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Sample records for calcium-induced conformational transition

  1. Calcium binding domains and calcium-induced conformational transition of SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin, an extracellular glycoprotein expressed in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Taylor, W.; Paulsson, M.; Sage, H.; Hogan, B.

    1987-11-03

    PSARC, BM-40, and osteonectin are identical or very closely related extracellular proteins of apparent M/sub r/ 43,000 (M/sub r/ 33,000 predicted from sequence). They were originally isolated from parietal endoderm cells, basement membrane producing tumors, and bone, respectively, but are rather widely distributed in various tissues. In view of the calcium binding activity reported for osteonectin, the authors analyzed the SPARC sequence and found two putative calcium binding domains. One is an N-terminal acid region with clusters of glutamic acid residues. This region, although neither ..gamma..-carboxylated nor homologous, resembles the ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of vitamin K dependent proteins of the blood clotting system in charge density, size of negatively charged clusters, and linkage to the rest of the molecule by a cysteine-rich domain. The other region is an EF-hand calcium binding domain located near the C-terminus. A disulfide bond between the E and F helix is predicted from modeling the EF-hand structure with the known coordinates of intestinal calcium binding protein. The disulfide bridge apparently serves to stabilize the isolated calcium loop in the extracellular protein. As observed for cytoplasmic EF-hand-containing proteins and for Gla domain containing proteins, a major conformational transition is induced in BM-40 upon binding of several Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This is accompanied by a 35% increase in ..cap alpha..-helicity. A pronounced sigmoidicity of the dependence of the circular dichroism signal at 220 nm on calcium concentration indicates that the process is cooperative. In view of its properties, abundance, and wide distribution, it is proposed that SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin has a rather general regulatory function in calcium-dependent processes of the extra-cellular matrix.

  2. Calcium-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in brain mitochondria is mediated by permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Magnus J; Månsson, Roland; Morota, Saori; Uchino, Hiroyuki; Kallur, Thérese; Sumi, Tetsuo; Ishii, Nagao; Shimazu, Motohide; Keep, Marcus F; Jegorov, Alexandr; Elmér, Eskil

    2008-08-01

    Mitochondrial uptake of calcium in excitotoxicity is associated with subsequent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and delayed cellular calcium deregulation in ischemic and neurodegenerative insults. The mechanisms linking mitochondrial calcium uptake and ROS production remain unknown but activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) may be one such mechanism. In the present study, calcium increased ROS generation in isolated rodent brain and human liver mitochondria undergoing mPT despite an associated loss of membrane potential, NADH and respiration. Unspecific permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane by alamethicin likewise increased ROS independently of calcium, and the ROS increase was further potentiated if NAD(H) was added to the system. Importantly, calcium per se did not induce a ROS increase unless mPT was triggered. Twenty-one cyclosporin A analogs were evaluated for inhibition of calcium-induced ROS and their efficacy clearly paralleled their potency of inhibiting mPT-mediated mitochondrial swelling. We conclude that while intact respiring mitochondria possess powerful antioxidant capability, mPT induces a dysregulated oxidative state with loss of GSH- and NADPH-dependent ROS detoxification. We propose that mPT is a significant cause of pathological ROS generation in excitotoxic cell death.

  3. Spermine selectively inhibits high-conductance, but not low-conductance calcium-induced permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Elustondo, Pia A; Negoda, Alexander; Kane, Constance L; Kane, Daniel A; Pavlov, Evgeny V

    2015-02-01

    The permeability transition pore (PTP) is a large channel of the mitochondrial inner membrane, the opening of which is the central event in many types of stress-induced cell death. PTP opening is induced by elevated concentrations of mitochondrial calcium. It has been demonstrated that spermine and other polyamines can delay calcium-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria, suggesting their role as inhibitors of the mitochondrial PTP. Here we further investigated the mechanism by which spermine inhibits the calcium-induced, cyclosporine A (CSA) -sensitive PTP by using three indicators: 1) calcium release from the mitochondria detected with calcium green, 2) mitochondrial membrane depolarization using TMRM, and 3) mitochondrial swelling by measuring light absorbance. We found that despite calcium release and membrane depolarization, indicative of PTP activation, mitochondria underwent only partial swelling in the presence of spermine. This was in striking contrast to the high-amplitude swelling detected in control mitochondria and in mitochondria treated with the PTP inhibitor CSA. We conclude that spermine selectively prevents opening of the high-conductance state, while allowing activation of the lower conductance state of the PTP. We propose that the existence of lower conductance, stress-induced PTP might play an important physiological role, as it is expected to allow the release of toxic levels of calcium, while keeping important molecules (e.g., NAD) within the mitochondrial matrix.

  4. Role of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in the calcium-induced structural transition of conantokin G, a conotoxin from the marine snail Conus geographus.

    PubMed

    Rigby, A C; Baleja, J D; Li, L; Pedersen, L G; Furie, B C; Furie, B

    1997-12-16

    Conantokin G is a gamma-carboxyglutamic acid- (Gla-) containing conotoxin isolated from the venom of the marine cone snail Conus geographus. This 17-residue polypeptide, which contains five gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues, is a N-methyl-d-aspartate- (NMDA-) type glutamate receptor antagonist. To investigate the role of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in the calcium-induced structural transition of conantokin G, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the conantokin G/Ca2+ complex by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy and compared it to the high-resolution structure of conantokin G in the absence of metal ions [Rigby et al. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 6906]. Complete resonance assignments were made by two dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy at pH 5.6 in the presence of saturating amounts of Ca2+. Distance geometry and simulated annealing methods were used to derive 23 convergent structures from a set of 302 interproton distance restraints and two torsion angle measurements. A high-resolution structure, with the backbone root mean square deviation to the geometric average of the 23 structures of 0.6 +/- 0.1 A, contains a linear alpha-helix from Gla 3 to Lys 15. Gla residues 3, 7, 10, and 14 are aligned in a linear array on one face of the helix. A genetic algorithm was applied to determine the calcium positions in conantokin G, and the conantokin G/Ca2+ complex refined by molecular simulation. Upon binding of Ca2+ to gamma-carboxyglutamic acid, conantokin G undergoes a conformational transition from a distorted curvilinear 310 helix to a linear alpha-helix. Occupancy of the metal binding sites, defined by gamma-carboxyglutamic acids, results in formation of a calcium-carboxylate network that linearizes the helix and exposes the hydrophobic amino acids on the opposite face of the helix.

  5. On the properties of calcium-induced permeability transition in neonatal heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pavón, Natalia; Gallardo, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz María; El-Hafidi, Mohammed; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Zazueta, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Chávez, Edmundo

    2011-12-01

    Permeability transition was examined in heart mitochondria isolated from neonate rats. We found that these mitochondria were more susceptible to Ca(2+)-induced membrane leakiness than mitochondria from adult rats. In K(+) containing medium, at 25 °C, mitochondria were unable to accumulate Ca(2+). Conversely, in Na(+) containing medium, mitochondria accumulated effectively Ca(2+). At 15 °C mitochondria accumulated Ca(2+) regardless of the presence of K(+). Kinetics of Ca(2+) accumulation showed a similar Vmax as that of adult mitochondria. Lipid milieu of inner membrane contained more unsaturated fatty acids than adult mitochondria. Aconitase inhibition and high thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) indicate that oxidative stress caused mitochondrial damage. In addition, proteomics analysis showed that there is a considerable diminution of succinate dehydrogenase C and subunit 4 of cytochrome oxidase in neonate mitochondria. Our proposal is that dysfunction of the respiratory chain makes neonate mitochondria more susceptible to damage by oxidative stress.

  6. Conformational Transitions in Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, M.; Janke, W.

    2008-11-01

    Proteins are the "work horses" in biological systems. In almost all functions specific proteins are involved. They control molecular transport processes, stabilize the cell structure, enzymatically catalyze chemical reactions; others act as molecular motors in the complex machinery of molecular synthetization processes. Due to their significance, misfolds and malfunctions of proteins typically entail disastrous diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Therefore, the understanding of the trinity of amino acid composition, geometric structure, and biological function is one of the most essential challenges for the natural sciences. Here, we glance at conformational transitions accompanying the structure formation in protein folding processes.

  7. Theory of conformational transitions of viral shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, Thomas; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2007-12-01

    We propose a continuum theory for the conformational transitions of viral shells. Conformational transitions of viral shells, as encountered during viral maturation, are associated with a soft mode instability of the capsid proteins [F. Tama and C. L. Brooks, J. Mol. Biol. 345(2), 299 (2005)]. The continuum theory presented here is an adaptation of the Ginzburg-Landau theory of soft-mode structural phase transitions of solids to viral shells. The theory predicts that the conformational transitions are characterized by a pronounced softening of the shell elasticity in the critical region. We demonstrate that the thermodynamics of the conformational transition can be probed quantitatively by a micromechanical atomic force microscope study. The external force can drive a capsid into a state of phase coexistence characterized by a highly nonlinear force deformation curve.

  8. Distinguishing Signatures of Multipathway Conformational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierse, Christopher A.; Dudko, Olga K.

    2017-02-01

    The folding and binding of biomolecules into functional conformations are thought to be commonly mediated by multiple pathways rather than a unique route. Yet even in experiments where one can "see" individual conformational transitions, their stochastic nature generally precludes one from determining whether the transitions occurred through one or multiple pathways. We establish model-free, observable signatures in the response of macromolecules to force that unambiguously identify multiple pathways—even when the pathways themselves cannot be resolved. The unified analytical description reveals that, through multiple pathways, the response of molecules to external forces can be shaped in diverse ways, resulting in a rich design space for a tailored biological function already at the single-molecule level.

  9. Electroweak phase transition in nearly conformal technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, James M.; Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2008-10-01

    We examine the temperature-dependent electroweak phase transition in extensions of the standard model in which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken via strongly coupled, nearly conformal dynamics. In particular, we focus on the low energy effective theory used to describe minimal walking technicolor at the phase transition. Using the one-loop effective potential with ring improvement, we identify significant regions of parameter space which yield a sufficiently strong first-order transition for electroweak baryogenesis. The composite particle spectrum corresponding to these regions can be produced and studied at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. We note the possible emergence of a second phase transition at lower temperatures. This occurs when the underlying technicolor theory possesses a nontrivial center symmetry.

  10. The Calcium-induced Conformation and Glycosylation of Scavenger-rich Cysteine Repeat (SRCR) Domains of Glycoprotein 340 Influence the High Affinity Interaction with Antigen I/II Homologs*

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2014-01-01

    Oral streptococci adhere to tooth-immobilized glycoprotein 340 (GP340) via the surface protein antigen I/II (AgI/II) and its homologs as the first step in pathogenesis. Studying this interaction using recombinant proteins, we observed that calcium increases the conformational stability of the scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCRs) domains of GP340. Our results also show that AgI/II adheres specifically with nanomolar affinity to the calcium-induced SRCR conformation in an immobilized state and not in solution. This interaction is significantly dependent on the O-linked carbohydrates present on the SRCRs. This study also establishes that a single SRCR domain of GP340 contains the two surfaces to which the apical and C-terminal regions of AgI/II noncompetitively adhere. Compared with the single SRCR domain, the three tandem SRCR domains displayed a collective/cooperative increase in their bacterial adherence and aggregation. The previously described SRCRP2 peptide that was shown to aggregate several oral streptococci displayed limited aggregation and also nonspecific adherence compared to SRCR domains. Finally, we show distinct species-specific adherence/aggregation between Streptococcus mutans AgI/II and Streptococcus gordonii SspB in their interaction with the SRCRs. This study concludes that identification of the metal ion and carbohydrate adherence motifs on both SRCRs and AgI/II homologs could lead to the development of anti-adhesive inhibitors that could deter the adherence of pathogenic oral streptococci and thereby prevent the onset of infections. PMID:24923446

  11. Compressibility changes accompanying conformational transitions of apomyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Taulier, Nicolas; Beletskaya, Irina V; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2005-11-01

    We used high-precision density and ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize the native (N), molten globule (MG), and unfolded (U) conformations of apomyoglobin. The molten globule states that were studied in this work include the MG(pH4)(NaCl) state observed at pH 4 and 20 mM NaCl, the MG(pH4)(NaTCA) state observed at pH 4 and 20 mM sodium trichloracetate (NaTCA), the MG(pH2)(NaCl) state observed at pH 2 and 200 mM NaCl, and the MG(pH2)(NaTCA) state observed at pH 2 and 20 mM NaTCA. We used our densimetric and acoustic data to evaluate changes in adiabatic compressibility associated with the acid- or salt-induced N-to-MG, MG-to-U, MG-to-MG, and U-to-MG transitions of the protein. The N-to-MG(pH4)(NaCl) and N-to-MG(pH4)(NaTCA) transitions are accompanied by decreases in compressibility of -(3.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(-6) and -(2.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(-6) cm3 g(-1)bar(-1), respectively. The N-to-MG(pH2)(NaCl) and N-to-MG(pH2)(NaTCA) transitions are associated with compressibility changes of -(4.9 +/- 1.1) x 10(-6) and (0.7 +/- 0.9) x 10(-6) cm3 g(-1) bar(-1), respectively. We interpret these data in terms of the degree of unfolding of the various molten globule forms of apomyoglobin. In general, our compressibility data reveal significant disparities between the various equilibrium molten globule states of apomyoglobin while also quantitatively characterizing each of these states. Volumetric insights provided by our data facilitate gaining a better understanding of the folding pathways, intermediates, and kinetics of apomyoglobin folding.

  12. Conformational transitions of Adenylate Kinase: switching by cracking

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Paul C.; Miyashita, Osamu; Levy, Yaakov; Onuchic, José N.

    2007-01-01

    Conformational heterogeneity in proteins is known to often be the key to their function. We present a coarse grained model to explore the interplay between protein structure, folding and function which is applicable to allosteric or non-allosteric proteins. We employ the model to study the detailed mechanism of the reversible conformational transition of Adenylate Kinase (AKE) between the open to the closed conformation, a reaction that is crucial to the protein’s catalytic function. We directly observe high strain energy which appears to be correlated with localized unfolding during the functional transition. This work also demonstrates that competing native interactions from the open and closed form can account for the large conformational transitions in AKE. We further characterize the conformational transitions with a new measure ΦFunc, and demonstrate that local unfolding may be due, in part, to competing intra-protein interactions. PMID:17217965

  13. De Sitter Transitivity, Conformal Transformations and Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J. G.; Sampson, A. C.; Savi, L. L.

    2014-02-01

    Minkowski spacetime is transitive under ordinary translations, a transformation that do not have matrix representations. The de Sitter spacetime, on the other hand, is transitive under a combination of translations and proper conformal transformations, which do have a matrix representation. Such matrix, however, is not by itself a de Sitter generator: it gives rise to a conformal re-scaling of the metric, a transformation not belonging to the de Sitter group, and in general not associated with diffeomorphisms in spacetime. When dealing with variational principles and Noether's theorem in de Sitter spacetime, it is necessary to regularize the transformations in order to eliminate the conformal re-scaling of the metric.

  14. Fluctuation Flooding Method (FFM) for accelerating conformational transitions of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ryuhei; Takano, Yu; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2014-03-01

    A powerful conformational sampling method for accelerating structural transitions of proteins, "Fluctuation Flooding Method (FFM)," is proposed. In FFM, cycles of the following steps enhance the transitions: (i) extractions of largely fluctuating snapshots along anisotropic modes obtained from trajectories of multiple independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and (ii) conformational re-sampling of the snapshots via re-generations of initial velocities when re-starting MD simulations. In an application to bacteriophage T4 lysozyme, FFM successfully accelerated the open-closed transition with the 6 ns simulation starting solely from the open state, although the 1-μs canonical MD simulation failed to sample such a rare event.

  15. Conformational transitions in random heteropolymer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blavatska, Viktoria; Janke, Wolfhard

    2014-01-01

    We study the conformational properties of heteropolymers containing two types of monomers A and B, modeled as self-attracting self-avoiding random walks on a regular lattice. Such a model can describe in particular the sequences of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues in proteins [K. F. Lau and K. A. Dill, Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] and polyampholytes with oppositely charged groups [Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Europhys. Lett. 28, 169 (1994)]. Treating the sequences of the two types of monomers as quenched random variables, we provide a systematic analysis of possible generalizations of this model. To this end we apply the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth chain-growth algorithm, which allows us to obtain the phase diagrams of extended and compact states coexistence as function of both the temperature and fraction of A and B monomers along the heteropolymer chain.

  16. Native proteins trap high-energy transit conformations.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Andrew E; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-10-01

    During protein folding and as part of some conformational changes that regulate protein function, the polypeptide chain must traverse high-energy barriers that separate the commonly adopted low-energy conformations. How distortions in peptide geometry allow these barrier-crossing transitions is a fundamental open question. One such important transition involves the movement of a non-glycine residue between the left side of the Ramachandran plot (that is, ϕ < 0°) and the right side (that is, ϕ > 0°). We report that high-energy conformations with ϕ ~ 0°, normally expected to occur only as fleeting transition states, are stably trapped in certain highly resolved native protein structures and that an analysis of these residues provides a detailed, experimentally derived map of the bond angle distortions taking place along the transition path. This unanticipated information lays to rest any uncertainty about whether such transitions are possible and how they occur, and in doing so lays a firm foundation for theoretical studies to better understand the transitions between basins that have been little studied but are integrally involved in protein folding and function. Also, the context of one such residue shows that even a designed highly stable protein can harbor substantial unfavorable interactions.

  17. General Trends of Dihedral Conformational Transitions in a Globular Protein

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and Adaptive Biasing Force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions ~2 times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ~3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the Bend, Coil and Turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein sidechains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Sidechains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. These general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins. PMID:26799251

  18. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ∼ 3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. These general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins.

  19. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ~3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. In conclusion, these general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins.

  20. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; ...

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ~3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed bymore » the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. In conclusion, these general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins.« less

  1. Quantum Hall transitions: An exact theory based on conformal restriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettelheim, E.; Gruzberg, I. A.; Ludwig, A. W. W.

    2012-10-01

    We revisit the problem of the plateau transition in the integer quantum Hall effect. Here we develop an analytical approach for this transition, and for other two-dimensional disordered systems, based on the theory of “conformal restriction.” This is a mathematical theory that was recently developed within the context of the Schramm-Loewner evolution which describes the “stochastic geometry” of fractal curves and other stochastic geometrical fractal objects in two-dimensional space. Observables elucidating the connection with the plateau transition include the so-called point-contact conductances (PCCs) between points on the boundary of the sample, described within the language of the Chalker-Coddington network model for the transition. We show that the disorder-averaged PCCs are characterized by a classical probability distribution for certain geometric objects in the plane (which we call pictures), occurring with positive statistical weights, that satisfy the crucial so-called restriction property with respect to changes in the shape of the sample with absorbing boundaries; physically, these are boundaries connected to ideal leads. At the transition point, these geometrical objects (pictures) become fractals. Upon combining this restriction property with the expected conformal invariance at the transition point, we employ the mathematical theory of “conformal restriction measures” to relate the disorder-averaged PCCs to correlation functions of (Virasoro) primary operators in a conformal field theory (of central charge c=0). We show how this can be used to calculate these functions in a number of geometries with various boundary conditions. Since our results employ only the conformal restriction property, they are equally applicable to a number of other critical disordered electronic systems in two spatial dimensions, including for example the spin quantum Hall effect, the thermal metal phase in symmetry class D, and classical diffusion in two

  2. Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance study of the calcium-induced structural transition in the N-domain of human cardiac troponin C complexed with troponin I.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Shoji; Nakamura, Motoyoshi; Komori, Tomotaka; Arata, Toshiaki

    2005-01-11

    Calcium-induced structural transition in the amino-terminal domain of troponin C (TnC) triggers skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. The salient feature of this structural transition is the movement of the B and C helices, which is termed the "opening" of the N-domain. This movement exposes a hydrophobic region, allowing interaction with the regulatory domain of troponin I (TnI) as can be seen in the crystal structure of the troponin ternary complex [Takeda, S., Yamashita, A., Maeda, K., and Maeda, Y. (2003) Nature 424, 35-41]. In contrast to skeletal TnC, Ca(2+)-binding site I (an EF-hand motif that consists of an A helix-loop-B helix motif) is inactive in cardiac TnC. The question arising from comparisons with skeletal TnC is how both helices move according to Ca(2+) binding or interact with TnI in cardiac TnC. In this study, we examined the Ca(2+)-induced movement of the B and C helices relative to the D helix in a cardiac TnC monomer state and TnC-TnI binary complex by means of site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Doubly spin-labeled TnC mutants were prepared, and the spin-spin distances were estimated by analyzing dipolar interactions with the Fourier deconvolution method. An interspin distance of 18.4 A was estimated for mutants spin labeled at G42C on the B helix and C84 on the D helix in a Mg(2+)-saturated monomer state. The interspin distance between Q58C on the C helix and C84 on the D helix was estimated to be 18.3 A under the same conditions. Distance changes were observed by the addition of Ca(2+) ions and the formation of a complex with TnI. Our data indicated that the C helix moved away from the D helix in a distinct Ca(2+)-dependent manner, while the B helix did not. A movement of the B helix by interaction with TnI was observed. Both Ca(2+) and TnI were also shown to be essential for the full opening of the N-domain in cardiac TnC.

  3. Conformational Fluctuations of Polymers in a Melt Associated with Glass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaoka, Nobuyuki; Takano, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    The conformational fluctuations of a glassy short polymer melt are studied by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and principal component analysis (PCA). The distribution of PCA eigenvalues, which measure static fluctuations of the polymers, shows a clear difference between above and below the conventional glass transition temperature Tg. The approximate conformational entropy of the polymers also indicates a transition near Tg. This is evidence that the static properties of polymers in the melt signal the glass transition.

  4. Temperature dependence of calcium-induced fusion of sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S T; Day, E P; Ho, J T

    1978-01-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence calcium-induced fusion of sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles. The vesicles were incubated in the presence of calcium at a specified temperature until the resulting aggregation or fusion process had gone to completion. EDTA was then added and the resulting final size of the vesicle population was measured by using dynamic light scattering. This final size was plotted against incubation temperature to show the temperature dependence of calcium-induced fusion. This curve has a peak near 11 degrees C which may be associated with the phase transition of the sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles in the presence of calcium prior to the aggregation or fusion process. PMID:279918

  5. Conformational Transitions of Subunit ɛ in ATP Synthase from Thermophilic Bacillus PS3

    PubMed Central

    Feniouk, Boris A.; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Masasuke; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Subunit ɛ of bacterial and chloroplast FOF1-ATP synthase is responsible for inhibition of ATPase activity. In Bacillus PS3 enzyme, subunit ɛ can adopt two conformations. In the “extended”, inhibitory conformation, its two C-terminal α-helices are stretched along subunit γ. In the “contracted”, noninhibitory conformation, these helices form a hairpin. The transition of subunit ɛ from an extended to a contracted state was studied in ATP synthase incorporated in Bacillus PS3 membranes at 59°C. Fluorescence energy resonance transfer between fluorophores introduced in the C-terminus of subunit ɛ and in the N-terminus of subunit γ was used to follow the conformational transition in real time. It was found that ATP induced the conformational transition from the extended to the contracted state (half-maximum transition extent at 140 μM ATP). ADP could neither prevent nor reverse the ATP-induced conformational change, but it did slow it down. Acid residues in the DELSEED region of subunit β were found to stabilize the extended conformation of ɛ. Binding of ATP directly to ɛ was not essential for the ATP-induced conformational change. The ATP concentration necessary for the half-maximal transition (140 μM) suggests that subunit ɛ probably adopts the extended state and strongly inhibits ATP hydrolysis only when the intracellular ATP level drops significantly below the normal value. PMID:20141757

  6. A small tripeptide AFA undergoes two state cooperative conformational transitions: implications for conformational biases in unfolded states.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunita; Taimni, Richa; Sasidhar, Yellamraju U

    2007-01-01

    It is important to understand the conformational biases that are present in unfolded states to understand protein folding. In this context, it is surprising that even a short tripeptide like AFA samples folded/ordered conformation as demonstrated recently by NMR experiments of the peptide in aqueous solution at 280 K. In this paper, we present molecular dynamics simulation of the peptide in explicit water using OPLS-AA/L all-atom force field. The results are in overall agreement with NMR results and provide some further insights. The peptide samples turn and extended conformational forms corresponding to minima in free energy landscape. Frequent transitions between the minima are observed due to modest free energy barriers. The turn conformation seems to be stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and possibly by bridging water molecules between backbone donors and acceptors. Thus the peptide does not sample conformations randomly, but samples well defined conformations. The peptide served as a model for folding-unfolding equilibrium in the context of peptide folding. Further, implications for drug design are also discussed.

  7. Efficient Conformational Search Based on Structural Dissimilarity Sampling: Applications for Reproducing Structural Transitions of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuhei; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2017-03-14

    Structural Dissimilarity Sampling (SDS) is proposed as an efficient conformational search method to promote structural transitions essential for the biological functions of proteins. In SDS, initial structures are selected based on structural dissimilarity, and conformational resampling is repeated. Conformational resampling is performed as follows: (I) arrangement of initial structures for a diverse distribution at the edge of a conformational subspace and (II) promotion of the structural transitions with multiple short-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations restarting from the diversely distributed initial structures. Cycles of (I) and (II) are repeated to intensively promote structural transitions because conformational resampling from the initial structures would quickly expand conformational distributions toward unvisited conformational subspaces. As a demonstration, SDS was first applied to maltodextrin binding protein (MBP) in explicit water to reproduce structural transitions between the open and closed states of MBP. Structural transitions of MBP were successfully reproduced with SDS in nanosecond-order simulation times. Starting from both the open and closed forms, SDS successfully reproduced the structural transitions within 25 cycles (a total of 250 ns of simulation time). For reference, a conventional long-time (500 ns) MD simulation under NPT (300 K and 1 bar) starting from the open form failed to reproduce the structural transition. In addition to the open-closed motions of MBP, SDS was applied to folding processes of the fast-folding proteins (chignolin, Trp-cage, and villin) and successfully sampled their native states. To confirm how the selections of initial structures affected conformational sampling efficiency, numbers of base sets for characterizing structural dissimilarity of initial structures were addressed in distinct trials of SDS. The parameter searches showed that the conformational sampling efficiency was relatively insensitive with

  8. Statins lower calcium-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Parihar, A; Parihar, M S; Zenebe, W J; Ghafourifar, P

    2012-04-01

    Statins are widely used cholesterol-lowering agents that exert cholesterol-independent effects including antioxidative. The present study delineates the effects of statins, atorvastatin, and simvastatin on oxidative stress and functions of mitochondria that are the primary cellular sources of oxidative stress. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, both the statins prevented calcium-induced cytochrome c release, lipid peroxidation, and opening of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT). Both the statins decreased the activity of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS), lowered the intramitochondrial ionized calcium, and increased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Our findings suggest that statins lower intramitochondrial ionized calcium that decreases mtNOS activity, lowers oxidative stress, prevents MPT opening, and prevents the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. These results provide a novel framework for understanding the antioxidative properties of statins and their effects on mitochondrial functions.

  9. Spectroscopic studies on the conformational transitions of a bovine growth hormone releasing factor analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarver, Ronald W.; Friedman, Alan R.; Thamann, Thomas J.

    1997-10-01

    The secondary structure of the bovine growth hormone releasing factor analog, [Ile 2, Ser 8,28, Ala 15, Leu 27, Hse 30] bGRF(1-30)-NH-Ethyl, acetate salt (U-90699F) was studied in solution by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. Spectroscopic studies revealed that concentrated aqueous solutions of U-90699F (100 mg ml -1) undergo a secondary structure transition from disordered coil/α-helix to intermolecular β-sheet. Disordered coil and α-helical structure were grouped together in the infrared and Raman studies since the amide I vibrations are close in frequency and overlap in assignments was possible. Before the conformational transition, the facile exchange of the peptide's amide hydrogens for deuterium indicated that the majority of amide hydrogens were readily accessible to solvent. The kinetics of the conformational transition coincided with an increase in solution viscosity and turbidity. An initiation phase preceded the conformational transition during which only minor spectral changes were observed by infrared spectroscopy. The initiation phase and reaction kinetics were consistent with a highly cooperative nucleation ultimately leading to a network of intermolecular β-sheet structure and gel formation. Increased temperature accelerated the conformational transition. The conformational transition was thermally irreversible but the β-sheet structure of aggregated or gelled peptide could be disrupted by dilution and agitation.

  10. Stabilities and conformational transitions of various proteases in the presence of an organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Gemba, Yuichi; Yutori, Yoshikazu; Doukyu, Noriyuki; Ishimi, Kosaku; Ishikawa, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The half-life of the activity of the PST-01 protease that was secreted by organic solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PST-01 was very long in the presence of methanol as compared to that in the absence of methanol. The conformational transitions of the PST-01 protease, alpha-chymotrypsin, thermolysin, and subtilisin in the presence and absence of methanol were monitored by measuring the CD spectra. The conformational stabilities of the PST-01 protease and subtilisin in the presence of methanol were higher than those in the absence of methanol. This resulted in high stability of these proteases in the presence of methanol. Furthermore, it was suggested that the organic solvent stabilities of enzymes were closely related to the secondary structure by monitoring the conformational transitions of polyamino acids, which form the particular conformations, in the presence and absence of methanol.

  11. Anomalous conformational transitions in cytochrome C adsorbing to Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Nair, B. U.; Dhathathreyan, A.

    2013-05-01

    Helix to beta conformational transitions in proteins has attracted much attention due to their relevance to fibril formation which is implicated in many neurological diseases. This study reports on unusual conformational transition of cytochrome C adsorbing to hydrophilic surface containing pure cationic lipid and mixed Langmuir-Blodgett films (LB films) of cationic and neutral lipids. Evidence for conformational changes of the protein from its native helical state to beta sheet comes from Circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD spectroscopy). Analysis of these samples using High resolution TEM (HRTEM) shows a typical fibrillar pattern with each strand spacing of about 0.41 nm across which can be attributed to the repeat distance of interdigitated neighboring hydrogen-bonded ribbons in a beta sheet. Changes in contact angles of protein adsorbing to the LB films together with the increased mass uptake of water using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) confirm the role of positive charges in the conformational transition. Dehydration of the protein resulting from the excess water entrainment in the polar planes of the cationic lipid in hydrophilic surface seems to trigger the refolding of the protein to beta sheet while it retains its native conformation in hydrophobic films. The results suggest that drastic conformational changes in CytC adsorbing to cationic lipids may be of significance in its role as a peripheral membrane protein.

  12. Investigation of the influence on conformational transition of DNA induced by cationic lipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheling; Huang, Weimin; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on the structural features of DNA-lipid assemblies. In this paper we take nile blue A (NBA) as a probe molecule to study the influence of the conformational transition of DNA induced by didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) cationic vesicles to the interaction between DNA and the probe molecules. We find that upon binding to DNA, a secondary conformational transition of DNA induced by the cationic liposome from the native B-form to the C-form resulted in the change of binding modes of NBA to DNA and different complexes are formed between DNA, DDAB and NBA.

  13. Conformational transitions of single polymer adsorption in poor solvent: Wetting transition due to molecular confinement induced line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Li, Yen-Ching

    2016-07-01

    We report a theory capable of describing conformational transitions for single polymer adsorption in a poor solvent. We show that an additional molecular confinement effect near the contact line can act exactly like line tension, playing a critical role in the behavior of an absorbed polymer chain. Using this theory, distinct conformational states: desorbed globule (DG), surface attached cap (SAC), and adsorbed lens (AL), can be vividly revealed, resembling the drying-wetting transition of a nanodroplet. But the transitions between these states can behave rather differently from those in the usual wetting transitions. The DG-SAC transition is discrete, occurring at the adsorption threshold when the globule size at the desorbed state is equal to the adsorption blob. The SAC-AL transition is smooth for finite chain lengths, but can change to discontinuous in the infinite chain limit, characterized by the different end-to-end exponent 3/8 and the unique crossover exponent 1/4. Distinctive critical exponents near this transition are also determined, indicating that it is an additional universality class of phase transitions. This work also sheds light on nanodrop spreading, wherein the important role played by line tension might simply be a manifestation of the local molecular confinement near the contact line.

  14. Conformational flexibility and the mechanisms of allosteric transitions in topologically similar proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Portman, John J.

    2011-08-01

    Conformational flexibility plays a central role in allosteric transition of proteins. In this paper, we extend the analysis of our previous study [S. Tripathi and J. J. Portman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 2104 (2009)] to investigate how relatively minor structural changes of the meta-stable states can significantly influence the conformational flexibility and allosteric transition mechanism. We use the allosteric transitions of the domains of calmodulin as an example system to highlight the relationship between the transition mechanism and the inter-residue contacts present in the meta-stable states. In particular, we focus on the origin of transient local unfolding (cracking), a mechanism that can lower free energy barriers of allosteric transitions, in terms of the inter-residue contacts of the meta-stable states and the pattern of local strain that develops during the transition. We find that the magnitude of the local strain in the protein is not the sole factor determining whether a region will ultimately crack during the transition. These results emphasize that the residue interactions found exclusively in one of the two meta-stable states is the key in understanding the mechanism of allosteric conformational change.

  15. Conformational flexibility and the mechanisms of allosteric transitions in topologically similar proteins.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Portman, John J

    2011-08-21

    Conformational flexibility plays a central role in allosteric transition of proteins. In this paper, we extend the analysis of our previous study [S. Tripathi and J. J. Portman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 2104 (2009)] to investigate how relatively minor structural changes of the meta-stable states can significantly influence the conformational flexibility and allosteric transition mechanism. We use the allosteric transitions of the domains of calmodulin as an example system to highlight the relationship between the transition mechanism and the inter-residue contacts present in the meta-stable states. In particular, we focus on the origin of transient local unfolding (cracking), a mechanism that can lower free energy barriers of allosteric transitions, in terms of the inter-residue contacts of the meta-stable states and the pattern of local strain that develops during the transition. We find that the magnitude of the local strain in the protein is not the sole factor determining whether a region will ultimately crack during the transition. These results emphasize that the residue interactions found exclusively in one of the two meta-stable states is the key in understanding the mechanism of allosteric conformational change.

  16. Conformational transitions and polymer flow in the glassy state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendler, John T.

    1986-01-01

    Viscoelastic response in bulk polymers reflects a strong coupling between the center-of-mass positions and the relative internal coordinates of the chain segments. In the liquid, this coupling causes a fraction of the flow stress to create an elastic strain arising from the perturbed chain dimensions. (Since the friction/elongation relation is non-linear, this can lead to coil-stretch CS at large flow rates, the main subject of this conference.) In the glass state, the lifetimes of vibrational minima are reduced next to regions of high rotational mobility within the polymer chains. Lattice strain is partly relieved by (time-dependent) conversion of internal bond states, and solid-state flow results. Non-linear stress/strain behavior also may result the glass because a drop in modulus makes it easier for rotating segments to jump over intermolecular barriers. The solid-state analog of the stretched state is the highly oriented chain conformations found in shear bands and craze fibrils. The mechanism of shear yielding is believed to involve chain alignment and reduced sliding friction in the direction of maximum stress. Similarly, craze nucleation and growth (which requires a negative hydrostatic stress) proceeds by simultaneous production of voids and cold-drawn oriented fibrils, the latter imparting load-bearing ability to the growing craze.

