient cerebral ischemia. This finding indicates that the longer maintenance of CBPs may contribute to a less and more delayed neuronal death/damage in the young.

  1. Shaker and Shal Mediate Transient Calcium-Independent Potassium Current in a Drosophila Flight Motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Duch, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Ionic currents underlie the firing patterns, excitability, and synaptic integration of neurons. Despite complete sequence information in multiple species, our knowledge about ion channel function in central neurons remains incomplete. This study analyzes the potassium currents of an identified Drosophila flight motoneuron, MN5, in situ. MN5 exhibits four different potassium currents, two fast-activating transient ones and two sustained ones, one of each is calcium activated. Pharmacological and genetic manipulations unravel the specific contributions of Shaker and Shal to the calcium independent transient A-type potassium currents. α-dendrotoxin (Shaker specific) and phrixotoxin-2 (Shal specific) block different portions of the transient calcium independent A-type potassium current. Following targeted expression of a Shaker dominant negative transgene in MN5, the remaining A-type potassium current is α-dendrotoxin insensitive. In Shal RNAi knock down the remaining A-type potassium current is phrixotoxin-2 insensitive. Additionally, barium blocks calcium-activated potassium currents but also a large portion of phrixotoxin-2-sensitive A-type currents. Targeted knock down of Shaker or Shal channels each cause identical reduction in total potassium current amplitude as acute application of α-dendrotoxin or phrixotoxin-2, respectively. This shows that the knock downs do not cause upregulation of potassium channels underlying other A-type channels during development. Immunocytochemistry and targeted expression of modified GFP-tagged Shaker channels with intact targeting sequence in MN5 indicate predominant axonal localization. These data can now be used to investigate the roles of Shaker and Shal for motoneuron intrinsic properties, synaptic integration, and spiking output during behavior by targeted genetic manipulations. PMID:19828724

  2. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  3. Acute effect of androgens on maximal force-generating capacity and electrically evoked calcium transient in mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Fraysse, Bodvael; Vignaud, Alban; Fane, Bourama; Schuh, Mélanie; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Metzger, Daniel; Ferry, Arnaud

    2014-09-01

    As androgens might have rapid androgen-receptor (AR) independent action on muscle cells, we analysed the in vivo acute effect of androgens on maximal force generation capacity and electrically evoked calcium transient responsible for the excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle from wild-type male mice and muscle fibre androgen receptor (AR) deficient (AR(skm-/y)) male mice. We tested the hypothesis that acute in vivo androgen treatment improves contractility and modifies calcium transient in mouse hindlimb muscles. In addition, we determined whether the reduced maximal force generation capacity of AR(skm-/y) mice is caused by an alteration in calcium transient. We found that acute dehydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone treatment of mice does not change in situ maximal force, power or fatigue resistance of tibialis anterior muscles. In agreement with this observation, maximal force and twitch kinetics also remained unchanged when both whole extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle or fibre bundles were incubated in vitro with DHT. Electrically evoked calcium transient, i.e. calcium amplitude, time to peak and decay, was also not modified by DHT treatment of EDL muscle fibre bundles. Finally, we found no difference in calcium transient between AR(skm-/y) and wild-type mice despite the reduced maximal force in EDL fibre bundles of AR(skm-/y) mice. In conclusion, acute androgen treatment has no ergogenic effect on muscle contractility and does not affect calcium transient in response to stimulation. In addition, the reduced maximal force of AR(skm-/y) mice is not related to calcium transient dysfunction.

  4. Fluid shear stress induces calcium transients in osteoblasts through depolarization of osteoblastic membrane.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junqing; Liu, Xifang; Tong, Jie; Sun, Lijun; Xu, Hao; Shi, Liang; Zhang, Jianbao

    2014-12-18

    Intracellular calcium transient ([Ca(2+)]i transient) induced by fluid shear stress (FSS) plays an important role in osteoblastic mechanotransduction. Changes of membrane potential usually affect [Ca(2+)]i level. Here, we sought to determine whether there was a relationship between membrane potential and FSS-induced [Ca(2+)]i transient in osteoblasts. Fluorescent dyes DiBAC4(3) and fura-2AM were respectively used to detect membrane potential and [Ca(2+)]i. Our results showed that FSS firstly induced depolarization of membrane potential and then a transient rising of [Ca(2+)]i in osteoblasts. There was a same threshold for FSS to induce depolarization of membrane potential and [Ca(2+)]i transients. Replacing extracellular Na(+) with tetraethylammonium or blocking stretch-activated channels (SACs) with gadolinium both effectively inhibited FSS-induced membrane depolarization and [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, voltage-activated K(+) channel inhibitor, 4-Aminopyridine, did not affect these responses. Removing extracellular Ca(2+) or blocking of L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels (L-VSCCs) with nifedipine inhibited FSS-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients in osteoblasts too. Quantifying membrane potential with patch clamp showed that the resting potential of osteoblasts was -43.3mV and the depolarization induced by FSS was about 44mV. Voltage clamp indicated that this depolarization was enough to activated L-VSCCs in osteoblasts. These results suggested a time line of Ca(2+) mobilization wherein FSS activated SACs to promote Na(+) entry to depolarize membrane that, in turn, activated L-VSCCs and Ca(2+) influx though L-VSCCs switched on [Ca(2+)]i response in osteoblasts.

  5. Two New Calcium-rich Gap Transients in Group and Cluster Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunnan, R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Hangard, L.; Yaron, O.; Parrent, J. T.; McCully, C.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Ben-Ami, S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fremling, C.; Fruchter, A. S.; Howell, D. A.; Koda, J.; Kupfer, T.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Nugent, P. E.; Ofek, E. O.; Yagi, M.; Yan, Lin

    2017-02-01

    We present the Palomar Transient Factory discoveries and the photometric and spectroscopic observations of PTF11kmb and PTF12bho. We show that both transients have properties consistent with the class of calcium-rich gap transients, specifically lower peak luminosities and rapid evolution compared to ordinary supernovae, and a nebular spectrum dominated by [Ca ii] emission. A striking feature of both transients is their host environments: PTF12bho is an intracluster transient in the Coma Cluster, while PTF11kmb is located in a loose galaxy group, at a physical offset ∼150 kpc from the most likely host galaxy. Deep Subaru imaging of PTF12bho rules out an underlying host system to a limit of {M}R> -8.0 {mag}, while Hubble Space Telescope imaging of PTF11kmb reveals a marginal counterpart that, if real, could be either a background galaxy or a globular cluster. We show that the offset distribution of Ca-rich gap transients is significantly more extreme than that seen for SNe Ia or even short-hard gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Thus, if the offsets are caused by a kick, they require higher kick velocities and/or longer merger times than sGRBs. We also show that almost all Ca-rich transients found to date are in group and cluster environments with elliptical host galaxies, indicating a very old progenitor population; the remote locations could partially be explained by these environments having the largest fraction of stars in the intragroup/intracluster light following galaxy–galaxy interactions.

  6. Calcium currents and transients in co-cultured contracting normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy human myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, Nathalie; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Duport, Gérard; Raymond, Guy; Hassoni, Abdul A; Constantin, Bruno; Cullen, Michael J; Cognard, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate differences in calcium movements between normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) human contracting myotubes co-cultured with explants of rat spinal cord with attached dorsal root ganglia. Membrane potential, variations of intracellular calcium concentration and T- and L-type calcium currents were recorded. Further, a descriptive and quantitative study by electron microscopy of the ultrastructure of the co-cultures was carried out. The resting membrane potential was slightly less negative in DMD (−61.4 ± 1.1 mV) than in normal myotubes (−65.5 ± 0.9 mV). Both types of myotube displayed spontaneous action potentials (mean firing frequency, 0.42 and 0.16 Hz, respectively), which triggered spontaneous calcium transients measured with Indo-1. The time integral under the spontaneous Ca2+ transients was significantly greater in DMD myotubes (97 ± 8 nm s) than in normal myotubes (67 ± 13 nm s). The L- and T-type current densities estimated from patch-clamp recordings were smaller in DMD cells (2.0 ± 0.5 and 0.90 ± 0.19 pA pF−1, respectively) than in normal cells (3.9 ± 0.7 and 1.39 ± 0.30 pA pF−1, respectively). The voltage-dependent inactivation relationships revealed a shift in the conditioning potential at which inactivation is half-maximal (Vh,0.5) of the T- and L-type currents towards less negative potentials, from −72.1 ± 0.7 and −53.7 ± 1.5 mV in normal cells to −61.9 ± 1.4 and −29.2 ± 1.4 mV in DMD cells, respectively. Both descriptive and quantitative studies by electron microscopy suggested a more advanced development of DMD myotubes as compared to normal ones. This conclusion was supported by the significantly larger capacitance of the DMD myotubes (408 ± 45 pF) than of the normal myotubes (299 ± 34 pF) of the same apparent size. Taken together, these results show that differences in T- and L-type calcium currents between normal and DMD myotubes cannot simply explain all observed

  7. IP3-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5–7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP3R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10–20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP3R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP3R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP3R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  8. Transient exposure to calcium ionophore enables in vitro fertilization in sterile mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Felipe A.; Alvau, Antonio; Lee, Hoi Chang; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Leon, Patricia Martin-De; Santi, Celia M.; Krapf, Dario; Mager, Jesse; Fissore, Rafael A.; Salicioni, Ana M.; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian sperm acquire fertilizing capacity in the female tract in a process called capacitation. At the molecular level, capacitation requires protein kinase A activation, changes in membrane potential and an increase in intracellular calcium. Inhibition of these pathways results in loss of fertilizing ability in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrated that transient incubation of mouse sperm with Ca2+ ionophore accelerated capacitation and rescued fertilizing capacity in sperm with inactivated PKA function. We now show that a pulse of Ca2+ ionophore induces fertilizing capacity in sperm from infertile CatSper1 (Ca2+ channel), Adcy10 (soluble adenylyl cyclase) and Slo3 (K+ channel) KO mice. In contrast, sperm from infertile mice lacking the Ca2+ efflux pump PMACA4 were not rescued. These results indicate that a transient increase in intracellular Ca2+ can overcome genetic infertility in mice and suggest this approach may prove adaptable to rescue sperm function in certain cases of human male infertility. PMID:27627854

  9. Cav3-type α1T calcium channels mediate transient calcium currents that regulate repetitive firing in Drosophila antennal lobe PNs.

    PubMed

    Iniguez, Jorge; Schutte, Soleil S; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2013-10-01

    Projection neurons (PNs), located in the antennal lobe region of the insect brain, play a key role in processing olfactory information. To explore how activity is regulated at the level of single PNs within this central circuit we have recorded from these neurons in adult Drosophila melanogaster brains. Our previous study demonstrated that PNs express voltage-gated calcium currents with a transient and sustained component. We found that the sustained component is mediated by cac gene-encoded Cav2-type channels involved in regulating action potential-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses. The function of the transient calcium current and the gene encoding the underlying channels, however, were unknown. Here we report that the transient current blocked by prepulse inactivation is sensitive to amiloride, a vertebrate Cav3-type channel blocker. In addition PN-specific RNAi knockdown of α1T, the Drosophila Cav3-type gene, caused a dramatic reduction in the transient current without altering the sustained component. These data demonstrate that the α1T gene encodes voltage-gated calcium channels underlying the amiloride-sensitive transient current. Alterations in evoked firing and spontaneous burst firing in the α1T knockdowns demonstrate that the Cav3-type calcium channels are important in regulating excitability in adult PNs.

  10. An optical coherent transient true-time delay device: Concept development and experimental demonstrations including delay programming with frequency-chirped pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Kristian Doyle

    1998-09-01

    A coherent transient true-time delay regenerator is presented in terms of conceptual development, simulations and experimental demonstrations in Tm3+:YAG. Theory predicts the arrival time of the emitted signals for a three-pulse sequence of square pulses. A shifting of the emitted signal's arrival time as a function of the individual pulse's area and duration is experimentally demonstrated. A novel delay-programming scheme is presented using linear frequency-chirped pulses. This technique enables changing the programmed delay only by frequency-shifting one (or both) of these pulses without changing its timing, bandwidth or duration. A delay range of 500 ns with sub-100 ps resolution is demonstrated for a signal bandwidth of 40 MHz. A continuous data stream of 100 bits, of a duration longer than the dephasing time T2 of Tm3+:YAG, is also delayed by a grating stored with linear frequency-chirped pulses. Frequency division multiplexing of delays is experimentally demonstrated for two delays whose gratings are in adjacent frequency channels, and stored with linear frequency-chirped pulses. The application of a coherent transient true-time delay device in array antennas is considered, and future research directions for this implementation are given.

  11. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres estimated from Arsenazo III calcium transients.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, S M; Chandler, W K; Marshall, M W

    1983-01-01

    Single twitch fibres, dissected from frog muscle, were injected with the metallochromic dye Arsenazo III. Changes in dye-related absorbance measured at 650 or 660 nm were used to estimate the time course of myoplasmic free [Ca2+] following either action potential stimulation or voltage-clamp depolarization (temperature, 15-17 degrees C). The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient decreased when fibres were stretched to sarcomere spacings approaching 4 microns. The effect appeared to be less marked in H2O Ringer than in D2O Ringer, where a reduction of about 40% was observed in going from 3.0 microns to 3.7-3.9 microns. In fibres heavily injected with dye (1.5-2.2 mM-dye) at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was complexed with Arsenazo III following a single action potential, implying that at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.) into the myoplasm. Computer simulations were carried out to estimate the flux of Ca2+ between the s.r. and myoplasm (in fibres containing no more that 0.8 mM-dye). The amounts and time courses of Ca2+ bound to the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin and to the Ca2+, Mg2+ sites on parvalbumin were estimated from the free [Ca2+] wave form and the law of mass action. In the computations the total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was taken as the total amount of Ca2+ existing either as free ion or as ion complexed with dye, troponin or parvalbumin. The time derivative of total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was used as an estimate of net Ca2+ flux (release minus uptake) from the s.r. into myoplasm. Rate constants for formation of cation: receptor complex were taken from published values. For the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin, three sets of rate constants, corresponding to two values of dissociation constant (0.2 and 2 microM) were used. Each set of three simulations was carried out both with and without parvalbumin. The simulations show that following action potential stimulation, 0.2-0.3 mM-Ca2+ enters the myoplasm from the s.r. The wave form of s.r. Ca2

  12. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  13. A novel calcium-sensing receptor antagonist transiently stimulates parathyroid hormone secretion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arey, Brian J; Seethala, Ramakrishna; Ma, Zhengping; Fura, Aberra; Morin, Jennifer; Swartz, Joann; Vyas, Viral; Yang, Wu; Dickson, John K; Feyen, Jean H M

    2005-04-01

    Circulating calcium (Ca(2+)) is a primary regulator of bone homeostasis through its action on PTH secretion. Extracellular Ca(2+) modulates PTH secretion through a cell surface G protein-coupled receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). The expression of the CaR suggests a critical role in cellular regulation by calcium in various organs, including parathyroid gland, bone, and kidney. Despite an obvious pharmacological utility for CaR antagonists in the treatment of disease, only a limited number of such classes of compounds exist. We have identified a novel class of small molecules with specific activity at the CaR. This class of compounds is represented by compound 1. It possesses potent antagonist activity at the human CaR with IC(50) values of 64 nm and 230 nm in inhibiting intracellular Ca(2+) flux and inositol phosphate generation in vitro, respectively. When administered to male rats in vivo, compound 1 robustly increased serum PTH levels. The stimulation of PTH secretion was rapid and transient when administered either iv or orally. The pharmacokinetic profile of compound 1 after oral administration revealed that maximal plasma levels of compound were reached within 1 h and the half-life of the compound to be approximately 2 h in rats. These data describe a representative compound of a novel chemical class than previously described allosteric modulators that offer a new avenue for the development of improved treatments of osteoporosis.

  14. Estimating background-subtracted fluorescence transients in calcium imaging experiments: a quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Joucla, Sébastien; Franconville, Romain; Pippow, Andreas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Pouzat, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Calcium imaging has become a routine technique in neuroscience for subcellular to network level investigations. The fast progresses in the development of new indicators and imaging techniques call for dedicated reliable analysis methods. In particular, efficient and quantitative background fluorescence subtraction routines would be beneficial to most of the calcium imaging research field. A background-subtracted fluorescence transients estimation method that does not require any independent background measurement is therefore developed. This method is based on a fluorescence model fitted to single-trial data using a classical nonlinear regression approach. The model includes an appropriate probabilistic description of the acquisition system's noise leading to accurate confidence intervals on all quantities of interest (background fluorescence, normalized background-subtracted fluorescence time course) when background fluorescence is homogeneous. An automatic procedure detecting background inhomogeneities inside the region of interest is also developed and is shown to be efficient on simulated data. The implementation and performances of the proposed method on experimental recordings from the mouse hypothalamus are presented in details. This method, which applies to both single-cell and bulk-stained tissues recordings, should help improving the statistical comparison of fluorescence calcium signals between experiments and studies.

  15. Neuronal damage and calcium accumulation following transient cerebral ischemia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Inoue, T.; Kato, H.; Kogure, K.; Murakami, M. )

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution of neuronal damage following transient cerebral ischemia in the rat model of four-vessel occlusion utilizing light microscopy as well as {sup 45}Ca-autoradiography. Transient ischemia was induced for 30 min. The animals were allowed to survive for 7 d after ischemia. In the animals subjected to ischemia, the most frequently and seriously damaged areas were the paramedian region of hippocampus, the hippocampal CA1 sector, and the dorsolateral part of striatum, followed by the inferior colliculus, the substantia nigra, the frontal cortex, and the thalamus, which were moderate damaged. Furthermore, the cerebellar Purkinje neurons, the hippocampal CA4 sector, the medial geniculate body, and the hippocampal CA3 sector were slightly affected. {sup 45}Ca-autoradiographyic study also revealed calcium accumulation in the identical sites of ischemic neuronal damage, except for the frontal cortex. Regional cerebral blood flow during 10 min of ischemia was severely decreased in selectively vulnerable areas. The blood flow in the medial geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the inferior colliculus, and the cerebellum was less pronounced than that in the selectively vulnerable areas. The present study demonstrates that transient cerebral ischemia can produce significant neuronal damage not only in the selectively vulnerable regions, but also in the brainstem.

  16. Calmodulin modulates the delay period between release of calcium from internal stores and activation of calcium influx via endogenous TRP1 channels.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Luis; Sampieri, Alicia

    2002-11-01

    In the present study we have explored the role of calmodulin (CaM) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) in the communication process activated after the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the activation of calcium influx via endogenous TRP1 channels from Chinese hamster ovary cells. Experiments using combined rapid confocal calcium and electrophysiology measurements uncovered a consistent delay of around 900 ms between the first detectable calcium released from the ER and the activation of the calcium current. This delay was evident with two different methods used to release calcium from the ER: either the blockade of the microsomal calcium ATPase with thapsigargin or activation of bradykinin receptors linked to the IP(3) cascade. Direct application of IP(3) or a peptide from the NH(2)-terminal region of the IP(3)R activated store operated calcium, reducing the delay period. Introduction of CaM into the cell via the patch pipette increased the delay period from 900 +/- 100 ms to 10 +/- 2.1 s (n = 18). Furthermore, the use of selective CaM antagonists W7 and trifluoperazine maleate resulted in a substantial reduction of the delay period to 200 +/- 100 ms with 5 microm trifluoperazine maleate (n = 16) and 150 +/- 50 ms with 500 nm W7 (n = 22). CaM reduced also the current density activated by thapsigargin or brandykinin to about 60% from control. The CaM antagonists did not affect significantly the current density. The results presented here are consistent with an antagonistic effect of IP(3)R and CaM for the activation of store operated calcium after depletion of the ER. The functional competition between the activating effect of IP(3)R and the inhibiting effect of CaM may modulate the delay period between the release of calcium from the ER and the activation of calcium influx observed in different cells, as well as the amount of current activated after depletion of the ER.

  17. Delayed administration IL-1β neutralizing antibody improves cognitive function after transient global ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bei; Zou, Chang-Jiang; Zhou, Ping

    2016-04-15

    In order to study the protective effects on motor and cognitive function by inhibiting IL-1β as delayed as 24h after global ischemia, we designed behavioral testing protocol and histology detection after 10 min transient global ischemia followed by IL-1β or its antibody intracerebroventricular injection. We found benefit of IL-1β antibody treatment 24h after ischemia in cognitive function recovery. But no obvious amelioration in motor function was found. Further we detected cell morphology and survival by histology staining and proved IL-1β antibody could reduce ischemia induced cell morphological changes and cell loss in hippocampus, which related with cognitive function. Present results indicate intervening IL-1β pathway could be helpful in cognitive function recovery even as late as 24h after ischemia happens.

  18. Seronegative Maternal Ocular Myasthenia Gravis and Delayed Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Townsel, Courtney; Keller, Rebecca; Johnson, Kendall; Hussain, Naveed; Campbell, Winston A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with fluctuating muscle weakness, divided into generalized and localized (ocular) forms. Maternal antibodies to acetylcholine receptors cross the placenta and may cause transient neonatal myasthenia gravis (TNMG). We present a case of seronegative maternal ocular MG and delayed TNMG. Case A 29-year-old G3P1011 underwent cesarean birth of a male infant who developed oxygen desaturation requiring supplemental oxygen on day of life (DOL) 3. Based on the clinical course and after exclusion of other diagnoses, the infant was diagnosed with TNMG. Infant's condition improved spontaneously and he was weaned off supplemental oxygen and discharged home on DOL 12. Conclusion Infants born to mothers with seronegative localized (ocular) MG are also susceptible to TNMG which may be late in onset. PMID:26989568

  19. The effects of caffeine on tension development and intracellular calcium transients in rat ventricular muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, M; Kurihara, S; Sakai, T

    1984-01-01

    The effects of caffeine on tension and intracellular [Ca2+] were investigated in rat ventricular muscle using the Ca2+-sensitive photoprotein, aequorin. Contracture was induced by rapid application of 0.5-10 mM-caffeine solution at 20 degrees C. In normal Tyrode solution at 8 degrees C, or in Na+-deficient solution in which Na+ was isotonically replaced by sucrose, peak tension of caffeine contracture was potentiated and relaxation was prolonged. Caffeine contracture could not be induced immediately after a prior contracture. Repriming time was 10 min in Tyrode solution, and was much shorter in Na+-deficient solution or in high-K+ solution containing 105.9 mM-K+. Caffeine prolonged the plateau of action potential dose dependently. At low temperature, prolongation of the plateau phase by caffeine was more marked. Twitch tension showed a triphasic change after application of caffeine; peak tension transiently increased in a potentiating phase (P phase), and then decreased below control level in an inhibitory phase (I phase) followed by gradual recovery in a recovery phase (R phase). The effects of caffeine on the Ca2+ transients during a twitch were also complex, depending on time after application and dose of caffeine. In low caffeine concentration (below 0.5 mM) the peak of the Ca2+ transient was potentiated in the I phase, although the peak tension was suppressed. At high concentration (above 3 mM) the peaks of both the Ca2+ transient and twitch tension were suppressed. In every concentration of caffeine tested (0.1-5 mM), time to the Ca2+ transient and twitch tension peaks was prolonged, and the falling phases of both were delayed. Caffeine might release Ca2+ from intracellular store(s) and enhance the slow inward current. The Ca2+ transient obtained in this study clearly indicate that the prolonged time to peak tension in the presence of caffeine is due to the slow rise of intracellular [Ca2+] and prolonged time to peak of the Ca2+ transient. It is also quite

  20. Nitric oxide triggers specific and dose-dependent cytosolic calcium transients in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Soud, Mourad A M; Aboul-Enein, Ahmed M; Loake, Gary J

    2009-03-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) transients have been shown to take place in response to diverse developmental and physiological cues. Also, it is involved in biotic and abiotic stress signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule that plays a crucial role in plant growth and development, starting from germination to flowering, ripening of fruit and senescence of organs. Moreover, it plays a pivotal role in several biotic and abiotic stress signaling processes. In the present work, the ability of NO to trigger increases in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](cyt)) was investigated. For this purpose, transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings constitutively expressing the luminescent Ca(2+)-sensitive protein apoaequorin (35S::APOAEQUORIN) was employed. In chemiluminescence and in vivo Ca(2+) imaging assays, the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) triggered a strong, instantaneous, reproducible, and dose-dependent rise in [Ca(2+)](cyt). Moreover, the observed rise in [Ca(2+)](cyt) was shown to be NO-specific and not associated with decomposition products of SNP, as the NO-scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3 oxide (C-PTIO) significantly blunted the observed NO-mediated spike in [Ca(2+)](cyt). Interestingly, preincubation of 35S::APOAEQUORIN Arabidopsis seedlings with the plasma membrane channel blocker lanthanum chloride resulted in partial concentration-dependent blocking of the NO-specific Ca(2+) transient. This observation indicates that, in addition to the mobilization of [Ca(2+)](cyt), as an external source in response to NO treatment, there also exists an appreciable contribution of an as yet unidentified internal pool.

  1. NMDA-evoked calcium transients and currents in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of evidence suggests that the effects of light on the mammalian circadian system are mediated by glutamatergic mechanisms and that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays an important role in this regulation. One of the fundamental features of circadian oscillators is that their response to environmental stimulation varies depending on the phase of the daily cycle when the stimuli are applied. For example, the same light treatment, which can produce phase shifts of the oscillator when applied during subjective night, has no effect when applied during the subjective day in animals held in constant darkness (DD). We examined the hypothesis that the effects of NMDA on neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) also vary from day to night. Optical techniques were utilized to estimate NMDA-induced calcium (Ca2+) changes in SCN cells. The resulting data indicate that there was a daily rhythm in the magnitude and duration of NMDA-induced Ca2+ transients. The phase of this rhythm was determined by the light—dark cycle to which the rats were exposed with the Ca2+ transients peaking during the night. This rhythm continued when animals were held in DD. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic mechanisms modulated the NMDA response but were not responsible for the rhythm. Finally, there was a rhythm in NMDA-evoked currents in SCN neurons that also peaked during the night. This study provides the first evidence for a circadian oscillation in NMDA-evoked Ca2+ transients in SCN cells. This rhythm may play an important role in determining the periodic sensitivity of the circadian systems response to light. PMID:11298803

  2. Delayed release of neurotransmitter from cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atluri, P P; Regehr, W G

    1998-10-15

    At fast chemical synapses the rapid release of neurotransmitter that occurs within a few milliseconds of an action potential is followed by a more sustained elevation of release probability, known as delayed release. Here we characterize the role of calcium in delayed release and test the hypothesis that facilitation and delayed release share a common mechanism. Synapses between cerebellar granule cells and their postsynaptic targets, stellate cells and Purkinje cells, were studied in rat brain slices. Presynaptic calcium transients were measured with calcium-sensitive fluorophores, and delayed release was detected with whole-cell recordings. Calcium influx, presynaptic calcium dynamics, and the number of stimulus pulses were altered to assess their effect on delayed release and facilitation. Following single stimuli, delayed release can be separated into two components: one lasting for tens of milliseconds that is steeply calcium-dependent, the other lasting for hundreds of milliseconds that is driven by low levels of calcium with a nearly linear calcium dependence. The amplitude, calcium dependence, and magnitude of delayed release do not correspond to those of facilitation, indicating that these processes are not simple reflections of a shared mechanism. The steep calcium dependence of delayed release, combined with the large calcium transients observed in these presynaptic terminals, suggests that for physiological conditions delayed release provides a way for cells to influence their postsynaptic targets long after their own action potential activity has subsided.

  3. Extracellular calcium transients and action potential configuration changes related to post-stimulatory potentiation in rabbit atrium.

    PubMed

    Hilgemann, D W

    1986-05-01

    Extracellular calcium transients were monitored with 2 mM tetramethylmurexide at low calcium (250 microM total, 130 microM free), and action potentials were monitored together with developed tension at normal calcium (1.3 mM) during the production and decay of post-stimulatory potentiation in rabbit left atrial strips. At normal calcium, the contractile potentiation produced by a brief burst of 4 Hz stimulation is lost in three to five post-stimulatory excitations, which correlate with a negative staircase of the late action potential. At low calcium, stimulation at 4 Hz for 3-8 s results in a net extracellular calcium depletion of 5-15 microM. At the subsequent potentiated contraction (1-45 s rest), total extracellular calcium increases by 4-8 microM. The contractile response at a second excitation is greatly suppressed and results in little or no further calcium shift; the sequence can be repeated immediately thereafter. Reducing external sodium to 60 mM (sucrose replacement) enhances post-rest contractions, suppresses the late action potential, nearly eliminates loss of contractility and net calcium efflux at post-rest excitations, and markedly reduces extracellular calcium depletion during rapid stimulation. 4-Aminopyridine (1 mM) markedly suppresses the rapid early repolarization of this preparation at post-rest excitations and the loss of contractility at post-rest stimulation from the rested state; during a post-stimulatory potentiation sequence at low calcium, replenishment of extracellular calcium takes several post-stimulatory excitations. Ryanodine (10 nM to 5 microM) abolishes the post-stimulatory contraction at rest periods of greater than 5 s. If the initial repolarization is rapid, ryanodine suppresses the late action potential, calcium efflux during quiescence is greatly accelerated, and subsequent excitations do not result in an accumulation of extracellular calcium. A positive staircase of the early action potential correlates with the magnitude

  4. Imaging and analysis of evoked excitatory-postsynaptic-calcium-transients by individual presynaptic-boutons of cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapse.

    PubMed

    Malkinson, Guy; Spira, Micha E

    2010-04-01

    The use of the sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapse of the Aplysia gill withdrawal reflex has contributed immensely to the understanding of synaptic transmission, learning and memory acquisition processes. Whereas the majority of the studies focused on analysis of the presynaptic mechanisms, recent studies indicated that as in mammalian synapses, long term potentiation (LTP) formed by Aplysia SN-MN synapse depends on elevation of the postsynaptic free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+](i)). Consistently, injection of the fast calcium chelator BAPTA to the MN prevents the formation of serotonin-induced LTP. Nevertheless, currently there are no published reports that directly examine and document whether evoked synaptic transmission is associated with transient increase in the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i). In the present study we imaged, for the first time, alterations in the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i) in response to presynaptic stimulation and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Using live imaging of the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i) while monitoring the EPSP, we found that evoked transmitter release generates excitatory postsynaptic calcium concentration transients (EPSCaTs) by two mechanisms: (a) activation of DNQX-sensitive postsynaptic receptors-gated calcium influx and (b) calcium influx through nitrendipine-sensitive voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Concomitant confocal imaging of presynaptic boutons and EPSCaTs revealed that approximately 86% of the presynaptic boutons are associated with functional synapses.

  5. Delayed and transient increase of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by physical exercise in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Overall, Rupert W; Walker, Tara L; Leiter, Odette; Lenke, Sina; Ruhwald, Susann; Kempermann, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    This study builds on the findings that physical activity, such as wheel running in mice, enhances cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus of the common mouse strain C57BL/6, and that the baseline level of neurogenesis varies by strain, being considerably lower in DBA/2. Because C57BL/6 and DBA/2 are important as the parental strains of the BXD recombinant inbred cross which allows the detection of genetic loci regulating phenotypes such as adult neurogenesis, we performed the current study to investigate the gene x environment interactions regulating neurogenesis. At equal distances and times run DBA/2J mice lacked the acute increase in precursor cell proliferation known from C57BL/6. In DBA/2J proliferation even negatively correlated with the distance run. This was neither due to a stress response (to running itself or single housing) nor differences in estrous cycle. DBA/2 animals exhibited a delayed and weaker pro-neurogenic response with a significant increase in numbers of proliferating cells first detectable after more than a week of wheel running. The proliferative response to running was transient in both strains, the effect being undetectable by 6 weeks. There was also a small transient increase in the production of new neurons in DBA/2J, although these extra cells did not survive. These findings indicate that the comparison between C57BL/6 and DBA/2, and by extension the BXD genetic reference population derived from these strains, should provide a powerful tool for uncovering the complex network of modifier genes affecting the activity-dependent regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. More generally, our findings also describe how the external physical environment interacts with the internal genetic environment to produce different responses to the same behavioral stimuli.

  6. The roles of calcium signaling and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a Pax6+/- mouse model of epithelial wound-healing delay

    PubMed Central

    Leiper, Lucy J; Walczysko, Petr; Kucerova, Romana; Ou, Jingxing; Shanley, Lynne J; Lawson, Diane; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D; Zhao, Min; Collinson, J Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background Congenital aniridia caused by heterozygousity at the PAX6 locus is associated with ocular surface disease including keratopathy. It is not clear whether the keratopathy is a direct result of reduced PAX6 gene dosage in the cornea itself, or due to recurrent corneal trauma secondary to defects such as dry eye caused by loss of PAX6 in other tissues. We investigated the hypothesis that reducing Pax6 gene dosage leads to corneal wound-healing defects. and assayed the immediate molecular responses to wounding in wild-type and mutant corneal epithelial cells. Results Pax6+/- mouse corneal epithelia exhibited a 2-hour delay in their response to wounding, but subsequently the cells migrated normally to repair the wound. Both Pax6+/+ and Pax6+/- epithelia activated immediate wound-induced waves of intracellular calcium signaling. However, the intensity and speed of propagation of the calcium wave, mediated by release from intracellular stores, was reduced in Pax6+/- cells. Initiation and propagation of the calcium wave could be largely decoupled, and both phases of the calcium wave responses were required for wound healing. Wounded cells phosphorylated the extracellular signal-related kinases 1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2). ERK1/2 activation was shown to be required for rapid initiation of wound healing, but had only a minor effect on the rate of cell migration in a healing epithelial sheet. Addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to wounded Pax6+/- cells restored the calcium wave, increased ERK1/2 activation and restored the immediate healing response to wild-type levels. Conclusion The study links Pax6 deficiency to a previously overlooked wound-healing delay. It demonstrates that defective calcium signaling in Pax6+/- cells underlies this delay, and shows that it can be pharmacologically corrected. ERK1/2 phosphorylation is required for the rapid initiation of wound healing. A model is presented whereby minor abrasions, which are quickly healed in normal

  7. Calcium permeability of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 4 channels measured by TRPC4-GCaMP6s

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Juyeon; Myeong, Jongyun; Yang, Dongki

    2017-01-01

    Conflicting evidence has been obtained regarding whether transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPC) are store-operated channels (SOCs) or receptor-operated channels (ROCs). Moreover, the Ca/Na permeability ratio differs depending on whether the current-voltage (I-V) curve has a doubly rectifying shape or inward rectifying shape. To investigate the calcium permeability of TRPC4 channels, we attached GCaMP6s to TRPC4 and simultaneously measured the current and calcium signals. A TRPC4 specific activator, (–)-englerin A, induced both current and calcium fluorescence with the similar time course. Muscarinic receptor stimulator, carbachol, also induced both current and calcium fluorescence with the similar time course. By forming heteromers with TRPC4, TRPC1 significantly reduced the inward current with outward rectifying I-V curve, which also caused the decrease of calcium fluorescence intensity. These results suggest that GCaMP6s attached to TRPC4 can detect slight calcium changes near TRPC4 channels. Consequently, TRPC4-GCaMP6s can be a useful tool for testing the calcium permeability of TRPC4 channels. PMID:28066150

  8. Galectin-3 expression in delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 following transient forebrain ischemia, and its inhibition by hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kunio; Niwa, Masayuki; Goda, Wael; Binh, Nguyen Huy; Nakashima, Masaya; Takamatsu, Manabu; Hara, Akira

    2011-03-25

    The ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA1 sector following transient ischemia, delayed neuronal death, is a typical apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying the delayed neuronal death is still far from fully understood. Galectin-3 is a β-galactosidase-binding lectin which is important in cell proliferation and apoptotic regulation. Galectin-3 is expressed by microglial cells in experimental models of adult stroke. It has been reported that activated microglial cells are widely observed in the brain, including in the hippocampal CA1 region after transient ischemic insult. In the present study, time course expression of galectin-3 following transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils was examined by immunohistochemistry, combined with Iba-1 immunostaining (a specific microglial cell marker), hematoxylin and eosin staining (for morphological observation), and in situ terminal dUTP-biotin nick end labeling of DNA fragments method (for determination of cell death). Following transient ischemia, we observed a transient increase of galectin-3 expression in CA1 region, which was maximal 96h after reperfusion. Galectin-3 expression was predominately localized within CA1 region and observed only in cells which expressed Iba-1. The galectin-3-positive microglial cells emerge after the onset of neuronal cell damage. Expressions of galectin-3 and Iba-1 were strongly reduced by hypothermia during ischemic insult. Prevention of galectin-3 and Iba-1 expression in microglia by hypothermia has led us to propose that hypothermia either inhibits microglial activation or prevents delayed neuronal death itself. Our results indicate that galectin-3 might exert its effect by modulating the neuronal damage in delayed neuronal death.

  9. Decay of calcium transients after electrical stimulation in rat fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, S L; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1997-01-01

    1. Calcium transients were calculated from fura-2 fluorescence signals (corrected for kinetic delays in the Ca(2+)-fura-2 reaction) from single rat skeletal muscle fibres, either fully dissociated from the fast-twitch flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle or in small bundles from the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Fibres or bundles were embedded in agarose gel to inhibit movement and stimulated by single or trains of 1-2 ms electrical pulses (100 Hz, 2-400 ms train duration). 2. The rate constant of decay of [Ca2+] determined from single-exponential fits to the final decay phase of [Ca2+] after a single action potential was considerably faster in FDB fibres than in soleus fibres. As the stimulation duration increased, the rate constant of [Ca2+] decay decreased for both the FDB and soleus fibres, but the effect was greater in FDB than in soleus fibres. 3. Using the magnitude of the decline in the rate constant of [Ca2+] decay with increasing stimulation duration as an index of relative contribution of the saturable Ca2+ binding sites on parvalbumin, subpopulations termed 'high', 'medium' and 'low', referring to estimated parvalbumin content, were determined within each group of FDB and soleus fibres. In fibres assigned to the 'high' and 'medium' groups, parvalbumin was the major contributor (50-73%) to the [Ca2+] decay rate constant after a single action potential. In fibres in the 'low' group, parvalbumin contributed only 0-28% to the rate constant of [Ca2+] decay. 4. Fluorescence recordings using mag-fura-2, a lower-affinity Ca2+ indicator expected to be in equilibrium with myoplasmic Ca2+, gave similar values for both the [Ca2+] decay rate constant after a single action potential and the decrease in this rate constant with increased stimulation duration, as found for the fura-2 [Ca2+] transients from FDB and soleus fibres. Thus, the observed differences in decay rate of Ca2+ were not introduced by kinetic correction of the fura-2 recordings, but are attributed to

  10. PMCA4 (ATP2B4) mutation in familial spastic paraplegia causes delay in intracellular calcium extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Pang, Shirley Yin-Yu; Li, Miaoxin; Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2015-01-01

    Background Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized primarily by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. More than 50 disease loci have been described with different modes of inheritance. Recently, we described a novel missense mutation (c.803G>A, p.R268Q) in the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA4, or ATP2B4) gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant FSP. Further to this finding, here we describe the functional effect of this mutation. Methods As PMCA4 removes cytosolic calcium, we measured transient changes and the time-dependent decay of cytosolic calcium level as visualized by using fura-2 fluorescent dye with confocal microscopy in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells overexpressing either wild-type or R268Q mutant PMCA4. Results Overexpressing both wild-type and R268Q PMCA4 significantly reduced maximum calcium surge after KCl-induced depolarization as compared with vector control cells. However, cells overexpressing mutant PMCA4 protein demonstrated significantly higher level of calcium surge when compared with wild-type. Furthermore, the steady-state cytosolic calcium concentration in these mutant cells remained markedly higher than the wild-type after SERCA inhibition by thapsigargin. Conclusion Our result showed that p.R268Q mutation in PMCA4 resulted in functional changes in calcium homeostasis in human neuronal cells. This suggests that calcium dysregulation may be associated with the pathogenesis of FSP. PMID:25798335

  11. Divergent Soybean Calmodulins Respond Similarly to Calcium Transients: Insight into Differential Target Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Shane D.; Chakravarthy, Harshini; Shettigar, Vikram; O’Neil, Andrew J.; Siddiqui, Jalal K.; Jones, Benjamin R.; Tikunova, Svetlana B.; Davis, Jonathan P.

    2017-01-01

    Plants commonly respond to stressors by modulating the expression of a large family of calcium binding proteins including isoforms of the ubiquitous signaling protein calmodulin (CaM). The various plant CaM isoforms are thought to differentially regulate the activity of specific target proteins to modulate cellular stress responses. The mechanism(s) behind differential target activation by the plant CaMs is unknown. In this study, we used steady-state and stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the strategy by which two soybean CaMs (sCaM1 and sCaM4) have evolved to differentially regulate NAD kinase (NADK), which is activated by sCaM1 but inhibited by sCaM4. Although the isolated proteins have different cation binding properties, in the presence of Mg2+ and the CaM binding domains from proteins that are differentially regulated, the two plant CaMs respond nearly identically to rapid and slow Ca2+ transients. Our data suggest that the plant CaMs have evolved to bind certain targets with comparable affinities, respond similarly to a particular Ca2+ signature, but achieve different structural states, only one of which can activate the enzyme. Understanding the basis for differential enzyme regulation by the plant CaMs is the first step to engineering a vertebrate CaM that will selectively alter the CaM signaling network. PMID:28261258

  12. [Curve-fit with hybrid logistic function for intracellular calcium transient].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Morita, Shigeho; Araki, Junichi; Otsuji, Mikiya; Hanaoka, Kazuo; Kurihara, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    As the left ventricular (LV) pressure curve and myocardial tension curve in heart are composed of contraction and relaxation processes, we have found that hybrid logistic (HL) function calculated as the difference between two logistic functions curve-fits better the isovolumic LV pressure curve and the isometric twitch tension curve than the conventional polynomial exponential and sinusoidal functions. Increase and decrease in intracellular Ca2+ concentration regulate myocardial contraction and relaxation. Recently, we reported that intracellular Ca2+ transient (CaT) curves measured using the calcium-sensitive bioluminescent protein, aequorin, were better curve-fitted by HL function compared to the polynomial exponential function in the isolated rabbit RV and mouse LV papillary muscles. We speculate that the first logistic component curve of HL fit represents the concentration of the Ca2+ inflow into the cytoplasmic space, the concentration of Ca2+ released from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the concentration of Ca2+ binding to troponin C (TnC), and the attached number of cross-bridge (CB) and their time courses, and that the second logistic component curve of HL fit represents the concentration of Ca2+ sequestered into SR, the concentration of Ca2+ removal from the cytoplasmic space, the concentration of Ca2+ released from TnC, and the detached number of CB and their time courses. This HL approach for CaT curve may provide a more useful model for investigating Ca2+ handling, Ca(2+) -TnC interaction, and CB cycling.

  13. Glibenclamide decreases ATP-induced intracellular calcium transient elevation via inhibiting reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial activity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo-ling; Ma, Zhi-yong; Fu, Zhi-jie; Ling, Ming-ying; Yan, Chuan-zhu; Zhang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence has revealed that glibenclamide has a wide range of anti-inflammatory effects. However, it is unclear whether glibenclamide can affect the resting and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) handling in Raw 264.7 macrophages. In the present study, [Ca(2+)]i transient, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial activity were measured by the high-speed TILLvisION digital imaging system using the indicators of Fura 2-am, DCFDA and rhodamine-123, respectively. We found that glibenclamide, pinacidil and other unselective K(+) channel blockers had no effect on the resting [Ca(2+)]i of Raw 264.7 cells. Extracellular ATP (100 µM) induced [Ca(2+)]i transient elevation independent of extracellular Ca(2+). The transient elevation was inhibited by an ROS scavenger (tiron) and mitochondria inhibitor (rotenone). Glibenclamide and 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) also decreased ATP-induced [Ca(2+)]i transient elevation, but pinacidil and other unselective K(+) channel blockers had no effect. Glibenclamide also decreased the peak of [Ca(2+)]i transient induced by extracellular thapsigargin (Tg, 1 µM). Furthermore, glibenclamide decreased intracellular ROS and mitochondrial activity. When pretreated with tiron and rotenone, glibenclamide could not decrease ATP, and Tg induced maximal [Ca(2+)]i transient further. We conclude that glibenclamide may inhibit ATP-induced [Ca(2+)]i transient elevation by blocking mitochondria KATP channels, resulting in decreased ROS generation and mitochondrial activity in Raw 264.7 macrophages.

  14. Calcium-dependent expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Hovsepian, Anahit; Tepel, Martin; Thilo, Florian

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown whether extracellular calcium may regulate the expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels in patients with chronic kidney disease. Using quantitative in-cell Western assay we compared the expression of TRPC3 channel protein in monocytes from 20 patients with chronic kidney disease and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. TRPC3 channels were identified by immunoblotting using specific antibodies and TRPC3 protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. We observed a significant increase of TRPC3 channel protein expression in patients with chronic kidney disease compared to healthy control subjects (normalized expression, 0.42±0.06 vs. 0.19±0.03; p<0.01). Expression of TRPC3 was significantly inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rates (Spearman r=-0.41) or serum calcium concentration (Spearman r=-0.34). During a hemodialysis session serum calcium concentrations significantly increased, whereas the expression of TRPC3 channels and calcium influx significantly decreased. In vitro studies confirmed that higher calcium concentrations but not magnesium, barium nor sodium concentrations significantly decreased TRPC3 expression in human monocytes. This study indicates that reduced extracellular calcium concentrations up-regulate TRPC3 channel protein expression in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  15. Sources of variability in cytosolic calcium transients triggered by stimulation of homogeneous uro-epithelial cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, Peter A.; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissue structure is the emergent outcome of the interactions between large numbers of individual cells. Experimental cell biology offers an important tool to unravel these complex interactions, but current methods of analysis tend to be limited to mean field approaches or representation by selected subsets of cells. This may result in bias towards cells that respond in a particular way and/or neglect local, context-specific cell responses. Here, an automated algorithm was applied to examine in detail the individual calcium transients evoked in genetically homogeneous, but asynchronous populations of cultured non-immortalized normal human urothelial cells when subjected to either the global application of an external agonist or a localized scratch wound. The recorded calcium transients were classified automatically according to a set of defined metrics and distinct sub-populations of cells that responded in qualitatively different ways were observed. The nature of this variability in the homogeneous cell population was apportioned to two sources: intrinsic variation in individual cell responses and extrinsic variability due to context-specific factors of the environment, such as spatial heterogeneity. Statistically significant variation in the features of the calcium transients evoked by scratch wounding according to proximity to the wound edge was identified. The manifestation of distinct sub-populations of cells is considered central to the coordination of population-level response resulting in wound closure. PMID:25694543

  16. Calcium transients during early development in single starfish (Asterias forbesi) oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Maturation and fertilization of the starfish oocyte are putative calcium-dependent events. We have investigated the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of this calcium dependence in single oocytes of Asterias forbesi. We used the calcium photoprotein, aequorin, in conjunction with a microscope-photomultiplier and microscope-image intensifier. Surprisingly, in contrast to earlier work with Marasthenias glacialis, there is no detectable increase in intracellular-free calcium in the oocyte of A. forbesi in response to the maturation hormone 1-methyl adenine. During fertilization of the same, matured, A. forbesi oocyte there is a large increase in intracellular-free calcium. The calcium concentration increases to approximately 1 microM at the point of insemination and the region of elevated free calcium expands across the oocyte in approximately 20 s (17-19 degrees C). After the entire oocyte reaches an elevated concentration of free calcium, the concentration decreases uniformly throughout the oocyte over the next several minutes. PMID:6490725

  17. Delay in Seeking Medical Help following Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) or “Mini-Stroke”: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Mc Sharry, Jennifer; Baxter, Alison; Wallace, Louise M.; Kenton, Anthony; Turner, Andrew; French, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prompt treatment following Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) can reduce the risk of subsequent stroke and disability. However, many patients delay in making contact with medical services. This study aimed to explore TIA patients' accounts of delay between symptom onset and contacting medical services including how decisions to contact services were made and the factors discussed in relation to delay. Methods Twenty interviews were conducted with TIA patients in England. Using a previous systematic review as an initial framework, interview data were organised into categories of symptom recognition, presence of others and type of care sought. A thematic analysis was then conducted to explore descriptions of care-seeking relevant to each category. Results Delay in contacting medical services varied from less than an hour to eight days. Awareness of typical stroke symptoms could lead to urgent action when more severe TIA symptoms were present but could lead to delay when experienced symptoms were less severe. The role of friends and family varied widely from deciding on and enacting care-seeking decisions to simply providing transport to the GP practice. When family or friends played a greater role, and both made and enacted care-seeking decisions, delays were often shorter, even when patients themselves failed to identify symptoms. Healthcare professionals also impacted on patients' care-seeking with greater delays in seeking further care for the same episode described when patients perceived a lack of urgency during initial healthcare interactions. Conclusions This study provides new information on patients' decisions to contact medical services following TIA and identifies overlapping factors that can lead to delay in receiving appropriate treatment. While recognition of symptoms may contribute to delay in contacting medical services, additional factors, including full responsibility being taken by others and initial healthcare interactions, can over

  18. Transient effect of weak electromagnetic fields on calcium ion concentration in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pazur, Alexander; Rassadina, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    Background Weak magnetic and electromagnetic fields can influence physiological processes in animals, plants and microorganisms, but the underlying way of perception is poorly understood. The ion cyclotron resonance is one of the discussed mechanisms, predicting biological effects for definite frequencies and intensities of electromagnetic fields possibly by affecting the physiological availability of small ions. Above all an influence on Calcium, which is crucial for many life processes, is in the focus of interest. We show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, changes in Ca2+-concentrations can be induced by combinations of magnetic and electromagnetic fields that match Ca2+-ion cyclotron resonance conditions. Results An aequorin expressing Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (Col0-1 Aeq Cy+) was subjected to a magnetic field around 65 microtesla (0.65 Gauss) and an electromagnetic field with the corresponding Ca2+ cyclotron frequency of 50 Hz. The resulting changes in free Ca2+ were monitored by aequorin bioluminescence, using a high sensitive photomultiplier unit. The experiments were referenced by the additional use of wild type plants. Transient increases of cytosolic Ca2+ were observed both after switching the electromagnetic field on and off, with the latter effect decreasing with increasing duration of the electromagnetic impact. Compared with this the uninfluenced long-term loss of bioluminescence activity without any exogenic impact was negligible. The magnetic field effect rapidly decreased if ion cyclotron resonance conditions were mismatched by varying the magnetic fieldstrength, also a dependence on the amplitude of the electromagnetic component was seen. Conclusion Considering the various functions of Ca2+ as a second messenger in plants, this mechanism may be relevant for perception of these combined fields. The applicability of recently hypothesized mechanisms for the ion cyclotron resonance effect in biological systems is discussed considering it's operating at

  19. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... You'll also find calcium in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables (especially collard and turnip greens, ... can enjoy good sources of calcium such as dark green, leafy vegetables, broccoli, chickpeas, and calcium-fortified ...