  17. Dehydration-induced conformational transitions in proteins and their inhibition by stabilizers.

    PubMed Central

    Prestrelski, S J; Tedeschi, N; Arakawa, T; Carpenter, J F

    1993-01-01

    Dehydration of proteins results in significant, measurable conformational changes as observed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and resolution-enhancement techniques. For several proteins these conformational changes are at least partially irreversible, since, upon rehydration, denaturation and aggregation are observed. The presence of certain stabilizers inhibited these dehydration-induced transitions; the native structure was preserved in the dried state and upon reconstitution. Conformational transitions were also observed in a model polypeptide, poly-L-lysine, after lyophilization and were inhibited with the addition of stabilizing cosolutes. The ability of a particular additive to preserve the aqueous structure of dehydrated proteins and poly-L-lysine upon dehydration correlates directly with its ability to preserve the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, a labile enzyme, during drying. PMID:7693001

  18. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: their role in the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Cui, Q; Lipscomb, W N; Karplus, M

    2001-07-31

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the motions of the enzyme, that when these inactive conformers are bound to the active site, they are rapidly converted to the reactive chair conformer. This result suggests that one contribution of the enzyme is to bind the more prevalent nonreactive conformers and transform them into the active form in a step before the chemical reaction. The motion of the reactive chair conformer in the active site calculated by using the QM/MM potential generates transient structures that are closer to the transition state than is the stable CHAIR conformer.

  19. The Preliminary Stretching Effect on Mechanical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Polyamide fibres and Conformational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksakal, Baki; Phoshkina, Svetlana P.; Darvish, Diana M.; Tsobkallo, Ekaterina S.; Alekberov, Vilayet

    2007-04-01

    The preliminary stretching effect on mechanical properties of natural (wool, hair, and silk) and synthetic polyamide fibres (nylon, capron) and conformational transitions are investigated by using a tensile tester. It is shown that α-keratin fibres (wool and hair) show silk-like properties and properties of synthetic polyamide fibres for preliminary extension of 18-24% and 34-38%, respectively.

  20. Cyclophilin A inhibition: targeting transition-state-bound enzyme conformations for structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Mulpuri; McGowan, Lauren C; Hamelberg, Donald

    2013-02-25

    Human Cyclophilin A (CypA) catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of the prolyl peptide ω-bond in proteins and is involved in many subcellular processes. CypA has, therefore, been identified as a potential drug target in many diseases, and the development of potent inhibitors with high selectivity is a key objective. In computer-aided drug design, selectivity is improved by taking into account the inherent flexibility of the receptor. However, the relevant receptor conformations to focus on in order to develop highly selective inhibitors are not always obvious from available X-ray crystal structures or ensemble of conformations generated using molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we show that the conformation of the active site of CypA varies as the substrate configuration changes during catalytic turnover. We have analyzed the principal modes of the active site dynamics of CypA from molecular dynamics simulations to show that similar ensembles of enzyme conformations recognize diverse inhibitors and bind the different configurations of the peptide substrate. Small nonpeptidomimetic inhibitors with varying activity are recognized by enzyme ensembles that are similar to those that tightly bind the transition state and cis configurations of the substrate. Our results suggest that enzyme-substrate ensembles are more relevant in structure-based drug design for CypA than free enzyme. Of the vast conformational space of the free enzyme, the enzyme conformations of the tightly bound enzyme-substrate complexes are the most important for catalysis. Therefore, functionalizing lead compounds to optimize their interactions with the enzyme's conformational ensemble bound to the substrate in the cis or the transition state could lead to more potent inhibitors.

  1. Conformational Transition Pathways in Signaling and Enzyme Catalysis Explored by Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachov, Dimitar V.

    Biomolecules are dynamic in nature and visit a number of states while performing their biological function. However, understanding how they interconvert between functional substates is a challenging task. In this thesis, we employ enhanced computational strategies to reveal in atomistic resolution transition states and molecular mechanism along conformational pathways of the signaling protein Nitrogen Regulatory Protein C (NtrC) and the enzyme Adenylate Kinase (Adk). Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) simulations and NMR experiments have previously found the active/inactive interconversion of NtrC is stabilized by non-native transient contacts. To find where along the conformational pathway they lie and probe the existence of multiple intermediates, a beyond 8mus-extensive mapping of the conformational landscape was performed by a multitude of straightforward MD simulations relaxed from the biased TMD pathway. A number of metastable states stabilized by local interactions was found to underline the conformational pathway of NtrC. Two spontaneous transitions of the last stage of the active-to-inactive conversion were identified and used in path sampling procedures to generate an ensemble of truly dynamic reactive pathways. The transition state ensemble (TSE) and mechanistic descriptors of this transition were revealed in atomic detail and verified by committor analysis. By analyzing how pressure affects the dynamics and function of two homologous Adk proteins - the P.Profundum Adk surviving at 700atm pressure in the deep sea, and the E. coli Adk that lives at ambient pressures - we indirectly obtained atomic information about the TSE of the large-amplitude rate-limiting conformational opening of the Adk lids. Guided by NMR experiments showing significantly decreased activation volumes of the piezophile compared to its mesophilic counterpart, TMD simulations revealed the formation of an extended hydrogen-bonded water network in the transition state of the piezophile

  2. The energy profiles of atomic conformational transition intermediates of adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaping; Yang, Lei; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L

    2009-11-15

    The elastic network interpolation (ENI) (Kim et al., Biophys J 2002;83:1620-1630) is a computationally efficient and physically realistic method to generate conformational transition intermediates between two forms of a given protein. However it can be asked whether these calculated conformations provide good representatives for these intermediates. In this study, we use ENI to generate conformational transition intermediates between the open form and the closed form of adenylate kinase (AK). Based on C(alpha)-only intermediates, we construct atomic intermediates by grafting all the atoms of known AK structures onto the C(alpha) atoms and then perform CHARMM energy minimization to remove steric conflicts and optimize these intermediate structures. We compare the energy profiles for all intermediates from both the CHARMM force-field and from knowledge-based energy functions. We find that the CHARMM energies can successfully capture the two energy minima representing the open AK and closed AK forms, while the energies computed from the knowledge-based energy functions can detect the local energy minimum representing the closed AK form and show some general features of the transition pathway with a somewhat similar energy profile as the CHARMM energies. The combinatorial extension structural alignment (Shindyalov et al., 1998;11:739-747) and the k-means clustering algorithm are then used to show that known PDB structures closely resemble computed intermediates along the transition pathway.

  3. Mechanistic picture for conformational transition of a membrane transporter at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2013-11-19

    During their transport cycle, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters undergo large-scale conformational changes between inward- and outward-facing states. Using an approach based on designing system-specific reaction coordinates and using nonequilibrium work relations, we have performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of explicit membrane/solvent to sample a large number of mechanistically distinct pathways for the conformational transition of MsbA, a bacterial ABC exporter whose structure has been solved in multiple functional states. The computational approach developed here is based on (i) extensive exploration of system-specific biasing protocols (e.g., using collective variables designed based on available low-resolution crystal structures) and (ii) using nonequilibrium work relations for comparing the relevance of the transition pathways. The most relevant transition pathway identified using this approach involves several distinct stages reflecting the complex nature of the structural changes associated with the function of the protein. The opening of the cytoplasmic gate during the outward- to inward-facing transition of apo MsbA is found to be disfavored when the periplasmic gate is open and facilitated by a twisting motion of the nucleotide-binding domains that involves a dramatic change in their relative orientation. These results highlight the cooperativity between the transmembrane and the nucleotide-binding domains in the conformational transition of ABC exporters. The approach introduced here provides a framework to study large-scale conformational changes of other membrane transporters whose computational investigation at an atomic resolution may not be currently feasible using conventional methods.

  4. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: How to represent an environment driven conformational transition

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Sayar, Mehmet; Peter, Christine

    2013-12-21

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties.

  5. Conformational transition of giant DNA in a confined space surrounded by a phospholipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ayako; Shindo, Eri; Sakaue, Takahiro; Tsuji, Akihiko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2009-09-16

    It has been established that a long DNA molecule exhibits a large discrete conformational change from a coiled state to a highly folded state in aqueous solution, depending on the presence of various condensing agents such as polyamines. In this study, T4 DNA labeled with fluorescent dyes was encapsulated in a cell-sized microdroplet covered with a phospholipid membrane to investigate the conformational behavior of a DNA molecule in such a confined space. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the presence of Mg(2+) induced the adsorption of DNA onto the membrane inner-surface of a droplet composed of phosphatidylethanolamine, while no adsorption was observed onto a phosphatidylcholine membrane. Under the presence of spermine (tetravalent amine), DNA had a folded conformation in the bulk solution. However, when these molecules were encapsulated in the microdroplet, DNA adsorbed onto the membrane surface accompanied by unfolding of its structure into an extended coil conformation under high concentrations of Mg(2+). In addition, DNA molecules trapped in large droplets tended not to be adsorbed on the membrane, i.e., no conformational transition occurred. A thermodynamic analysis suggests that the translational entropy loss of a DNA molecule that is accompanied by adsorption is a key factor in these phenomena under micrometer-scale confinement.

  6. Solid-to-hybrid transitioning armature railgun with non-conforming-to-prejudice bore profile

    SciTech Connect

    Solberg, Jerome Michael

    2012-12-04

    An improved railgun, railgun barrel, railgun projectile, and railgun system for accelerating a solid-to-hybrid transitioning armature projectile using a barrel having a bore that does not conform to a cross-sectional profile of the projectile, to contact and guide the projectile only by the rails in a low pressure bore volume so as to minimize damage, failure, and/or underperformance caused by plasma armatures, insulator ablation, and/or restrikes.

  7. Distribution, Transition and Thermodynamic Stability of Protein Conformations in the Denaturant-Induced Unfolding of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive and intensive studies on the unfolding of proteins require appropriate theoretical model and parameter to clearly illustrate the feature and characteristic of the unfolding system. Over the past several decades, four approaches have been proposed to describe the interaction between proteins and denaturants, but some ambiguity and deviations usually occur in the explanation of the experimental data. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, a theoretical model was presented to show the dependency of the residual activity ratio of the proteins on the molar denaturant concentration. Through the characteristic unfolding parameters ki and Δmi in this model, the distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations during the unfolding process can be quantitatively described. This model was tested with the two-state unfolding of bovine heart cytochrome c and the three-state unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme induced by both guanidine hydrochloride and urea, the four-state unfolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase b induced by guanidine hydrochloride and the unfolding of some other proteins induced by denaturants. The results illustrated that this model could be used accurately to reveal the distribution and transition of protein conformations in the presence of different concentrations of denaturants and to evaluate the unfolding tendency and thermodynamic stability of different conformations. In most denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins, the unfolding became increasingly hard in next transition step and the proteins became more unstable as they attained next successive stable conformation. Conclusions/Significance This work presents a useful method for people to study the unfolding of proteins and may be used to describe the unfolding and refolding of other biopolymers induced by denaturants, inducers, etc. PMID:24603868

  8. Potential Energy Surface-Based Automatic Deduction of Conformational Transition Networks and Its Application on Quantum Mechanical Landscapes of d-Glucose Conformers.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroko; Oda, Tomohiro; Nakakoji, Kumiyo; Uno, Takeaki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Iwata, Satoru; Ohno, Koichi

    2016-11-08

    This paper describes our approach that is built upon the potential energy surface (PES)-based conformational analysis. This approach automatically deduces a conformational transition network, called a conformational reaction route map (r-map), by using the Scaled Hypersphere Search of the Anharmonic Downward Distortion Following method (SHS-ADDF). The PES-based conformational search has been achieved by using large ADDF, which makes it possible to trace only low transition state (TS) barriers while restraining bond lengths and structures with high free energy. It automatically performs sampling the minima and TS structures by simply taking into account the mathematical feature of PES without requiring any a priori specification of variable internal coordinates. An obtained r-map is composed of equilibrium (EQ) conformers connected by reaction routes via TS conformers, where all of the reaction routes are already confirmed during the process of the deduction using the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) method. The postcalculation analysis of the deduced r-map is interactively carried out using the RMapViewer software we have developed. This paper presents computational details of the PES-based conformational analysis and its application to d-glucose. The calculations have been performed for an isolated glucose molecule in the gas phase at the RHF/6-31G level. The obtained conformational r-map for α-d-glucose is composed of 201 EQ and 435 TS conformers and that for β-d-glucose is composed of 202 EQ and 371 TS conformers. For the postcalculation analysis of the conformational r-maps by using the RMapViewer software program we have found multiple minimum energy paths (MEPs) between global minima of (1)C4 and (4)C1 chair conformations. The analysis using RMapViewer allows us to confirm the thermodynamic and kinetic predominance of (4)C1 conformations; that is, the potential energy of the global minimum of (4)C1 is lower than that of (1)C4 (thermodynamic predominance

  9. Electronic detection of dsDNA transition from helical to zipper conformation using graphene nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Chaitanya; Girdhar, Anuj; Leburton, Jean-Pierre; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical manipulation of DNA, by forced extension, can lead to a structural transformation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from a helical form to a linear zipper-like form. By employing classical molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical non-equilibrium Greens function-based transport simulations, we show the ability of graphene nanopores to discern different dsDNA conformations, in a helical to zipper transition, using transverse electronic conductance. In particular, conductance oscillations due to helical dsDNA vanish as dsDNA extends from helical to zipper form as it is transported through the nanopore. The predicted ability to detect conformational changes in dsDNA, via transverse electronic conductance, can widen the potential of graphene-based nanosensors for DNA detection. PMID:25325530

  10. Conformational transitions of plasmid ds-DNA on ultrathin films of alkylamines on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Caroline; Liang, Hua; Severin, Nikolai; Zhuang, Wei; Zauscher, Stefan; Rabe, Jürgen P.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is an important process in the human body. Replication of double-stranded (ds)-DNA requires its local melting into two single strands. DNA, when stretched in solution, overwinds and melts. This was argued to give insight onto the replication mechanism. It is difficult, however, to access the direct conformational changes during stretching in solution. Recent work demonstrated that this transition can be imaged with scanning force microscopy on a graphite surface that is coated with an alkylamine layer. ds-DNA can be controlled by an amphiphilic layer, since the DNA conformation depends on the amphiphile concentration. In particular we analyzed different DNA lengths on the same surface, and we found that at a specific concentration of octadecylamine the ds-DNA pUC19 plasmid ring splits into two single strands at one position. We will discuss methods to mark the DNA to determine the exact location at which the plasmid ring splits.

  11. How and why do transition dipole moment orientations depend on conformer structure?

    PubMed

    Brand, Christian; Meerts, W Leo; Schmitt, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A remarkable influence of the orientation of a polar side chain on the direction of the S(1) ← S(0) transition dipole moment of monosubstituted benzenes was previously reported from high-resolution electronic spectroscopy. In search for a more general understanding of this non-Condon behavior, we investigated ethylamino-substituted indole and benzene (tryptamine and 2-phenylethylamine) using ab initio theory and compared the results to rotationally resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements. The interaction of the ethylamino side chain with the benzene chromophore can evoke a rotation and a change of ordering of the molecular orbitals involved in the excitation, leading to state mixing and large changes in the orientation of the excited-state transition dipole moment. These changes are much less pronounced in tryptamine with the indole chromophore, where a rotation of the transition dipole moment is attributed to Rydberg contributions of the nitrogen atom of the chromophore. For phenylethylamine, a strong dependence of the oscillator strengths of the lowest two singlet states from the conformation of the side chain is found, which makes the use of experimental vibronic intensities for assessment of relative conformer stabilities at least questionable.

  12. Conformational transitions of a confined lattice protein: A Wang-Landau study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanasiri, Busara; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.; Wüst, Thomas; Triampo, Wannapong

    2012-12-01

    We use Wang-Landau sampling with suitable Monte Carlo trial moves to study a hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice protein confined between two parallel, attractive walls. The density of states is determined iteratively by a random walk in energy space. Thermodynamic and structural properties, such as specific heat, number of surface contacts and number of H-H monomer pairs, are then calculated. When the surface attraction is comparable to the internal attraction among the hydrophobic monomers in the chain, two conformational “transitions”, adsorption at higher temperature and collapse at lower temperature, have been analyzed based on these properties. This transition behavior depends on the variation of surface separation.

  13. Effect of water on the temperatures of human immunoglobulin conformation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur'yash, V. F.; Kokurina, N. Yu.

    2013-10-01

    A differential thermal analysis of native and denaturated human immunoglobulin (G isotype) and mixtures of the native protein with water over the temperature range of 80-570 K is conducted. Temperatures of the protein conformational transitions and the effect of water on them are investigated. The limit of water solubility in the native protein is determined calorimetrically from the enthalpy of excess water phase melting. A physical state diagram of the immunoglobulin-water system over a wide range of temperatures and component concentrations is built and analyzed.

  14. Contributions of conformational compression and preferential transition state stabilization to the rate enhancement by chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Cristiano Ruch Werneck; Repasky, Matthew P; Chandrasekhar, Jayaraman; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2003-06-11

    The rate enhancement provided by the chorismate mutase (CM) enzyme for the Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate has been investigated by application of the concept of near attack conformations (NACs). Using a combined QM/MM Monte Carlo/free-energy perturbation (MC/FEP) method, 82% and 100% of chorismate conformers were found to be NAC structures in water and in the CM active site, respectively. Consequently, the conversion of non-NACs to NACs does not contribute to the free energy of activation from preorganization of the substrate into NACs. The FEP calculations yielded differences in free energies of activation that well reproduce the experimental data. Additional calculations indicate that the rate enhancement by CM over the aqueous phase results primarily from conformational compression of NACs by the enzyme and that this process is enthalpically controlled. This suggests that preferential stabilization of the transition state in the enzyme environment relative to water plays a secondary role in the catalysis by CM.

  15. In situ study of dynamic conformational transitions of a water-soluble poly(3-hexylthiophene) derivative by surfactant complexation.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Cameron D; Starkweather, Nathan S; Zhang, Shanju

    2012-10-25

    Transitions in the backbone conformation of polythiophenes (PTs) in organic solvents, measurable spectroscopically, have been widely observed to influence thin-film morphology; however, such conformational transitions of water-soluble PT derivatives, with respect to their intramolecular versus intermolecular origin, remain largely obscure. Here, we report on dynamic conformational transitions of poly(3-potassium hexanoate thiophene) in aqueous cetyltrimethylammonium bromide investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing optical microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. As-prepared complexes exist as stable hydrogels. Upon dilution, a significant time-dependent chromism occurs spontaneously. A coil-to-rod conformational transition is identified in this mechanism. Study into the corresponding kinetics demonstrates an inverse first-order rate law. It is found that the conformational transition is thermally reversible and concentration-independent. The critical transition temperature is largely dependent on the surfactant architecture. A theoretical model is presented to explain this new phenomenon and the mechanisms behind its influence on the optoelectronic properties.

  16. Conformational transitions of cytochrome c in sub-micron-sized capsules at air/buffer interface.

    PubMed

    Jaganathan, Maheshkumar; Dhathathreyan, Aruna

    2014-09-30

    This work presents the design of sub-micron-sized capsules of Cytochrome c (cyt c) in the range 300-350 nm and the conformational transitions of the protein that occur when the films of these capsules spread at the air/buffer interface are subjected to repeated compression-expansion cycles. Steady state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, and circular dichroic (CD) spectra have been used to study the highly compact native conformation (70% helicity) of the protein in the capsules and its stability has been analyzed using cyclic voltammetry. The capsules have been characterized using zeta sizer and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Surface concentration-surface pressure (Γ-π) isotherms of the films of the capsules spread at air/buffer interface following compression-expansion show destabilizing effect on cyt c. FTIR and CD spectra of these films skimmed from the surface show that the protein transitions gradually from its native helical to an anomalous beta sheet aggregated state. This results from a competition between stabilizing hydrated polar segments of the protein in the capsule and destabilizing nonspecific hydrophobic interactions arising at the air/buffer interface. This 2D model could further our understanding of the spatial and temporal roles of proteins in confined spaces and also in the design of new drug delivery vehicles using proteins.

  17. Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant D; Khan, Bashir M; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase, a key regulatory enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, from Leucaena leucocephala (Ll-CCRH1) were studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The native protein possesses four trp residues exposed on the surface and 66% of helical structure, undergoes rapid structural transitions at and above 45 °C and starts forming aggregates at 55 °C. Ll-CCRH1 was transformed into acid induced (pH 2.0) molten globule like structure, exhibiting altered secondary structure, diminished tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule like structure was examined for the thermal and chemical stability. The altered secondary structure of L1-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 was stable up to 90 °C. Also, in presence of 0.25 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), it got transformed into different structure which was stable in the vicinity of 2M GdnHCl (as compared to drastic loss of native structure in 2M GdnHCl) as seen in far UV-CD spectra. The structural transition of Ll-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 followed another transition after readjusting the pH to 8.0, forming a structure with hardly any similarity to that of native protein.

  18. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Rigid-cluster models of conformational transitions in macromolecular machines and assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon K; Jernigan, Robert L; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2005-07-01

    We present a rigid-body-based technique (called rigid-cluster elastic network interpolation) to generate feasible transition pathways between two distinct conformations of a macromolecular assembly. Many biological molecules and assemblies consist of domains which act more or less as rigid bodies during large conformational changes. These collective motions are thought to be strongly related with the functions of a system. This fact encourages us to simply model a macromolecule or assembly as a set of rigid bodies which are interconnected with distance constraints. In previous articles, we developed coarse-grained elastic network interpolation (ENI) in which, for example, only Calpha atoms are selected as representatives in each residue of a protein. We interpolate distance differences of two conformations in ENI by using a simple quadratic cost function, and the feasible conformations are generated without steric conflicts. Rigid-cluster interpolation is an extension of the ENI method with rigid-clusters replacing point masses. Now the intermediate conformations in an anharmonic pathway can be determined by the translational and rotational displacements of large clusters in such a way that distance constraints are observed. We present the derivation of the rigid-cluster model and apply it to a variety of macromolecular assemblies. Rigid-cluster ENI is then modified for a hybrid model represented by a mixture of rigid clusters and point masses. Simulation results show that both rigid-cluster and hybrid ENI methods generate sterically feasible pathways of large systems in a very short time. For example, the HK97 virus capsid is an icosahedral symmetric assembly composed of 60 identical asymmetric units. Its original Hessian matrix size for a Calpha coarse-grained model is >(300,000)(2). However, it reduces to (84)(2) when we apply the rigid-cluster model with icosahedral symmetry constraints. The computational cost of the interpolation no longer scales heavily with

  20. Mutation in the SH1 helix reduces the activation energy of the ATP-induced conformational transition of myosin.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Chaen, Shigeru

    2007-05-25

    The SH1 helix is a joint that links the converter subdomain to the rest of the myosin motor domain. Recently, we showed that a mutation within the SH1 helix in Dictyostelium myosin II (R689H) reduced the elasticity and thermal stability of the protein. To reveal the involvement of the SH1 helix in ATP-dependent conformational changes of the motor domain, we have investigated the effects of the R689H mutation on the conformational changes of the converter, using a GFP-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer method. Although the mutation does not seem to strongly affect conformations, we found that it significantly reduced the activation energy required for the ATP-induced conformational transition corresponding to the recovery stroke. Given the effects of the mutation on the mechanical properties of myosin, we propose that the SH1 helix plays an important role in the mechanochemical energy conversion underlying the conformational change of the myosin motor domain.

  1. Beta-hairpin conformation of fibrillogenic peptides: structure and alpha-beta transition mechanism revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Simona, Fabio; Roccatano, Danilo; Broglia, Ricardo A; Tiana, Guido; Colombo, Giorgio; Di Nola, Alfredo

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the conformational transitions that trigger the aggregation and amyloidogenesis of otherwise soluble peptides at atomic resolution is of fundamental relevance for the design of effective therapeutic agents against amyloid-related disorders. In the present study the transition from ideal alpha-helical to beta-hairpin conformations is revealed by long timescale molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water solvent, for two well-known amyloidogenic peptides: the H1 peptide from prion protein and the Abeta(12-28) fragment from the Abeta(1-42) peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. The simulations highlight the unfolding of alpha-helices, followed by the formation of bent conformations and a final convergence to ordered in register beta-hairpin conformations. The beta-hairpins observed, despite different sequences, exhibit a common dynamic behavior and the presence of a peculiar pattern of the hydrophobic side-chains, in particular in the region of the turns. These observations hint at a possible common aggregation mechanism for the onset of different amyloid diseases and a common mechanism in the transition to the beta-hairpin structures. Furthermore the simulations presented herein evidence the stabilization of the alpha-helical conformations induced by the presence of an organic fluorinated cosolvent. The results of MD simulation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)/water mixture provide further evidence that the peptide coating effect of TFE molecules is responsible for the stabilization of the soluble helical conformation.

  2. Capturing the Membrane-Triggered Conformational Transition of an α-Helical Pore-Forming Toxin.

    PubMed

    Giri Rao, V V Hemanth; Desikan, Rajat; Ayappa, K Ganapathy; Gosavi, Shachi

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli cytolysin A (ClyA) is an α-helical pore-forming toxin (PFT) which lyses target cells by forming membrane permeabilizing pores. The rate-determining step of this process is the conversion of the soluble ClyA monomer into a membrane inserted protomer. We elucidate the mechanism of this conformational transition using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained models of ClyA and a membrane. We find that a membrane is necessary for the conformational conversion because membrane-protein interactions counteract the loss of the many intraprotein hydrophobic interactions that stabilize the membrane-inserting segments in the ClyA monomer. Of the two membrane-inserting segments, the flexible and highly hydrophobic β-tongue inserts first while the insertion of helix αA1 is membrane assisted. We conclude that the β-tongue is designed to behave as a quick-response membrane sensor, while helix αA1 improves target selectivity for cholesterol-containing cell membranes by acting as a fidelity check.

  3. Particular behavior of the adenine and guanine ring-breathing modes upon the DNA conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Ghomi, M; Letellier, R; Taillandier, E

    1988-06-01

    Harmonic dynamics calculations performed on the deoxyguanosine (dG) and deoxyadenosine (dA) residues, based on a reliable force field, show that the breathing motions of both guanine and adenine residues are involved in two different vibration modes (750-500 cm-1 spectral region). The calculated results reveal a strong coupling of these modes with the sugar pucker motions. This effect has been verified for the dG residue by the Raman spectra of polyd(G-C). As far as the dA residue is concerned, the particular behavior of the adenine residue breathing mode predicted by these calculations, has been confirmed by Raman spectra of polyd(A-T) undergoing a B----Z conformational transition.

  4. Water-mediated conformational transitions in nicotinic receptor M2 helix bundles: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Sansom, M S

    1995-12-27

    The ion channel of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is a water-filled pore formed by five M2 helix segments, one from each subunit. Molecular dynamics simulations on bundles of five M2 alpha 7 helices surrounding a central column of water and with caps of water molecules at either end of the pore have been used to explore the effects of intrapore water on helix packing. Interactions of water molecules with the N-terminal polar sidechains lead to a conformational transition from right- to left-handed supercoils during these stimulations. These studies reveal that the pore formed by the bundle of M2 helices is flexible. A structural role is proposed for water molecules in determining the geometry of bundles of isolated pore-forming helices.

  5. The Activation of c-Src Tyrosine Kinase: Conformational Transition Pathway and Free Energy Landscape.

    PubMed

    Fajer, Mikolai; Meng, Yilin; Roux, Benoît

    2016-10-28

    Tyrosine kinases are important cellular signaling allosteric enzymes that regulate cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and migration. Their activity must be tightly controlled, and malfunction can lead to a variety of diseases, particularly cancer. The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Src, a prototypical model system and a representative member of the Src-family, functions as complex multidomain allosteric molecular switches comprising SH2 and SH3 domains modulating the activity of the catalytic domain. The broad picture of self-inhibition of c-Src via the SH2 and SH3 regulatory domains is well characterized from a structural point of view, but a detailed molecular mechanism understanding is nonetheless still lacking. Here, we use advanced computational methods based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent to advance our understanding of kinase activation. To elucidate the mechanism of regulation and self-inhibition, we have computed the pathway and the free energy landscapes for the "inactive-to-active" conformational transition of c-Src for different configurations of the SH2 and SH3 domains. Using the isolated c-Src catalytic domain as a baseline for comparison, it is observed that the SH2 and SH3 domains, depending upon their bound orientation, promote either the inactive or active state of the catalytic domain. The regulatory structural information from the SH2-SH3 tandem is allosterically transmitted via the N-terminal linker of the catalytic domain. Analysis of the conformational transition pathways also illustrates the importance of the conserved tryptophan 260 in activating c-Src, and reveals a series of concerted events during the activation process.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations on the conformational transitions from the GA 98 (GA 88) to GB 98 (GB 88) proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunnian; Wang, Qing; Xue, Tuo; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2016-12-01

    We performed conventional and targeted molecular dynamics simulations to address the dynamic transition mechanisms of the conformational transitions from the GA 98 protein with only 1 mutation of Leu45Tyr to GB 98 and from the GA 88 protein with 7 mutations of Gly24Ala, Ile25Thr, Ile30Phe, Ile33Tyr, Leu45Tyr, Ile49Thr, and Leu50Lys to GB 88. The results show that the conformational transition mechanism from the mutated 3α GA 98 (GA 88) state to the α+4β GB 98 (GB 88) state via several intermediate conformations involves the bending of loops at the N and C termini firstly, the unfolding of αA and αC, then the traversing of αB, and the formation of the 4β layer with the conversion of the hydrophobic core. The bending of loops at the N and C termini and the formation of the crucial transition conformation with the full unfolded structure are key factors in their transition processes. The communication of the interaction network, the bending directions of loops, and the traversing site of αB in the transition of GA 98 to GB 98 are markedly different from those in GA 88 to GB 88 because of the different mutated residues. The analysis of the correlations and the calculated mass center distances between some segments further supported their conformational transition mechanisms. These results could help people to better understand the Paracelsus challenge. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir; Bhosale, Siddharth; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2016-02-01

    Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), a key enzyme of mevalonate pathway in isoprenoid biosynthesis, from Bacopa monniera (BmMDD), cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli were studied under thermal, chemical and pH-mediated denaturation conditions using fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopy. Native BmMDD is a helix dominant structure with 45% helix and 11% sheets and possesses seven tryptophan residues with two residues exposed on surface, three residues partially exposed and two situated in the interior of the protein. Thermal denaturation of BmMDD causes rapid structural transitions at and above 40°C and transient exposure of hydrophobic residues at 50°C, leading to aggregation of the protein. An acid induced molten globule like structure was observed at pH 4, exhibiting altered but compact secondary structure, distorted tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule displayed different response at higher temperature and similar response to chemical denaturation as compared to the native protein. The surface tryptophans have predominantly positively charged amino acids around them, as indicated by higher KSV for KI as compared to that for CsCl. The native enzyme displayed two different lifetimes, τ1 (1.203±0.036 ns) and τ2 (3.473±0.12 ns) indicating two populations of tryptophan.

  8. Detection of an en masse and reversible B- to A-DNA conformational transition in prokaryotes in response to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Donna R; Hiscox, Thomas J; Rood, Julian I; Bambery, Keith R; McNaughton, Don; Wood, Bayden R

    2014-08-06

    The role that DNA conformation plays in the biochemistry of cells has been the subject of intensive research since DNA polymorphism was discovered. B-DNA has long been considered the native form of DNA in cells although alternative conformations of DNA are thought to occur transiently and along short tracts. Here, we report the first direct observation of a fully reversible en masse conformational transition between B- and A-DNA within live bacterial cells using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. This biospectroscopic technique allows for non-invasive and reagent-free examination of the holistic biochemistry of samples. For this reason, we have been able to observe the previously unknown conformational transition in all four species of bacteria investigated. Detection of this transition is evidence of a previously unexplored biological significance for A-DNA and highlights the need for new research into the role that A-DNA plays as a cellular defence mechanism and in stabilizing the DNA conformation. Such studies are pivotal in understanding the role of A-DNA in the evolutionary pathway of nucleic acids. Furthermore, this discovery demonstrates the exquisite capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy and opens the door for further investigations of cell biochemistry with this under-used technique.

  9. Detection of an en masse and reversible B- to A-DNA conformational transition in prokaryotes in response to desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Donna R.; Hiscox, Thomas J.; Rood, Julian I.; Bambery, Keith R.; McNaughton, Don; Wood, Bayden R.

    2014-01-01

    The role that DNA conformation plays in the biochemistry of cells has been the subject of intensive research since DNA polymorphism was discovered. B-DNA has long been considered the native form of DNA in cells although alternative conformations of DNA are thought to occur transiently and along short tracts. Here, we report the first direct observation of a fully reversible en masse conformational transition between B- and A-DNA within live bacterial cells using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. This biospectroscopic technique allows for non-invasive and reagent-free examination of the holistic biochemistry of samples. For this reason, we have been able to observe the previously unknown conformational transition in all four species of bacteria investigated. Detection of this transition is evidence of a previously unexplored biological significance for A-DNA and highlights the need for new research into the role that A-DNA plays as a cellular defence mechanism and in stabilizing the DNA conformation. Such studies are pivotal in understanding the role of A-DNA in the evolutionary pathway of nucleic acids. Furthermore, this discovery demonstrates the exquisite capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy and opens the door for further investigations of cell biochemistry with this under-used technique. PMID:24898023

  10. A Hybrid All-Atom Structure-Based Model for Protein Folding and Large Scale Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Sutto, Ludovico; Mereu, Ilaria; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2011-12-13

    Structure-based models are successful at conjugating the essence of the energy landscape theory of protein folding with an easy and efficient implementation. Recently, their realm expanded beyond a single protein structure, and structure-based potentials have been used profitably to widely study complex conformational transitions. Still, when dealing with structural rearrangements between two, or more, well-defined structures, an unbiased and transferable description of the local backbone and side chain interactions could be advantageous. Here, we propose an all-atom model that merges a classical force field description of these local interactions with a structure-based long-range potential that takes into account the different conformations. We first validate the model simulating and characterizing the folding reaction and the transition state of two well-known proteins: the villin headpiece and the SH3 domain. Then, we characterize the activation mechanism of the catalytic domain of c-Src kinase. Such a process involves the conformational rearrangement of a large loop and the swing of an α helix. The appearance of a stable intermediate state in the free energy landscape between the two conformational end points suggests the mechanism of the loop opening. The low computational cost of the model together with the satisfactory accuracy of the results make it a promising approach to studying conformational transitions in large protein systems.

  11. Transitions between Closed and Open Conformations of TolC: The Effects of Ions in Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Robert; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, use multidrug efflux pumps to export toxic substrates through their cell membranes. Upon formation of an efflux pump, the aperture of its outer membrane protein TolC opens and thereby enables the extrusion of substrate molecules. The specialty of TolC is its ability to dock to different transporters, making it a highly versatile export protein. Within this study, the transition between two conformations of TolC that are both available as crystal structures was investigated using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. To create a partially open conformation from a closed one, the stability of the periplasmic aperture was weakened by a double point mutation at the constricting ring, which removes some salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. These mutants, which showed partial opening in previous experiments, did not spontaneously open during a 20-ns equilibration at physiological values of the KCl solution. Detailed analysis of the constricting ring revealed that the cations of the solvent were able to constitute ionic bonds in place of the removed salt bridges, which inhibited the opening of the aperture in simulations. To remove the ions from these binding positions within the available simulation time, an extra force was applied onto the ions. To keep the effect of this additional force rather flexible, it was applied in form of an artificial external electric field perpendicular to the membrane. Depending on the field direction and the ion concentration, these simulations led to a partial opening. In experiments, this energy barrier for the ions can be overcome by thermal fluctuations on a longer timescale. PMID:19383457

  12. Conformational transition free energy profiles of an adsorbed, lattice model protein by multicanonical Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castells, Victoria; Van Tassel, Paul R.

    2005-02-01

    Proteins often undergo changes in internal conformation upon interacting with a surface. We investigate the thermodynamics of surface induced conformational change in a lattice model protein using a multicanonical Monte Carlo method. The protein is a linear heteropolymer of 27 segments (of types A and B) confined to a cubic lattice. The segmental order and nearest neighbor contact energies are chosen to yield, in the absence of an adsorbing surface, a unique 3×3×3 folded structure. The surface is a plane of sites interacting either equally with A and B segments (equal affinity surface) or more strongly with the A segments (A affinity surface). We use a multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm, with configuration bias and jump walking moves, featuring an iteratively updated sampling function that converges to the reciprocal of the density of states 1/Ω(E), E being the potential energy. We find inflection points in the configurational entropy, S(E)=klnΩ(E), for all but a strongly adsorbing equal affinity surface, indicating the presence of free energy barriers to transition. When protein-surface interactions are weak, the free energy profiles F(E)=E-TS(E) qualitatively resemble those of a protein in the absence of a surface: a free energy barrier separates a folded, lowest energy state from globular, higher energy states. The surface acts in this case to stabilize the globular states relative to the folded state. When the protein surface interactions are stronger, the situation differs markedly: the folded state no longer occurs at the lowest energy and free energy barriers may be absent altogether.

  13. Further investigation on potassium-induced conformation transition of Nephila spidroin film with two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xianneng; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin; Knight, David P; Wu, Peiyi; Vollrath, Fritz

    2005-01-01

    We used two-dimensional (2D) correlation infrared spectroscopy to study further the potassium-induced conformation transition in Nephila spidroin films. It provided increased resolution and important new information on the sequence of events in the conformation transition process, showing that beta-sheet formed from the helical component before they formed from random coil. It also showed more evidence that formation of the 1691 cm(-1) (turn/bend) peak did not proceed with the same kinetics as the 1620 cm(-1) (antiparallel beta-sheet component) one, so we attribute the 1691 cm(-1) peak to turns which formed with different kinetics as the antiparallel beta-sheets. We present a single coherent and detailed hypothesis for the assembly and secondary structural transition of silk proteins in vivo and in vitro based on our findings and on evidence from other laboratories.

  14. Computational Study of the “DFG-Flip” Conformational Transition in c-Abl and c-Src Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are crucial to cellular signaling pathways regulating cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and migration. To maintain normal regulation of cellular signal transductions, the activities of tyrosine kinases are also highly regulated. The conformation of a three-residue motif Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) near the N-terminus of the long “activation” loop covering the catalytic site is known to have a critical impact on the activity of c-Abl and c-Src tyrosine kinases. A conformational transition of the DFG motif can switch the enzyme from an active (DFG-in) to an inactive (DFG-out) state. In the present study, the string method with swarms-of-trajectories was used to computationally determine the reaction pathway connecting the two end-states, and umbrella sampling calculations were carried out to characterize the thermodynamic factors affecting the conformations of the DFG motif in c-Abl and c-Src kinases. According to the calculated free energy landscapes, the DFG-out conformation is clearly more favorable in the case of c-Abl than that of c-Src. The calculations also show that the protonation state of the aspartate residue in the DFG motif strongly affects the in/out conformational transition in c-Abl, although it has a much smaller impact in the case of c-Src due to local structural differences. PMID:25548962

  15. Enhancing pairwise state-transition weights: A new weighting scheme in simulated tempering that can minimize transition time between a pair of conformational states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Qin; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-04-01

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a widely used enhancing sampling method for Molecular Dynamics simulations. As one expanded ensemble method, ST is a combination of canonical ensembles at different temperatures and the acceptance probability of cross-temperature transitions is determined by both the temperature difference and the weights of each temperature. One popular way to obtain the weights is to adopt the free energy of each canonical ensemble, which achieves uniform sampling among temperature space. However, this uniform distribution in temperature space may not be optimal since high temperatures do not always speed up the conformational transitions of interest, as anti-Arrhenius kinetics are prevalent in protein and RNA folding. Here, we propose a new method: Enhancing Pairwise State-transition Weights (EPSW), to obtain the optimal weights by minimizing the round-trip time for transitions among different metastable states at the temperature of interest in ST. The novelty of the EPSW algorithm lies in explicitly considering the kinetics of conformation transitions when optimizing the weights of different temperatures. We further demonstrate the power of EPSW in three different systems: a simple two-temperature model, a two-dimensional model for protein folding with anti-Arrhenius kinetics, and the alanine dipeptide. The results from these three systems showed that the new algorithm can substantially accelerate the transitions between conformational states of interest in the ST expanded ensemble and further facilitate the convergence of thermodynamics compared to the widely used free energy weights. We anticipate that this algorithm is particularly useful for studying functional conformational changes of biological systems where the initial and final states are often known from structural biology experiments.

  16. Conformational transitions and interactions underlying the function of membrane embedded receptor protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Sharonov, Georgy V; Bocharova, Olga V; Pavlov, Konstantin V

    2017-01-25

    Among membrane receptors, the single-span receptor protein kinases occupy a broad but specific functional niche determined by distinctive features of the underlying transmembrane signaling mechanisms that are briefly overviewed on the basis of some of the most representative examples, followed by a more detailed discussion of several hierarchical levels of organization and interactions involved. All these levels, including single-molecule interactions (e.g., dimerization, liganding, chemical modifications), local processes (e.g. lipid membrane perturbations, cytoskeletal interactions), and larger scale phenomena (e.g., effects of membrane surface shape or electrochemical potential gradients) appear to be closely integrated to achieve the observed diversity of the receptor functioning. Different species of receptor protein kinases meet their specific functional demands through different structural features defining their responses to stimulation, but certain common patterns exist. Signaling by receptor protein kinases is typically associated with the receptor dimerization and clustering, ligand-induced rearrangements of receptor domains through allosteric conformational transitions with involvement of lipids, release of the sequestered lipids, restriction of receptor diffusion, cytoskeleton and membrane shape remodeling. Understanding of complexity and continuity of the signaling processes can help identifying currently neglected opportunities for influencing the receptor signaling with potential therapeutic implications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interactions between membrane receptors in cellular membranes edited by Kalina Hristova.

  17. Identification of the Conformational transition pathway in PIP2 Opening Kir Channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junwei; Lü, Shouqin; Liu, Yuzhi; Pang, Chunli; Chen, Yafei; Zhang, Suhua; Yu, Hui; Long, Mian; Zhang, Hailin; Logothetis, Diomedes E.; Zhan, Yong; An, Hailong

    2015-01-01

    The gating of Kir channels depends critically on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), but the detailed mechanism by which PIP2 regulates Kir channels remains obscure. Here, we performed a series of Targeted molecular dynamics simulations on the full-length Kir2.1 channel and, for the first time, were able to achieve the transition from the closed to the open state. Our data show that with the upward motion of the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) the structure of the C-Linker changes from a loop to a helix. The twisting of the C-linker triggers the rotation of the CTD, which induces a small downward movement of the CTD and an upward motion of the slide helix toward the membrane that pulls the inner helix gate open. At the same time, the rotation of the CTD breaks the interaction between the CD- and G-loops thus releasing the G-loop. The G-loop then bounces away from the CD-loop, which leads to the opening of the G-loop gate and the full opening of the pore. We identified a series of interaction networks, between the N-terminus, CD loop, C linker and G loop one by one, which exquisitely regulates the global conformational changes during the opening of Kir channels by PIP2. PMID:26063437

  18. Multifractality and Conformal Invariance at 2D Metal-Insulator Transition in the Spin-Orbit Symmetry Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuse, H.; Subramaniam, A. R.; Furusaki, A.; Gruzberg, I. A.; Ludwig, A. W. W.

    2007-04-01

    We study the multifractality (MF) of critical wave functions at boundaries and corners at the metal-insulator transition (MIT) for noninteracting electrons in the two-dimensional (2D) spin-orbit (symplectic) universality class. We find that the MF exponents near a boundary are different from those in the bulk. The exponents at a corner are found to be directly related to those at a straight boundary through a relation arising from conformal invariance. This provides direct numerical evidence for conformal invariance at the 2D spin-orbit MIT. The presence of boundaries modifies the MF of the whole sample even in the thermodynamic limit.

  19. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com Zhu, Weiliang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com; Shi, Jiye E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com

    2015-03-28

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  20. Multifractality and Conformal Invariance at 2D Metal-Insulator Transition in the Spin-Orbit Symmetry Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuse, Hideaki; Subramaniam, Arvind; Furusaki, Akira; Gruzberg, Ilya; Ludwig, Andreas

    2007-03-01

    We study the multifractality of critical wave functions at boundaries and corners at the Anderson metal-insulator transition for noninteracting electrons in the two-dimensional (2D) spin-orbit (symplectic) universality class. We find that the multifractal exponents near a boundary are different from those in the bulk. The exponents at a corner are found to be directly related to those at a straight boundary through a relation arising from conformal invariance. This provides direct numerical evidence for conformal invariance at the 2D spin-orbit metal-insulator transition. We also show that the presence of boundaries modifies the multifractality of the whole sample even in the thermodynamic limit.

  1. Free energy of conformational transition paths in biomolecules: The string method and its application to myosin VI

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Karplus, Martin; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A set of techniques developed under the umbrella of the string method is used in combination with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to analyze the conformation change between the prepowerstroke (PPS) and rigor (R) structures of the converter domain of myosin VI. The challenges specific to the application of these techniques to such a large and complex biomolecule are addressed in detail. These challenges include (i) identifying a proper set of collective variables to apply the string method, (ii) finding a suitable initial string, (iii) obtaining converged profiles of the free energy along the transition path, (iv) validating and interpreting the free energy profiles, and (v) computing the mean first passage time of the transition. A detailed description of the PPS↔R transition in the converter domain of myosin VI is obtained, including the transition path, the free energy along the path, and the rates of interconversion. The methodology developed here is expected to be useful more generally in studies of conformational transitions in complex biomolecules. PMID:21361558

  2. Ion-controlled conformational dynamics in the outward-open transition from an occluded state of LeuT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Gracia, Luis; Weinstein, Harel; Noskov, Sergei; Shi, Lei

    2012-09-05

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) proteins are secondary Na(+)-driven active transporters that terminate neurotransmission by substrate uptake. Despite the availability of high-resolution crystal structures of a bacterial homolog of NSSs-Leucine Transporter (LeuT)-and extensive computational and experimental structure-function studies, unanswered questions remain regarding the transport mechanisms. We used microsecond atomistic molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations and free-energy computations to reveal ion-controlled conformational dynamics of LeuT in relation to binding affinity and selectivity of the more extracellularly positioned Na(+) binding site (Na1 site). In the course of MD simulations starting from the occluded state with bound Na(+), but in the absence of substrate, we find a spontaneous transition of the extracellular vestibule of LeuT into an outward-open conformation. The outward opening is enhanced by the absence of Na1 and modulated by the protonation state of the Na1-associated Glu-290. Consistently, the Na(+) affinity for the Na1 site is inversely correlated with the extent of outward-open character and is lower than in the occluded state with bound substrate; however, the Na1 site retains its selectivity for Na(+) over K(+) in such conformational transitions. To the best of our knowledge, our findings shed new light on the Na(+)-driven transport cycle and on the symmetry in structural rearrangements for outward- and inward-open transitions.

  3. Dynamics of the His79-heme alkaline transition of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c probed by conformationally gated electron transfer with Co(II)bis(terpyridine).

    PubMed

    Cherney, Melisa M; Junior, Carolyn C; Bergquist, Bryan B; Bowler, Bruce E

    2013-08-28

    Alkaline conformers of cytochrome c may be involved in both its electron transport and apoptotic functions. We use cobalt(II)bis(terpyridine), Co(terpy)2(2+), as a reagent for conformationally gated electron-transfer (gated ET) experiments to study the alkaline conformational transition of K79H variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c expressed in Escherichia coli , WT*K79H, with alanine at position 72 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae , yK79H, with trimethyllysine (Tml) at position 72. Co(terpy)2(2+) is well-suited to the 100 ms to 1 s time scale of the His79-mediated alkaline conformational transition of these variants. Reduction of the His79-heme alkaline conformer by Co(terpy)2(2+) occurs primarily by gated ET, which involves conversion to the native state followed by reduction, with a small fraction of the His79-heme alkaline conformer directly reduced by Co(terpy)2(2+). The gated ET experiments show that the mechanism of formation of the His79-heme alkaline conformer involves only two ionizable groups. In previous work, we showed that the mechanism of the His73-mediated alkaline conformational transition requires three ionizable groups. Thus, the mechanism of heme crevice opening depends upon the position of the ligand mediating the process. The microscopic rate constants provided by gated ET studies show that mutation of Tml72 (yK79H variant) in the heme crevice loop to Ala72 (WT*K79H variant) affects the dynamics of heme crevice opening through a small destabilization of both the native conformer and the transition state relative to the His79-heme alkaline conformer. Previous pH jump data had indicated that the Tml72→Ala mutation primarily stabilized the transition state for the His79-mediated alkaline conformational transition.

  4. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  5. Forbidden Transitions in the Microwave Rotational Spectrum of the Tt Conformer of the N-Propanol Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazimova, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    A search for forbidden transitions was made in the microwave rotational spectrum of the Tt conformer of the propanol molecule (n-CH3CH2CH2OH) in the region of 37.0-78.0 GHz. The n-CH3CH2CH2OH molecule has a plane of symmetry containing μb and μa components of the dipole moment (μc = 0). On account of centrifugal distortion an induced component of the dipole moment μa, perpendicular to the symmetry plane of the molecule and leading to the appearance of previously forbidden rotational transitions, appears in such molecules. Forbidden "centrifugal transitions" of this type were found in the microwave rotational spectrum of the Tt conformer of the n-CH3CH2CH2OH molecule. The spectrum was analyzed by means of the Watson A-reduction rotational Hamiltonian. Sixty four forbidden μc transitions with rotational quantum numbers of up to J = 37 inclusive were identified.

  6. Intrinsic disorder of the bacterial cell division protein ZipA: coil-to-brush conformational transition.

    PubMed

    López-Montero, Iván; López-Navajas, Pilar; Mingorance, Jesús; Rivas, Germán; Vélez, Marisela; Vicente, Miguel; Monroy, Francisco

    2013-08-01

    The full-length ZipA protein from Escherichia coli, one of the essential elements of the cell division machinery, was studied in a surface model built as adsorbed monolayers. The interplay between lateral packing and molecular conformation was probed using a combined methodology based on the scaling analysis of the surface pressure isotherms and ellipsometry measurements of the monolayer thickness. The observed behavior is compatible with the one expected for an intrinsically disordered and highly flexible protein that is preferentially structured in a random coil conformation. At low grafting densities, ZipA coils organize in a mushroom-like regime, whereas a coil-to-brush transition occurs on increasing lateral packing. The structural results suggest a functional scenario in which ZipA acts as a flexible tether anchoring bacterial proto-ring elements to the membrane during the earlier stages of division.

  7. Heat-induced conformation transition of the comb-branched β-glucan in dimethyl sulfoxide/water mixture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuqin; Xu, Xiaojuan; Xu, Min; O'Leary, Timothy R; Zhang, Lina

    2017-02-10

    We studied the chain conformation transition of the comb-branched β-glucan (AF1) isolated from Auricularia auricula-judae by heating associated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The results from (1)H NMR and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) indicated that the reversible hydrogen bonds between side chains of AF1 and water clusters formed at relatively low temperatures. With increasing vDMSO to 0.70, the transition temperature (Tm) increased from 9 to 71°C, and then decreased to 57°C with continuously increasing vDMSO due to the competition between DMSO and water for forming hydrogen bonds. Additionally, the combined analysis of (13)C NMR, viscosity and light scattering revealed an obvious stiff-to-flexible chain conformation transition of AF1, which occurred at 95-130°C, 120-145°C and 130-160°C with vDMSO of 0.90, 0.85 and 0.70, respectively. This work demonstrated that AF1 has complex structure under different conditions, and the results obtained herein would benefit us to understand its specific behaviors including hollow fibril and anti-hepatoma activity.

  8. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation.

  9. Residues in the gp41 Ectodomain Regulate HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Conformational Transitions Induced by gp120-Directed Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Beatriz; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Debbeche, Olfa; Prévost, Jérémie; Ding, Shilei; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Herschhorn, Alon; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy; Melillo, Bruno; Gu, Christopher; Zeng, Xin; Mao, Youdong; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-03-01

    Interactions between the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer maintain the metastable unliganded form of the viral spike. Binding of gp120 to the receptor, CD4, changes the Env conformation to promote gp120 interaction with the second receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4. CD4 binding also induces the transformation of Env into the prehairpin intermediate, in which the gp41 heptad repeat 1 (HR1) coiled coil is assembled at the trimer axis. In nature, HIV-1 Envs must balance the requirements to maintain the noncovalent association of gp120 with gp41 and to evade the host antibody response with the need to respond to CD4 binding. Here we show that the gp41 HR1 region contributes to gp120 association with the unliganded Env trimer. Changes in particular amino acid residues in the gp41 HR1 region decreased the efficiency with which Env moved from the unliganded state. Thus, these gp41 changes decreased the sensitivity of HIV-1 to cold inactivation and ligands that require Env conformational changes to bind efficiently. Conversely, these gp41 changes increased HIV-1 sensitivity to small-molecule entry inhibitors that block Env conformational changes induced by CD4. Changes in particular gp41 HR1 amino acid residues can apparently affect the relative stability of the unliganded state and CD4-induced conformations. Thus, the gp41 HR1 region contributes to the association with gp120 and regulates Env transitions from the unliganded state to downstream conformations.IMPORTANCE The development of an efficient vaccine able to prevent HIV infection is a worldwide priority. Knowledge of the envelope glycoprotein structure and the conformational changes that occur after receptor engagement will help researchers to develop an immunogen able to elicit antibodies that block HIV-1 transmission. Here we identify residues in the HIV-1 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein that stabilize the unliganded state by modulating the

  10. Exploring transition pathway and free-energy profile of large-scale protein conformational change by combining normal mode analysis and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Xu, Zhijian; Liu, Yingtao; Yang, Zhuo; Cossins, Benjamin P; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-09

    Large-scale conformational changes of proteins are usually associated with the binding of ligands. Because the conformational changes are often related to the biological functions of proteins, understanding the molecular mechanisms of these motions and the effects of ligand binding becomes very necessary. In the present study, we use the combination of normal-mode analysis and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulation to delineate the atomically detailed conformational transition pathways and the associated free-energy landscapes for three well-known protein systems, viz., adenylate kinase (AdK), calmodulin (CaM), and p38α kinase in the absence and presence of respective ligands. For each protein under study, the transient conformations along the conformational transition pathway and thermodynamic observables are in agreement with experimentally and computationally determined ones. The calculated free-energy profiles reveal that AdK and CaM are intrinsically flexible in structures without obvious energy barrier, and their ligand binding shifts the equilibrium from the ligand-free to ligand-bound conformation (population shift mechanism). In contrast, the ligand binding to p38α leads to a large change in free-energy barrier (ΔΔG ≈ 7 kcal/mol), promoting the transition from DFG-in to DFG-out conformation (induced fit mechanism). Moreover, the effect of the protonation of D168 on the conformational change of p38α is also studied, which reduces the free-energy difference between the two functional states of p38α and thus further facilitates the conformational interconversion. Therefore, the present study suggests that the detailed mechanism of ligand binding and the associated conformational transition is not uniform for all kinds of proteins but correlated to their respective biological functions.

  11. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic analysis of the conformational transition of poly(vinyl alcohol) by temperature-dependent FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shan; Luan, Ye-Mei; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The conformational change of poly(vinyl alcohol) has been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy at various temperatures in the 4000-400 cm-1 region. The molecular motion and the trans/gauche content are sensitive to the Csbnd H, Csbnd C stretching modes. FTIR spectra show that the I2920/I2849 decreases from 1.84 to 1.0 with increasing temperature, companying the decrease in I1047/I1095 from 0.78 to 0.58, implying the conformational transition from trans to gauche in alkyl chain. Based on the van't Hoff relation, the enthalpies and entropies have been calculated in different temperatures, which are 4.61 kJ mol-1 and 15.23 J mol-1 K-1, respectively, in the region of 80-140 °C. From the Cdbnd O stretching mode and Osbnd H band, it can be concluded that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds decrease owing to elevating temperature, which leads to more gauche conformers.

  12. The nature of the force-induced conformation transition of dsDNA studied by using single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningning; Bu, Tianjia; Song, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jinjing; Zhang, Wenke; Shen, Jiacong; Li, Hongbin

    2010-06-15

    Single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) interact with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) specifically. Taking advantage of this character, we have employed Bacillus subtilis SSB protein to investigate the nature of force-induced conformation transition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by using AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) technique. Our results show that, when a dsDNA is stretched beyond its contour length, the dsDNA is partially melted, producing some ssDNA segments which can be captured by SSB proteins. We have also systematically investigated the effects of stretching length, waiting time, and salt concentration on the conformation transition of dsDNA and SSB-ssDNA interactions, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of proflavine, a DNA intercalator, on the SSB-DNA interactions has been investigated, and the results indicate that the proflavine-saturated dsDNA can be stabilized to the extent that the dsDNA will no longer melt into ssDNA under the mechanical force even up to 150 pN, and no SSB-DNA interactions are detectable.

  13. Calcium-induced conformational changes of the regulatory domain of human mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carriers

    PubMed Central

    Thangaratnarajah, Chancievan; Ruprecht, Jonathan J.; Kunji, Edmund R. S.

    2014-01-01

    The transport activity of human mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carriers is central to the malate–aspartate shuttle, urea cycle, gluconeogenesis and myelin synthesis. They have a unique three-domain structure, comprising a calcium-regulated N-terminal domain with eight EF-hands, a mitochondrial carrier domain, and a C-terminal domain. Here we present the calcium-bound and calcium-free structures of the N- and C-terminal domains, elucidating the mechanism of calcium regulation. Unexpectedly, EF-hands 4–8 are involved in dimerization of the carrier and form a static unit, whereas EF-hands 1–3 form a calcium-responsive mobile unit. On calcium binding, an amphipathic helix of the C-terminal domain binds to the N-terminal domain, opening a vestibule. In the absence of calcium, the mobile unit closes the vestibule. Opening and closing of the vestibule might regulate access of substrates to the carrier domain, which is involved in their transport. These structures provide a framework for understanding cases of the mitochondrial disease citrin deficiency. PMID:25410934

  14. Trifluoroethanol-induced conformational transition of the C-terminal sterile alpha motif (SAM) of human p73.

    PubMed

    Neira, José L; Cámara-Artigas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    The alpha splice variant of p73 (p73α), a homologue of the tumour suppressor p53, has at its C terminus a sterile alpha motif (SAM); this domain, SAMp73, is involved in lipid binding and it is thought to mediate in protein-protein interactions. As SAMp73 is a 68-residue-long helical bundle, it could be a good model to study the (2,2,2-trifluoroethanol) TFE-induced conformational transitions of α-helical proteins. Furthermore, as SAMp73 binds to lipids through a well-known polypeptide patch, we can test whether TFE is a good mimic of lipids and membranes. To address those questions, we used several biophysical probes, namely, fluorescence, circular dichroism, 1D, 2D and 3D-NMR spectroscopies, and dynamic light scattering. The TFE-induced conformational transition of SAMp73 was complex, involving several species as detected by the biophysical probes. The last TFE-induced transition occurred at a concentration of TFE of ∼20% (v/v), where the protein lost its compactness. None of those TFE-induced species accumulated during the two-state folding of SAMp73 in aqueous solution. The final state at 40% TFE was highly helical, but its structure was not rigid. For SAMp73, TFE did not properly mimic a membrane-like environment, since at very low TFE concentrations, other residues, together with those known to interact with lipids, were also affected by the co-solvent. Comparison with studies on isolated peptides, comprising the helical regions of SAMp73, suggests that peptides were good models of the intact protein in TFE.

  15. The 32 kDa Enamelin Undergoes Conformational Transitions upon Calcium Binding

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Daming; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2008-01-01

    The 32 kDa hydrophilic and acidic enamelin, the most stable cleavage fragment of the enamel specific glycoprotein, is believed to play vital roles in controlling crystal nucleation or growth during enamel biomineralization. Circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectra demonstrate that the secondary structure of the 32 kDa enamelin has a high content of α-helix (81.5%). Quantitative analysis on the circular dichroism data revealed that the 32 kDa enamelin undergoes conformational changes with a structural preference to β-sheet as a function of calcium ions. We suggest that the increase of β-sheet conformation upon presence of Ca2+ may allow preferable interaction of the 32 kDa enamelin with apatite crystal surfaces during enamel biomineralization. The calcium association constant of the 32 kDa enamelin calculated from the fitting curve of ellipticity at 222 nm is Ka = 1.55 (±0.13) × 103 M−1, indicating a relatively low affinity. Our current biophysical studies on the 32 kDa enamelin structure provide novel insights towards understanding the enamelin-mineral interaction and subsequently the functions of enamelin during enamel formation. PMID:18508280

  16. Conformation and dynamics of biopharmaceuticals: transition of mass spectrometry-based tools from academe to industry

    PubMed Central

    Kaltashov, Igor A.; Bobst, Cedric E.; Abzalimov, Rinat R.; Berkowitz, Steven A.; Houde, Damian

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays a very visible role in biopharmaceutical industry, although its use in development, characterization and quality control of protein drugs is mostly limited to the analysis of covalent structure (amino acid sequence and post-translational modifications). Despite the centrality of protein conformation to biological activity, stability and safety of biopharmaceutical products, the expanding arsenal of mass spectrometry-based methods that are currently available to probe higher order structure and conformational dynamics of biopolymers did not enjoy until recently much attention in the industry. This is beginning to change as a result of recent work demonstrating the utility of these experimental tools for various aspects of biopharmaceutical product development and manufacturing. In this work we use a paradigmatic protein drug interferon β-1a as an example to illustrate the utility of mass spectrometry as a powerful tool not only to assess the integrity of higher order structure of a protein drug, but also to predict consequences of its degradation at a variety of levels. PMID:19963397

  17. Formation of critical oligomers is a key event during conformational transition of recombinant syrian hamster prion protein.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Fabian; Modler, Andreas Johannes; Masuch, Ralf; Zirwer, Dietrich; Baier, Michael; Lutsch, Gudrun; Moss, David Alan; Gast, Klaus; Naumann, Dieter

    2003-10-17

    We have investigated the conformational transition and aggregation process of recombinant Syrian hamster prion protein (SHaPrP90-232) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, light scattering, and electron microscopy under equilibrium and kinetic conditions. SHaPrP90-232 showed an infrared absorbance spectrum typical of proteins with a predominant alpha-helical structure both at pH 7.0 and at pH 4.2 in the absence of guanidine hydrochloride. At pH 4.2 and destabilizing conditions (0.3-2 m guanidine hydrochloride), the secondary structure of SHaPrP90-232 was transformed to a strongly hydrogen-bonded, most probably intermolecularly arranged antiparallel beta-sheet structure as indicated by dominant amide I band components at 1620 and 1691 cm-1. Kinetic analysis of the transition process showed that the decrease in alpha-helical structures and the increase in beta-sheet structures occurred concomitantly according to a bimolecular reaction. However, the concentration dependence of the corresponding rate constant pointed to an apparent third order reaction. No beta-sheet structure was formed within the dead time (190 ms) of the infrared experiments. Light scattering measurements revealed that the structural transition of SHaPrP90-232 was accompanied by formation of oligomers, whose size was linearly dependent on protein concentration. Extrapolation to zero protein concentration yielded octamers as the smallest oligomers, which are considered as "critical oligomers." The small oligomers showed spherical and annular shapes in electron micrographs. Critical oligomers seem to play a key role during the transition and aggregation process of SHaPrP90-232. A new model for the structural transition and aggregation process of the prion protein is described.

  18. Conformation of ceramide 6 molecules and chain-flip transitions in the lipid matrix of the outermost layer of mammalian skin, the stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    Neutron diffraction from oriented multilamellar model stratum corneum (SC) membranes provides information on the internal nanostructure and hydration of the lipid bilayer. The main distinguishing feature of model SC membranes based on ceramide 6 is the extremely small intermembrane space (1 Å). The role of the fully extended (FE) conformation of ceramide 6 molecules in the organization of the nanostructure of the lipid matrix is discussed. The FE conformation gives rise to extremely strong intermembrane attractions (armature reinforcement), which tighten the adjacent bilayers to form steric contacts. Chain-flip transitions in the conformation of ceramide molecules account for structural alterations in native and model SC membranes upon their hydration.

  19. Conformation of ceramide 6 molecules and chain-flip transitions in the lipid matrix of the outermost layer of mammalian skin, the stratum corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2007-05-15

    Neutron diffraction from oriented multilamellar model stratum corneum (SC) membranes provides information on the internal nanostructure and hydration of the lipid bilayer. The main distinguishing feature of model SC membranes based on ceramide 6 is the extremely small intermembrane space (1 A). The role of the fully extended (FE) conformation of ceramide 6 molecules in the organization of the nanostructure of the lipid matrix is discussed. The FE conformation gives rise to extremely strong intermembrane attractions (armature reinforcement), which tighten the adjacent bilayers to form steric contacts. Chain-flip transitions in the conformation of ceramide molecules account for structural alterations in native and model SC membranes upon their hydration.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions in the mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulator PrrA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guo; Mcmahon, Benjamin H; Tung, Chang - Shung

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation-activated modulation of response regulators (RR) is predominantly used by bacteria as a strategy in regulating their two-component signaling (TCS) systems, the underlying molecular mechanisms are however far from fully understood. In this work we have conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions of RRs with the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis PrrA as a particular example. Starting from the full-length inactive structure of PrrA we introduced a local disturbance by phosphorylating the conserved aspartic acid residue, Asp-58, in the regulatory domain. A Go-model-type algorithm packaged with AMBER force fields was then applied to simulate the dynamics upon phosphorylation. The MD simulation shows that the phosphorylation of Asp-58 facilitates PrrA, whose inactive state has a compact conformation with a closed interdomain interface, to open up with its interdomain separation being increased by an average of about 1.5 {angstrom} for a simulation of 20 ns. The trans-activation loop, which is completely buried within the interdomain interface in the inactive PrrA, is found to become more exposed with the phosphorylated structure as well. These results provide more structural details of how the phosphorylation of a local aspartate activates PrrA to undergo a global conformational rearrangement toward its extended active state. This work also indicates that MD simulations can serve as a fast tool to unravel the regulation mechanisms of all RRs, which is especially valuable when the structures of full-length active RRs are currently unavailable.

  1. Conformational dynamics of the SH1-SH2 helix in the transition states of myosin subfragment-1.

    PubMed Central

    Nitao, Lisa K; Yeates, Todd O; Reisler, Emil

    2002-01-01

    The alpha-helix containing the thiols, SH1 (Cys-707) and SH2 (Cys-697), has been proposed to be one of the structural elements responsible for the transduction of conformational changes in the myosin head (subfragment-1 (S1)). Previous studies, using a method that isolated and measured the rate of the SH1-SH2 cross-linking step, showed that this helix undergoes ligand-induced conformational changes. However, because of long incubation times required for the formation of the transition state complexes (S1.ADP.BeF(x), S1.ADP.AlF(4)-, and S1.ADP.V(i)), this method could not be used to determine the cross-linking rate constants for such states. In this study, kinetic data from the SH1-SH2 cross-linking reaction were analyzed by computational methods to extract rate constants for the two-step mechanism. For S1.ADP.BeF(x), the results obtained were similar to those for S1.ATPgammaS. For reactions involving S1.ADP.AlF(4)- and S1.ADP.V(i), the first step (SH1 modification) is rate limiting; consequently, only lower limits could be established for the rate constants of the cross-linking step. Nevertheless, these results show that the cross-linking rate constants in the transition state complexes are increased at least 20-fold for all the reagents, including the shortest one, compared with nucleotide-free S1. Thus, the SH1-SH2 helix appears to be destabilized in the post-hydrolysis state. PMID:12414706

  2. [Conformational transitions of human serum albumin depending on pH. Study using tritium markers].

    PubMed

    Dzhafarov, E S

    1991-01-01

    Accessible surfaces of the HSA molecule in N-, F- and B-forms were studied in the present work by tritium labelling method which allowed to obtain detailed information on N-F- and N-B-transitions. In was shown that the F-form in comparison top the N-form is characterized by more high accessibility of Ser, Ala, Ile, Tyr, Phe, His, Arg, Pro, Val and Phe residues and in the B-form Tyr, Ser, Arg, Gly, Ile, Phe and Pro residues turn to be highly accessible. Full accessible surfaces of protein molecule at N-F- and N-B-transitions increase respectively from 39,000 to 70,400 A2 and from 39,000 to 47,000 A2. Basing on the prevailing increase of hydrophobic residues accessibility it is supposed that the molecule expansion testifies the separation of the subunits forming the molecule.