  20. Mapping calcium transients in the dendrites of Purkinje cells from the guinea-pig cerebellum in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, W N; Werman, R

    1987-01-01

    1. A 10 X 10 photodiode array was used to detect stimulation-dependent absorbance changes simultaneously from many positions in the dendrite field of guinea-pig Purkinje cells which had been injected with the calcium indicator Arsenazo III in thin cerebellar slices. Signals from each element of the array were matched to positions on the cells by mapping them onto fluorescence photographs of Lucifer Yellow which had been co-injected into the cells with the Arsenazo III. 2. In response to intrasomatic stimulation the rising phase of the absorbance signals corresponded in time with the calcium spikes recorded with an intracellular electrode. There was no increase in absorbance during bursts of fast sodium spikes. Absorbance signals persisted after the sodium spikes were blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX). In addition, the signals were largest at 660 nm and small signals of opposite polarity were found at 540 nm. These results indicate that the absorbance signals came from calcium entry into the cell resulting from the turning on of voltage-dependent calcium conductances. 3. In these experiments signals were usually seen all over the dendritic field and were weak or totally absent over the soma. In some cases signals were seen over a more restricted area. With a spatial resolution of 25 microns we were not able to see any evidence for highly localized sites of calcium entry. 4. Sometimes the rising phase of the calcium signals was separated by almost 13 ms in different parts of the dendritic field, too long to be explained by active propagation delay. This suggests that calcium spikes causing these signals can be evoked separately in different regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic field by long-lasting potentials which may reach local threshold at different times. 5. Calcium signals resulting from slow plateau after-potentials and the calcium spikes produced by them were also detected in all locations in the dendritic field. The relative distribution of amplitudes from

  1. Activity-dependent depression of excitability and calcium transients in the neurohypophysis suggests a model of "stuttering conduction".

    PubMed

    Muschol, Martin; Kosterin, Paul; Ichikawa, Michinori; Salzberg, B M

    2003-12-10

    Using millisecond time-resolved optical recordings of transmembrane voltage and intraterminal calcium, we have determined how activity-dependent changes in the population action potential are related to a concurrent modulation of calcium transients in the neurohypophysis. We find that repetitive stimulation dramatically alters the amplitude of the population action potential and significantly increases its temporal dispersion. The population action potentials and the calcium transients exhibit well correlated frequency-dependent amplitude depression, with broadening of the action potential playing only a limited role. High-speed camera recordings indicate that the magnitude of the spike modulation is uniform throughout the neurohypophysis, thereby excluding propagation failure as the underlying mechanism. In contrast, temporal dispersion and latency of the population spike do increase with distance from the stimulation site. This increase is enhanced during repeated stimulation and by raising the stimulation frequency. Changes in Ca influx directly affect the decline in population spike amplitude, consistent with electrophysiological measurements of the local loss of excitability in nerve terminals and varicosities, mediated by a Ca-activated K conductance. Our observations suggest a model of "stuttering conduction": repeated action potential stimulation causes excitability failures limited to nerve terminals and varicosities, which account for the rapid decline in the population spike amplitude. These failures, however, do not block action potential propagation but generate the cumulative increases in spike latency.

  2. TRPM2 channel deficiency prevents delayed cytosolic Zn2+ accumulation and CA1 pyramidal neuronal death after transient global ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, M; Yang, W; Ainscough, J F; Hu, X-P; Li, X; Sedo, A; Zhang, X-H; Zhang, X; Chen, Z; Li, X-M; Beech, D J; Sivaprasadarao, A; Luo, J-H; Jiang, L-H

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemia is a leading cause of cognitive dysfunction. Postischemic ROS generation and an increase in the cytosolic Zn2+ level ([Zn2+]c) are critical in delayed CA1 pyramidal neuronal death, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we investigated the role of ROS-sensitive TRPM2 (transient receptor potential melastatin-related 2) channel. Using in vivo and in vitro models of ischemia–reperfusion, we showed that genetic knockout of TRPM2 strongly prohibited the delayed increase in the [Zn2+]c, ROS generation, CA1 pyramidal neuronal death and postischemic memory impairment. Time-lapse imaging revealed that TRPM2 deficiency had no effect on the ischemia-induced increase in the [Zn2+]c but abolished the cytosolic Zn2+ accumulation during reperfusion as well as ROS-elicited increases in the [Zn2+]c. These results provide the first evidence to show a critical role for TRPM2 channel activation during reperfusion in the delayed increase in the [Zn2+]c and CA1 pyramidal neuronal death and identify TRPM2 as a key molecule signaling ROS generation to postischemic brain injury. PMID:25429618

  3. Mitochondrial calcium uptake regulates rapid calcium transients in skeletal muscle during excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianxun; Ma, Changling; Li, Yan; Weisleder, Noah; Ríos, Eduardo; Ma, Jianjie; Zhou, Jingsong

    2011-09-16

    Defective coupling between sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria during control of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling has been implicated in the progression of neuromuscular diseases. Our previous study showed that skeletal muscles derived from an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model displayed segmental loss of mitochondrial function that was coupled with elevated and uncontrolled sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release activity. The localized mitochondrial defect in the ALS muscle allows for examination of the mitochondrial contribution to Ca(2+) removal during excitation-contraction coupling by comparing Ca(2+) transients in regions with normal and defective mitochondria in the same muscle fiber. Here we show that Ca(2+) transients elicited by membrane depolarization in fiber segments with defective mitochondria display an ~10% increased amplitude. These regional differences in Ca(2+) transients were abolished by the application of 1,2-bis(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, a fast Ca(2+) chelator that reduces mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Using a mitochondria-targeted Ca(2+) biosensor (mt11-YC3.6) expressed in ALS muscle fibers, we monitored the dynamic change of mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels during voltage-induced Ca(2+) release and detected a reduced Ca(2+) uptake by mitochondria in the fiber segment with defective mitochondria, which mirrored the elevated Ca(2+) transients in the cytosol. Our study constitutes a direct demonstration of the importance of mitochondria in shaping the cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling in skeletal muscle during excitation-contraction coupling and establishes that malfunction of this mechanism may contribute to neuromuscular degeneration in ALS.

  4. Mammalian oocyte activation by the synergistic action of discrete sperm head components: induction of calcium transients and involvement of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Perry, A C; Wakayama, T; Cooke, I M; Yanagimachi, R

    2000-01-15

    Sperm-borne oocyte-activating factor (SOAF) elicits activation sufficient for full development and originates from sperm head submembrane matrices. SOAF comprises discrete, heat-sensitive and -stable components (referred to here respectively as SOAF-I and -II) which are each necessary but not sufficient to activate oocytes. The heat-sensitive SOAF component, SOAF-I(m), becomes solubilized from the perinuclear matrix under reducing conditions (the SOAF transition) to generate SOAF-I(s). Although calcium transients likely play an important role in oocyte activation at fertilization, the question is open as to whether demembranated heads or SOAF-I(s) and/or SOAF-II can induce calcium transients. We now report that injection of demembranated sperm heads into mouse oocytes efficiently induced Ca(2+) oscillations. When injected independently, SOAF-I(s) and demembranated heads heated to 48 degrees C failed to generate Ca(2+) oscillations. However, co-injection of SOAF-I(s) and 48 degrees C-heated heads induced oscillations, mirroring their synergistic ability to activate oocytes. This suggests that SOAF-mediated activation proceeds via pathways resembling those at fertilization and provides the first direct evidence that multiple sperm components are required to induce Ca(2+) oscillations. We probed the SOAF-I(s) liberation at the center of this activation and show that in vitro it was sensitive to a profile of serine protease inhibitors. These findings support a model in which mammalian oocyte activation, including the induction of calcium transients, involves proteolytic processing of SOAF from sperm head submembrane compartments.

  5. Emerin plays a crucial role in nuclear invagination and in the nuclear calcium transient.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Masaya; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Motoda, Chikaaki; Yozu, Gakuto; Nagai, Toshihiro; Ito, Shogo; Lachmann, Mark; Kashimura, Shin; Takei, Makoto; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Seki, Tomohisa; Tohyama, Shugo; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kodaira, Masaki; Egashira, Toru; Hayashi, Kenshi; Nakanishi, Chiaki; Sakata, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2017-03-14

    Alteration of the nuclear Ca(2+) transient is an early event in cardiac remodeling. Regulation of the nuclear Ca(2+) transient is partly independent of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient in cardiomyocytes. One nuclear membrane protein, emerin, is encoded by EMD, and an EMD mutation causes Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). It remains unclear whether emerin is involved in nuclear Ca(2+) homeostasis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of emerin in rat cardiomyocytes by means of hypertrophic stimuli and in EDMD induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiomyocytes in terms of nuclear structure and the Ca(2+) transient. The cardiac hypertrophic stimuli increased the nuclear area, decreased nuclear invagination, and increased the half-decay time of the nuclear Ca(2+) transient in cardiomyocytes. Emd knockdown cardiomyocytes showed similar properties after hypertrophic stimuli. The EDMD-iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes showed increased nuclear area, decreased nuclear invagination, and increased half-decay time of the nuclear Ca(2+) transient. An autopsied heart from a patient with EDMD also showed increased nuclear area and decreased nuclear invagination. These data suggest that Emerin plays a crucial role in nuclear structure and in the nuclear Ca(2+) transient. Thus, emerin and the nuclear Ca(2+) transient are possible therapeutic targets in heart failure and EDMD.

  6. Emerin plays a crucial role in nuclear invagination and in the nuclear calcium transient

    PubMed Central

    Shimojima, Masaya; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Motoda, Chikaaki; Yozu, Gakuto; Nagai, Toshihiro; Ito, Shogo; Lachmann, Mark; Kashimura, Shin; Takei, Makoto; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Seki, Tomohisa; Tohyama, Shugo; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kodaira, Masaki; Egashira, Toru; Hayashi, Kenshi; Nakanishi, Chiaki; Sakata, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Alteration of the nuclear Ca2+ transient is an early event in cardiac remodeling. Regulation of the nuclear Ca2+ transient is partly independent of the cytosolic Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes. One nuclear membrane protein, emerin, is encoded by EMD, and an EMD mutation causes Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). It remains unclear whether emerin is involved in nuclear Ca2+ homeostasis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of emerin in rat cardiomyocytes by means of hypertrophic stimuli and in EDMD induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiomyocytes in terms of nuclear structure and the Ca2+ transient. The cardiac hypertrophic stimuli increased the nuclear area, decreased nuclear invagination, and increased the half-decay time of the nuclear Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes. Emd knockdown cardiomyocytes showed similar properties after hypertrophic stimuli. The EDMD-iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes showed increased nuclear area, decreased nuclear invagination, and increased half-decay time of the nuclear Ca2+ transient. An autopsied heart from a patient with EDMD also showed increased nuclear area and decreased nuclear invagination. These data suggest that Emerin plays a crucial role in nuclear structure and in the nuclear Ca2+ transient. Thus, emerin and the nuclear Ca2+ transient are possible therapeutic targets in heart failure and EDMD. PMID:28290476

  7. Functional properties of cardiac L-type calcium channels transiently expressed in HEK293 cells. Roles of alpha 1 and beta subunits

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The cardiac dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel was transiently expressed in HEK293 cells by transfecting the rabbit cardiac calcium channel alpha 1 subunit (alpha 1C) alone or in combination with the rabbit calcium channel beta subunit cloned from skeletal muscle. Transfection with alpha 1C alone leads to the expression of inward, voltage-activated, calcium or barium currents that exhibit dihydropyridine sensitivity and voltage- as well as calcium-dependent inactivation. Coexpression of the skeletal muscle beta subunit increases current density and the number of high-affinity dihydropyridine binding sites and also affects the macroscopic kinetics of the current. Recombinant alpha 1C beta channels exhibit a slowing of activation and a faster inactivation rate when either calcium or barium carries the charge. Our data suggest that both an increase in the number of channels as well as modulatory effects on gating underlie the modifications observed upon beta subunit coexpression. PMID:7539049

  8. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1-mediated calcium responses are inhibited by the alkylamine antihistamines dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Campi, Barbara; Trevisani, Marcello; Compton, Steven J; Morice, Alyn H

    2008-12-01

    American guidelines, unlike European guidelines, support the use of antihistamines as a first line of treatment for some causes of chronic cough. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel activated by the tussive agents capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and protons. It is predominantly expressed by C-fiber and some Adelta -fiber sensory neurons and is thought to be a cough receptor. By measuring increases in intracellular calcium as an indicator of TRPV1 activation, the authors sought to determine whether antihistamines could antagonise TRPV1 permanently expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells and TRPV1 endogenously expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons. In human TRPV1-expressing HEK cells (hTRPV1-HEK), diphenhydramine and fexofenadine failed to inhibit capsaicin-triggered calcium responses. However, both dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine significantly inhibited capsaicin-evoked responses in hTRPV1-HEK. Dexbrompheniramine also inhibited activation of rat TRPV1 expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells, without interfering with TRPA1 and proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) activation. Finally, in rat dorsal root ganglia neuron preparations, dexbrompheniramine dose-dependently inhibited capsaicin-evoked calcium responses. Thus, the inhibition of TRPV1 activation by dexbrompheniramine may provide one potential mechanism whereby this antihistamine exerts its therapeutic effect in chronic cough.

  9. Least-Squares Time-Delay Estimation for Transient Signals in a Multipath Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    characterized by a thin sediment In order to obtain unbiased estimates, we need to go layer over a highly reflecting basalt as shown in Fig. 6. The...surface and the basalt . The model Transient data were gathered in the Atlantic Ocean on a ocean impulse response is shown in Fig. 8 with the four paths...Senamato and D. G. Childers , "Signal resolution via digital inverse Multipath Environment." in Proc. Oceans 󈨞, Washington. DC, pp filtering." [EEE Trans

  10. High-Speed Fluorescence Imaging and Intensity Profiling of Femtosecond-Induced Calcium Transients

    PubMed Central

    Cranfield, Charles G.; Gu, Min

    2006-01-01

    We have demonstrated a combined imaging system, where the physiology of biological specimens can be imaged and profiled at 10–20 frames per second whilst undergoing femtosecond laser irradiation. Individual GH3 cells labeled with the calcium fluorophore Fluo-3 were stimulated using a counter-propagating focused femtosecond beam with respect to the imaging system. As a result of the stimulation, calcium waves can be generated in COS cells, and laser-induced calcium oscillations are initiated in the GH3 cells. Single-photon fluorescence images and intensity profiles of the targeted specimens are sampled in real-time using a modified PerkinElmer UltraView LCI microscope. PMID:23165061

  11. Dependence of transient and residual calcium dynamics on action-potential patterning during neuropeptide secretion.

    PubMed

    Muschol, M; Salzberg, B M

    2000-09-15

    Secretion of the neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) from the neurohypophysis is optimized by short phasic bursts of action potentials with a mean intraburst frequency around 10 Hz. Several hypotheses, most prominently action-potential broadening and buildup of residual calcium, have been proposed to explain this frequency dependence of AVP release. However, how either of these mechanisms would optimize release at any given frequency remains an open question. We have addressed this issue by correlating the frequency-dependence of intraterminal calcium dynamics and AVP release during action-potential stimulation. By monitoring the intraterminal calcium changes with low-affinity indicator dyes and millisecond time resolution, the signal could be dissected into three separate components: rapid Ca(2+) rises (Delta[Ca(2+)](tr)) related to action-potential depolarization, Ca(2+) extrusion and/or uptake, and a gradual increase in residual calcium (Delta[Ca(2+)](res)) throughout the stimulus train. Action-potential stimulation modulated all three components in a manner dependent on both the stimulation frequency and number of stimuli. Overall, the cumulative Delta[Ca(2+)](tr) amplitude initially increased with f(Stim) and then rapidly deteriorated, with a maximum around f(Stim) calcium levels, in contrast, increased monotonically with stimulation frequency. Simultaneously with the calcium measurements we determined the amount of AVP release evoked by each stimulus train. Hormone release increased with f(Stim) beyond the peak in Delta[Ca(2+)](tr) amplitudes, reaching its maximum between 5 and 10 Hz before returning to its 1 Hz level. Thus, AVP release responds to the temporal patterning of stimulation, is sensitive to both Delta[Ca(2+)](tr) and Delta[Ca(2+)](res), and is optimized at a frequency intermediate between the frequency-dependent maxima in Delta[Ca(2+)](tr) and Delta[Ca(2+)](res).

  12. Spontaneous calcium transients manifest in the regenerating muscle and are necessary for skeletal muscle replenishment.

    PubMed

    Tu, Michelle Kim; Borodinsky, Laura Noemi

    2014-07-01

    Tissue regeneration entails replenishing of damaged cells, appropriate cell differentiation and inclusion of regenerated cells into functioning tissues. In adult humans, the capacity of the injured spinal cord and muscle to self-repair is limited. In contrast, the amphibian larva can regenerate its tail after amputation with complete recovery of muscle, notochord and spinal cord. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still unclear. Here we show that upon injury muscle cell precursors exhibit Ca(2+) transients that depend on Ca(2+) release from ryanodine receptor-operated stores. Blockade of these transients impairs muscle regeneration. Furthermore, inhibiting Ca(2+) transients in the regenerating tail prevents the activation and proliferation of muscle satellite cells, which results in deficient muscle replenishment. These findings suggest that Ca(2+)-mediated activity is critical for the early stages of muscle regeneration, which may lead to developing effective therapies for tissue repair.

  13. Calcium transients and the effect of a photolytically released calcium chelator during electrically induced contractions in rabbit rectococcygeus smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Arner, A; Malmqvist, U; Rigler, R

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ was determined with the fura-2 technique during electrically induced contractions in the rabbit rectococcygeus smooth muscle at 22 degreesC. The muscles were electrically activated to give short, reproducible contractions. Intracellular [Ca2+] increased during activation; the increase in [Ca2+] preceded force development by approximately 2 s. After cessation of stimulation Ca2+ fell, preceding the fall in force by approximately 4 s. The fluorescence properties of fura-2 were determined with time-resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron light at the MAX-storage ring, Lund, Sweden. The fluorescence decay of free fura-2 was best described by two exponential decays (time constants approximately 0.5 and 1.5 ns) at low Ca2+ (pCa 9). At high Ca2+ (pCa 4.5), fluorescence decay became slower and could be fitted by one exponential decay (1.9 ns). Time-resolved anisotropy of free fura-2 was characteristic of free rotational motion (correlation time 0.3 ns). Motion of fura-2 could be markedly inhibited by high concentrations of creatine kinase. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of muscle fibers loaded with fura-2 showed that the fluorescence lifetime of the probe was longer, suggesting an influence of the chemical environment. Anisotropy measurements revealed, however, that the probe was mobile in the cells. The Ca2+-dependence of contraction and relaxation was studied using a photolabile calcium chelator, diazo-2, which could be loaded into the muscle cells in a similar manner as fura-2. Photolysis of diazo-2 leads to an increase in its Ca2+-affinity and a fall in free Ca2+. When muscles that had been loaded with diazo-2 were illuminated with UV light flashes during the rising phase of contraction, the rate of contraction became slower, suggesting a close relation between intracellular Ca2+ and the cross-bridge interaction. In contrast, photolysis during relaxation did not influence the rate of force decay, suggesting that relaxation of these

  14. Protective role of transient pore openings in calcium handling by cardiac mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; Yang, Ling; Yang, Jun-Hai; Wang, Yibin; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2011-10-07

    Long-lasting mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) openings damage mitochondria, but transient mPTP openings protect against chronic cardiac stress. To probe the mechanism, we subjected isolated cardiac mitochondria to gradual Ca(2+) loading, which, in the absence of BSA, induced long-lasting mPTP opening, causing matrix depolarization. However, with BSA present to mimic cytoplasmic fatty acid-binding proteins, the mitochondrial population remained polarized and functional, even after matrix Ca(2+) release caused an extramitochondrial free [Ca(2+)] increase to >10 μM, unless mPTP openings were inhibited. These findings could be explained by asynchronous transient mPTP openings allowing individual mitochondria to depolarize long enough to flush accumulated matrix Ca(2+) and then to repolarize rapidly after pore closure. Because subsequent matrix Ca(2+) reuptake via the Ca(2+) uniporter is estimated to be >100-fold slower than matrix Ca(2+) release via mPTP, only a tiny fraction of mitochondria (<1%) are depolarized at any given time. Our results show that transient mPTP openings allow cardiac mitochondria to defend themselves collectively against elevated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels as long as respiratory chain activity is able to balance proton influx with proton pumping. We found that transient mPTP openings also stimulated reactive oxygen species production, which may engage reactive oxygen species-dependent cardioprotective signaling.

  15. Controlling pulse delay by light and low magnetic fields: slow light in emerald induced by transient spectral hole-burning.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rajitha Papukutty; Riesen, Hans; Rebane, Aleksander

    2013-11-15

    Slow light based on transient spectral hole-burning is reported for emerald, Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18):Cr(3+). Experiments were conducted in π polarization on the R(1)(± 3/2) line (E2 ← A(2)4) at 2.2 K in zero field and low magnetic fields B||c. The hole width was strongly dependent on B||c, and this allowed us to smoothly tune the pulse delay from 40 to 154 ns between zero field and B||c = 15.2 mT. The latter corresponds to a group velocity of 16 km/s. Slow light in conjunction with a linear filter theory can be used as a powerful and accurate technique in time-resolved spectroscopy, e.g., to determine spectral hole-widths as a function of time.

  16. Alcohol delays the emergence of the fetal elicited startle response, but only transiently.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Peter G; Dornan, James C; Lynch, Catherine; Maguire, Jennifer F

    2012-08-20

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol may exert a significant detrimental effect on the functioning of the individual's brain, however few studies have examined this before birth. This longitudinal study examined the effect of maternal alcohol consumption on the elicited startle response of the fetus. Two groups of fetuses were examined: one whose mothers drank alcohol (approximately 10 units per week); the other whose mothers did not drink alcohol. Fetuses were examined at 29, 32 and 35 weeks gestation and their startle response observed using ultrasound in response to 2 presentations of a pink noise (70-250Hz) at 90dB(A) separated by 30s. Fetuses exposed to alcohol exhibited a weaker startle response at 29 weeks gestation than did fetuses not exposed to alcohol. There was no difference in the response at 32 and 35 weeks gestation. To ensure that the effects were not due to a more general effect of alcohol on fetal movement, a second experiment compared the spontaneous movements (observed on ultrasound for 45 min) of fetuses whose mothers drank alcohol and fetuses of mothers who didn't drink alcohol. There were no differences in movements exhibited by the fetuses. The results suggest that exposure to alcohol delays the emergence of the elicited startle response at 29 weeks gestation but this delay has disappeared by 32 weeks gestation. The possible role of altered neural development, acute exposure to alcohol and disruptions to the fetus's behavioural repertoire, in mediating these effects are discussed.

  17. Ginkgo biloba Prevents Transient Global Ischemia-Induced Delayed Hippocampal Neuronal Death Through Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tulsulkar, Jatin; Shah, Zahoor A.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported neuroprotective properties of Ginkgo biloba/EGb 761® (EGb 761) in transient and permanent mouse models of brain ischemia. In a quest to extend our studies on EGB 761 and its constituents further, we used a model of transient global ischemia induced delayed hippocampal neuronal death and inflammation. Mice pretreated with different test drugs for 7 days were subjected to eight-minute bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (tBCCAO) at day 8. After 7 days of reperfusion, mice brains were dissected out for TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry. In-situ detection of fragmented DNA (TUNEL staining) showed that out of all test drugs, only EGb 761 (13.6% ± 3.2) pretreatment protected neurons in the hippocampus against global ischemia (vs. vehicle, 85.1% ± 9.9; p < 0.05). Immunofluorescence-based studies demonstrated that pretreatment with EGb 761 upregulated the expression levels of heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as compared to the vehicle group. In addition, increased number of activated astrocytes and microglia in the vehicle group was observed to be significantly lower in the EGb 761 pretreated group. Together, these results suggest that EGb 761 is a multifunctional neuroprotective agent, and the protection is in part associated with activation of the HO1/Nrf2 pathway, upregulation of VEGF and downregulation of inflammatory mediators such as astrocytes and microglia. PMID:23228346

  18. A diffusible signal from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi elicits a transient cytosolic calcium elevation in host plant cells.

    PubMed

    Navazio, Lorella; Moscatiello, Roberto; Genre, Andrea; Novero, Mara; Baldan, Barbara; Bonfante, Paola; Mariani, Paola

    2007-06-01

    The implication of calcium as intracellular messenger in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has not yet been directly demonstrated, although often envisaged. We used soybean (Glycine max) cell cultures stably expressing the bioluminescent Ca(2+) indicator aequorin to detect intracellular Ca(2+) changes in response to the culture medium of spores of Gigaspora margarita germinating in the absence of the plant partner. Rapid and transient elevations in cytosolic free Ca(2+) were recorded, indicating that diffusible molecules released by the mycorrhizal fungus are perceived by host plant cells through a Ca(2+)-mediated signaling. Similar responses were also triggered by two Glomus isolates. The fungal molecules active in generating the Ca(2+) transient were constitutively released in the medium, and the induced Ca(2+) signature was not modified by the coculture of germinating spores with plant cells. Even ungerminated spores were able to generate the signaling molecules, as proven when the germination was blocked by a low temperature. The fungal molecules were found to be stable to heat treatment, of small molecular mass (<3 kD), and, on the basis of extraction with an organic solvent, partially lipophilic. Evidence for the specificity of such an early fungal signal to the AM symbiosis is suggested by the lack of a Ca(2+) response in cultured cells of the nonhost plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and by the up-regulation in soybean cells of genes related to Medicago truncatula DMI1, DMI2, and DMI3 and considered essential for the establishment of the AM symbiosis.

  19. Novel features on the regulation by mitochondria of calcium and secretion transients in chromaffin cells challenged with acetylcholine at 37°C

    PubMed Central

    Caricati‐Neto, Afonso; Padín, Juan‐Fernando; Silva‐Junior, Edilson‐Dantas; Fernández‐Morales, José‐Carlos; de Diego, Antonio‐Miguel G.; Jurkiewicz, Aron; García, Antonio G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract From experiments performed at room temperature, we know that the buffering of Ca2+ by mitochondria contributes to the shaping of the bulk cytosolic calcium transient ([Ca2+]c) and secretion transients of chromaffin cells stimulated with depolarizing pulses. We also know that the mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters and the release of catecholamine are faster at 37°C with respect to room temperature. Therefore, we planned this investigation to gain further insight into the contribution of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering to the shaping of [Ca2+]c and catecholamine release transients, using some novel experimental conditions that have not been yet explored namely: (1) perifusion of bovine chromaffin cells (BCCs) with saline at 37°C and their repeated challenging with the physiological neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh); (2) separate blockade of mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (mCUP) with Ru360 or the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (mNCX) with CGP37157; (3) full blockade of the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling (mCC) by the simultaneous inhibition of the mCUP and the mNCX. Ru360 caused a pronounced delay of [Ca2+]c clearance and augmented secretion. In contrast, CGP37157 only caused a tiny delay of [Ca2+]c clearance and a mild decrease in secretion. The mCC resulting in continued Ca2+ uptake and its release back into the cytosol was interrupted by combined Ru360 + CGP37157 (Ru/CGP), the protonophore carbonyl cyanide‐p‐trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, or combined oligomycin + rotenone (O/R); these three treatments caused a mild but sustained elevation of basal [Ca2+]c that, however, was not accompanied by a parallel increase in basal secretion. Nevertheless, all treatments caused a pronounced augmentation of ACh‐induced secretion, with minor changes of the ACh‐induced [Ca2+]c transients. Combined Ru/CGP did not alter the resting membrane potential in current‐clamped cells. Additionally, Ru/CGP did not increase basal [Ca2+]c near subplasmalemmal sites and caused a

  20. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  1. Calcium Transients in Dendrites of Neocortical Neurons Evoked by Single Subthreshold Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials via Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markram, Henry; Sakmann, Bert

    1994-05-01

    Simultaneous recordings of membrane voltage and concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]_i) were made in apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal cells of rat neocortex after filling dendrites with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Calcium Green-1. Subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), mediated by the activation of glutamate receptor channels, caused a brief increase in dendritic [Ca2+]_i. This rise in dendritic [Ca2+]_i was mediated by the opening of low-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in the dendritic membrane. The results provide direct evidence that dendrites do not function as passive cables even at low-frequency synaptic activity; rather, a single subthreshold EPSP changes the dendritic membrane conductance by opening Ca2+ channels and generating a [Ca2+]_i transient that may propagate towards the soma. The activation of these Ca2+ channels at a low-voltage threshold is likely to influence the way in which dendritic EPSPs contribute to the electrical activity of the neuron.

  2. Neurally Evoked Calcium Transients in Terminal Schwann Cells at the Neuromuscular Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reist, Noreen E.; Smith, Stephen J.

    1992-08-01

    We examined the effects of motor-nerve stimulation on the intracellular Ca2+ levels of Schwann cells, the glial cells at the frog neuromuscular junction. Schwann cells, which were loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 and examined by confocal microscopy, showed a transient increase in free Ca2+ within a few seconds of the onset of tetanic stimulation of the motor nerve. The Ca2+ response was specific to the synapse in that it was found in the terminal Schwann cells at the junction but not in the myelinating Schwann cells along the axon. The Ca2+ transients occurred in the presence of d-tubocurare, indicating that they were not mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and recurred when the stimulus was repeated. The Ca2+ response persisted after degeneration of the postsynaptic muscle fiber, demonstrating that the terminal Schwann cell was stimulated directly by presynaptic activity. The finding that terminal Schwann cells at the neuromuscular junction respond to presynaptic activity suggests that glial-cell function is modulated by synaptic transmission.

  3. Mechanisms of GABA and glycine depolarization-induced calcium transients in rat dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Reichling, D B; Kyrozis, A; Wang, J; MacDermott, A B

    1994-01-01

    1. The mechanisms and effects of GABA- and glycine-evoked depolarization were studied in cultured rat dorsal horn neurons using indo-1 recordings of [Ca2+]i and patch clamp recordings in conventional whole-cell or perforated-patch mode. 2. Application of GABA to unclamped neurons caused [Ca2+]i increases that were dose dependent and exhibited GABAA receptor pharmacology. Calcium entered the neurons via high-threshold voltage-gated calcium channels (conotoxin and nimodipine sensitive). 3. In perforated-patch recordings employing cation-selective ionophores, GABAA receptor activation depolarized 123 of 132 cells to membrane potentials as depolarized as -33 mV (mean -50 mV in all 132 cells, +12 mV above resting potential). The ionic basis of the depolarization was determined by extracellular ion substitution; increased anionic conductance could account fully for the results. 4. Glycine, acting at a strychnine-sensitive receptor, also caused Ca2+ entry into these neurons through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Glycine and GABA both evoked [Ca2+]i responses in the same cells and the responses were highly correlated in amplitude. Glycine also depolarized all five cells tested with perforated recording. Each of the five cells was also depolarized by muscimol to a value similar to that obtained for glycine. 5. Both the depolarization and the increases in [Ca2+]i caused by GABA and glycine could potentially play a role in processes of development and differentiation and sensory transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn. PMID:8057250

  4. Direct In Vivo Manipulation and Imaging of Calcium Transients in Neutrophils Identify a Critical Role for Leading-Edge Calcium Flux.

    PubMed

    Beerman, Rebecca W; Matty, Molly A; Au, Gina G; Looger, Loren L; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Keller, Philipp J; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-15

    Calcium signaling has long been associated with key events of immunity, including chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and activation. However, imaging and manipulation of calcium flux in motile immune cells in live animals remain challenging. Using light-sheet microscopy for in vivo calcium imaging in zebrafish, we observe characteristic patterns of calcium flux triggered by distinct events, including phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria and migration of neutrophils toward inflammatory stimuli. In contrast to findings from ex vivo studies, we observe enriched calcium influx at the leading edge of migrating neutrophils. To directly manipulate calcium dynamics in vivo, we have developed transgenic lines with cell-specific expression of the mammalian TRPV1 channel, enabling ligand-gated, reversible, and spatiotemporal control of calcium influx. We find that controlled calcium influx can function to help define the neutrophil's leading edge. Cell-specific TRPV1 expression may have broad utility for precise control of calcium dynamics in other immune cell types and organisms.

  5. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the Modulation of Airway Smooth Muscle Tone and Calcium Handling.

    PubMed

    Yocum, Gene T; Chen, Jun; Choi, Christine H; Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Dingbang; Fu, Xiao Wen; Sanderson, Michael J; Emala, Charles W

    2017-03-23

    Asthma is a common disorder characterized, in part, by airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed on airway nerve fibers that modulates afferent signals resulting in cough, and potentially bronchoconstriction. In the present study, the TRPV1 transcript was detected by RT-PCR in primary cultured human ASM cells, and the TRPV1 protein was detected in ASM of human trachea by immunohistochemistry. Proximity ligation assays suggest that TRPV1 is expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane of human ASM cells in close association with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2. In guinea pig tracheal ring organ bath experiments, the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin led to ASM contraction, but this contraction was significantly attenuated by the sodium-channel inhibitor bupivicaine (N=4, p<0.05) and the NK-2 receptor antagonist GR 159897 (N=4, p<0.05), suggesting that this contraction is neurally-mediated. However, pretreatment of guinea pig and human ASM in organ bath experiments with the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine inhibited the maintenance phase of an acetylcholine-induced contraction (N=4, p<0.01 for both species). Similarly, capsazepine inhibited methacholine-induced contraction of peripheral airways in mouse precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) experiments (N=4-5, p<0.05). Although capsazepine did not inhibit store-operated calicum entry in mouse ASM cells in PCLS (N=4-7, p=NS), it did inhibit calcium oscillations (N=3, p<0.001). These studies suggest that TRPV1 is expressed on ASM, including the SR, but that ASM TRPV1 activation does not play a significant role in initiation of ASM contraction. However, capsazepine does inhibit maintenance of contraction, likely by inhibiting calcium oscillation.

  6. Transient calcium-dependent potassium current in magnocellular neurosecretory cells of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bourque, C W

    1988-03-01

    1. Magnocellular neurosecretory neurones were impaled in the supraoptic nucleus of perfused explants of rat hypothalamus. Membrane currents were studied at 35 degrees C using the single-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. 2. Depolarizing voltage steps applied from -100 mV evoked a transient outward current (TOC) from a threshold of -75 mV. From this potential, the amplitude of the current increased non-linearly with voltage. 3. Following its activation TOC reached a peak within 7 ms and subsequently decayed monotonically with a time constant of 30 ms. This time constant did not vary significantly with voltage between -75 and -55 mV. 4. The TOC showed complete steady-state inactivation at potentials positive to -55 mV. Inactivation was removed by hyperpolarization, with a mid-point near -80 mV. The removal of inactivation followed a complex time course with distinct fast (tens of milliseconds) and slow (hundreds of milliseconds) components. 5. Tail current measurements revealed that the TOC equilibrium potential (ETOC) lies near -97 mV in the presence of 3 mM [K+]o. Increasing [K+]o caused a decrease of TOC amplitude and a shift in ETOC of 57 mV/log [K+]o. The TOC is therefore predominantly a K+ current. 6. The TOC was unaffected by tetraethylammonium (up to 12 mM) but was reversibly reduced by 4-aminopyridine (ca. 50% block at 1.0 mM) and dendrotoxin (ca. 50% block at 4 nM). 7. The TOC was strongly inhibited (greater than 70%) by adding Co2+ or Mn2+ (1-3 mM) or Cd2+ (50-400 microM) to Ca-containing solutions, or by removal of Ca2+ from the perfusate. These effects were not accompanied by detectable changes in threshold voltage. The amplitude of TOC was also depressed by the organic Ca2+ channel blocker methoxyverapamil (D600). Finally replacement of Ca2+ by Ba2+ in the perfusate completely and reversibly abolished the TOC. 8. These findings suggest that neurosecretory neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus display a transient K+ current which is strongly

  7. Transient calcium-dependent potassium current in magnocellular neurosecretory cells of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, C W

    1988-01-01

    1. Magnocellular neurosecretory neurones were impaled in the supraoptic nucleus of perfused explants of rat hypothalamus. Membrane currents were studied at 35 degrees C using the single-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. 2. Depolarizing voltage steps applied from -100 mV evoked a transient outward current (TOC) from a threshold of -75 mV. From this potential, the amplitude of the current increased non-linearly with voltage. 3. Following its activation TOC reached a peak within 7 ms and subsequently decayed monotonically with a time constant of 30 ms. This time constant did not vary significantly with voltage between -75 and -55 mV. 4. The TOC showed complete steady-state inactivation at potentials positive to -55 mV. Inactivation was removed by hyperpolarization, with a mid-point near -80 mV. The removal of inactivation followed a complex time course with distinct fast (tens of milliseconds) and slow (hundreds of milliseconds) components. 5. Tail current measurements revealed that the TOC equilibrium potential (ETOC) lies near -97 mV in the presence of 3 mM [K+]o. Increasing [K+]o caused a decrease of TOC amplitude and a shift in ETOC of 57 mV/log [K+]o. The TOC is therefore predominantly a K+ current. 6. The TOC was unaffected by tetraethylammonium (up to 12 mM) but was reversibly reduced by 4-aminopyridine (ca. 50% block at 1.0 mM) and dendrotoxin (ca. 50% block at 4 nM). 7. The TOC was strongly inhibited (greater than 70%) by adding Co2+ or Mn2+ (1-3 mM) or Cd2+ (50-400 microM) to Ca-containing solutions, or by removal of Ca2+ from the perfusate. These effects were not accompanied by detectable changes in threshold voltage. The amplitude of TOC was also depressed by the organic Ca2+ channel blocker methoxyverapamil (D600). Finally replacement of Ca2+ by Ba2+ in the perfusate completely and reversibly abolished the TOC. 8. These findings suggest that neurosecretory neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus display a transient K+ current which is strongly

  8. Transient early neurotrophin release and delayed inflammatory cytokine release by microglia in response to PAR-2 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Ouyang, Qing; Sun, Ji-Hu; Liu, Fang-Ting; Song, Dian-Wen; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2012-06-25

    Activated microglia exerts both beneficial and deleterious effects on neurons, but the signaling mechanism controlling these distinct responses remain unclear. We demonstrated that treatment of microglial cultures with the PAR-2 agonist, 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, evoked early transient release of BDNF, while sustained PAR-2 stimulation evoked the delayed release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) and nitric oxide. Culture medium harvested during the early phase (at 1 h) of microglial activation induced by 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 (microglial conditioned medium, MCM) had no deleterious effects on cultured neurons, while MCM harvested during the late phase (at 72 h) promoted DNA fragmentation and apoptosis as indicated by TUNEL and annexin/PI staining. Blockade of PAR-1 during the early phase of PAR-2 stimulation enhanced BDNF release (by 11%, small but significant) while a PAR-1 agonist added during the late phase (24 h after 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 addition) suppressed the release of cytokines and NO. The neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of activated microglial exhibit distinct temporal profiles that are regulated by PAR-1 and PAR-2 stimulation. It may be possible to facilitate neuronal recovery and repair by appropriately timed stimulation and inhibition of microglial PAR-1 and PAR-2 receptors.

  9. Single event transient modeling and mitigation techniques for mixed-signal delay locked loop (DLL) and clock circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, Pierre

    The purpose of this PhD work has been to investigate, model, test, develop and provide hardening techniques and guidelines for the mitigation of single event transients (SETs) in analog mixed-signal (AMS) delay locked loops (DLLs) for radiation-hardened applications. Delay-locked-loops (DLLs) are circuit substructures that are present in complex ASIC and system-on-a-chip designs. These circuits are widely used in on-chip clock distribution systems to reduce clock skew, to reduce jitter noise, and to recover clock signals at regional points within a global clock distribution system. DLLs are critical to the performance of many clock distribution systems, and in turn, the overall performance of the associated integrated system; as such, complex systems often employ multiple DLLs for clock deskew and distribution tasks. In radiation environments such as on-orbit, these critical circuits represent at-risk points of malfunction for large sections of integrated circuits due to vulnerabilities to radiation-generated transients (i.e. single event transients) that fan out across the system. The analysis of single event effects in analog DLLs has shown that each DLL sub-circuit primitive is vulnerable to single event transients. However, we have identified the voltage controlled delay line (VCDL) sub-circuit as the most sensitive to radiation-induced single event effects generating missing clock pulses that increase with the operating frequency of the circuit. This vulnerability increases with multiple instantiation of DLLs as clock distribution nodes throughout an integrated system on a chip. To our knowledge, no complete work in the rad-hard community regarding the hardening of mixed-signal DLLs against single event effects (missing pulses) has been developed. Most of the work present in the literature applies the "brute force" and well-established digital technique of triple modular redundancy (TMR) to the digital subcomponents. We have developed two novel design

  10. Calcium transients in single fibers of low-frequency stimulated fast-twitch muscle of rat.

    PubMed

    Carroll, S; Nicotera, P; Pette, D

    1999-12-01

    Ca(2+) transients were investigated in single fibers isolated from rat extensor digitorum longus muscles exposed to chronic low-frequency stimulation for different time periods up to 10 days. Approximately 2.5-fold increases in resting Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) were observed 2 h after stimulation onset and persisted throughout the stimulation period. The elevated [Ca(2+)] levels were in the range characteristic of slow-twitch fibers from soleus muscle. In addition, we noticed a transitory elevation of the integral [Ca(2+)] per pulse with a maximum ( approximately 5-fold) after 1 day. Steep decreases in rate constant of [Ca(2+)] decay could be explained by an immediate impairment of Ca(2+) uptake and, with longer stimulation periods, by an additional loss of cytosolic Ca(2+) binding capacity resulting from a decay in parvalbumin content. A partial recovery of the rate constant of [Ca(2+)] decay in 10-day stimulated muscle could be explained by an increasing mitochondrial contribution to Ca(2+) sequestration.

  11. Seventy per cent hydrofluoric acid burns: delayed decontamination with hexafluorine® and treatment with calcium gluconate.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Carlos Alberto; Mathieu, Laurence; Hall, Alan H; Monteiro, Mário G Kool; de Almeida, Décio Moreira

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of decontamination and treatment of a 70% hydrofluoric acid (HF) dermal splash injury. A worker was splashed with 70% HF, sustaining approximately 10% TBSA first- to third-degree chemical skin burns of the face, trunk, and left thigh and leg. Initial decontamination involved water rinsing, removal of contaminated clothing, more water rinsing, topical application of magnesium oxide, and administration of intravenous narcotics for management of severe pain. After a delay of approximately 3 hours, active skin washing with Hexafluorine®, 5 L, was performed, followed by intravenous, intradermal perilesional, and topical inunction administration of calcium gluconate. Pain relief and a cooling sensation were quite prompt after Hexafluorine® decontamination. Surgical debridement and skin grafting of the more severe burns were required. No significant systemic toxicity developed, although this has occurred in previously reported similar concentrated HF dermal splash exposure cases, some of which resulted in fatality. While burns did develop, the patient was released from the intensive care service after 2 days and, after skin grafting, had a good outcome at 90-day follow-up. Even after a long delay, decontamination with Hexafluorine® appeared to be beneficial in this case.

  12. Noggin inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation by targeting store-operated calcium entry and transient receptor potential cation channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Lu, Wenju; Jia, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Mingming; Wang, Sabrina; Jiang, Haiyang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Abnormally elevated bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) expression and mediated signaling play a critical role in the pathogenesis of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (CHPH). In this study, we investigated the expression level and functional significance of four reported naturally occurring BMP4 antagonists, noggin, follistatin, gremlin1, and matrix gla protein (MGP), in the lung and distal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC). A 21-day chronic hypoxic (10% O2) exposure rat model was utilized, which has been previously shown to successfully establish experimental CHPH. Among the four antagonists, noggin, but not the other three, was selectively downregulated by hypoxic exposure in both the lung tissue and PASMC, in correlation with markedly elevated BMP4 expression, suggesting that the loss of noggin might account for the hypoxia-triggered BMP4 signaling transduction. Then, by using treatment of extrogenous recombinant noggin protein, we further found that noggin significantly normalized 1) BMP4-induced phosphorylation of cellular p38 and ERK1/2; 2) BMP4-induced phosphorylation of cellular JAK2 and STAT3; 3) hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation; 4) hypoxia-induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), and 5) hypoxia-increased expression of transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPC1 and TRPC6) in PASMC. In combination, these data strongly indicated that the hypoxia-suppressed noggin accounts, at least partially, for hypoxia-induced excessive PASMC proliferation, while restoration of noggin may be an effective way to inhibit cell proliferation by suppressing SOCE and TRPC expression.

  13. Rate Dependence and Regulation of Action Potential and Calcium Transient in a Canine Cardiac Ventricular Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Thomas J.; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Background Computational biology is a powerful tool for elucidating arrhythmogenic mechanisms at the cellular level, where complex interactions between ionic processes determine behavior. A novel theoretical model of the canine ventricular epicardial action potential and calcium cycling was developed and used to investigate ionic mechanisms underlying Ca2+ transient (CaT) and action potential duration (APD) rate dependence. Methods and Results The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) regulatory pathway was integrated into the model, which included a novel Ca2+-release formulation, Ca2+ subspace, dynamic chloride handling, and formulations for major ion currents based on canine ventricular data. Decreasing pacing cycle length from 8000 to 300 ms shortened APD primarily because of ICa(L) reduction, with additional contributions from Ito1, INaK, and late INa. CaT amplitude increased as cycle length decreased from 8000 to 500 ms. This positive rate–dependent property depended on CaMKII activity. Conclusions CaMKII is an important determinant of the rate dependence of CaT but not of APD, which depends on ion-channel kinetics. The model of CaMKII regulation may serve as a paradigm for modeling effects of other regulatory pathways on cell function. PMID:15505083

  14. Myoplasmic calcium transients monitored with purpurate indicator dyes injected into intact frog skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Intact single twitch fibers from frog muscle were studied on an optical bench apparatus after microinjection with tetramethylmurexide (TMX) or purpurate-3,3' diacetic acid (PDAA), two compounds from the purpurate family of absorbance Ca2+ indicators previously used in cut muscle fibers (Maylie, J., M. Irving, N. L. Sizto, G. Boyarsky, and W. K. Chandler. 1987. J. Gen. Physiol. 89:145-176; Hirota, A., W. K. Chandler, P. L. Southwick, and A. S. Waggoner. 1989. J. Gen. Physiol. 94:597-631.) The apparent longitudinal diffusion constant of PDAA (mol wt 380) in myoplasm was 0.99 (+/- 0.04, SEM) x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 (16-17 degrees C), a value which suggests that 24-43% of the PDAA molecules were bound to myoplasmic constituents of large molecular weight. The corresponding values for TMX (mol wt 322) were 0.98 (+/- 0.05) x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 and 44-50%, respectively. Muscle membranes (surface and/or transverse-tubular) appear to be permeable to TMX and, to a lesser extent, to PDAA, since the total amount of indicator contained within a fiber decreased with time after injection. The average time constants for disappearance of indicator were 46 (+/- 7, SEM) min for TMX and 338 (+/- 82) min for PDAA. The fraction of indicator in the Ca2(+)-bound state in resting fibers was significantly different from zero for TMX (0.070 +/- 0.008) but not for PDAA (0.026 +/- 0.009). In in vitro calibrations PDAA but not TMX appeared to react with Ca2+ with 1:1 stoichiometry. In agreement with Hirota et al. (Hirota, A., W. K. Chandler, P. L. Southwick, and A. S. Waggoner. 1989. J. Gen. Physiol. 94:597-631), we conclude that PDAA is probably a more reliable myoplasmic Ca2+ indicator than TMX. In fibers that contained PDAA and were stimulated by a single action potential, the calibrated peak value of the myoplasmic free [Ca2+] transient (delta[Ca2+]) averaged 9.4 (+/- 0.6) microM, a value about fivefold larger than that calibrated with antipyrylazo III under otherwise identical conditions (Baylor, S. M

  15. Production altitude and time delays of the terrestrial gamma flashes: Revisiting the Burst and Transient Source Experiment spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østgaard, N.; Gjesteland, T.; Stadsnes, J.; Connell, P. H.; Carlson, B.

    2008-02-01

    On the basis of the RHESSI results it has been suggested that terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) are produced at very low altitudes. On the other hand some of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) spectra show unabsorbed fluxes of X rays in the 25-50 keV energy range, indicating a higher production altitude. To investigate this, we have developed a Monte Carlo code for X-ray propagation through the atmosphere. The most important features seen in the modeled spectra are (1) a low-energy cutoff which moves to lower energies as TGFs are produced at higher altitudes, (2) a high-energy cutoff which moves to lower energies as TGFs are observed at larger zenith angles, and (3) time delays are observed for TGFs produced at <=20 km (and some at 30 km) altitude when observed at larger zenith angle than the half-angle defining the initial isotropic X-ray beam. This is a pure Compton effect. The model results and an optimization procedure are used to estimate production altitudes of the BATSE TGFs. The main findings are (1) half or more of the BATSE TGFs are produced at low altitudes, <=20 km, (2) a significant portion of the BATSE TGFs are produced at higher altitudes, 30 km to 40 km, (3) for the TGFs produced at <=20 km (and some at 30 km) altitudes the dispersion signatures can be explained as a pure Compton effect, and (4) the softening of the BATSE spectra for increasing zenith angles and the time dispersions both indicate that the initial TGF distribution is beamed.