  3. Conformational Transitions that Enable Histidine Kinase Autophosphorylation and Receptor Array Integration

    PubMed Central

    Greenswag, Anna R.; Muok, Alise; Li, Xiaoxiao; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    During bacterial chemotaxis, transmembrane chemoreceptor arrays regulate autophosphorylation of the dimeric, histidine-kinase CheA. The five domains of CheA (P1-P5) each play a specific role in coupling receptor stimulation to CheA activity. Biochemical and x-ray scattering studies of thermostable CheA from Thermotoga maritima find that the His-containing substrate domain (P1) is sequestered by interactions that depend upon P1 of the adjacent subunit. Non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs (but not ATP nor ADP) release P1 from the protein core (domains P3P4P5) and increase its mobility. Detachment of both P1 domains, or removal of one within a dimer, increases net autophosphorylation substantially at physiological temperature (55°C). However, nearly all activity is lost without the dimerization domain (P3). The linker length between P1 and P3 dictates inter-subunit (trans) versus intra-subunit (cis) autophosphorylation; with the trans reaction requiring a minimum length of 47 residues. A new crystal structure of the most active dimerization-plus-kinase unit (P3P4) reveals trans-directing interactions between the tether connecting P3 to P2-P1 and the adjacent ATP-binding (P4) domain. The orientation of P4 relative to P3 in the P3P4 structure supports a planar CheA conformation that is required by membrane array models, and suggests that the ATP-lid of CheA may be poised to interact with receptors and coupling proteins. Collectively, these data suggest that the P1 domains are restrained in the off-state as a result of cross-subunit interactions. Perturbations at the nucleotide-binding pocket increase P1 mobility and access of the substrate His to P4-bound ATP. PMID:26522934

  4. Network representation of conformational transitions between hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Mojie; Liu, Hanzhong; Li, Minghai; Huo, Shuanghong

    2015-10-01

    The folding kinetics of Rd-apocytochrome b562 is two-state, but native-state hydrogen exchange experiments show that there are discrete partially unfolded (PUF) structures in equilibrium with the native state. These PUF structures are called hidden intermediates because they are not detected in kinetic experiments and they exist after the rate-limiting step. Structures of the mimics of hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562 are resolved by NMR. Based upon their relative stability and structural features, the folding mechanism was proposed to follow a specific pathway (unfolded → rate-limiting transition state → PUF1 → PUF2 → native). Investigating the roles of equilibrium PUF structures in folding kinetics and their interrelationship not only deepens our understanding of the details of folding mechanism but also provides guides in protein design and prevention of misfolding. We performed molecular dynamics simulations starting from a hidden intermediate and the native state of Rd-apocytochrome b562 in explicit solvent, for a total of 37.18 μs mainly with Anton. We validated our simulations by detailed comparison with experimental data and other computations. We have verified that we sampled the post rate-limiting transition state region only. Markov state model was used to analyze the simulation results. We replace the specific pathway model with a network model. Transition-path theory was employed to calculate the net effective flux from the most unfolded state towards the most folded state in the network. The proposed sequential folding pathway via PUF1 then more stable, more native-like PUF2 is one of the routes in our network, but it is not dominant. The dominant path visits PUF2 without going through PUF1. There is also a route from PUF1 directly to the most folded state in the network without visiting PUF2. Our results indicate that the PUF states are not necessarily sequential in the folding. The major routes predicted in our network are

  5. Network representation of conformational transitions between hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Mojie; Liu, Hanzhong; Li, Minghai; Huo, Shuanghong

    2015-01-01

    The folding kinetics of Rd-apocytochrome b562 is two-state, but native-state hydrogen exchange experiments show that there are discrete partially unfolded (PUF) structures in equilibrium with the native state. These PUF structures are called hidden intermediates because they are not detected in kinetic experiments and they exist after the rate-limiting step. Structures of the mimics of hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562 are resolved by NMR. Based upon their relative stability and structural features, the folding mechanism was proposed to follow a specific pathway (unfolded → rate-limiting transition state → PUF1 → PUF2 → native). Investigating the roles of equilibrium PUF structures in folding kinetics and their interrelationship not only deepens our understanding of the details of folding mechanism but also provides guides in protein design and prevention of misfolding. We performed molecular dynamics simulations starting from a hidden intermediate and the native state of Rd-apocytochrome b562 in explicit solvent, for a total of 37.18 μs mainly with Anton. We validated our simulations by detailed comparison with experimental data and other computations. We have verified that we sampled the post rate-limiting transition state region only. Markov state model was used to analyze the simulation results. We replace the specific pathway model with a network model. Transition-path theory was employed to calculate the net effective flux from the most unfolded state towards the most folded state in the network. The proposed sequential folding pathway via PUF1 then more stable, more native-like PUF2 is one of the routes in our network, but it is not dominant. The dominant path visits PUF2 without going through PUF1. There is also a route from PUF1 directly to the most folded state in the network without visiting PUF2. Our results indicate that the PUF states are not necessarily sequential in the folding. The major routes predicted in our network are

  6. A High-Temperature Order-Disorder Phase Transition Coupled With Conformational Change in the Hybrid Material [C6 H13 NH]2 ⋅ZnBr4.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tariq; Asghar, Muhammad Adnan; Sun, Zhihua; Zeb, Aurang; Li, Lina; Sijie, Liu; Zhao, Sangen; Ji, Chengmin; Luo, Junhua

    2016-10-20

    A new high-temperature, hybrid, phase-transition material, 1-methylpiperidinium tetrabromozincate (1), that shows a reversible transition at 345 K was synthesized. Differential scanning calorimetry and specific heat capacity measurements confirmed this reversible transformation with a large heat hysteresis of 25 K, which describes a typical first-order phase transition in 1. The dielectric constant exhibited a steplike anomaly and showed high and low dielectric states in the high- and room-temperature phases, respectively, and therefore, this hybrid might be considered as a potential switchable dielectric material. The variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction patterns displayed remarkable shifts between the experimental patterns at the two different phases. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses at various temperatures revealed that the origin of this transformation could be attributed to disordering of the bromine atoms in the anion and the nitrogen atom of the cation. The cation also assumed a conformational change, which was likely induced by the disordered nitrogen atom. The conformational onset of the transformation of the cation from a planar conformer into a relaxed chair also occurred upon decreasing the temperature below transition point; thus, the combined order-disorder and conformational change induced the structural transformation and the change in symmetry.

  7. Conformation transition of Bombyx mori silk protein monitored by time-dependent fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy: effect of organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Cai, Huifei; Ling, Shengjie; Shao, Zhengzhong; Huang, Yufang

    2012-06-01

    The conformation transition from random coil and/or helix to β-sheet of silk protein is the most important step in the formation of silk fiber in nature as well as by artificial spinning. Time-dependent Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used in this research to monitor such a conformation transition process induced by the organic solvents methanol, ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, and acetone. The kinetics of β-sheet formation of regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin in these organic solvents was obtained by the Δabsorbance-time curve from the time-dependent difference infrared spectra. The results showed that the conformation transition rate of silk fibroin was methanol > ethanol > acetone > propanol > isopropanol, which is in accordance with the polarity of these organic solvents. In connection with the mechanical properties and morphologies of regenerated silk fibers using these organic solvents as coagulation bath reported in the literature, we may conclude that the conformation transition rate of silk protein in the organic solvent is very important in wet-spinning to produce high-performance regenerated silk fibers.

  8. Na(+) transport, and the E(1)P-E(2)P conformational transition of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Babes, A; Fendler, K

    2000-01-01

    We have used admittance analysis together with the black lipid membrane technique to analyze electrogenic reactions within the Na(+) branch of the reaction cycle of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. ATP release by flash photolysis of caged ATP induced changes in the admittance of the compound membrane system that are associated with partial reactions of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Frequency spectra and the Na(+) dependence of the capacitive signal are consistent with an electrogenic or electroneutral E(1)P <--> E(2)P conformational transition which is rate limiting for a faster electrogenic Na(+) dissociation reaction. We determine the relaxation rate of the rate-limiting reaction and the equilibrium constants for both reactions at pH 6.2-8.5. The relaxation rate has a maximum value at pH 7.4 (approximately 320 s(-1)), which drops to acidic (approximately 190 s(-1)) and basic (approximately 110 s(-1)) pH. The E(1)P <--> E(2)P equilibrium is approximately at a midpoint position at pH 6.2 (equilibrium constant approximately 0.8) but moves more to the E(1)P side at basic pH 8.5 (equilibrium constant approximately 0.4). The Na(+) affinity at the extracellular binding site decreases from approximately 900 mM at pH 6.2 to approximately 200 mM at pH 8.5. The results suggest that during Na(+) transport the free energy supplied by the hydrolysis of ATP is mainly used for the generation of a low-affinity extracellular Na(+) discharge site. Ionic strength and lyotropic anions both decrease the relaxation rate. However, while ionic strength does not change the position of the conformational equilibrium E(1)P <--> E(2)P, lyotropic anions shift it to E(1)P. PMID:11053130

  9. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano‐chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide‐dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly‐ stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin‐related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head‐to‐head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P‐) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization‐dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin‐like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P‐loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano‐chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580–593, 2016. PMID:27062152

  10. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Daumke, Oliver; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2016-08-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano-chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide-dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly- stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin-related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head-to-head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P-) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization-dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin-like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P-loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano-chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580-593, 2016.

  11. Conformational transitions in peptides containing two putative alpha-helices of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Kaneko, K; Nguyen, J T; Livshits, T L; Baldwin, M A; Cohen, F E; James, T L; Prusiner, S B

    1995-07-21

    Prions are composed largely, if not entirely, of the scrapie isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). Conversion of the cellular isoform (PrPC) to PrPSc is accompanied by a diminution in the alpha-helical content and an increase in the beta-sheet structure. To investigate the structural basis of this transition, peptide fragments corresponding to Syrian hamster PrP residues 90 to 145 and 109 to 141, which contain the most conserved residues of the prion protein and the first two putative alpha-helical regions in a PrPC model, were studied using infrared spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The peptides could be induced to form alpha-helical structures in aqueous solutions in the presence of organic solvents, such as trifluoroethanol and hexafluoroisopropanol, or detergents, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl phosphocholine. NaCl at physiological concentration or acetonitrile induced the peptides to acquire substantial beta-sheet. The intermolecular nature of the beta-sheet was evident in the formation of rod-shaped polymers as detected by electron microscopy. Resistance to hydrolysis by proteinase K and epitope mapping argue that the beta-sheet structures were formed by the interaction of residues lying between 109 and 141. A similar range of residues was shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to be capable of forming alpha-helices. The alpha-helical structures seem to require a hydrophobic support from either intermolecular interactions or the hydrophobic environment provided by micelles, in agreement with the predicted hydrophobic nature of the packing surface among the four putative helices of PrPC and the outer surfaces of the first two helices. Our results suggest that perturbation of the packing environment of the highly conserved residues is a possible mechanism for triggering the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc where alpha-helices appear to be converted into beta-sheets.

  12. Protein conformational transitions at the liquid-gas interface as studied by dilational surface rheology.

    PubMed

    Noskov, Boris A

    2014-04-01

    Experimental results on the dynamic dilational surface elasticity of protein solutions are analyzed and compared. Short reviews of the protein behavior at the liquid-gas interface and the dilational surface rheology precede the main sections of this work. The kinetic dependencies of the surface elasticity differ strongly for the solutions of globular and non-globular proteins. In the latter case these dependencies are similar to those for solutions of non-ionic amphiphilic polymers and have local maxima corresponding to the formation of the distal region of the surface layer (type I). In the former case the dynamic surface elasticity is much higher (>60 mN/m) and the kinetic dependencies are monotonical and similar to the data for aqueous dispersions of solid nanoparticles (type II). The addition of strong denaturants to solutions of bovine serum albumin and β-lactoglobulin results in an abrupt transition from the type II to type I dependencies if the denaturant concentration exceeds a certain critical value. These results give a strong argument in favor of the preservation of the protein globular structure in the course of adsorption without any denaturants. The addition of cationic surfactants also can lead to the non-monotonical kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity indicating destruction of the protein tertiary and secondary structures. The addition of anionic surfactants gives similar results only for the protein solutions of high ionic strength. The influence of cationic surfactants on the local maxima of the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity for solutions of a non-globular protein (β-casein) differs from the influence of anionic surfactants due to the heterogeneity of the charge distribution along the protein chain. In this case one can use small admixtures of ionic surfactants as probes of the adsorption mechanism. The effect of polyelectrolytes on the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity of protein

  13. Energetics of the Cleft Closing Transition and the Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Conformational Rearrangements of the Glutamate Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mamonova, Tatyana; Yonkunas, Michael J.; Kurnikova, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptors are localized in the pre- and postsynaptic membrane of neurons in the brain. Activation by the principal excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate allows the ligand binding domain to change conformation, communicating opening of the channel for ion conduction. The free energy of the GluR2 S1S2 ligand binding domain (S1S2) closure transition was computed using a combination of thermodynamic integration and umbrella sampling modeling methods. A path that involves lowering the charge on E705 was chosen to clarify the role of this binding site residue. A continuum electrostatic approach in S1S2 is used to show E705, located in the ligand binding cleft, stabilizes the closed conformation of S1S2. In the closed conformation, in the absence of a ligand, S1S2 is somewhat more closed than reported from X-ray structures. A semi-open conformation has been identified which is characterized by disruption of a single cross-cleft interaction and differs only slightly in energy from the fully closed S1S2. The fully open S1S2 conformation exhibits a wide energy well and shares structural similarity to the apo S1S2 crystal structure. Hybrid continuum electrostatics/MD calculations along the chosen closure transition pathway reveal solvation energies, as well as electrostatic interaction energies between two lobes of the protein increase the relative energetic difference between the open and the closed conformational states. By analyzing the role of several cross-cleft contacts as well as other binding site residues we demonstrate how S1S2 interactions facilitate formation of the closed conformation of the ligand binding domain. PMID:18823129

  14. Conformational transition of the lid helix covering the protease active site is essential for the ATP-dependent protease activity of FtsH.

    PubMed

    Suno, Ryoji; Shimoyama, Masakazu; Abe, Akiko; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Shimodate, Natsuka; Watanabe, Yo-hei; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-09-21

    When bound to ADP, ATP-dependent protease FtsH subunits adopt either an "open" or "closed" conformation. In the open state, the protease catalytic site is located in a narrow space covered by a lidlike helix. This space disappears in the closed form because the lid helix bends at Gly448. Here, we replaced Gly448 with various residues that stabilize helices. Most mutants retained low ATPase activity and bound to the substrate protein, but lost protease activity. However, a mutant proline substitution lost both activities. Our study shows that the conformational transition of the lid helix is essential for the function of FtsH.

  15. Evidence of PPII-like helical conformation and glass transition in a self-assembled solid-state polypeptide-surfactant complex: poly(L-histidine)/docylbenzenesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Ramasubbu; Hanski, Sirkku; Laiho, Ari; Tuma, Roman; Kilpeläinen, Simo; Tuomisto, Filip; Ruokolainen, Janne; Ikkala, Olli

    2008-05-01

    We present lamellar self-assembly of cationic poly(L-histidine) (PLH) stoichiometrically complexed with an anionic surfactant, dodecyl benzenesulfonic acid (DBSA), which allows a stabilized conformation reminiscent of polyproline type II (PPII) left-handed helices. Such a conformation has no intrapeptide hydrogen bonds, and it has previously been found to be one source of flexibility, e.g., in collagen and elastin, as well as an intermediate in silk processing. PLH(DBSA)1.0 complexes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The PPII-like conformation in PLH(DBSA)1.0 is revealed by characteristic CD and FTIR spectra, where the latter indicates absence of intrachain peptide hydrogen bonds. In addition, a glass transition was directly verified by DSC at ca. 135 degrees C for PLH(DBSA)1.0 and indirectly by SAXS and TEM in comparison to pure PLH at 165 degrees C, thus indicating plasticization. Glass transitions have not been observed before in polypeptide-surfactant complexes. The present results show that surfactant binding can be a simple scheme to provide steric crowding to stabilize PPII conformation to tune the polypeptide properties, plasticization and flexibility.

  16. External Ba2+ block of the two-pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 defines conformational transition in its selectivity filter.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Yun; Yu, Jin-Mei; Zhang, Shu-Zhuo; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wu, Bao-Hong; Wei, Xiao-Li; Yan, Jia-Qing; Sun, Hong-Liang; Yan, Hai-Tao; Zheng, Jian-Quan

    2011-11-18

    TREK-1 is a member of the two-pore domain potassium channel family that is known as a leak channel and plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes. The conformational transition of the selectivity filter is considered as an effective strategy for potassium channels to control the course of potassium efflux. It is well known that TREK-1 is regulated by a large volume of extracellular and intracellular signals. However, until now, little was known about the selectivity filter gating mechanism of the channel. In this research, it was found that Ba(2+) blocked the TREK-1 channel in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. A mutagenesis analysis showed that overlapped binding of Ba(2+) at the assumed K(+) binding site 4 (S4) within the selectivity filter was responsible for the inhibitory effects on TREK-1. Then, Ba(2+) was used as a probe to explore the conformational transition in the selectivity filter of the channel. It was confirmed that collapsed conformations were induced by extracellular K(+)-free and acidification at the selectivity filters, leading to nonconductive to permeable ions. Further detailed characterization demonstrated that the two conformations presented different properties. Additionally, the N-terminal truncated isoform (ΔN41), a product derived from alternative translation initiation, was identified as a constitutively nonconductive variant. Together, these results illustrate the important role of selectivity filter gating in the regulation of TREK-1 by the extracellular K(+) and proton.

  17. To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Saris, Nils-Erik L

    2016-04-01

    The conformation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) has a profound impact in opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane. Fixing the ANT in 'c' conformation by phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside as well as the interaction of 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) with mitochondrial thiols markedly attenuated the ability of ADP to inhibit the MPTP opening. We earlier found (Korotkov and Saris, 2011) that calcium load of rat liver mitochondria in medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3 stimulated the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The MPTP opening as well as followed increase in swelling, a drop in membrane potential (ΔΨmito), and a decrease in state 3, state 4, and 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration were visibly enhanced in the presence of PAO, tBHP, DIDS, and carboxyatractyloside. However, these effects were markedly inhibited by ADP and membrane-penetrant hydrophobic thiol reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) which fix the ANT in 'm' conformation. Cyclosporine A additionally potentiated these effects of ADP and NEM. Our data suggest that conformational changes of the ANT may be directly involved in the opening of the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria. Using the Tl(+)-induced MPTP model is discussed in terms finding new transition pore inhibitors and inducers among different chemical and natural compounds.

  18. Polyelectrolyte conformational transition in aqueous solvent mixture influenced by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding effects: PAA-water-ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sappidi, Praveenkumar; Natarajan, Upendra

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of poly(acrylic acid) PAA chain in water-ethanol mixture were performed for un-ionized and ionized cases at different degree-of-ionization 0%, 80% and 100% of PAA chain by Na(+) counter-ions and co-solvent (ethanol) concentration in the range 0-90vol% ethanol. Aspects of structure and dynamics were investigated via atom pair correlation functions, number and relaxation of hydrogen bonds, nearest-neighbor coordination numbers, and dihedral angle distribution function for back-bone and side-groups of the chain. With increase in ethanol concentration, chain swelling is observed for un-ionized chain (f=0) and on the contrary chain shrinkage is observed for partially and fully ionized cases (i.e., f=0.8 and 1). For un-ionized PAA, with increase in ethanol fraction ϕeth the number of PAA-ethanol hydrogen bonds increases while PAA-water decreases. Increase in ϕeth leads to PAA chain expansion for un-ionized case and chain shrinkage for ionized case, in agreement with experimental observations on this system. For ionized-PAA case, chain shrinkage is found to be influenced by intermolecular hydrogen bonding with water as well as ethanol. The localization of ethanol molecules near the un-ionized PAA backbone at higher levels of ethanol is facilitated by a displacement of water molecules indicating presence of specific ethanol hydration shell, as confirmed by results of the RDF curves and coordination number calculations. This behavior, controlled by hydrogen bonding provides a significant contribution to such a conformational transition behavior of the polyelectrolyte chain. The interactions between counter-ions and charges on the PAA chain also influence chain collapse. The underlying origins of polyelectrolyte chain collapse in water-alcohol mixtures are brought out for the first time via explicit MD simulations by this study.

  19. Conformation transition in silk protein films monitored by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: effect of potassium ions on Nephila spidroin films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Knight, David P; Shao, Zhengzhong; Vollrath, Fritz

    2002-12-17

    We used time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to follow a conformation transition in Nephila spidroin film from random coil and/or helical structures to beta-sheet induced by the addition of KCl from 0.01 to 1.0 mol/L in D(2)O. Time series difference spectra showed parallel increases in absorption at 1620 and 1691 cm(-)(1), indicating formation of beta-sheet, together with a coincident loss of intensity of approximately 1650 cm(-)(1), indicating decrease of random coil and/or helical structures. Increase in KCl concentration produced an increased rate of the conformation transition that may attributable to weakening of hydrogen bonds within spidroin macromolecules. The conformation transition was a biphasic process with [KCl] > or = 0.3 mol/L but monophasic with [KCl] < or = 0.1 mol/L. This suggests that, at high KCl concentrations, segments of the molecular chain are adjusted first and then the whole molecule undergoes rearrangement. We discuss the possible significance of these findings to an understanding of the way that spiders spin silk.

  20. Applying the stochastic difference equation to DNA conformational transitions: a study of B-Z and B-A DNA transitions.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wilber; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2005-06-15

    Despite the existence of numerous models to account for the B-Z DNA transition, experimenters have not yet arrived at a conclusive answer to the structural and dynamical features of the B-Z transition. By applying the stochastic difference equation to simulate the B-Z DNA transition, we have shown that the stretched intermediate model of the B-Z transition is more probable than other B-Z transition models such as the Harvey model. This is accomplished by comparing potential energy profiles of various B-Z DNA transition models and calculating relative probabilities based on the stochastic difference equation with respect to length (SDEL) formalism. The results garnered in this article allow for new approaches in determining the structural transition of B-DNA to Z-DNA experimentally. We have also simulated the B-A DNA transition using the stochastic difference equation. Unlike the B-Z DNA transition, the mechanism for the B-A DNA transition is well established. The variation in the pseudorotation angle during the transition is in good agreement with experimental results. Qualitative features of the simulated B-A transition also agree well with experimental data. The SDEL approach is thus a suitable numerical technique to compute long-time molecular dynamics trajectory for DNA molecules.

  1. The Role of TM5 in Na2 Release and the Conformational Transition of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters toward the Inward-Open State.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Li, Zheng; Quick, Matthias; Malinauskaite, Lina; Nissen, Poul; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Shi, Lei

    2017-03-20

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) terminate neurotransmission by the reuptake of released neurotransmitters. This active accumulation of substrate against its concentration gradient is driven by the transmembrane Na+ gradient and requires that the transporter traverses several conformational states. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homolog, has been crystallized in outward-open, outward-occluded and inward-open states. Two crystal structures of another prokaryotic NSS homolog, the multi-hydrophobic amino acid transporter (MhsT) from Bacillus halodurans have been resolved in novel inward-occluded states, with the extracellular vestibule closed and the intracellular portion of TM5 (TM5i) in either an unwound or a helical conformation. We have investigated the potential involvement of TM5i in binding and unbinding of Na2, i.e. the Na(+) bound in the Na2 site, by carrying out comparative molecular dynamics simulations of the models derived from the two MhsT structures. We find that the helical TM5i conformation is associated with a higher propensity for Na2 release, which leads to the repositioning of the N terminus (NT) and transition to an inward-open state. By using comparative interaction network analysis, we also identify allosteric pathways connecting TM5i and the Na2 binding site to the extracellular and intracellular regions. Based on our combined computational and mutagenesis studies of MhsT and LeuT, we propose that TM5i plays a key role in Na2 binding and release associated with the conformational transition toward the inward-open state, a role that is likely to be shared across the NSS family.

  2. Interaction of phospholipase C with liposome: A conformation transition of the enzyme is critical and specific to liposome composition for burst hydrolysis and fusion in concert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Samir Kumar; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Kausar, Chahat

    2017-02-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC)1 is known to help the pathogen B. cereus entry to the host cell and human PLC is over expressed in multiple cancers. Knowledge of dynamic activity of the enzyme PLC while in action on membrane lipids is essential and helpful to drug design and delivery. In view of this, interactions of PLC with liposome of various lipid compositions have been visualized by testing enzyme activity and microenvironments around the intrinsic fluorophores of the enzyme. Overall change of the protein's conformation has been monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD). Liposome aggregation and fusion were predicted by increase in turbidity and vesicle size. PLC in solution has high fluorescence and exhibit appreciable shift in its emission maxima, upon gradual change in excitation wavelength towards the red edge of the absorption band. REES fluorescence studies indicated that certain Trp fluorophores of inactive PLC are in motionally restricted compact/rigid environments in solution conformation. PLC fluorescence decreased in association with liposome and Trps loosed rigidity where liposome aggregation and fusion occurred. We argue that the structural flexibility is the cause of decrease of fluorescence, mostly to gain optimum conformation for maximum activity of the enzyme PLC. Further studies deciphered that the enzyme PLC undergoes change of conformation when mixed to LUVs prepared with specific lipids. CD data at the far-UV and near-UV regions of PLC in solution are in excellent agreement with the previous reports. CD analyses of PLC with LUVs, showed significant reduction of α-helices, increase of β-sheets; and confirmed dramatic change of orientations of Trps. In case of liposome composed of lipid raft like composition, the enzyme binds very fast, hydrolyze PC with higher rate, exhibit highest structural flexibility and promote vesicle fusion. These data strongly suggest marked differences in conformation transition induced PLC

  3. Interaction of phospholipase C with liposome: A conformation transition of the enzyme is critical and specific to liposome composition for burst hydrolysis and fusion in concert.

    PubMed

    Patra, Samir Kumar; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Kausar, Chahat

    2017-02-15

    Phospholipase C (PLC)(1) is known to help the pathogen B. cereus entry to the host cell and human PLC is over expressed in multiple cancers. Knowledge of dynamic activity of the enzyme PLC while in action on membrane lipids is essential and helpful to drug design and delivery. In view of this, interactions of PLC with liposome of various lipid compositions have been visualized by testing enzyme activity and microenvironments around the intrinsic fluorophores of the enzyme. Overall change of the protein's conformation has been monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD). Liposome aggregation and fusion were predicted by increase in turbidity and vesicle size. PLC in solution has high fluorescence and exhibit appreciable shift in its emission maxima, upon gradual change in excitation wavelength towards the red edge of the absorption band. REES fluorescence studies indicated that certain Trp fluorophores of inactive PLC are in motionally restricted compact/rigid environments in solution conformation. PLC fluorescence decreased in association with liposome and Trps loosed rigidity where liposome aggregation and fusion occurred. We argue that the structural flexibility is the cause of decrease of fluorescence, mostly to gain optimum conformation for maximum activity of the enzyme PLC. Further studies deciphered that the enzyme PLC undergoes change of conformation when mixed to LUVs prepared with specific lipids. CD data at the far-UV and near-UV regions of PLC in solution are in excellent agreement with the previous reports. CD analyses of PLC with LUVs, showed significant reduction of α-helices, increase of β-sheets; and confirmed dramatic change of orientations of Trps. In case of liposome composed of lipid raft like composition, the enzyme binds very fast, hydrolyze PC with higher rate, exhibit highest structural flexibility and promote vesicle fusion. These data strongly suggest marked differences in conformation transition induced PLC

  4. Reorganization of substrate waters between the closed and open cubane conformers during the S2 to S3 transition in the oxygen evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Capone, Matteo; Bovi, Daniele; Narzi, Daniele; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-10-27

    A crucial step in the mechanism for oxygen evolution in the Photosystem II complex resides in the transition from the S2 state to the S3 state of Kok–Joliot’s cycle, in which an additional water molecule binds to the cluster. On the basis of computational chemistry calculations on Photosystem II models, we propose a reorganization mechanism involving a hydroxyl (W2) and a μ2-oxo bridge (O5) that is able to link the closed cubane S2B intermediate conformer to the S3 open cubane structure. This mechanism can reconcile the apparent conflict between recently reported water exchange and electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, and theoretical studies.

  5. Conformational analysis of the 5' leader and the gag initiation site of Mo-MuLV RNA and allosteric transitions induced by dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Mougel, M; Tounekti, N; Darlix, J L; Paoletti, J; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C

    1993-01-01

    Dimerization of genomic RNA is a key step in the retroviral life cycle and has been postulated to be involved in the regulation of translation, encapsidation and reverse transcription. Here, we have derived a secondary structure model of nucleotides upstream from psi and of the gag initiation region of Mo-MuLV RNA in monomeric and dimeric forms, using chemical probing, sequence comparison and computer prediction. The 5' domain is extensively base-paired and interactions take place between U5 and 5' leader sequences. The U5-PBS subdomain can fold in two mutually exclusive conformations: a very stable and extended helical structure (E form) in which 17 of the 18 nucleotides of the PBS are paired, or an irregular three-branch structure (B form) in which 10 nucleotides of the PBS are paired. The dimeric RNA adopts the B conformation. The monomeric RNA can switch from the E to the B conformation by a thermal treatment. If the E to B transition is associated to dimerization, it may facilitate annealing of the primer tRNAPro to the PBS by lowering the free energy required for melting the PBS. Furthermore, dimerization induces allosteric rearrangements around the SD site and the gag initiation region. Images PMID:8233816

  6. A conformational transition at the N terminus of the prion protein features in formation of the scrapie isoform.

    PubMed

    Peretz, D; Williamson, R A; Matsunaga, Y; Serban, H; Pinilla, C; Bastidas, R B; Rozenshteyn, R; James, T L; Houghten, R A; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B; Burton, D R

    1997-10-31

    The scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) is formed from the cellular isoform (PrPC) by a post-translational process that involves a profound conformational change. Linear epitopes for recombinant antibody Fab fragments (Fabs) on PrPC and on the protease-resistant core of PrPSc, designated PrP 27-30, were identified using ELISA and immunoprecipitation. An epitope region at the C terminus was accessible in both PrPC and PrP 27-30; in contrast, epitopes towards the N-terminal region (residues 90 to 120) were accessible in PrPC but largely cryptic in PrP 27-30. Denaturation of PrP 27-30 exposed the epitopes of the N-terminal domain. We argue from our findings that the major conformational change underlying PrPSc formation occurs within the N-terminal segment of PrP 27-30.

  7. Conformational transitions and stop-and-go nanopore transport of single-stranded DNA on charged graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankla, Manish; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2014-10-01

    Control over interactions with biomolecules holds the key to applications of graphene in biotechnology. One such application is nanopore sequencing, where a DNA molecule is electrophoretically driven through a graphene nanopore. Here we investigate how interactions of single-stranded DNA and a graphene membrane can be controlled by electrically biasing the membrane. The results of our molecular dynamics simulations suggest that electric charge on graphene can force a DNA homopolymer to adopt a range of strikingly different conformations. The conformational response is sensitive to even very subtle nucleotide modifications, such as DNA methylation. The speed of DNA motion through a graphene nanopore is strongly affected by the graphene charge: a positive charge accelerates the motion, whereas a negative charge arrests it. As a possible application of the effect, we demonstrate stop-and-go transport of DNA controlled by the charge of graphene. Such on-demand transport of DNA is essential for realizing nanopore sequencing.

  8. A conformational transition in the structure of a 2'-thiomethyl-modified DNA visualized at high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Li, Feng; Eoff, Robert L.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Egli, Martin

    2009-06-17

    Crystal structures of A-form and B-form DNA duplexes containing 2'-S-methyl-uridines reveal that the modified residues adopt a RNA-like C3'-endo pucker, illustrating that the replacement of electronegative oxygen at the 2'-carbon of RNA by sulfur does not appear to fundamentally alter the conformational preference of the sugar in the oligonucleotide context and sterics trump stereoelectronics.

  9. Holographic research on phase transitions for a five dimensional AdS black hole with conformally coupled scalar hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Ling; Yang, Shu-Zheng; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of holography, we survey the phase structure for a higher dimensional hairy black hole including the effects of the scalar field hair. It is worth emphasizing that, not only black hole entropy, but also entanglement entropy and two point correlation function exhibit the Van der Waals-like phase transition in a fixed scalar charge ensemble. Furthermore, by making use of numerical computation, we show that the Maxwell's equal area law is valid for the first order phase transition. In addition, we also discuss how the hair parameter affects the black hole's phase transition.

  10. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier

    PubMed Central

    Harborne, Steven P.D.; Ruprecht, Jonathan J.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  11. Calculation of relative free energies for ligand-protein binding, solvation, and conformational transitions using the GROMOS software.

    PubMed

    Riniker, Sereina; Christ, Clara D; Hansen, Halvor S; Hünenberger, Philippe H; Oostenbrink, Chris; Steiner, Denise; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-11-24

    The calculation of the relative free energies of ligand-protein binding, of solvation for different compounds, and of different conformational states of a polypeptide is of considerable interest in the design or selection of potential enzyme inhibitors. Since such processes in aqueous solution generally comprise energetic and entropic contributions from many molecular configurations, adequate sampling of the relevant parts of configurational space is required and can be achieved through molecular dynamics simulations. Various techniques to obtain converged ensemble averages and their implementation in the GROMOS software for biomolecular simulation are discussed, and examples of their application to biomolecules in aqueous solution are given.

  12. SN2 regioselectivity in the esterification of 5- and 7-membered azacycloalkane quaternary salts: a DFT study to reveal the transition state ring conformation prevailing over the ground state ring strain.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akihiro; Kawauchi, Susumu; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tezuka, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-14

    The nucleophilic esterification of 5- and 7-membered N-phenylcyclic ammonium salts resulted in distinctive regioselectivity, despite their comparable ring strain in the ground states relative to the corresponding cyclopentane and cycloheptane (both 25.9 kJ mol(-1)). The former underwent a selective ring-opening reaction, while the latter predominantly underwent ring-emitting with concurrent ring-opening reactions. A DFT study of the model compounds revealed that the regioselection in the 5- and 7-membered azacycloalkane quaternary salts is plausibly directed by the transition state ring conformation, and not by the ground state ring strain. Remarkably, at the ring-opening transition state, the 5-membered cyclic skeletal structure expands toward the unstrained and thus less frustrated 6-membered cyclohexane conformation. On the other hand, the 7-membered counterpart expands at the ring-opening transition state toward the more frustrated 8-membered cyclooctane conformation to promote the alternative ring-emitting process.

  13. Nonequilibrium phase transitions and a nonequilibrium critical point from anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theory correspondence.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shin

    2012-09-21

    We find novel phase transitions and critical phenomena that occur only outside the linear-response regime of current-driven nonequilibrium states. We consider the strongly interacting (3+1)-dimensional N = 4 large-N(c) SU(N(c)) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with a single flavor of fundamental N = 2 hypermultiplet as a microscopic theory. We compute its nonlinear nonballistic quark-charge conductivity by using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We find that the system exhibits a novel nonequilibrium first-order phase transition where the conductivity jumps and the sign of the differential conductivity flips at finite current density. A nonequilibrium critical point is discovered at the end point of the first-order regime. We propose a nonequilibrium steady-state analogue of thermodynamic potential in terms of the gravity-dual theory in order to define the transition point. Nonequilibrium analogues of critical exponents are proposed as well. The critical behavior of the conductivity is numerically confirmed on the basis of these proposals. The present work provides a new example of nonequilibrium phase transitions and nonequilibrium critical points.