  16. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  17. Comparison of the myoplasmic calcium transient elicited by an action potential in intact fibres of mdx and normal mice.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, Stephen; Zeiger, Ulrike; Baylor, Stephen M

    2008-11-01

    The myoplasmic free [Ca2+] transient elicited by an action potential (Delta[Ca2+]) was compared in fast-twitch fibres of mdx (dystrophin null) and normal mice. Methods were used that maximized the likelihood that any detected differences apply in vivo. Small bundles of fibres were manually dissected from extensor digitorum longus muscles of 7- to 14-week-old mice. One fibre within a bundle was microinjected with furaptra, a low-affinity rapidly responding fluorescent calcium indicator. A fibre was accepted for study if it gave a stable, all-or-nothing fluorescence response to an external shock. In 18 normal fibres, the peak amplitude and the full-duration at half-maximum (FDHM) of Delta[Ca2+] were 18.4 +/- 0.5 microm and 4.9 +/- 0.2 ms, respectively (mean +/- s.e.m.; 16 degrees C). In 13 mdx fibres, the corresponding values were 14.5 +/- 0.6 microm and 4.7 +/- 0.2 ms. The difference in amplitude is statistically highly significant (P = 0.0001; two-tailed t test), whereas the difference in FDHM is not (P = 0.3). A multi-compartment computer model was used to estimate the amplitude and time course of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release flux underlying Delta[Ca2+]. Estimates were made based on several differing assumptions: (i) that the resting myoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]R) and the total concentration of parvalbumin ([Parv(T)]) are the same in mdx and normal fibres, (ii) that [Ca2+](R) is larger in mdx fibres, (iii) that [Parv(T)] is smaller in mdx fibres, and (iv) that [Ca2+]R is larger and [Parv(T)] is smaller in mdx fibres. According to the simulations, the 21% smaller amplitude of Delta[Ca2+] in mdx fibres in combination with the unchanged FDHM of Delta[Ca2+] is consistent with mdx fibres having a approximately 25% smaller flux amplitude, a 6-23% larger FDHM of the flux, and a 9-20% smaller total amount of released Ca2+ than normal fibres. The changes in flux are probably due to a change in the gating of the SR Ca2+-release channels and

  18. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; Appel, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  19. Noggin inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation by targeting store-operated calcium entry and transient receptor potential cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Lu, Wenju; Jia, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Mingming; Wang, Sabrina; Jiang, Haiyang; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Abnormally elevated bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) expression and mediated signaling play a critical role in the pathogenesis of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (CHPH). In this study, we investigated the expression level and functional significance of four reported naturally occurring BMP4 antagonists, noggin, follistatin, gremlin1, and matrix gla protein (MGP), in the lung and distal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC). A 21-day chronic hypoxic (10% O2) exposure rat model was utilized, which has been previously shown to successfully establish experimental CHPH. Among the four antagonists, noggin, but not the other three, was selectively downregulated by hypoxic exposure in both the lung tissue and PASMC, in correlation with markedly elevated BMP4 expression, suggesting that the loss of noggin might account for the hypoxia-triggered BMP4 signaling transduction. Then, by using treatment of extrogenous recombinant noggin protein, we further found that noggin significantly normalized 1) BMP4-induced phosphorylation of cellular p38 and ERK1/2; 2) BMP4-induced phosphorylation of cellular JAK2 and STAT3; 3) hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation; 4) hypoxia-induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), and 5) hypoxia-increased expression of transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPC1 and TRPC6) in PASMC. In combination, these data strongly indicated that the hypoxia-suppressed noggin accounts, at least partially, for hypoxia-induced excessive PASMC proliferation, while restoration of noggin may be an effective way to inhibit cell proliferation by suppressing SOCE and TRPC expression. PMID:25740156

  20. A functional tandem between transient receptor potential canonical channels 6 and calcium-dependent chloride channels in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Johanna; Dannhoffer, Luc; Antigny, Fabrice; Vachel, Laura; Jayle, Christophe; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline

    2015-10-15

    TRPC6 plays important human physiological functions, notably in artery and arterioles constriction, in regulation of vascular volume and in bronchial muscle constriction. It is implicated in pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and seems to play a role in cancer development. Previously, we identified Guanabenz, an α2-adrenergic agonist used for hypertension treatment (Wytensin®), as an activator of calcium-dependent chloride channels (CaCC) in human Cystic Fibrosis (CF) nasal epithelial cells by transiently increasing [Ca2+]i via an influx of extracellular Ca2+. In this study, using assays to measure chloride channel activity, we show that guanabenz is an activator of CaCC in freshly dissociated human bronchial epithelial cells from three CF patients with various genotypes (F508del/F508del, F508del/R1066C, F508del/H1085R). We further characterised the effect of guanabenz and show that it is independent of α-adrenergic receptors, is inhibited by the TRPC family inhibitor SKF-96365 but not by the TRPV family inhibitor ruthenium red. Using western-blotting, Ca2+ measurements and iodide efflux assay, we found that TRPC1 siRNA has no effect on guanabenz induced responses whereas TRPC6 siRNA prevented the guanabenz-dependent Ca2+ influx and the CaCC-dependent activity stimulated by guanabenz. In conclusion, we show that TRPC6 channel is pivotal for the activation of CaCC by guanabenz through a α2-adrenergic-independent pathway in human airway epithelial cells. We suggest propose a functional coupling between TRPC6 and CaCC and guanabenz as a potential TRPC6 activator for exploring TRPC6 and CaCC channel functions and corresponding channelopathies.

  1. Increase of galectin-3 expression in microglia by hyperthermia in delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 following transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kunio; Niwa, Masayuki; Binh, Nguyen Huy; Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Takamatsu, Manabu; Hara, Akira

    2011-10-31

    The ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA1 region following transient forebrain ischemia, delayed neuronal death, is a typical apoptotic response, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We have reported that mild hyperthermia (38 °C) accelerates DNA fragmentation of the gerbil CA1 pyramidal neurons following transient forebrain ischemia. Recently, we reported that galectin-3, a β-galactosidase-binding lectin, is spatio-temporally expressed only by activated microglial cells located within CA1 region following transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils. Furthermore, expression of galectin-3 and Iba-1 (a specific microglial cell marker) are strongly reduced by hypothermia during ischemic insult. To further elucidate the effect of hyperthermia on the expression of galectin-3 by micloglia in delayed neuronal death, we examined immunohistochemical expression of galectin-3 and Iba-1, in situ terminal dUTP-biotin nick end labeling of DNA fragmentation (for determination of cell death) and hematoxylin and eosin staining (for morphological observation). We observed that between 37 °C and 39 °C, there was a temperature-dependent enhancement of galectin-3 expression in microglial cells in the CA1 region following transient ischemia. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation, detected by TUNEL staining, was observed in CA1 region in normothermia. This TUNEL staining was enhanced by hyperthermia at 37.5 °C and 38 °C, but not at 39 °C. Ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration in CA1 region in gerbil hippocampus subjected to hyperthermia (37.5 °C, 38 °C and 39 °C) observed by HE staining is similar to that in normothermic gerbils. These findings imply that galectin-3 expression in microglia may influence the survival of CA1 pyramidal neurons in cases such as hyperthermia-related neuronal injury.

  2. The calcium-independent transient outward potassium current in isolated ferret right ventricular myocytes. I. Basic characterization and kinetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Enzymatically isolated myocytes from ferret right ventricles (12-16 wk, male) were studied using the whole cell patch clamp technique. The macroscopic properties of a transient outward K+ current I(to) were quantified. I(to) is selective for K+, with a PNa/PK of 0.082. Activation of I(to) is a voltage-dependent process, with both activation and inactivation being independent of Na+ or Ca2+ influx. Steady-state inactivation is well described by a single Boltzmann relationship (V1/2 = -13.5 mV; k = 5.6 mV). Substantial inactivation can occur during a subthreshold depolarization without any measurable macroscopic current. Both development of and recovery from inactivation are well described by single exponential processes. Ensemble averages of single I(to) channel currents recorded in cell-attached patches reproduce macroscopic I(to) and indicate that inactivation is complete at depolarized potentials. The overall inactivation/recovery time constant curve has a bell-shaped potential dependence that peaks between -10 and -20 mV, with time constants (22 degrees C) ranging from 23 ms (-90 mV) to 304 ms (-10 mV). Steady-state activation displays a sigmoidal dependence on membrane potential, with a net aggregate half- activation potential of +22.5 mV. Activation kinetics (0 to +70 mV, 22 degrees C) are rapid, with I(to) peaking in approximately 5-15 ms at +50 mV. Experiments conducted at reduced temperatures (12 degrees C) demonstrate that activation occurs with a time delay. A nonlinear least- squares analysis indicates that three closed kinetic states are necessary and sufficient to model activation. Derived time constants of activation (22 degrees C) ranged from 10 ms (+10 mV) to 2 ms (+70 mV). Within the framework of Hodgkin-Huxley formalism, Ito gating can be described using an a3i formulation. PMID:8505627

  3. Transient Growth Theory Prediction of Optimal Placing of Passive and Active Flow Control Devices for Separation Delay in LPT Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner-Skan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point. At very low Reynolds numbers, there is a possibility to enhance the transient energy growth by means of wall cooling.

  4. Transient response of thyroidectomized pigs to bolus calcium injections and the effect of salmon calcitonin and parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Jaros, G G; Van Hoorn-Hickman, R; Maier, H; Newman, E

    1983-04-01

    The intravenous injection of calcium gluconate (0.11 mM/kg body weight) into conscious thyroidectomized pigs elicits a 30% rise in both ionized and total calcium concentrations of plasma, which return to basal levels within 180 min. The administration of calcitonin (2.5-10 MRC U/kg body weight) reduces this time to 30 to 40 min which is similar to the time obtained in thyroid intact animals. These results suggest that calcitonin may be involved in the fast calcium removal processes and thus in the short-term regulating system of calcium homeostasis. Neither parathyroidectomy nor the administration of parathyroid hormone affected the time for recovery in thyroidectomized pigs, suggesting that the short-term regulation is independent on the parathyroid gland and its hormone.

  5. Elevated polyamines in urothelial cells from OAB subjects mediate oxotremorine-evoked rapid intracellular calcium rise and delayed acetylcholine release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkai; Sun, Yan; Tomiya, Noboru; Hsu, Yuchao

    2013-01-01

    Increased polyamine signaling in bladder urothelial cells (BUC) may play a role in the pathophysiology of overactive bladder (OAB). We quantitated intracellular polyamine levels in cultured BUC from OAB and asymptomatic (NB) subjects. We assessed whether polyamines modulated rapid intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) changes and delayed acetylcholine (ACh) release evoked by oxotremorine (OXO, a muscarinic agonist). BUC were cultured from cystoscopic biopsies. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) quantitated intracellular putrescine, spermidine, and spermine levels. Five-millimeter difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), and one-millimeter methylglyoxalbisguanylhydrazone (MGBG) treatments were used to deplete intracellular polyamines. Ten micrometers of OXO were used to increase [Ca2+]i levels (measured by fura 2 microfluorimetry) and trigger extracellular ACh release (measured by ELISA). Polyamine levels were elevated in OAB compared with NB BUC (0.5 ± 0.15 vs. 0.16 ± 0.03 nmol/mg for putrescine, 2.4 ± 0.21 vs. 1.01 ± 0.13 nmol/mg for spermidine, and 1.90 ± 0.27 vs. 0.86 ± 0.26 nmol/mg for spermine; P < 0.05 for all comparisons). OXO evoked greater [Ca2+]i rise in OAB (205.10 ± 18.82% increase over baseline) compared with in NB BUC (119.54 ± 13.01%; P < 0.05). After polyamine depletion, OXO evoked [Ca2+]i rise decreased in OAB and NB BUC to 43.40 ± 6.45 and 38.82 ± 3.5%, respectively. OXO tended to increase ACh release by OAB vs. NB BUC (9.02 ± 0.1 vs. 7.04 ± 0.09 μM, respectively; P < 0.05). Polyamine depletion reduced ACh release by both OAB and NB BUC. In conclusion, polyamine levels were elevated twofold in OAB BUC. OXO evoked greater increase in [Ca2+]i and ACh release in OAB BUC, although these two events may be unrelated. Depletion of polyamines caused OAB BUC to behave similarly to NB BUC. PMID:23698115

  6. Understanding spatial and temporal patterning of astrocyte calcium transients via interactions between network transport and extracellular diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrahman, E.; Maruyama, D.; Olariu, E.; Fink, C. G.; Zochowski, M.

    2017-02-01

    Astrocytes form interconnected networks in the brain and communicate via calcium signaling. We investigate how modes of coupling between astrocytes influence the spatio-temporal patterns of calcium signaling within astrocyte networks and specifically how these network interactions promote coordination within this group of cells. To investigate these complex phenomena, we study reduced cultured networks of astrocytes and neurons. We image the spatial temporal patterns of astrocyte calcium activity and quantify how perturbing the coupling between astrocytes influences astrocyte activity patterns. To gain insight into the pattern formation observed in these cultured networks, we compare the experimentally observed calcium activity patterns to the patterns produced by a reduced computational model, where we represent astrocytes as simple units that integrate input through two mechanisms: gap junction coupling (network transport) and chemical release (extracellular diffusion). We examine the activity patterns in the simulated astrocyte network and their dependence upon these two coupling mechanisms. We find that gap junctions and extracellular chemical release interact in astrocyte networks to modulate the spatiotemporal patterns of their calcium dynamics. We show agreement between the computational and experimental findings, which suggests that the complex global patterns can be understood as a result of simple local coupling mechanisms.

  7. Spine Calcium Transients Induced by Synaptically-Evoked Action Potentials Can Predict Synapse Location and Establish Synaptic Democracy

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Rhiannon M.; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2012-01-01

    CA1 pyramidal neurons receive hundreds of synaptic inputs at different distances from the soma. Distance-dependent synaptic scaling enables distal and proximal synapses to influence the somatic membrane equally, a phenomenon called “synaptic democracy”. How this is established is unclear. The backpropagating action potential (BAP) is hypothesised to provide distance-dependent information to synapses, allowing synaptic strengths to scale accordingly. Experimental measurements show that a BAP evoked by current injection at the soma causes calcium currents in the apical shaft whose amplitudes decay with distance from the soma. However, in vivo action potentials are not induced by somatic current injection but by synaptic inputs along the dendrites, which creates a different excitable state of the dendrites. Due to technical limitations, it is not possible to study experimentally whether distance information can also be provided by synaptically-evoked BAPs. Therefore we adapted a realistic morphological and electrophysiological model to measure BAP-induced voltage and calcium signals in spines after Schaffer collateral synapse stimulation. We show that peak calcium concentration is highly correlated with soma-synapse distance under a number of physiologically-realistic suprathreshold stimulation regimes and for a range of dendritic morphologies. Peak calcium levels also predicted the attenuation of the EPSP across the dendritic tree. Furthermore, we show that peak calcium can be used to set up a synaptic democracy in a homeostatic manner, whereby synapses regulate their synaptic strength on the basis of the difference between peak calcium and a uniform target value. We conclude that information derived from synaptically-generated BAPs can indicate synapse location and can subsequently be utilised to implement a synaptic democracy. PMID:22719238

  8. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:27313508

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection of Host Epithelial Cells via Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor Transiently Induces Calcium Release from Intracellular Stores*

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Räth, Susann; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) is a major adhesin of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) that interacts in a human-specific manner with the ectodomain of the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) produced by respiratory epithelial cells. This interaction promotes bacterial colonization and bacterial internalization by initiating host signal transduction cascades. Here, we examined alterations of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels in epithelial cells during host cell infections with pneumococci via the PspC-hpIgR mechanism. The release of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores in host cells was significantly increased by wild-type pneumococci but not by PspC-deficient pneumococci. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on phospholipase C as pretreatment of cells with a phospholipase C-specific inhibitor U73122 abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i. In addition, we demonstrated the effect of [Ca2+]i on pneumococcal internalization by epithelial cells. Uptake of pneumococci was significantly increased after pretreatment of epithelial cells with the cell-permeable calcium chelator 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid-tetraacetoxymethyl ester or use of EGTA as an extracellular Ca2+-chelating agent. In contrast, thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase, which increases [Ca2+]i in a sustained fashion, significantly reduced pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion. Importantly, pneumococcal adherence to pIgR-expressing cells was not altered in the presence of inhibitors as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that pneumococcal infections induce mobilization of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores. This may constitute a defense response of host cells as the experimental reduction of intracellular calcium levels facilitates pneumococcal internalization by pIgR-expressing cells, whereas elevated calcium levels diminished bacterial internalization by host epithelial

  10. Cytosolic calcium transients are a determinant of contraction-induced HSP72 transcription in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Stary, Creed M; Hogan, Michael C

    2016-05-15

    The intrinsic activating factors that induce transcription of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle following exercise remain unclear. We hypothesized that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with depolarization is a determinant. We utilized intact, single skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus laevis to test the role of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient and several other exercise-related factors (fatigue, hypoxia, AMP kinase, and cross-bridge cycling) on the activation of HSP72 transcription. HSP72 and HSP60 mRNA levels were assessed with real-time quantitative PCR; cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was assessed with fura-2. Both fatiguing and nonfatiguing contractions resulted in a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. As expected, peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained tightly coupled with peak developed tension in contracting fibers. Pretreatment with N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) resulted in depressed peak developed tension with stimulation, while peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained largely unchanged from control values. Despite excitation-contraction uncoupling, BTS-treated fibers displayed a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. Treatment of fibers with hypoxia (Po2: <3 mmHg) or AMP kinase activation had no effect on HSP72 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the intermittent cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with skeletal muscle depolarization provides a sufficient activating stimulus for HSP72 transcription. Metabolic or mechanical factors associated with fatigue development and cross-bridge cycling likely play a more limited role.

  11. Effects of total flavones from Acanthopanax senticosus on L-type calcium channels, calcium transient and contractility in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shengjiang; Ma, Juanjuan; Chu, Xi; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Zhenyi; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms (AS), a traditional herbal medicine, has been widely used to treat ischemic heart disease. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of its benefits to cardiac function remain unclear. The present study examined the effects of total flavones from AS (TFAS) on L-type Ca(2+) channel currents (ICa-L ) using the whole cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge-detection system. Exposure to TFAS resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L , with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of 283.12 µg/mL and the maximal inhibitory effect of 36.49 ± 1.95%. Moreover, TFAS not only increased the maximum current in the current-voltage relationship but also shifted the activation and inactivation curves of ICa-L toward the hyperpolarizing direction. Meanwhile, TFAS significantly reduced amplitudes of myocyte shortening and [Ca(2+) ]i with an increase in the time to 10% of the peak (Tp) and a decrease in the time to 10% of the baseline (Tr). Thus, the cardioprotective effects of TFAS may be attributed mainly to the attenuation of [Ca(2+) ]i through the direct inhibition of ICa-L in rat ventricular myocytes and consequent negative effect on myocardial contractility.

  12. α1H mRNA in single skeletal muscle fibres accounts for T-type calcium current transient expression during fetal development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Christine; Monteil, Arnaud; Lory, Philippe; Strube, Caroline

    2002-01-01

    Calcium channels are essential for excitation-contraction coupling and muscle development. At the end of fetal life, two types of Ca2+ currents can be recorded in muscle cells. Whereas L-type Ca2+ channels have been extensively studied, T-type channels have been poorly characterized in skeletal muscle. We describe here the functional and molecular properties of T-type calcium channels in developing mouse skeletal muscle. The T-type current density increased transiently during prenatal myogenesis with a maximum at embryonic day E16 followed by a drastic decrease until birth. This current showed similar electrophysiological and pharmacological properties at all examined stages. It displayed a wide window current centred at about −35 and −55 mV in 10 and 2 mm external Ca2+, respectively. Activation and inactivation kinetics were fast (3 and 16 ms, respectively). The current was inhibited by nickel and amiloride with an IC50 of 5.4 and 156 μm, respectively, values similar to those described for cloned T-type α1H channels. Whole muscle tissue RT-PCR analysis revealed mRNAs corresponding to α1H and α1G subunits in the fetus but not in the adult. However, single-fibre RT-PCR demonstrated that only α1H mRNA was present in prenatal fibres, suggesting that the α1G transcript present in muscle tissue must be expressed by non-skeletal muscle cells. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the α1H subunit generates functional T-type calcium channels in developing skeletal muscle fibres and suggest that these channels are involved in the early stages of muscle differentiation. PMID:11897840

  13. New Findings on the Effects of Tannic Acid: Inhibition of L-Type Calcium Channels, Calcium Transient and Contractility in Rat Ventricular Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengli; Chu, Xi; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Liu, Hongying; Liu, Yang; Chu, Li; Zhang, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Tannic acid (TA) is a group of water-soluble polyphenolic compounds that occur mainly in plant-derived feeds, food grains and fruits. Many studies have explored its biomedical properties, such as anticancer, antibacterial, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiinflammatory and antihypertensive activities. However, the effects of TA on the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L) of cardiomyocytes remain undefined. The present study examined the effects of TA on ICa-L using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular Ca(2+) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge detection system. Exposure to TA resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration of 1.69 μM and the maximal inhibitory effect of 46.15%. Moreover, TA significantly inhibited the amplitude of myocyte shortening and peak value of Ca(2+) transient and increased the time to 10% of the peak. These findings provide new experimental evidence for the cellular mechanism of action of TA and may help to expand clinical treatments for cardiovascular disease.

  14. Inhibition of presynaptic calcium transients in cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum by metabotropic GABAB and mGlu2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) are dynamically regulated during skill learning and habit formation, and are dysregulated in disorders characterized by impaired action control. Therefore, a mechanistic investigation of the processes regulating corticostriatal transmission is key to understanding DLS-associated circuit function, behaviour and pathology. Presynaptic GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors exert marked inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamate release in the DLS, yet the signalling pathways through which they do so are unclear. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 to assess presynaptic Ca2+ in corticostriatal projections to the DLS. Using simultaneous photometric presynaptic Ca2+ and striatal field potential recordings, we report that relative to P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, N-type channels preferentially contributed to evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx in motor cortex projections to, and excitatory transmission in, the DLS. Activation of GABAB or mGlu2/3 receptors inhibited both evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients and striatal field potentials. mGlu2/3 receptor-mediated depression did not require functional N-type Ca2+ channels, but was attenuated by blockade of P/Q-type channels. These findings reveal presynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory modulation of corticostriatal function that probably contribute to the selection and shaping of behavioural repertoires. Key points Plastic changes at cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) underlie skill learning and habit formation, so characterizing the mechanisms by which these inputs are regulated is important for understanding the neural basis of action control. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 and brain slice photometry to assess evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients in cortical inputs to the DLS and study their regulation by GABAB and mGlu2

  15. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  16. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons.

  17. Ca analysis: an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Greensmith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow.

  18. Profound regulation of Na/K pump activity by transient elevations of cytoplasmic calcium in murine cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang-Min; Deisl, Christine; Hilgemann, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Small changes of Na/K pump activity regulate internal Ca release in cardiac myocytes via Na/Ca exchange. We now show conversely that transient elevations of cytoplasmic Ca strongly regulate cardiac Na/K pumps. When cytoplasmic Na is submaximal, Na/K pump currents decay rapidly during extracellular K application and multiple results suggest that an inactivation mechanism is involved. Brief activation of Ca influx by reverse Na/Ca exchange enhances pump currents and attenuates current decay, while repeated Ca elevations suppress pump currents. Pump current enhancement reverses over 3 min, and results are similar in myocytes lacking the regulatory protein, phospholemman. Classical signaling mechanisms, including Ca-activated protein kinases and reactive oxygen, are evidently not involved. Electrogenic signals mediated by intramembrane movement of hydrophobic ions, such as hexyltriphenylphosphonium (C6TPP), increase and decrease in parallel with pump currents. Thus, transient Ca elevation and Na/K pump inactivation cause opposing sarcolemma changes that may affect diverse membrane processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19267.001 PMID:27627745

  19. Different fibre populations distinguished by their calcium transient characteristics in enzymatically dissociated murine flexor digitorum brevis and soleus muscles.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Juan C; Bolaños, Pura; Torres, Sonia H; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Greta; Caputo, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatically dissociated flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and soleus fibres from mouse were used to compare the kinetics of electrically elicited Ca2+ transients of slow and fast skeletal muscle fibres, using the fast Ca2+ dye MagFluo4-AM, at 20-22 degrees C. For FDB two Ca2+ transient morphologies, types I (MT-I, 11 fibres, 19%) and II (MT-II, 47 fibres, 81%), were found, the kinetic parameters (amplitude, rise time, half width, decay time, and time constants of decay) being statistically different. For soleus (n = 20) only MT-I was found, with characteristics similar to MT-I from FDB. Correlations with histochemically determined mATPase, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide diaphorase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activities, as well as immunostaining and myosin heavy chain electrophoretic analysis of both muscles suggest that signals classified as MT-I may correspond to slow type I and fast IIA fibres while those classified as MT-II may correspond to fast IIX/D fibres. The results point to the importance of Ca2+ signaling for characterization of muscle fibres, but also to its possible role in determining fibre function.

  20. Transient Increased Calcium and Calcitriol Requirements After Discontinuation of Human Synthetic Parathyroid Hormone 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) Replacement Therapy in Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Gafni, Rachel I; Guthrie, Lori C; Kelly, Marilyn H; Brillante, Beth A; Christie, C Michele; Reynolds, James C; Yovetich, Nancy A; James, Robert; Collins, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic human PTH 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism maintains eucalcemia and converts quiescent bone to high-turnover bone. However, the skeletal and metabolic effects of drug discontinuation have not been reported. Nine subjects with hypoparathyroidism received subcutaneous injections of hPTH 1-34 two to three times daily for 19.8 to 61.3 months and then transitioned back to calcium and calcitriol. Biochemistries and bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were assessed at baseline, while on treatment, and at follow-up 3 to 12 months after drug discontinuation. Two subjects developed hypocalcemia when hPTH 1-34 was abruptly discontinued. Thus, to avoid hypocalcemia, subjects were slowly weaned from hPTH 1-34 over several weeks. When hPTH 1-34 was stopped, subjects were requiring two to three times pretreatment doses of calcitriol and calcium to maintain blood calcium levels. Doses were gradually reduced over many weeks until calcium levels were stable on doses similar to baseline. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP), N-telopeptide (NTX), and osteocalcin (OC) increased significantly with hPTH 1-34; at follow-up, BSAP and NTX had returned to baseline while OC was still slightly elevated. During treatment, BMD was unchanged at the hip and lateral spine but declined at the anterior-posterior (AP) spine, radius, and total body. During weaning, BMD increased, with the hip and lateral spine exceeding pre-hPTH 1-34 values and the whole body returning to baseline. AP spine was increased non-significantly compared to baseline at follow-up. hPTH 1-34 must be gradually weaned in hypoparathyroid patients with high doses of oral medications given to avoid hypocalcemia. The transient increased requirements accompanied by increased BMD after long-term hPTH 1-34 therapy suggest a reversal of the expanded remodeling space favoring bone formation as the skeleton returns to a low-turnover state, reminiscent of the hungry

  1. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8-11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4-6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5-6).

  2. Ca analysis: An Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Greensmith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow. PMID:24125908

  3. A crucial role for cAMP and protein kinase A in D1 dopamine receptor regulated intracellular calcium transients.

    PubMed

    Dai, Rujuan; Ali, Mohammad K; Lezcano, Nelson; Bergson, Clare

    2008-01-01

    D1-like dopamine receptors stimulate Ca(2+) transients in neurons but the effector coupling and signaling mechanisms underlying these responses have not been elucidated. Here we investigated potential mechanisms using both HEK 293 cells that stably express D1 receptors (D1HEK293) and hippocampal neurons in culture. In D1HEK293 cells, the full D1 receptor agonist SKF 81297 evoked a robust dose-dependent increase in Ca(2+)(i) following 'priming' of endogenous G(q/11)-coupled muscarinic or purinergic receptors. The effect of SKF81297 could be mimicked by forskolin or 8-Br-cAMP. Further, cholera toxin and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitors, KT5720 and H89, as well as thapsigargin abrogated the D1 receptor evoked Ca(2+) transients. Removal of the priming agonist and treatment with the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 also blocked the SKF81297-evoked responses. D1R agonist did not stimulate IP(3) production, but pretreatment of cells with the D1R agonist potentiated G(q)-linked receptor agonist mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores. In neurons, SKF81297 and SKF83959, a partial D1 receptor agonist, promoted Ca(2+) oscillations in response to G(q/11)-coupled metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) stimulation. The effects of both D1R agonists on the mGluR-evoked Ca(2+) responses were PKA dependent. Altogether the data suggest that dopamine D1R activation and ensuing cAMP production dynamically regulates the efficiency and timing of IP(3)-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) store mobilization.

  4. SKF-96365 activates cytoprotective autophagy to delay apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of the calcium/CaMKIIγ/AKT-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhao; Sui, Xinbing; Yao, Junlin; Xie, Jiansheng; Jiang, Liming; Zhou, Yubin; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2016-03-28

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) inhibitors are emerging as an attractive new generation of anti-cancer drugs. Here, we report that SKF-96365, an SOCE inhibitor, exhibits potent anti-neoplastic activity by inducing cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. In the meantime, SKF-96365 also induces cytoprotective autophagy to delay apoptosis by preventing the release of cytochrome c (cyt c) from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm. Mechanistically, SKF-96365 treatment inhibited the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIγ (CaMKIIγ)/AKT signaling cascade in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of CaMKIIγ or AKT abolished the effects of SKF-96365 on cancer cells, suggesting a critical role of the CaMKIIγ/AKT signaling pathway in SFK-96365-induced biological effects. Moreover, Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an FDA-approved drug used to inhibit autophagy, could significantly augment the anti-cancer effect of SFK-96365 in a mouse xenograft model. To our best knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that calcium/CaMKIIγ/AKT signaling can regulate apoptosis and autophagy simultaneously in cancer cells, and the combination of the SOCE inhibitor SKF-96365 with autophagy inhibitors represents a promising strategy for treating patients with colorectal cancer.

  5. Role of protein kinase C (PKC) in short- and long-term cellular responses: inhibition of agonist-mediated calcium transients and down-regulation of PKC

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbro, D.; Mazurek, N.; Borner, C.; Conscience, J.F.; Erne, P.

    1988-01-01

    Active tumor promoters such as 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or membrane-diffusible synthetic diacylglycerols such as 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (DiC8), which specifically activate protein kinase C (PKC), inhibited the agonist-mediated rise in cytosolic calcium ((Ca2+)i) in a mast cell line (PB-3c) and human platelets. TPA inhibition of agonist-mediated calcium transient in platelets was readily reversed by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. In contrast to DiCs, only active tumor promoters induced a time- and dose-dependent translocation of cytosolic PKC to membranes as determined both enzymatically or by immunoblotting. However, the concentration of TPA required to induce a half-maximal subcellular redistribution of immunodetectable PKC activity was an order of magnitude greater than the half-maximal dose required to inhibit the intracellular rise in (Ca2+)i. Thus, activation of PKC seems not to be exclusively coupled to its translocation to membranes, suggesting that translocation of PKC is mainly involved in the down-regulation of PKC. Down-regulation of immunoprecipitable PKC was studied in various human breast cancer cell lines that display differential growth inhibitory responses toward the tumor promoter. TPA induced translocation of (35S)methionine-prelabeled cytosolic 80 kDa PKC to membranes followed by complete degradation of the enzyme (t1/2 = 2 h) without affecting PKC synthesis. During prolonged TPA exposure, 20-80% of total 80 kDa PKC of control cells was still synthetized as a membrane-bound 74/80 kDa PKC doublet. Although both proteins lacked PKC activity and phorbol ester binding, they revealed structural similarity with the active 80 kDa PKC form of untreated cells.

  6. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels.

  7. A transient outward current related to calcium release and development of tension in elephant seal atrial fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Maylie, J; Morad, M

    1984-01-01

    Membrane currents and development of tension in atrial trabeculae from elephant seal hearts were studied using a single sucrose-gap voltage-clamp technique. A transient outward current (Ito) was observed with kinetics, voltage and beat dependence, similar to those of tension. Ito had a bell-shaped voltage dependence similar to that of tension and the slow inward current (Isi). Ito, unlike Isi, showed beat dependence quite similar to developed tension. Increases in [Ca]o, frequency of stimulation, and addition of adrenaline enhanced Ito and developed tension. Ito was suppressed by addition of Mn2+, tetracaine, or by depolarizing pre-pulses (to -40 mV for 250 ms). Caffeine at low concentrations (1 mM) blocked beat dependence of Ito. At higher concentrations (greater than 5 mM) caffeine suppressed the activation of Ito, phasic tension, and the second component of the birefringence signal (related to Ca2+-releasing activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.]. Similar to Isi phasic tension and Ito, the voltage dependence of the second component of the birefringence signal was bell-shaped. Our studies suggest that activation of Ito is related to triggered release of Ca2+ from the s.r. which generates the phasic tension. An excitation-contraction coupling scheme is presented which incorporates these findings and suggests that Ito may be responsible for shorter action potentials found in atrial fibres. Images Plate 1 PMID:6512692

  8. Adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 transiently delayed high-fat diet-induced obesity by altering glucose, lipid and energy metabolism of male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a well-known master controller of the cellular adaptive antioxidant and detoxification response. Recent studies demonstrated altered glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in mice with a global Nrf2 knockout. In the present study, we aim to determine the effects of an adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 (ASAN) on diet-induced obesity (DIO) in male mice. The 6-week-old adipose-specific Nrf2 knockout (NK) and its Nrf2 control (NC) mice were fed with either control diet (CD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. NK mice exhibited transiently delayed body weight (BW) growth from week 5 to week 11 of HFD feeding, higher daily physical activity levels and preferential use of fat over carbohydrates as a source of energy at week 8 of the CD-feeding period. After 14 weeks of feeding, NK mice showed comparable results with NC mice with respect to the overall BW and body fat content, but exhibited reduced blood glucose, reduced number but increased size of adipocytes, accompanied with elevated expression of many genes and proteins in the visceral fat related to glucose, lipid and energy metabolism (e.g. Fgf21, Pgc1a). These results indicated that NRF2 is an important mediator for glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in adipose tissue, and ASAN could have beneficial effect for prevention of DIO during the early development of mice.

  9. Adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 transiently delayed high-fat diet-induced obesity by altering glucose, lipid and energy metabolism of male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a well-known master controller of the cellular adaptive antioxidant and detoxification response. Recent studies demonstrated altered glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in mice with a global Nrf2 knockout. In the present study, we aim to determine the effects of an adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 (ASAN) on diet-induced obesity (DIO) in male mice. The 6-week-old adipose-specific Nrf2 knockout (NK) and its Nrf2 control (NC) mice were fed with either control diet (CD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. NK mice exhibited transiently delayed body weight (BW) growth from week 5 to week 11 of HFD feeding, higher daily physical activity levels and preferential use of fat over carbohydrates as a source of energy at week 8 of the CD-feeding period. After 14 weeks of feeding, NK mice showed comparable results with NC mice with respect to the overall BW and body fat content, but exhibited reduced blood glucose, reduced number but increased size of adipocytes, accompanied with elevated expression of many genes and proteins in the visceral fat related to glucose, lipid and energy metabolism (e.g. Fgf21, Pgc1a). These results indicated that NRF2 is an important mediator for glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in adipose tissue, and ASAN could have beneficial effect for prevention of DIO during the early development of mice. PMID:28078004

  10. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S

    2015-10-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  11. Novel transient outward and ultra-rapid delayed rectifier current antagonist, AVE0118, protects against ventricular fibrillation induced by myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Billman, George E; Kukielka, Monica

    2008-04-01

    AVE0118 is a novel drug that blocks the transient outward current (Ito), the ultra rapid component of the delayed rectifier current (IKur), and the acetylcholine dependent potassium channel (IKach). The latter 2 channels are more abundant in atrial tissue. It is possible that AVE0118 could reduce regional differences in repolarization and thereby prevent malignant arrhythmias provoked by ischemia. To test this hypothesis, ventricular fibrillation was induced by a 2-minute occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery during the last min of exercise in dogs with healed myocardial infarctions (n = 9). On a subsequent day, this exercise plus ischemia test was repeated after pretreatment with AVE0118 (1.0 mg/kg, IV). AVE0118 did not change QTc (Van de Water's correction) interval [245 +/- 6.0 ms (control) versus 242 +/- 2.3 ms (AVE)] and attenuated the dispersion of repolarization as measured by the duration of the descending portion of the T wave (Tpeak - Tend) induced by ischemia [ischemic changes: +11.1 +/- 2.4 ms (no drug) versus +2.2 +/- 3.7 ms (AVE)]. AVE0118 also significantly reduced the incidence of ventricular fibrillation, protecting 7 of 9 animals. Thus, AVE0118 abolished ischemically induced repolarization abnormalities and prevented malignant arrhythmias induced by ischemia without altering QTc interval.

  12. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE PAGES

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; ...

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  13. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  14. Functional identification of neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes by means of calcium transients elicited by thrombin.

    PubMed

    Grade, Sofia; Agasse, Fabienne; Bernardino, Liliana; Silva, Carla G; Cortes, Luísa; Malva, João O

    2010-02-01

    Current immunosuppressive treatments for central nervous system demyelinating diseases fail to prevent long-term motor and cognitive decline in patients. Excitingly, glial cell transplantation arises as a promising complementary strategy to challenge oligodendrocytes loss occurring in myelination disorders. A potential source of new oligodendrocytes is the subventricular zone (SVZ) pool of multipotent neural stem cells. However, this approach has been handicapped by the lack of functional methods for identification and pharmacological analysis of differentiating oligodendrocytes, prior to transplantation. In this study, we questioned whether SVZ-derived oligodendrocytes could be functionally discriminated due to intracellular calcium level ([Ca(2+)](i)) variations following KCl, histamine, and thrombin stimulations. Previously, we have shown that SVZ-derived neurons and immature cells can be discriminated on the basis of their selective [Ca(2+)](i) rise upon KCl and histamine stimulation, respectively. Herein, we demonstrate that O4+ and proteolipid protein-positive (PLP+) oligodendrocytes do not respond to these stimuli, but display a robust [Ca(2+)](i) rise following thrombin stimulation, whereas other cell types are thrombin-insensitive. Thrombin-induced Ca(2+) increase in oligodendrocytes is mediated by protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) activation and downstream signaling through G(q/11) and phospholipase C (PLC), resulting in Ca(2+) recruitment from intracellular compartments. This method allows the analysis of functional properties of oligodendrocytes in living SVZ cultures, which is of major interest for the development of effective grafting strategies in the demyelinated brain. Additionally, it opens new perspectives for the search of new pro-oligodendrogenic factors to be used prior grafting.

  15. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4)-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse oesophageal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Boudaka, Ammar; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Tominaga, Makoto

    2011-07-15

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a multi-factorial disease that may involve oesophageal hypersensitivity to mechanical or heat stimulus as well as acids. Intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs) are the most prominent terminal structures of oesophageal vagal mechanosensitive afferents and may modulate mechanotransduction via purinergic receptors. Transient receptor potential channel vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) can detect various stimuli such as warm temperature, stretch and some chemicals, including 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD) and GSK1016790A. TRPV4 is expressed in many tissues, including renal epithelium, skin keratinocytes and urinary bladder epithelium, but its expression and function in the oesophagus is poorly understood. Here, we show anatomical and functional TRPV4 expression in mouse oesophagus and its involvement in ATP release. TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in oesophageal keratinocytes. Several known TRPV4 activators (chemicals, heat and stretch stimulus) increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations in cultured WT keratinocytes but not in TRPV4 knockout (KO) cells. Moreover, the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A and heat stimulus evoked TRPV4-like current responses in isolated WT keratinocytes, but not in TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A and heat stimulus also significantly increased ATP release from WT oesophageal keratinocytes compared to TRPV4KO cells. The vesicle-trafficking inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA) inhibited the ATP release. This ATP release could be mediated by the newly identified vesicle ATP transporter, VNUT, which is expressed by oesophageal keratinocytes at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, in response to heat, chemical and possibly mechanical stimuli, TRPV4 contributes to ATP release in the oesophagus. Thus, TRPV4 could be involved in oesophageal mechano- and heat hypersensitivity.

  16. Calcium-induced transitions between the spontaneous miniature outward and the transient outward currents in retinal amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pratip; Slaughter, Malcolm M

    2002-04-01

    Spontaneous miniature outward currents (SMOCs) occur in a subset of retinal amacrine cells at membrane potentials between -60 and -40 mV. At more depolarized potentials, a transient outward current (I(to)) appears and SMOCs disappear. Both SMOCs and the I(to) are K(+) currents carried by BK channels. They both arise from Ca(2+) influx through high voltage-activated (HVA) Ca(2+) channels, which stimulates release of internal Ca(2+) from caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive stores. An increase in Ca(2+) influx resulted in an increase in SMOC frequency, but also led to a decline in SMOC mean amplitude. This reduction showed a temporal dependence: the effect being greater in the latter part of a voltage step. Thus, Ca(2+) influx, although required to generate SMOCs, also produced a negative modulation of their amplitudes. Increasing Ca(2+) influx also led to a decline in the first latency to SMOC occurrence. A combination of these effects resulted in the disappearance of SMOCs, along with the concomitant appearance of the I(to) at high levels of Ca(2+) influx. Therefore, low levels of Ca(2+) influx, arising from low levels of activation of the HVA Ca(2+) channels, produce randomly occurring SMOCs within the range of -60 to -40 mV. Further depolarization leads to greater activation of the HVA Ca(2+) channels, larger Ca(2+) influx, and the disappearance of discontinuous SMOCs, along with the appearance of the I(to). Based on their characteristics, SMOCs in retinal neurons may function as synaptic noise suppressors at quiescent glutamatergic synapses.

  17. Wenxin Keli attenuates ischemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias in rats: Involvement of L‑type calcium and transient outward potassium currents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Wang, Xin; Gu, Yongwei; Wang, Teng; Huang, Congxin

    2013-02-01

    Wenxin Keli is the first state‑sanctioned traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)-based antiarrhythmic drug. The present study aimed to examine whether long‑term treatment with Wenxin Keli reduces ischemia‑induced ventricular arrhythmias in rats in vivo, and if so, which mechanisms are involved. Male rats were treated with either saline (control group) or Wenxin Keli for 3 weeks and were subjected to myocardial ischemia for 30 min with assessment of the resulting ventricular arrhythmias. The L‑type calcium current (ICa,L) and transient outward potassium current (Ito) were measured by the patch clamp technique in normal rat cardiac ventricular myocytes. During the 30‑min ischemia, Wenxin Keli significantly reduced the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (VF) (P<0.05). The number of ventricular tachycardia (VT)+VF episodes and the severity of arrhythmias were significantly reduced by Wenxin Keli administration compared to the control group (P<0.05). In addition, Wenxin Keli inhibited ICa,L and Ito in a concentration‑dependent manner. These results suggest that long‑term treatment with Wenxin Keli may attenuate ischemia‑induced ventricular arrhythmias in rats and that ICa,L and Ito may be involved in this attenuation.

  18. Simulation of intracellular [Formula: see text] transients in osteoblasts induced by fluid shear stress and its application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junqing; Xie, Wenjun; Shi, Liang; Yu, Liyin; Zhang, Jianbao

    2017-04-01

    Intracellular [Formula: see text] transient induced by fluid shear stress (FSS) plays an important role in mechanical regulation of osteoblasts, but the cellular mechanism remains incompletely understood. Here, we constructed a mathematical model combined with experiments to elucidate it. Our simulated and experimental results showed that it was the delay of membrane potential repolarization to produce the refractory period of FSS-induced intracellular calcium transients in osteoblasts. Moreover, the results also demonstrated that the amplitude of FSS-induced intracellular calcium transient is crucial to the proliferation, while its duration is critical to the differentiation, of osteoblasts. Overall, the present study provides a way to understand the cellular mechanism of intracellular calcium transients in osteoblast induced by FSS and explains some of related physiological events.

  19. No advantage to delaying the introduction of calcium soaps of palm oil fatty acids to early lactation dairy rations.

    PubMed

    Holter, J B; Hayes, H H

    1994-03-01

    Holstein cows (n = 105, 39 primiparous) were blocked by parity (1 vs. > 1) and assigned randomly at calving to receive supplemental Ca soaps of palm oil (2.9% fatty acids in dietary DM), commencing on DIM 1, 29, or 57 and ending on DIM 112. Effects on DMI, BW and condition score, and milk yield and composition were studied during 1 to 140 DIM. Control TMR contained 4.4% ether extract (mainly from corn meal and dried distillers grains with solubles), was fed using four grain to forage ratios, and, in early lactation, averaged 60% concentrate, 25% corn silage, and 15% wilted grass silage DM. Delayed supplementation of soaps did not promote higher dietary DMI, resulted in reduced milk fat percentage and yield, tended to decrease 4% FCM yield, and did not significantly influence milk protein content. Supplementation of soaps in wk 1 to 8 did not spare postpartum BW loss, hasten BW regain, or affect the normal change in body condition score. Ad libitum DMI and 4% FCM yield were significantly and negatively correlated (r = -.3) with the proportion of dietary CP that was ruminally undegradable.

  20. Nonequilibrium Calcium Dynamics Regulate the Autonomous Firing Pattern of Rat Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua A.; Teagarden, Mark A.; Foehring, Robert C.; Wilson, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons discharge rhythmically in two patterns associated with different afterhyperpolarization timescales, each dictated by a different calcium-dependent potassium current. Single spiking depends on a medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) generated by rapid SK currents that are associated with N-type calcium channels. Periodic bursting is driven by a delayed and slowly decaying afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) current associated with L-type channels. Using calcium imaging we show that the calcium transients underlying these currents exhibit two corresponding timescales throughout the somatodendritic tree. This result is not consistent with spatial compartmentalization of calcium entering through the two calcium channels and acting on the two potassium currents, or with differences in channel gating kinetics of the calcium dependent potassium currents. Instead, we show that nonequilibrium dynamics of calcium redistribution among cytoplasmic binding sites with different calcium binding kinetics can give rise to multiple timescales within the same cytoplasmic volume. The resulting independence of mAHP and sAHP currents allows cytoplasmic calcium to control two different and incompatible firing patterns (single spiking or bursting and pausing), depending on whether calcium influx is pulsatile or sustained. During irregular firing, calcium entry at both timescales can be detected, suggesting that an interaction between the medium and slow calcium-dependent afterhyperpolarizations may underlie this firing pattern. PMID:19571130

  1. Nonequilibrium calcium dynamics regulate the autonomous firing pattern of rat striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joshua A; Teagarden, Mark A; Foehring, Robert C; Wilson, Charles J

    2009-07-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons discharge rhythmically in two patterns associated with different afterhyperpolarization timescales, each dictated by a different calcium-dependent potassium current. Single spiking depends on a medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) generated by rapid SK currents that are associated with N-type calcium channels. Periodic bursting is driven by a delayed and slowly decaying afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) current associated with L-type channels. Using calcium imaging we show that the calcium transients underlying these currents exhibit two corresponding timescales throughout the somatodendritic tree. This result is not consistent with spatial compartmentalization of calcium entering through the two calcium channels and acting on the two potassium currents, or with differences in channel gating kinetics of the calcium dependent potassium currents. Instead, we show that nonequilibrium dynamics of calcium redistribution among cytoplasmic binding sites with different calcium binding kinetics can give rise to multiple timescales within the same cytoplasmic volume. The resulting independence of mAHP and sAHP currents allows cytoplasmic calcium to control two different and incompatible firing patterns (single spiking or bursting and pausing), depending on whether calcium influx is pulsatile or sustained. During irregular firing, calcium entry at both timescales can be detected, suggesting that an interaction between the medium and slow calcium-dependent afterhyperpolarizations may underlie this firing pattern.

  2. Potential roles for calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) in murine anorectic response to deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin).

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenda; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2017-01-01

    Food contamination by the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) has the potential to adversely affect animal and human health by suppressing food intake and impairing growth. In mice, the DON-induced anorectic response results from aberrant satiety hormone secretion by enteroendocrine cells (EECs) of the gastrointestinal tract. Recent in vitro studies in the murine STC-1 EEC model have linked DON-induced satiety hormone secretion to activation of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-coupled protein receptor, and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), a TRP channel. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms mediate DON's anorectic effects in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DON-induced food refusal and satiety hormone release in the mouse are linked to activation of CaSR and TRPA1. Oral treatment with selective agonists for CaSR (R-568) or TRPA1 (allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)) suppressed food intake in mice, and the agonist's effects were suppressed by pretreatment with corresponding antagonists NPS-2143 or ruthenium red (RR), respectively. Importantly, NPS-2143 or RR inhibited both DON-induced food refusal and plasma elevations of the satiety hormones cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36); cotreatment with both antagonists additively suppressed both anorectic and hormone responses to DON. Taken together, these in vivo data along with prior in vitro findings support the contention that activation of CaSR and TRPA1 contributes to DON-induced food refusal by mediating satiety hormone exocytosis from EEC.

  3. Impaired calcium mobilization in natural killer cells from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis patients is associated with transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, S.; Clarke, L.; Smith, P.; Staines, D.; Marshall‐Gradisnik, S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily 3 (TRPM3) ion channels play a role in calcium (Ca2+) cell signalling. Reduced TRPM3 protein expression has been identified in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients. However, the significance of TRPM3 and association with intracellular Ca2+ mobilization has yet to be determined. Fifteen CFS/ME patients (mean age 48·82 ± 9·83 years) and 25 healthy controls (mean age 39·2 ± 12·12 years) were examined. Isolated natural killer (NK) cells were labelled with fluorescent antibodies to determine TRPM3, CD107a and CD69 receptors on CD56dimCD16+NK cells and CD56brightCD16dim/– NK cells. Ca2+ flux and NK cytotoxicity activity was measured under various stimulants, including pregnenolone sulphate (PregS), thapsigargin (TG), 2‐aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB) and ionomycin. Unstimulated CD56brightCD16dim/– NK cells showed significantly reduced TRPM3 receptors in CFS/ME compared with healthy controls (HC). Ca2+ flux showed no significant difference between groups. Moreover, PregS‐stimulated CD56brightCD16dim/–NK cells showed a significant increase in Ca2+ flux in CFS/ME patients compared with HC. By comparison, unstimulated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells showed no significant difference in both Ca2+ flux and TRPM3 expression. PregS‐stimulated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells increased TRPM3 expression significantly in CFS/ME, but this was not associated with a significant increase in Ca2+ flux. Furthermore, TG‐stimulated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells increased K562 cell lysis prior to PregS stimulation in CFS/ME patients compared with HC. Differential expression of TRPM3 and Ca2+ flux between NK cell subtypes may provide evidence for their role in the pathomechanism involving NK cell cytotoxicity activity in CFS/ME. PMID:27727448

  4. Impaired calcium mobilization in natural killer cells from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis patients is associated with transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T; Johnston, S; Clarke, L; Smith, P; Staines, D; Marshall-Gradisnik, S

    2017-02-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily 3 (TRPM3) ion channels play a role in calcium (Ca(2+) ) cell signalling. Reduced TRPM3 protein expression has been identified in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients. However, the significance of TRPM3 and association with intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization has yet to be determined. Fifteen CFS/ME patients (mean age 48·82 ± 9·83 years) and 25 healthy controls (mean age 39·2 ± 12·12 years) were examined. Isolated natural killer (NK) cells were labelled with fluorescent antibodies to determine TRPM3, CD107a and CD69 receptors on CD56(dim) CD16(+) NK cells and CD56(bright) CD16(dim/-) NK cells. Ca(2+) flux and NK cytotoxicity activity was measured under various stimulants, including pregnenolone sulphate (PregS), thapsigargin (TG), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB) and ionomycin. Unstimulated CD56(bright) CD16(dim/-) NK cells showed significantly reduced TRPM3 receptors in CFS/ME compared with healthy controls (HC). Ca(2+) flux showed no significant difference between groups. Moreover, PregS-stimulated CD56(bright) CD16(dim/-) NK cells showed a significant increase in Ca(2+) flux in CFS/ME patients compared with HC. By comparison, unstimulated CD56(dim) CD16(+) NK cells showed no significant difference in both Ca(2+) flux and TRPM3 expression. PregS-stimulated CD56(dim) CD16(+) NK cells increased TRPM3 expression significantly in CFS/ME, but this was not associated with a significant increase in Ca(2+) flux. Furthermore, TG-stimulated CD56(dim) CD16(+) NK cells increased K562 cell lysis prior to PregS stimulation in CFS/ME patients compared with HC. Differential expression of TRPM3 and Ca(2+) flux between NK cell subtypes may provide evidence for their role in the pathomechanism involving NK cell cytotoxicity activity in CFS/ME.

  5. Rapid intracellular calcium changes in U937 monocyte cell line: transient increases in response to platelet-activating factor and chemotactic peptide but not interferon-gamma or lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Maudsley, D J; Morris, A G

    1987-01-01

    The dye fura-2, a potentially more sensitive successor to quin2 for measuring intracellular free calcium ion concentrations [(Ca2+]i), has been applied here to investigate the possible involvement of early changes in [Ca2+]i in the stimulation of the human monocyte-macrophage-like cell line U937. The calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin, known pharmacological stimuli for macrophages, were found to cause sharp rises in [Ca2+]i as expected. Responses analogous to those reported for a murine macrophage cell (J774) were obtained on stimulation of U937 cells with ATP which caused rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 200 mM). In addition to ATP, several agents known to activate macrophages were used as stimuli. In particular, platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) was found to cause rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 400 nM) even at concentrations as low as 10(-10) M. This contrasts with responses to ATP that were markedly reduced at 10(-6) M compared with 10(-5) M or above, suggesting that PAF is a highly potent stimulus for intracellular calcium mobilization in macrophages. Similar responses were obtained with chemotactic peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine). On the other hand, two agents known to be potent activators of macrophages, interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide, had no rapid effect on [Ca2+]i. This may reflect differences in the kinetics of signal-response coupling or alternatively a different mechanism of action by-passing the need for rapid elevation of [Ca2+]i. PMID:3110054

  6. Combined system for high-time-resolution dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and fluorescence imaging of calcium transients in single normal and diseased skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1994-12-01

    Fast photometric measurements and video-imaging of fluorescent indicators both are powerful tools in measuring the intracellular free calcium concentration of muscle and many other cells. as photometric systems yield a high temporal resolution, calcium imaging systems have high spatial but significantly reduced temporal resolution. Therefore we have developed an integrated system combining both methods and based mostly on standard components. As a common, sensitive Ca2+- indicator we used the fluorescent probe Fura-2, which is alternatingly excited for ratio measurements at 340/380 nm. We used a commercially available dual excitation photometric system (OSP-3; Olympus) for attaching a CCD-camera and a frame grabber board. To achieve the synchronization we had to design circuitries for external triggering, synchronization and accurate control of the filter changer, which we added to the system. Additionally, the software for a triggered image acquisition was developed. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode (ratio frequency 100 Hz) and the imaging mode (ratio frequency 4.17 Hz). The calcium images are correlated with the 25 times faster spot measurements and are analyzed by means of image processing. With this combined system we study release and uptake of calcium ions of normal and diseased skeletal muscle from mdx mice. Such a system will also be important for other cellular studies in which fluorescence indicators are used to monitor similar time dependent alterations as well as changes in cellular distributions of calcium.

  7. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  8. Mitochondrial calcium transients in adult rabbit cardiac myocytes: inhibition by ruthenium red and artifacts caused by lysosomal loading of Ca(2+)-indicating fluorophores.

    PubMed Central

    Trollinger, D R; Cascio, W E; Lemasters, J J

    2000-01-01

    A cold/warm loading protocol was used to ester-load Rhod 2 into mitochondria and other organelles and Fluo 3 into the cytosol of adult rabbit cardiac myocytes for confocal fluorescence imaging. Transient increases in both cytosolic Fluo 3 and mitochondrial Rhod 2 fluorescence occurred after electrical stimulation. Ruthenium red, a blocker of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, inhibited mitochondrial Rhod 2 fluorescence transients but not cytosolic Fluo 3 transients. Thus the ruthenium red-sensitive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter catalyzes Ca(2+) uptake during beat-to-beat transients of mitochondrial free Ca(2+), which in turn may help match mitochondrial ATP production to myocardial ATP demand. After ester loading, substantial amounts of Ca(2+)-indicating fluorophores localized into an acidic lysosomal/endosomal compartment. This lysosomal fluorescence did not respond to electrical stimulation. Because fluorescence arose predominantly from lysosomes after the cold loading/warm incubation procedure, total cellular fluorescence failed to track beat-to-beat changes of mitochondrial fluorescence. Only three-dimensionally resolved confocal imaging distinguished the relatively weak mitochondrial signal from the bright lysosomal fluorescence. PMID:10866936

  9. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  10. Glutamate Receptor-Like Channel3.3 Is Involved in Mediating Glutathione-Triggered Cytosolic Calcium Transients, Transcriptional Changes, and Innate Immunity Responses in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Wang, Jing; Ma, Chunli; Zhao, Yongxiu; Wang, Yingchun; Hasi, Agula; Qi, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The tripeptide reduced glutathione (GSH; γ-glutamate [Glu]-cysteine [Cys]-glycine) is a major endogenous antioxidant in both animal and plant cells. It also functions as a neurotransmitter mediating communication among neurons in the central nervous system of animals through modulating specific ionotropic Glu receptors (GLRs) in the membrane. Little is known about such signaling roles in plant cells. Here, we report that transient rises in cytosolic calcium triggered by exogenous GSH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves were sensitive to GLR antagonists and abolished in loss-of-function atglr3.3 mutants. Like the GSH biosynthesis-defective mutant PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT2, atglr3.3 showed enhanced susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Pathogen-induced defense marker gene expression was also decreased in atglr3.3 mutants. Twenty-seven percent of genes that were rapidly responsive to GSH treatment of seedlings were defense genes, most of which were dependent on functional AtGLR3.3, while GSH suppressed pathogen propagation through the AtGLR3.3-dependent pathway. Eight previously identified putative AtGLR3.3 ligands, GSH, oxidized glutathione, alanine, asparagine, Cys, Glu, glycine, and serine, all elicited the AtGLR3.3-dependent cytosolic calcium transients, but only GSH and Cys induced the defense response, with the Glu-induced AtGLR3.3-dependent transcription response being much less apparent than that triggered by GSH. Together, these observations suggest that AtGLR3.3 is required for several signaling effects mediated by extracellular GSH, even though these effects may not be causally related. PMID:23656893

  11. Transient increases in cytosolic free calcium appear to be required for the migration of adherent human neutrophils [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1990 Mar;110(3):861

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Human neutrophils exhibit multiple increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration [( Ca2+]i) spontaneously and in response to the chemoattractant N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (Jaconi, M. E. E., R. W. Rivest, W. Schlegel, C. B. Wollheim, D. Pittet, and P. D. Lew. 1988. J. Biol. Chem. 263:10557-10560). The function of these repetitive increases in [Ca2+]i, as well as the role of Ca2+ in human neutrophil migration, remain unresolved. We have used microspectrofluorometry to measure [Ca2+]i in single fura-2-loaded human neutrophils as they moved on poly-D-lysine-coated glass in the presence of serum. To investigate the role of Ca2+ in human neutrophil migration, we examined cells in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+, as well as intracellular Ca2(+)-buffered and Ca2(+)- depleted cells. In the presence of extracellular Ca2+, multiple increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i were frequently observed, and at least one such transient increase in [Ca2+]i occurred in every moving cell during chemokinesis, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. In addition, neutrophils that extended pseudopodia and assumed a polarized morphology after plating onto a surface were always observed to exhibit [Ca2+]i transients even in the absence of chemoattractant. In contrast, a [Ca2+]i transient was observed in only one of the nonpolarized stationary cells that were examined (n = 15). Although some cells exhibited relatively periodic increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i, resembling the regular oscillations that have been observed in some cell types, many others exhibited increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i that varied in their timing, magnitude, and duration. Buffering of [Ca2+]i or removal of extracellular Ca2+ damped out or blocked transient increases in [Ca2+]i and reduced or inhibited the migration of neutrophils. Under these conditions, polarized cells were often observed to make repeated attempts at migration, but they remained anchored at their rear. These data suggest

  12. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor ameliorates delayed neuronal death in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after transient global ischemia in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Iijima, T; Sawa, H; Shiokawa, Y; Saito, I; Ishii, H; Nakamura, Z; Sankawa, H

    1996-07-01

    Thromboxane A2 accumulates in the hippocampus after global ischemia and may play a key role in postischemic hypoperfusion. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor (OKY-046) inhibits the accumulation of thromboxane A2 and promotes prostacycline production. Therefore, we set out to determine whether the inhibition of thromboxane synthesis would ameriolate postischemic neuronal death. Three groups of six Mongolian gerbils were subjected to different treatments: untreated control, untreated ischemia, and treated ischemia. Immediately after forebrain ischemia, OKY-046 (10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into the treated group. After 7 days of survival, the histopathology of the brain was examined. Pyramidal cell density in the CA1 sector in the treated group was 147 +/- 70 nuclei/mm (mean +/- SD), which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than than in the untreated group (33 +/- 10 (nuclei/mm). The findings were 231 +/- 7 nuclei/mm for the control group. No significant difference was seen in the profile of temporal muscle temperature before and after ischemia between the groups. Ultrastructurally, the vessels in the CAI sector showed lumen patency in the treated group, whereas occluded vessels with an extended perivascular space were observed in the untreated group. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor thus partly ameliorates the selective vulnerability of the hippocampus after forebrain ischemia, suggesting that thromboxane A2 is involved in the development of delayed neuronal death, independently of any thermal effect.

  13. Calcium Efflux from Internally Dialyzed Squid Giant Axons

    PubMed Central

    Dipolo, Reinaldo

    1973-01-01

    Calcium efflux has been studied in squid giant axons under conditions in which the internal composition was controlled by means of a dialysis perfusion technique. The mean calcium efflux from axons dialyzed with 0.3 µM calcium and 5 mM ATP was 0.26 pmol/cm2·s at 22°C. The curve relating the Ca efflux with the internal Ca concentration had a slope of about one for [Ca]i lower than 0.3µM and a slope smaller than one for higher concentrations. Under the above conditions replacement of [Na]o and [Ca]o by Tris and Mg causes an 80% fall in the calcium efflux. When the axons were dialyzed with a medium free of ATP and containing 2 mM cyanide plus 5µg/ml oligomycin, analysis of the perfusion effluent gave values of 1–4 µM ATP. Under this low ATP condition, replacement of external sodium and calcium causes the same drop in the calcium efflux. The same effect was observed at higher [Ca]i, (80 µM). These results suggest that the Na-Ca exchange component of the calcium efflux is apparently not dependent on the amounts of ATP in the axoplasm. Axons previously depleted of ATP show a significant transient drop in the calcium efflux when ATP is added to the dialysis medium. This effect probably represents the sequestering of calcium by the mitochondrial system. The consumption of calcium by the mitochondria of the axoplasm in dialyzed axons was determined to be of the order of 6.0 x 10-7 mol Ca++/mg of protein with an initial rate of 2.6 x 10-8 mol Ca++/min·mg of protein. Axons dialyzed with 2 mM cyanide after 8–10-min delays show a rise in the calcium efflux in the presence of "normal" amounts of exogenous ATP. This effect seems to indicate that cyanide, per se, can release calcium ions from internal sources. PMID:4751386

  14. In vivo analysis of the calcium signature in the plant Golgi apparatus reveals unique dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ordenes, Viviana R; Moreno, Ignacio; Maturana, Daniel; Norambuena, Lorena; Trewavas, Anthony J; Orellana, Ariel

    2012-11-01

    The Golgi apparatus is thought to play a role in calcium homeostasis in plant cells. However, the calcium dynamics in this organelle is unknown in plants. To monitor the [Ca2+]Golgiin vivo, we obtained and analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana plants that express aequorin in the Golgi. Our results show that free [Ca2+] levels in the Golgi are higher than in the cytosol (0.70 μM vs. 0.05 μM, respectively). Stimuli such as cold shock, mechanical stimulation and hyperosmotic stress, led to a transient increase in cytosolic calcium; however, no instant change in the [Ca2+]Golgi concentration was detected. Nevertheless, a delayed increase in the [Ca2+]Golgi up to 2-3 μM was observed. Cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin inhibited the stimuli-induced [Ca2+]Golgi increase, suggesting that [Ca2+]Golgi levels are dependent upon the activity of Ca2+-ATPases. Treatment of these plants with the synthetic auxin analog, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), produced a slow decrease of free calcium in the organelle. Our results indicate that the plant Golgi apparatus is not involved in the generation of cytosolic calcium transients and exhibits its own dynamics modulated in part by the activity of Ca2+ pumps and hormones.

  15. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation; Infertility - delayed ejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  16. Villin promoter-mediated transgenic expression of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) increases intestinal calcium absorption in wild-type and vitamin D receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min; Li, Qiang; Johnson, Robert; Fleet, James C

    2012-10-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is an apical membrane calcium (Ca) channel in the small intestine proposed to be essential for vitamin D-regulated intestinal Ca absorption. Recent studies have challenged the proposed role for TRPV6 in Ca absorption. We directly tested intestinal TRPV6 function in Ca and bone metabolism in wild-type (WT) and vitamin D receptor knockout (VDRKO) mice. TRPV6 transgenic mice (TG) were made with intestinal epithelium-specific expression of a 3X Flag-tagged human TRPV6 protein. TG and VDRKO mice were crossed to make TG-VDRKO mice. Ca and bone metabolism was examined in WT, TG, VDRKO, and TG-VDRKO mice. TG mice developed hypercalcemia and soft tissue calcification on a chow diet. In TG mice fed a 0.25% Ca diet, Ca absorption was more than three-fold higher and femur bone mineral density (BMD) was 26% higher than WT. Renal 1α hydroxylase (CYP27B1) mRNA and intestinal expression of the natural mouse TRPV6 gene were reduced to <10% of WT but small intestine calbindin-D(9k) expression was elevated >15 times in TG mice. TG-VDRKO mice had high Ca absorption that prevented the low serum Ca, high renal CYP27B1 mRNA, low BMD, and abnormal bone microarchitecture seen in VDRKO mice. In addition, small intestinal calbindin D(9K) mRNA and protein levels were elevated in TG-VDRKO. Transgenic TRPV6 expression in intestine is sufficient to increase Ca absorption and bone density, even in VDRKO mice. VDR-independent upregulation of intestinal calbindin D(9k) in TG-VDRKO suggests this protein may buffer intracellular Ca during Ca absorption. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  17. Kidney and calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Un Sil

    2008-12-01

    Plasma calcium concentration is maintained within a narrow range (8.5-10.5 mg/dL) by the coordinated action of parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25(OH)2D3, calcitonin, and ionized calcium (iCa(2+)) itself. The kidney plays a key role in this process by the fine regulation of calcium excretion. More than 95% of filtered calcium is reabsorbed along the renal tubules. In the proximal tubules, 60% of filtered calcium is reabsorbed by passive mechanisms. In the thick ascending limb, 15% of calcium is reabsorbed by paracellular diffusion through paracellin-1 (claudin-16). The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) in the basolateral membrane of the thick ascending limb senses the change in iCa(2+) and inhibits calcium reabsorption independent to PTH and 1,25(OH)2D3. The fine regulation of calcium excretion occurs in the distal convoluted tubules and connecting tubules despite the fact that only 10-15% of filtered calcium is reabsorbed there. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) and 6 (TRPV6) in the apical membrane act as the main portal of entry, calbindin-D28K delivers Ca(2+) in the cytoplasm, and then Na(2+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase in the basolateral membrane serve as an exit. In the cortical collecting duct, TRPV6 is expressed, but the role might be negligible. In addition to PTH and 1,25(OH)2D3, acid-base disturbance, diuretics, and estrogen affect on these calcium channels. Recently, klotho and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are suggested as new players in the calcium metabolism. Klotho is exclusively expressed in the kidney and co-localized with TRPV5, NCX1, and calbindin-D28K. Klotho increases calcium reabsorption through trafficking of TRPV5 to the plasma membrane, and also converts FGF receptor to the specific FGF23 receptor. FGF23:klotho complex bound to FGF receptor inhibits 1α-hydroxylase of vitamin D, and contributes to calcium reabsorption and phosphate excretion in the kidney.

  18. Dopaminergic regulation of dendritic calcium: fast multisite calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Oikonomou, Katerina D; Short, Shaina M; Antic, Srdjan D

    2013-01-01

    Optimal dopamine tone is required for the normal cortical function; however it is still unclear how cortical-dopamine-release affects information processing in individual cortical neurons. Thousands of glutamatergic inputs impinge onto elaborate dendritic trees of neocortical pyramidal neurons. In the process of ensuing synaptic integration (information processing), a variety of calcium transients are generated in remote dendritic compartments. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms of dopaminergic modulation it is important to know whether and how dopaminergic signals affect dendritic calcium transients. In this chapter, we describe a relatively inexpensive method for monitoring dendritic calcium fluctuations at multiple loci across the pyramidal dendritic tree, at the same moment of time (simultaneously). The experiments have been designed to measure the amplitude, time course and spatial extent of action potential-associated dendritic calcium transients before and after application of dopaminergic drugs. In the examples provided here the dendritic calcium transients were evoked by triggering the somatic action potentials (backpropagation-evoked), and puffs of exogenous dopamine were applied locally onto selected dendritic branches.

  19. Viva Delay.

    PubMed

    Yahaghi, Hossein; Sorooshian, Shahryar; Yahaghi, Javad

    2016-06-28

    The time delay between submission of a thesis and Viva Voce is intolerable for students. This letter tries to draw the readers' attention to the effect of choosing the right examiner, in order to reduce the Viva Voce delay.

  20. A model of propagating calcium-induced calcium release mediated by calcium diffusion

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The effect of sudden local fluctuations of the free sarcoplasmic [Ca++]i in cardiac cells on calcium release and calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was calculated with the aid of a simplified model of SR calcium handling. The model was used to evaluate whether propagation of calcium transients and the range of propagation velocities observed experimentally (0.05-15 mm s(-1)) could be predicted. Calcium fluctuations propagate by virtue of focal calcium release from the SR, diffusion through the cytosol (which is modulated by binding to troponin and calmodulin and sequestration by the SR), and subsequently induce calcium release from adjacent release sites of the SR. The minimal and maximal velocities derived from the simulation were 0.09 and 15 mm s(-1) respectively. The method of solution involved writing the diffusion equation as a difference equation in the spatial coordinates. Thus, coupled ordinary differential equations in time with banded coefficients were generated. The coupled equations were solved using Gear's sixth order predictor-corrector algorithm for stiff equations with reflective boundaries. The most important determinants of the velocity of propagation of the calcium waves were the diastolic [Ca++]i, the rate of rise of the release, and the amount of calcium released from the SR. The results are consistent with the assumptions that calcium loading causes an increase in intracellular calcium and calcium in the SR, and an increase in the amount and rate of calcium released. These two effects combine to increase the propagation velocity at higher levels of calcium loading. PMID:2738577

  1. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Review Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  2. Spatiotemporal effects of sonoporation measured by real-time calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumon, R E; Aehle, M; Sabens, D; Parikh, P; Han, Y W; Kourennyi, D; Deng, C X

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the effects of sonoporation, spatiotemporal evolution of ultrasound-induced changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was determined using real-time fura-2AM fluorescence imaging. Monolayers of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to a 1-MHz ultrasound tone burst (0.2 s, 0.45 MPa) in the presence of Optison microbubbles. At extracellular [Ca(2+)](o) of 0.9 mM, ultrasound application generated both nonoscillating and oscillating (periods 12 to 30 s) transients (changes of [Ca(2+)](i) in time) with durations of 100-180 s. Immediate [Ca(2+)](i) transients after ultrasound application were induced by ultrasound-mediated microbubble-cell interactions. In some cases, the immediately affected cells did not return to pre-ultrasound equilibrium [Ca(2+)](i) levels, thereby indicating irreversible membrane damage. Spatial evolution of [Ca(2+)](i) in different cells formed a calcium wave that was observed to propagate outward from the immediately affected cells at 7-20 microm/s over a distance >200 microm, causing delayed transients in cells to occur sometimes 60 s or more after ultrasound application. In calcium-free solution, ultrasound-affected cells did not recover, consistent with the requirement of extracellular Ca(2+) for cell membrane recovery subsequent to sonoporation. In summary, ultrasound application in the presence of Optison microbubbles can generate transient [Ca(2+)](i) changes and oscillations at a focal site and in surrounding cells via calcium waves that last longer than the ultrasound duration and spread beyond the focal site. These results demonstrate the complexity of downstream effects of sonoporation beyond the initial pore formation and subsequent diffusion-related transport through the cellular membrane.

  3. [Delayed puberty].

    PubMed

    Edouard, T; Tauber, M

    2010-02-01

    Delayed puberty is defined in girls by the absence of breast development beyond 13 years old and in boys by the absence of testicular enlargement (< 4 ml) beyond 14 years old. Simple investigations lead to the diagnosis of central or peripheral hypogonadism and constitutional delay of puberty. In girls, delayed puberty is rare and often organic, and then Turner syndrome should be systematically suspected. In boys, delayed puberty is often constitutional and functional. Treatment is etiologic when possible, hormonal replacement therapy (oestrogen in girls and testosterone in boys) and psychological management.

  4. Theoretical aspects of calcium signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencea, Corneliu Stefan

    2001-08-01

    Experiments investigating intracellular calcium dynamics have revealed that calcium signals differentially affect a variety of intracellular processes, from fertilization and cell development and differentiation to subsequent cellular activity, ending with cell death. As an intracellular messenger, calcium transmits information within and between cells, thus regulating their activity. To control such a variety of processes, calcium signals have to be very flexible and also precisely regulated. The cell uses a calcium signaling ``toolkit'', where calcium ions can act in different contexts of space, amplitude and time. For different tasks, the cell selects the particular signal, or combination of signals, that triggers the appropriate physiological response. The physical foundations of such a versatile cellular signaling toolkit involving calcium are not completely understood, despite important experimental and theoretical progress made recently. The declared goal of this work is to investigate physical mechanisms on which the propagation of differential signals can be based. The dynamics of calcium near a cluster of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) activated calcium channels has been investigated analytically and numerically. Our work has demonstrated that clusters of different IP3 receptors can show similar bistable behavior, but differ in both the transient and long term dynamics. We have also investigated the conditions under which a calcium signal propagates between a pair of localized stores. We have shown that the propagation of the signal across a random distribution of such stores shows a percolation transition manifested in the shape of the wave front. More importantly, our work indicates that specific distribution of stores can be interpreted as calcium circuits that can perform important signal analyzing task, from unidirectional propagation and coincidence detection to a complete set of logic gates. We believe that phenomena like the ones described are

  5. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-02-01

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function.

  6. Acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, G G; Morrell, D F; Brain, V; Jaros, G G

    1987-07-01

    To elucidate a pathogenesis for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals, we studied the acute calcium homeostasis of MHS swine. This was achieved by the serial measurement, with a calcium selective electrode, of calcium transients in Landrace MHS (five) and control Landrace/large white cross MH negative (five) swine following IV bolus injection of calcium gluconate 0.1 mmol X kg-1--a dose which induced an acute 45 per cent increase in plasma ionised calcium. Experimental animals were anaesthetised with ketamine 10 mg X kg-1 IM, thiopentone (intermittent divided doses) 15-25 mg X kg-1 (total) IV and N2O/O2 (FIO2 0.3) by IPPV to maintain a normal blood gas, acid/base state. The plasma ionised calcium decay curve observed in MHS swine did not differ from that of control normal swine. Further it was noted that the induced acute rise in plasma ionised calcium failed to trigger the MH syndrome in any MHS swine. It is concluded that the mechanisms of acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine are normal. An explanation for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals must be sought, therefore, through study of the slow long-term component of the calcium regulatory process. In addition, the conventional strictures placed on the use, in MHS patients, of calcium gluconate are called in question.

  7. Influence of sodium borate on the early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    SciTech Connect

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Dhoury, Mélanie; Cau Dit Coumes, Céline; Mercier, Cyrille; Revel, Bertrand; Le Bescop, Patrick; Damidot, Denis

    2015-04-15

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are potential candidates for the conditioning of radioactive wastes with high sodium borate concentrations. This work thus investigates early age hydration of two CSA cements with different gypsum contents (0 to 20%) as a function of the mixing solution composition (borate and NaOH concentrations). Gypsum plays a key role in controlling the reactivity of cement. When the mixing solution is pure water, increasing the gypsum concentration accelerates cement hydration. However, the reverse is observed when the mixing solution contains sodium borate. Until gypsum exhaustion, the pore solution pH remains constant at ~ 10.8, and a poorly crystallized borate compound (ulexite) precipitates. A correlation is established between this transient precipitation and the hydration delay. Decreasing the gypsum content in the binder, or increasing the sodium content in the mixing solution, are two ways of reducing the stability of ulexite, thus decreasing the hydration delay.

  8. Yeast respond to hypotonic shock with a calcium pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batiza, A. F.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the transgenic AEQUORIN calcium reporter system to monitor the cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypotonic shock. Such a shock generates an almost immediate and transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt which is eliminated by gadolinium, a blocker of stretch-activated channels. In addition, this transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt is initially insensitive to 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), an extracellular calcium chelator. However, BAPTA abruptly attenuates the maintenance of that transient rise. These data show that hypotonic shock generates a stretch-activated channel-dependent calcium pulse in yeast. They also suggest that the immediate calcium influx is primarily generated from intracellular stores, and that a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt depends upon extracellular calcium.

  9. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  10. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  11. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Traggiai, Cristina; Stanhope, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Puberty is the acquisition of secondary sexual characteristics associated with a growth spurt and resulting in the attainment of reproductive function. Delayed puberty is diagnosed when there is no breast development by 13.4 years of age in a girl and no testicular enlargement by 14.0 years in a boy. The aetiologies are: (i) pubertal delay, either with constitutional delay of growth and puberty or secondary to chronic illness, and (ii) pubertal failure, with hypogonadotrophic (defect in the hypothalamo-pituitary region) or hypergonadotrophic (secondary to gonadal failure) hypogonadism, or both (secondary to radio/chemotherapy). The investigation includes: history, auxological data and pubertal development examination. Boys usually require treatment and, if they do not respond, investigation. In girls it is appropriate to measure the thyroid function and karyotype first and, if necessary, to offer treatment. If they present with dysmorphic features, or positive familial history, an assessment is required before treatment.

  12. Transient effects in Herschel/PACS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Jacobson, Jeffery D.; Appleton, Philip N.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The Ge:Ga detectors used in the PACS spectrograph onboard the Herschel space telescope react to changes of the incident flux with a certain delay. This generates transient effects on the resulting signal which can be important and last for up to an hour. Aims: The paper presents a study of the effects of transients on the detected signal and proposes methods to mitigate them especially in the case of the unchopped mode. Methods: Since transients can arise from a variety of causes, we classified them in three main categories: transients caused by sudden variations of the continuum due to the observational mode used; transients caused by cosmic ray impacts on the detectors; transients caused by a continuous smooth variation of the continuum during a wavelength scan. We propose a method to disentangle these effects and treat them separately. In particular, we show that a linear combination of three exponential functions is needed to fit the response variation of the detectors during a transient. An algorithm to detect, fit, and correct transient effects is presented. Results: The solution proposed to correct the signal for the effects of transients substantially improves the quality of the final reduction with respect to the standard methods used for archival reduction in the cases where transient effects are most pronounced. Conclusions: The programs developed to implement the corrections are offered through two new interactive data reduction pipelines in the latest releases of the Herschel Interactive Processing Environment.

  13. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... 245. Read More Acute kidney failure Albumin - blood (serum) test Bone tumor Calcium blood test Hyperparathyroidism Hypoparathyroidism Malabsorption Milk-alkali syndrome Multiple myeloma Osteomalacia Paget disease of the bone Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Review ...

  14. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables.

  15. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  16. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  17. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Since puberty is a long ongoing developmental process with significant individual and population differences in timing, the definition of delayed puberty for a given individual needs to rest on simple, though arbitrary criteria based on epidemiological data. Although several genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal maturation cascade have been characterized recently from familial or sporadic cases of primitive isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, many genes regulating puberty onset remain undetermined. In case of delayed puberty and/or primary amenorrhea, a complete clinical examination including a detailed past history will evaluate the development of secondary sex characteristics, verify the association with a growth delay and look for specific indicative features pertaining to the etiological diagnosis. This clinical check-up completed if necessary with biological, ultrasonographic, radiological and genetic investigations will try to determine which girls will have a permanent sexual infantilism of gonadal, hypophyseal or hypothalamic origin, which girls will undergo spontaneous but delayed puberty and which girls have primary amenorrhea with developed secondary sex characteristics. Therapeutic attitude will have to integrate etiological factors, statural prognosis, bone mass preservation and psychological factors.

  18. The use of size-defined DNA-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles to minimise intracellular calcium disturbance during transfection.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Sebastian; Kovtun, Anna; Dietzel, Irmgard D; Epple, Matthias; Heumann, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    Calcium phosphate-based transfection methods are frequently used to transfer DNA into living cells. However, it has so far not been studied in detail to what extend the different transfection methods lead to a net calcium uptake. Upon subsequent resolution of the calcium phosphate, intracellular free ionic calcium-surges could result, inducing as side effect various physiological responses that may finally result in cell death. Here we investigated the overall calcium uptake by the human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 during the standard calcium phosphate transfection method and also during transfection with custom-made calcium phosphate/DNA nanoparticles by isotope labelling with (45)calcium. (45)Calcium uptake was strongly increased after 7h of standard calcium phosphate transfection but not if the transfection was performed with calcium phosphate nanoparticles. Time lapse imaging microscopy using the calcium-sensitive dye Fura-2 revealed large transient increases of the intracellular free calcium level during the standard calcium phosphate transfection but not if calcium phosphate nanoparticles were used. Consistently, the viability of cells transfected by calcium phosphate/DNA nanoparticles was not changed, in remarkable contrast to the standard method where considerable cell death occurred.

  19. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Edward O; Lee, Peter A

    2002-02-01

    Normal puberty is a time of life and a process of development that results in full adult maturity of growth, sexual development, and psychosocial achievement. Delayed puberty describes the clinical condition in which the pubertal events start late (usually > +2.5 SD later than the mean) or are attenuated in progression. The differential diagnosis includes syndromes of low gonadotropin production, usually constitutional delay of growth and maturation associated with chronic disease, but also an array of gene-mediated disorders, and syndromes of primary gonadal dysfunction with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, including Turner and Klinefelter syndromes, and a group of acquired and genetic abnormalities. Diagnostic assessment and varied therapeutic modalities are discussed. The issues of androgen or estrogen therapy are important to assess, and growth hormone treatment remains a difficult dilemma.

  20. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations. PMID:19792040

  1. Speract induces calcium oscillations in the sperm tail.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris D; Darszon, Alberto; Whitaker, Michael

    2003-04-14

    Sea urchin sperm motility is modulated by sperm-activating peptides. One such peptide, speract, induces changes in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). High resolution imaging of single sperm reveals that speract-induced changes in [Ca2+]i have a complex spatiotemporal structure. [Ca2+]i increases arise in the tail as periodic oscillations; [Ca2+]i increases in the sperm head lag those in the tail and appear to result from the summation of the tail signal transduction events. The period depends on speract concentration. Infrequent spontaneous [Ca2+]i transients were also seen in the tail of unstimulated sperm, again with the head lagging the tail. Speract-induced fluctuations were sensitive to membrane potential and calcium channel blockers, and were potentiated by niflumic acid, an anion channel blocker. 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which potentiates the cGMP/cAMP-signaling pathways, abolished the [Ca2+]i fluctuations in the tail, leading to a very delayed and sustained [Ca2+]i increase in the head. These data point to a model in which a messenger generated periodically in the tail diffuses to the head. Sperm are highly polarized cells. Our results indicate that a clear understanding of the link between [Ca2+]i and sperm motility will only be gained by analysis of [Ca2+]i signals at the level of the single sperm.

  2. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells in vitro induces calcium influx and IP3-dependent release of calcium stores

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Klinger, Alexandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Gas embolism is a serious complication of decompression events and clinical procedures, but the mechanism of resulting injury remains unclear. Previous work has demonstrated that contact between air microbubbles and endothelial cells causes a rapid intracellular calcium transient and can lead to cell death. Here we examined the mechanism responsible for the calcium rise. Single air microbubbles (50–150 μm), trapped at the tip of a micropipette, were micromanipulated into contact with individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) loaded with Fluo-4 (a fluorescent calcium indicator). Changes in intracellular calcium were then recorded via epifluorescence microscopy. First, we confirmed that HUVECs rapidly respond to air bubble contact with a calcium transient. Next, we examined the involvement of extracellular calcium influx by conducting experiments in low calcium buffer, which markedly attenuated the response, or by pretreating cells with stretch-activated channel blockers (gadolinium chloride or ruthenium red), which abolished the response. Finally, we tested the role of intracellular calcium release by pretreating cells with an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (xestospongin C) or phospholipase C inhibitor (neomycin sulfate), which eliminated the response in 64% and 67% of cases, respectively. Collectively, our results lead us to conclude that air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes an influx of calcium through a stretch-activated channel, such as a transient receptor potential vanilloid family member, triggering the release of calcium from intracellular stores via the IP3 pathway. PMID:21633077

  3. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  4. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... if a person has symptoms of a parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , or an overactive thyroid. A total calcium level is often measured as part of a routine health screening. It is included in the comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) and the basic metabolic panel (BMP) , ...

  5. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  6. Survival of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the gerbil hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia does not depend on HSP-70 protein induction.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I; Soriano, M A; Vidal, A; Planas, A M

    1995-09-18

    HSP-70 was induced in the gerbil following 20 min of forebrain ischemia. The induction, as revealed with immunohistochemistry, is stronger and longer-lasting in CA3 and dentate gyrus than in CA1. Most neurons in this region, except GABAergic interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, eventually cease to live as a result of delayed cell death. Double-labeling of inducible HSP-70 and parvalbumin has shown that no co-localization occurs in the hippocampus and neocortex of the gerbil in this model of transient forebrain ischemia. These results show that different thresholds of sensitivity and vulnerability exist for different subpopulations of neurons in the ischemic hippocampus, and suggest that HSP-70 protein induction is probably not essential for the survival of particular neuronal subpopulations subjected to transient ischemia.

  7. Calcium channels and migraine.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in CACNA1A, the gene that encodes the pore-forming α1 subunit of human voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels, cause a rare form of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 1: FHM1). Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder whose key manifestations are recurrent attacks of unilateral headache that may be preceded by transient neurological aura symptoms. This review, first, briefly summarizes current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that are believed to underlie migraine headache, migraine aura and the onset of a migraine attack, and briefly describes the localization and function of neuronal Ca(V)2.1 channels in the brain regions that have been implicated in migraine pathogenesis. Then, the review describes and discusses i) the functional consequences of FHM1 mutations on the biophysical properties of recombinant human Ca(V)2.1 channels and native Ca(V)2.1 channels in neurons of knockin mouse models carrying the mild R192Q or severe S218L mutations in the orthologous gene, and ii) the functional consequences of these mutations on neurophysiological processes in the cerebral cortex and trigeminovascular system thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine, and the insights into migraine mechanisms obtained from the functional analysis of these processes in FHM1 knockin mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  8. Calcium and bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C.; Robinson, Lisa J.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Sun, Li; Friedman, Peter A.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Zaidi, Mone

    2013-01-01

    Calcium transport and calcium signaling are of basic importance in bone cells. Bone is the major store of calcium and a key regulatory organ for calcium homeostasis. Bone, in major part, responds to calcium-dependent signals from the parathyroids and via vitamin D metabolites, although bone retains direct response to extracellular calcium if parathyroid regulation is lost. Improved understanding of calcium transporters and calcium-regulated cellular processes has resulted from analysis of genetic defects, including several defects with low or high bone mass. Osteoblasts deposit calcium by mechanisms including phosphate and calcium transport with alkalinization to absorb acid created by mineral deposition; cartilage calcium mineralization occurs by passive diffusion and phosphate production. Calcium mobilization by osteoclasts is mediated by acid secretion. Both bone forming and bone resorbing cells use calcium signals as regulators of differentiation and activity. This has been studied in more detail in osteoclasts, where both osteoclast differentiation and motility are regulated by calcium. PMID:21674636

  9. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  10. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  11. Pacemaker-Induced Transient Asynchrony Suppresses Heart Failure Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jonathan A.; Chakir, Khalid; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Karst, Edward; Holewinski, Ronald J.; Pironti, Gianluigi; Tunin, Richard S.; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P.; de Tombe, Pieter; Rockman, Howard A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Craig, Roger; Farazi, Taraneh G.; Kass, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Uncoordinated contraction from electromechanical delay worsens heart failure pathophysiology and prognosis, but restoring coordination with bi-ventricular pacing, known as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves both. Not every patient, however, qualifies for CRT. Here we show that heart failure with synchronous contraction is improved by inducing dyssynchrony for 6 hours daily by right-ventricular pacing using an intracardiac pacing device, in a process we call pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony (PITA). In dogs with heart failure induced by 6 weeks of atrial tachypacing, PITA (starting on week 3) suppressed progressive cardiac dilation as well as chamber and myocyte dysfunction. PITA enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness in vivo and normalized it in myocytes. Myofilament calcium response declined in dogs with synchronous heart failure, which was accompanied by sarcomere disarray and generation of myofibers with severely reduced function, and these changes were absent in PITA-treated hearts. The benefits of PITA were not replicated when the same number of RV-paced beats was randomly distributed throughout the day, indicating that continuity of dyssynchrony exposure is necessary to trigger the beneficial biological response upon resynchronization. These results suggest PITA could bring the benefits of CRT to the many heart failure patients with synchronous contraction that are not CRT candidates. PMID:26702095

  12. Activation of store-mediated calcium entry by secretion-like coupling between the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type II and human transient receptor potential (hTrp1) channels in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, J A; Sage, S O

    2001-01-01

    Physical coupling between inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors and transient receptor potential (Trp) channels has been demonstrated in both transfected and normal cells as a candidate mechanism for the activation of store-mediated Ca(2+) entry (SMCE). We have investigated the properties of the coupling between the type II IP(3) receptor and naturally expressed human Trp1 (hTrp1) in human platelets. Treatment with xestospongin C, an inhibitor of IP(3) receptor function, abolished SMCE and coupling between the IP(3) receptor and hTrp1. The coupling was activated by depletion of the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and was reversed by refilling of the stores. We have also examined the role of actin filaments in the activation and maintenance of the coupling. Stabilization of the cortical actin network with jasplakinolide prevented the coupling, indicating that, as with secretion, the actin filaments at the cell periphery act as a negative clamp which prevents constitutive coupling. In addition, the actin cytoskeleton plays a positive role, since disruption of the actin network inhibited the coupling when the Ca(2+) stores were depleted. These results provide strong evidence for the activation of SMCE by a secretion-like coupling mechanism involving a reversible association between IP(3) receptors and hTrp1 in normal human cells. PMID:11336651

  13. Spindle function in Xenopus oocytes involves possible nanodomain calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruizhen; Leblanc, Julie; He, Kevin; Liu, X. Johné

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium transients are a universal phenomenon at fertilization and are required for egg activation, but the exact role of Ca2+ in second-polar-body emission remains unknown. On the other hand, similar calcium transients have not been demonstrated during oocyte maturation, and yet, manipulating intracellular calcium levels interferes with first-polar-body emission in mice and frogs. To determine the precise role of calcium signaling in polar body formation, we used live-cell imaging coupled with temporally precise intracellular calcium buffering. We found that BAPTA-based calcium chelators cause immediate depolymerization of spindle microtubules in meiosis I and meiosis II. Surprisingly, EGTA at similar or higher intracellular concentrations had no effect on spindle function or polar body emission. Using two calcium probes containing permutated GFP and the calcium sensor calmodulin (Lck-GCaMP3 and GCaMP3), we demonstrated enrichment of the probes at the spindle but failed to detect calcium increase during oocyte maturation at the spindle or elsewhere. Finally, endogenous calmodulin was found to colocalize with spindle microtubules throughout all stages of meiosis. Our results—most important, the different sensitivities of the spindle to BAPTA and EGTA—suggest that meiotic spindle function in frog oocytes requires highly localized, or nanodomain, calcium signaling. PMID:27582389

  14. Intracellular Calcium Release at Fertilization in the Sea Urchin Egg

    PubMed Central

    Steinhardt, R.; Zucker, R.; Schattenand, G.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilization or ionophore activation of Lytechinus pictus eggs can be monitored after injection with the Ca-sensitive photoprotein aequorin to estimate calcium release during activation. We estimate the peak calcium transient to reach concentrations of 2.5–4.5 μM free calcium 45–60 sec after activation and to last 2–3 min, assuming equal Ca2+ release throughout the cytoplasm. Calcium is released from an intracellular store, since similar responses are obtained during fertilization at a wide range of external calcium concentrations or in zero-calcium seawater in ionophore activations. In another effort to estimate free calcium at fertilization, we isolated egg cortices, added back calcium quantitatively, and fixed for observation with a scanning electron microscope. In this way, we determined that the threshold for discharge of the cortical granules is between 9 and 18 μM Ca2+. Therefore, the threshold for the in vitro cortical reaction is about five times the amount of free calcium, assuming equal distribution in the egg. This result suggests that transient calcium release is confined to the inner subsurface of the egg. PMID:326602

  15. Excitability in a stochastic differential equation model for calcium puffs.

    PubMed

    Rüdiger, S

    2014-06-01

    Calcium dynamics are essential to a multitude of cellular processes. For many cell types, localized discharges of calcium through small clusters of intracellular channels are building blocks for all spatially extended calcium signals. Because of the large noise amplitude, the validity of noise-approximating model equations for this system has been questioned. Here we revisit the master equations for local calcium release, examine the multiple scales of calcium concentrations in the cluster domain, and derive adapted stochastic differential equations. We show by comparison of discrete and continuous trajectories that the Langevin equations can be made consistent with the master equations even for very small channel numbers. In its deterministic limit, the model reveals that excitability, a dynamical phenomenon observed in many natural systems, is at the core of calcium puffs. The model also predicts a bifurcation from transient to sustained release which may link local and global calcium signals in cells.

  16. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  17. UAVs and Control Delays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Transport Delay itI tl2 s2+(tl +t2tI2)s+ 1 Delay Figure 17 A Matlab Simulink model used to compare a simple delayed system , in this case an integrator...23 3 Control of tim e-delay system s...discuss the various sources of delays, leading to an assessment of typical delays to be expected in a few example systems . Sources of delay that will

  18. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  19. Sodium-calcium exchange during the action potential in guinea-pig ventricular cells.

    PubMed Central

    Egan, T M; Noble, D; Noble, S J; Powell, T; Spindler, A J; Twist, V W

    1989-01-01

    1. Slow inward tail currents attributable to electrogenic sodium-calcium exchange can be recorded by imposing hyperpolarizing voltage clamp pulses during the normal action potential of isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells. The hyperpolarizations return the membrane to the resting potential (between -65 and -88 m V) allowing an inward current to be recorded. This current usually has peak amplitude when repolarization is imposed during the first 50 ms after the action potential upstroke, but becomes negligible once the final phase of repolarization is reached. The envelope of peak current tail amplitudes strongly resembles that of the intracellular calcium transient recorded in other studies. 2. Repetitive stimulation producing normal action potentials at a frequency of 2 Hz progressively augments the tail current recorded immediately after the stimulus train. Conversely, if each action potential is prematurely terminated at 0.1 Hz, repetitive stimulation produces a tail current much smaller than the control value. The control amplitude of inward current is only maintained if interrupted action potentials are separated by at least one full 'repriming' action potential. These effects mimic those on cell contraction (Arlock & Wohlfart, 1986) and suggest that progressive changes in tail current are controlled by variations in the amplitude and time course of the intracellular calcium transient. 3. When intracellular calcium is buffered sufficiently to abolish contraction, the tail current is abolished. Substitution of calcium with strontium greatly reduces the tail current. 4. The inward tail current can also be recorded at more positive membrane potentials using standard voltage clamp pulse protocols. In this way it was found that temperature has a large effect on the tail current, which can change from net inward at 22 degrees C to net outward at 37 degrees C. The largest inward currents are usually recorded at about 30 degrees C. It is shown that this effect is

  20. Rapid and delayed effects of epidermal growth factor on gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Soler, C; Soley, M

    1993-01-01

    Most reports on the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on gluconeogenesis have indicated that such effects depend on the substrate used and are only observable after a lag time of 30-40 min. Recently, an immediate and transient effect of EGF on glucose synthesis was described in a perfused liver system. Here we extend the study of the effect of EGF on gluconeogenesis to isolated hepatocytes from fasted rats. The delayed effect of EGF on gluconeogenesis was studied by adding the substrate 40 min after the peptide. Under these conditions EGF increased glucose synthesis from pyruvate, decreased it when the substrate was lactate or glycerol and did not modify gluconeogensis from fructose or dihydroxyacetone. EGF did not affect the metabolic flux through glycolysis, determined as the production of lactate+pyruvate from 30 mM glucose. Furthermore, EGF did not modify the metabolic flux through pyruvate kinase, determined as the production of lactate+pyruvate from 1 mM dihydroxyacetone. The differing effects of EGF on gluconeogenesis depending on the substrate used can be explained by the effects of EGF on the cytosolic redox state (measured as the lactate/pyruvate ratio). About 20 min after the addition of EGF, the mitochondrial redox state (measured as the 3-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratio) decreased. This effect of EGF was blocked by ammonium, which also abolished the effect of the peptide on gluconeogenesis. Thus the effect of EGF at the mitochondrial level appears to be necessary for its effects on gluconeogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that the delayed effects of EGF on gluconeogenesis are secondary to the effects of the peptide at both the mitochondrial and cytosolic levels. In addition to these delayed effects, we observed that EGF rapidly and transiently stimulated glucose synthesis from lactate, decreased the cytosolic redox state and increased oxygen consumption. All of these rapid effects required the presence of extracellular calcium

  1. Transient triggering of near and distant earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Blanpied, M.L.; Beeler, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrate qualitatively that frictional instability theory provides a context for understanding how earthquakes may be triggered by transient loads associated with seismic waves from near and distance earthquakes. We assume that earthquake triggering is a stick-slip process and test two hypotheses about the effect of transients on the timing of instabilities using a simple spring-slider model and a rate- and state-dependent friction constitutive law. A critical triggering threshold is implicit in such a model formulation. Our first hypothesis is that transient loads lead to clock advances; i.e., transients hasten the time of earthquakes that would have happened eventually due to constant background loading alone. Modeling results demonstrate that transient loads do lead to clock advances and that the triggered instabilities may occur after the transient has ceased (i.e., triggering may be delayed). These simple "clock-advance" models predict complex relationships between the triggering delay, the clock advance, and the transient characteristics. The triggering delay and the degree of clock advance both depend nonlinearly on when in the earthquake cycle the transient load is applied. This implies that the stress required to bring about failure does not depend linearly on loading time, even when the fault is loaded at a constant rate. The timing of instability also depends nonlinearly on the transient loading rate, faster rates more rapidly hastening instability. This implies that higher-frequency and/or longer-duration seismic waves should increase the amount of clock advance. These modeling results and simple calculations suggest that near (tens of kilometers) small/moderate earthquakes and remote (thousands of kilometers) earthquakes with magnitudes 2 to 3 units larger may be equally effective at triggering seismicity. Our second hypothesis is that some triggered seismicity represents earthquakes that would not have happened without the transient load (i

  2. Transient tachypnea - newborn

    MedlinePlus

    TTN; Wet lungs - newborns; Retained fetal lung fluid; Transient RDS; Prolonged transition; Neonatal - transient tachypnea ... As the baby grows in the womb, the lungs make a special fluid. This fluid fills the ...

  3. Biologically formed amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Steve; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Raz, Sefi; Addadi, Lia

    2003-01-01

    Many organisms from a wide variety of taxa produce amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), despite the fact that it is inherently unstable and relatively soluble in its pure state. These properties also make it difficult to detect and characterize ACC. Raman spectroscopy is a particularly useful method for investigating ACC because the sample can be examined wet, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis can provide detailed information on the short-range order. Other methods for characterizing ACC include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron and X-ray diffraction. Because of the difficulties involved, we suspect that ACC is far more widely distributed than is presently known, and a comparison of EXAFS spectra shows that different biogenic ACC phases have different short-range order structures. We also suspect that ACC fulfils many different functions, including as a transient precursor phase during the formation of crystalline calcium carbonate.

  4. Transient drainage summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the history of transient drainage issues on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. It defines and describes the UMTRA Project disposal cell transient drainage process and chronicles UMTRA Project treatment of the transient drainage phenomenon. Section 4.0 includes a conceptual cross section of each UMTRA Project disposal site and summarizes design and construction information, the ground water protection strategy, and the potential for transient drainage.

  5. Cloning and expression of a novel mammalian homolog of Drosophila transient receptor potential (Trp) involved in calcium entry secondary to activation of receptors coupled by the Gq class of G protein.