  14. Specificity Rendering ‘Hot-Spots’ for Aurora Kinase Inhibitor Design: The Role of Non-Covalent Interactions and Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the conformational transitions occurring among the major structural motifs of Aurora kinase (AK) concomitant with the DFG-flip and deciphers the role of non-covalent interactions in rendering specificity. Multiple sequence alignment, docking and structural analysis of a repertoire of 56 crystal structures of AK from Protein Data Bank (PDB) has been carried out. The crystal structures were systematically categorized based on the conformational disposition of the DFG-loop [in (DI) 42, out (DO) 5 and out-up (DOU) 9], G-loop [extended (GE) 53 and folded (GF) 3] and αC-helix [in (CI) 42 and out (CO) 14]. The overlapping subsets on categorization show the inter-dependency among structural motifs. Therefore, the four distinct possibilities a) 2W1C (DI, CI, GE) b) 3E5A (DI, CI, GF) c) 3DJ6 (DI, CO, GF) d) 3UNZ (DOU, CO, GF) along with their co-crystals and apo-forms were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations of 40 ns each to evaluate the variations of individual residues and their impact on forming interactions. The non-covalent interactions formed by the 157 AK co-crystals with different regions of the binding site were initially studied with the docked complexes and structure interaction fingerprints. The frequency of the most prominent interactions was gauged in the AK inhibitors from PDB and the four representative conformations during 40 ns. Based on this study, seven major non-covalent interactions and their complementary sites in AK capable of rendering specificity have been prioritized for the design of different classes of inhibitors. PMID:25485544

  15. Conformational transitions of duplex and triplex nucleic acid helices: thermodynamic analysis of effects of salt concentration on stability using preferential interaction coefficients.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. P.; Anderson, C. F.; Record, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    For order-disorder transitions of double- and triple-stranded nucleic acid helices, the midpoint temperatures Tm depend strongly on a +/-, the mean ionic activity of uniunivalent salt. Experimental determinations of dTm/d ln a +/- and of the enthalpy change (delta H(o)) accompanying the transition in excess salt permit evaluation of delta gamma, the stoichiometrically weighted combination of preferential interaction coefficients, each of which reflects thermodynamic effects of interactions of salt ions with a reactant or product of the conformational transition (formula; see text) Here delta H(o) is defined per mole of nucleotide by analogy to delta gamma. Application of Eq. 1 to experimental values of delta H(o) and Tm yields values of delta gamma for the denaturation of B-DNA over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-0.20 M (Privalov et al. (1969), Biopolymers 8,559) and for each of four order-disorder transitions of poly rA.(poly rU)n, n = 1, 2 over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-1.0 M (Krakauer and Sturtevant (1968), Biopolymers 6, 491). For denaturation of duplexes and triplexes, delta gamma is negative and not significantly dependent on a +/-, but delta gamma is positive and dependent on a +/- for the disproportionation transition of poly rA.poly rU duplexes. Quantitative interpretations of these trends and magnitudes of delta gamma in terms of coulombic and excluded volume effects are obtained by fitting separately each of the two sets of thermodynamic data using Eq. 1 with delta gamma PB evaluated from the cylindrically symmetric Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for a standard model of salt-polyelectrolyte solutions. The only structural parameters required by this model are: b, the mean axial distance between the projections of adjacent polyion charges onto the cylindrical axis; and a, the mean distance of closest approach between a salt ion center and the cylindrical axis. Fixing bMS and aMS for the multi-stranded (ordered) conformations, we

  16. pH Induced Conformational Transitions in the Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Protein (TGFβIp) Associated Corneal Dystrophy Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Elavazhagan; Venkatraman, Anandalakshmi; Lei, Zhou; Mouvet, Victoria; Rui Yi Lim, Rayne; Muruganantham, Nandhakumar; Goh, Eunice; Swee Lim Peh, Gary; Beuerman, Roger W.; Chaurasia, Shyam S.; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Most stromal corneal dystrophies are associated with aggregation and deposition of the mutated transforming growth factor-β induced protein (TGFβIp). The 4th_FAS1 domain of TGFβIp harbors ~80% of the mutations that forms amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic aggregates. To understand the mechanism of aggregation and the differences between the amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic phenotypes, we expressed the 4th_FAS1 domains of TGFβIp carrying the mutations R555W (non-amyloidogenic) and H572R (amyloidogenic) along with the wild-type (WT). R555W was more susceptible to acidic pH compared to H572R and displayed varying chemical stabilities with decreasing pH. Thermal denaturation studies at acidic pH showed that while WT did not undergo any conformational transition, the mutants exhibited a clear pH-dependent irreversible conversion from αβ conformation to β-sheet oligomers. The β-oligomers of both mutants were stable at physiological temperature and pH. Electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies showed that β-oligomers of H572R were larger compared to R555W. The β-oligomers of both mutants were cytotoxic to primary human corneal stromal fibroblast (pHCSF) cells. The β-oligomers of both mutants exhibit variations in their morphologies, sizes, thermal and chemical stabilities, aggregation patterns and cytotoxicities. PMID:27030015

  17. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of a bacterial type IV pilus reveal characteristics of an experimentally-observed, force-induced conformational transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Joseph; Biais, Nicolas; Tama, Florence

    2011-10-01

    Type IV pili (T4P) are long, filamentous structures that emanate from the cellular surface of many infectious bacteria. They are built from a 158 amino acid long subunit called pilin. T4P can grow to many micrometers in length, and can withstand large tension forces. During the infection process, pili attach themselves to host cells, and therefore naturally find themselves under tension. We investigated the response of a T4 pilus to a pulling force using the method of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulation. Our simulations expose to the external environment an amino acid sequence initially hidden in the native filament, in agreement with experimental data. Therefore, our simulations might be probing the initial stage of the transition to a force-induced conformation of the T4 pilus. Additional exposed amino acid sequences that might be useful targets for drugs designed to mitigate bacterial infection were also predicted.

  18. Stretch-activated calcium channels relay fast calcium waves propagated by calcium-induced calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2007-03-01

    For nearly 30 years, fast calcium waves have been attributed to a regenerative process propagated by CICR (calcium-induced calcium release) from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, I propose a model containing a new subclass of fast calcium waves which is propagated by CICI (calcium-induced calcium influx) through the plasma membrane. They are called fast CICI waves. These move at the order of 100 to 1000 microm/s (at 20 degrees C), rather than the order of 3 to 30 microm/s found for CICR. Moreover, in this proposed subclass, the calcium influx which drives calcium waves is relayed by stretch-activated calcium channels. This model is based upon reports from approx. 60 various systems. In seven of these reports, calcium waves were imaged, and, in five of these, evidence was presented that these waves were regenerated by CICI. Much of this model involves waves that move along functioning flagella and cilia. In these systems, waves of local calcium influx are thought to cause waves of local contraction by inducing the sliding of dynein or of kinesin past tubulin microtubules. Other cells which are reported to exhibit waves, which move at speeds in the fast CICI range, include ones from a dozen protozoa, three polychaete worms, three molluscs, a bryozoan, two sea urchins, one arthropod, four insects, Amphioxus, frogs, two fish and a vascular plant (Equisetum), together with numerous healthy, as well as cancerous, mammalian cells, including ones from human. In two of these systems, very gentle local mechanical stimulation is reported to initiate waves. In these non-flagellar systems, the calcium influxes are thought to speed the sliding of actinomyosin filaments past each other. Finally, I propose that this mechanochemical model could be tested by seeing if gentle mechanical stimulation induces waves in more of these systems and, more importantly, by imaging the predicted calcium waves in more of them.

  19. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo. PMID:28045057

  20. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo.

  1. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-03-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  2. Ionic liquid-induced all-α to α + β conformational transition in cytochrome c with improved peroxidase activity in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Bharmoria, Pankaj; Trivedi, Tushar J; Pabbathi, Ashok; Samanta, Anunay; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-04-21

    Choline dioctylsulfosuccinate [Cho][AOT] (a surface active ionic liquid) has been found to induce all-α to α + β conformational transition in the secondary structure of enzyme cytochrome c (Cyt c) with an enhanced peroxidase activity in its aqueous vesicular phase at pH 7.0. [Cho][AOT] interacted with Cyt c distinctly at three critical concentrations (aggregation C1, saturation C2 and vesicular C3) as detected from isothermal titration calorimetric analysis. Oxidation of heme iron was observed from the disappearance of the Q band in the UV-vis spectra of Cyt c upon [Cho][AOT] binding above C3. Circular dichroism analysis (CD) has shown the loss in both the secondary (190-240 nm) and tertiary (250-300 nm) structure of Cyt c in the monomeric regime until C1, followed by their stabilization until the pre-vesicular regime (C1 → C3). Loss in both the secondary and tertiary structure has been observed in the post-vesicular regime with the change in Cyt c conformation from all-α to α + β which is similar to the conformational changes of Cyt c upon binding with mitochondrial membrane (Biochemistry 1998, 37, 6402-6409), thus citing the potential utility of [Cho][AOT] membranes as an artificial analog for in vitro bio-mimicking. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements confirm the unfolding of Cyt c in the vesicular phase. Dynamic light scattering experiments have shown the contraction of [Cho][AOT] vesicles upon Cyt c binding driven by electrostatic interactions observed by charge neutralization from zeta potential measurements. [Cho][AOT] has been found to enhance the peroxidase activity of Cyt c with maximum activity at C3, observed using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt as the substrate in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. This result shows the relevance of tuning ionic liquids to surfactants for bio-mimicking of specific membrane protein-lipid interactions.

  3. A lattice model Monte Carlo study of coil-to-globule and other conformational transitions of polymer, amphiphile, and solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Deirdre E.; Kuznetsov, Yuri A.; Timoshenko, Edward G.; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2000-05-01

    A model of polymer-amphiphile-solvent systems on a cubic lattice is used to investigate the phase diagram of such systems. The polymer is treated within the canonical ensemble (T,V,N) and the amphiphile and solvent are treated within the grand canonical ensemble (T,V,μ). Using a range of Monte Carlo moves the phase diagram of polymer-amphiphile-solvent mixtures, as a function of solvent quality (parametrized by χ) and relative chemical potential, μ, is studied for the dilute polymer limit. The effect of increasing the polymer chain length, N, on the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), and the type of polymer-amphiphile complex formed above the CAC are also examined. For some parameters, it is found that the polymer and amphiphile form a polymer-micelle complex at low amphiphile concentrations, and that the polymer coil-to-globule transition point increases with increasing amphiphile concentration. The resulting collapsed globule has a solvent core and is surrounded by a layer of amphiphile. These results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results for the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) system. At higher amphiphile concentrations, the polymer and amphiphile form several layered structures depending on the strength of the three-body amphiphilic interactions, l. Finally, the effect of the polymer chain length, N, and the strength of the three-body amphiphilic interactions, l, on the stability of the polymer-amphiphile structures is investigated.

  4. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, Michael E.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. PMID:26510758

  5. Cholate and deoxycholate counteract the calcium-induced lowering of fat digestion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuangklang, C; Wensing, Th; Lankhorst, Ae; Lemmens, A G; Fielmich-Bouman, X M; Jittakhot, S; Beynen, A C

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the present experiment was to investigate whether deoxycholate and cholate would differ in their effectiveness of counteracting the inhibitory effect of calcium on fat digestibility in rats. Rats were fed one of four experimental diets, a diet low in calcium, high in calcium or high in calcium with either 0.5% sodium cholate or 0.5% sodium deoxycholate. Both deoxycholate and cholate supplementation of the high-calcium diet reduced feed intake and body-weight gain. Low-calcium intake increased fat digestibility. Supplemental bile acids partially counteracted the calcium-induced inhibition of fat digestion, cholate being more effective than deoxycholate. The outcome is explained by the suggestion that cholate is bound to the calcium phosphate sediment in the small intestinal lumen with less affinity than deoxycholate. As a result, more cholate than deoxycholate would be available to support the process of fat digestion. Rats fed cholate had higher liver and serum cholesterol concentrations than did the rats fed deoxycholate.

  6. Sulfhydryl oxidation overrides Mg(2+) inhibition of calcium-induced calcium release in skeletal muscle triads.

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, P; Aracena, P; Hidalgo, C

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of oxidation of sulfhydryl (SH) residues on the inhibition by Mg(2+) of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in triad-enriched sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle. Vesicles were either passively or actively loaded with calcium before eliciting CICR by dilution at pCa 4.6-4.4 in the presence of 1.2 mM free [ATP] and variable free [Mg(2+)]. Native triads exhibited a significant inhibition of CICR by Mg(2+), with a K(0.5) approximately 50 microM. Partial oxidation of vesicles with thimerosal produced a significant increase of release rate constants and initial release rates at all [Mg(2+)] tested (up to 1 mM), and shifted the K(0.5) value for Mg(2+) inhibition to 101 or 137 microM in triads actively or passively loaded with calcium, respectively. Further oxidation of vesicles with thimerosal completely suppressed the inhibitory effect of [Mg(2+)] on CICR, yielding initial rates of CICR of 2 micromol/(mg x s) in the presence of 1 mM free [Mg(2+)]. These effects of oxidation on CICR were fully reversed by SH reducing agents. We propose that oxidation of calcium release channels, by decreasing markedly the affinity of the channel inhibitory site for Mg(2+), makes CICR possible in skeletal muscle. PMID:10866954

  7. Conformational transitions of the catalytic domain of heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase, a key translational regulatory molecule.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R K; Suresh, C G; Bhosale, Siddharth H; Bhavnani, Varsha; Kumar, Avinash; Gaikwad, Sushama M; Pal, Jayanta K

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI) plays a critical role in the regulation of protein synthesis at the initiation step through phosphorylation of α-subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2). In this study we have cloned and performed biophysical characterization of the kinase catalytic domain (KD) of rabbit HRI. The KD described here comprises kinase 1, the kinase insertion domain (KI) and kinase 2. We report here the existence of an active and stable monomer of HRI (KD). The HRI (KD) containing three tryptophan residues was examined for its conformational transitions occurring under various denaturing conditions using steady-state and time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and hydrophobic dye binding. The parameter A and phase diagram analysis revealed multi-state unfolding and existence of three stable intermediates during guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn-HCl) induced unfolding of HRI (KD). The protein treated with 6 M Gdn-HCl showed collisional and static mechanism of acrylamide quenching and the constants (K(sv) = 3.08 M(-1) and K(s)= 5.62 M(-1)) were resolved using time resolved fluorescence titration. Based on pH, guanidine hydrochloride and temperature mediated transitions, HRI (KD) appears to exemplify a rigid molten globule-like intermediate with compact secondary structure, altered tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic patches at pH 3.0. The results indicate the inherent structural stability of HRI (KD), a member of the class of stress response proteins.

  8. Probing the interaction induced conformation transitions in acid phosphatase with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Relation to inhibition and bio-activity of Chlorella vulgaris acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Chao

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the interaction and kinetics of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) with acid phosphatase (ACP) by utilizing diverse range of spectroscopic techniques. The results corroborate, the CoFe2O4 NPs cause fluorescence quenching in ACP by static quenching mechanism. The negative values of van't Hoff thermodynamic expressions (ΔH=-0.3293Jmol(-1)K(-1) and ΔG=-3.960kJmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate the spontaneity and exothermic nature of static quenching. The positive value of ΔS (13.2893Jmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate that major contributors of higher and stronger binding affinity among CoFe2O4 NPs with ACP were electrostatic. In addition, FTIR, UV-CD, UV-vis spectroscopy and three dimensional fluorescence (3D) techniques confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs binding induces microenvironment perturbations leading to secondary and tertiary conformation changes in ACP to a great extent. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) affirmed the comparatively significant changes in microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residue by CoFe2O4 NPs. The effect of CoFe2O4 NPs on the activation kinetics of ACP was further examined in Chlorella vulgaris. Apparent Michaelis constant (Km) values of 0.57 and 26.5mM with activation energy values of 0.538 and 3.428kJmol(-1) were determined without and with 200μM CoFe2O4 NPs. Apparent Vmax value of -7Umml(-1) corroborate that enzyme active sites were completely captured by the NPs leaving no space for the substrate. The results confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs ceased the activity by unfolding of ACP enzyme. This suggests CoFe2O4 NPs perturbed the enzyme activity by transitions in conformation and hence the metabolic activity of ACP. This study provides the pavement for novel and simple approach of using sensitive biomarkers for sensing NPs in environment.

  9. Transportation Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This section provides information on: current laws, regulations and guidance, policy and technical guidance, project-level conformity, general information, contacts and training, adequacy review of SIP submissions

  10. Coupling of conformational transitions in the N-terminal domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP51) near its site of interaction with the steroid receptor proteins

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, David M.; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Heroux, Annie; Li, Hongmin; Hernandez, Griselda

    2015-05-07

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β45 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β45 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centered near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. As a result, the contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state.

  11. Coupling of conformational transitions in the N-terminal domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP51) near its site of interaction with the steroid receptor proteins

    DOE PAGES

    LeMaster, David M.; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; ...

    2015-05-07

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β4-β5 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β4-β5 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centeredmore » near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. As a result, the contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state.« less

  12. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition…

  13. Use of surface plasmon resonance for real-time measurements of the global conformational transition in human phenylalanine hydroxylase in response to substrate binding and catalytic activation.

    PubMed

    Flatmark, T; Stokka, A J; Berge, S V

    2001-07-15

    In the present study the optical biosensor technique, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon, was used for real-time measurements of the reversible binding of the pterin cofactor (6R)-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and l-phenylalanine (l-Phe) to human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPAH). When BH(4) (241 Da) was injected over the sensor chip with immobilized tetrameric wt-hPAH a positive DeltaRU response was observed with a square-wave type of sensorgram and a saturable response (about 25 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2)) with a [S](0.5) value of 5.6 +/- 0.8 microM for the pterin cofactor. The rapid on-and-off rates were, however, not possible to determine. By contrast, when l-Phe (165 Da) was injected a time-dependent increase in RU (up to about 3 min) and a much higher saturable DeltaRU response (about 75 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2)) at 2 mM l-Phe) than expected (i.e., <5 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2))) from the low molecular mass of l-Phe were observed in the sensorgram. The half-time for the on-and-off rates were 6 +/- 2 and 9 +/- 1 s, respectively, at 2 mM l-Phe. The steady-state (apparent equilibrium) response revealed a hyperbolic concentration dependence with a [S](0.5) value of 98 +/- 7 microM. The [S](0.5) values of both pterin cofactor and l-Phe were lower than those determined by steady-state enzyme kinetic analysis. Evidence is presented that the DeltaRU response to l-Phe is accounted for by the global conformational transition which occurs in the enzyme upon l-Phe binding, i.e., by the slow reversible transition from a low activity state ("T"-state) to a high activity state ("R"-state) characteristic of this hysteretic enzyme.

  14. Accounting for conformational flexibility and torsional anharmonicity in the H + CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH hydrogen abstraction reactions: A multi-path variational transition state theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2014-05-07

    This work reports a detailed theoretical study of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from ethanol by atomic hydrogen. The calculated thermal rate constants take into account torsional anharmonicity and conformational flexibility, in addition to the variational and tunneling effects. Specifically, the kinetics calculations were performed by using multi-path canonical variational transition state theory with least-action path tunneling corrections, to which we have added the two-dimensional non-separable method to take into account torsional anharmonicity. The multi-path thermal rate constant is expressed as a sum over conformational reaction channels. Each of these channels includes all the transition states that can be reached by internal rotations. The results show that, in the interval of temperatures between 250 and 2500 K, the account for multiple paths leads to higher thermal rate constants with respect to the single path approach, mainly at low and at high temperatures. In addition, torsional anharmonicity enhances the slope of the Arrhenius plot in this range of temperatures. Finally, we show that the incorporation of tunneling into the hydrogen abstraction reactions substantially changes the contribution of each of the transition states to the conformational reaction channel.

  15. General Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  16. Conformal Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2004-12-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, "conformal infinity" is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  17. Calcium-induced transitions between the spontaneous miniature outward and the transient outward currents in retinal amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pratip; Slaughter, Malcolm M

    2002-04-01

    Spontaneous miniature outward currents (SMOCs) occur in a subset of retinal amacrine cells at membrane potentials between -60 and -40 mV. At more depolarized potentials, a transient outward current (I(to)) appears and SMOCs disappear. Both SMOCs and the I(to) are K(+) currents carried by BK channels. They both arise from Ca(2+) influx through high voltage-activated (HVA) Ca(2+) channels, which stimulates release of internal Ca(2+) from caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive stores. An increase in Ca(2+) influx resulted in an increase in SMOC frequency, but also led to a decline in SMOC mean amplitude. This reduction showed a temporal dependence: the effect being greater in the latter part of a voltage step. Thus, Ca(2+) influx, although required to generate SMOCs, also produced a negative modulation of their amplitudes. Increasing Ca(2+) influx also led to a decline in the first latency to SMOC occurrence. A combination of these effects resulted in the disappearance of SMOCs, along with the concomitant appearance of the I(to) at high levels of Ca(2+) influx. Therefore, low levels of Ca(2+) influx, arising from low levels of activation of the HVA Ca(2+) channels, produce randomly occurring SMOCs within the range of -60 to -40 mV. Further depolarization leads to greater activation of the HVA Ca(2+) channels, larger Ca(2+) influx, and the disappearance of discontinuous SMOCs, along with the appearance of the I(to). Based on their characteristics, SMOCs in retinal neurons may function as synaptic noise suppressors at quiescent glutamatergic synapses.

  18. Relationship between SU subdomains that regulate the receptor-mediated transition from the native (fusion-inhibited) to the fusion-active conformation of the murine leukemia virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Ruggieri, Alessia; Boson, Bertrand; Maurice, Marielle; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-10-01

    Envelope glycoproteins (Env) of retroviruses are trimers of SU (surface) and TM (transmembrane) heterodimers and are expressed on virions in fusion-competent forms that are likely to be metastable. Activation of the viral receptor-binding domain (RBD) via its interaction with a cell surface receptor is thought to initiate a cascade of events that lead to refolding of the Env glycoprotein into its stable fusion-active conformation. While the fusion-active conformation of the TM subunit has been described in detail for several retroviruses, little is known about the fusion-competent structure of the retroviral glycoproteins or the molecular events that mediate the transition between the two conformations. By characterizing Env chimeras between the ecotropic and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) SUs as well as a set of point mutants, we show that alterations of the conformation of the SU glycoprotein strongly elevate Env fusogenicity by disrupting the stability of the Env complex. Compensatory mutations that restored both Env stability and fusion control were also identified, allowing definition of interactions within the Env complex that maintain the stability of the native Env complex. We show that, in the receptor-unbound form, structural interactions between the N terminus of the viral RBD (NTR domain), the proline-rich region (PRR), and the distal part of the C-terminal domain of the SU subunit maintain a conformation of the glycoprotein that is fusion inhibitory. Additionally, we identified mutations that disrupt this fusion-inhibitory conformation and allow fusion activation in the absence of viral receptors, provided that receptor-activated RBD fragments are added in trans during infection. Other mutations were identified that allow fusion activation in the absence of receptors for both the viral glycoprotein and the trans-acting RBD. Finally, we found mutations of the SU that bypass in cis the requirement for the NTR domain in fusion activation. All

  19. Relationship between SU Subdomains That Regulate the Receptor-Mediated Transition from the Native (Fusion-Inhibited) to the Fusion-Active Conformation of the Murine Leukemia Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Ruggieri, Alessia; Boson, Bertrand; Maurice, Marielle; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-01-01

    Envelope glycoproteins (Env) of retroviruses are trimers of SU (surface) and TM (transmembrane) heterodimers and are expressed on virions in fusion-competent forms that are likely to be metastable. Activation of the viral receptor-binding domain (RBD) via its interaction with a cell surface receptor is thought to initiate a cascade of events that lead to refolding of the Env glycoprotein into its stable fusion-active conformation. While the fusion-active conformation of the TM subunit has been described in detail for several retroviruses, little is known about the fusion-competent structure of the retroviral glycoproteins or the molecular events that mediate the transition between the two conformations. By characterizing Env chimeras between the ecotropic and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) SUs as well as a set of point mutants, we show that alterations of the conformation of the SU glycoprotein strongly elevate Env fusogenicity by disrupting the stability of the Env complex. Compensatory mutations that restored both Env stability and fusion control were also identified, allowing definition of interactions within the Env complex that maintain the stability of the native Env complex. We show that, in the receptor-unbound form, structural interactions between the N terminus of the viral RBD (NTR domain), the proline-rich region (PRR), and the distal part of the C-terminal domain of the SU subunit maintain a conformation of the glycoprotein that is fusion inhibitory. Additionally, we identified mutations that disrupt this fusion-inhibitory conformation and allow fusion activation in the absence of viral receptors, provided that receptor-activated RBD fragments are added in trans during infection. Other mutations were identified that allow fusion activation in the absence of receptors for both the viral glycoprotein and the trans-acting RBD. Finally, we found mutations of the SU that bypass in cis the requirement for the NTR domain in fusion activation. All

  20. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Results Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27489424

  1. The conformal bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, David; Simmons-Duffin, David

    2016-06-01

    The conformal bootstrap was proposed in the 1970s as a strategy for calculating the properties of second-order phase transitions. After spectacular success elucidating two-dimensional systems, little progress was made on systems in higher dimensions until a recent renaissance beginning in 2008. We report on some of the main results and ideas from this renaissance, focusing on new determinations of critical exponents and correlation functions in the three-dimensional Ising and O(N) models.

  2. Transition from rolling to firm adhesion is regulated by the conformation of the I domain of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1.

    PubMed

    Salas, Azucena; Shimaoka, Motomu; Chen, Shuqi; Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy

    2002-12-27

    The integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (alpha(L)beta(2)), which is known for its ability to mediate firm adhesion and migration, can also contribute to tethering and rolling in shear flow. The alpha(L) I domain can be mutationally locked with disulfide bonds into two distinct conformations, open and closed, which have high and low affinity for the ligand intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), respectively. The wild type I domain exists primarily in the lower energy closed conformation. We have measured for the first time the effect of conformational change on adhesive behavior in shear flow. We show that wild type and locked open I domains, expressed in alpha(L)beta(2) heterodimers or as isolated domains on the cell surface, mediate rolling adhesion and firm adhesion, respectively. alpha(L)beta(2) is thus poised for the conversion of rolling to firm adhesion upon integrin activation in vivo. Isolated I domains are surprisingly more effective than alpha(L)beta(2) in interactions in shear flow, which may in part be a consequence of the presence of alpha(L)beta(2) in a bent conformation. Furthermore, the force exerted on the C-terminal alpha-helix appears to stabilize the open conformation of the wild type isolated I domain and contribute to its robustness in supporting rolling. An allosteric small molecule antagonist of alpha(L)beta(2) inhibits both rolling adhesion and firm adhesion, which has important implications for its mode of action in vivo.

  3. Conformational changes at the highly reactive cystein and lysine regions of skeletal muscle myosin induced by formation of transition state analogues.

    PubMed

    Maruta, S; Homma, K; Ohki, T

    1998-09-01

    Myosin forms stable ternary complexes with Mg2+-ADP and phosphate analogues of aluminum fluoride (AlF4-), beryllium fluoride (BeFn), and scandium fluoride (ScFn). These complexes are distinct from each other and may mimic different transient states in the ATPase cycle [Maruta et al. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 7093-7100]. Regions of skeletal muscle myosin containing the highly reactive residues Cys 707 (SH1), Cys 697 (SH2), and lysine 83 (RLR) dramatically alter their local conformation when myosin hydrolyzes ATP, and these changes may reflect formation of a series of transient intermediates during ATP hydrolysis. We used the fluorescent probes 4-fluoro-7-sulfamoylbezofurazan, 2-(4'-maleimidylanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid, and trinitrobenzene-sulfonate, which bind to SH1, SH2, and RLR, respectively, to examine differences in local conformations within myosin.ADP.phosphate analogue (BeFn, Vi, AlF4-, and ScFn) complexes. It was observed that the ternary complexes had SH1 conformations similar to those seen on S-1 in the presence of ATP. In contrast, local conformations in the SH2 and RLR regions of S-1.ADP.BeFn were different from those in corresponding regions of S-1.ADP.AlF4- or ScFn. These results suggest that SH1 and SH2 move distinctly during ATP hydrolysis and that the local conformations of the SH2 and RLR regions more sensitively reflect different transient states.

  4. Slow conformational changes in MutS and DNA direct ordered transitions between mismatch search, recognition and signaling of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anushi; Doucette, Christopher; Biro, F Noah; Hingorani, Manju M

    2013-11-15

    MutS functions in mismatch repair (MMR) to scan DNA for errors, identify a target site and trigger subsequent events in the pathway leading to error removal and DNA re-synthesis. These actions, enabled by the ATPase activity of MutS, are now beginning to be analyzed from the perspective of the protein itself. This study provides the first ensemble transient kinetic data on MutS conformational dynamics as it works with DNA and ATP in MMR. Using a combination of fluorescence probes (on Thermus aquaticus MutS and DNA) and signals (intensity, anisotropy and resonance energy transfer), we have monitored the timing of key conformational changes in MutS that are coupled to mismatch binding and recognition, ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as sliding clamp formation and signaling of repair. Significant findings include (a) a slow step that follows weak initial interaction between MutS and DNA, in which concerted conformational changes in both macromolecules control mismatch recognition, and (b) rapid, binary switching of MutS conformations that is concerted with ATP binding and hydrolysis and (c) is stalled after mismatch recognition to control formation of the ATP-bound MutS sliding clamp. These rate-limiting pre- and post-mismatch recognition events outline the mechanism of action of MutS on DNA during initiation of MMR.

  5. Quantification of the calcium-induced secondary structural changes in the regulatory domain of troponin-C.

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, S. M.; Tsuda, S.; Li, M. X.; Chandra, M.; Smillie, L. B.; Sykes, B. D.

    1994-01-01

    The backbone resonance assignments have been completed for the apo (1H and 15N) and calcium-loaded (1H, 15N, and 13C) regulatory N-domain of chicken skeletal troponin-C (1-90), using multidimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The chemical-shift information, along with detailed NOE analysis and 3JHNH alpha coupling constants, permitted the determination and quantification of the Ca(2+)-induced secondary structural change in the N-domain of TnC. For both structures, 5 helices and 2 short beta-strands were found, as was observed in the apo N-domain of the crystal structure of whole TnC (Herzberg O, James MNG, 1988, J Mol Biol 203:761-779). The NMR solution structure of the apo form is indistinguishable from the crystal structure, whereas some structural differences are evident when comparing the 2Ca2+ state solution structure with the apo one. The major conformational change observed is the straightening of helix-B upon Ca2+ binding. The possible importance and role of this conformational change is explored. Previous CD studies on the regulatory domain of TnC showed a significant Ca(2+)-induced increase in negative ellipticity, suggesting a significant increase in helical content upon Ca2+ binding. The present study shows that there is virtually no change in alpha-helical content associated with the transition from apo to the 2Ca2+ state of the N-domain of TnC. Therefore, the Ca(2+)-induced increase in ellipticity observed by CD does not relate to a change in helical content, but more likely to changes in spatial orientation of helices. PMID:7703843

  6. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5 promotes the accuracy of start codon recognition by regulating Pi release and conformational transitions of the preinitiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Adesh K.; Nanda, Jagpreet S.; Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Dong, Jinsheng; Zhang, Fan; Bhardwaj, Monika; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    eIF5 is the GTPase activating protein (GAP) for the eIF2·GTP·Met-tRNAiMet ternary complex with a critical role in initiation codon selection. Previous work suggested that the eIF5 mutation G31R/SUI5 elevates initiation at UUG codons by increasing GAP function. Subsequent work implicated eIF5 in rearrangement of the preinitiation complex (PIC) from an open, scanning conformation to a closed state at AUG codons, from which Pi is released from eIF2·GDP·Pi. To identify eIF5 functions crucial for accurate initiation, we investigated the consequences of G31R on GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and the effects of intragenic G31R suppressors on these reactions, and on the partitioning of PICs between open and closed states. eIF5-G31R altered regulation of Pi release, accelerating it at UUG while decreasing it at AUG codons, consistent with its ability to stabilize the closed complex at UUG. Suppressor G62S mitigates both defects of G31R, accounting for its efficient suppression of UUG initiation in G31R,G62S cells; however suppressor M18V impairs GTP hydrolysis with little effect on PIC conformation. The strong defect in GTP hydrolysis conferred by M18V likely explains its broad suppression of Sui− mutations in numerous factors. We conclude that both of eIF5's functions, regulating Pi release and stabilizing the closed PIC conformation, contribute to stringent AUG selection in vivo. PMID:25114053

  7. Calcium-induced aggregation of archaeal bipolar tetraether liposomes derived from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Kanichay, Roby; Boni, Lawrence T; Cooke, Peter H; Khan, Tapan K; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2003-10-01

    Previously, we showed that the proton permeability of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) composed of polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was remarkably low and insensitive to temperature (Komatsu and Chong 1998). In this study, we used photon correlation spectroscopy to investigate the time dependence of PLFE SUV size as a function of Ca2+ concentration. In the absence of Ca2+, vesicle diameter changed little over 6 months. Addition of Ca2+, however, immediately induced formation of vesicle aggregates with an irregular shape, as revealed by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Aggregation was reversible upon addition of EDTA; however, the reversibility varied with temperature as well as incubation time with Ca2+. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy showed that, after a long period of incubation (2 weeks) with Ca2+, the PLFE vesicles had not just aggregated, but had fused or coalesced. The initial rate of vesicle aggregation varied sigmoidally with Ca2+ concentration. At pH 6.6, the threshold calcium concentration (Cr) for vesicle aggregation at 25 and 40 degrees C was 11 and 17 mM, respectively. At pH 3.0, the Cr at 25 degrees C increased to 25 mM. The temperature dependence of Cr may be attributable to changes in membrane surface potential, which was -22.0 and -13.2 mV at 25 and 40 degrees C, respectively, at pH 6.6, as determined by 2-(p-toluidinyl)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid fluorescence. The variation in surface potential with temperature is discussed in terms of changes in lipid conformation and membrane organization.

  8. Calcium Induced Regulation of Skeletal Troponin — Computational Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Genchev, Georgi Z.; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi; Lu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between calcium and the regulatory site(s) of striated muscle regulatory protein troponin switches on and off muscle contraction. In skeletal troponin binding of calcium to sites I and II of the TnC subunit results in a set of structural changes in the troponin complex, displaces tropomyosin along the actin filament and allows myosin-actin interaction to produce mechanical force. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the calcium dependent dynamics of the fast skeletal troponin molecule and its TnC subunit in the calcium saturated and depleted states. We focused on the N-lobe and on describing the atomic level events that take place subsequent to removal of the calcium ion from the regulatory sites I and II. A main structural event - a closure of the A/B helix hydrophobic pocket results from the integrated effect of the following conformational changes: the breakage of H-bond interactions between the backbone nitrogen atoms of the residues at positions 2, 9 and sidechain oxygen atoms of the residue at position 12 (N2-OE12/N9-OE12) in sites I and II; expansion of sites I and II and increased site II N-terminal end-segment flexibility; strengthening of the β-sheet scaffold; and the subsequent re-packing of the N-lobe hydrophobic residues. Additionally, the calcium release allows the N-lobe to rotate relative to the rest of the Tn molecule. Based on the findings presented herein we propose a novel model of skeletal thin filament regulation. PMID:23554884

  9. Lipid-induced conformational transition of the amyloid core fragment Abeta(28-35) and its A30G and A30I mutants.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Sureshbabu; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran; Neelakanta Reddy, P; Cereghetti, Damiano M; Padma Malar, E J; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2008-05-01

    The interaction of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) with neuronal membranes could play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies have focused on the interactions of Abeta oligomers to explain the neuronal toxicity accompanying Alzheimer's disease. In our study, we have investigated the role of lipid interactions with soluble Abeta(28-35) (wild-type) and its mutants A30G and A30I in their aggregation and conformational preferences. CD and Trp fluorescence spectroscopic studies indicated that, immediately on dissolution, these peptides adopted a random coil structure. Upon addition of negatively charged 1,2-dipalmitoyl-syn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(glycerol) sodium salt (PG) lipid, the wild-type and A30I mutant underwent reorganization into a predominant beta-sheet structure. However, no conformational changes were observed in the A30G mutant on interaction with PG. In contrast, the presence of zwitterionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-syn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid had no effect on the conformation of these three peptides. These observations were also confirmed with atomic force microscopy and the thioflavin-T assay. In the presence of PG vesicles, both the wild-type and A30I mutant formed fibrillar structures within 2 days of incubation in NaCl/P(i), but not in their absence. Again, no oligomerization was observed with PC vesicles. The Trp studies also revealed that both ends of the three peptides are not buried deep in the vesicle membrane. Furthermore, fluorescence spectroscopy using the environment-sensitive probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene showed an increase in the membrane fluidity upon exposure of the vesicles to the peptides. The latter effect may result from the lipid head group interactions with the peptides. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments revealed that these peptides undergo a random coil-to-sheet conversion in solution on aging and that this process is accelerated by negatively charged lipid vesicles

  10. General Information for Transportation and Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Transportation conformity is required by the Clean Air Act section 176(c) (42 U.S.C. 7506(c)) to ensure that federal funding and approval are given to highway and transit projects that are consistent with SIP.