    PubMed

    Boulay, G; Zhu, X; Peyton, M; Jiang, M; Hurst, R; Stefani, E; Birnbaumer, L

    1997-11-21

    Hormonal stimulation of Gq-protein coupled receptors triggers Ca2+ mobilization from internal stores. This is followed by a Ca2+ entry through the plasma membrane. Drosophila Trp and Trpl proteins have been implicated in Ca2+ entry and three mammalian homologues of Drosophila Trp/Trpl, hTrp1, hTrp3 and bTrp4 (also bCCE) have been cloned and expressed. Using mouse brain RNA as template, we report here the polymerase chain reaction-based cloning and functional expression of a novel Trp, mTrp6. The cDNA encodes a protein of 930 amino acids, the sequence of which is 36.8, 36.3, 43.1, 38.6, and 74. 1% identical to Drosophila Trp and Trpl, bovine Trp4, and human Trp1 and Trp3, respectively. Transient expression of mTrp6 in COS.M6 cells by transfection of the full-length mTrp6 cDNA increases Ca2+ entry induced by stimulation of co-transfected M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor with carbachol (CCh), as seen by dual wavelength fura 2 fluorescence ratio measurements. The mTrp6-mediated increase in Ca2+ entry activity was blocked by SKF-96365 and La3+. Ca2+ entry activity induced by thapsigargin was similar in COS cells transfected with or without the mTrp6 cDNA. The thapsigargin-stimulated Ca2+ entry could not be further stimulated by CCh in control cells but was markedly increased in mTrp6-transfected cells. Records of whole cell transmembrane currents developed in response to voltage ramps from -80 to +40 mV in control HEK cells and HEK cells stably expressing mTrp6 revealed the presence of a muscarinic receptor responsive non-selective cation conductance in Trp6 cells that was absent in control cells. Our data support the hypothesis that mTrp6 encodes an ion channel subunit that mediates Ca2+ entry stimulated by a G-protein coupled receptor, but not Ca2+ entry stimulated by intracellular Ca2+ store depletion.

  6. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... A calcium-rich diet (including dairy, nuts, leafy greens and fish) helps to build and protect your ... yogurt and cheese are high in calcium. Certain green vegetables and other foods contain calcium in smaller ...

  7. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Electrocardiogram Heart Attack Send a link to NHLBI ... calcium, or calcifications, are a sign of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, or coronary microvascular disease. A coronary calcium scan ...

  8. Design and mechanistic insight into ultrafast calcium indicators for monitoring intracellular calcium dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Podor, Borbala; Fine, Alan; Török, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-based genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicators (GCaMP-s) are powerful tools of imaging calcium dynamics from cells to freely moving animals. High affinity indicators with slow kinetics however distort the temporal profile of calcium transients. Here we report the development of reduced affinity ultrafast variants of GCaMP6s and GCaMP6f. We hypothesized that GCaMP-s have a common kinetic mechanism with a rate-limiting process in the interaction of the RS20 peptide and calcium-calmodulin. Therefore we targeted specific residues in the binding interface by rational design generating improved indicators with GCaMP6fu displaying fluorescence rise and decay times (t1/2) of 1 and 3 ms (37 °C) in vitro, 9 and 22-fold faster than GCaMP6f respectively. In HEK293T cells, GCaMP6fu revealed a 4-fold faster decay of ATP-evoked intracellular calcium transients than GCaMP6f. Stimulation of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with five action potentials fired at 100 Hz resulted in a single dendritic calcium transient with a 2-fold faster rise and 7-fold faster decay time (t1/2 of 40 ms) than GCaMP6f, indicating that tracking high frequency action potentials may be limited by calcium dynamics. We propose that the design strategy used for generating GCaMP6fu is applicable for the acceleration of the response kinetics of GCaMP-type calcium indicators. PMID:27922063

  9. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, T R; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content ([Ca](SRT)) and free SR [Ca] ([Ca](SR)) on the fraction of SR calcium released during voltage clamp steps in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. [Ca](SRT), as measured by caffeine application, was progressively increased by conditioning pulses. Sodium was absent in both the intracellular and in the extracellular solutions to block sodium/calcium exchange. Total cytosolic calcium flux during the transient was inferred from I(Ca), [Ca](SRT), [Ca](i), and cellular buffering characteristics. Fluxes via the calcium current (I(Ca)), the SR calcium pump, and passive leak from the SR were evaluated to determine SR calcium release flux (J(rel)). Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling was characterized with respect to both gain (integral J(rel)/integral I(Ca)) and fractional SR calcium release. Both parameters were virtually zero for a small, but measurable [Ca](SRT). Gain and fractional SR calcium release increased steeply and nonlinearly with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). We conclude that potentiation of EC coupling can be correlated with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). While fractional SR calcium release was not linearly dependent upon [Ca](SR), intra-SR calcium may play a crucial role in regulating the SR calcium release process. PMID:10620297

  10. Delayed childbearing.

    PubMed

    Francis, H H

    1985-06-01

    In many Western nations, including England and Wales, Sweden, and the US, there is a current trend towards delayed childbearing because of women's pursuit of a career, later marriage, a longer interval between marriage and the 1st birth, and the increasing number of divorcees having children in a 2nd marriage. Wives of men in social classes I and II in England and Wales are, on average, having their 1st child at 27.9 years, 1.6 years later than in 1973, and in social classes IV and V, 1.0 years later than in 1973, at a mean age of 23.7 years. Consequently, the total period fertility rate for British women aged 30-34 years, 35-39 years, and 40 and over increased by 4%, 2%, and 4%, respectively, between 1982-83, in contrast to reductions of 2% and 3%, respectively, in the 15-19 year and 20-24 year age groups, with the 25-29-year-olds remaining static. The average maternal mortality for all parties in England and Wales during 1976-78 was 106/million for adolescents, 70.4/million for 20-24 year-olds, and 1162/million for those aged 40 years and older. The specific obstetric and allied conditions which increase with age are the hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, abortion, cardiac disease, caesarean section, ruptured uterus, and amniotic fluid embolism. The Swedish Medical Birth Registry of all live births and perinatal deaths since 1973 has shown that the risk of late fetal death is significantly greater in women aged 30-39 years than in those of the same parity and gravidity aged 20-24 years. The risk of giving birth to low birth weight babies preterm and at term and of premature labor are similarly increased. The early neonatal death rate also was increased for primigravidas and nulliparas in the 30-39 year age group but not in parous women. This is, in part, due to the rise in incidence of fetal abnormalities with advancing maternal age because of chromosomal and nonchromosomal anomalies. These also appear to be the cause of the

  11. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, Michael E.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. PMID:26510758

  12. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  13. The calcium paradox in isolated frog heart: Ringer revisited.

    PubMed

    Ruigrok, T J; Slade, A M; Poole-Wilson, P A

    1983-12-01

    Restoration of a normal calcium concentration in the perfusate of isolated hearts after a short period of calcium-free perfusion may result in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). We have compared the calcium paradox in rat and frog hearts. Perfusion with zero calcium for 8 min at 37 degrees C predisposed the rat heart to the paradox. After the reintroduction of calcium to the perfusate resting tension rose, developed tension did not recover, ultrastructural changes occurred and enzyme loss was substantial. In the frog heart a calcium paradox did not occur after 8 min of calcium-free perfusion at 23 degrees C. Removal of both potassium and calcium caused a rise in resting tension on reintroduction of control solution, but the rise was only transient and absent if potassium was present during the perfusion with zero calcium. At 37 degrees C no complete calcium paradox occurred after 8 min calcium-free perfusion. Only a small rise in resting tension was apparent, and developed tension partially recovered. A calcium paradox could only be induced in the frog heart after calcium-free perfusion at 37 degrees C for 30 min. Ultrastructural changes were apparent and resting tension rose but even under these conditions the recovery of developed tension was not abolished. Release of creatine kinase was 161 +/- 55 IU/g dry tissue during the 15 min after reintroduction of calcium (n = 5). Calcium-free perfusion for 8 min resulted in a smaller release of creatine kinase over 15 min (39 +/- 11 IU/g dry tissue. n = 5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1.

  15. L-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition Contributes to the Proarrhythmic Effects of Aconitine in Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianjun; Wang, Xiangchong; Chung, Ying Ying; Koh, Cai Hong; Liu, Zhenfeng; Guo, Huicai; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Chuan; Su, Suwen; Wei, Heming

    2017-01-01

    Aconitine (ACO) is well-known for causing lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias. While cardiac Na+ channel opening during repolarization has long been documented in animal cardiac myocytes, the cellular effects and mechanism of ACO in human remain unexplored. This study aimed to assess the proarrhythmic effects of ACO in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). ACO concentration-dependently (0.3 ~ 3.0 μM) shortened the action potentials (AP) durations (APD) in ventricular-like hiPSC-CMs by > 40% and induced delayed after-depolarization. Laser-scanning confocal calcium imaging analysis showed that ACO decreased the duration and amplitude of [Ca2+]i transients and increased in the beating frequencies by over 60%. Moreover, ACO was found to markedly reduce the L-type calcium channel (LTCC) currents (ICa,L) in hiPSC-CMs associated with a positive-shift of activation and a negative shift of inactivation. ACO failed to alter the peak and late Na+ currents (INa) in hiPSC-CMs while it drastically increased the late INa in Guinea-pig ventricular myocytes associated with enhanced activation/delayed inactivation of INa at -55 mV~ -85 mV. Further, the effects of ACO on ICa,L, INa and the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (Ikr) were validated in heterologous expression systems by automated voltage-clamping assays and a moderate suppression of Ikr was observed in addition to concentration-dependent ICa,L inhibition. Lastly, increased beating frequency, decreased Ca2+ wave and shortened field potential duration were recorded from hiPSC-CMs by microelectrode arrays assay. In summary, our data demonstrated that LTCC inhibition could play a main role in the proarrhythmic action of ACO in human cardiomyocytes. PMID:28056022

  16. Delayed coker fractionator advanced control

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisinghani, R.; Minter, B. ); Tica, A.; Puglesi, A.; Ojeda, R. )

    1993-08-01

    In a delayed coking process, as coke drum switches are made, rapid changes occur in both the fractionator feed rate and composition. With conventional control, it is not unusual to see long transient behavior of large swings in both quality and flowrates of coker gas oils. This can extract a heavy economic toll, not only in coker operation, but in the operation of downstream units as the upset is propagated. An advanced process control application (APC) was recently implemented on the coker fractionator at the Yacimentos Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF), Lujan de Cuyo Refinery, in Mendoza, Argentina. This coker fractionator control design was unique as it handled two different operating objectives: control of product qualities via tower temperature profile during normal operation and control of gas oil product flow ratio during drum switch. This combination of control objectives in one multivariable predictive control program was achieved by including special logic to decouple the individual tuning requirements. Also, additional logic was included to unambiguously detect and identify drum switch and drum steam out as discrete events within 30 seconds of their actual occurrence. These discrete events were then used as disturbance variables to minimize fractionator transient behavior. As a performance measure, the overhead temperature was controlled within 2 C to 2.5 C of its target, gas oil flows were stabilized during drum switches and steam generation via pump around was maximized. Overall, implementing advanced control for the delayed coker fractionator resulted in substantial benefits from product quality control, product flow control and minimized energy consumption.

  17. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    PubMed

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  18. Dynamic modulation of spike timing-dependent calcium influx during corticostriatal upstates

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R. C.; Maniar, Y. M.

    2013-01-01

    The striatum of the basal ganglia demonstrates distinctive upstate and downstate membrane potential oscillations during slow-wave sleep and under anesthetic. The upstates generate calcium transients in the dendrites, and the amplitude of these calcium transients depends strongly on the timing of the action potential (AP) within the upstate. Calcium is essential for synaptic plasticity in the striatum, and these large calcium transients during the upstates may control which synapses undergo plastic changes. To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the relationship between calcium and AP timing, we have developed a realistic biophysical model of a medium spiny neuron (MSN). We have implemented sophisticated calcium dynamics including calcium diffusion, buffering, and pump extrusion, which accurately replicate published data. Using this model, we found that either the slow inactivation of dendritic sodium channels (NaSI) or the calcium inactivation of voltage-gated calcium channels (CDI) can cause high calcium corresponding to early APs and lower calcium corresponding to later APs. We found that only CDI can account for the experimental observation that sensitivity to AP timing is dependent on NMDA receptors. Additional simulations demonstrated a mechanism by which MSNs can dynamically modulate their sensitivity to AP timing and show that sensitivity to specifically timed pre- and postsynaptic pairings (as in spike timing-dependent plasticity protocols) is altered by the timing of the pairing within the upstate. These findings have implications for synaptic plasticity in vivo during sleep when the upstate-downstate pattern is prominent in the striatum. PMID:23843436

  19. Functional characterization of linear delay Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budini, Adrián A.; Cáceres, Manuel O.

    2004-10-01

    We present an exact functional characterization of linear delay Langevin equations driven by any noise structure defined through its characteristic functional. This method relies on the possibility of finding an explicitly analytical expression for each realization of the delayed stochastic process in terms of those of the driving noise. General properties of the transient dissipative dynamics are analyzed. The corresponding interplay with a color Gaussian noise is presented. As a full application of our functional method we study a model for population growth with non-Gaussian fluctuations: the Gompertz model driven by multiplicative white shot noise.

  20. Nuclear calcium sensors reveal that repetition of trains of synaptic stimuli boosts nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, C Peter; Freitag, H Eckehard; Weislogel, Jan-Marek; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-12-15

    Nuclear calcium is a key signal in the dialogue between synapse and nucleus that controls the genomic responses required for persistent adaptations, including memory and acquired neuroprotection. The amplitude and duration of nuclear calcium transients specify activity-induced transcriptional changes. However, the precise relationship between synaptic input and nuclear calcium output is unknown. Here, we used stereotaxic delivery to the rat brain of recombinant adeno-associated viruses encoding nuclear-targeted calcium sensors to assess nuclear calcium transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons after stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals. We show that in acute hippocampal slices, a burst of synaptic activity elicits a nuclear calcium signal with a regenerative component at above-threshold stimulation intensities. Using classical stimulation paradigms (i.e., high-frequency stimulation (HFS) and θ burst stimulation (TBS)) to induce early LTP (E-LTP) and transcription-dependent late LTP (L-LTP), we found that the magnitude of nuclear calcium signals and the number of action potentials activated by synaptic stimulation trains are greatly amplified by their repetition. Nuclear calcium signals and action potential generation were reduced by blockade of either NMDA receptors or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, but not by procedures that lead to internal calcium store depletion or by blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptors. These findings identify a repetition-induced switch in nuclear calcium signaling that correlates with the transition from E-LTP to L-LTP, and may explain why the transcription-dependent phase of L-LTP is not induced by a single HFS or TBS but requires repeated trains of activity. Recombinant, nuclear-targeted indicators may prove useful for further analysis of nuclear calcium signaling in vivo.

  1. Cameleon calcium indicator reports cytoplasmic calcium dynamics in Arabidopsis guard cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. J.; Kwak, J. M.; Chu, S. P.; Llopis, J.; Tsien, R. Y.; Harper, J. F.; Schroeder, J. I.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) acts as a stimulus-induced second messenger in plant cells and multiple signal transduction pathways regulate [Ca2+]cyt in stomatal guard cells. Measuring [Ca2+]cyt in guard cells has previously required loading of calcium-sensitive dyes using invasive and technically difficult micro-injection techniques. To circumvent these problems, we have constitutively expressed the pH-independent, green fluorescent protein-based calcium indicator yellow cameleon 2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (Miyawaki et al. 1999; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 2135-2140). This yellow cameleon calcium indicator was expressed in guard cells and accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Fluorescence ratio imaging of yellow cameleon 2.1 allowed time-dependent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt in Arabidopsis guard cells. Application of extracellular calcium or the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients in guard cells. [Ca2+]cyt changes could be semi-quantitatively determined following correction of the calibration procedure for chloroplast autofluorescence. Extracellular calcium induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients with peak values of up to approximately 1.5 microM, whereas ABA-induced [Ca2+]cyt transients had peak values up to approximately 0.6 microM. These values are similar to stimulus-induced [Ca2+]cyt changes previously reported in plant cells using ratiometric dyes or aequorin. In some guard cells perfused with low extracellular KCl concentrations, spontaneous calcium transients were observed. As yellow cameleon 2.1 was expressed in all guard cells, [Ca2+]cyt was measured independently in the two guard cells of single stomates for the first time. ABA-induced, calcium-induced or spontaneous [Ca2+]cyt increases were not necessarily synchronized in the two guard cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that that GFP-based cameleon calcium indicators are suitable to measure [Ca2+]cyt changes in guard cells and enable the pattern of [Ca

  2. Optical measurement of presynaptic calcium currents.

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, B L; Regehr, W G

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of presynaptic calcium currents are vital to understanding the control of transmitter release. However, most presynaptic boutons in the vertebrate central nervous system are too small to allow electrical recordings of presynaptic calcium currents (I(Ca)pre). We therefore tested the possibility of measuring I(Ca)pre optically in boutons loaded with calcium-sensitive fluorophores. From a theoretical treatment of a system containing an endogenous buffer and an indicator, we determined the conditions necessary for the derivative of the stimulus-evoked change in indicator fluorescence to report I(Ca)pre accurately. Matching the calcium dissociation rates of the endogenous buffer and indicator allows the most precise optical measurements of I(Ca)pre. We tested our ability to measure I(Ca)pre in granule cells in rat cerebellar slices. The derivatives of stimulus-evoked fluorescence transients from slices loaded with the low-affinity calcium indicators magnesium green and mag-fura-5 had the same time courses and were unaffected by changes in calcium influx or indicator concentration. Thus both of these indicators were well suited to measuring I(Ca)pre. In contrast, the high-affinity indicator fura-2 distorted I(Ca)pre. The optically determined I(Ca)pre was well approximated by a Gaussian with a half-width of 650 micros at 24 degrees C and 340 micros at 34 degrees C. PMID:9512051

  3. Autoradiographic localization of N-type VGCCs in gerbil hippocampus and failure of omega-conotoxin MVIIA to attenuate neuronal injury after transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Azimi-Zonooz, A; Kawa, C B; Dowell, C D; Olivera, B M

    2001-07-13

    In the mammalian central nervous system, transient global ischemia of specific duration causes selective degeneration of CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampus. Many of the ischemia-induced pathophysiologic cascades that destroy the neurons are triggered by pre- and postsynaptic calcium entry. Consistent with this, many calcium channel blockers have been shown to be neuroprotective in global models of ischemia. omega-Conotoxin MVIIA, a selective N-type VGCC blocker isolated from the venom of Conus magus, protects CA1 neurons in the rat model of global ischemia, albeit transiently. The mechanism by which this peptide renders neuroprotection is unknown. We performed high-resolution receptor autoradiography with the radiolabeled peptide and observed highest binding in stratum lucidum of CA3 subfield, known to contain inhibitory neurons potentially important in the pathogenesis of delayed neuronal death. This finding suggested that the survival of stratum lucidum inhibitory neurons might be the primary event, leading to CA1 neuroprotection after ischemia. Testing of this hypothesis required the reproduction of its neuroprotective effects in the gerbil model of global ischemia. Surprisingly, we found that omega-MVIIA did not attenuate CA1 hippocampal injury after 5 min of cerebral ischemia in gerbil. Possible reasons are discussed. Lastly, we show that the peptide can be used as a synaptic marker in assessing short and long-term changes that occur in hippocampus after ischemic injury.

  4. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, N.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies, and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6°C.

  5. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here, we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon-cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the LOSCAR model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6oC.

  6. Calcium Imaging of Sonoporation of Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabens, David; Aehle, Matthew; Steyer, Grant; Kourennyi, Dmitri; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound mediated delivery of compounds is a relatively recent development in drug delivery and gene transfection techniques. Due to the lack of methods for real-time monitoring of sonoporation at the cellular level, the efficiency of drug/gene delivery and sonoporation associated side effects, such as the loss of cell viability and enhanced apoptosis, have been studied only through post US exposure analyses, requiring days for cell incubation. Furthermore, because microporation appears to be transient in nature, it was not possible to correlate transfection with microporation on an individual cellular basis. By studying the role of calcium in the cell and using fluorescent calcium imaging to study sonoporation it is possible to quantify both cell porosity and sonoporation side effects. Since both post sonoporation cell survival and delivery efficiency are related to the dynamic process of the cell membrane poration, calcium imaging of sonoporation will provide important knowledge to obtain improved understanding of sonoporation mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of calcium imaging of sonoporation in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We have measured the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration using Fura-2, a fluorescent probe, which indicate influx or flow of Calcium across the cell membrane. Analysis of data identified key aspects in the dynamic sonoporation process including the formation of pores in the cell membrane, and the relative temporal duration of the pores and their resealing. These observations are obtained through the analysis of the rate the calcium concentration changes within the cells, making it possible to visualize membrane opening and repair in real-time through such changes in the intracellular calcium concentration.

  7. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  8. [Do cows drink calcium?].

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Lechner, S; Plate, I; Heidemann, B

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how well cows drink the Propeller calcium drink, and it's effect on blood calcium concentration. Drinking was tested in 120 cows right after calving, before cows drank anything else. 60 cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or 20 liters of water. Cows drank the Propeller as good as water. 72% of all cows drank all 20 liters, 18% drank on average 8.2 liters and 10% drank less than 1 liter. Blood calcium concentration was studied in 16 cows right after calving. Eight cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or no calcium drink. Blood calcium significantly increased ten minutes after Propeller intake and stayed significantly elevated for 24 hours. Without calcium drink blood calcium levels decreased significantly. Advantages of the new Propeller calcium drink over calcium gels or boli could be that cows now drink calcium themselves and that the Propeller increases blood calcium concentration rapidly and long lasting.

  9. Effect of glycoursodeoxycholate on precipitation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Marteau, C; Portugal, H; Pauli, A M; Gerolami, A

    1985-01-01

    The potential role of bile salts in preventing calcium carbonate precipitation was investigated by studying their interaction of Ca2+ and their inhibitory effects on calcium carbonate formation. Glycochenodeoxycholate micelles bound more calcium than did glycocholate. At bile salt concentrations exceeding 12.5 mM, glycoursodeoxycholate bound calcium as well as glycochenodexycholate did. Similar results for calcium binding were observed in mixed micelles of bile salts and lecithin. In bicarbonate (25 or 50 mM) and CaCl2 (10 mM) solutions, calcium carbonate formation was inhibited by the bile salts. Glycoursodeoxycholate and glycochenodeoxycholate (25 mM) prevented calcium carbonate formation which was delayed by glycocholate. This effect is not due to differences between both series of bile salts for calcium binding since glycoursodeoxycholate or glycochenodeoxycholate (25 mM) more efficiently prevented calcium carbonate precipitation than did 35 mM glycocholate in spite of the same Ca2+ binding. These results suggest that some bile salts may have a specific role in preventing calcium precipitation in bile. The mechanism is unknown. The physical properties of glycoursodeoxycholate and glycochenodeoxycholate do not support a role for CaCO3 precipitation in gallstone calcification during litholytic therapy.

  10. Alendronate affects calcium dynamics in cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kemeny-Suss, Naomi; Kasneci, Amanda; Rivas, Daniel; Afilalo, Jonathan; Komarova, Svetlana V; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Duque, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Therapy with bisphosphonates, including alendronate (ALN), is considered a safe and effective treatment for osteoporosis. However, recent studies have reported an unexpected increase in serious atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients treated with bisphosphonates. The mechanism that explains this side effect remains unknown. Since AF is associated with an altered sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium load, we studied how ALN affects cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and protein isoprenylation in vitro. Acute and long-term (48h) treatment of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes with ALN (10(-8)-10(-6)M) was performed. Changes in calcium dynamics were determined by both fluorescence measurement of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration and western blot analysis of calcium-regulating proteins. Finally, effect of ALN on protein farnesylation was also identified. In both atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes, ALN treatment delayed and diminished calcium responses to caffeine. Only in atrial cells, long-term exposure to ALN-induced transitory calcium oscillations and led to the development of oscillatory component in calcium responses to caffeine. Changes in calcium dynamics were accompanied by changes in expression of proteins controlling sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium. In contrast, ALN minimally affected protein isoprenylation in these cells. In summary, treatment of atrial cardiomyocytes with ALN-induced abnormalities in calcium dynamics consistent with induction of a self-stimulatory, pacemaker-like behavior, which may contribute to the development of cardiac side effects associated with these drugs.

  11. Reporting neural activity with genetically encoded calcium indicators

    PubMed Central

    Hires, S. Andrew; Tian, Lin; Looger, Loren L.

    2009-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), based on recombinant fluorescent proteins, have been engineered to observe calcium transients in living cells and organisms. Through observation of calcium, these indicators also report neural activity. We review progress in GECI construction and application, particularly toward in vivo monitoring of sparse action potentials (APs). We summarize the extrinsic and intrinsic factors that influence GECI performance. A simple model of GECI response to AP firing demonstrates the relative significance of these factors. We recommend a standardized protocol for evaluating GECIs in a physiologically relevant context. A potential method of simultaneous optical control and recording of neuronal circuits is presented. PMID:18941901

  12. [Transient epileptic amnesia].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Yoshizaki, Takahito

    2016-03-01

    Transient amnesia is one of common clinical phenomenon of epilepsy that are encountered by physicians. The amnestic attacks are often associated with persistent memory disturbances. Epilepsy is common among the elderly, with amnesia as a common symptom and convulsions relatively uncommon. Therefore, amnesia due to epilepsy can easily be misdiagnosed as dementia. The term 'transient epileptic amnesia (TEA)' was introduced in the early 1990s by Kapur, who highlighted that amnestic attacks caused by epilepsy can be similar to those occurring in 'transient global amnesia', but are distinguished by features brevity and recurrence. In 1998, Zeman et al. proposed diagnostic criteria for TEA.

  13. Luminous Extragalactic Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Jonker, Peter; Athena Explosive Transients Working Group

    2015-09-01

    The ESA Athena X-ray observatory mission will combine exceptionally high throughout with high spectral-energy resolution and will revolutionise many aspects of high-energy astrophysics. Many of the most powerful transient sources, including gamma-ray bursts and tidal disruptions events, are bright X-ray sources. Athena will be designed to have a fast-response capability permitting efficient observations of many transients. We will summarise the proposed capability of the mission and illustrate science programs to study transients ranging from the most distant GRBs to nuclear activity in nearby galaxies.

  14. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  15. Simultaneous patch-clamping and calcium imaging in developing dendrites.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Thomas; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Calcium imaging has been used extensively to explore the role of action potential (AP) firing in the development of neuronal structure and synaptic function because increases in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) reliably and, within a certain range, linearly reflect neuronal spiking activity. Patterns of APs in individual cells can be deduced from calcium recordings, which have typically been performed at the level of cell bodies. However, neurons are particularly susceptible to phototoxicity when they are illuminated at the soma. Furthermore, for some imaging experiments (e.g., those that address the interactions between dendrites and axons during synapse formation), the cell body of a given neuron may simply not be in the field of view. In these situations, it would be helpful to determine the spiking patterns of a neuron from the calcium activity in its subcellular compartments such as stretches of dendrites or axons. Here, we describe an approach for determining the relationship between AP firing and dendritic calcium transients by simultaneously imaging calcium transients in small dendritic stretches of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in slice cultures from neonatal rats and recording spiking activity with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in these neurons. These experiments allow us to correlate the electrophysiological spiking pattern with the accompanying changes in the calcium concentration in individual dendritic segments.

  16. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... very bad at absorbing calcium. Most people absorb only 15% to 20% of the calcium they eat in their diet. Vitamin D is the hormone that helps the gut absorb more calcium. Many older adults have common risks that make bone health worse. ...

  17. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... a food with 45% DV of calcium. Check food labels. The Daily Value (DV) on a food label tells you the amount of a nutrient (like ... serving, or 60% DV. Learn how to check food labels for calcium information. Use this calcium shopping list ...

  18. Transient topographical amnesia.

    PubMed Central

    Stracciari, A; Lorusso, S; Pazzaglia, P

    1994-01-01

    Ten healthy middle aged or elderly women experienced isolated episodes of topographical amnesia without an obvious aetiology. It is likely a benign cognitive disorder, similar to transient global amnesia. PMID:7964826

  19. Transient Global Amnesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... global amnesia is a sudden, temporary episode of memory loss that can't be attributed to a ... know well. But that doesn't make your memory loss less disturbing. Fortunately, transient global amnesia is ...

  20. Transient Astrophysics Observatory (TAO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; TAO Team

    2016-10-01

    The Transient Astrophysics Observatory (TAO) is a NASA MidEx mission concept (formerly known as Lobster) designed to provide simultaneous wide-field gamma-ray, X-ray, and near-infrared observations of the sky.

  1. High energy transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A meeting was convened on the campus of the University of California at Santa Cruz during the two-week interval July 11 through July 22, 1983. Roughly 100 participants were chosen so as to give broad representation to all aspects of high energy transients. Ten morning review sessions were held in which invited speakers discussed the current status of observations and theory of the above subjects. Afternoon workshops were also held, usually more than one per day, to informally review various technical aspects of transients, confront shortcomings in theoretical models, and to propose productive courses for future research. Special attention was also given to the instrumentation used to study high energy transient and the characteristics and goals of a dedicated space mission to study transients in the next decade were determined. A listing of articles written by various members of the workshop is included.

  2. Calcium accentuates injury induced by ethanol in human gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Smith, G S; Deshpande, Y; Wolff, A B; Rieckenberg, C; Miller, T A

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism(s) whereby ethanol induces cellular injury remains poorly understood. Furthermore, the role of calcium in gastric mucosal injury under in vitro conditions is poorly defined. The major objectives of this study were to (1) define the temporal relationship between intracellular calcium accumulation induced by ethanol and cellular injury, (2) characterize the mechanism(s) whereby ethanol increases cellular calcium content, and (3) determine whether calcium removal would attenuate ethanol-induced cellular injury. Human gastric cells (AGS) were used for all experiments. Sustained intracellular calcium accumulation induced by ethanol, but not transient changes, preceded and directly correlated with cellular injury. Cells exposed to damaging concentrations of ethanol demonstrated an initial calcium surge that appeared to be a consequence of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) generation and subsequent internal store release followed by a sustained plateau resulting from extracellular calcium influx through store-operated calcium channels. Finally, both morphologic (cellular injury) and functional (clearance of bovine serum albumin) changes induced by ethanol were significantly attenuated when extracellular Ca(+&plus) influx was prevented, and further decreased when intracellular Ca(++) stores were depleted. These data indicate that calcium plays a significant role in cellular injury induced by ethanol.

  3. Nonlinear femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy using a power-encoded soliton delay line.

    PubMed

    Saint-Jalm, Sarah; Andresen, Esben Ravn; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Rigneault, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    We show femtosecond time-resolved nonlinear pump-probe spectroscopy using a fiber soliton as the probe pulse. Furthermore, we exploit soliton dynamics to record an entire transient trace with a power-encoded delay sweep. The power-encoded delay line takes advantage of the dependency of the soliton trajectory in the (λ,z) space upon input power; the difference in accumulated group delay between trajectories converts a fast power sweep into a fast delay sweep. We demonstrate the concept by performing transient absorption spectroscopy in a test sample and validate it against a conventional pump-probe setup.

  4. Transient multivariable sensor evaluation

    DOEpatents

    Vilim, Richard B.; Heifetz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    A method and system for performing transient multivariable sensor evaluation. The method and system includes a computer system for identifying a model form, providing training measurement data, generating a basis vector, monitoring system data from sensor, loading the system data in a non-transient memory, performing an estimation to provide desired data and comparing the system data to the desired data and outputting an alarm for a defective sensor.

  5. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  6. Effect of thymol on calcium handling in mammalian ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Szentandrássy, Norbert; Szigeti, Gyula; Szegedi, Csaba; Sárközi, Sándor; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Csernoch, László; Kovács, László; Nánási, Péter P; Jóna, István

    2004-01-02

    Concentration-dependent effects of thymol on calcium handling were studied in canine and guinea pig cardiac preparations (Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts, canine ventricular trabeculae, canine sarcoplasmic reticular vesicles and single ryanodine receptors). Thymol induced a concentration-dependent negative inotropic action in both canine and guinea pig preparations (EC(50) = 297 +/- 12 microM in dog). However, low concentrations of thymol reduced intracellular calcium transients in guinea pig hearts without decreasing contractility. At higher concentrations both calcium transients and contractions were suppressed. In canine sarcoplasmic reticular vesicles thymol induced rapid release of calcium (V(max) = 0.47 +/- 0.04 nmol s(-1), EC(50) = 258 +/- 21 microM, Hill coefficient = 3.0 +/- 0.54), and decreased the activity of the calcium pump (EC(50) = 253 +/- 4.7 microM, Hill coefficient = 1.62 +/- 0.05). Due to the less sharp concentration-dependence of the ATPase inhibition, this effect was significant from 50 microM, whereas the thymol-induced calcium release only from 100 microM. In single ryanodine receptors incorporated into artificial lipid bilayer thymol induced long lasting openings, having mean open times increased with 3 orders of magnitude, however, the specific conductance of the channel remained unaltered. This effect of thymol was not voltage-dependent and failed to prevent the binding of ryanodine. In conclusion, the negative inotropic action of thymol can be explained by reduction in calcium content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum due to the combination of the thymol-induced calcium release and inhibition of the calcium pump. The calcium-sensitizer effect, observed at lower thymol concentrations, indicates that thymol is likely to interact with the contractile machinery also.

  7. Fluid Flow Induced Calcium Response in Bone Cell Network

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Bo; Lu, Xin L.; Hung, Clark T.; Costa, Kevin D.; Xu, Qiaobing; Whitesides, George M.; Guo, X. Edward

    2010-01-01

    In our previous work, bone cell networks with controlled spacing and functional intercellular gap junctions had been successfully established by using microcontact printing and self assembled monolayers technologies [Guo, X. E., E. Takai, X. Jiang, Q. Xu, G. M. Whitesides, J. T. Yardley, C. T. Hung, E. M. Chow, T. Hantschel, and K. D. Costa. Mol. Cell. Biomech. 3:95–107, 2006]. The present study investigated the calcium response and the underlying signaling pathways in patterned bone cell networks exposed to a steady fluid flow. The glass slides with cell networks were separated into eight groups for treatment with specific pharmacological agents that inhibit pathways significant in bone cell calcium signaling. The calcium transients of the network were recorded and quantitatively evaluated with a set of network parameters. The results showed that 18α-GA (gap junction blocker), suramin (ATP inhibitor), and thapsigargin (depleting intracellular calcium stores) significantly reduced the occurrence of multiple calcium peaks, which were visually obvious in the untreated group. The number of responsive peaks also decreased slightly yet significantly when either the COX-2/PGE2 or the NOS/nitric oxide pathway was disrupted. Different from all other groups, cells treated with 18α-GA maintained a high concentration of intracellular calcium following the first peak. In the absence of calcium in the culture medium, the intracellular calcium concentration decreased slowly with fluid flow without any calcium transients observed. These findings have identified important factors in the flow mediated calcium signaling of bone cells within a patterned network. PMID:20852730

  8. The yin and yang of calcium effects on synaptic vesicle endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Sheng; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2014-02-12

    A large number of studies suggest that calcium triggers and accelerates vesicle endocytosis at many synapses and non-neuronal secretory cells. However, many studies show that prolonging the duration of the stimulation train, which induces more calcium influx, slows down endocytosis; and several studies suggest that instead of triggering endocytosis, calcium actually inhibits endocytosis. Here we addressed this apparent conflict at a large nerve terminal, the calyx of Held in rat brainstem, in which recent studies suggest that transient calcium increase up to tens of micromolar concentration at the micro/nano domain triggers endocytosis. By dialyzing 0-1 μM calcium into the calyx via a whole-cell pipette, we found that slow endocytosis was inhibited by calcium dialysis in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, prolonged, small, and global calcium increase inhibits endocytosis, whereas transient and large calcium increase at the micro/nano domain triggers endocytosis and facilitates endocytosis. This yin and yang effect of calcium may reconcile apparent conflicts regarding whether calcium accelerates or inhibits endocytosis. Whether endocytosis is fast or slow depends on the net outcome between the yin and yang effect of calcium.

  9. Recommendations for the Avoidance of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the possible causes of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which include buildup of lactic acid in muscle, increased intracellular calcium concentration, increased intramuscular inflammation, and muscle fiber and connective tissue damage. Proposed methods to reduce DOMS include warming up before exercise and performing repeated bouts…

  10. Optical Fiber Delay Line Signal Processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Steven Arthur

    The delay line transversal filter is a basic component in analog signal processing systems. Unfortunately, conventional delay line devices, such as those that use surface acoustic waves, are largely limited to operation at frequencies of several hundred megahertz and below. In this work, single-mode optical fiber has been used as a delay medium to make transversal filters that extend this kind of signal processing to frequencies of one gigahertz and above. Single-mode optical fiber is an excellent delay medium because it exhibits extremely low loss and dispersion. By efficiently collecting, weighting, and combining signals extracted from a fiber delay line, single-mode fiber can be used, not only to transmit broadband signals, but to process them as well. The goals of the work have been to study efficient tapping mechanisms, and to construct fiber transversal filters capable of performing some basic signal processing functions. Several different tapped and recirculating delay line prototypes have been fabricated using a variety of tapping techniques, including macrobending and evanescent field coupling. These devices have been used to demonstrate basic signal processing functions, such as code generation, convolution, correlation, and frequency filtering, at frequencies that exceed those possible using conventional delay line technologies. Fiber recirculating delay line loops have also been demonstrated as transient memories for the temporary storage of signals and as a means of time division multiplexing via data rate transformation. These devices are the building blocks that are necessary to make systems capable of performing complex signal processing functions. With the recent development of high speed optical sources and detectors to interface with fiber systems of this kind, the real time processing of signals having bandwidths of tens of gigahertz is envisioned.

  11. Inhibitors of calcium buffering depress evoked transmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D J; Takeda, K; Umbach, J A

    1985-01-01

    Evoked release of transmitter at the squid giant synapse was examined under conditions where the calcium ion concentration in the presynaptic terminal was manipulated by inhibitors of calcium sequestration. Simultaneous intracellular recordings of presynaptic and post-synaptic resting and action potentials were made during bath application of one of the following metabolic inhibitors: sodium cyanide (NaCN), carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (FCCP); ruthenium red (RuR) and sodium-free (lithium) sea water. Cyanide and lithium sea water reversibly depressed the post-synaptic potential (p.s.p.) whilst RuR and FCCP blocked the evoked post-synaptic response irreversibly. The progressive reduction of p.s.p. amplitude was accompanied by a reversible increase in synaptic delay. The time course of block of the p.s.p. was similar for different agents and dependent on the rate of presynaptic activity (30-40 min at 0.01 Hz). Recovery of the post-synaptic action potential following block by cyanide and lithium sea water was obtained within 40 min and 5 min respectively. Synaptic depression by the metabolic inhibitors does not result from changes in presynaptic resting or action potentials, nor from a change in post-synaptic receptor sensitivity. The post-synaptic response to the local ionophoresis of L-glutamate was unchanged following inhibition of evoked release of transmitter by cyanide. Injections of EGTA into presynaptic terminals poisoned by cyanide produced transient increases in p.s.p. amplitude, suggesting that cyanide is having its effect through raising intracellular calcium rather than lowering ATP. Control experiments injecting EGTA into unpoisoned nerve terminals showed no apparent effect on evoked transmitter release. PMID:2419546

  12. Privileged crosstalk between TRPV1 channels and mitochondrial calcium shuttling machinery controls nociception.

    PubMed

    Nita, Iulia I; Caspi, Yaki; Gudes, Sagi; Fishman, Dimitri; Lev, Shaya; Hersfinkel, Michal; Sekler, Israel; Binshtok, Alexander M

    2016-12-01

    The nociceptive noxious heat-activated receptor - TRPV1, conducts calcium and sodium, thus producing a depolarizing receptor potential, leading to activation of nociceptive neurons. TRPV1-mediated calcium and sodium influx is negatively modulated by calcium, via calcium-dependent desensitization of TRPV1 channels. A mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter - MCU, controls mitochondrial Ca(2+) entry while a sodium/calcium transporter - NCLX shapes calcium and sodium transients by mediating sodium entry into and removing calcium from the mitochondria. The functional interplay between TRPV1, MCU and NCLX, in controlling the cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium and sodium transients and subsequently the nociceptive excitability, is poorly understood. Here, we used cytosolic and mitochondrial fluorescent calcium and sodium imaging together with electrophysiological recordings of TRPV1-induced currents in HEK293T cells and nociceptor-like dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, while modulating NCLX or MCU expression using specific small interfering RNA (siNCLX). We show that the propagation of the TRPV1-induced cytosolic calcium and sodium fluxes into mitochondria is dependent on coordinated activity of NCLX and MCU. Thus, knocking-down of NCLX triggers down regulation of MCU dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. This in turn decreases rate and amplitude of TRPV1-mediated cytosolic calcium, which inhibits capsaicin-induced inward current and neuronal firing. TRPV1-mediated currents were fully rescued by intracellular inclusion of the fast calcium chelator BAPTA. Finally, NCLX controls capsaicin-induced cell death, by supporting massive mitochondrial Ca(2+) shuttling. Altogether, our results suggest that NCLX, by regulating cytosolic and mitochondrial ionic transients, modulates calcium-dependent desensitization of TRPV1 channels, thereby, controlling nociceptive signaling.

  13. Functional calcium imaging in developing cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Hjorth, J J Johannes; Meredith, Rhiannon M

    2011-10-22

    , synaptogenesis and plasticity (Rakic & Komuro, 1995; Spitzer et al., 2004) are of critical importance for the correct development and maturation of the cortical circuitry. In this JoVE video, we demonstrate the methods used to image spontaneous activity in developing cortical networks. Calcium-sensitive indicators, such as Fura 2-AM ester diffuse across the cell membrane where intracellular esterase activity cleaves the AM esters to leave the cell-impermeant form of indicator dye. The impermeant form of indicator has carboxylic acid groups which are able to then detect and bind calcium ions intracellularly. The fluorescence of the calcium-sensitive dye is transiently altered upon binding to calcium. Single or multi-photon imaging techniques are used to measure the change in photons being emitted from the dye, and thus indicate an alteration in intracellular calcium. Furthermore, these calcium-dependent indicators can be combined with other fluorescent markers to investigate cell types within the active network.

  14. CGI delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-generated graphics in real-time helicopter simulation produces objectionable scene-presentation time delays. In the flight simulation laboratory at Ames Research Center, it has been determined that these delays have an adverse influence on pilot performance during aggressive tasks such as nap-of-the-earth (NOE) maneuvers. Using contemporary equipment, computer-generated image (CGI) time delays are an unavoidable consequence of the operations required for scene generation. However, providing that magnitide distortions at higher frequencies are tolerable, delay compensation is possible over a restricted frequency range. This range, assumed to have an upper limit of perhaps 10 or 15 rad/sec, conforms approximately to the bandwidth associated with helicopter handling qualities research. A compensation algorithm is introduced here and evaluated in terms of tradeoffs in frequency responses. The algorithm has a discrete basis and accommodates both a large, constant transport delay interval and a periodic delay interval, as associated with asynchronous operations.

  15. Stretch-activated calcium channels relay fast calcium waves propagated by calcium-induced calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2007-03-01

    For nearly 30 years, fast calcium waves have been attributed to a regenerative process propagated by CICR (calcium-induced calcium release) from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, I propose a model containing a new subclass of fast calcium waves which is propagated by CICI (calcium-induced calcium influx) through the plasma membrane. They are called fast CICI waves. These move at the order of 100 to 1000 microm/s (at 20 degrees C), rather than the order of 3 to 30 microm/s found for CICR. Moreover, in this proposed subclass, the calcium influx which drives calcium waves is relayed by stretch-activated calcium channels. This model is based upon reports from approx. 60 various systems. In seven of these reports, calcium waves were imaged, and, in five of these, evidence was presented that these waves were regenerated by CICI. Much of this model involves waves that move along functioning flagella and cilia. In these systems, waves of local calcium influx are thought to cause waves of local contraction by inducing the sliding of dynein or of kinesin past tubulin microtubules. Other cells which are reported to exhibit waves, which move at speeds in the fast CICI range, include ones from a dozen protozoa, three polychaete worms, three molluscs, a bryozoan, two sea urchins, one arthropod, four insects, Amphioxus, frogs, two fish and a vascular plant (Equisetum), together with numerous healthy, as well as cancerous, mammalian cells, including ones from human. In two of these systems, very gentle local mechanical stimulation is reported to initiate waves. In these non-flagellar systems, the calcium influxes are thought to speed the sliding of actinomyosin filaments past each other. Finally, I propose that this mechanochemical model could be tested by seeing if gentle mechanical stimulation induces waves in more of these systems and, more importantly, by imaging the predicted calcium waves in more of them.

  16. Environmentally Benign Pyrotechnic Delays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    jay.poret@us.army.mil † School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA ABSTRACT Pyrotechnic delays are used in...benign formulations are described. The delay time of the new system is easily tunable. These compositions will consistently function in aluminum ...tunable. These compositions will consistently function in aluminum housings which is generally difficult for delay compositions due to extreme thermal

  17. Delayed Orgasm and Anorgasmia

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Lawrence C.; Mulhall, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies; which include: medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation and psychological etiologies, amongst others. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. PMID:26439762

  18. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up.

  19. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  20. Delayed puberty and amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Barbara; Bradshaw, Karen D

    2003-11-01

    The ability to diagnose and manage disorders that cause delayed puberty requires a thorough understanding of the physical and hormonal events of puberty. Wide variation exists within normal pubertal maturation, but most adolescent girls in the United States have begun to mature by the age of 13. Delayed puberty, a rare condition in girls, occurs in only approximately 2.5% of the population. Constitutional delay, genetic defects, or hypothalamic-pituitary disorders are common causes. Amenorrhea, often found as a symptom of delayed puberty, may be due to congenital genital tract anomalies, ovarian failure, or chronic anovulation with estrogen presence or with estrogen absence.

  1. Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S.; Quimby, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) was designed to explicitly to chart the transient sky with a particular focus on events which lie in the nova-supernova gap. With its innovative two-telescope architecture it achieves both high cadence and large areal rate of coverage. PTF was commissioned during the summer of 2009. PTF is now finding an extragalactic transient every 20 minutes and a Galactic (strong) variable every 10 minutes. Spectroscopy undertaken at Keck and Palomar has allowed us: identify an emerging class of ultra-luminous supernovae, discover luminous red novae, undertake UV spectroscopy of Ia supernovae, discover supernovae powered by something other than Nickel-56, clarification of sub-classes of core collapse and thermo-nuclear explosions, map the systematics of core collapse supernovae, a trove of eclipsing binaries and many others.

  2. Excavatolide B Modulates the Electrophysiological Characteristics and Calcium Homeostasis of Atrial Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hwong-Ru; Tai, Buh-Yuan; Cheng, Pao-Yun; Chen, Ping-Nan; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Hsu, Chih-Hsueng

    2017-01-01

    Severe bacterial infections caused by sepsis always result in profound physiological changes, including fever, hypotension, arrhythmia, necrosis of tissue, systemic multi-organ dysfunction, and finally death. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provokes an inflammatory response under sepsis, which may increase propensity to arrhythmogenesis. Excavatolide B (EXCB) possesses potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, it is not clear whether EXCB could modulate the electrophysiological characteristics and calcium homeostasis of atrial myocytes. This study investigated the effects of EXCB on the atrial myocytes exposed to lipopolysaccharide. A whole-cell patch clamp and indo-1 fluorimetric ratio technique was employed to record the action potential (AP), ionic currents, and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in single, isolated rabbit left atrial (LA) cardiomyocytes, with and without LPS (1 μg/mL) and LPS + EXCB administration (10 μM) for 6 ± 1 h, in order to investigate the role of EXCB on atrial electrophysiology. In the presence of LPS, EXCB-treated LA myocytes (n = 13) had a longer AP duration at 20% (29 ± 2 vs. 20 ± 2 ms, p < 0.05), 50% (52 ± 4 vs. 40 ± 3 ms, p < 0.05), and 90% (85 ± 5 vs. 68 ± 3 ms, p < 0.05), compared to the LPS-treated cells (n = 12). LPS-treated LA myocytes showed a higher late sodium current, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current, transient outward current, and delayed rectifier potassium current, but a lower l-type Ca2+ current, than the control LA myocytes. Treatment with EXCB reversed the LPS-induced alterations of the ionic currents. LPS-treated, EXCB-treated, and control LA myocytes exhibited similar Na+ currents. In addition, the LPS-treated LA myocytes exhibited a lower [Ca2+]i content and higher sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, than the controls. EXCB reversed the LPS-induced calcium alterations. In conclusion, EXCB modulates LPS-induced LA electrophysiological characteristics and calcium homeostasis, which may contribute to attenuating

  3. Modulation of calcium signalling by the endoplasmic reticulum in Carassius neurons.

    PubMed

    Lukyanets, Igor A; Lukyanetz, Elena A

    2013-04-19

    It is known that endoplasmic reticulum (ER), being a calcium store participates in the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration. Ca-ATPase of the ER is one of the crucial agents providing the calcium-accumulating function of this intracellular structure. We studied the role of the ER in modulation of calcium signalling in Carassius neurons using a Ca2+-imaging technique. We tested the role of the ER in the maintenance of a steady state calcium level in the cytoplasm and in modulation of Ca2+ transients evoked by cell depolarizations. The ER calcium stores were depleted using inhibitors of ER Ca-ATPase, which provided blocking of Ca2+ uptake by the ER. Our experiments firstly showed that the ER can significantly modulate the characteristics of intracellular calcium signals in Carassius neurons during their activity. These findings also indicate that the ER modulates the shape of Ca2+ signals rather than the basal level of intracellular Ca2+ in these neurons.

  4. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement thickening products, and many ...

  5. Calcium: total or ionized?

    PubMed

    Schenck, Patricia A; Chew, Dennis J

    2008-05-01

    Measurement of serum total calcium (tCa) has been relied on for assessment of calcium status, despite the fact that it is the ionized calcium (iCa) fraction that has biologic activity. Serum tCa does not accurately predict iCa status in many clinical conditions. For accurate assessment of iCa status, iCa should be directly measured. Anaerobic measurement of serum iCa under controlled conditions provides the most reliable assessment of calcium status; aerobic measurement of iCa with species-specific pH correction is highly correlated with anaerobic measurements.

  6. A fast, transient K+ current in neurohypophysial nerve terminals of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, P J; Wang, X M; Lemos, J R

    1991-01-01

    1. Nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary were acutely dissociated and identified using a combination of morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. Macroscopic terminal membrane currents and voltages were studied using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. 2. In physiological solutions, depolarizing voltage clamp steps, from a holding potential (-80 mV) similar to the normal terminal resting potential, elicited a fast, inward followed by a fast, transient, outward current. 3. The threshold of activation for the outward current was -60 mV. The outward current quickly reached a peak and then decayed more slowly. The decay was fitted by two exponentials with time constants of 21 +/- 2.9 and 143 +/- 36 ms. These decay constants did not show a dependence on voltage. The time to peak of the outward current decreased and the amplitude increased with increasingly depolarized potential steps. 4. The outward current was blocked by the substitution of K+ with Cs+ and its reversal potential was consistent with a potassium current. 5. The transient outward current showed steady-state inactivation at more depolarized (than -80 mV) holding potentials with 50% inactivation occurring at -47.9 mV. The time course of recovery from inactivation was complex with full recovery taking greater than 16 s. 6. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) blocked the transient outward current in a dose-dependent manner (approximately IC50 = 3 mM), while charybdotoxin (4 micrograms/ml) and tetraethylammonium (100 mM) had no effect on the current amplitude. 7. Lowering external [Ca2+] had no effect on the fast, transient outward current nor did the calcium channel blocker Cd2+ (2 mM). 8. The neurohypophysial outward current reported here corresponds most closely to IA, and not to the delayed rectifier or Ca2(+)-activated K+ currents. Neurohypophysial IA, however, appears to be different from the outward currents found in the cell bodies in the hypothalamus which project their axons to the posterior

  7. Digital time delay

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  8. Time Delay Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    investigate the possibility of exploiting the properties of a detected Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) signal waveform to estimate time delay, and by...ratios, namely 10 dB and less. We also examine the minimum time –delay estimate error – the Cramer–Rao bound. The results indicate that the method

  9. Role of intracellular calcium handling in force-interval relationships of human ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Gwathmey, J K; Slawsky, M T; Hajjar, R J; Briggs, G M; Morgan, J P

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were performed in human working myocardium to investigate the relationship of intracellular calcium handling and availability to alterations in the strength of contraction produced by changes in stimulation rate and pattern. Both control and myopathic muscles exhibited potentiation of peak isometric force during the postextrasystolic contraction which was associated with an increase in the peak intracellular calcium transient. Frequency-related force potentiation was attenuated in myopathic muscles compared to controls. This occurred despite an increase in resting intracellular calcium and in the peak amplitude of the calcium transient as detected with aequorin. Therefore, abnormalities in contractile function of myopathic muscles during frequency-related force potentiation are not due to decreased availability of intracellular calcium, but more likely reflect differences in myofibrillar calcium responsiveness. Sarcolemmal calcium influx may also contribute to frequency-related changes in contractile force in myopathic muscles as suggested by a decrease in action potential duration with increasing stimulation frequency which is associated with fluctuations in peak calcium transient amplitude. PMID:2332508

  10. Localised calcium release events in cells from the muscle of guinea-pig gastric fundus

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, S P; Bolton, T B

    2004-01-01

    After enzymatic dispersion of the muscle of the guinea-pig gastric fundus, single elongated cells were observed which differed from archetypal smooth muscle cells due to their knurled, tuberose or otherwise irregular surface morphology. These, but not archetypal smooth muscle cells, consistently displayed spontaneous localized (i.e. non-propagating) intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) release events. Such calcium events were novel in their magnitude and kinetic profiles. They included short transient events, plateau events and events which coalesced spatially or temporally (compound events). Quantitative analysis of the events with an automatic detection programme showed that their spatio-temporal characteristics (full width and full duration at half-maximum amplitude) were approximately exponentially distributed. Their amplitude distribution suggested the presence of two release modes. Carbachol application caused an initial cell-wide calcium transient followed by an increase in localized calcium release events. Pharmacological analysis suggested that localized calcium release was largely dependent on external calcium entry acting on both inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) to release stored calcium. Nominally calcium-free external solution immediately and reversibly abolished all localized calcium release without blocking the initial transient calcium release response to carbachol. This was inhibited by 2-APB (100 μm), ryanodine (10 or 50 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm). 2-APB (100 μm), xestospongin C (XeC, 10 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm) blocked both spontaneous localized calcium release and localized release stimulated by 10 μm carbachol. Ryanodine (50 μm) also inhibited spontaneous release, but enhanced localized release in response to carbachol. This study represents the first characterization of localized calcium release events in cells from the gastric fundus. PMID:14608011

  11. Transient lingual papillitis.

    PubMed

    Kornerup, Ida M; Senye, Mireya; Peters, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    A case of recurrent, clinically innocuous, but painful papules involving the tongue dorsum of a 25-year-old man is presented. The lesions were interpreted to represent a transient lingual papillitis. This a poorly understood, but benign and self-limited condition involving the tongue fungiform papillae, which does not appear to be widely recognized.

  12. Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia is a metabolic disorder that is passed down through families. Babies with ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Jaundice Metabolic Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  13. Lightning-Transient Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grumm, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Battery-powered system operates for more than one year. Recorder digitizes and records up to 146 current samples at selected intervals during lightning stroke. System continues to store time tags of lightning strokes even if transient current memory is full.

  14. Calcium dynamics and buffering in motoneurones of the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Palecek, Jiri; Lips, Mario B; Keller, Bernhard U

    1999-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of endogenous calcium homeostasis was performed on 65 motoneurones in slices of the lumbar spinal cord from 2- to 8-day-old mice by simultaneous patch-clamp and microfluorometric calcium measurements. Somatic calcium concentrations were monitored with a temporal resolution in the millisecond time domain. Measurements were performed by using a monochromator for excitation and a photomultiplier detection system. Somatic calcium signalling was investigated during defined voltage-clamp protocols. Calcium responses were observed for membrane depolarizations positive to −50 mV. A linear relation between depolarization time and free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) indicated that voltage-dependent calcium influx dominated the response. Endogenous calcium homeostasis was quantified by using the ‘added buffer’ approach. In the presence of fura-2 and mag-fura-5, calcium transients decayed according to a monoexponential function. Decay-time constants showed a linear dependence on dye concentration and the extrapolated constant in the absence of indicator dye was 371 ± 120 ms (n= 13 cells, 21 °C). For moderate elevations (< 1 μm), recovery kinetics of depolarization-induced calcium transients were characterized by a calcium-independent, ‘effective’ extrusion rate γ = 140 ± 47 s−1 (n= 13 cells, 21 °C). The endogenous calcium binding ratio for fixed buffers in spinal motoneurones was κB’ = 50 ± 17 (n= 13 cells), indicating that less than 2% of cytosolic calcium ions contributed to [Ca2+]i. Endogenous binding ratios in spinal motoneurones were small compared to those found in hippocampal or cerebellar Purkinje neurones. From a functional perspective, they provided motoneurones with rapid dynamics of cytosolic [Ca2+]i for a given set of influx, extrusion and uptake mechanisms. With respect to pathophysiological conditions, our measurements are in agreement with a model where the selective vulnerability of spinal motoneurones during

  15. Differential mitochondrial calcium responses in different cell types detected with a mitochondrial calcium fluorescent indicator, mito-GCaMP2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Wang, Yanru; Hou, Tingting; Zhang, Huiliang; Qu, Aijuan; Wang, Xianhua

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial calcium plays a crucial role in mitochondrial metabolism, cell calcium handling, and cell death. However, some mechanisms concerning mitochondrial calcium regulation are still unknown, especially how mitochondrial calcium couples with cytosolic calcium. In this work, we constructed a novel mitochondrial calcium fluorescent indicator (mito-GCaMP2) by genetic manipulation. Mito-GCaMP2 was imported into mitochondria with high efficiency and the fluorescent signals co-localized with that of tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester, a mitochondrial membrane potential indicator. The mitochondrial inhibitors specifically decreased the signals of mito-GCaMP2. The apparent K(d) of mito-GCaMP2 was 195.0 nmol/L at pH 8.0 in adult rat cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, we observed that mito-GCaMP2 preferred the alkaline pH surrounding of mitochondria. In HeLa cells, we found that mitochondrial calcium ([Ca(2+)](mito)) responded to the changes of cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)](cyto)) induced by histamine or thapasigargin. Moreover, external Ca(2+) (100 μmol/L) directly induced an increase of [Ca(2+)](mito) in permeabilized HeLa cells. However, in rat cardiomyocytes [Ca(2+)](mito) did not respond to cytosolic calcium transients stimulated by electric pacing or caffeine. In permeabilized cardiomyocytes, 600 nmol/L free Ca(2+) repeatedly increased the fluorescent signals of mito-GCaMP2, which excluded the possibility that mito-GCaMP2 lost its function in cardiomyocytes mitochondria. These results showed that the response of mitochondrial calcium is diverse in different cell lineages and suggested that mitochondria in cardiomyocytes may have a special defense mechanism to control calcium flux.

  16. Altered Calcium Handling and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Acute Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Baumeister, Peter; Quinn, T. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemia results in deadly cardiac arrhythmias that are a major contributor to sudden cardiac death (SCD). The electrophysiological changes involved have been extensively studied, yet the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias during acute ischemia remain unclear. What is known is that during acute ischemia both focal (ectopic excitation) and nonfocal (reentry) arrhythmias occur, due to an interaction of altered electrical, mechanical, and biochemical properties of the myocardium. There is particular interest in the role that alterations in intracellular calcium handling, which cause changes in intracellular calcium concentration and to the calcium transient, play in ischemia-induced arrhythmias. In this review, we briefly summarize the known contributors to ventricular arrhythmias during acute ischemia, followed by an in-depth examination of the potential contribution of altered intracellular calcium handling, which may include novel targets for antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:28008297

  17. Calcium oscillations index the extent of calcium loading and predict functional recovery during reperfusion in rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, R G; Gerstenblith, G; Lakatta, E G

    1990-01-01

    Delayed recovery of contractile function after myocardial ischemia may be due to prolonged recovery of high-energy phosphates, persistent acidosis, increased inorganic phosphate, and/or calcium loading. To examine these potential mechanisms, metabolic parameters measured by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and spontaneous diastolic myofilament motion caused by sarcoplasmic reticulum-myofilament calcium cycling indexed by the scattered light intensity fluctuations (SLIF) it produces in laser beam reflected from the heart, were studied in isolated atrioventricularly blocked rat hearts (n = 10) after 65 min of ischemia at 30 degrees C. All metabolic parameters recovered to their full extent 5 min after reperfusion. Developed pressure evidenced a small recovery but then fell abruptly. This was accompanied by an increase in end diastolic pressure to 37 +/- 5 mm Hg and a fourfold increase in SLIF, to 252 +/- 58% of baseline. In another series of hearts initial reperfusion with calcium of 0.08 mM prevented the SLIF rise and resulted in improved developed pressure (74 +/- 3% vs. 39 +/- 13% of control), and lower cell calcium (5.9 +/- 3 vs. 10.3 +/- 1.4 mumol/g dry wt). Thus, during reperfusion, delayed contractile recovery is not associated with delayed recovery of pH, inorganic phosphate, or high-energy phosphates and can be attributed, in part, to an adverse effect of calcium loading which can be indexed by increased SLIF occurring at that time. PMID:2312726

  18. PAR-1-Stimulated Factor IXa Binding to a Small Platelet Subpopulation Requires a Pronounced and Sustained Increase of Cytoplasmic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    London, Fredda S.; Marcinkiewicz, Mariola; Walsh, Peter N.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that only a subpopulation of PAR-1-stimulated platelets binds coagulation factor IXa, since confirmed by other laboratories. Since calcium changes have been implicated in exposure of procoagulant aminophospholipids, we have now examined calcium fluxes in this subpopulation by measuring fluorescence changes in Fura Red/AM-loaded platelets following PAR-1 stimulation. While fluorescence changes in all platelets indicated calcium release from internal stores and influx of external calcium, a subpopulation of platelets displayed a pronounced increase in calcium transients by 15 seconds and positive factor IXa binding by 2 minutes, with calcium transients sustained for 45 minutes. Pretreatment of platelets with Xestospongin C to inhibit IP3-mediated dense tubule calcium release, and the presence of impermeable calcium channel blockers nifedipine, SKF96365 or LaCl3, inhibited PAR-1-induced development of a subpopulation with pronounced calcium transients, factor IXa binding, and platelet support of FXa generation, suggesting the importance of both release of calcium from internal stores and influx of extracellular calcium. When platelets were stimulated in EDTA for 5 to 20 minutes before addition of calcium, factor IXa binding sites developed on a smaller subpopulation but with unchanged rate indicating sustained opening of calcium channels and continued availability of signaling elements required for binding site exposure. While pretreatment of platelets with 100 μM BAPTA/AM (Kd 160 nM) had minimal effects, 100 μM 5, 5′-dimethylBAPTA/AM (Kd 40 nM) completely inhibited the appearance and function of the platelet subpopulation, indicating the importance of minor increases of cytoplasmic calcium. We conclude that PAR-1-stimulated development of factor IXa binding sites in a subpopulation of platelets is dependent upon release of calcium from internal stores leading to sustained and pronounced calcium transients. PMID:16752917

  19. Two transient potassium currents in layer V pyramidal neurones from cat sensorimotor cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Spain, W J; Schwindt, P C; Crill, W E

    1991-01-01

    1. Two transient outward currents were identified in large pyramidal neurones from layer V of cat sensorimotor cortex ('Betz cells') using an in vitro brain slice preparation and single-microelectrode voltage clamp. Properties of the currents deduced from voltage-clamp measurements were reflected in neuronal responses during constant current stimulation. 2. Both transient outward currents rose rapidly after a step depolarization, but their subsequent time course differed greatly. The fast-transient current decayed within 20 ms, while the slow-transient current took greater than 10 s to decay. Raised extracellular potassium reduced current amplitude. Both currents were present in cadmium-containing or calcium-free perfusate. 3. Tetraethylammonium had little effect on the slow-transient current at a concentration of 1 mM, but the fast-transient current was reduced by 60%. 4-Aminopyridine had little effect on the fast-transient current over the range 20 microM-2 mM, but these concentrations reduced the slow-transient current and altered its time course. 4. Both transient currents were evoked by depolarizations below action potential threshold. The fast-transient current was evoked by a 7 mV smaller depolarization than the slow-transient current, but its chord conductance increased less steeply with depolarization. 5. Voltage-dependent inactivation of the fast-transient was steeper than that of the slow-transient current (4 vs. 7 mV per e-fold change), and half-inactivation occurred at a less negative potential (-59 vs. -65 mV). The activation and inactivation characteristics of each current overlapped, however, implying the existence of a steady 'window current' extending over a range of approximately 14 mV beginning negative to action potential threshold. 6. The fast-transient current displayed a clear voltage dependence of both its activation and inactivation kinetics, whereas the slow-transient current did not. Recovery of either current from inactivation took

  20. Different effects of endothelin-1 on calcium and potassium currents in canine ventricular cells.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Magyar, J; Körtvély, A; Szigeti, G; Szigligeti, P; Papp, Z; Mohácsi, A; Kovács, L; Nánási, P P

    2001-04-01

    Effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on the L-type calcium current (ICa) and delayed rectifier potassium current (IK) were studied in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. ET-1 (8 nM) was applied in three experimental arrangements: untreated cells, in the presence of 50 nM isoproterenol, and in the presence of 250 microM 8-bromo-cAMP. In untreated cells, ET-1 significantly decreased the peak amplitude of ICa by 32.3+/-4.8% at +5 mV (P<0.05) without changing activation or inactivation characteristics of ICa. ET-1 had no effect on the amplitude of IK, Ito (transient outward current) or IK1 (inward rectifier K current) in untreated cells; however, the time course of recovery from inactivation of Ito was significantly increased by ET-1 (from 26.5+/-4.6 ms to 59.5+/- 1.8 ms, P < 0.05). Amplitude and time course of intracellular calcium transients, recorded in voltage-clamped cells previously loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator dye Fura-2, were not affected by ET-1. ET-1 had no effect on force of contraction in canine ventricular trabeculae. Isoproterenol increased the amplitude of ICa to 263+/-29% of control. ET-1 reduced ICa also in isoproterenol-treated cells by 17.8+/-2% (P<0.05); this inhibition was significantly less than obtained in untreated cells. IK was increased by isoproterenol to 213+/-18% of control. This effect of isoproterenol on IK was reduced by 31.8+/-4.8% if the cells were pretreated with ET-1. Similarly, in isoproterenol-treated cells ET-1 decreased IK by 16.2+/-1.5% (P<0.05). Maximal activation of protein kinase A (PKA) was achieved by application of 8-bromo-cAMP in the pipette solution. In the presence of 8-bromo-cAMP ET-1 failed to alter ICa or IK It was concluded that differences in effects of ET-1 on ICa and IK may be related to differences in cAMP sensitivity of the currents.

  1. Calcium fluoride window mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, D. Douglas

    1982-10-01

    A technique has been developed for joining a large calcium fluoride crystal to a stainless-steel flange by means of a silver transition ring. The process involves both vacuum brazing using a copper-silver alloy and air brazing using silver chloride. This paper describes the procedure used in fabricating a high-vacuum leak-tight calcium fluoride window assembly.

  2. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human body. Bones, like other tissues in the body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the formation of and maintenance of healthy teeth.

  3. Local calcium changes regulate the length of growth cone filopodia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su; Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2002-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in growth cones can act as an important regulator of growth cone behavior. Here we investigated whether there is a spatial and temporal correlation between [Ca(2+)](i) and one particular aspect of growth cone behavior, namely the regulation of growth cone filopodia. Calcium was released from the caged compound NP-EGTA (o-nitrophenyl EGTA tetrapotassium salt) to simulate a signaling event in the form of a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In three different experimental paradigms, we released calcium either globally (within an entire growth cone), regionally (within a small area of the lamellipodium), or locally (within a single filopodium). We demonstrate that global photolysis of NP-EGTA in growth cones caused a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) throughout the growth cone and elicited subsequent filopodial elongation that was restricted to the stimulated growth cone. Pharmacological blockage of either calmodulin or the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, inhibited the effect of uncaging calcium, suggesting that these enzymes are acting downstream of calcium. Regional uncaging of calcium in the lamellipodium caused a regional increase in [Ca(2+)](i), but induced filopodial elongation on the entire growth cone. Elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) locally within an individual filopodium resulted in the elongation of only the stimulated filopodium. These findings suggest that the effect of an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) on filopodial behavior depends on the spatial distribution of the calcium signal. In particular, calcium signals within filopodia can cause filopodial length changes that are likely a first step towards directed filopodial steering events seen during pathfinding in vivo.

  4. Mobilization of hepatic calcium pools by platelet activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Hanahan, D.J.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-03-24

    In the perfused rat liver, platelet activating factor, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (AGEPC), infusion produces an extensive but transient glycogenolytic response which at low AGEPC concentrations is markedly dependent upon the perfusate calcium levels. The role of calcium in the glycogenolytic response of the liver to AGEPC was investigated by assessing the effect of AGEPC on various calcium pools in the intact liver. Livers from fed rats were equilibrated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, and the kinetics of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were determined in control, AGEPC-stimulated, and phenylephrine-stimulated livers during steady-state washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. AGEPC treatment had only a slight if any effect on the pattern of steady-state calcium efflux from the liver, as opposed to major perturbations in the pattern of calcium efflux effected by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Infusion of short pulses of AGEPC during the washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from labeled livers caused a transient release of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ which was not abolished at low calcium concentrations in the perfusate. Infusion of latex beads, which are removed by the reticuloendothelial cells, caused the release of hepatic /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in a fashion similar to the case with AGEPC. The findings indicate that AGEPC does not perturb a major pool of calcium within the liver as occurs upon ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation; it is likely that AGEPC mobilizes calcium from a smaller yet very important pool, very possibly from nonparenchymal cells in the liver.

  5. Simple method of measuring delay time in manufacturing delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Yukio; Mikoda, Masanari

    1982-07-01

    A simple method for measuring delay time in an operational frequency range is required in manufacturing delay lines used for video tape recorders and television receiver sets. This paper describes a simple method of measuring and adjusting the delay time of such delay lines. The delay time is obtained by measuring a phase difference ϑ between the signals at the input and output transducers of the delay line with frequencies under test. The delay time is more precisely obtained by measuring the ϑ at a constant frequency within the bandwidth of the delay line. A delay-time tolerance of a polished glass medium at 3.58 MHz was found to be within 100 ns. The delay time was found to be shortened by 30 ns by attaching the medium on polishing powder and oil. Also shown is a simple method for adjusting the delay time by polishing a delay medium while measuring the phase difference.

  6. Photoacoustic transient imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschi, J. L.; Marty-Dessus, D.; Severac, H.; Boucher, Jean-Marc; Bastie, A.

    1993-01-01

    A collimated laser diode associated with a small, short focal length objective lens produces a focused laser beam on the top of a sample glued onto a piezoelectric transducer. This laser beam is horizontally scanned on the surface and its intensity is modulated by a square wave using a TTL signal generator. This system induces acoustic waves in the sample. With a specially designed control circuitry, by combining this acoustic signal and the scanned laser beam, imaging of the subsurface is possible. The transient analysis developed is described and we show how to select cut-away views of the subsurface specimen with some applications in failure analysis of integrated circuits. We present the apparatus, the transient photoacoustic signal theory, and make a comparison between scanning photoacoustic (SPAM) and scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM).

  7. Unusual CRTS Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, A. J.; Mahabal, A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Williams, R.; Graham, M. J.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.; Christensen, E.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.

    2008-10-01

    We have detected an optical transient of unknown nature in Catalina 0.7m Schmidt telescope images from 28 Sep 2008 UT. The object has the following parameters:

    CSS080928:160837+041626 2008-09-28 UT 02:50:49 RA 16:08:37.23 Dec 04:16:26.7 Mag 17.7 Type ?
    A possible uncataloged match to the transient is present in SDSS images with magnitude r~22.5.

  8. Synthesized light transients.

    PubMed

    Wirth, A; Hassan, M Th; Grguras, I; Gagnon, J; Moulet, A; Luu, T T; Pabst, S; Santra, R; Alahmed, Z A; Azzeer, A M; Yakovlev, V S; Pervak, V; Krausz, F; Goulielmakis, E

    2011-10-14

    Manipulation of electron dynamics calls for electromagnetic forces that can be confined to and controlled over sub-femtosecond time intervals. Tailored transients of light fields can provide these forces. We report on the generation of subcycle field transients spanning the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet frequency regimes with a 1.5-octave three-channel optical field synthesizer and their attosecond sampling. To demonstrate applicability, we field-ionized krypton atoms within a single wave crest and launched a valence-shell electron wavepacket with a well-defined initial phase. Half-cycle field excitation and attosecond probing revealed fine details of atomic-scale electron motion, such as the instantaneous rate of tunneling, the initial charge distribution of a valence-shell wavepacket, the attosecond dynamic shift (instantaneous ac Stark shift) of its energy levels, and its few-femtosecond coherent oscillations.

  9. Transient Pulse Monitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-20

    connection to the test solar array pannels . One radiated electromagnetic signal sensor will be placed on one of the solar array panels (Figures 6 and 7). The...22 02 Spacecraft, Charging , Discharge, Transient, Environment 19. ABSTRACT (Cmntnue on mromN ifesor AWMI endwtfr by blok numfber) SRI International is...6 2.1.2 Particle Interactions with Satellite Materials: Charging ........................ 6 2.1.3 Discharges and Their Effects on Systems

  10. Coherent Transient Systems Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-17

    europium doped yttrium silicate in collaboration with IBM Almaden Research Center. Research into divalent ion doped crystals as photon gated materials...demonstration of the coherent transient continuous optical processor was performed in europium doped yttrium silicate. Though hyperfine split ground...materials. Research into divalent samarium doped into other hosts is incomplete and may produce better results. Preliminary measurements on Tm:KCl revealed

  11. Transient Detection Using Wavelets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    signaL and transients are nonstationary. A new technique for the analysis of this type of signal, called the Wavelet Transform , was applied to artificial...and real signals. A brief theoretical comparison between the Short Time Fourier Transform and the Wavelet Transform is introduced A multisolution...analysis approach for implementing the transform was used. Computer code for the Discrete Wavelet Transform was implemented. Different types of wavelets to use as basis functions were evaluated. (KAR) P. 2

  12. Lunar transient phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W. S.

    1991-03-01

    Lunar transient phenomena (LTP) sightings are classified into five categories: brightenings, darkenings, reddish colorations, bluish colorations, and obscurations. There is evidence that the remaining LTP's are of lunar origin. A substantial number of sightings are independently confirmed. They have been recorded on film and spectrograms, as well as with photoelectric photometers and polarization equipment. It suggested that the LTP's may be gentle outgassings of less-than-volcanic proportions.

  13. Visualization of Calcium Dynamics in Kidney Proximal Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Szebényi, Kornélia; Füredi, András; Kolacsek, Orsolya; Csohány, Rózsa; Prókai, Ágnes; Kis-Petik, Katalin; Szabó, Attila; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Bender, Balázs; Tóvári, József; Enyedi, Ágnes; Orbán, Tamás I.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal changes in cytoplasmic calcium levels have a key role in determining pathologic and pharmacologic responses in major kidney diseases. However, cell-specific delivery of calcium-sensitive probes in vivo remains problematic. We generated a transgenic rat stably expressing the green fluorescent protein-calmodulin–based genetically encoded calcium indicator (GCaMP2) predominantly in the kidney proximal tubules. The transposon-based method used allowed the generation of homozygous transgenic rats containing one copy of the transgene per allele with a defined insertion pattern, without genetic or phenotypic alterations. We applied in vitro confocal and in vivo two-photon microscopy to examine basal calcium levels and ligand- and drug-induced alterations in these levels in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Notably, renal ischemia induced a transient increase in cellular calcium, and reperfusion resulted in a secondary calcium load, which was significantly decreased by systemic administration of specific blockers of the angiotensin receptor and the Na-Ca exchanger. The parallel examination of in vivo cellular calcium dynamics and renal circulation by fluorescent probes opens new possibilities for physiologic and pharmacologic investigations. PMID:25788535

  14. Calcium: Alpha-Synuclein Interactions in Alpha-Synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rcom-H'cheo-Gauthier, Alexandre N.; Osborne, Samantha L.; Meedeniya, Adrian C. B.; Pountney, Dean L.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of the pre-synaptic protein, α-synuclein (α-syn), is the key etiological factor in Parkinson's disease (PD) and other alpha-synucleinopathies, such as multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Various triggers for pathological α-syn aggregation have been elucidated, including post-translational modifications, oxidative stress, and binding of metal ions, such as calcium. Raised neuronal calcium levels in PD may occur due to mitochondrial dysfunction and/or may relate to calcium channel dysregulation or the reduced expression of the neuronal calcium buffering protein, calbindin-D28k. Recent results on human tissue and a mouse oxidative stress model show that neuronal calbindin-D28k expression excludes α-syn inclusion bodies. Previously, cell culture model studies have shown that transient increases of intracellular free Ca(II), such as by opening of the voltage-gated plasma calcium channels, could induce cytoplasmic aggregates of α-syn. Raised intracellular free calcium and oxidative stress also act cooperatively to promote α-syn aggregation. The association between raised neuronal calcium, α-syn aggregation, oxidative stress, and neurotoxicity is reviewed in the context of neurodegenerative α-syn disease and potential mechanism-based therapies. PMID:28066161

  15. ON DETECTING TRANSIENT PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, G.

    2013-08-10

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximize the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article, we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients which is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method makes use of all the information that is available in the data throughout the statistical decision-making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. Here we consider those most common in astrophysics, which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra, and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the case of a weak X-ray flare in a time series and a short-lived quasi-periodic oscillation in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting arbitrarily shaped models to a power density distribution, which is of general interest in all applications involving periodogram analysis.

  16. Choice and reinforcement delay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Marr, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies of choice between two delayed reinforcers have indicated that the relative immediacy of the reinforcer is a major determinant of the relative frequency of responding. Parallel studies of choice between two interresponse times have found exceptions to this generality. The present study looked at the choice by pigeons between two delays, one of which was always four times longer than the other, but whose absolute durations were varied across conditions. The results indicated that choice is not uniquely determined by the relative immediacy of reinforcement, but that absolute delays are also involved. Models for concurrent chained schedules appear to be more applicable to the present data than the matching relation; however, these too failed to predict choice for long delays.

  17. Time delay spectrum conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A device for delaying specified frequencies of a multiple frequency laser beam. The device separates the multiple frequency beam into a series of spatially separated single frequency beams. The propagation distance of the single frequency beam is subsequently altered to provide the desired delay for each specific frequency. Focusing reflectors can be utilized to provide a simple but nonadjustable system or, flat reflectors with collimating and focusing optics can be utilized to provide an adjustable system.

  18. Microinjection of strong calcium buffers suppresses the peak of calcium release during depolarization in frog skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The effects of high intracellular concentrations of various calcium buffers on the myoplasmic calcium transient and on the rate of release of calcium (Rrel) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were studied in voltage-clamped frog skeletal muscle fibers. The changes in intracellular calcium concentration (delta[Ca2+]) for 200-ms pulses to 0-20 mV were recorded before and after the injection of the calcium buffer and the underlying Rrel was calculated. If the buffer concentration after the injection was high, the initial rate of rise of the calcium transient was slower after injection than before and was followed by a slow increase of [Ca2+] that resembled a ramp. The increase in myoplasmic [Mg2+] that accompanies the calcium transient in control was suppressed after the injection and a slight decrease was observed instead. After the injection the buffer concentration in the voltage-clamped segment of the fiber decreased as the buffer diffused away toward the open ends. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficient for fura-2 (Dapp = 0.40 +/- 0.03 x 10(-6) cm2/s, mean +/- SEM, n = 6) suggests that approximately 65-70% of the indicator was bound to relatively immobile intracellular constituents. As the concentration of the injected buffer decreased, the above effects were reversed. The changes in delta[Ca2+] were underlined by characteristic modification of Rrel. The early peak component was suppressed or completely eliminated; thus, Rrel rose monotonically to a maintained steady level if corrected for depletion. If Rrel was expressed as percentage of SR calcium content, the steady level after injection did not differ significantly from that before. Control injections of anisidine, to the concentration that eliminated the peak of Rrel when high affinity buffers were used, had only a minor effect on Rrel, the peak was suppressed by 26 +/- 5% (mean +/- SE, n = 6), and the steady level remained unchanged. Thus, the peak component of Rrel is dependent on a rise in

  19. Calcium homeostasis in low and high calcium water acclimatized Oreochromis mossambicus exposed to ambient and dietary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Pratap, H B; Wendelaar Bonga, S E

    2007-04-01

    The effects of cadmium administered via ambient water (10 microg/l) or food (10 microgCd/fish/day) on plasma calcium, corpuscles of Stannius and bony tissues of Oreochromis mossambicus acclimated to low calcium (0.2 mM) and high calcium (0.8 mM) water were studied for 2, 4, 14 and 35 days. In low calcium water acclimated fish, ambient cadmium induced significant hypocalcemia, while the structure and morphometry of type-1 and type-2 cells of corpuscles of Stannius were not affected on day 2 and 4. Subsequently on day 14 and 35, recovery of plasma calcium to normal levels was observed followed by a decrease in corpuscles of Stannius index (CSI), cell size, volume of granular endoplasmic reticulum (p < 0.05) of type-1 cells in both, fish exposed to ambient or dietary cadmium. The type-2 cells were not affected. In high calcium water acclimated fish both, ambient and dietary cadmium caused a significant reduction of plasma calcium levels on day 2 and 4. In these fish, there was a significant transient increase in the size of corpuscles of Stannius on day 4, followed by recovery on day 14 and 35. Ultrastructural observations of corpuscles of Stannius revealed that cadmium did not cause any cellular damage on type- and type-2 cells during 35 days exposure. In low or high calcium water acclimatized tilapia exposed to ambient or dietary cadmium had no effect on the calcium and phosphate composition of the scales, operculum and vertebrae. Thus, it is unlikely that recovery of hypocalcemia was due to the dissolution of calcium from bony tissues. This study also revealed that cadmium does not mediate stimulation of the corpuscles of Stannius gland, and that high Ca2+ water had a protective effect against ambient and dietary cadmium.

  20. [Calcium and health].

    PubMed

    Ortega Anta, Rosa M; Jiménez Ortega, Ana I; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-04-07

    An adequate intake of calcium is only not limited to avoid the risk of osteoporosis and its benefits in longterm bone health, but also it has been linked to protection against various major diseases, such as hypertension, cancer, kidney stones, insulin resistance, diabetes... and several investigations suggest its importance in preventing and controlling obesity. Studies conducted in Spanish representative samples show that a high percentage of adults and children (> 75%) don't achieve the recommended intake of calcium. Moreover, are growing trends among the population suggesting that calcium intake and dairy consumption (main food source of the mineral) are high, and even excessive, in many individuals. This misconception results in that the calcium intake is increasingly far from the recommended one. The maximum tolerable intake of the mineral is fixed at 2.500 mg/day, but this intake is unusual, and it's more disturbing and frequent, to find intakes below the recommended calcium intakes (1.000 and 1.200 mg/day in adults, men and women, respectively). Data from different studies highlight the risk of an inadequate calcium intake and the damages that may affect the health in a long term. It is not about transmitting indiscriminate guidelines in order to increase the intake of calcium / dairy, but the recommended intakes must be met to achieve both the nutritional and health benefits. Also activities for demystification of misconceptions are need, increasingly frequent, that may impair health population.

  1. Calcium Signaling and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington’s disease (HD), and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are very important both for fundamental science and for practical medicine. Despite extensive research into the causes of these diseases, clinical researchers have had very limited progress and, as of now, there is still no cure for any of these diseases. One of the main obstacles in the way of creating treatments for these disorders is the fact that their etiology and pathophysiology still remain unclear. This paper reviews results that support the so–called “calcium hypothesis of neurodegenerative diseases.” The calcium hypothesis states that the atrophic and degenerative processes in the neurons of AD, PD, ALS, HD, and SCA patients are accompanied by alterations in calcium homeostasis. Moreover, the calcium hypothesis states that this deregulation of calcium signaling is one of the early–stage and key processes in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Based on the results we reviewed, we conclude that the calcium channels and other proteins involved in the neuronal calcium signaling system are potential drug targets for AD, PD, ALS, HD, and SCA therapy. PMID:22649630

  2. Calcium Green FlAsH as a genetically targeted small-molecule calcium indicator.

    PubMed

    Tour, Oded; Adams, Stephen R; Kerr, Rex A; Meijer, Rene M; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Tsien, Richard W; Tsien, Roger Y

    2007-07-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) regulates numerous proteins and cellular functions and can vary substantially over submicron and submillisecond scales, so precisely localized fast detection is desirable. We have created a approximately 1-kDa biarsenical Ca(2+) indicator, called Calcium Green FlAsH (CaGF, 1), to probe [Ca(2+)] surrounding genetically targeted proteins. CaGF attached to a tetracysteine motif becomes ten-fold more fluorescent upon binding Ca(2+), with a K(d) of approximately 100 microM, <1-ms kinetics and good Mg(2+) rejection. In HeLa cells expressing tetracysteine-tagged connexin 43, CaGF labels gap junctions and reports Ca(2+) waves after injury. Total internal reflection microscopy of tetracysteine-tagged, CaGF-labeled alpha(1C) L-type calcium channels shows fast-rising depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients, whose lateral nonuniformity suggests that the probability of channel opening varies greatly over micron dimensions. With moderate Ca(2+) buffering, these transients decay surprisingly slowly, probably because most of the CaGF signal comes from closed channels feeling Ca(2+) from a tiny minority of clustered open channels. With high Ca(2+) buffering, CaGF signals decay as rapidly as the calcium currents, as expected for submicron Ca(2+) domains immediately surrounding active channels. Thus CaGF can report highly localized, rapid [Ca(2+)] dynamics.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  7. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  8. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  9. Calcium-activated conductance in skate electroreceptors: current clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Clusin, W T; Bennett, M V

    1977-02-01

    When current clamped, skate electroreceptor epithelium produces large action potentials in response to stimuli that depolarize the lumenal faces of the receptor cells. With increasing stimulus strength these action potentials become prolonged. When the peak voltage exceeds about 140 mV the repolarizing phase is blocked until the end of the stimulus. Perfusion experiments show that the rising phase of the action potential results from an increase in calcium permeability in the lumenal membranes. Perfusion of the lumen with cobalt or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA blocks the action potential. Perfusion of the lumen with a solution containing 10 mM Ca and 20 mM EGTA initially slows the repolarizing process at all voltages and lowers the potential at which it is blocked. With prolonged perfusion, repolarization is blocked at all voltages. When excitability is abolished by perfusion with cobalt, or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA, no delayed rectification occurs. We suggest that repolarization during the action potential depends on an influx of calcium into the cytoplasm, and that the rate of repolarization depends on the magnitude of the inward calcium current. Increasingly large stimuli reduce the rate of repolarization by reducing the driving force for calcium, and then block repolarization by causing the lumenal membrane potential to exceed ECa. Changes in extracellular calcium affect repolarization in a manner consistent with the resulting change in ECa.

  10. Calcium Channel Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as high blood pressure, chest pain and Raynaud's disease. Find out more about this class of medication. ... Irregular heartbeats (arrhythmia) Some circulatory conditions, such as Raynaud's disease For black people and older people, calcium channel ...

  11. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  12. Calcium-D-glucarate.

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    Calcium-D-glucarate is the calcium salt of D-glucaric acid, a substance produced naturally in small amounts by mammals, including humans. Glucaric acid is also found in many fruits and vegetables with the highest concentrations to be found in oranges, apples, grapefruit, and cruciferous vegetables. Oral supplementation of calcium-D-glucarate has been shown to inhibit beta-glucuronidase, an enzyme produced by colonic microflora and involved in Phase II liver detoxification. Elevated beta-glucuronidase activity is associated with an increased risk for various cancers, particularly hormone-dependent cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Other potential clinical applications of oral calcium-D-glucarate include regulation of estrogen metabolism and as a lipid-lowering agent.

  13. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  14. Transient transformation of plants.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw D; Doherty, Angela; Sparks, Caroline A

    2009-01-01

    Transient expression in plants is a valuable tool for many aspects of functional genomics and promoter testing. It can be used both to over-express and to silence candidate genes. It is also scaleable and provides a viable alternative to microbial fermentation and animal cell culture for the production of recombinant proteins. It does not depend on chromosomal integration of heterologous DNA so is a relatively facile procedure and can lead to high levels of transgene expression. Recombinant DNA can be introduced into plant cells via physical methods, via Agrobacterium or via viral vectors.

  15. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

    1989-07-18

    A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

  16. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, James L.; Vresk, Josip

    1989-01-01

    A thermal transient anemometer having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe.

  17. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Tonry, John; Wright, Shelley; Tully, R. Brent; Lu, Jessica R.; Takamiya, Marianne Y.; Hunter, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The next decade of astronomy will be dominated by large area surveys (see the detailed discussion in the Astro-2010 Decadal survey and NRC's recent OIR System Report). Ground-based optical transient surveys, e.g., LSST, ZTF and ATLAS and space-based exoplanet, supernova, and lensing surveys such as TESS and WFIRST will join the Gaia all-sky astrometric survey in producing a flood of data that will enable leaps in our understanding of the universe. There is a critical need for further characterization of these discoveries through high angular resolution images, deeper images, spectra, or observations at different cadences or periods than the main surveys. Such follow-up characterization must be well matched to the particular surveys, and requires sufficient additional observing resources and time to cover the extensive number of targets.We describe plans for the Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS), a permanently mounted, rapid-response, high-cadence facility for follow-up characterization of transient objects on the U. of Hawai'i 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will comprise an improved robotic laser adaptive optics system, based on the prototype Robo-AO system (formerly at the Palomar 1.5-m and now at the Kitt Peak 2.2-m telescope), with simultaneous visible and near-infrared imagers as well as a near-infrared integral field spectrograph (R~100, λ = 850 - 1830 nm, 0.15″ spaxels, 8.7″×6.0″ FoV). RTS will achieve an acuity of ~0.07″ in visible wavelengths and < 0.16″ in the near infrared leading to an increase of the infrared point-source sensitivity against the sky background by a factor of ~9, crucial for efficient near-infrared spectroscopy.RTS will allow us to map the dark matter distribution in the z < 0.1 local universe with ten times better accuracy and precision than previous experiments. ATLAS will discover several thousand SNIae per year, measuring SNIa peak brightness, and decline rates, while RTS will measure reddening by dust, confirm SN type and

  18. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  19. Nonresonant Transient Refractive Index Spectroscopy in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, D. K.; Leontyev, A. V.; Shmelev, A. G.; Nikiforov, V. G.; Lobkov, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report transient refractive index change in semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in polymethylmethacrylate matrix via pump-probe experiment. At lower pump intensities the detected signal consists of the pulse autocorrelation-shaped part and another part delayed by 300 fs. The latter's relative intensity depends on the pump level. However in CdS monocrystal the detected signal was found to lack this second feature completely.

  20. Intracellular calcium and the relationship to contractility in an avian model of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C. S.; Doye, A. A.; Davidoff, A. J.; Maki, T. M.

    2005-01-01

    Global contractile heart failure was induced in turkey poults by furazolidone feeding (700 ppm). Abnormal calcium regulation appears to be a key factor in the pathophysiology of heart failure, but the cellular mechanisms contributing to changes in calcium fluxes have not been clearly defined. Isolated ventricular myocytes from non-failing and failing hearts were therefore used to determine whether the whole heart and ventricular muscle contractile dysfunctions were realized at the single cell level. Whole cell current- and voltage-clamp techniques were used to evaluate action potential configurations and L-type calcium currents, respectively. Intracellular calcium transients were evaluated in isolated myocytes with fura-2 and in isolated left ventricular muscles using aequorin. Action potential durations were prolonged in failing myocytes, which correspond to slowed cytosolic calcium clearing. Calcium current-voltage relationships were normal in failing myocytes; preliminary evidence suggests that depressed transient outward potassium currents contribute to prolonged action potential durations. The number of calcium channels (as measured by radioligand binding) were also similar in non-failing and failing hearts. Isolated ventricular muscles from failing hearts had enhanced inotropic responses, in a dose-dependent fashion, to a calcium channel agonist (Bay K 8644). These data suggest that changes in intracellular calcium mobilization kinetics and longer calcium-myofilament interaction may be able to compensate for contractile failure. We conclude that the relationship between calcium current density and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release is a dynamic process that may be altered in the setting of heart failure at higher contraction rates. PMID:10935520

  1. Calcium-sensing receptors.

    PubMed

    Goodman, William G

    2004-01-01

    It is now known that variations in extracellular calcium concentration exert diverse physiologic effects in a variety of tissues that are mediated by a calcium-sensing receptor (CaSRs). In parathyroid tissue, the CaSR represents the molecular mechanism by which parathyroid cells detect changes in blood ionized calcium concentration, modulate parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion accordingly, and thus maintain serum calcium levels within a narrow physiologic range. In the kidney, the CaSR regulates renal calcium excretion and influences the transepithelial movement of water and other electrolytes. More generally, activation of the CaSR represents an important signal transduction pathway in intestine, placenta, brain, and perhaps bone. Some of these actions involve cell cycle regulation, changes that may be relevant to understanding the pathogenesis of parathyroid gland hyperplasia in secondary hyperparathyroidism caused by chronic kidney disease. The CaSR represents an appealing target for therapeutic agents designed to modify parathyroid gland function in vivo, offering the prospect of novel therapies for selected disorders of bone and mineral metabolism. Other receptors capable of responding to extracellular calcium ions also have been identified, but the functional importance of these interactions remains to be determined.

  2. Dynamic and static calcium gradients inside large snail (Helix aspersa) neurones detected with calcium-sensitive microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roger C; Postma, Marten

    2007-04-01

    We have used quartz Ca2+-sensitive microelectrodes (CASMs) in large voltage-clamped snail neurones to investigate the inward spread of Ca2+ after a brief depolarisation. Both steady state and [Ca2+]i transients changed with depth of penetration. When the CASM tip was within 20 microm of the far side of the cell the [Ca2+]i transient time to peak was 4.4+/-0.5s, rising to 14.7+/-0.7s at a distance of 80 microm. We estimate that the Ca2+ transients travelled centripetally at an average speed of 6 microm2 s(-1) and decreased in size by half over a distance of about 45 microm. Cyclopiazonic acid had little effect on the size and time to peak of Ca2+ transients but slowed their recovery significantly. This suggests that the endoplasmic reticulum curtails rather than reinforces the transients. Injecting the calcium buffer BAPTA made the Ca2+ transients more uniform in size and increased their times to peak and rates of recovery near the membrane. We have developed a computational model for the transients, which includes diffusion, uptake and Ca2+ extrusion. Good fits were obtained with a rather large apparent diffusion coefficient of about 90+/-20 microm2 s(-1). This may assist fast recovery by extrusion.

  3. Oxidative calcium release from catechol.

    PubMed

    Riley, Patrick A; Stratford, Michael R L

    2015-04-01

    Oxidation of 4-methylcatechol previously exposed to aqueous calcium chloride was shown by ion chromatography to be associated with release of calcium ions. The catechol was oxidised to the corresponding orthoquinone by the use of tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus. The oxidative release of calcium from the catechol is ascribed to the diminution of the available hydroxyl functions able to act as chelating groups. Our results suggest that the redox status of melanin may regulate calcium binding and influence calcium levels in pigmented cells.

  4. Changes in synaptic plasticity and expression of glutamate receptor subunits in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus after transient global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin-Jia; Shi, Zhong-Shan; Xia, Luo-Xing; Zhu, Li-Hui; Zeng, Ling; Nie, Jun-Hua; Xu, Zao-Cheng; Ruan, Yi-Wen

    2016-07-07

    Excess glutamate release from the presynaptic membrane has been thought to be the major cause of ischemic neuronal death. Although both CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons receive presynaptic glutamate input, transient cerebral ischemia induces CA1 neurons to die while CA3 neurons remain relatively intact. This suggests that changes in the properties of pyramidal cells may be the main cause related to ischemic neuronal death. Our previous studies have shown that the densities of dendritic spines and asymmetric synapses in the CA1 area are increased at 12h and 24h after ischemia. In the present study, we investigated changes in synaptic structures in the CA3 area and compared the expression of glutamate receptors in the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions of rats after ischemia. Our results demonstrated that the NR2B/NR2A ratio became larger after ischemia although the expression of both the NR2B subunit (activation of apoptotic pathway) and NR2A subunit (activation of survival pathway) decreased in the CA1 area from 6h to 48h after reperfusion. Furthermore, expression of the GluR2 subunit (calcium impermeable) of the AMPA receptor class significantly decreased while the GluR1 subunit (calcium permeable) remained unchanged at the same examined reperfusion times, which subsequently caused an increase in the GluR1/GluR2 ratio. Despite these notable differences in subunit expression, there were no obvious changes in the density of synapses or expression of NMDAR and AMPAR subunits in the CA3 area after ischemia. These results suggest that delayed CA1 neuronal death may be related to the dramatic fluctuation in the synaptic structure and relative upregulation of NR2B and GluR1 subunits induced by transient global ischemia.

  5. Controlling metabolism and cell death: at the heart of mitochondrial calcium signalling

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Marta; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    Transient increases in intracellular calcium concentration activate and coordinate a wide variety of cellular processes in virtually every cell type. This review describes the main homeostatic mechanisms that control Ca2+ transients, focusing on the mitochondrial checkpoint. We subsequently extend this paradigm to the cardiomyocyte and to the interplay between cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria that occurs beat-to-beat in excitation-contraction coupling. The mechanisms whereby mitochondria decode fast cytosolic calcium spikes are discussed in the light of the results obtained with recombinant photoproteins targeted to the mitochondrial matrix of contracting cardiomyocytes. Mitochondrial calcium homeostasis is then highlighted as a crucial point of convergence of the environmental signals that mediate cardiac cell death, both by necrosis and by apoptosis. Altogether we point to a role of the mitochondrion as an integrator of calcium signalling and fundamental decision maker in cardiomyocyte metabolism and survival. PMID:19285982

  6. Heat stress responses modulate calcium regulations and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Chun-Feng; Cheng, Chen-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2010-04-01

    Heat stress-induced responses change the ionic currents and calcium homeostasis. However, the molecular insights into the heat stress responses on calcium homeostasis remain unclear. The purposes of this study were to examine the mechanisms of heat stress responses on calcium handling and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes. We used indo-1 fluorimetric ratio technique and whole-cell patch clamp to investigate the intracellular calcium, action potentials, and ionic currents in isolated rabbit single atrial cardiomyocytes with or without (control) exposure to heat stress (43 degrees C, 15 min) 5+/-1 h before experiments. The expressions of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA2a), and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in the control and heat stress-treated atrial myocytes were evaluated by Western blot and real-time PCR. As compared with control myocytes, the heat stress-treated myocytes had larger sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content and larger intracellular calcium transient with a shorter decay portion. Heat stress-treated myocytes also had larger L-type calcium currents, transient outward potassium currents, but smaller NCX currents. Heat stress responses increased the protein expressions, SERCA2a, NCX, and heat shock protein. However, heat stress responses did not change the RNA expression of SERCA2a and NCX. In conclusion, heat stress responses change calcium handling through protein but not RNA regulation.

  7. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA genes are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wound...

  8. A transiently expressed connexin is essential for anterior neural plate development in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Hackley, Christopher; Mulholland, Erin; Kim, Gil Jung; Newman-Smith, Erin; Smith, William C

    2013-01-01

    A forward genetic screen in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis identified a mutant line (frimousse) with a profound disruption in neural plate development. In embryos with the frimousse mutation, the anteriormost neural plate cells, which are products of an FGF induction at the blastula and gastrula stages, initially express neural plate-specific genes but fail to maintain the induced state and ultimately default to epidermis. The genetic lesion in the frimousse mutant lies within a connexin gene (cx-11) that is transiently expressed in the developing neural plate in a temporal window corresponding to the period of a-lineage neural induction. Using a genetically encoded calcium indicator we observed multiple calcium transients throughout the developing neural plate in wild-type embryos, but not in mutant embryos. A series of treatments at the gastrula and neurula stages that block the calcium transients, including gap junction inhibition and calcium depletion, were also found to disrupt the development of the anterior neural plate in a similar way to the frimousse mutation. The requirement for cx-11 for anterior neural fate points to a crucial role for intercellular communication via gap junctions, probably through mediation of Ca(2+) transients, in Ciona intestinalis neural induction.