  11. Calcium-induced precipitate formation in brain mitochondria: composition, calcium capacity, and retention.

    PubMed

    Kristian, Tibor; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Fiskum, Gary; Andrews, S Brian

    2007-08-01

    Both isolated brain mitochondria and mitochondria in intact neurons are capable of accumulating large amounts of calcium, which leads to formation in the matrix of calcium- and phosphorus-rich precipitates, the chemical composition of which is largely unknown. Here, we have used inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) to determine how the amount and rate of mitochondrial calcium uptake relate to mitochondrial morphology, precipitate composition, and precipitate retention. Using isolated rat brain (RBM) or liver mitochondria (RLM) Ca(2+)-loaded by continuous cation infusion, precipitate composition was measured in situ in parallel with Ca(2+) uptake and mitochondrial swelling. In RBM, the endogenous MPT inhibitors adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading capacity and facilitated formation of precipitates. In the presence of ADP, the Ca/P ratio approached 1.5, while ATP or reduced infusion rates decreased this ratio towards 1.0, indicating that precipitate chemical form varies with the conditions of loading. In both RBM and RLM, the presence of cyclosporine A in addition to ADP increased the Ca(2+) capacity and precipitate Ca/P ratio. Following MPT and/or depolarization, the release of accumulated Ca(2+) is rapid but incomplete; significant residual calcium in the form of precipitates is retained in damaged mitochondria for prolonged periods.

  12. Binuclear cyclopentadienylmetal cyclooctatetraene derivatives of the first row transition metals: effects of ring conformation on the bonding of an eight-membered carbocyclic ring to a pair of metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiuming; Li, Guoliang; Li, Qian-shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2011-04-14

    Binuclear Cp(2)M(2)(μ-C(8)H(8)) derivatives have been synthesized for M = V, Cr, Co, and Ni and have now been studied theoretically for the entire first row of transition metals from Ti to Ni. The early transition metal derivatives Cp(2)M(2)(μ-C(8)H(8)) (M = Ti, V, Cr. Mn) are predicted to form low-energy cis-Cp(2)M(2)(μ-C(8)H(8)) structures with a folded C(8)H(8) ring (dihedral angle ∼130°) and short metal-metal distances suggesting multiple bonding. These predicted structures are close to the experimental structures for M = V, Cr with V≡V and Cr≡Cr bond lengths of ∼2.48 and ∼2.36 Å, respectively. The middle to late transition metals form trans-Cp(2)M(2)(μ-C(8)H(8)) structures (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) with a twisted μ-C(8)H(8) ring and no metal-metal bonding. The hapticity of the central μ-C(8)H(8) ring in such structures ranges from five for Mn and Fe to four for Co and three for Ni and thus depend on the electronic requirements of the central metal atom. This leads to the favored 18-electron configuration for both metal atoms in the singlet Fe, Co, and Ni structures but only 17-electron metal configurations in the triplet Mn structure. In addition, the late transition metals form trans-Cp(2)M(2)(μ-C(8)H(8)) structures (M = Fe, Co, Ni), with the tub conformation of the μ-C(8)H(8) ring functioning as a tetrahapto (M = Fe, Co) or trihapto (M = Ni) ligand to each CpM group. A μ-C(8)H(8) ring in the tub conformation also bonds to two CpFe units as a bis(tetrahapto) ligand in both singlet and triplet cis-Cp(2)Fe(2)(μ-C(8)H(8)) structures.

  13. Theoretical modeling of UV-Vis absorption and emission spectra in liquid state systems including vibrational and conformational effects: Explicit treatment of the vibronic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    D’Abramo, Marco; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2014-04-28

    Here, we extend a recently introduced theoretical-computational procedure [M. D’Alessandro, M. Aschi, C. Mazzuca, A. Palleschi, and A. Amadei, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114102 (2013)] to include quantum vibrational transitions in modelling electronic spectra of atomic molecular systems in condensed phase. The method is based on the combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations within the Perturbed Matrix Method approach. The main aim of the presented approach is to reproduce as much as possible the spectral line shape which results from a subtle combination of environmental and intrinsic (chromophore) mechanical-dynamical features. As a case study, we were able to model the low energy UV-vis transitions of pyrene in liquid acetonitrile in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Oxidation of carbon sources via the tricarboxylic acid cycle during calcium-induced conidiation of Penicillium notatum.

    PubMed

    Pitt, D; Mosley, M J

    1986-01-01

    The TCA cycle was examined during Ca2+-induced conidiation in Penicillium notatum over the 12-h period after addition of Ca2+ to vegetative cultures. Conidiation was independent of Ca2+ when certain intermediates and derivatives of the TCA cycle served as sole carbon sources. Arsenite and malonate augmented the effect of Ca2+ on conidiation but did not substitute for it. Mitochondria from vegetative cells had low rates of oxidation of TCA cycle intermediates and, with the exception of pyruvate, aconitate and glutamate, these were poorly linked to phosphorylation processes. Calcium ions affected mitochondrial function causing reduced oxidation of oxoglutarate, elimination of pyruvate oxidation and a decline in respiratory control of these substrates with increased oxidation of NADH and NADPH. Radiorespirometric studies and enzyme searches revealed a complete but weakly oxidative TCA cycle in vegetative cells. In Ca2+-induced cells oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity was deleted within 6.5 h of Ca2+ addition and this was accompanied by establishment of an 'incomplete Krebs cycle'. Calcium-induced conidiation was associated with increased capacity for acetate and glutamate metabolism involving an activated glyoxylate shunt which may be related to enhanced biosynthetic demand. The metabolic basis of the Ca2+ effect on conidiation is discussed in connection with previous findings.

  15. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca2+]i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca2+]i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca2+]i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P < 0.01) when the external calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca2+]i. We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. PMID:27980039

  16. Intramolecular interactions in the polar headgroup of sphingosine: serinol† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Ab initio parameters for serinol conformers within 1000 cm–1, measured transition frequencies, typical a-type transition for conformer aa1, interconversion barriers and possible tunnelling pathways. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc09423b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Loru, Donatella; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular interactions in the lipid sphingosine have been elucidated through the investigation of the amino alcohol serinol which mimics its polar headgroup. Intricate networks of intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxyl groups and the amino group contribute to the stabilisation of five different conformations observed in the broadband rotational spectrum. PMID:26727395

  17. Effects of protamine sulphate on spontaneous and calcium-induced contractile activity in the rat uterus are potassium channels-mediated.

    PubMed

    Orescanin-Dusić, Zorana; Milovanović, Slobodan; Radojicić, Ratko; Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra; Appiah, Isabella; Slavić, Marija; Cutura, Nedo; Trbojević, Stevan; Spasić, Mihajlo; Blagojević, Dusko

    2009-01-01

    Protamine sulphate (PS) effect on spontaneous and calcium-induced rhythmic contractions of isolated virgin rat uteri was studied. PS caused dose-dependent relaxation of both types of contractions (two-way ANOVA, significant dose effects). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10(-5) mol/l), methylene blue (MB; 0.9 x 10(-6) mol/l) or propranolol (1.7 x 10(-5) mol/l) enhanced PS-mediated uterine muscle relaxation of spontaneous contractions. Dosedependent relaxation of spontaneous active isolated rat uterus with PS was lower in uteri pretreated with single dose of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 6 x 10(-3) mol/l), glibenclamide (2 x 10(-6) mol/l) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 10(-3) mol/l). Calcium-induced activity of the isolated rat uterus pretreated with the same concentration of L-NAME, MB, or propranolol modified the kinetic of PS-induced relaxation without changes in EC(50) values. Pre-treatment with glibenclamide, TEA and 4-AP significantly reduce PS relaxing effect of calcium-induced activity and according to EC(50) values the order of magnitude was glibenclamide > TEA > 4-AP. PS is mixture of polyamines and may activate different signal-transduction pathways. Our results cleary demonstrate that in uterine smooth muscle PS act dominantly through potassium chanels and marginaly through beta-adrenergic receptos or nitric oxide-dependent pathways.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Conformational Transitions and Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics of the Elastin-Like Octapeptide GVG(VPGVG): A Molecular-Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Roger; Schreiner, Eduard; Kohlmeyer, Axel; Marx, Dominik

    2004-01-01

    A joint experimental/theoretical investigation of the elastin-like octapeptide GVG(VPGVG) was carried out. In this article a comprehensive molecular-dynamics study of the temperature-dependent folding and unfolding of the octapeptide is presented. The current study, as well as its experimental counterpart (see companion article in this issue) find that this peptide undergoes an inverse temperature transition (ITT), leading to a folding at ∼40–60°C. In addition, an unfolding transition is identified at unusually high temperatures approaching the normal boiling point of water. Due to the small size of the system, two broad temperature regimes are found: the ITT regime at ∼10–60°C and the unfolding regime at ∼T > 60°C, where the peptide has a maximum probability of being folded at T ≈ 60°C. A detailed molecular picture involving a thermodynamic order parameter, or reaction coordinate, for this process is presented along with a time-correlation function analysis of the hydrogen-bond dynamics within the peptide as well as between the peptide and solvating water molecules. Correlation with experimental evidence and ramifications on the properties of elastin are discussed. PMID:14990469

  19. Mechanism-based inhibition reveals transitions between two conformational states in the action of lysine 5,6-aminomutase: a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy, and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Han; Maity, Amarendra N; Frey, Perry A; Ke, Shyue-Chu

    2013-01-16

    An "open"-state crystal structure of lysine 5,6-aminomutase suggests that transition to a hypothetical "closed"-state is required to bring the cofactors adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) and the substrate into proximity for the radical-mediated 1,2-amino group migration. This process is achieved by transaldimination of the PLP-Lys144β internal aldimine with the PLP-substrate external aldimine. A closed-state crystal structure is not available. UV-vis and electron paramagnetic resonance studies show that homologues of substrate D-lysine, 2,5-DAPn, 2,4-DAB, and 2,3-DAPr bind to PLP as an external aldimine and elicit the AdoCbl Co-C bond homolysis and the accumulations of cob(II)alamin and analogue-based radicals, demonstrating the existence of a closed state. (2)H- and (31)P-electron nuclear double resonance studies, supported by computations, show that the position for hydrogen atom abstraction from 2,5-DAPn and 2,4-DAB by the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical occurs at the carbon adjacent to the imine, resulting in overstabilized radicals by spin delocalization through the imine into the pyridine ring of PLP. These radicals block the active site, inhibit the enzyme, and poise the enzyme into two distinct conformations: for even-numbered analogues, the cob(II)alamin remains proximal to and spin-coupled with the analogue-based radical in the closed state while odd-numbered analogues could trigger the transition to the open state of the enzyme. We provide here direct spectroscopic evidence that strongly support the existence of a closed state and its analogue-dependent transition to the open state, which is one step that was proposed to complete the catalytic turnover of the substrate lysine.

  20. Conversion of the g=4.1 EPR signal to the multiline conformation during the S(2) to S(3) transition of the oxygen evolving complex of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chrysina, Maria; Zahariou, Georgia; Ioannidis, Nikolaos; Petrouleas, Vasili

    2010-04-01

    The oxygen evolving complex of Photosystem II undergoes four light-induced oxidation transitions, S(0)-S(1),...,S(3)-(S(4))S(0) during its catalytic cycle. The oxidizing equivalents are stored at a (Mn)(4)Ca cluster, the site of water oxidation. EPR spectroscopy has yielded valuable information on the S states. S(2) shows a notable heterogeneity with two spectral forms; a g=2 (S=1/2) multiline, and a g=4.1 (S=5/2) signal. These oscillate in parallel during the period-four cycle. Cyanobacteria show only the multiline signal, but upon advancement to S(3) they exhibit the same characteristic g=10 (S=3) absorption with plant preparations, implying that this latter signal results from the multiline configuration. The fate of the g=4.1 conformation during advancement to S(3) is accordingly unknown. We searched for light-induced transient changes in the EPR spectra at temperatures below and above the half-inhibition temperature for the S(2) to S(3) transition (ca 230K). We observed that, above about 220K the g=4.1 signal converts to a multiline form prior to advancement to S(3). We cannot exclude that the conversion results from visible-light excitation of the Mn cluster itself. The fact however, that the conversion coincides with the onset of the S(2) to S(3) transition, suggests that it is triggered by the charge-separation process, possibly the oxidation of tyr Z and the accompanying proton relocations. It therefore appears that a configuration of (Mn)(4)Ca with a low-spin ground state advances to S(3).

  1. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  2. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  3. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  4. Levetiracetam Inhibits Both Ryanodine and IP3 Receptor Activated Calcium Induced Calcium Release in Hippocampal Neurons in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Nisha; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide, and there is a pressing need to develop new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and understand their mechanisms of action. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel AED and despite its increasingly widespread clinical use, its mechanism of action is as yet undetermined. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) regulation by both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) has been implicated in epileptogenesis and the maintenance of epilepsy. To this end, we investigated the effect of LEV on RyR and IP3R activated calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in hippocampal neuronal cultures. RyR-mediated CICR was stimulated using the well-characterized RyR activator, caffeine. Caffeine (10mM) caused a significant increase in [Ca2+]i in hippocampal neurons. Treatment with LEV (33μM) prior to stimulation of RyR-mediated CICR by caffeine led to a 61% decrease in the caffeine induced peak height of [Ca2+]i when compared to the control. Bradykinin stimulates IP3R-activated CICR—to test the effect of LEV on IP3R-mediated CICR, bradykinin (1μM) was used to stimulate cells pre-treated with LEV (100μM). The data showed that LEV caused a 74% decrease in IP3R-mediated CICR compared to the control. In previous studies we have shown that altered Ca2+ homeostatic mechanisms play a role in seizure activity and the development of spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges (SREDs). Elevations in [Ca2+]i mediated by CICR systems have been associated with neurotoxicity, changes in neuronal plasticity, and the development of AE. Thus, the ability of LEV to modulate the two major CICR systems demonstrates an important molecular effect of this agent on a major second messenger system in neurons. PMID:18406528

  5. Vitamin D receptor is required for dietary calcium-induced repression of calbindin-D9k expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Merry J G; Cao, Li-Ping; Kong, Juan; Sitrin, Michael D; Li, Yan Chun

    2005-05-01

    Calbindin (CaBP), the vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, is believed to play an important role in intracellular calcium transport. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high dietary calcium on the expression of CaBP-D9k and CaBP-D28k in the presence and absence of a functional vitamin D receptor (VDR). Treatment with the HCa-Lac diet containing 2% calcium, 1.5% phosphorus and 20% lactose reversed the hypocalcemia seen in adult VDR-null mice in 3 weeks but did not significantly change the blood ionized calcium in wild-type mice. This dietary treatment dramatically suppressed both the duodenal and the renal CaBP-D9k expression in wild-type mice at both mRNA and protein levels but had little effect on the expression of the same gene in VDR-null mice. Removal of this diet gradually restored the expression of CaBP-D9k to the untreated level in wild-type mice. Only moderate or little change in CaBP-D28k expression was seen in wild-type and VDR-null mice fed with the HCa-Lac diet. The VDR content in the duodenum or kidney of wild-type mice was not altered by the dietary treatment. These results suggest that calcium regulates CaBP-D9k expression by modulating the circulating 1,25-dihydrxyvitamin D(3) level and that VDR is thus required for the dietary calcium-induced suppression of CaBP-D9k expression. Calcium regulation of the CaBP-D9k level may represent an important mechanism by which animals maintain their calcium balance.

  6. Steinberg conformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalev, A. V.; Pinchuk, I. A.

    2005-06-01

    The structure of Steinberg conformal algebras is studied; these are analogues of Steinberg groups (algebras, superalgebras).A Steinberg conformal algebra is defined as an abstract algebra by a system of generators and relations between the generators. It is proved that a Steinberg conformal algebra is the universal central extension of the corresponding conformal Lie algebra; the kernel of this extension is calculated.

  7. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saldaño, Tadeo E.; Monzon, Alexander M.; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  8. Protein conformational populations and functionally relevant substates.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej; Burger, Virginia; Chennubhotla, Chakra S; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2014-01-21

    it to attain the transition state, therefore promoting the reaction mechanism. In the long term, this emerging view of proteins with conformational substates has broad implications for improving our understanding of enzymes, enzyme engineering, and better drug design. Researchers have already used photoactivation to modulate protein conformations as a strategy to develop a hypercatalytic enzyme. In addition, the alteration of the conformational substates through binding of ligands at locations other than the active site provides the basis for the design of new medicines through allosteric modulation.

  9. Free volume distribution of branched poly(methyl methacrylates): Conformational probes study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalova, D. I.; Remizov, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we studied the free volume distribution of the branched poly (methylmethacrylates) by the method of conformational probes. The freezing temperatures of the conformational transitions of the probes introduced into branched polymers were determined by FTIR spectra. The influence of covalently connected fullerene C60 on the freezing temperatures of conformational transitions was shown.

  10. Platelet-activating factor in Iberian pig spermatozoa: receptor expression and role as enhancer of the calcium-induced acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Bragado, M J; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2011-12-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid involved in reproductive physiology. PAF receptor is expressed in some mammalian spermatozoa species where it plays a role in these germ-cell-specific processes. The aim of this study is to identify PAF receptor in Iberian pig spermatozoa and to evaluate PAF's effects on motility, viability and acrosome reaction. Semen samples from Iberian boars were used. PAF receptor identification was performed by Western blotting. Spermatozoa motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis system, whereas spermatozoa viability and acrosome reaction were evaluated by flow cytometry. Different PAF concentrations added to non-capacitating medium during 60 min have no effect on any spermatozoa motility parameter measured. Acrosome reaction was rapid and potently induced by 1 μm calcium ionophore A23187 showing an effect at 60 min and maximum at 240 min. PAF added to a capacitating medium is not able to induce spermatozoa acrosome reaction at any time studied. However, PAF, in the presence of A23187, significantly accelerates and enhances the calcium-induced acrosome reaction in a concentration-dependent manner in Iberian boar spermatozoa. Exogenous PAF does not affect at all spermatozoa viability, whereas slightly exacerbated the A23187-induced loss in viability. This work demonstrates that PAF receptor is expressed in Iberian pig spermatozoa and that its stimulation by PAF regulates the calcium-induced acrosome reaction. This work contributes to further elucidate the physiological regulation of the most relevant spermatozoa functions for successful fertilization: acrosome reaction.

  11. Toward TeV Conformality

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T; Avakian, A; Babich, R; Brower, R C; Cheng, M; Clark, M A; Cohen, S D; Fleming, G T; Kiskis, J; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Schaich, D; Soltz, R; Vranas, P

    2009-11-30

    We study the chiral condensate <{bar {psi}}{psi}> for an SU(3) gauge theory with N{sub f} massless Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation when N{sub f} is increased from 2 to 6. For N{sub f} = 2, our lattice simulations of <{bar {psi}}{psi}>/F{sup 3}, where F is the Nambu-Goldstone-boson decay constant, agree with the measured QCD value. For N{sub f} = 6, this ratio shows significant enhancement, presaging an even larger enhancement anticipated as N{sub f} increases further, toward the critical value for transition from confinement to infrared conformality.

  12. Conformational isomers of linear rotaxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevick, Edith M.; Williams, David R. M.

    2014-09-01

    We examine a simple model of rotaxane structure, with 3 asymmetric rings interacting via repulsive power-law forces. This interlocked molecule exhibits conformational isomerisation which is different from that of molecules whose connectedness is through covalent bonds. The rings are free to translate along and rotate around the axle, and hence weak interaction forces between the rings can lead to distinct rotamer states. We use energy minimisation to determine these states exactly, and show that there can be transitions from asymmetric to symmetric states by varying the bond lengths. We also use classical statistical mechanics to show the effect of thermal noise.

  13. Conformational Dynamics in DNA Replication Selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieba, Luis G.

    2007-11-01

    Replicative DNA polymerases are remarkable molecular machines that carry out DNA synthesis accordingly to the Watson and Crick rules (Guanine pairs with Cytosine and Adenine with Thymidine) with high specificity or fidelity. The biochemical mechanism that dictates polymerase fidelity has its fundaments in the tight active site of replicative polymerases and the shape and size of the Watson-Crick base pairs. Pre-steady state kinetic analysis have shown that during polymerase nucleotide addition, the chemical reaction is not the rate limiting step and it was postulated that DNA polymerases suffer a conformational change from an "open" to a "closed" conformation before chemistry which is also the step responsible for their high fidelity. Crystal structures of replicative DNA polymerases demonstrated that the fingers subdomain suffers a large conformational change during catalysis and that this conformational transition aligns the polymerase active site in a proper conformation for catalysis. Recent studies using single molecule techniques and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer analysis also shown that at least in the case of T7 DNA polymerase, the closure of the fingers subdomain is in part the rate limiting step associated with the high fidelity of DNA polymerases, although the overall fidelity of the reaction maybe involves an assemble of chemical steps and several conformational changes. Our current knowledge indicates that the mechanisms of enzyme specificity in DNA replication involve several energy landscapes that maybe correlated with conformational changes and active site assemblies.

  14. Mapping conformational dynamics of proteins using torsional dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K; Wagner, Jeffrey R; Park, In-Hee; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-07

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations are widely used to study the flexibility of protein conformations. However, enhanced sampling techniques are required for simulating protein dynamics that occur on the millisecond timescale. In this work, we show that torsional molecular dynamics simulations enhance protein conformational sampling by performing conformational search in the low-frequency torsional degrees of freedom. In this article, we use our recently developed torsional-dynamics method called Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) to study the conformational dynamics of four proteins. We investigate the use of the GNEIMO method in simulations of the conformationally flexible proteins fasciculin and calmodulin, as well as the less flexible crambin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. For the latter two proteins, the GNEIMO simulations with an implicit-solvent model reproduced the average protein structural fluctuations and sample conformations similar to those from Cartesian simulations with explicit solvent. The application of GNEIMO with replica exchange to the study of fasciculin conformational dynamics produced sampling of two of this protein's experimentally established conformational substates. Conformational transition of calmodulin from the Ca(2+)-bound to the Ca(2+)-free conformation occurred readily with GNEIMO simulations. Moreover, the GNEIMO method generated an ensemble of conformations that satisfy about half of both short- and long-range interresidue distances obtained from NMR structures of holo to apo transitions in calmodulin. Although unconstrained all-atom Cartesian simulations have failed to sample transitions between the substates of fasciculin and calmodulin, GNEIMO simulations show the transitions in both systems. The relatively short simulation times required to capture these long-timescale conformational dynamics indicate that GNEIMO is a promising molecular-dynamics technique for studying domain motion in

  15. Mapping Conformational Dynamics of Proteins Using Torsional Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K.; Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Park, In-Hee; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations are widely used to study the flexibility of protein conformations. However, enhanced sampling techniques are required for simulating protein dynamics that occur on the millisecond timescale. In this work, we show that torsional molecular dynamics simulations enhance protein conformational sampling by performing conformational search in the low-frequency torsional degrees of freedom. In this article, we use our recently developed torsional-dynamics method called Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) to study the conformational dynamics of four proteins. We investigate the use of the GNEIMO method in simulations of the conformationally flexible proteins fasciculin and calmodulin, as well as the less flexible crambin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. For the latter two proteins, the GNEIMO simulations with an implicit-solvent model reproduced the average protein structural fluctuations and sample conformations similar to those from Cartesian simulations with explicit solvent. The application of GNEIMO with replica exchange to the study of fasciculin conformational dynamics produced sampling of two of this protein’s experimentally established conformational substates. Conformational transition of calmodulin from the Ca2+-bound to the Ca2+-free conformation occurred readily with GNEIMO simulations. Moreover, the GNEIMO method generated an ensemble of conformations that satisfy about half of both short- and long-range interresidue distances obtained from NMR structures of holo to apo transitions in calmodulin. Although unconstrained all-atom Cartesian simulations have failed to sample transitions between the substates of fasciculin and calmodulin, GNEIMO simulations show the transitions in both systems. The relatively short simulation times required to capture these long-timescale conformational dynamics indicate that GNEIMO is a promising molecular-dynamics technique for studying domain motion in

  16. The Conformal Bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons-Duffin, David

    These notes are from courses given at TASI and the Advanced Strings School in summer 2015. Starting from principles of quantum field theory and the assumption of a traceless stress tensor, we develop the basics of conformal field theory, including conformal Ward identities, radial quantization, reection positivity, the operator product expansion, and conformal blocks. We end with an introduction to numerical bootstrap methods, focusing on the 2d and 3d Ising models.

  17. Ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions of platinum(II) complexes with arylacetylide ligands with different chain lengths: spectroscopic characterization, effect of molecular conformations, and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Glenna So Ming; Law, Yuen-Chi; Kui, Steven C F; Zhu, Nianyong; Leung, King Hong; Phillips, David Lee; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-11

    The complexes [Pt(tBu(3)tpy){C[triple bond]C(C(6)H(4)C[triple bond]C)(n-1)R}](+) (n = 1: R = alkyl and aryl (Ar); n = 1-3: R = phenyl (Ph) or Ph-N(CH(3))(2)-4; n = 1 and 2, R = Ph-NH(2)-4; tBu(3)tpy = 4,4',4''-tri-tert-butyl-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and [Pt(Cl(3)tpy)(C[triple bond]CR)](+) (R = tert-butyl (tBu), Ph, 9,9'-dibutylfluorene, 9,9'-dibutyl-7-dimethyl-amine-fluorene; Cl(3)tpy = 4,4',4''-trichloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) were prepared. The effects of substituent(s) on the terpyridine (tpy) and acetylide ligands and chain length of arylacetylide ligands on the absorption and emission spectra were examined. Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of [Pt(tBu(3)tpy)(C[triple bond]CR)](+) (R = n-butyl, Ph, and C(6)H(4)-OCH(3)-4) obtained in acetonitrile at 298 K reveal that the structural distortion of the C[triple bond]C bond in the electronic excited state obtained by 502.9 nm excitation is substantially larger than that obtained by 416 nm excitation. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations on [Pt(H(3)tpy)(C[triple bond]CR)](+) (R = n-propyl (nPr), 2-pyridyl (Py)), [Pt(H(3)tpy){C[triple bond]C(C(6)H(4)C[triple bond]C)(n-1)Ph}](+) (n = 1-3), and [Pt(H(3)tpy){C[triple bond]C(C(6)H(4)C[triple bond]C)(n-1)C(6)H(4)-N(CH(3))(2)-4}](+)/+H(+) (n = 1-3; H(3)tpy = nonsubstituted terpyridine) at two different conformations were performed, namely, with the phenyl rings of the arylacetylide ligands coplanar ("cop") with and perpendicular ("per") to the H(3)tpy ligand. Combining the experimental data and calculated results, the two lowest energy absorption peak maxima, lambda(1) and lambda(2), of [Pt(Y(3)tpy)(C[triple bond]CR)](+) (Y = tBu or Cl, R = aryl) are attributed to (1)[pi(C[triple bond]CR)-->pi*(Y(3)tpy)] in the "cop" conformation and mixed (1)[d(pi)(Pt)-->pi*(Y(3)tpy)]/(1)[pi(C[triple bond]CR)-->pi*(Y(3)tpy)] transitions in the "per" conformation. The lowest energy absorption peak lambda(1) for [Pt(tBu(3)tpy){C[triple bond]C(C(6)H(4)C

  18. [Dosimetric evaluation of conformal radiotherapy: conformity factor].

    PubMed

    Oozeer, R; Chauvet, B; Garcia, R; Berger, C; Felix-Faure, C; Reboul, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) is to treat the Planning Target Volume (PTV) to the prescribed dose while reducing doses to normal tissues and critical structures, in order to increase local control and reduce toxicity. The evaluation tools used for optimizing treatment techniques are three-dimensional visualization of dose distributions, dose-volume histograms, tumor control probabilities (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). These tools, however, do not fully quantify the conformity of dose distributions to the PTV. Specific tools were introduced to measure this conformity for a given dose level. We have extended those definitions to different dose levels, using a conformity index (CI). CI is based on the relative volumes of PTV and outside the PTV receiving more than a given dose. This parameter has been evaluated by a clinical study including 82 patients treated for lung cancer and 82 patients treated for prostate cancer. The CI was low for lung dosimetric studies (0.35 at the prescribed dose 66 Gy) due to build-up around the GTV and to spinal cord sparing. For prostate dosimetric studies, the CI was higher (0.57 at the prescribed dose 70 Gy). The CI has been used to compare treatment plans for lung 3DCRT (2 vs 3 beams) and prostate 3DCRT (4 vs 7 beams). The variation of CI with dose can be used to optimize dose prescription.

  19. Conformal differential invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglikov, Boris

    2017-03-01

    We compute the Hilbert polynomial and the Poincaré function counting the number of fixed jet-order differential invariants of conformal metric structures modulo local diffeomorphisms, and we describe the field of rational differential invariants separating generic orbits of the diffeomorphism pseudogroup action. This resolves the local recognition problem for conformal structures.

  20. Conformations of Substituted Ethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, Charles A.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews state-of-the-art of conformational analysis and factors which affect it. Emphasizes sp-3 hybridized acrylic molecules. Provides examples on the importance of certain factors in determining conformation. Purpose, is to provide examples for examination questions. (Author/SA)

  1. EC declaration of conformity.

    PubMed

    Donawa, M E

    1996-05-01

    The CE-marking procedure requires that manufacturers draw up a written declaration of conformity before placing their products on the market. However, some companies do not realize that this is a requirement for all devices. Also, there is no detailed information concerning the contents and format of the EC declaration of conformity in the medical device Directives or in EC guidance documentation. This article will discuss some important aspects of the EC declaration of conformity and some of the guidance that is available on its contents and format.

  2. Conformal Carroll groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2014-08-01

    Conformal extensions of Lévy-Leblond's Carroll group, based on geometric properties analogous to those of Newton-Cartan space-time are proposed. The extensions are labeled by an integer k. This framework includes and extends our recent study of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) and Newman-Unti (NU) groups. The relation to conformal Galilei groups is clarified. Conformal Carroll symmetry is illustrated by ‘Carrollian photons’. Motion both in the Newton-Cartan and Carroll spaces may be related to that of strings in the Bargmann space.

  3. Discovering Conformational Sub-States Relevant to Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J.; Langmead, Christopher J.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Internal motions enable proteins to explore a range of conformations, even in the vicinity of native state. The role of conformational fluctuations in the designated function of a protein is widely debated. Emerging evidence suggests that sub-groups within the range of conformations (or sub-states) contain properties that may be functionally relevant. However, low populations in these sub-states and the transient nature of conformational transitions between these sub-states present significant challenges for their identification and characterization. Methods and Findings To overcome these challenges we have developed a new computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA). QAA utilizes higher-order statistics of protein motions to identify sub-states in the conformational landscape. Further, the focus on anharmonicity allows identification of conformational fluctuations that enable transitions between sub-states. QAA applied to equilibrium simulations of human ubiquitin and T4 lysozyme reveals functionally relevant sub-states and protein motions involved in molecular recognition. In combination with a reaction pathway sampling method, QAA characterizes conformational sub-states associated with cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerization catalyzed by the enzyme cyclophilin A. In these three proteins, QAA allows identification of conformational sub-states, with critical structural and dynamical features relevant to protein function. Conclusions Overall, QAA provides a novel framework to intuitively understand the biophysical basis of conformational diversity and its relevance to protein function. PMID:21297978

  4. Transition of hemoglobin between two tertiary conformations: determination of equilibrium and thermodynamic parameters from the reaction of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) with the CysF9[93]beta sulfhydryl group.

    PubMed

    Okonjo, Kehinde Onwochei; Adediji, A Temilade; Fodeke, Adedayo A; Adeboye, Omolara; Ezeh, Chibuzo V

    2007-06-01

    The equilibrium constant of the reaction of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) with the CysF9[93]beta sulfhydryl group of hemoglobin decreases by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude between pH 5.6 and 9. The reaction is coupled to the ionizations of two groups on the protein. At 25 degrees C one group has a pK(a) of 5.31+/-0.2 when hemoglobin is in its (tertiary) r conformation, typified by the thiolate anion form of CysF9[93]beta; this changes to 7.73+/-0.4 in the (tertiary) t conformation, typified by the mixed disulfide form of the sulfhydryl. The second group ionizes with a pK(a) of 7.11+/-0.4 in the r conformation; this changes to 8.38+/-0.2 in the t conformation. K(rt), the equilibrium constant for the r<-->t isomerization process, is 0.22+/-0.06. The standard enthalpy and entropy changes for the isomerization are DeltaH(o)(rt)=24.2 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS(o)(rt)=68.8 JK(-1)mol(-1), respectively.

  5. Animal culture: chimpanzee conformity?

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-05-22

    Culture-like phenomena in wild animals have received much attention, but how good is the evidence and how similar are they to human culture? New data on chimpanzees suggest their culture may even have an element of conformity.

  6. Enhanced conformational sampling using enveloping distribution sampling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-10-14

    To lessen the problem of insufficient conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations is still a major challenge in computational biochemistry. In this article, an application of the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) is proposed that addresses this challenge and its sampling efficiency is demonstrated in simulations of a hexa-β-peptide whose conformational equilibrium encompasses two different helical folds, i.e., a right-handed 2.7(10∕12)-helix and a left-handed 3(14)-helix, separated by a high energy barrier. Standard MD simulations of this peptide using the GROMOS 53A6 force field did not reach convergence of the free enthalpy difference between the two helices even after 500 ns of simulation time. The use of soft-core non-bonded interactions in the centre of the peptide did enhance the number of transitions between the helices, but at the same time led to neglect of relevant helical configurations. In the simulations of a two-state EDS reference Hamiltonian that envelops both the physical peptide and the soft-core peptide, sampling of the conformational space of the physical peptide ensures that physically relevant conformations can be visited, and sampling of the conformational space of the soft-core peptide helps to enhance the transitions between the two helices. The EDS simulations sampled many more transitions between the two helices and showed much faster convergence of the relative free enthalpy of the two helices compared with the standard MD simulations with only a slightly larger computational effort to determine optimized EDS parameters. Combined with various methods to smoothen the potential energy surface, the proposed EDS application will be a powerful technique to enhance the sampling efficiency in biomolecular simulations.