  9. Effects of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol on recovery and resolution of late transient neonatal hypocalcemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Late transient neonatal hypocalcemia with hyperphosphatemia is potentially life-threatening. The use of 1.25 dihydroxycholecalciferol in the management of neonatal hypocalcemia is unexplored. We hypothesized adding 1.25 dihydroxycholecalciferol to intravenous continuous calcium infusion (CaI) will a...

  10. Calculating transient rates from surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Rowlinson, A.

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a method to determine the transient surface density and transient rate for any given survey, using Monte Carlo simulations. This method allows us to determine the transient rate as a function of both the flux and the duration of the transients in the whole flux-duration plane rather than one or a few points as currently available methods do. It is applicable to every survey strategy that is monitoring the same part of the sky, regardless the instrument or wavelength of the survey, or the target sources. We have simulated both top-hat and Fast Rise Exponential Decay light curves, highlighting how the shape of the light curve might affect the detectability of transients. Another application for this method is to estimate the number of transients of a given kind that are expected to be detected by a survey, provided that their rate is known.

  11. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    PubMed

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  12. The joy of transient chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Tél, Tamás

    2015-09-15

    We intend to show that transient chaos is a very appealing, but still not widely appreciated, subfield of nonlinear dynamics. Besides flashing its basic properties and giving a brief overview of the many applications, a few recent transient-chaos-related subjects are introduced in some detail. These include the dynamics of decision making, dispersion, and sedimentation of volcanic ash, doubly transient chaos of undriven autonomous mechanical systems, and a dynamical systems approach to energy absorption or explosion.

  13. Time lag in transient cosmic accreting sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Giovannelli, F.

    2017-02-01

    Context. We develop models for time lag between the maxima of the source brightness in different wavelengths during a transient flash of luminosity that is connected with a short-period increase of the mass flux onto the central compact object. Aims: We derive a simple formula for finding the time delay among events in different wavelengths which is valid in general for all disk-accreting cosmic sources. We quantitatively also discuss a model for time-lag formation in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Methods: In close binaries with accretion disks, the time lag is connected with effects of viscosity that define a radial motion of matter in the accretion disk. In AGN flashes, the infalling matter has a low angular momentum, and the time lag is defined by the free-fall time to the gravitating center. Results: We show the validity of these models by means of several examples of galactic and extragalactic accreting sources.

  14. The Zwicky Transient Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) has been designed with a singular focus: a systematic exploration of the night sky at a magnitude level well suited for spectral classification and follow up with the existing class of 4-m to 10-m class telescopes. ZTF is the successor to the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The discovery engine for ZTF is a 47 square degree camera (realized through 16 e2V monolithic CCDs) that fills the entire focal plane of the 48-inch Oschin telescope of the Palomar Observatory. Single 30-s epoch sensitivity is about 20.5 in g and R bands. The Infarared Processing & Analysis Center (IPAC) is the data center for ZTF. ZTF is a public-private partnership with equal contributions from a consortium of world-wide partners and an NSF MSIP grant. Forty percent of ZTF time is set aside for two major community surveys: a 3-day cadence survey of high latitudes (to mimic LSST) and a time domain survey of the entire Northern Galactic plane. We expect first light in February 2017 and begin a 3-year survey starting summer of 2017. The first year will be spent on building up deep reference images of the sky (a must for transient surveys). During the second year IPAC will deliver near archival quality photometric products within 12 hours of observations. By comparison to reference images photometric alerts will be sent out. Year 3 will see the near real-time release of image differencing products. A Community Science Advisory Committee (CSAC), chaired by S. Ridgway (NOAO), has been set up to both advise the PI and to ensure that the US community's interests are well served. Astronomers interested in getting a head start on ZTF may wish to peruse the data releases from PTF. Young people (or young at heart) may wish to attend the annual summer school on PTF/ZTF (August, Caltech campus). The Principal Investigator (PI) for the project is S. Kulkarni and the Project Scientist is Eric Bellm.For further details please consult http://www.ptf.caltech.edu/ztf

  15. Potassium current kinetics in bursting secretory neurons: effects of intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J J; Onetti, C G; García, E; Hernández, S

    1991-11-01

    1. The kinetics of delayed rectifier (IK) and transient potassium (IA) currents and their modification by intracellular calcium ions in bursting X-organ neurons of the crayfish were studied with whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Activation and inactivation kinetics were analyzed according to Hodgkin and Huxley-type equations. 2. IK activates with sigmoidal time course at membrane potentials more positive than -38.4 +/- 3.5 (SD) mV (n = 5), and does not inactivate. The conductance through delayed rectifier channels (gK) is described by the equation gK = GKn2. 3. IA activates at membrane potentials close to the resting potential (-52.2 +/- 4.3 mV, n = 5) and, after a peak, inactivates completely. The conductance through A-channels (gA) can be described by the product of independent activation and inactivation parameters: gA = GAa4b. Both activation and inactivation processes are voltage and time dependent. 4. Steady-state activation of IK and IA as well as inactivation of IA can be described by Boltzmann distributions for single particles with valencies of 2.55 +/- 0.01 (n = 5), 1.60 +/- 0.25 (n = 5), and 3.87 +/- 0.39 (n = 3), respectively. 5. Increasing [Ca2+]i, we observed the following: 1) a considerable inactivation of IK during test pulses, 2) an increase of maximal conductance for IA, 3) a reduction of the valency of IA inactivation gating particle (from 3.87 to 2.27), 4) a reduction of the inactivation time constants of IA, and 5) a shift of the inactivation steady-state curve to more positive membrane potentials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Effects of thymol on calcium and potassium currents in canine and human ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Bányász, Tamás; Fülöp, László; Varró, András; Nánási, Péter P

    2002-05-01

    1. Concentration-dependent effects of thymol (1 - 1000 microM) was studied on action potential configuration and ionic currents in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using conventional microelectrode and patch clamp techniques. 2. Low concentration of thymol (10 microM) removed the notch of the action potential, whereas high concentrations (100 microM or higher) caused an additional shortening of action potential duration accompanied by progressive depression of plateau and reduction of V(max). 3. In the canine cells L-type Ca current (I(Ca)) was decreased by thymol in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50): 158+/-7 microM, Hill coeff.: 2.96+/-0.43). In addition, thymol (50 - 250 microM) accelerated the inactivation of I(Ca), increased the time constant of recovery from inactivation, shifted the steady-state inactivation curve of I(Ca) leftwards, but voltage dependence of activation remained unaltered. Qualitatively similar results were obtained with thymol in ventricular myocytes isolated from healthy human hearts. 4. Thymol displayed concentration-dependent suppressive effects on potassium currents: the transient outward current, I(to) (EC(50): 60.6+/-11.4 microM, Hill coeff.: 1.03+/-0.11), the rapid component of the delayed rectifier, I(Kr) (EC(50): 63.4+/-6.1 microM, Hill coeff.: 1.29+/-0.15), and the slow component of the delayed rectifier, I(Ks) (EC(50): 202+/-11 microM, Hill coeff.: 0.72+/-0.14), however, K channel kinetics were not much altered by thymol. These effects on Ca and K currents developed rapidly (within 0.5 min) and were readily reversible. 5. In conclusion, thymol suppressed cardiac ionic channels in a concentration-dependent manner, however, both drug-sensitivities as well as the mechanism of action seems to be different when blocking calcium and potassium channels.

  17. Calcium sensing receptors and calcium oscillations: calcium as a first messenger.

    PubMed

    Breitwieser, Gerda E

    2006-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptors (CaR) are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) since both the first (extracellular) and second (intracellular) messengers are Ca(2+). CaR serves to translate small fluctuations in extracellular Ca(2+) into intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. In many cells and tissues, CaR also acts as a coincidence detector, sensing both changes in extracellular Ca(2+) plus the presence of various allosteric activators including amino acids, polyamines, and/or peptides. CaR oscillations are uniquely shaped by the activating agonist, that is, Ca(2+) triggers sinusoidal oscillations while Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine trigger transient oscillations of lower frequency. The distinct oscillation patterns generated by Ca(2+)versus Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine are the results of activation of distinct signal transduction pathways. CaR is a member of Family C GPCRs, having a large extracellular agonist binding domain, and functioning as a disulfide-linked dimer. The CaR dimer likely can be driven to distinct active conformations by various Ca(2+) plus modulator combinations, which can drive preferential coupling to divergent signaling pathways. Such plasticity with respect to both agonist and signaling outcomes allows CaR to uniquely contribute to the physiology of organs and tissues where it is expressed. This chapter will examine the structural features of CaR, which contribute to its unique properties, the nature of CaR-induced intracellular Ca(2+) signals and the potential role(s) for CaR in development and differentiation.

  18. 'No delays achiever'.

    PubMed

    2007-05-01

    The latest version of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement's 'no delays achiever', a web based tool created to help NHS organisations achieve the 18-week target for GP referrals to first treatment, is available at www.nodelaysachiever.nhs.uk.

  19. Contingencies promote delay tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid; Hanley, Gregory P; Jessel, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of functional communication training as treatment for problem behavior depends on the extent to which treatment can be extended to typical environments that include unavoidable and unpredictable reinforcement delays. Time-based progressive delay (TBPD) often results in the loss of acquired communication responses and the resurgence of problem behavior, whereas contingency-based progressive delay (CBPD) appears to be effective for increasing tolerance for delayed reinforcement. No direct comparison of TBPD and CBPD has, however, been conducted. We used single-subject designs to compare the relative efficacy of TBPD and CBPD. Four individuals who engaged in problem behavior (e.g., aggression, vocal and motor disruptions, self-injury) participated. Results were consistent across all participants, and showed lower rates of problem behavior and collateral responses during CBPD than during TBPD. The generality of CBPD treatment effects, including optimal rates of communication and compliance with demands, was demonstrated across a small but heterogeneous group of participants, reinforcement contingencies, and contexts.

  20. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  1. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  2. DSN Transient Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Monroe, R. M.; White, L. A.; Miro, C. Garcia; Levin, S. M.; Majid, W. A.; Soriano, M.

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) Transient Observatory (DTO) is a signal processing facility that can monitor up to four DSN downlink bands for astronomically interesting signals. The monitoring is done commensally with reception of deep space mission telemetry. The initial signal processing is done with two CASPERa ROACH1 boards, each handling one or two baseband signals. Each ROACH1 has a 10 GBe interface with a GPU-equipped Debian Linux workstation for additional processing. The initial science programs include monitoring Mars for electrostatic discharges, radio spectral lines, searches for fast radio bursts and pulsars and SETI. The facility will be available to the scientific community through a peer review process.

  3. Unexpected transient effect.

    PubMed

    Chame, A; Villain, J

    2001-02-01

    When a grooved periodic profile cut in a crystalline surface relaxes through surface diffusion, flatter parts appear at the top and bottom in the transient state which precedes complete smoothing. This has been attributed to a tendency of successive steps of identical sign to draw closer to one another. This kind of kinetic interaction is a consequence of the finite value of the interatomic distance, and is present even if no interaction between steps is taken into account. We investigate this effect in a very simplified model, namely, a one-dimensional profile with alternating pairs of up and down steps, where no annihilation of steps is allowed. The quantitative effect is partly treated analytically.

  4. Transient heliosheath modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenby, J. J.; Webber, W. R.

    2015-10-01

    Voyager 1 has explored the solar wind-interstellar medium interaction region between the terminal shock and heliopause, following the intensity distribution of Galactic cosmic ray protons above 200 MeV energy. Before this component reached the expected galactic flux level at 121.7 au from the Sun, four episodes of rapid intensity change occurred with a behaviour similar to that found in Forbush Decreases in the inner Solar system, rather than that expected from a mechanism related to models for the long-term modulation found closer to the Sun. Because the mean solar wind flow is both expected and observed to be perpendicular to the radial direction close to the heliopause, an explanation is suggested in terms of transient radial flows related to possible heliopause boundary flapping. It is necessary that the radial flows are of the order either of the sound speed found for conditions downstream of the terminal shock or of the fluctuations found near the boundary by the Voyager 1 Low Energy Charged Particle detector and that the relevant cosmic ray diffusion perpendicular to the mean field is controlled by `slab' fluctuations accounting for about 20 per cent of the total power in the field variance. However, additional radial drift motion related to possible north to south gradients in the magnetic field may allow the inclusion of some diffusion according to the predictions of a theory based upon the presence of 2D turbulence. The required field gradients may arise due to field variation in the field carried by solar plasma flow deflected away from the solar equatorial plane. Modulation amounting to a total 30 per cent drop in galactic intensity requires explanation by a combination of transient effects.

  5. Interferometric Propagation Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Radar interferometry based on (near) exact repeat passes has lately been used by many groups of scientists, worldwide, to achieve state of the art measurements of topography, glacier and ice stream motion, earthquake displacements, oil field subsidence, lava flows, crop-induced surface decorrelation, and other effects. Variations of tropospheric and ionospheric propagation delays limit the accuracy of all such measurements. We are investigating the extent of this limitation, using data from the Shuttle radar flight, SIR-C, which is sensitive to the troposphere, and the Earth Resources Satellites, ERS-1/2, which are sensitive to both the troposphere and the ionosphere. We are presently gathering statistics of the delay variations over selected, diverse areas to determine the best accuracy possible for repeat track interferometry. The phases of an interferogram depend on both the topography of the scene and variations in propagation delay. The delay variations can be caused by movement of elements in the scene, by changes in tropospheric water vapor and by changes of the charge concentrations in the ionosphere. We plan to separate these causes by using the data from a third satellite visit (three-pass interferometry). The figure gives the geometry of the three-pass observations. The page of the figure is taken to be perpendicular to the spacecraft orbits. The three observational locations are marked on the figure, giving baselines B-12 and B-13, separated by the angle alpha. These parameters are almost constant over the whole scene. However, each pixel has an individual look angle, theta, which is related to the topography, rho is the slant range. A possible spurious time delay is shown. Additional information is contained in the original.

  6. Imaging of calcium dynamics in pollen tube cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Barberini, María Laura; Muschietti, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic calcium [(Ca(2+))cyt] is a central component of cellular signal transduction pathways. In plants, many external and internal stimuli transiently elevate (Ca(2+))cyt, initiating downstream responses that control different features of plant development. In pollen tubes the establishment of an oscillatory gradient of calcium at the tip is essential for polarized growth. Disruption of the cytosolic Ca(2+) gradient by chelators or channel blockers inhibits pollen tube growth. To quantify the physiological role of (Ca(2+))cyt in cellular systems, genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators such as Yellow Cameleons (YCs) have been developed. The Cameleons are based on a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Here, we describe a method for imaging cytoplasmic Ca(2+) dynamics in growing pollen tubes that express the fluorescent calcium indicator Yellow Cameleon 3.6 (YC 3.6), using laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

  7. Calcium metabolism and correcting calcium deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Emkey, Ronald D; Emkey, Gregory R

    2012-09-01

    Calcium is the most abundant cation in the human body, of which approximately 99% occurs in bone, contributing to its rigidity and strength. Bone also functions as a reservoir of Ca for its role in multiple physiologic and biochemical processes. This article aims to provide a thorough understanding of the absorptive mechanisms and factors affecting these processes to enable one to better appreciate an individual's Ca needs, and to provide a rationale for correcting Ca deficiencies. An overview of Ca requirements and suggested dosing regimens is presented, with discussion of various Ca preparations and potential toxicities of Ca treatment.

  8. Automated Classification of Transient and Variable Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donalek, Ciro; Graham, M.; Mahabal, A. A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A. J.; Yang, M.; Maker, A.; Duan, V.

    2013-01-01

    Better and faster technology is increasing the amount of collected data in many scientific fields, all of them requiring a common task: extract knowledge from massive, multi parametric data sets, as rapidly and efficiently possible. Most systems today rely on a delayed human judgment and this “manual” approach will simply not scale to the next generation of surveys thus the need of a machine learning approach. We present a sleeping expert framework that makes use of many different ensembles of classifiers (eg, kNN, Neural Networks, Bayesian Networks, Decision Trees) that can be activated according to the input data; results from the single classifiers are then combined in order to achieve a better classification rate. Using data sets extracted from the ongoing Catalina Real-Time Transient Surveys (CRTS), we show the results obtained applying this framework to different astronomical problems (eg, classifying transients on the basis of features describing the light curves, systematic search of CV). Moreover, we illustrate a variety of feature selection strategies used to identify the subsets that give the most information; given the high number of parameters this is quickly becoming a crucial task in analyzing astronomical data sets.

  9. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    PubMed

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an important role for the intracellular calcium signal in the induction of EMT in human breast cancer cells. Manipulation of

  10. Inositol trisphosphate and calcium signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate is a second messenger that controls many cellular processes by generating internal calcium signals. It operates through receptors whose molecular and physiological properties closely resemble the calcium-mobilizing ryanodine receptors of muscle. This family of intracellular calcium channels displays the regenerative process of calcium-induced calcium release responsible for the complex spatiotemporal patterns of calcium waves and oscillations. Such a dynamic signalling pathway controls many cellular processes, including fertilization, cell growth, transformation, secretion, smooth muscle contraction, sensory perception and neuronal signalling.

  11. Pharmacology of the calcium sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Filopanti, Marcello; Corbetta, Sabrina; Barbieri, Anna Maria; Spada, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Summary Calcium sensing receptor (CASR) is a G-protein couple receptor which plays a key role in calcium homeostasis in vertebrates. Its extracellular domain is sensitive to divalent cations, aminoacids and polyamines. In parathyroid glands, CASR activation causes parathyroid hormone (PTH) reduction and subsequently a decrease in blood calcium concentration. In PTH-dependent disorders, e.g. primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT), the need for therapeutic options other than surgery led to the synthesis of various allosteric CASR agonists (calcimimetics), such as cinacalcet. Cinacalcet is the only calcimimetic approved for HPT secondary to chronic kidney disease (CDK), parathyroid carcinoma, and, in some countries, primary HPT. Clinical trials showed that cinacalcet reduced PTH and calcemia both in CDK and primary HPT, lowering the risk of bone fractures, surgery, and cardiovascular complications in the former patients. Long-term safety and pharmacoeconomics have to be fully tested yet. Few both in vitro and in vivo studies showed an association between Arg990Gly-CASR polymorphism and cinacalcet sensitivity, though in patients with severe CASR inactivating mutations the drug substantially retained its positive clinical effects. Recently, a new class of allosteric antagonists of CASR, i.e. calcilytics, has been synthesized. Calcilytics are structurally similar to calcimimetics, but exert their effects acting on a different allosteric site. Infusion of calcilytics was followed by transient rise in PTH and calcium. One of these compounds, ronacaleret, was able to increase femur BMD in post menopausal women, but with induction of mild hyperparathyroidism. In the future, calcilytics may contribute to the osteoporosis treatment choice. PMID:24554924

  12. Alteration of calcium homeostasis in primary preeclamptic syncytiotrophoblasts: effect on calcium exchange in placenta

    PubMed Central

    Haché, S; Takser, L; LeBellego, F; Weiler, H; Leduc, L; Forest, J C; Giguère, Y; Masse, A; Barbeau, B; Lafond, J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Preeclampsia (PE) is characterized by maternal hypertension, proteinuria, oedema and, in 30% of cases, by intrauterine growth retardation. Causes are still unknown; however, epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested alterations in maternal calcium metabolism. We suggested that in PE, calcium transport by the syncytiotrophoblast (ST) is disturbed. From total placental tissues, we studied the expression of: calcium channels (TRPV5, TRPV6 [transient receptor potential vanilloid]), calcium binding proteins (CaBP-9K, CaBP-28K), plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA)1,2,3,4 pumps, ATP synthase, genes implicated in Ca2+ release [inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R)1,2,3; Ryanodine receptor (RyR)1,2,3] and replenishment (SERCA1,2,3 [sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases]) from endoplasmic reticulum, channels implicated in mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation (VDAC1,2,3 [voltage-dependent anion channels]) and a marker of oxidative stress (hOGG1 [Human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1]), as well as the influence of these variations on calcium transport in primary ST cultures. The mRNA and protein levels were thereby examined by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively, in two different groups of pregnant women with similar gestational age: a normal group (n= 16) and a PE group (n= 8), diagnosed by a clinician. Our study showed a significant decrease in calcium transport by the ST cultured from preeclamptic placentas. We found a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in mRNA levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, CaBP-9K, CaBP-28K, PMCA1, PMCA4, ATP synthase, IP3R1, IP3R2, RyR1, RyR2 and RyR3 in PE group compared to normal one. We also noted a significant decrease in protein levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, CaBP-9K, CaBP-28K and PMCA1/4 in PE group. In contrast, SERCA1, SERCA2, SERCA3, VDAC3 and hOGG1 mRNA expressions were significantly increased in PE placentas. Calcium homeostasis and transport through placenta is compromised in preeclamptic pregnancies and it appears to

  13. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  14. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, R; Safar, P; Tisherman, S A; Basford, R; Bruttig, S P; Capone, A; Dubick, M A; Ernster, L; Hattler, B G; Hochachka, P; Klain, M; Kochanek, P M; Kofke, W A; Lancaster, J R; McGowan, F X; Oeltgen, P R; Severinghaus, J W; Taylor, M J; Zar, H

    1996-02-01

    Suspended animation is defined as the therapeutic induction of a state of tolerance to temporary complete systemic ischemia, i.w., protection-preservation of the whole organism during prolonged circulatory arrest ( > or = 1 hr), followed by resuscitation to survival without brain damage. The objectives of suspended animation include: a) helping to save victims of temporarily uncontrollable (internal) traumatic (e.g., combat casualties) or nontraumatic (e.g., ruptured aortic aneurysm) exsanguination, without severe brain trauma, by enabling evacuation and resuscitative surgery during circulatory arrest, followed by delayed resuscitation; b) helping to save some nontraumatic cases of sudden death, seemingly unresuscitable before definite repair; and c) enabling selected (elective) surgical procedures to be performed which are only feasible during a state of no blood flow. In the discussion session, investigators with suspended animation-relevant research interests brainstorm on present knowledge, future research potentials, and the advisability of a major research effort concerning this subject. The following topics are addressed: the epidemiologic facts of sudden death in combat casualties, which require a totally new resuscitative approach; the limits and potentials of reanimation research; complete reversibility of circulatory arrest of 1 hr in dogs under profound hypothermia ( < 10 degrees C), induced and reversed by portable cardiopulmonary bypass; the need for a still elusive pharmacologic or chemical induction of suspended animation in the field; asanguinous profound hypothermic low-flow with cardiopulmonary bypass; electric anesthesia; opiate therapy; lessons learned by hypoxia tolerant vertebrate animals, hibernators, and freeze-tolerant animals (cryobiology); myocardial preservation during open-heart surgery; organ preservation for transplantation; and reperfusion-reoxygenation injury in vital organs, including the roles of nitric oxide and free radicals

  15. Local calcium gradients during excitation–contraction coupling and alternans in atrial myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Lothar A; Kockskämper, Jens; Sheehan, Katherine A; Zima, Aleksey V; Hüser, Jörg; Lipsius, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    Subcellular Ca2+ signalling during normal excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling and during Ca2+ alternans was studied in atrial myocytes using fast confocal microscopy and measurement of Ca2+ currents (ICa). Ca2+ alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient, causes electromechanical alternans, which has been implicated in the generation of cardiac fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Cat atrial myocytes lack transverse tubules and contain sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of the junctional (j-SR) and non-junctional (nj-SR) types, both of which have ryanodine-receptor calcium release channels. During E-C coupling, Ca2+ entering through voltage-gated membrane Ca2+ channels (ICa) triggers Ca2+ release at discrete peripheral j-SR release sites. The discrete Ca2+ spark-like increases of [Ca2+]i then fuse into a peripheral ‘ring’ of elevated [Ca2+]i, followed by propagation (via calcium-induced Ca2+ release, CICR) to the cell centre, resulting in contraction. Interrupting ICa instantaneously terminates j-SR Ca2+ release, whereas nj-SR Ca2+ release continues. Increasing the stimulation frequency or inhibition of glycolysis elicits Ca2+ alternans. The spatiotemporal [Ca2+]i pattern during alternans shows marked subcellular heterogeneities including longitudinal and transverse gradients of [Ca2+]i and neighbouring subcellular regions alternating out of phase. Moreover, focal inhibition of glycolysis causes spatially restricted Ca2+ alternans, further emphasising the local character of this phenomenon. When two adjacent regions within a myocyte alternate out of phase, delayed propagating Ca2+ waves develop at their border. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that (1) during normal E-C coupling the atrial [Ca2+]i transient is the result of the spatiotemporal summation of Ca2+ release from individual release sites of the peripheral j-SR and the central nj-SR, activated in a centripetal fashion by CICR via ICa and Ca2+ release from j

  16. The MWA Transients Survey (MWATS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M.; Murphy, T.; Kaplan, D. L.; Croft, S. D.; Hancock, P.; Rowlinson, A.; Wayth, R.; Gaensler, B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Offringa, A.; Loi, C.; Bannister, K.; Trott, C.; Marquart, J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose the continuation of the MWA transients survey to search for and monitor low frequency transient and variable radio sources in the southern sky. This proposal is aimed at commensally utilising data from the GLEAM-X (G0008) project in semester 2017-A. The aim of this commensal data acquisition is to commission long baseline observations for transient science. In particular this will involve studying the impact of the ionosphere on calibration and imaging, and developing the techniques needed to produce science quality data products. The proposed drift scans with LST locking (see G0008 proposal) are particularly exciting as we can test image subtraction for transient and variable identification. This survey is targeted at studying objects such as AGN (intrinsic and extrinsic variability), long duration synchrotron emitters, pulsars and transients of unknown origin. The maps generated from this survey will be analysed with the Variables and Slow Transients (VAST) detection pipeline. The motivation for this survey is as follows: (i) To obtain temporal data on an extremely large and robust sample of low frequency sources to explore and quantify both intrinsic and extrinsic variability; (ii) To search and find new classes of low frequency radio transients that previously remained undetected and obscured from multi-wavelength discovery; (iii) To place rigorous statistics on the occurrence of both transients and variables prior to the Australian SKA era.

  17. Summer 1993 Transient Student Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent State Univ., Warren, OH. Office of Institutional Research.

    A study was conducted by the Trumbull Campus (TC) of Kent State University, in Ohio, to determine the motivations, objectives, and level of satisfaction of transient students, or students pursuing a degree at another institution but enrolled in courses at TC. Surveys were mailed to 50 transient students enrolled in summer 1993, with completed…

  18. Calcium Handling and Arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bompotis, Georgios C; Pappas, Loukas K; Angelidis, Christos; Kossyvakis, Charalampos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium homeostasis plays a fundamental role in the electric and mechanical function of the heart by modulating action potential pattern and duration, by linking cell membrane depolarization to myocardial contraction and by regulating cardiac automaticity. Abnormalities of intracellular calcium regulation disrupt the electrophysiological properties of the heart and create an arrhythmogenic milieu, which promotes atrial and ventricular arrhythmogenesis and impairs cardiac automaticity and atrioventricular conduction. In this brief review, we summarize the basic genetic, molecular and electrophysiological mechanisms linking inherited or acquired intracellular Ca(2+) dysregulation to arrhythmogenesis.

  19. Calcium metabolism in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Heer, M; Kamps, N; Biener, C; Korr, C; Boerger, A; Zittermann, A; Stehle, P; Drummer, C

    1999-09-09

    Unloading of weight bearing bones as induced by microgravity or immobilization has significant impacts on the calcium and bone metabolism and is the most likely cause for space osteoporosis. During a 4.5 to 6 month stay in space most of the astronauts develop a reduction in bone mineral density in spine, femoral neck, trochanter, and pelvis of 1%-1.6% measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA). Dependent on the mission length and the individual turnover rates of the astronauts it can even reach individual losses of up to 14% in the femoral neck. Osteoporosis itself is defined as the deterioration of bone tissue leading to enhanced bone fragility and to a consequent increase in fracture risk. Thinking of long-term missions to Mars or interplanetary missions for years, space osteoporosis is one of the major concerns for manned spaceflight. However, decrease in bone density can be initiated differently. It either can be caused by increases in bone formation and bone resorption resulting in a net bone loss, as obtained in fast looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. On the other hand decrease in bone formation and increase in bone resorption also leads to bone losses as obtained in slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis or in Anorexia Nervosa patients. Biomarkers of bone turnover measured during several missions indicated that the pattern of space osteoporosis is very similar to the pattern of Anorexia Nervosa patients or slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, beside unloading, other risk factors for space osteoporosis exist such as stress, nutrition, fluid shifts, dehydration and bone perfusion. Especially nutritional factors may contribute considerably to the development of osteoporosis. From earthbound studies it is known that calcium supplementation in women and men can prevent bone loss of 1% bone per year. Based on these results we studied the calcium intake during several European missions and performed an experiment during the German MIR 97 mission

  20. Transient mitochondrial permeability transition mediates excitotoxicity in glutamate-sensitive NSC34D motor neuron-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Shangcheng; Wang, Pei; Wang, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity plays a critical role in neurodegenerative disease. Cytosolic calcium overload and mitochondrial dysfunction are among the major mediators of high level glutamate-induced neuron death. Here, we show that the transient opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (tMPT) bridges cytosolic calcium signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction and mediates glutamate-induced neuron death. Incubation of the differentiated motor neuron-like NSC34D cells with glutamate (1 mM) acutely induces cytosolic calcium transient (30% increase). Glutamate also stimulates tMPT opening, as reflected by a 2-fold increase in the frequency of superoxide flash, a bursting superoxide production event in individual mitochondria coupled to tMPT opening. The glutamate-induced tMPT opening is attenuated by suppressing cytosolic calcium influx and abolished by inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) with Ru360 (100 µM) or MCU shRNA. Further, increased cytosolic calcium is sufficient to induce tMPT in a mitochondrial calcium dependent manner. Finally, chronic glutamate incubation (24 hr) persistently elevates the probability of tMPT opening, promotes oxidative stress and induces neuron death. Attenuating tMPT activity or inhibiting MCU protects NSC34D cells from glutamate-induced cell death. These results indicate that high level glutamate-induced neuron toxicity is mediated by tMPT, which connects increased cytosolic calcium signal to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26024861

  1. Calcium channels, external calcium concentration and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Bidaux, Gabriel; Pigat, Natascha; Goffin, Vincent; Bernichtein, Sophie; Capiod, Thierry

    2014-09-15

    Evidence for a role for calcium channel proteins in cell proliferation is numerous suggesting that calcium influx is essential in this physiological process. Several studies in the past thirty years have demonstrated that calcium channel expression levels are determinant in cell proliferation. Voltage-gated, store-operated, second messengers and receptor-operated calcium channels have been associated to cell proliferation. However, the relationship between calcium influx and cell proliferation can be uncoupled in transformed and cancer cells, resulting in an external calcium-independent proliferation. Thus, protein expression could be more important than channel function to trigger cell proliferation suggesting that additional channel functions may be responsible to reconcile calcium channel expression and cell proliferation. When needed, external calcium concentration is obviously important for calcium channel function but it also regulates calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) activity. CaSR can up- or down-regulate cell proliferation depending on physiological conditions. CaSR sensitivity to external calcium is within the 0.5 to 5 mM range and therefore, the role of these receptors in cell proliferation must be taken into account. We therefore suggest here that cell proliferation rates could depend on the relative balance between calcium influx and CaSR activation.

  2. [Diagnosis of delayed puberty].

    PubMed

    Busiah, K; Belien, V; Dallot, N; Fila, M; Guilbert, J; Harroche, A; Leger, J

    2007-09-01

    Puberty is the phenomenon that conducts once to reproductive maturation. Delayed puberty (DP) is defined by the absence of testicular development in boys beyond 14 years old (or a testicular volume lower than 4 ml) and by the absence of breast development in girls beyond 13 years old. DP occurs in approximatively 3% of cases. Most cases are functional DP, with a large amount of constitutional delay of puberty. Others etiologies are hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism like Kallmann syndrome, or hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism. Turner syndrome is a diagnostic one should not forget by its frequency. Treatment is hormonal replacement therapy and of the etiology. During the last decade, many genes have been identified and elucidated the etiological diagnosis of some hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism syndrome. Further studies are required in collaboration with molecular biologists to better understand the mechanism of hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis abnormalities and of the neuroendocrine physiology of the onset of puberty.

  3. Delayed visual maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G F; Hungerford, J; Jones, R B

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen blind babies who were considered to be showing the characteristics of delayed visual maturation were studied prospectively. The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds, and the criteria for this are discussed. All of these infants developed visual responses between 4 and 6 months of age and had normal or near normal visual acuities by 1 year of age. Long term follow up, however, has shown neurological abnormalities in some of these children. PMID:6200080

  4. Theoretical Delay Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelemans, Gijs; Toonen, Silvia; Bours, Madelon

    2013-01-01

    We briefly discuss the method of population synthesis to calculate theoretical delay time distributions of Type Ia supernova progenitors. We also compare the results of different research groups and conclude that, although one of the main differences in the results for single degenerate progenitors is the retention efficiency with which accreted hydrogen is added to the white dwarf core, this alone cannot explain all the differences.

  5. Delayed coking process

    SciTech Connect

    Shigley, J.K.; Roussel, K.M.; Harris, S.D.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes improvement in a delayed premium coking process in which an aromatic mineral oil feedstock is heated to elevated temperature and introduced continuously to a coking drum under delayed coking conditions wherein the heated feedstock soaks in its contained heat to convert the feedstock to cracked vapors and premium coke at lower than normal coking temperatures in the range of about 780{degrees} F. to about 895{degrees} F. and in which the introduction of feedstock to the coking drum is discontinued after the coking drum is filled to a desired level. The improvement comprises: introducing additional aromatic mineral oil capable of forming coke admixed with a non-coking material to the coking drum under delayed coking conditions for a sufficient period of time to convert unconverted liquid material to coke wherein the concentration of aromatic mineral oil in the admixture is from 5 to 90 percent, and thereafter subjecting the contents of the coke drum to a heat soak at a temperature greater than the initial coking temperature whereby a premium coke having improved CTE and reduced fluff is obtained.

  6. MULTIMOMENT RADIO TRANSIENT DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, L. G.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Stone, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present a multimoment technique for signal classification and apply it to the detection of fast radio transients in incoherently dedispersed data. Specifically, we define a spectral modulation index in terms of the fractional variation in intensity across a spectrum. A signal whose intensity is distributed evenly across the entire band has a lower modulation index than a spectrum whose intensity is localized in a single channel. We are interested in broadband pulses and use the modulation index to excise narrowband radio frequency interference by applying a modulation index threshold above which candidate events are removed. The technique is tested both with simulations and using data from known sources of radio pulses (RRAT J1928+15 and giant pulses from the Crab pulsar). The method is generalized to coherent dedispersion, image cubes, and astrophysical narrowband signals that are steady in time. We suggest that the modulation index, along with other statistics using higher order moments, should be incorporated into signal detection pipelines to characterize and classify signals.

  7. Transient internal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Mattick, Arthur T.

    1993-12-01

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) diagnostic is a novel method for probing the interior of hot magnetic fusion plasmas that are inaccessible with ordinary stationary probes. A small probe of magneto-optic (Verdet) material is fired through a plasma at speeds of several km/sec, illuminated by a laser beam. The beam's polarization is rotated in the probe by the local magnetic field and retroreflection back to a polarimetry detector allows determination of the B-field profile across the diameter of a plasma at a spatial resolution of better than 1-cm and an absolute B-field resolution of a few tens of Gauss. The principal components of a TIP diagnostic system were developed and tested. A two-stage light gas gun was constructed that accelerates 30-caliber projectiles to 3 km/sec, and methods were examined for stripping a lexan sabot from a probe prior to entry into a plasma. Probes of CdMnTe and FR-5 Verdet glass were fabricated, and a polarimetry system was constructed for resolving polarization to within 0.25 deg. The diagnostic was validated by measuring a static B-field with a moving (dropped) TIP probe, and finding agreement with Hall-probe measurements to within experimental accuracy (40 Gauss).

  8. Impact of Calcium Signaling during Infection of Neisseria meningitidis to Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells. PMID:25464500

  9. Desalted duck egg white peptides promote calcium uptake by counteracting the adverse effects of phytic acid.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Wen; Ma, Zhili; He, Hui

    2017-03-15

    The structure of the desalted duck egg white peptides-calcium chelate was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Characterization results showed structural folding and aggregation of amino acids or oligopeptides during the chelation process. Desalted duck egg white peptides enhanced the calcium uptake in the presence of oxalate, phosphate and zinc ions in Caco-2 monolayers. Animal model indicated that desalted duck egg white peptides effectively enhanced the mineral absorption and counteracted the deleterious effects of phytic acid. These findings suggested that desalted duck egg white peptides might promote calcium uptake in three pathways: 1) desalted duck egg white peptides bind with calcium to form soluble chelate and avoid precipitate; 2) the chelate is absorbed as small peptides by enterocyte; and 3) desalted duck egg white peptides regulate the proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes through the interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 calcium channel.

  10. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  11. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  12. Calcium biofortification of crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than half of the world's population is deficient in calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), or zinc (Zn). The consumption of plants, directly or via livestock, containing inadequate concentrations of particular minerals causes these deficiencies. Agronomic and geneti...

  13. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sarcoidosis • Hormone disorders, such as overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) • A genetic condition called familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia • Kidney ... topics: www.hormone.org (search for PHPT, calcium, hyperthyroidism, or osteoporosis) • MedlinePlus (National Institutes of Health-NIH): ...

  14. Assay for calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  15. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  16. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  17. The fragile X mental retardation protein developmentally regulates the strength and fidelity of calcium signaling in Drosophila mushroom body neurons.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Charles R; Broadie, Kendal

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a broad-spectrum neurological disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli, hyperactivity and severe cognitive impairment. FXS is caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene, whose FMRP product regulates mRNA translation downstream of synaptic activity to modulate changes in synaptic architecture, function and plasticity. Null Drosophila FMR1 (dfmr1) mutants exhibit reduced learning and loss of protein synthesis-dependent memory consolidation, which is dependent on the brain mushroom body (MB) learning and memory center. We targeted a transgenic GFP-based calcium reporter to the MB in order to analyze calcium dynamics downstream of neuronal activation. In the dfmr1 null MB, there was significant augmentation of the calcium transients induced by membrane depolarization, as well as elevated release of calcium from intracellular organelle stores. The severity of these calcium signaling defects increased with developmental age, although early stages were characterized by highly variable, low fidelity calcium regulation. At the single neuron level, both calcium transient and calcium store release defects were exhibited by dfmr1 null MB neurons in primary culture. Null dfmr1 mutants exhibit reduced brain mRNA expression of calcium-binding proteins, including calcium buffers calmodulin and calbindin, predicting that the inability to appropriately sequester cytosolic calcium may be the common mechanistic defect causing calcium accumulation following both influx and store release. Changes in the magnitude and fidelity of calcium signals in the absence of dFMRP likely contribute to defects in neuronal structure/function, leading to the hallmark learning and memory dysfunction of FXS.

  18. Bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates.

    PubMed

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2010-03-01

    A strong interest in use of ceramics for biomedical applications appeared in the late 1960's. Used initially as alternatives to metals in order to increase a biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics, bioactive (or surface reactive) and bioresorbable ones. Furthermore, any type of bioceramics could be porous to provide tissue ingrowth. This review is devoted to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates, which belong to the categories of bioresorbable and bioactive compounds. During the past 30-40 years, there have been a number of major advances in this field. Namely, after the initial work on development of bioceramics that was tolerated in the physiological environment, emphasis was shifted towards the use of bioceramics that interacted with bones by forming a direct chemical bond. By the structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether the bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates was biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether it was resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics, which is able to regenerate bone tissues, has been developed. Current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Potential future applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics will include drug-delivery systems, as well as they will become effective carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  19. Calcium pump kinetics determined in single erythrocyte ghosts by microphotolysis and confocal imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Kubitscheck, U; Pratsch, L; Passow, H; Peters, R

    1995-01-01

    The activity of the plasma membrane calcium pump was measured in single cells. Human red blood cell ghosts were loaded with a fluorescent calcium indicator and either caged calcium and ATP (protocol A) or caged ATP and calcium (protocol B). In a suitably modified laser scanning microscope either calcium or ATP were released by a short UV light pulse. The time-dependent fluorescence intensity of the calcium indicator was then followed in single ghosts by repetitive confocal imaging. The fluorescence intensity was converted into calcium concentration, which in turn was used to derive the kinetic parameters of the calcium pump, the Michaelis-Menten constant Km, and the maximal transport rate vmax. Km and vmax values derived in this manner were 24 +/- 14 microM and 1.0 +/- 0.6 microM/(ghost s) for protocol A, and 4 +/- 3 microM and 1.0 +/- 0.6 microM/(ghost s) for protocol B, respectively. The difference between A and B is presumably caused by calmodulin, which is inactive in the experiments with protocol A. The possibilities to extend the new method to living nucleus-containing cells transiently transfected with mutants of the plasma membrane calcium pump are discussed. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:7669907

  20. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOEpatents

    DeRyckere, John F.; Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank Nolan

    2002-07-09

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  1. Sustained Perceptual Deficits from Transient Sensory Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Sanes, Dan H.

    2015-01-01

    displays an increased vulnerability to the sensory environment. Here, we identify a precise developmental window during which mild hearing loss affects the maturation of an auditory perceptual cue that is known to support animal communication, including human speech. Furthermore, animals reared with transient hearing loss display deficits in perceptual learning. Our results suggest that speech and language delays associated with transient or permanent childhood hearing loss may be accounted for, in part, by deficits in central auditory processing mechanisms. PMID:26224865

  2. Initiation of a coronal transient

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B.C.; Munro, R.H.; Fisher, R.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper analyzes the coronal transient/eruptive prominence event of 1980 August 5 observed by the Mauna Loa experiment system. This event yielded data on the early development of the transient in the low corona between 1.2 R/sub sun/ and 2.2 R/sub sun/, information which was not available when earlier attempts were made to explain transient phenomena. The transient's initial appearance in the form of a rising density-depleted structure, prior to the eruption of the associated prominence, can be explained as an effect of magnetic buoyancy. The data indicate that this transient has a density depletion of 17% to 33% relative to an undisturbed corona which is approximately isothermal with a temperature of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ K and a coronal density of 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ at the base of the corona. The height versus base length relationship of the evolving transient resembles, remarkably well, the theoretical predictions obtained from a quasi-static model of a margnetically buoyant loop system. By matching this relationship with the theoretical model, we estimate the magnetic field at the base of the transient to be between 2 and 3 gauss. It is also shown that the initial, nearly constant speed of the top of the transient, 80 +- 20 km s/sup -1/, is consistent with a theoretical estimate calculated from the quasi-static model. These results suggest that some transients are not initiated impulsively, the initial stage of the development being driven by a quasi-static response to a slow change in magnetic field conditions at the base of the corona.

  3. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A.; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  4. A physiologic differentiation between delayed and immediate hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Apicella, Michael A.; Allen, James C.

    1969-01-01

    Studies have been made of movement of various macromolecules into and out of the pleural space of guinea pigs during the course of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to purified protein derivative (PPD), and a passively transferred immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ovalbumin. While the immediate hypersensitivity reaction transiently alters vascular permeability as shown by increased movement of macromolecules into the chest, the delayed hypersensitivity reaction is marked by a decreased capacity to resorb macromolecules from the pleural space. The data suggest that the two hypersensitivity reactions may be distinguished by these physiologic differences. Additional data from studies of a chemically induced pleural effusion in these animals suggest that some type of outflow obstruction is necessary for the development of effusion, but that the outflow defect caused by the irritating chemical is based on a different mechanism than that seen during the delayed hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:4179171

  5. The rapid transient surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Lu, J. R.; Wright, S. A.; Tonry, J.; Tully, R. B.; Szapudi, I.; Takamiya, M.; Hunter, L.; Riddle, R.; Chen, S.; Chun, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS) is a proposed rapid-response, high-cadence adaptive optics (AO) facility for the UH 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will uniquely address the need for high-acuity and sensitive near-infrared spectral follow-up observations of tens of thousands of objects in mere months by combining an excellent observing site, unmatched robotic observational efficiency, and an AO system that significantly increases both sensitivity and spatial resolving power. We will initially use RTS to obtain the infrared spectra of 4,000 Type Ia supernovae identified by the Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System over a two year period that will be crucial to precisely measuring distances and mapping the distribution of dark matter in the z < 0.1 universe. RTS will comprise an upgraded version of the Robo-AO laser AO system and will respond quickly to target-of-opportunity events, minimizing the time between discovery and characterization. RTS will acquire simultaneous-multicolor images with an acuity of 0.07-0.10" across the entire visible spectrum (20% i'-band Strehl in median conditions) and <0.16" in the near infrared, and will detect companions at 0.5" at contrast ratio of 500. The system will include a high-efficiency prism integral field unit spectrograph: R = 70-140 over a total bandpass of 840-1830nm with an 8.7" by 6.0" field of view (0.15" spaxels). The AO correction boosts the infrared point-source sensitivity of the spectrograph against the sky background by a factor of seven for faint targets, giving the UH 2.2-m the H-band sensitivity of a 5.7-m telescope without AO.

  6. Delay Choice vs. Delay Maintenance: Different Measures of Delayed Gratification in Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella)

    PubMed Central

    Addessi, Elsa; Paglieri, Fabio; Beran, Michael J.; Evans, Theodore A.; Macchitella, Luigi; De Petrillo, Francesca; Focaroli, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Delaying gratification involves two components: (i) delay choice (selecting a delayed reward over an immediate one), and (ii) delay maintenance (sustaining the decision to delay gratification even if the immediate reward is available during the delay). In primates, two tasks most commonly have explored these components, the Intertemporal choice task and the Accumulation task. It is unclear whether these tasks provide equivalent measures of delay of gratification. Here, we compared the performance of the same capuchin monkeys, belonging to two study populations, between these tasks. We found only limited evidence of a significant correlation in performance. Consequently, in contrast to what is often assumed, our data provide only partial support to the hypothesis that these tasks provide equivalent measures of delay of gratification. PMID:23544770

  7. Transient Effects in Turbulence Modelling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    field data are reported for recirculat- !I " " Ing water flows under steady-state and transient flow conditions in en 0I, Improved 1/15 scale FFTF ...15 scale FFTF outlet plenum test-cell. A dual-channel Laser Doppler Anemometer is used, and a unique method for performing transient measurements is...Description of Loop 26 3.1.2 Repeatable Flow Transient Generator (RFTG) 27 3.1.3 FFTF Test Cell 28 3.2 Laser Doppler Anemometer (LOA) 31 5 3.2.1 General

  8. Controlled environment life support system: Calcium-related leaf injuries on plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium related injuries to plants grown in controlled environments under conditions which maximize plant growth rates are described. Procedures to encourage movement of calcium into developing leaves of lettuce plants were investigated. The time course and pattern of calcium accumulation was determined to develop effective control procedures for this injury, termed tipburn. Procedures investigated were: (1) increasing the relative humidity to saturation during the dark period and altering root temperatures, (2) maximizing water stress during light and minimizing water stress during dark periods, (3) shortening the light-dark cycle lengths in combination with elevated moisture levels during the dark cycles, (4) reducing nutrient concentrations and (5) vibrating the plants. Saturated humidities at night increased the rate of growth and the large fluctuation in plant water potential encouraged calcium movement to the young leaves and delayed tipburn. Root temperature regulation between 15 and 26 C was not effective in preventing tipburn. Attempts to modulate water stress produced little variation, but no difference in tipburn development. Variations in light-dark cycle lengths also had no effect on calcium concentrations within developing leaves and no variation in tipburn development. Low concentrations of nutrient solution delayed tipburn, presumably because of greater calcium transport in the low concentration plants. Shaking of the plants did not prevent tipburn, but did delay it slightly.

  9. Cutaneous Penetration Enhancing Effect of Menthol: Calcium Involvement.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amit; Joshi, Abhay; Patel, Hiren; Ponnoth, Dovenia; Stagni, Grazia

    2017-04-08

    Menthol is a naturally occurring terpene used as a penetration enhancer in topical and transdermal formulations. Literature shows a growing interest on menthol's interactions with the Transient-Receptor-Potential (TRPM-8) calcium channel. A decrease in extracellular Ca(+2) due to the activation of TRPM-8 channels produces inhibition of E-cadherin expression that is responsible for cell-cell adhesion. Since calcium is present in the entire epidermis, the purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the aforementioned properties of menthol are also related to its penetration-enhancing-effects. We formulated sixteen gels: (i) drug-alone (diphenhydramine or lidocaine), (ii) drug with menthol, (iii) drug, menthol, and calcium channel blocker (verapamil or diltiazem), and (iv) drug and calcium channel blocker (CCB). In-vitro studies showed no effect of the CCB on the release of the drugs either with or without menthol. In-vivo experiments were performed for each drug/menthol/CCB combination gel by applying four formulations on a shaved rabbit's dorsum on the same day. Dermis concentration profiles were assessed with microdialysis. The gels containing menthol showed higher penetration of drugs than those without whereas the addition of the CCB consistently inhibited the penetration-enhancing-effects of menthol. In summary, these findings strongly support the involvement of calcium in the penetration-enhancing-effect of menthol.

  10. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain.

  11. Reactor transient analyses with KIN3D/PARTISN

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielli, F.; Rineiski, A.; Maschek, W.; Marchetti, M.