  7. Two-dimensional heterospectral correlation analysis of the redox-induced conformational transition in cytochrome c using surface-enhanced Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopies on a two-layer gold surface.

    PubMed

    Zou, Changji; Larisika, Melanie; Nagy, Gabor; Srajer, Johannes; Oostenbrink, Chris; Chen, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang; Liedberg, Bo; Nowak, Christoph

    2013-08-22

    The heme protein cytochrome c adsorbed to a two-layer gold surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol was analyzed using a two-dimensional (2D) heterospectral correlation analysis that combined surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Stepwise increasing electric potentials were applied to alter the redox state of the protein and to induce conformational changes within the protein backbone. We demonstrate herein that 2D heterospectral correlation analysis is a particularly suitable and useful technique for the study of heme-containing proteins as the two spectroscopies address different portions of the protein. Thus, by correlating SERS and SEIRAS data in a 2D plot, we can obtain a deeper understanding of the conformational changes occurring at the redox center and in the supporting protein backbone during the electron transfer process. The correlation analyses are complemented by molecular dynamics calculations to explore the intramolecular interactions.

  8. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kyle G; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-07-28

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein's affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states.

  9. Conformers of Gaseous Serine.

    PubMed

    He, Kedan; Allen, Wesley D

    2016-08-09

    The myriad conformers of the neutral form of natural amino acid serine (Ser) have been investigated by systematic computations with reliable electronic wave function methods. A total of 85 unique conformers were located using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The 12 lowest-energy conformers of serine fall within a 8 kJ mol(-1) window, and for these species, geometric structures, precise relative energies, equilibrium and vibrationally averaged rotational constants, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants, dipole moments, and (14)N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were computed. The relative energies were refined through composite focal-point analyses employing basis sets as large as aug-cc-pV5Z and correlation treatments through CCSD(T). The rotational constants for seven conformers measured by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy are in good agreement with the vibrationally averaged rotational constants computed in this study. Our anharmonic vibrational frequencies are compared to the large number of experimental vibrational absorptions attributable to at least six conformers.

  10. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  11. Holography of the conformal window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvares, Raul; Evans, Nick; Kim, Keun-Young

    2012-07-01

    Inspired by the model of Jarvinen and Kiritsis, we present a simple holographic model for the onset of chiral symmetry breaking at the edge of the conformal window in QCD in the Veneziano limit. Our most naive model enforces the QCD two-loop running coupling on a D3/D7 holographic brane system. The mass of the holographic field, describing the chiral condensate in the model, is driven below the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound when the running is sufficiently strong, triggering chiral symmetry breaking for Nf/Nc<2.9. This model though contains too great a remnant of supersymmetry and does not correctly encode the perturbative anomalous dimensions of QCD. In a second model we impose the QCD anomalous dimension result and find chiral symmetry breaking sets in for Nf/Nc=4 at a Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type phase transition. In this case the transition is triggered when the anomalous dimension of the mass operator γm=1.

  12. Molecular dynamics studies of the conformation of sorbitol

    PubMed Central

    Lerbret, A.; Mason, P.E.; Venable, R.M.; Cesàro, A.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Pastor, R.W.; Brady, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a 3 m aqueous solution of D-sorbitol (also called D-glucitol) have been performed at 300 K, as well as at two elevated temperatures to promote conformational transitions. In principle, sorbitol is more flexible than glucose since it does not contain a constraining ring. However, a conformational analysis revealed that the sorbitol chain remains extended in solution, in contrast to the bent conformation found experimentally in the crystalline form. While there are 243 staggered conformations of the backbone possible for this open-chain polyol, only a very limited number were found to be stable in the simulations. Although many conformers were briefly sampled, only eight were significantly populated in the simulation. The carbon backbones of all but two of these eight conformers were completely extended, unlike the bent crystal conformation. These extended conformers were stabilized by a quite persistent intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl groups of carbon C-2 and C-4. The conformational populations were found to be in good agreement with the limited available NMR data except for the C-2–C-3 torsion (spanned by the O-2–O-4 hydrogen bond), where the NMR data supports a more bent structure. PMID:19744646

  13. Conformational properties of pyrethroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullaley, Anne; Taylor, Robin

    1994-04-01

    X-ray database searches and theoretical potential-energy calculations indicate that the acid moieties of pyrethroid cyclopropanecarboxylate esters adopt a well-defined, relatively inflexible conformation. In contrast, the alcohol moieties can exist in many low-energy geometries. One of the least conformationally flexible pyrethroid alcohols is 4-phenylindan-2-ol. The approximate overall conformation adopted at the biological binding site by insecticidal esters of this alcohol can be deduced with reasonable confidence by molecular modelling. Graphics superposition of a variety of pyrethroid acids suggests the existence of a large but rather narrow pocket at the binding site, in which substituents at the 3-position of the cyclopropane ring can be accommodated. This pocket is asymmetric with respect to the plane of the cyclopropane ring, extending further on the side remote from the ester group. The effects of α-substitution on the insecticidal activity of pyrethroid esters may be due to the influence of substituents on the preferred conformations of the molecules. This hypothesis rationalises the paradoxical dependence on absolute stereochemistry of the activities of various allylbenzyl and cinnamyl alcohol derivatives.

  14. Conformal cloak for waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Huanyang; Leonhardt, Ulf; Tyc, Tomas

    2011-05-15

    Conformal invisibility devices are only supposed to work within the valid range of geometrical optics. Here, we show by numerical simulations and analytical arguments that for certain quantized frequencies, they are nearly perfect even in a regime that clearly violates geometrical optics. The quantization condition follows from the analogy between the Helmholtz equation and the stationary Schroedinger equation.

  15. Calcium-induced proline accumulation contributes to amelioration of NaCl injury and expression of glutamine synthetase in greater duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tai-Sheng; Hung, Meng-Ju; Cheng, Yen-I; Cheng, Lee-Ju

    2013-11-15

    The calcium-mediated proline accumulation is a critical response under NaCl stress and the function of the induced proline as a glutamine synthetase (GS) protectant in greater duckweed was investigated. The plants were treated with solutions containing 100mM NaCl, 200 mM NaCl, 200 mM NaCl plus 10mM CaCl2, or 10mM CaCl2 alone for 4 days. At the end of the experiment, the fronds of inoculum treated with 200 mM NaCl showed the chlorotic effect, higher glutamate dehydrogenase (NADH-GDH) activity and lower GS activity. At the lower salinity, the activities of GS and NADH-GDH were not altered markedly. A significant accumulation of proline was not found under either low or high salinity. The activity of Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) was enhanced only at 200 mM NaCl but remained unchanged at 100mM NaCl. The activity of Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) did not change under salinity-stressed. Addition of CaCl2 to the salt stressed plants not only lowered NaCl injury but also showed an elevated level of proline contents in response to the salinity treatment. In addition, both GS activity and corresponding polypeptides were expressed close to the level of control. Exogenous proline protects GS2 and the 32 kDa protein in photosystem II reaction center (D1) from H2O2-induced redox degradation in the chloroplast lysates of duckweed. The results suggest that calcium-induced proline accumulation may play an important role as a GS protectant under NaCl exposure in S. polyrhiza.

  16. Inhibition of HhaI DNA (Cytosine-C5) methyltransferase by oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine: examination of the intertwined roles of co-factor, target, transition state structure and enzyme conformation.

    PubMed

    Brank, Adam S; Eritja, Ramon; Garcia, Ramon Guimil; Marquez, Victor E; Christman, Judith K

    2002-10-11

    The presence of 5-azacytosine (ZCyt) residues in DNA leads to potent inhibition of DNA (cytosine-C5) methyltranferases (C5-MTases) in vivo and in vitro. Enzymatic methylation of cytosine in mammalian DNA is an epigenetic modification that can alter gene activity and chromosomal stability, influencing both differentiation and tumorigenesis. Thus, it is important to understand the critical mechanistic determinants of ZCyt's inhibitory action. Although several DNA C5-MTases have been reported to undergo essentially irreversible binding to ZCyt in DNA, there is little agreement as to the role of AdoMet and/or methyl transfer in stabilizing enzyme interactions with ZCyt. Our results demonstrate that formation of stable complexes between HhaI methyltransferase (M.HhaI) and oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing ZCyt at the target position for methylation (ZCyt-ODNs) occurs in both the absence and presence of co-factors, AdoMet and AdoHcy. Both binary and ternary complexes survive SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions and take on a compact conformation that increases their electrophoretic mobility in comparison to free M.HhaI. Since methyl transfer can occur only in the presence of AdoMet, these results suggest (1) that the inhibitory capacity of ZCyt in DNA is based on its ability to induce a stable, tightly closed conformation of M.HhaI that prevents DNA and co-factor release and (2) that methylation of ZCyt in DNA is not required for inhibition of M.HhaI.

  17. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  18. Characterization of DNA conformation inside bacterial viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Anton S.; Locker, C. Rebecca; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2009-08-01

    In this study we develop a formalism to describe the organization of DNA inside bacteriophage capsids during genome packaging. We have previously shown that DNA inside bacteriophage phi29 (ϕ29) is organized into folded toroids [A. S. Petrov and S. C. Harvey, Structure 15, 21 (2007)], whereas epsilon15 (ɛ15) reveals the coaxial organization of the genetic material [A. S. Petrov, K. Lim-Hing, and S. C. Harvey, Structure 15, 807 (2007)]. We now show that each system undergoes two consecutive transitions. The first transition corresponds to the formation of global conformations and is analogous to a disorder-order conformational transition. The second transition is characterized by a significant loss of DNA mobility at the local level leading to glasslike dynamic behavior. Packing genetic material inside bacteriophages can be used as a general model to study the behavior of semiflexible chains inside confined spaces, and the proposed formalism developed here can be used to study other systems of linear polymer chains confined to closed spaces.

  19. Protein Conformational Populations and Functionally Relevant Sub-states

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K; Burger, Virginia; Savol, Andrej; Ramanathan, Arvind; Chennubhotla, Chakra

    2013-01-01

    it to attain the transition state, therefore promoting the reaction mechanism. In the long term, this emerging view of proteins with conformational substates has broad implications for improving our understanding of enzymes, enzyme engineering, and better drug design. Researchers have already used photoactivation to modulate protein conformations as a strategy to develop a hypercatalytic enzyme. In addition, the alteration of the conformational substates through binding of ligands at locations other than the active site provides the basis for the design of new medicines through allosteric modulation.

  20. Targeting the Conformal Window: Scalars on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Evan; Brower, Rich; Hasenfratz, Anna; Rebbi, Claudio; Witzel, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    The light Higgs boson of the Standard Model could arise as the consequence of the weakly broken conformal symmetry in a strongly interacting gauge theory. Here we present a novel idea to study the transition from conformal to confining behavior using an SU(3) gauge theory with four light and eight heavy flavors. This system interpolates between the 12-flavor conformal and the 4 flavor chirally broken theory as the mass of the heavy flavors are varied. We show first results on our determination of the iso-singlet 0++ state.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of the nondenaturational conformational change of baker's yeast phosphoglycerate kinase at 24 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Ijeoma, Opral; Hollowell, Heather N; Bodnar, Melissa A; Britt, B Mark

    2008-10-15

    A plot of the Gibbs free energy of unfolding vs. temperature is calculated for baker's yeast phosphoglycerate kinase in 150 mM sodium phosphate (pH=7.0) from a combination of reversible differential scanning calorimetry measurements and isothermal guanidine hydrochloride titrations. The stability curve reveals the existence of two stable, folded conformers with an abrupt conformational transition occurring at 24 degrees C. The transition state thermodynamics for the low- to high-temperature conformational change are calculated from slow-scan-rate differential scanning calorimetry measurements where it is found that the free energy barrier for the conversion is 90 kJ/mol and the transition state possesses a significant unfolding quality. This analysis also confirms a nondenaturational conformational transition at 24 degrees C. The data therefore suggest that X-ray structures obtained from crystals grown below this temperature may differ considerably from the physiological structure and that the two conformers are not readily interconverted.

  2. Correcting mitochondrial fusion by manipulating mitofusin conformations

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Antonietta; Kitsis, Richard N.; Fleischer, Julie A.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Kornfeld, Opher S.; Gong, Guohua; Biris, Nikolaos; Benz, Ann; Qvit, Nir; Donnelly, Sara K; Chen, Yun; Mennerick, Steven; Hodgson, Louis; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Dorn, Gerald W

    2017-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, remodeling and exchanging contents during cyclic fusion and fission. Genetic mutations of mitofusin (Mfn) 2 interrupt mitochondrial fusion and cause the untreatable neurodegenerative condition, Charcot Marie Tooth disease type 2A (CMT2A). It has not been possible to directly modulate mitochondrial fusion, in part because the structural basis of mitofusin function is incompletely understood. Here we show that mitofusins adopt either a fusion-constrained or fusion-permissive molecular conformation directed by specific intramolecular binding interactions, and demonstrate that mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial fusion can be regulated by targeting these conformational transitions. Based on this model we engineered a cell-permeant minipeptide to destabilize fusion-constrained mitofusin and promote the fusion-permissive conformation, reversing mitochondrial abnormalities in cultured fibroblasts and neurons harboring CMT2A gene defects. The relationship between mitofusin conformational plasticity and mitochondrial dynamism uncovers a central mechanism regulating mitochondrial fusion whose manipulation can correct mitochondrial pathology triggered by defective or imbalanced mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:27775718

  3. Transportation Conformity Training and Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's OTAQ has provided multiple conformity training sessions in the past to assist state and local governments in implementing conformity requirements. As training information is prepared for other venues, it will be posted on this page.

  4. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  5. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  6. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016.

  7. Conformal ALON® windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Smith, Mark; Nag, Nagendra; Foti, Robyn; Jha, Santosh; Sastri, Suri

    2014-05-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALON® Optical Ceramic) combines broadband transparency with excellent mechanical properties. ALON's cubic structure means that it is transparent in its polycrystalline form, allowing it to be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques. Surmet controls every aspect of the manufacturing process, beginning with synthesis of ALON® powder, continuing through forming/heat treatment of blanks, ending with optical fabrication of ALON® windows. Surmet has made significant progress in its production capability in recent years. Additional scale up of Surmet's manufacturing capability, for complex geometries, larger sizes and higher quantities, is underway. The requirements for modern aircraft are driving the need for conformal windows for future sensor systems. However, limitations on optical systems and the ability to produce windows in complex geometries currently limit the geometry of existing windows and window assemblies to faceted assemblies of flat windows. Surmet's ability to produce large curved ALON® blanks is an important step in the development of conformal windows for future aircraft applications.

  8. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  9. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 force field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.

  10. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    DOE PAGES

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; ...

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 forcemore » field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.« less

  11. Electrical control of protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Alwin M D; Schur, Rebecca M; Ober, Christopher K; Fischbach, Claudia; Gourdon, Delphine; Malliaras, George G

    2012-05-08

    Conducting polymer devices that enable precise control of fibronectin conformation over macroscopic areas are reported. Single conformations as well as conformation gradients are achieved by applying an appropriate potential. These surfaces remain biologically relevant and support cell culture; hence, they may serve as a model to understand and control cell-surface interactions, with applications in basic research, medical diagnostics, and tissue engineering.

  12. Low-Mode Conformational Search Method with Semiempirical Quantum Mechanical Calculations: Application to Enantioselective Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2016-02-22

    A conformational search program for finding low-energy conformations of large noncovalent complexes has been developed. A quantitatively reliable semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6-DH+ method, which is able to accurately describe noncovalent interactions at a low computational cost, was employed in contrast to conventional conformational search programs in which molecular mechanical methods are usually adopted. Our approach is based on the low-mode method whereby an initial structure is perturbed along one of its low-mode eigenvectors to generate new conformations. This method was applied to determine the most stable conformation of transition state for enantioselective alkylation by the Maruoka and cinchona alkaloid catalysts and Hantzsch ester hydrogenation of imines by chiral phosphoric acid. Besides successfully reproducing the previously reported most stable DFT conformations, the conformational search with the semiempirical quantum mechanical calculations newly discovered a more stable conformation at a low computational cost.

  13. Conformal Janus on Euclidean sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gustavsson, Andreas; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2016-12-01

    We interpret Janus as an interface in a conformal field theory and study its properties. The Janus is created by an exactly marginal operator and we study its effect on the interface conformal field theory on the Janus. We do this by utilizing the AdS/CFT correspondence. We compute the interface free energy both from leading correction to the Euclidean action in the dual gravity description and from conformal perturbation theory in the conformal field theory. We find that the two results agree each other and that the interface free energy scales precisely as expected from the conformal invariance of the Janus interface.

  14. Conformal vectors and stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjonjo, A. M.; Maharaj, S. D.; Moopanar, S.

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between conformal symmetries and relativistic spheres in astrophysics is studied. We use the nonvanishing components of the Weyl tensor to classify the conformal symmetries in static spherical spacetimes. It is possible to find an explicit connection between the two gravitational potentials for both conformally flat and nonconformally flat cases. We show that the conformal Killing vector admits time dependence in terms of quadratic, trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. The Einstein and Einstein-Maxwell field equations can be written in terms of a single potential, any choice of which leads to an exact solution. Previous results of conformally invariant static spheres are contained in our treatment.

  15. OSI Conformance Testing for Bibliographic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbez, Gilbert; Swain, Leigh

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) conformance testing sites, conformance testing tools, and conformance testing services. Discusses related topics such as interoperability testing, arbitration testing, and international harmonization of conformance testing. A glossary is included. (24 references) (SD)

  16. Metamaterials with conformational nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Lapine, Mikhail; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Powell, David A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2011-01-01

    Within a decade of fruitful development, metamaterials became a prominent area of research, bridging theoretical and applied electrodynamics, electrical engineering and material science. Being man-made structures, metamaterials offer a particularly useful playground to develop interdisciplinary concepts. Here we demonstrate a novel principle in metamaterial assembly which integrates electromagnetic, mechanical, and thermal responses within their elements. Through these mechanisms, the conformation of the meta-molecules changes, providing a dual mechanism for nonlinearity and offering nonlinear chirality. Our proposal opens a wide road towards further developments of nonlinear metamaterials and photonic structures, adding extra flexibility to their design and control. PMID:22355655

  17. Leaf growth is conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  18. Energetic and conformational aspects of dendrimer overcharging by linear polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Lyulin, Sergey V; Darinskii, Anatolij A; Lyulin, Alexey V

    2008-10-01

    Extensive Brownian dynamics simulations of conformational changes accompanying the overcharging of a dendrimer by an oppositely charged long linear polyelectrolyte (LPE) have been carried out. The simulated results have been compared with the predictions of the Nguen and Shklovskii correlation theory [Physica A 293, 324 (2001)] for impenetrable charged spherical macroion. Dendrimer overcharging is caused by the spatial correlations between the "excess" of the LPE charges adsorbed onto its surface. The simulated LPE-length dependence of the corresponding "correlation" energy is in agreement with the theoretical predictions. Maximum of the LPE adsorption occurs at some critical LPE length N{ch};{c} , and the first order phase transition from completely coiled conformation to the conformation with released tails takes place. The phase transition is accompanied by the drastic increase in the relative fluctuations of the polyelectrolyte size. Upon increasing the linear-chain length above N{ch};{c} , the one-long-tail conformation becomes energetically preferable; the exchange time between the long-tail conformation and the short-tail conformation is very large.

  19. Movement of elongation factor G between compact and extended conformations.

    PubMed

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie; Netter, Zoe; Dann, Jillian; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2015-01-30

    Previous structural studies suggested that ribosomal translocation is accompanied by large interdomain rearrangements of elongation factor G (EF-G). Here, we follow the movement of domain IV of EF-G relative to domain II of EF-G using ensemble and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. Our results indicate that ribosome-free EF-G predominantly adopts a compact conformation that can also, albeit infrequently, transition into a more extended conformation in which domain IV moves away from domain II. By contrast, ribosome-bound EF-G predominantly adopts an extended conformation regardless of whether it is interacting with pretranslocation ribosomes or with posttranslocation ribosomes. Our data suggest that ribosome-bound EF-G may also occasionally sample at least one more compact conformation. GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by EF-G does not affect the relative stability of the observed conformations in ribosome-free and ribosome-bound EF-G. Our data support a model suggesting that, upon binding to a pretranslocation ribosome, EF-G moves from a compact to a more extended conformation. This transition is not coupled to but likely precedes both GTP hydrolysis and mRNA/tRNA translocation.

  20. Movement of Elongation Factor G between Compact and Extended Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie; Netter, Zoe; Dann, Jillian; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous structural studies suggested that ribosomal translocation is accompanied by large interdomain rearrangements of elongation factor G (EF-G). Here, we follow the movement of domain IV of EF-G relative to domain II of EF-G using ensemble and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Our results indicate that ribosome-free EF-G predominantly adopts a compact conformation that can also, albeit infrequently, transition into a more extended conformation in which domain IV moves away from domain II. By contrast, ribosome-bound EF-G predominantly adopts an extended conformation regardless of whether it is interacting with pre- or posttranslocation ribosomes. Our data suggest that ribosome-bound EF-G may also occasionally sample at least one more compact conformation. GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by EF-G does not affect the relative stability of the observed conformations in ribosome-free and ribosome-bound EF-G. Our data support a model suggesting that, upon binding to a pretranslocation ribosome, EF-G moves from a compact to a more extended conformation. This transition is not coupled to, but likely precedes both GTP hydrolysis and mRNA/tRNA translocation. PMID:25463439

  1. A novel approach to the study of conformality in the SU(3) theory with multiple flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, R.; Hasenfratz, A.; Rebbi, C.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the transition between spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and conformal behavior in the SU(3) theory with multiple fermion flavors. We propose a new strategy for studying this transition. Instead of changing the number of flavors, we lift the mass of a subset of the fermions, keeping the rest of the fermions near the massless chiral limit in order to probe the transition.

  2. A novel approach to the study of conformality in the SU(3) theory with multiple flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, R.; Hasenfratz, A.; Rebbi, C. Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the transition between spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and conformal behavior in the SU(3) theory with multiple fermion flavors. We propose a new strategy for studying this transition. Instead of changing the number of flavors, we lift the mass of a subset of the fermions, keeping the rest of the fermions near the massless chiral limit in order to probe the transition.

  3. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  4. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; ...

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  5. Conformally symmetric traversable wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2007-10-15

    Exact solutions of traversable wormholes are found under the assumption of spherical symmetry and the existence of a nonstatic conformal symmetry, which presents a more systematic approach in searching for exact wormhole solutions. In this work, a wide variety of solutions are deduced by considering choices for the form function, a specific linear equation of state relating the energy density and the pressure anisotropy, and various phantom wormhole geometries are explored. A large class of solutions impose that the spatial distribution of the exotic matter is restricted to the throat neighborhood, with a cutoff of the stress-energy tensor at a finite junction interface, although asymptotically flat exact solutions are also found. Using the 'volume integral quantifier', it is found that the conformally symmetric phantom wormhole geometries may, in principle, be constructed by infinitesimally small amounts of averaged null energy condition violating matter. Considering the tidal acceleration traversability conditions for the phantom wormhole geometry, specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity are also deduced.

  6. An Expression of Periodic Phenomena of Fashion on Sexual Selection Model with Conformity Genes and Memes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, Atsuko; Tokuhara, Shinya; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Oboshi, Tamon; Kato, Shohei; Itoh, Hidenori

    It is generally thought that living things have trends in their preferences. The mechanism of occurrence of another trends in successive periods is concerned in their conformity. According to social impact theory, the minority is always exists in the group. There is a possibility that the minority make the transition to the majority by conforming agents. Because of agent's promotion of their conform actions, the majority can make the transition. We proposed an evolutionary model with both genes and memes, and elucidated the interaction between genes and memes on sexual selection. In this paper, we propose an agent model for sexual selection imported the concept of conformity. Using this model we try an environment where male agents and female agents are existed, we find that periodic phenomena of fashion are expressed. And we report the influence of conformity and differentiation on the transition of their preferences.

  7. In silico Exploration of the Conformational Universe of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Espigares, Ismael; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Selent, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The structural plasticity of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to a conformational universe going from inactive to active receptor states with several intermediate states. Many of them have not been captured yet and their role for GPCR activation is not well understood. The study of this conformational space and the transition dynamics between different receptor populations is a major challenge in molecular biophysics. The rational design of effector molecules that target such receptor populations allows fine-tuning receptor signalling with higher specificity to produce drugs with safer therapeutic profiles. In this minireview, we outline highly conserved receptor regions which are considered determinant for the establishment of distinct receptor states. We then discuss in-silico approaches such as dimensionality reduction methods and Markov State Models to explore the GPCR conformational universe and exploit the obtained conformations through structure-based drug design.

  8. Conformations of low-molecular-weight lignin polymers in water

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-13

    Low-molecular-weight lignin binds to cellulose during the thermochemical pretreatment of biomass for biofuel production, which prevents the efficient hydrolysis of the cellulose to sugars. The binding properties of lignin are influenced strongly by the conformations it adopts. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution to investigate the dependence of the shape of lignin polymers on chain length and temperature. Lignin is found to adopt collapsed conformations in water at 300 and 500 K. However, at 300 K, a discontinuous transition is found in the shape of the polymer as a function of the chain length. Below a critical degree of polymerization, Nc=15, the polymer adopts less spherical conformations than above Nc. The transition disappears at high temperatures (500 K) at which only spherical shapes are adopted. As a result, an implication relevant to cellulosic biofuel production is that lignin will self-aggregate even at high pretreatment temperatures.

  9. Conformations of Low-Molecular-Weight Lignin Polymers in Water.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-02-08

    Low-molecular-weight lignin binds to cellulose during the thermochemical pretreatment of biomass for biofuel production, which prevents the efficient hydrolysis of the cellulose to sugars. The binding properties of lignin are influenced strongly by the conformations it adopts. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution to investigate the dependence of the shape of lignin polymers on chain length and temperature. Lignin is found to adopt collapsed conformations in water at 300 and 500 K. However, at 300 K, a discontinuous transition is found in the shape of the polymer as a function of the chain length. Below a critical degree of polymerization, Nc =15, the polymer adopts less spherical conformations than above Nc. The transition disappears at high temperatures (500 K) at which only spherical shapes are adopted. An implication relevant to cellulosic biofuel production is that lignin will self-aggregate even at high pretreatment temperatures.

  10. Conformations of low-molecular-weight lignin polymers in water

    DOE PAGES

    Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-13

    Low-molecular-weight lignin binds to cellulose during the thermochemical pretreatment of biomass for biofuel production, which prevents the efficient hydrolysis of the cellulose to sugars. The binding properties of lignin are influenced strongly by the conformations it adopts. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution to investigate the dependence of the shape of lignin polymers on chain length and temperature. Lignin is found to adopt collapsed conformations in water at 300 and 500 K. However, at 300 K, a discontinuous transition is found in the shape of the polymer as a function of the chain length. Below a criticalmore » degree of polymerization, Nc=15, the polymer adopts less spherical conformations than above Nc. The transition disappears at high temperatures (500 K) at which only spherical shapes are adopted. As a result, an implication relevant to cellulosic biofuel production is that lignin will self-aggregate even at high pretreatment temperatures.« less

  11. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Analysis of Merlin Conformational Changes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hennigan, Robert F.; Foster, Lauren A.; Chaiken, Mary F.; Mani, Timmy; Gomes, Michelle M.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ip, Wallace

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 is an inherited autosomal disorder caused by biallelic inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene. The NF2 gene encodes a 70-kDa protein, merlin, which is a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family. ERM proteins are believed to be regulated by a transition between a closed conformation, formed by binding of their N-terminal FERM domain and C-terminal tail domain (CTD), and an open conformation, in which the two domains do not interact. Previous work suggests that the tumor suppressor function of merlin is similarly regulated and that only the closed form is active. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control its conformation is crucial. We have developed a series of probes that measures merlin conformation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, both as purified protein and in live cells. Using these tools, we find that merlin exists predominately as a monomer in a stable, closed conformation that is mediated by the central α-helical domain. The contribution from the FERM-CTD interaction to the closed conformation appears to be less important. Upon phosphorylation or interaction with an effector protein, merlin undergoes a subtle conformational change, suggesting a novel mechanism that modulates the interaction between the FERM domain and the CTD. PMID:19884346

  12. Recent Advances in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Chaykov, Spasen

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in alternative gravitational theories. Although MOND remains the leading candidate among the alternative models, Conformal Gravity has been studied by Mannheim and O'Brien to solve the rotation curve problem without the need for dark matter. Recently, Mannheim, O'Brien and Chaykov have begun solving other gravitational questions in Conformal Gravity. In this presentation, we highlight the new work of Conformal Gravity's application to random motions of clusters (the original Zwicky problem), gravitational bending of light, gravitational lensing and a very recent survey of dwarf galaxy rotation curves. We will show in each case that Conformal Gravity can provide an accurate explanation and prediction of the data without the need for dark matter. Coupled with the fact that Conformal Gravity is a fully re-normalizable metric theory of gravity, these results help to push Conformal Gravity onto a competitive stage against other alternative models.

  13. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  14. tRNA Shifts the G-quadruplex-Hairpin Conformational Equilibrium in RNA towards the Hairpin Conformer.

    PubMed

    Rode, Ambadas B; Endoh, Tamaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-11-07

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in cellular homeostasis and are involved in many human diseases including cancer. Intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions are the basis for the diverse functions of many non-coding RNAs. Herein, we show how the presence of tRNA influences the equilibrium between hairpin and G-quadruplex conformations in the 5' untranslated regions of oncogenes and model sequences. Kinetic and equilibrium analyses of the hairpin to G-quadruplex conformational transition of purified RNA as well as during co-transcriptional folding indicate that tRNA significantly shifts the equilibrium toward the hairpin conformer. The enhancement of relative translation efficiency in a reporter gene assay is shown to be due to the tRNA-mediated shift in hairpin-G-quadruplex equilibrium of oncogenic mRNAs. Our findings suggest that tRNA is a possible therapeutic target in diseases in which RNA conformational equilibria is dysregulated.

  15. Conformal array antenna subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-04-01

    An antenna subsystem to communicate between Ariane 4 and a data relay satellite was studied, concluding that the original ideas on ring antennas should be corrected due to the wide margin of coverage required in elevation for such antennas, which implies the need of splitting the coverage. Nevertheless, the study of cylindrical and conical conformal arrays was continued in view of their intrinsic interest. Needed coverages with specified gain can be obtained with a set of microstrip circular patch antennas. For the lower stage, a single patch is enough. For geostationary missions, one horizontal array is used, and for heliosynchronous missions two horizontal arrays and a vertical one. The numerical study carried out on omniazimuthal ring antennas shows that a tendency to omnidirectional pattern exists in spite of the directivity of the elementary radiators. A small pointing improvement of the meridian pattern can be obtained by means of conical arrays instead of the cylindrical ones.

  16. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  17. Conformally symmetric relativistic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Farook; Maharaj, Sunil D.; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain; Chakraborty, Koushik

    2017-03-01

    We investigate whether compact stars having Tolman-like interior geometry admit conformal symmetry. Taking anisotropic pressure along the two principal directions within the compact object, we obtain physically relevant quantities such as transverse and radial pressure, density and redshift function. We study the equation of state (EOS) for the matter distribution inside the star. From the relation between pressure and density function of the constituent matter, we explore the nature and properties of the interior matter. The redshift function and compactness parameter are found to be physically reasonable. The matter inside the star satisfies the null, weak and strong energy conditions. Finally, we compare the masses and radii predicted from the model with corresponding values in some observed stars.

  18. 40 CFR 93.107 - Relationship of transportation plan and TIP conformity with the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... development studies. Should the NEPA process result in a project with design concept and scope significantly... and TIP conformity with the NEPA process. 93.107 Section 93.107 Protection of Environment... Transit Laws § 93.107 Relationship of transportation plan and TIP conformity with the NEPA process....

  19. 40 CFR 93.107 - Relationship of transportation plan and TIP conformity with the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... development studies. Should the NEPA process result in a project with design concept and scope significantly... and TIP conformity with the NEPA process. 93.107 Section 93.107 Protection of Environment... Transit Laws § 93.107 Relationship of transportation plan and TIP conformity with the NEPA process....

  20. 40 CFR 93.107 - Relationship of transportation plan and TIP conformity with the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... development studies. Should the NEPA process result in a project with design concept and scope significantly... and TIP conformity with the NEPA process. 93.107 Section 93.107 Protection of Environment... Transit Laws § 93.107 Relationship of transportation plan and TIP conformity with the NEPA process....

  1. Comparison of Replica Exchange Simulations of a Kinetically Trapped Protein Conformational State and its Native Form.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mark A; Legler, Patricia M; Goldman, Ellen R

    2016-03-10

    Recently an X-ray crystallographic structure of a single-domain antibody was reported with the protein chain trapped in a rare homodimeric form. One of the conformers appears to exhibit a misfolded region, and thus presumably the configurational stability is less favorable. To investigate whether simulation methods can detect any difference between the conformers and buttress the notion that one conformation is trapped on a pathway that incurs lower activation energy to unfold, adaptive temperature-based replica exchange simulations were applied to each chain to model conformational transitions. Simulation results found that the observed crystallographic difference between the two chains in the complementarity determining region CDR2 induces a stark distinction in conformational populations on the energy landscape. An appraisal of the energetic difference between the CDR2 conformations at 300 K revealed a localized order-disorder free-energy transition of roughly equivalent to two peptide hydrogen bonds in solution. It was also found that interconversion between the conformers is slower than the rate to unfold and that near an unfolding transition temperature one conformer retained a greater fraction of native-like contacts and energy over a longer time span before fully populating the denatured state, thus verifying the coexistence of a metastable conformation in the crystallographic assembly.

  2. 40 CFR 93.114 - Criteria and procedures: Currently conforming transportation plan and TIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DETERMINING CONFORMITY OF FEDERAL ACTIONS TO STATE OR..., Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws §...

  3. 40 CFR 93.114 - Criteria and procedures: Currently conforming transportation plan and TIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DETERMINING CONFORMITY OF FEDERAL ACTIONS TO STATE OR..., Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws §...

  4. 40 CFR 93.107 - Relationship of transportation plan and TIP conformity with the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Transit Laws § 93.107 Relationship of transportation plan and TIP conformity with the NEPA process. The... quality modeling do not preclude the consideration of alternatives in the NEPA process or other...