    2013-07-01

    Efforts are going on at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) to extend the kinetics capability of the PARTISN code in order to run in parallel two- and three-dimensional transient analyses with the quasistatic method, while taking into account delayed neutrons. In the original code version, time-dependent transport problems are solved by employing a semi-implicit direct kinetics option, the delayed neutrons being not taken into account. The PARTISN 5.97 code has been extended and then coupled with KIN3D, a time-dependent model embedded in the ERANOS code system. In the coupled code, PARTISN 5.97 is used as neutron transport solver to perform transient analyses while employing direct and quasi-static kinetics options of KIN3D. The coupled code can be also applied for first-order and exact perturbation theory calculations. In the paper, the PARTISN 5.97 extensions and coupling procedure are described and the performances of the KIN3D/PARTISN coupled code are investigated by analyzing transients induced by a source-jerk in a three-dimensional ADS model driven by an external source. (authors)

  12. Transient critical heat flux and blowdown heat-transfer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, J.C.

    1980-05-01

    Objective of this study is to give a best-estimate prediction of transient critical heat flux (CHF) during reactor transients and hypothetical accidents. To accomplish this task, a predictional method has been developed. Basically it involves the thermal-hydraulic calculation of the heated core with boundary conditions supplied from experimental measurements. CHF predictions were based on the instantaneous ''local-conditions'' hypothesis, and eight correlations (consisting of round-tube, rod-bundle, and transient correlations) were tested against most recent blowdown heat-transfer test data obtained in major US facilities. The prediction results are summarized in a table in which both CISE and Biasi correlations are found to be capable of predicting the early CHF of approx. 1 s. The Griffith-Zuber correlation is credited for its prediction of the delay CHF that occurs in a more tranquil state with slowly decaying mass velocity. In many instances, the early CHF can be well correlated by the x = 1.0 criterion; this is certainly indicative of an annular-flow dryout-type crisis. The delay CHF occurred at near or above 80% void fraction, and the success of the modified Zuber pool-boiling correlation suggests that this CHF is caused by flooding and pool-boiling type hydrodynamic crisis.

  13. Calcium Phosphates and Human Beings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2006-05-01

    This article describes the general importance of calcium phosphates for human beings. The basic information on the structure and chemical properties of the biologically relevant calcium phosphates is summarized. Basic facts on the natural occurrence and the industrial use of natural calcium phosphates are discussed. Fundamental details on the presence of calcium phosphates in major calcified tissues (bones and teeth) of humans and mammals, as well as on biomaterials made of calcium phosphates are discussed. The article will be of value for chemistry teachers for expansion of their general background and point the students' attention to the rapidly growing topic of bone-substituting biomaterials.

  14. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  15. Adaptive Phase Delay Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    There are several experimental setups involving rotating machinery that require some form of synchronization. The adaptive phase delay generator (APDG) the Bencic-1000 is a flexible instrument that allows the user to generate pulses synchronized to the rising edge of a tachometer signal from any piece of rotating machinery. These synchronized pulses can vary by the delay angle, pulse width, number of pulses per period, number of skipped pulses, and total number of pulses. Due to the design of the pulse generator, any and all of these parameters can be changed independently, yielding an unparalleled level of versatility. There are two user interfaces to the APDG. The first is a LabVIEW program that has the advantage of displaying all of the pulse parameters and input signal data within one neatly organized window on the PC monitor. Furthermore, the LabVIEW interface plots the rpm of the two input signal channels in real time. The second user interface is a handheld portable device that goes anywhere a computer is not accessible. It consists of a liquid-crystal display and keypad, which enable the user to control the unit by scrolling through a host of command menus and parameter listings. The APDG combines all of the desired synchronization control into one unit. The experimenter can adjust the delay, pulse width, pulse count, number of skipped pulses, and produce a specified number of pulses per revolution. Each of these parameters can be changed independently, providing an unparalleled level of versatility when synchronizing hardware to a host of rotating machinery. The APDG allows experimenters to set up quickly and generate a host of synchronizing configurations using a simple user interface, which hopefully leads to faster results.

  16. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    PubMed

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  17. DELAYED REINFORCEMENT OF OPERANT BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Lattal, Kennon A

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement, but, also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between responses and reinforcers can be isolated from other features of the environment that often accompany delays, such as stimuli or changes in the temporal distribution or rate of reinforcement. The second question is that of the effects of delays on operant behavior. Beyond the common denominator of a temporal separation between reinforcers and the responses that produce them, delay of reinforcement procedures differ from one another along several dimensions, making delay effects circumstance dependent. The final question is one of interpreting delay of reinforcement effects. It centers on the role of the response–reinforcer temporal relation in the context of other, concurrently operating behavioral processes. PMID:20676272

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF TRANSIENT PUFF EMISSIONS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Symposium Paper Transient puff emissions were characterized from burning carpet charges that were fed to a pilotscale rotary kiln combustor to assess the potential impact on emissions of using post-consumer carpet as an alternative fuel in cement kilns.

  19. Arrhythmogenic consequences of intracellular calcium waves.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Weiss, James N

    2009-09-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(i)(2+)) waves are known to cause delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs), which have been associated with arrhythmias in cardiac disease states such as heart failure, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and digitalis toxicity. Here we show that, in addition to DADs, Ca(i)(2+) waves also have other consequences relevant to arrhythmogenesis, including subcellular spatially discordant alternans (SDA, in which the amplitude of the local Ca(i)(2+) transient alternates out of phase in different regions of the same cell), sudden repolarization changes promoting the dispersion of refractoriness, and early afterdepolarizations (EADs). Ca(i)(2+) was imaged using a charge-coupled device-based system in fluo-4 AM-loaded isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes paced at constant or incrementally increasing rates, using either field stimulation, current clamp, or action potential (AP) clamp. Ca(i)(2+) waves were induced by Bay K 8644 (50 nM) + isoproterenol (100 nM), or low temperature. When pacing was initiated during a spontaneous Ca(i)(2+) wave, SDA occurred abruptly and persisted during pacing. Similarly, during rapid pacing, SDA typically arose suddenly from spatially concordant alternans, due to an abrupt phase reversal of the subcellular Ca(i)(2+) transient in a region of the myocyte. Ca(i)(2+) waves could be visualized interspersed with AP-triggered Ca(i)(2+) transients, producing a rich variety of subcellular Ca(i)(2+) transient patterns. With free-running APs, complex Ca(i)(2+) release patterns were associated with DADs, EADs, and sudden changes in AP duration. These findings link Ca(i)(2+) waves directly to a variety of arrhythmogenic phenomena relevant to the intact heart.

  20. Transient Tsunamis in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L.; Mei, C.; Alam, M.

    2013-12-01

    A large number of lakes are surrounded by steep and unstable mountains with slopes prone to failure. As a result, landslides are likely to occur and impact water sitting in closed reservoirs. These rare geological phenomena pose serious threats to dam reservoirs and nearshore facilities because they can generate unexpectedly large tsunami waves. In fact, the tallest wave experienced by contemporary humans occurred because of a landslide in the narrow bay of Lituya in 1958, and five years later, a deadly landslide tsunami overtopped Lake Vajont's dam, flooding and damaging villages along the lakefront and in the Piave valley. If unstable slopes and potential slides are detected ahead of time, inundation maps can be drawn to help people know the risks, and mitigate the destructive power of the ensuing waves. These maps give the maximum wave runup height along the lake's vertical and sloping boundaries, and can be obtained by numerical simulations. Keeping track of the moving shorelines along beaches is challenging in classical Eulerian formulations because the horizontal extent of the fluid domain can change over time. As a result, assuming a solid slide and nonbreaking waves, here we develop a nonlinear shallow-water model equation in the Lagrangian framework to address the problem of transient landslide-tsunamis. In this manner, the shorelines' three-dimensional motion is part of the solution. The model equation is hyperbolic and can be solved numerically by finite differences. Here, a 4th order Runge-Kutta method and a compact finite-difference scheme are implemented to integrate in time and spatially discretize the forced shallow-water equation in Lagrangian coordinates. The formulation is applied to different lake and slide geometries to better understand the effects of the lake's finite lengths and slide's forcing mechanism on the generated wavefield. Specifically, for a slide moving down a plane beach, we show that edge-waves trapped by the shoreline and free

  1. Transient Alerts in LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, J.

    During LSST observing, transient events will be detected and alerts generated at the LSST Archive Center at NCSA in Champaign-Illinois. As a very high rate of alerts is expected, approaching ˜ 10 million per night, we plan for VOEvent-compliant Distributor/Brokers (http://voevent.org) to be the primary end-points of the full LSST alert streams. End users will then use these Distributor/Brokers to classify and filter events on the stream for those fitting their science goals. These Distributor/Brokers are envisioned to be operated as a community service by third parties who will have signed MOUs with LSST. The exact identification of Distributor/Brokers to receive alerts will be determined as LSST approaches full operations and may change over time, but it is in our interest to identify and coordinate with them as early as possible. LSST will also operate a limited Distributor/Broker with a filtering capability at the Archive Center, to allow alerts to be sent directly to a limited number of entities that for some reason need to have a more direct connection to LSST. This might include, for example, observatories with significant follow-up capabilities whose observing may temporarily be more directly tied to LSST observing. It will let astronomers create simple filters that limit what alerts are ultimately forwarded to them. These user defined filters will be possible to specify using an SQL-like declarative language, or short snippets of (likely Python) code. We emphasize that this LSST-provided capability will be limited, and is not intended to satisfy the wide variety of use cases that a full-fledged public Event Distributor/Broker could. End users will not be able to subscribe to full, unfiltered, alert streams coming directly from LSST. In this session, we will discuss anticipated LSST data rates, and capabilities for alert processing and distribution/brokering. We will clarify what the LSST Observatory will provide versus what we anticipate will be a

  2. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  3. Catalina/Palomar Optical Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeshalingam, M.; Griffith, C. V.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.

    2008-07-01

    Inspection of a CCD spectrum (range 330-1000 nm), obtained on July 7 UT with the 3-m Shane reflector (+ Kast spectrograph) at Lick Observatory, shows that the transient reported in ATel 1604 has a very blue, featureless continuum. This could be a very young Type II supernova (though at this time no clear hydrogen Balmer features are present), or some kind of Galactic transient. Further observations are encouraged.

  4. The Effect of a Novel Highly Selective Inhibitor of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger (NCX) on Cardiac Arrhythmias in In Vitro and In Vivo Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kohajda, Zsófia; Farkas-Morvay, Nikolett; Jost, Norbert; Nagy, Norbert; Geramipour, Amir; Horváth, András; Varga, Richárd S.; Hornyik, Tibor; Corici, Claudia; Acsai, Károly; Horváth, Balázs; Prorok, János; Ördög, Balázs; Déri, Szilvia; Tóth, Dániel; Levijoki, Jouko; Pollesello, Piero; Koskelainen, Tuula; Otsomaa, Leena; Tóth, András; Baczkó, István; Leprán, István; Nánási, Péter P.; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Virág, László

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study the effects of a new, highly selective sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) inhibitor, ORM-10962 were investigated on cardiac NCX current, Ca2+ transients, cell shortening and in experimental arrhythmias. The level of selectivity of the novel inhibitor on several major transmembrane ion currents (L-type Ca2+ current, major repolarizing K+ currents, late Na+ current, Na+/K+ pump current) was also determined. Methods Ion currents in single dog ventricular cells (cardiac myocytes; CM), and action potentials in dog cardiac multicellular preparations were recorded utilizing the whole-cell patch clamp and standard microelectrode techniques, respectively. Ca2+ transients and cell shortening were measured in fluorescent dye loaded isolated dog myocytes. Antiarrhythmic effects of ORM-10962 were studied in anesthetized ouabain (10 μg/kg/min i.v.) pretreated guinea pigs and in ischemia-reperfusion models (I/R) of anesthetized coronary artery occluded rats and Langendorff perfused guinea pigs hearts. Results ORM-10962 significantly reduced the inward/outward NCX currents with estimated EC50 values of 55/67 nM, respectively. The compound, even at a high concentration of 1 μM, did not modify significantly the magnitude of ICaL in CMs, neither had any apparent influence on the inward rectifier, transient outward, the rapid and slow components of the delayed rectifier potassium currents, the late and peak sodium and Na+/K+ pump currents. NCX inhibition exerted moderate positive inotropic effect under normal condition, negative inotropy when reverse, and further positive inotropic effect when forward mode was facilitated. In dog Purkinje fibres 1 μM ORM-10962 decreased the amplitude of digoxin induced delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs). Pre-treatment with 0.3 mg/kg ORM-10962 (i.v.) 10 min before starting ouabain infusion significantly delayed the development and recurrence of ventricular extrasystoles (by about 50%) or ventricular tachycardia (by about 30

  5. Epidemiology of delayed ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Di Sante, Stefania; Mollaioli, Daniele; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Ciocca, Giacomo; Limoncin, Erika; Carosa, Eleonora; Lenzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A large body of literature on diminished ejaculatory disorders has been generated without the use of a clear diagnostic definition. Many studies have not distinguished between the orgasm and ejaculation disorders leading to doubtful results. Delayed ejaculation (DE) is one of the diminished ejaculatory disorders, which range from varying delays in ejaculatory latency to a complete inability to ejaculate. The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the definition and epidemiology of diminished ejaculatory disorders. We focus on the acquired diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and specific drug regimens that may cause an iatrogenic form of ejaculatory disorder. In addition, the impact of aging is discussed since the prevalence of DE appears to be moderately but positively related to age. Finally, we also focus on the importance of the hormonal milieu on male ejaculation. To date, evidence on the endocrine control of ejaculation is derived from small clinical trials, but the evidence suggests that hormones modulate the ejaculatory process by altering its overall latency. PMID:27652226

  6. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    DOEpatents

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  7. Nutrition in calcium nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease with a complex pathogenesis due to genetic and environmental factors. The importance of social and health effects of nephrolithiasis is further highlighted by the strong tendency to relapse of the disease. Long-term prospective studies show a peak of disease recurrence within 2–3 years since onset, 40-50% of patients have a recurrence after 5 years and more than 50-60% after 10 years. International nutritional studies demonstrated that nutritional habits are relevant in therapy and prevention approaches of nephrolithiasis. Water, right intake of calcium, low intake of sodium, high levels of urinary citrate are certainly important for the primary and secondary prevention of nephrolithiasis. In this review is discussed how the correction of nutritional mistakes can reduce the incidence of recurrent nephrolithiasis. PMID:23634702

  8. Complexometric Determination of Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) complexes with numerous mineral ions, including calcium and magnesium. This reaction can be used to determine the amount of these minerals in a sample by a complexometric titration. Endpoints in the titration are detected using indicators that change color when they complex with mineral ions. Calmagite and eriochrome black T (EBT) are such indicators that change from blue to pink when they complex with calcium and magnesium. In the titration of a mineral-containing solution with EDTA, the solution turns from pink to blue at the endpoint with either indicator. The pH affects a complexometric EDTA titration in several ways, and must be carefully controlled. A major application of EDTA titration is testing the hardness of water, for which the method described is an official one (Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, Method 2340C; AOAC Method 920.196).

  9. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  10. Theory of strong-field attosecond transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is one of the promising new techniques being developed to exploit the availability of sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses to study the dynamics of the electron on its natural time scale. The temporal resolution in a transient absorption setup comes from the control of the relative delay and coherence between pump and probe pulses, while the spectral resolution comes from the characteristic width of the features that are being probed. In this review we focus on transient absorption scenarios where an attosecond pulse of XUV radiation creates a broadband excitation that is subsequently probed by a few cycle infrared (IR) laser. Because the attosecond XUV pulses are locked to the IR field cycle, the exchange of energy in the laser-matter interaction can be studied with unprecedented precision. We focus on the transient absorption by helium atoms of XUV radiation around the first ionization threshold, where we can simultaneoulsy solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the single atom response and the Maxwell wave equation for the collective response of the nonlinear medium. We use a time-domain method that allows us to treat on an equal footing all the different linear and nonlinear processes by which the medium can exchange energy with the fields. We present several simple models, based on a few-level system interacting with a strong IR field, to explain many of the novel features found in attosecond transient absorption spectrograms. These include the presence of light-induced states, which demonstrate the ability to probe the dressed states of the atom. We also present a time-domain interpretation of the resonant pulse propagation features that appear in absorption spectra in dense, macroscopic media. We close by reviewing several recent experimental results that can be explained in terms of the models we discuss. Our aim is to present a road map for understanding future attosecond transient absorption

  11. Availability of calcium from skim milk, calcium sulfate and calcium carbonate for bone mineralization in pigs.

    PubMed

    Pointillart, A; Coxam, V; Sève, B; Colin, C; Lacroix, C H; Guéguen, L

    2000-01-01

    Dairy products provide abundant, accessible calcium for humans, while some calcium sulfate-rich mineral waters could provide appreciable amounts of calcium. But there is little evidence that this calcium is as available as milk calcium for making bone. The availability of calcium was studied by monitoring bone parameters in 2-month-old pigs fed restricted amounts of calcium (70% RDA) for 2.5 months. The 3 main (> or = 50% Ca intake) Ca sources were either CaCO3 or CaSO4 or skim milk powder (29% of the diet). The bones of the pigs fed the "milk" diet had higher (P < 0.01) ash contents, breaking strength and density (DEXA) than those of the two others groups, in which the bone values were similar. Thus, the calcium provided by a diet containing milk appears to ensure better bone mineralization than do calcium salts included in a non-milk diet. The calcium restriction may have enhanced some milk properties to stimulate calcium absorption in these young, rapidly growing pigs.

  12. Calcium bioavailability and kinetics of calcium ascorbate and calcium acetate in rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jianwei; Zhang, Qinmin; Wastney, Meryl E; Weaver, Connie M

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the bioavailability and mechanism of calcium absorption of calcium ascorbate (ASC) and calcium acetate (AC). A series of studies was performed in adult Sprague-Dawley male rats. In the first study, each group of rats (n = 10/group) was assigned to one of the five test meals labeled with (45)Ca: (i) 25 mg calcium as heated ASC or (ii) unheated ASC, (iii) 25 mg calcium as unheated AC, (iv) 3.6 mg Ca as unheated ASC, or (v) unheated AC. Femur uptake indicated better calcium bioavailability from ASC than AC at both calcium loads. A 5-min heat treatment partly reduced bioavailability of ASC. Kinetic studies were performed to further investigate the mechanism of superior calcium bioavailability from ASC. Two groups of rats (n = 10/group) received oral doses of 25 mg Ca as ASC or AC. Each dose contained 20 micro Ci (45)Ca. Two additional groups of rats (n = 10/group) received an intravenous injection (iv) of 10 micro Ci (45)Ca after receiving an unlabeled oral dose of 25 mg calcium as ASC or AC. Sequential blood samples were collected over 48 hrs. Urine and fecal samples were collected every 12 hrs for 48 hrs and were analyzed for total calcium and (45)Ca content. Total calcium and (45)Ca from serum, urine, and feces were fitted by a compartment kinetics model with saturable and nonsaturable absorption pathways by WinSAAM (Windows-based Simulation Analysis and Modeling). The difference in calcium bioavailability between the two salts was due to differences in saturable rather than passive intestinal absorption and not to endogenous secretion or calcium deposition rate. The higher bioavailability of calcium ascorbate was due to a longer transit time in the small intestine compared with ASC.

  13. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms.

  14. Fabrications of zinc-releasing biocement combining zinc calcium phosphate to calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shinya; Hiasa, Masahiro; Yasue, Akihiro; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Hamada, Kenichi; Asaoka, Kenzo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, zinc-releasing bioceramics have been the focus of much attention owing to their bone-forming ability. Thus, some types of zinc-containing calcium phosphate (e.g., zinc-doped tricalcium phosphate and zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite) are examined and their osteoblastic cell responses determined. In this investigation, we studied the effects of zinc calcium phosphate (ZCP) derived from zinc phosphate incorporated into calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in terms of its setting reaction and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell responses. Compositional analysis by powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that HAP crystals were precipitated in the CPC containing 10 or 30wt% ZCP after successfully hardening. However, the crystal growth observed by scanning electron microscopy was delayed in the presence of additional ZCP. These findings indicate that the additional zinc inhibits crystal growth and the conversion of CPC to the HAP crystals. The proliferation of the cells and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were enhanced when 10wt% ZCP was added to CPC. Taken together, ZCP added CPC at an appropriate fraction has a potent promotional effect on bone substitute biomaterials.

  15. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Findings Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Conclusion Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance. PMID:28182142

  16. Response of traveling waves to transient inputs in neural fields.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P; Ermentrout, Bard

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the effects of transient stimulation on traveling waves in neural field equations. Neural fields are modeled as integro-differential equations whose convolution term represents the synaptic connections of a spatially extended neuronal network. The adjoint of the linearized wave equation can be used to identify how a particular input will shift the location of a traveling wave. This wave response function is analogous to the phase response curve of limit cycle oscillators. For traveling fronts in an excitatory network, the sign of the shift depends solely on the sign of the transient input. A complementary estimate of the effective shift is derived using an equation for the time-dependent speed of the perturbed front. Traveling pulses are analyzed in an asymmetric lateral inhibitory network and they can be advanced or delayed, depending on the position of spatially localized transient inputs. We also develop bounds on the amplitude of transient input necessary to terminate traveling pulses, based on the global bifurcation structure of the neural field.

  17. Response of traveling waves to transient inputs in neural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Ermentrout, Bard

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the effects of transient stimulation on traveling waves in neural field equations. Neural fields are modeled as integro-differential equations whose convolution term represents the synaptic connections of a spatially extended neuronal network. The adjoint of the linearized wave equation can be used to identify how a particular input will shift the location of a traveling wave. This wave response function is analogous to the phase response curve of limit cycle oscillators. For traveling fronts in an excitatory network, the sign of the shift depends solely on the sign of the transient input. A complementary estimate of the effective shift is derived using an equation for the time-dependent speed of the perturbed front. Traveling pulses are analyzed in an asymmetric lateral inhibitory network and they can be advanced or delayed, depending on the position of spatially localized transient inputs. We also develop bounds on the amplitude of transient input necessary to terminate traveling pulses, based on the global bifurcation structure of the neural field.

  18. Space shuttle observation of an unusual transient atmospheric emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Ziv, Baruch; Israelevich, Peter L.; Sentman, Davis D.; São-Sabbas, Fernanda T.; Devir, Adam D.; Sato, Mitsuteru; Rodger, Craig J.; Moalem, Meir; Greenberg, Eran; Yaron, Ofer

    2005-01-01

    We report an observation of an unusual transient luminous event (TLE) detected in the near IR, south of Madagascar above the Indian Ocean. The event was imaged from the space shuttle Columbia during the MEIDEX sprite campaign [Yair et al., 2004]. It was delayed 0.23 seconds from a preceding visual lightning flash which was horizontally displaced >1000 km from the event. The calculated brightness in the 860 (+/-50) nm filter was ~310 +/- 30 kR, and the morphology of the emitting volume did not resemble any known class of TLE (i.e., sprites, ELVES or halos). This TIGER event (Transient Ionospheric Glow Emission in Red) may constitute a new class of TLE, not necessarily induced by a near-by thunderstorm. We discuss possible generation mechanisms, including the conjugate sprite hypothesis caused by lightning at the magnetic mirror point, lightning-induced electron precipitation and an extraterrestrial source, meteoric or cometary.

  19. Laboratory Delayed Triggering and Insights into Rate-State Friction Properties During Stick-Slip (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, H. M.; van der Elst, N.

    2013-12-01

    Remote triggering observations often include earthquakes that are delayed with respect to the passage of seismic waves. These delayed triggered earthquakes may simply be aftershocks of initial triggered events, or they may point to a slower or prolonged triggering process. The nature of this delay mechanism remains a topic of considerable debate. Stick-slip experiments on a dry, granular, laboratory fault show that stress perturbations do not only trigger slip during the transient stress, but also advance the timing of slip well after the transient has passed. Delayed triggering therefore does not necessarily require any secondary triggering or non-frictional mechanisms. Our experiments were performed in a biaxial deformation apparatus, with a double-direct shear sample geometry. Our fault consists of 3-mm thick layers of soda lime glass beads. Glass beads show remarkably consistent stick-slip recurrence intervals, making them an ideal material to study triggering. The background loading rate is constant, and small velocity oscillations of varying amplitude and frequency are introduced at different intervals in the stick-slip cycle. We find that for a given stress amplitude, higher frequency oscillations (2-3 Hz) lead to statistically significant delayed triggering whereas 1 Hz frequencies do not (the higher frequency oscillations also have a faster transient loading velocity). To determine what makes higher frequency triggers more effective at delayed triggering, we measure the transient mechanical response of the fault to a load point oscillation at different points in the stick-slip cycle. We find that the response varies considerably throughout the cycle, with slip velocity and dilation increasing systematically, and transient stress amplitude decreasing. The results suggest a monotonic decrease in the rate-state friction direct effect, a, throughout the stick-slip cycle. The evolution of frictional parameters during the interseismic cycle would have important

  20. Spatiotemporal properties of high-speed calcium oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, James; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a component of the reticular activating system (RAS), and is involved in the activated states of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Gamma oscillations (approximately 30–80 Hz) are evident in all PPN neurons and are mediated by high-threshold voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels. We tested the hypothesis that high-speed calcium imaging would reveal calcium-mediated oscillations in dendritic compartments in synchrony with patch-clamp recorded oscillations during depolarizing current ramps. Patch-clamped 8- to 16-day-old rat PPN neurons (n = 67 out of 121) were filled with Fura 2, Bis Fura, or OGB1/CHR. This study also characterized a novel ratiometric technique using Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB1) with coinjections of a new long-stokes-shift dye, Chromeo 494 (CHR). Fluorescent calcium transients were blocked with the nonspecific calcium channel blocker cadmium, or by the combination of ω-agatoxin-IVA, a specific P/Q-type calcium channel blocker, and ω-conotoxin-GVIA, a specific N-type calcium channel blocker. The calcium transients were evident in different dendrites (suggesting channels are present throughout the dendritic tree) along the sampled length without interruption (suggesting channels are evenly distributed), and appeared to represent a summation of oscillations present in the soma. We confirm that PPN calcium channel-mediated oscillations are due to P/Q- and N-type channels, and reveal that these channels are distributed along the dendrites of PPN cells. PMID:23990242

  1. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  2. Soviet delays raise prices

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.

    1992-01-15

    The breakup of the Soviet Union is causing massive disruptions to methanol exports. The changeover to a Commonwealth of independent States has created logistical problems which have led some shipments of Russian methanol to be cancelled and delayed other deliveries by up to two weeks. In recent years the Soviet Union has exported 700,000 m.t./year-900,000 m.t./year of methanol, mainly to Western Europe. The product is made at 750,000-m.t./year plants at Tomsk and Gubakha in Russia and transported by rail for shipment from the ports of Ventspils, Latvia, on the Baltic Sea and Yuzhnyy in Ukraine, on the Black Sea. The exports were handled by state export agency Soyuzagrochim, mainly under contract to West European traders and consumers in areas like Scandinavia and France.

  3. Compact Dielectric-Rod White-Light Delay Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    Optical delay lines of a proposed type would be made from rods of such dielectric materials as calcium fluoride, fused silica, or sapphire. These would offer advantages over prior optical delay lines, as summarized below. Optical delay lines are key components of opto-electronic microwave oscillators, narrow-band opto-electronic microwave filters, evanescent-field optical biochemical detectors, and some Fourier-Transform spectrum analyzers. Heretofore, optical delay lines used in such applications have been of two types: resonators and coiled long optical fibers, both of which have disadvantages: Resonators are compact, but excitation must be provided by narrow-band lasers. Wide-band (including noisy) laser light cannot be coupled efficiently to narrow-band resonators. When light is coupled into a narrowband resonator from a source of reasonably high power, a significant amount of optical energy circulates within the resonator, causing nonlinear loss and significant noise. Typically, a coil-type optical delay line is made of fused-silica fiber, which exhibits fundamental loss. To overcome the limit imposed by the optical loss in fused silica, it would be necessary to use fibers having crystalline cores. Although space is saved by winding fibers into coils, fiber-coil delay lines are still inconveniently bulky. The proposed compact dielectric-rod delay lines would exploit the special class of non-diffracting light beams that are denoted Bessel beams because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have large values of angular momentum. They can be generated with the help of whispering-gallery-mode optical resonators, as described, for example, in "Simplified Generation of High-Angular-Momentum Light Beams" (NPO-42965) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 3 (March 2007), page 8a. In a delay line according to the proposal, the dielectric rod would be dimensioned to function as a multimode

  4. Measuring near plasma membrane and global intracellular calcium dynamics in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shigetomi, Eiji; Khakh, Baljit S

    2009-04-26

    The brain contains glial cells. Astrocytes, a type of glial cell, have long been known to provide a passive supportive role to neurons. However, increasing evidence suggests that astrocytes may also actively participate in brain function through functional interactions with neurons. However, many fundamental aspects of astrocyte biology remain controversial, unclear and/or experimentally unexplored. One important issue is the dynamics of intracellular calcium transients in astrocytes. This is relevant because calcium is well established as an important second messenger and because it has been proposed that astrocyte calcium elevations can trigger the release of transmitters from astrocytes. However, there has not been any detailed or satisfying description of near plasma membrane calcium signaling in astrocytes. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool to analyze physiologically relevant signaling events within about 100 nm of the plasma membrane of live cells. Here, we use TIRF microscopy and describe how to monitor near plasma membrane and global intracellular calcium dynamics almost simultaneously. The further refinement and systematic application of this approach has the potential to inform about the precise details of astrocyte calcium signaling. A detailed understanding of astrocyte calcium dynamics may provide a basis to understand if, how, when and why astrocytes and neurons undergo calcium-dependent functional interactions.

  5. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  6. Transient perioperative brainstem paralysis secondary to a local anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Joannides, Alexis J; Santarius, Thomas; Fernandes, Helen M; Laing, Rodney J C; Trivedi, Rikin A

    2012-07-01

    Local anesthesia is widely used, in isolation or in conjunction with general anesthesia. The authors describe 2 adolescent patients presenting with absent brainstem reflexes and delayed awakening following elective foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation. In both cases, neurological deficits were closely associated with the administration of a levobupivacaine field block following wound closure. In the absence of any structural or biochemical abnormalities, and with spontaneous recovery approximating the anesthetic half-life, the authors' observations are consistent with transient brainstem paralysis caused by perioperative local anesthetic infiltration.

  7. Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 by eugenol.

    PubMed

    Chung, G; Im, S T; Kim, Y H; Jung, S J; Rhyu, M-R; Oh, S B

    2014-03-07

    Eugenol is a bioactive plant extract used as an analgesic agent in dentistry. The structural similarity of eugenol to cinnamaldehyde, an active ligand for transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), suggests that eugenol might produce its effect via TRPA1, in addition to TRPV1 as we reported previously. In this study, we investigated the effect of eugenol on TRPA1, by fura-2-based calcium imaging and patch clamp recording in trigeminal ganglion neurons and in a heterologous expression system. As the result, eugenol induced robust calcium responses in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that responded to a specific TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), and not to capsaicin. Capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist failed to inhibit eugenol-induced calcium responses in AITC-responding neurons. In addition, eugenol response was observed in trigeminal ganglion neurons from TRPV1 knockout mice and human embryonic kidney 293 cell lines that express human TRPA1, which was inhibited by TRPA1-specific antagonist HC-030031. Eugenol-evoked TRPA1 single channel activity and eugenol-induced TRPA1 currents were dose-dependent with EC50 of 261.5μM. In summary, these results demonstrate that the activation of TRPA1 might account for another molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological action of eugenol.

  8. Semisynthetic photoprotein reporters for tracking fast Ca(2+) transients.

    PubMed

    Malikova, Natalia P; Borgdorff, Aren J; Vysotski, Eugene S

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the intracellular concentration of free ionized calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) control a host of cellular processes as varied as vision, muscle contraction, neuronal signal transmission, proliferation, apoptosis etc. The disturbance in Ca(2+)-signaling causes many severe diseases. To understand the mechanisms underlying the control by calcium and how disorder of this regulation relates to pathological conditions, it is necessary to measure [Ca(2+)]i. The Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins which are responsible for bioluminescence of marine coelenterates have been successfully used for this purpose over the years. Here we report the results on comparative characterization of bioluminescence properties of aequorin from Aequorea victoria, obelin from Obelia longissima, and clytin from Clytia gregaria charged by native coelenterazine and coelenterazine analogues f, i, and hcp. The comparison of specific bioluminescence activity, stability, emission spectra, stopped-flow kinetics, sensitivity to calcium, and effect of physiological concentrations of Mg(2+) establishes obelin-hcp as an excellent semisynthetic photoprotein to keep track of fast intracellular Ca(2+) transients. The rate of rise of its light signal on a sudden change of [Ca(2+)] is almost 3- and 11-fold higher than those of obelin and aequorin with native coelenterazine, respectively, and 20 times higher than that of the corresponding aequorin-hcp. In addition, obelin-hcp preserves a high specific bioluminescence activity and displays higher Ca(2+)-sensitivity as compared to obelin charged by native coelenterazine and sensitivity to Ca(2+) comparable with those of aequorin-f and aequorin-hcp.

  9. Delay modeling of bipolar ECL/EFL (Emitter-Coupled Logic/Emitter-Follower-Logic) circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Andrew T.

    1986-08-01

    This report deals with the development of a delay-time model for timing simulation of large circuits consisting of Bipolar ECL(Emitter-Coupled Logic) and EFL (Emitter-Follower-Logic) networks. This model can provide adequate information on the performance of the circuits with a minimum expenditure of computation time. This goal is achieved by the use of proper circuit transient models on which analytical delay expressions can be derived with accurate results. The delay-model developed in this report is general enough to handle complex digital circuits with multiple inputs or/and multiple levels. The important effects of input slew rate are also included in the model.

  10. Communication: XUV transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Drescher, L; Galbraith, M C E; Reitsma, G; Dura, J; Zhavoronkov, N; Patchkovskii, S; Vrakking, M J J; Mikosch, J

    2016-07-07

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation at the iodine pre-N4,5 edge is presented, using femtosecond UV pump pulses and XUV probe pulses from high harmonic generation. For both molecules the molecular core-to-valence absorption lines fade immediately, within the pump-probe time-resolution. Absorption lines converging to the atomic iodine product emerge promptly in CH3I but are time-delayed in C6H5I. We attribute this delay to the initial π → σ(*) excitation in iodobenzene, which is distant from the iodine reporter atom. We measure a continuous shift in energy of the emerging atomic absorption lines in CH3I, attributed to relaxation of the excited valence shell. An independent particle model is used to rationalize the observed experimental findings.

  11. Communication: XUV transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, L.; Galbraith, M. C. E.; Reitsma, G.; Dura, J.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Patchkovskii, S.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Mikosch, J.

    2016-07-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation at the iodine pre-N4,5 edge is presented, using femtosecond UV pump pulses and XUV probe pulses from high harmonic generation. For both molecules the molecular core-to-valence absorption lines fade immediately, within the pump-probe time-resolution. Absorption lines converging to the atomic iodine product emerge promptly in CH3I but are time-delayed in C6H5I. We attribute this delay to the initial π → σ* excitation in iodobenzene, which is distant from the iodine reporter atom. We measure a continuous shift in energy of the emerging atomic absorption lines in CH3I, attributed to relaxation of the excited valence shell. An independent particle model is used to rationalize the observed experimental findings.

  12. Time Delay of CGM Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Schoemaker, Michael; Kirchsteiger, Harald; Freckmann, Guido; Heinemann, Lutz; del Re, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a powerful tool to support the optimization of glucose control of patients with diabetes. However, CGM systems measure glucose in interstitial fluid but not in blood. Rapid changes in one compartment are not accompanied by similar changes in the other, but follow with some delay. Such time delays hamper detection of, for example, hypoglycemic events. Our aim is to discuss the causes and extent of time delays and approaches to compensate for these. Methods: CGM data were obtained in a clinical study with 37 patients with a prototype glucose sensor. The study was divided into 5 phases over 2 years. In all, 8 patients participated in 2 phases separated by 8 months. A total number of 108 CGM data sets including raw signals were used for data analysis and were processed by statistical methods to obtain estimates of the time delay. Results: Overall mean (SD) time delay of the raw signals with respect to blood glucose was 9.5 (3.7) min, median was 9 min (interquartile range 4 min). Analysis of time delays observed in the same patients separated by 8 months suggests a patient dependent delay. No significant correlation was observed between delay and anamnestic or anthropometric data. The use of a prediction algorithm reduced the delay by 4 minutes on average. Conclusions: Prediction algorithms should be used to provide real-time CGM readings more consistent with simultaneous measurements by SMBG. Patient specificity may play an important role in improving prediction quality. PMID:26243773

  13. Chaotic simulated annealing by a neural network with a variable delay: design and application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shyan-Shiou

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we have three goals: the first is to delineate the advantages of a variably delayed system, the second is to find a more intuitive Lyapunov function for a delayed neural network, and the third is to design a delayed neural network for a quadratic cost function. For delayed neural networks, most researchers construct a Lyapunov function based on the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach. However, that approach is not intuitive. We provide a alternative candidate Lyapunov function for a delayed neural network. On the other hand, if we are first given a quadratic cost function, we can construct a delayed neural network by suitably dividing the second-order term into two parts: a self-feedback connection weight and a delayed connection weight. To demonstrate the advantage of a variably delayed neural network, we propose a transiently chaotic neural network with variable delay and show numerically that the model should possess a better searching ability than Chen-Aihara's model, Wang's model, and Zhao's model. We discuss both the chaotic and the convergent phases. During the chaotic phase, we simply present bifurcation diagrams for a single neuron with a constant delay and with a variable delay. We show that the variably delayed model possesses the stochastic property and chaotic wandering. During the convergent phase, we not only provide a novel Lyapunov function for neural networks with a delay (the Lyapunov function is independent of the LMI approach) but also establish a correlation between the Lyapunov function for a delayed neural network and an objective function for the traveling salesman problem.

  14. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  15. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  16. Ryanodine modification of cardiac muscle responses to potassium-free solutions. Evidence for inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    To test whether ryanodine blocks the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle, we examined its effects on the aftercontractions and transient depolarizations or transient inward currents developed by guinea pig papillary muscles and voltage-clamped calf cardiac Purkinje fibers in potassium-free solutions. Ryanodine (0.1-1.0 microM) abolished or prevented aftercontractions and transient depolarizations by the papillary muscles without affecting any of the other sequelae of potassium removal. In the presence of 4.7 mM potassium and at a stimulation rate of 1 Hz, ryanodine had only a small variable effect on papillary muscle force development and action potential characteristics. In calf Purkinje fibers, ryanodine (1 nM-1 microM) completely blocked the aftercontractions and transient inward currents without altering the steady state current-voltage relationship. Ryanodine also abolished the twitch in potassium-free solutions, but it enhanced the tonic force during depolarizing voltage- clamp steps. This latter effect was dependent on the combination of ryanodine and potassium-free solutions. The slow inward current was not blocked by 1 microM ryanodine, but ryanodine did appear to abolish an outward current that remained in the presence of 0.5 mM 4- aminopyridine. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that ryanodine, by inhibiting the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, prevents the oscillations in intracellular calcium that activate the transient inward currents and aftercontractions associated with calcium overload states. PMID:6631403

  17. Revisiting intracellular calcium signaling semantics.

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Audran, Emilie; Fève, Marie; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-12-01

    Cells use intracellular free calcium concentration changes for signaling. Signal encoding occurs through both spatial and temporal modulation of the free calcium concentration. The encoded message is detected by an ensemble of intracellular sensors forming the family of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) which must faithfully translate the message using a new syntax that is recognized by the cell. The cell is home to a significant although limited number of genes coding for proteins involved in the signal encoding and decoding processes. In a cell, only a subset of this ensemble of genes is expressed, leading to a genetic regulation of the calcium signal pathways. Calmodulin (CaM), the most ubiquitous expressed intracellular calcium-binding protein, plays a major role in calcium signal translation. Similar to a hub, it is central to a large and finely tuned network, receiving information, integrating it and dispatching the cognate response. In this review, we examine the different steps starting with an external stimulus up to a cellular response, with special emphasis on CaM and the mechanism by which it decodes calcium signals and translates it into exquisitely coordinated cellular events. By this means, we will revisit the calcium signaling semantics, hoping that we will ease communication between scientists dealing with calcium signals in different biological systems and different domains.

  18. Cardiovascular effects of calcium supplements.

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R

    2013-07-05

    Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%-31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%-20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... acid with calcium hydroxide or calcium carbonate. It occurs as a fine white, odorless powder and... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 184.1195 Section 184.1195 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Calcium citrate...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... acid with calcium hydroxide or calcium carbonate. It occurs as a fine white, odorless powder and... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 184.1195 Section 184.1195 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Calcium citrate...

  1. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  2. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  3. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  4. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  5. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Calcium citrate (Ca3(C6H5O7)2·4H2O, CAS Reg. No. 813-0994-095) is the calcium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by neutralizing citric acid with calcium hydroxide or calcium carbonate. It occurs as a fine white, odorless powder...

  7. Cohabitation Duration and Transient Domesticity.

    PubMed

    Golub, Andrew; Reid, Megan; Strickler, Jennifer; Dunlap, Eloise

    2013-01-01

    Research finds that many impoverished urban Black adults engage in a pattern of partnering and family formation involving a succession of short cohabitations yielding children, a paradigm referred to as transient domesticity. Researchers have identified socioeconomic status, cultural adaptations, and urbanicity as explanations for aspects of this pattern. We used longitudinal data from the 2001 Survey of Income and Program Participation to analyze variation in cohabitation and marriage duration by race/ethnicity, income, and urban residence. Proportional hazards regression indicated that separation risk is greater among couples that are cohabiting, below 200% of the federal poverty line, and Black but is not greater among urban dwellers. This provides empirical demographic evidence to support the emerging theory of transient domesticity and suggests that both socioeconomic status and race explain this pattern. We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding transient domesticity and make recommendations for using the Survey of Income and Program Participation to further study this family formation paradigm.

  8. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated.

  9. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  10. Complexity in electro-optic delay dynamics: modelling, design and applications.

    PubMed

    Larger, Laurent

    2013-09-28

    Nonlinear delay dynamics have found during the last 30 years a particularly prolific exploration area in the field of photonic systems. Besides the popular external cavity laser diode set-ups, we focus in this article on another experimental realization involving electro-optic (EO) feedback loops, with delay. This approach has strongly evolved with the important technological progress made on broadband photonic and optoelectronic devices dedicated to high-speed optical telecommunications. The complex dynamical systems performed by nonlinear delayed EO feedback loop architectures were designed and explored within a huge range of operating parameters. Thanks to the availability of high-performance photonic devices, these EO delay dynamics led also to many successful, efficient and diverse applications, beyond the many fundamental questions raised from the observation of experimental behaviours. Their chaotic motion allowed for a physical layer encryption method to secure optical data, with a demonstrated capability to operate at the typical speed of modern optical telecommunications. Microwave limit cycles generated in similar EO delay oscillators showed significantly improved spectral purity thanks to the use of a very long fibre delay line. Last but not least, a novel brain inspired computational principle has been recently implemented physically in photonics for the first time, again on the basis of an EO delay dynamical system. In this latter emerging application, the computed result is obtained by a proper 'read-out' of the complex nonlinear transients emerging from a fixed point, the transient being issued by the injection of the information signal to be processed.

  11. Studies of Transient Meteor Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter M. M.

    2002-01-01

    Meteoroids bombard Earth's atmosphere daily, but occasionally meteor rates increase to unusual high levels when Earth crosses the relatively fresh ejecta of comets. These transient events in meteor activity provide clues about the whereabouts of Earth-threatening long-period comets, the mechanisms of large-grain dust ejection from comets, and the particle composition and size distribution of the cometary ejecta. Observations of these transient events provide important insight in natural processes that determine the large grain dust environment of comets, in natural phenomena that were prevalent during the time of the origin of life, and in processes that determine the hazard of civilizations to large impacts and of man-made satellites to the periodic blizzard of small meteoroids. In this proposal, three tasks form a coherent program aimed at elucidating various aspects of meteor outbursts, with special reference to planetary astronomy and astrobiology. Task 1 was a ground-based effort to observe periods of transient meteor activity. This includes: (1) stereoscopic imaging of meteors during transient meteor events for measurements of particle size distribution, meteoroid orbital dispersions and fluxes; and (2) technical support for Global-MS-Net, a network of amateur-operated automatic counting stations for meteor reflections from commercial VHF radio and TV broadcasting stations, keeping a 24h vigil on the level of meteor activity for the detection of new meteor streams. Task 2 consisted of ground-based and satellite born spectroscopic observations of meteors and meteor trains during transient meteor events for measurements of elemental composition, the presence of organic matter in the meteoroids, and products generated by the interaction of the meteoroid with the atmosphere. Task 3 was an airborne effort to explore the 2000 Leonid meteor outbursts, which are anticipated to be the most significant of transient meteor activity events in the remainder of the

  12. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  13. Charting the Transient Sky: The Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shri

    2010-11-01

    Only about a hundred years ago astronomers came to recognize cosmic explosive events. What was once termed as Stella Nova are now divided into two major families, novae and supernovae (with real distinct classes in each). The variables and the explosions have been interesting in their own right and contributed richly to key problems in modern astrophysics: distances to galaxies and cosmography. The area of transient and variable stars is once again undergoing a renaissance due to wide field optical surveys. The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) was designed to explicitly to chart the transient sky with a particular focus on events which lie in the nova-supernova gap.. With its innovative two-telescope architecture it achieves both high cadence and large areal rate of coverage. PTF was commissioned during the summer of 2009. PTF is now finding an extragalactic transient every 20 minutes and a Galactic (strong) variable every 10 minutes. Spectroscopy undertaken at Keck and Palomar has allowed us: identify an emerging class of ultra-luminous supernovae, discover luminous red novae, undertake UV spectroscopy of Ia supernovae, discover supernovae powered by something other than Nickel-56, clarification of sub-classes of core collapse and thermo-nuclear explosions, map the systematics of core collapse supernovae, a trove of eclipsing binaries and many others.

  14. Interpreting the Marine Calcium Isotope Record: Influence of Reef Builders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Farkas, J.; Kiessling, W.; Veizer, J.; Wallmann, K.

    2008-12-01

    The calcium isotopic composition of seawater as recorded in brachiopod shells varied substantially during the Paleozoic (Farkas et al. 2007, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 71, 5117-5134). The most prominent feature of the record is an excursion to higher 44Ca/40Ca values that started during the Early Carboniferous and lasted until the Permian. The shift occurred shortly after the transition from a calcite-sea to an aragonite-sea (Sandberg 1983, Nature 305, 19-22; Stanley and Hardie 1998, Pal3, 144, 3-19). It therefore has been interpreted to reflect a change in the average calcium isotope fractionation of carbonates produced in the oceans. Aragonite is depleted by about 0.6 permil in 44Ca/40Ca compared to calcite (Gussone et al. 2005, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 69, 4485-4494). Consequently a transient shift from calcite dominated to an aragonite dominated calcium carbonate sedimentation could have caused the observed 0.5 permil isotope shift. We compare the marine calcium isotope record with a new compilation of the Phanerozoic trends in the skeletal mineralogy of marine invertebrates (Kiessling et al. 2008, Nature Geoscience, 1, 527-530). The compilation is based on data collected in the PaleoReef database and the Paleobiology Database, which include information on Phanerozoic reef complexes and taxonomic collection data of Phanerozoic biota, respectively. We find a strong positive correlation between the calcium isotope ratios and the abundance of aragonitic reef builders from the Silurian until the Permian at a sample resolution of about 10 million years. The two records, however, diverge in the Triassic, when reefs were dominated by aragonite but the calcium isotope values remained at a relatively low level. We also find a good correlation between calcium isotopes and the proportion of aragonite in the general record of Phanerozoic biota. However, in this case the records start to diverge already in the latest Carboniferous. The observations suggest that the

  15. Delayed unlatching mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2015-05-19

    In various embodiments an apparatus is presented for securing a structure such as a door, window, hatch, or gate that moves between an open and a closed position relative to a fixed structure to provide or deny access to a compartment, a room, an outdoor area, or a facility. Various embodiments provide a delay in opening the closure of sufficient duration to frustrate a rapid activation that might be desired by a person who is attempting to pass through the closure for some illicit purpose. Typically, hydraulics are used to activate the apparatus and no electrical energy or electronic signals are employed. In one embodiment, a plurality of actuations of a hand lever operates a hydraulic pump that moves a locking bolt from a first position in which a locking bolt is engaged with a recess in the fixed structure (preventing opening of a gate) to a second position in which the locking bolt is disengaged from the recess to permit opening of the gate.

  16. Delay Adjusted Incidence

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  17. The calcium sensor synaptotagmin 7 is required for synaptic facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Skyler L.; Turecek, Josef; Belinsky, Justine E.

    2015-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that synaptic strength is dynamically regulated in a use-dependent manner1. At synapses with a low initial release probability, closely spaced presynaptic action potentials can result in facilitation, a short-term form of enhancement where each subsequent action potential evokes greater neurotransmitter release2. Facilitation can enhance neurotransmitter release manyfold and profoundly influence information transfer across synapses3, but the underlying mechanism remains a mystery. Among the proposed mechanisms is that a specialized calcium sensor for facilitation transiently increases the probability of release2,4 and is distinct from the fast sensors that mediate rapid neurotransmitter release. Yet such a sensor has never been identified, and its very existence has been disputed5,6. Here we show that synaptotagmin 7 (syt7) is a calcium sensor that is required for facilitation at multiple central synapses. In syt7 knockout mice, facilitation is eliminated even though the initial probability of release and presynaptic residual calcium signals are unaltered. Expression of wild-type syt7 in presynaptic neurons restored facilitation, whereas expression of a mutated syt7 with a calcium-insensitive C2A domain did not. By revealing the role of syt7 in synaptic facilitation, these results resolve a longstanding debate about a widespread form of short-term plasticity, and will enable future studies that may lead to a deeper understanding of the functional importance of facilitation. PMID:26738595

  18. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt...

  19. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt...

  20. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt...

  1. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt...

  2. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for...

  3. Delayed Reinforcement of Operant Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement but also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between…

  4. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  5. Calibrating for Ionospheric Phase Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1985-01-01

    Technique determines ionospheric phase delay on real-time universally applicable basis in terms of electrons per meter squared by coherently modulating two L-band carrier frequencies received from two Global Positioning System satelites. Two pseudorandom number sequences cross-correlated to derive delay time.

  6. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  7. Imitation dynamics with time delay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Chang; Yu, Jie-Ru; Kurokawa, Shun; Tao, Yi

    2017-02-28

    Based on the classic imitation dynamics (Hofbauer and Sigmund, 1998, Evolutionary Games and Population Dynamics, Cambridge University Press), the imitation dynamics with time delay is investigated, where the probability that an individual will imitate its opponent's own strategy is assumed to depend on the comparison between the past expected payoff of this individual's own strategy and the past expected payoff of its opponent's own strategy, i.e. there is a time delay effect. For the two-phenotype model, we show that if the system has an interior equilibrium and this interior equilibrium is stable when there is no time delay, then there must be a critical value of time delay such that the system tends to a stable periodic solution when the time delay is larger than the critical value. On the other hand, for three-phenotype (rock-scissors-paper) model, the numerical analysis shows that for the stable periodic solution induced by the time delay, the amplitude and the period will inc