  5. New open conformation of SMYD3 implicates conformational selection and allostery

    PubMed Central

    Spellmon, Nicholas; Sun, Xiaonan; Xue, Wen; Holcomb, Joshua; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Shang, Weifeng; Edwards, Brian; Sirinupong, Nualpun; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    SMYD3 plays a key role in cancer cell viability, adhesion, migration and invasion. SMYD3 promotes formation of inducible regulatory T cells and is involved in reducing autoimmunity. However, the nearly “closed” substrate-binding site and poor in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase activity have obscured further understanding of this oncogenically related protein. Here we reveal that SMYD3 can adopt an “open” conformation using molecular dynamics simulation and small-angle X-ray scattering. This ligand-binding-capable open state is related to the crystal structure-like closed state by a striking clamshell-like inter-lobe dynamics. The two states are characterized by many distinct structural and dynamical differences and the conformational transition pathway is mediated by a reversible twisting motion of the C-terminal domain (CTD). The spontaneous transition from the closed to open states suggests two possible, mutually non-exclusive models for SMYD3 functional regulation and the conformational selection mechanism and allostery may regulate the catalytic or ligand binding competence of SMYD3. This study provides an immediate clue to the puzzling role of SMYD3 in epigenetic gene regulation. PMID:28050603

  6. Fe-heme conformations in ferric myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Della Longa, S; Pin, S; Cortès, R; Soldatov, A V; Alpert, B

    1998-12-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of ferric myoglobin from horse heart have been acquired as a function of pH (between 5.3 and 11.3). At pH = 11.3 temperature-dependent spectra (between 20 and 293 K) have been collected as well. Experimental data solve three main conformations of the Fe-heme: the first, at low pH, is related to high-spin aquomet-myoglobin (Mb+OH2). The other two, at pH 11.3, are related to hydroxymet-myoglobin (Mb+OH-), and are in thermal equilibrium, corresponding to high- and low-spin Mb+OH-. The structure of the three Fe-heme conformations has been assigned according to spin-resolved multiple scattering simulations and fitting of the XANES data. The chemical transition between Mb+OH2 and high-spin Mb+OH-, and the spin transition of Mb+OH-, are accompanied by changes of the Fe coordination sphere due to its movement toward the heme plane, coupled to an increase of the axial asymmetry.

  7. Replacement between conformity and counter-conformity in consumption decisions.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Jui; Chang, En-Chung; Dai, Qi; Wong, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    This study assessed, in a Chinese context, how self-esteem interacts with perceived similarity and uniqueness to yield cognitive dissonance, and whether the dissonance leads to self-reported conformity or counter-conformity behavior. Participants were 408 respondents from 4 major Chinese cities (M age = 33.0 yr., SD = 4.3; 48% men). Self-perceptions of uniqueness, similarity, cognitive dissonance, self-esteem and need to behave in conformity or counter-conformity were measured. A theoretical model was assessed in four situations, relating the ratings of self-esteem and perceived similarity/uniqueness to the way other people at a wedding were dressed, and the resultant cognitive dissonance and conformity/ counter-conformity behavior. Regardless of high or low self-esteem, all participants reported cognitive dissonance when they were told that they were dressed extremely similarly to or extremely differently from the other people attending the wedding. However, the conforming/counter-conforming strategies used by participants to resolve the cognitive dissonance differed. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme uniqueness of dress, participants with low self-esteem tended to say they would dress next time so as to conform with the way others were dressed, while those with high self-esteem indicated they would continue their counter-conformity in attire. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme similarity to others, both those with high and low self-esteem tended to say they would dress in an unorthodox manner to surprise other people in the future.

  8. The Principle of Maximum Conformality

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J; Giustino, Di; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}). It is common practice to guess a physical scale {mu} = Q which is of order of a typical momentum transfer Q in the process, and then vary the scale over a range Q/2 and 2Q. This procedure is clearly problematic since the resulting fixed-order pQCD prediction will depend on the renormalization scheme, and it can even predict negative QCD cross sections at next-to-leading-order. Other heuristic methods to set the renormalization scale, such as the 'principle of minimal sensitivity', give unphysical results for jet physics, sum physics into the running coupling not associated with renormalization, and violate the transitivity property of the renormalization group. Such scale-setting methods also give incorrect results when applied to Abelian QED. Note that the factorization scale in QCD is introduced to match nonperturbative and perturbative aspects of the parton distributions in hadrons; it is present even in conformal theory and thus is a completely separate issue from renormalization scale setting. The PMC provides a consistent method for determining the renormalization scale in pQCD. The PMC scale-fixed prediction is independent of the choice of renormalization scheme, a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC global scale can be derived efficiently at NLO from basic properties of the PQCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increases the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of colliders to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  9. Hybrid percolation transition in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahng, Byungnam

    Percolation has been one of the most applied statistical models. Percolation transition is one of the most robust continuous transitions known thus far. However, recent extensive researches reveal that it exhibits diverse types of phase transitions such as discontinuous and hybrid phase transitions. Here hybrid phase transition means the phase transition exhibiting natures of both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions simultaneously. Examples include k-core percolation, cascading failures in interdependent networks, synchronization, etc. Thus far, it is not manifest if the critical behavior of hybrid percolation transitions conforms to the conventional scaling laws of second-order phase transition. Here, we investigate the critical behaviors of hybrid percolation transitions in the cascading failure model in inter-dependent networks and the restricted Erdos-Renyi model. We find that the critical behaviors of the hybrid percolation transitions contain some features that cannot be described by the conventional theory of second-order percolation transitions.

  10. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  11. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  12. Transition States and transition state analogue interactions with enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Vern L

    2015-04-21

    Enzymatic transition states have lifetimes of a few femtoseconds (fs). Computational analysis of enzyme motions leading to transition state formation suggests that local catalytic site motions on the fs time scale provide the mechanism to locate transition states. An experimental test of protein fs motion and its relation to transition state formation can be provided by isotopically heavy proteins. Heavy enzymes have predictable mass-altered bond vibration states without altered electrostatic properties, according to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. On-enzyme chemistry is slowed in most heavy proteins, consistent with altered protein bond frequencies slowing the search for the transition state. In other heavy enzymes, structural changes involved in reactant binding and release are also influenced. Slow protein motions associated with substrate binding and catalytic site preorganization are essential to allow the subsequent fs motions to locate the transition state and to facilitate the efficient release of products. In the catalytically competent geometry, local groups move in stochastic atomic motion on the fs time scale, within transition state-accessible conformations created by slower protein motions. The fs time scale for the transition state motions does not permit thermodynamic equilibrium between the transition state and stable enzyme states. Isotopically heavy enzymes provide a diagnostic tool for fast coupled protein motions to transition state formation and mass-dependent conformational changes. The binding of transition state analogue inhibitors is the opposite in catalytic time scale to formation of the transition state but is related by similar geometries of the enzyme-transition state and enzyme-inhibitor interactions. While enzymatic transition states have lifetimes as short as 10(-15) s, transition state analogues can bind tightly to enzymes with release rates greater than 10(3) s. Tight-binding transition state analogues stabilize the rare but

  13. Dynamics of protein conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Maria

    2010-10-01

    A novel theoretical methodology is introduced to identify dynamic structural domains and analyze local flexibility in proteins. The methodology employs a multiscale approach combining identification of essential collective coordinates based on the covariance analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories, construction of the Mori projection operator with these essential coordinates, and analysis of the corresponding generalized Langevin equations [M.Stepanova, Phys.Rev.E 76(2007)051918]. Because the approach employs a rigorous theory, the outcomes are physically transparent: the dynamic domains are associated with regions of relative rigidity in the protein, whereas off-domain regions are relatively soft. This also allows scoring the flexibility in the macromolecule with atomic-level resolution [N.Blinov, M.Berjanskii, D.S.Wishart, and M.Stepanova, Biochemistry, 48(2009)1488]. The applications include the domain coarse-graining and characterization of conformational stability in protein G and prion proteins. The results are compared with published NMR experiments. Potential applications for structural biology, bioinformatics, and drug design are discussed.

  14. Imaging of conformational changes

    SciTech Connect

    Michl, Josef

    2016-03-13

    Control of intramolecular conformational change in a small number of molecules or even a single one by an application of an outside electric field defined by potentials on nearby metal or dielectric surfaces has potential applications in both 3-D and 2-D nanotechnology. Specifically, the synthesis, characterization, and understanding of designed solids with controlled built-in internal rotational motion of a dipole promises a new class of materials with intrinsic dielectric, ferroelectric, optical and optoelectronic properties not found in nature. Controlled rotational motion is of great interest due to its expected utility in phenomena as diverse as transport, current flow in molecular junctions, diffusion in microfluidic channels, and rotary motion in molecular machines. A direct time-resolved observation of the dynamics of motion on ps or ns time scale in a single molecule would be highly interesting but is also very difficult and has yet to be accomplished. Much can be learned from an easier but still challenging comparison of directly observed initial and final orientational states of a single molecule, which is the basis of this project. The project also impacts the understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and single-molecule spectroscopic detection, as well as the synthesis of solid-state materials with tailored properties from designed precursors.

  15. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian E-mail: Enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable effects and ''projection'' terms.

  16. Remarks on Polyelectrolyte Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gennes, P. G.; Pincus, P.; Velasco, R. M.; Brochard, F.

    Nous discutons des conformations de polymères linéaires chargés en faisant les hypothèses suivantes : a) la chaĬne sans charge est flexible, b) la force éctrostatique domine les interactions monomère-monomère c) il n'y a pas de sels. 1) Pour le cas dilué (chaĬne non enchevetrees) en corrigeant le calcul self-consistant fait récemment par Richmond [1a], on trouve une taille des polyions égale a = R ND, qui est une fonction linéaire de l'indice de polymérisation N. Ce rèsultat est en accord avec les prècèdents travaux de Hermans et Overbeek [1b], Kuhn, Kunzle et Katchalsky [1c]. 2) Il existe un domaine pour des concentrations très petites c (c** < c < c*) oò les interactions èlectrostatiques entre les polyions sont supèrieures aux ènergies thermiques, il semble donc possible que les polyions puissent former un rèseau pèriodique à trois dimensions. Nèanmoins, il semble difficile de mettre en èvidence un rèseau si diluè. 3) Jusqu'ici toutes les expériences avec les polyélectrolytes sans sels ont été pratiquement faites à des concentrations c > c*, pour lesquelles les différentes cha.nes sont enchevêtrées. Pour discuter ce régime on s.intéresse uniquement au cas où la charge par unité de longueur est près du (ou audessus du) seuil de condensation, donc il existe une seule longueur ξ(c) caractérisant les corrélations; à trois dimensions 03BE a le même comportement que le rayon de Debye pour les contre-ions. On a considéré quelques conformations possibles : a) un réseau hexagonal de batonnets; b) un réseau cubique de batonnets; c) une phase isotrope de cha.nes partiellement flexibles. Les différentes structures formées de batonnets semblent avoir la même énergie électrostatique. Ce fait suggère que la phase isotrope peut être la plus favorable. On analyse cette dernière phase en utilisant les mêmes méthodes qui se sont révélées efficaces pour les solutions des polymères neutres. Dans le modèle isotrope

  17. Necessary Condition for Emergent Symmetry from the Conformal Bootstrap.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yu; Ohtsuki, Tomoki

    2016-09-23

    We use the conformal bootstrap program to derive the necessary conditions for emergent symmetry enhancement from discrete symmetry (e.g., Z_{n}) to continuous symmetry [e.g., U(1)] under the renormalization group flow. In three dimensions, in order for Z_{2} symmetry to be enhanced to U(1) symmetry, the conformal bootstrap program predicts that the scaling dimension of the order parameter field at the infrared conformal fixed point must satisfy Δ_{1}>1.08. We also obtain the similar necessary conditions for Z_{3} symmetry with Δ_{1}>0.580 and Z_{4} symmetry with Δ_{1}>0.504 from the simultaneous conformal bootstrap analysis of multiple four-point functions. As applications, we show that our necessary conditions impose severe constraints on the nature of the chiral phase transition in QCD, the deconfinement criticality in Néel valence bond solid transitions, and anisotropic deformations in critical O(n) models. We prove that some fixed points proposed in the literature are unstable under the perturbation that cannot be forbidden by the discrete symmetry. In these situations, the second-order phase transition with enhanced symmetry cannot happen.

  18. Holographic instant conformal symmetry breaking by colliding conical defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, D. S.; Aref'eva, I. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    We study instant conformal symmetry breaking as a holographic effect of ultrarelativistic particles moving in the AdS3 space-time. We give a qualitative picture of this effect based on calculating the two-point correlation functions and the entanglement entropy of the corresponding boundary theory. We show that in the geodesic approximation, because of gravitational lensing of the geodesics, the ultrarelativistic massless defect produces a zone structure for correlators with broken conformal invariance. At the same time, the holographic entanglement entropy also exhibits a transition to nonconformal behavior. Two colliding massless defects produce a more diverse zone structure for correlators and the entanglement entropy.

  19. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2002-02-28

    This technical progress report describes work performed from June 20 through December 19, 2001, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels''. Interest has increased in some new polymeric products that purport to substantially reduce permeability to water while causing minimum permeability reduction to oil. In view of this interest, we are currently studying BJ's Aqua Con. Results from six corefloods revealed that the Aqua Con gelant consistently reduced permeability to water more than that to oil. However, the magnitude of the disproportionate permeability reduction varied significantly for the various experiments. Thus, as with most materials tested to date, the issue of reproducibility and control of the disproportionate permeability remains to be resolved. Concern exists about the ability of gels to resist washout after placement in fractures. We examined whether a width constriction in the middle of a fracture would cause different gel washout behavior upstream versus downstream of the constriction. Tests were performed using a formed Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel in a 48-in.-long fracture with three sections of equal length, but with widths of 0.08-, 0.02-, and 0.08-in., respectively. The pressure gradients during gel extrusion (i.e., placement) were similar in the two 0.08-in.-wide fracture sections, even though they were separated by a 0.02-in.-wide fracture section. The constriction associated with the middle fracture section may have inhibited gel washout during the first pulse of brine injection after gel placement. However, during subsequent phases of brine injection, the constriction did not inhibit washout in the upstream fracture section any more than in the downstream section.

  20. Predicting conformational switches in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Young, M.; Kirshenbaum, K.; Dill, K. A.; Highsmith, S.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a new computational technique to predict conformationally switching elements in proteins from their amino acid sequences. The method, called ASP (Ambivalent Structure Predictor), analyzes results from a secondary structure prediction algorithm to identify regions of conformational ambivalence. ASP identifies ambivalent regions in 16 test protein sequences for which function involves substantial backbone rearrangements. In the test set, all sites previously described as conformational switches are correctly predicted to be structurally ambivalent regions. No such regions are predicted in three negative control protein sequences. ASP may be useful as a guide for experimental studies on protein function and motion in the absence of detailed three-dimensional structural data. PMID:10493576

  1. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  2. Conformal tensors via Lovelock gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastor, David

    2013-10-01

    Constructs from conformal geometry are important in low dimensional gravity models, while in higher dimensions the higher curvature interactions of Lovelock gravity are similarly prominent. Considering conformal invariance in the context of Lovelock gravity leads to natural, higher curvature generalizations of the Weyl, Schouten, Cotton and Bach tensors, with properties that straightforwardly extend those of their familiar counterparts. As a first application, we introduce a new set of conformally invariant gravity theories in D = 4k dimensions, based on the squares of the higher curvature Weyl tensors.

  3. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  4. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn

    2013-12-14

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  5. Conformational Landscape of Nicotinoids: Solving the "conformational - Rity" of Anabasine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Evangelisti, Luca; Suenram, Richard D.; Caminati, Walther; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2010-06-01

    The conformational landscape of the alkaloid anabasine (neonicotine) has been investigated using rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results allow a detailed comparison of the structural properties of the prototype piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nicotinoids (anabasine vs. nicotine). Anabasine adopts two most stable conformations in isolation conditions, for which we determined accurate rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters. The preferred conformations are characterized by an equatorial pyridine moiety and additional N-H equatorial stereochemistry at the piperidine ring (Eq-Eq). The two rings of anabasine are close to a bisecting arrangement, with the observed conformations differing in a ca. 180° rotation of the pyridine subunit, denoted either Syn or Anti. The preference of anabasine for the Eq-Eq-Syn conformation has been established by relative intensity measurements (Syn/Anti˜5(2)). The conformational preferences of free anabasine are directed by a N\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotH-C weak hydrogen bond interaction between the nitrogen lone pair at piperidine and the closest hydrogen bond in pyridine, with N\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotN distances ranging from 4.750 Å (Syn) to 4.233 Å (Anti). R. J. Lavrich, R. D. Suenram, D. F. Plusquellic and S. Davis, 58^th OSU Int. Symp. on Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2003, Comm. RH13.

  6. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 5

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the conformity SIP adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, OH, WI) is provided here.

  7. Graphene-based conformal devices.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Ju; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Hyunmin; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2014-08-26

    Despite recent progress in bendable and stretchable thin-film transistors using novel designs and materials, the development of conformal devices remains limited by the insufficient flexibility of devices. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of graphene-based conformal and stretchable devices such as transistor and tactile sensor on a substrate with a convoluted surface by scaling down the device thickness. The 70 nm thick graphene-based conformal devices displayed a much lower bending stiffness than reported previously. The demonstrated devices provided excellent conformal coverage over an uneven animal hide surface without the need for an adhesive. In addition, the ultrathin graphene devices formed on the three-dimensionally curved animal hide exhibited stable electrical characteristics, even under repetitive bending and twisting. The advanced performance and flexibility demonstrated here show promise for the development and adoption of wearable electronics in a wide range of future applications.

  8. Conformation Distributions in Adsorbed Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuse, Curtis W.; Hubbard, Joseph B.; Vrettos, John S.; Smith, Jackson R.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2007-03-01

    While the structural basis of protein function is well understood in the biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, few methods for the characterization and comparison of protein conformation distributions are available. New methods capable of measuring the stability of protein conformations and the integrity of protein-protein, protein-ligand and protein-surface interactions both in solution and on surfaces are needed to help the development of protein-based products. We are developing infrared spectroscopy methods for the characterization and comparison of molecular conformation distributions in monolayers and in solutions. We have extracted an order parameter describing the orientational and conformational variations of protein functional groups around the average molecular values from a single polarized spectrum. We will discuss the development of these methods and compare them to amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange methods for albumin in solution and on different polymer surfaces to show that our order parameter is related to protein stability.

  9. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; ...

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  10. Conformal mapping of rectangular heptagons

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatyrev, Andrei B

    2012-12-31

    A new effective approach to calculating the direct and inverse conformal mapping of rectangular polygons onto a half-plane is put forward; it is based on the use of Riemann theta functions. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  11. Solution NMR conformation of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been giving a pivotal contribution to the progress of glycomics, mostly by elucidating the structural, dynamical, conformational and intermolecular binding aspects of carbohydrates. Particularly in the field of conformation, NOE resonances, scalar couplings, residual dipolar couplings, and chemical shift anisotropy offsets have been the principal NMR parameters utilized. Molecular dynamics calculations restrained by NMR-data input are usually employed in conjunction to generate glycosidic bond dihedral angles. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are a special class of sulfated polysaccharides extensively studied worldwide. Besides regulating innumerous physiological processes, these glycans are also widely explored in the global market as either clinical or nutraceutical agents. The conformational aspects of GAGs are key regulators to the quality of interactions with the functional proteins involved in biological events. This report discusses the solution conformation of each GAG type analyzed by one or more of the above-mentioned methods.

  12. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4

  13. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-03-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from September 1, 2003, through February 29, 2004, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' We examined the properties of several ''partially formed'' gels that were formulated with a combination of high and low molecular weight HPAM polymers. After placement in 4-mm-wide fractures, these gels required about 25 psi/ft for brine to breach the gel (the best performance to date in fractures this wide). After this breach, stabilized residual resistance factors decreased significantly with increased flow rate. Also, residual resistance factors were up to 9 times greater for water than for oil. Nevertheless, permeability reduction factors were substantial for both water and oil flow. Gel with 2.5% chopped fiberglass effectively plugged 4-mm-wide fractures if a 0.5-mm-wide constriction was present. The ability to screen-out at a constriction appears crucial for particulate incorporation to be useful in plugging fractures. In addition to fiberglass, we examined incorporation of polypropylene fibers into gels. Once dispersed in brine or gelant, the polypropylene fibers exhibited the least gravity segregation of any particulate that we have tested to date. In fractures with widths of at least 2 mm, 24-hr-old gels (0.5% high molecular weight HPAM) with 0.5% fiber did not exhibit progressive plugging during placement and showed extrusion pressure gradients similar to those of gels without the fiber. The presence of the fiber roughly doubled the gel's resistance to first breach by brine flow. The breaching pressure gradients were not as large as for gels made with high and low molecular weight polymers (mentioned above). However, their material requirements and costs (i.e., polymer and/or particulate concentrations) were substantially lower than for those gels. A partially formed gel made with 0.5% HPAM did not enter a 0.052-mm-wide fracture when applying a pressure gradient of 65 psi/ft. This result

  14. Scale invariance vs conformal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2015-03-01

    In this review article, we discuss the distinction and possible equivalence between scale invariance and conformal invariance in relativistic quantum field theories. Under some technical assumptions, we can prove that scale invariant quantum field theories in d = 2 space-time dimensions necessarily possess the enhanced conformal symmetry. The use of the conformal symmetry is well appreciated in the literature, but the fact that all the scale invariant phenomena in d = 2 space-time dimensions enjoy the conformal property relies on the deep structure of the renormalization group. The outstanding question is whether this feature is specific to d = 2 space-time dimensions or it holds in higher dimensions, too. As of January 2014, our consensus is that there is no known example of scale invariant but non-conformal field theories in d = 4 space-time dimensions under the assumptions of (1) unitarity, (2) Poincaré invariance (causality), (3) discrete spectrum in scaling dimensions, (4) existence of scale current and (5) unbroken scale invariance in the vacuum. We have a perturbative proof of the enhancement of conformal invariance from scale invariance based on the higher dimensional analogue of Zamolodchikov's c-theorem, but the non-perturbative proof is yet to come. As a reference we have tried to collect as many interesting examples of scale invariance in relativistic quantum field theories as possible in this article. We give a complementary holographic argument based on the energy-condition of the gravitational system and the space-time diffeomorphism in order to support the claim of the symmetry enhancement. We believe that the possible enhancement of conformal invariance from scale invariance reveals the sublime nature of the renormalization group and space-time with holography. This review is based on a lecture note on scale invariance vs conformal invariance, on which the author gave lectures at Taiwan Central University for the 5th Taiwan School on Strings and

  15. Conformal Magnifier: A Focus+Context Technique with Minimal Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Zeng, Wei; Gu, Xianfeng; Kaufman, Arie; Xu, Wei; Mueller, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We present the conformal magnifier, a novel interactive Focus+Context visualization technique to magnify a region of interest (ROI) using conformal mapping. Our framework allows the user to design an arbitrary magnifier to enlarge the features of interest while deforming part of the remaining areas without any cropping. By using conformal mapping, the ROI is magnified with minimal distortion, while the transition region is a smooth and continuous deformation between the focus and context regions. An interactive interface is designed for the user to select important features, design focus models of arbitrary shape and set deformation constraints to satisfy his/her specified requirements. We demonstrate the effectiveness, robustness and efficiency of our method using several applications: texts, maps, geographic images, data structures and multi-media visualization. PMID:26279613

  16. Computational Investigation of Conformational Changes in Proteins upon Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Anand, Gaurav; Belfort, Georges; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2009-03-01

    Amyloidogenic diseases, such as, Alzheimer's, are caused by adsorption and aggregation of partially unfolded proteins. Protein adsorption is often accompanied by conformational rearrangements, which are thought to affect many properties such as their adhesion strength to the surface, biological activity, and aggregation tendency. Experiments have shown that many proteins, upon adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces, undergo a helix to sheet or random coil secondary structural rearrangement. To better understand the equilibrium structural complexities of this phenomenon, we have performed Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and Single Chain Mean Field calculations of adsorption of different proteins, modeled as lattice chains, to study the adsorption behavior and equilibrium protein conformations at different temperatures, protein concentration and surface hydrophobicity. Free energy and entropic effects on adsorption have been studied by determining density of states using Weighted Histogram Analysis Method. Conformational transitions of proteins on surfaces will be discussed as a function of surface hydrophobicity.

  17. Instability of Human Societies as a Result of Conformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efros, A. L.; Désesquelles, P.

    We introduce a new model that mimics the strong and sudden effects induced by conformity in tightly interacting human societies. Such effects range from mere crowd phenomena to dramatic political turmoil. The model is a modified version of the Ising Hamiltonian. We have studied the properties of this Hamiltonian using both a Metropolis simulation and analytical derivations. Our study shows that increasing the value of the conformity parameter, results in a first order phase transition. As a result a majority of people begin to honestly support the idea that may contradict the moral principles of a normal human beings though each individual would support the moral principle without tight interaction with the society. Thus, above some critical level of conformity our society destabilizes with respect to ideas that might be doubtful. Our model includes, in a simplified way, human diversity with respect to loyalty to the moral principles.

  18. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the flow capacity of

  19. Sequential conformational rearrangements in flavivirus membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Luke H; Klein, Daryl E; Schmidt, Aaron G; Peña, Jennifer M; Harrison, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The West Nile Virus (WNV) envelope protein, E, promotes membrane fusion during viral cell entry by undergoing a low-pH triggered conformational reorganization. We have examined the mechanism of WNV fusion and sought evidence for potential intermediates during the conformational transition by following hemifusion of WNV virus-like particles (VLPs) in a single particle format. We have introduced specific mutations into E, to relate their influence on fusion kinetics to structural features of the protein. At the level of individual E subunits, trimer formation and membrane engagement of the threefold clustered fusion loops are rate-limiting. Hemifusion requires at least two adjacent trimers. Simulation of the kinetics indicates that availability of competent monomers within the contact zone between virus and target membrane makes trimerization a bottleneck in hemifusion. We discuss the implications of the model we have derived for mechanisms of membrane fusion in other contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04389.001 PMID:25479384

  20. To conform or not to conform: spontaneous conformity diminishes the sensitivity to monetary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjun; Sun, Sai

    2013-01-01

    When people have different opinions in a group, they often adjust their own attitudes and behaviors to match the group opinion, known as social conformity. The affiliation account of normative conformity states that people conform to norms in order to 'fit in', whereas the accuracy account of informative conformity posits that the motive to learn from others produces herding. Here, we test another possibility that following the crowd reduces the experienced negative emotion when the group decision turns out to be a bad one. Using event related potential (ERP) combined with a novel group gambling task, we found that participants were more likely to choose the option that was predominately chosen by other players in previous trials, although there was little explicit normative pressure at the decision stage and group choices were not informative. When individuals' choices were different from others, the feedback related negativity (FRN), an ERP component sensitive to losses and errors, was enhanced, suggesting that being independent is aversive. At the outcome stage, the losses minus wins FRN effect was significantly reduced following conformity choices than following independent choices. Analyses of the P300 revealed similar patterns both in the response and outcome period. Our study suggests that social conformity serves as an emotional buffer that protects individuals from experiencing strong negative emotion when the outcomes are bad.

  1. To Conform or Not to Conform: Spontaneous Conformity Diminishes the Sensitivity to Monetary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    When people have different opinions in a group, they often adjust their own attitudes and behaviors to match the group opinion, known as social conformity. The affiliation account of normative conformity states that people conform to norms in order to ‘fit in’, whereas the accuracy account of informative conformity posits that the motive to learn from others produces herding. Here, we test another possibility that following the crowd reduces the experienced negative emotion when the group decision turns out to be a bad one. Using event related potential (ERP) combined with a novel group gambling task, we found that participants were more likely to choose the option that was predominately chosen by other players in previous trials, although there was little explicit normative pressure at the decision stage and group choices were not informative. When individuals' choices were different from others, the feedback related negativity (FRN), an ERP component sensitive to losses and errors, was enhanced, suggesting that being independent is aversive. At the outcome stage, the losses minus wins FRN effect was significantly reduced following conformity choices than following independent choices. Analyses of the P300 revealed similar patterns both in the response and outcome period. Our study suggests that social conformity serves as an emotional buffer that protects individuals from experiencing strong negative emotion when the outcomes are bad. PMID:23691242

  2. Applications of Molecular Modeling to Transition State Energies and Conformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-08

    reactivity trends for similar systems are known. Illuminati and Mandolini have done research on the lactone formation from w-bromoalkane-carboxylate...strikingly similar to that determined for Illuminati and Mandolini’s similar lactonization system (see Figure 20). The AE, for the 4- 69 membered ring...Brown, F.K.; Spellmeyer, D.C.; Metz, J.T.; Li, Y.; Loncharich, R.L. Science. 1986, 231, 1108-17. Illuminati , G.; Mandolini, L. Accts. of Chem. Res. 1981

  3. Collapse transition of short polymers on simple cubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaleel, Asweel Ahmed A.; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.

    2016-10-01

    Denatured proteins and polymers exhibit two types of conformations in solution. Extended coil conformation and compact globule conformation. There is a phase transition associated with these conformation change as a function of temperature or solvent concentration etc. These phase transition is usually studied using Self Avoiding Walk(SAW). We have generated Self avoiding walk using chain growth algorithm. Here we have compared our generated density of states with Exact enumerated data of the same. Also we have presented the Pseudo order parameter method to identify collapse temperature. The results are compared with Partition function zero analysis.

  4. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  5. HAMP domain conformers that propagate opposite signals in bacterial chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Airola, Michael V; Sukomon, Nattakan; Samanta, Dipanjan; Borbat, Peter P; Freed, Jack H; Watts, Kylie J; Crane, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    HAMP domains are signal relay modules in >26,000 receptors of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea that mediate processes involved in chemotaxis, pathogenesis, and biofilm formation. We identify two HAMP conformations distinguished by a four- to two-helix packing transition at the C-termini that send opposing signals in bacterial chemoreceptors. Crystal structures of signal-locked mutants establish the observed structure-to-function relationships. Pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled soluble receptors active in cells verify that the crystallographically defined HAMP conformers are maintained in the receptors and influence the structure and activity of downstream domains accordingly. Mutation of HR2, a key residue for setting the HAMP conformation and generating an inhibitory signal, shifts HAMP structure and receptor output to an activating state. Another HR2 variant displays an inverted response with respect to ligand and demonstrates the fine energetic balance between "on" and "off" conformers. A DExG motif found in membrane proximal HAMP domains is shown to be critical for responses to extracellular ligand. Our findings directly correlate in vivo signaling with HAMP structure, stability, and dynamics to establish a comprehensive model for HAMP-mediated signal relay that consolidates existing views on how conformational signals propagate in receptors. Moreover, we have developed a rational means to manipulate HAMP structure and function that may prove useful in the engineering of bacterial taxis responses.

  6. Josephin Domain Structural Conformations Explored by Metadynamics in Essential Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, Jack A.; Gallo, Diego; Morbiducci, Umberto; Danani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The Josephin Domain (JD), i.e. the N-terminal domain of Ataxin 3 (At3) protein, is an interesting example of competition between physiological function and aggregation risk. In fact, the fibrillogenesis of Ataxin 3, responsible for the spinocerebbellar ataxia 3, is strictly related to the JD thermodynamic stability. Whereas recent NMR studies have demonstrated that different JD conformations exist, the likelihood of JD achievable conformational states in solution is still an open issue. Marked differences in the available NMR models are located in the hairpin region, supporting the idea that JD has a flexible hairpin in dynamic equilibrium between open and closed states. In this work we have carried out an investigation on the JD conformational arrangement by means of both classical molecular dynamics (MD) and Metadynamics employing essential coordinates as collective variables. We provide a representation of the free energy landscape characterizing the transition pathway from a JD open-like structure to a closed-like conformation. Findings of our in silico study strongly point to the closed-like conformation as the most likely for a Josephin Domain in water. PMID:26745628

  7. Inherent conformational flexibility of F1-ATPase α-subunit.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Herrera, Otto; Salcedo, Guillermo; Barril, Xavier; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The core of F1-ATPase consists of three catalytic (β) and three noncatalytic (α) subunits, forming a hexameric ring in alternating positions. A wealth of experimental and theoretical data has provided a detailed picture of the complex role played by catalytic subunits. Although major conformational changes have only been seen in β-subunits, it is clear that α-subunits have to respond to these changes in order to be able to transmit information during the rotary mechanism. However, the conformational behavior of α-subunits has not been explored in detail. Here, we have combined unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calorimetrically measured thermodynamic signatures to investigate the conformational flexibility of isolated α-subunits, as a step toward deepening our understanding of its function inside the α3β3 ring. The simulations indicate that the open-to-closed conformational transition of the α-subunit is essentially barrierless, which is ideal to accompany and transmit the movement of the catalytic subunits. Calorimetric measurements of the recombinant α-subunit from Geobacillus kaustophilus indicate that the isolated subunit undergoes no significant conformational changes upon nucleotide binding. Simulations confirm that the nucleotide-free and nucleotide-bound subunits show average conformations similar to that observed in the F1 crystal structure, but they reveal an increased conformational flexibility of the isolated α-subunit upon MgATP binding, which might explain the evolutionary conserved capacity of α-subunits to recognize nucleotides with considerable strength. Furthermore, we elucidate the different dependencies that α- and β-subunits show on Mg(II) for recognizing ATP.

  8. Polyproline II conformation is one of many local conformational states and is not an overall conformation of unfolded peptides and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Makowska, Joanna; Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia; Bagińska, Katarzyna; Vila, Jorge A.; Liwo, Adam; Chmurzyński, Lech; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2006-01-01

    The alanine-based peptide Ac-XX(A)7OO-NH2, referred to as XAO (where X, A, and O denote diaminobutyric acid, alanine, and ornithine, respectively), has recently been proposed to possess a well defined polyproline II (PII) conformation at low temperatures. Based on the results of extensive NMR and CD investigations combined with theoretical calculations, reported here, we present evidence that, on the contrary, this peptide does not have any significant amount of organized PII structure but exists in an ensemble of conformations with a distorted bend in the N- and C-terminal regions. The conformational ensemble was obtained by molecular dynamics/simulated annealing calculations using the amber suite of programs with time-averaged distance and dihedral-angle restraints obtained from rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect (ROE) volumes and vicinal coupling constants 3JHNΗα, respectively. The computed ensemble-averaged radius of gyration Rg (7.4 ± 1.0) Å is in excellent agreement with that measured by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) whereas, if the XAO peptide were in the PII conformation, Rg would be 11.6 Å. Depending on the pH, peptide concentration, and temperature, the CD spectra of XAO do or do not possess the maximum with positive ellipticity in the 217-nm region, which is characteristic of the PII structure, reflecting a shifting conformational equilibrium rather than an all-or-none transition. The “PII conformation” should, therefore, be considered as one of the accessible conformational states of individual amino acid residues in peptides and proteins rather than as a structure of most of the chain in the early stage of folding. PMID:16446433

  9. 40 CFR 93.154 - Conformity analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conformity analysis. 93.154 Section 93...) DETERMINING CONFORMITY OF FEDERAL ACTIONS TO STATE OR FEDERAL IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans § 93.154 Conformity analysis. Any...

  10. Group Cohesiveness, Deviation, Stress, and Conformity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-11

    assessed pre- and post- conformity pressure (see Appendix VIII). Components of group influences , Offer of Reward for Conformity (ORC), and Threat of...Cohesiveness Pressures to Uniformity Studies . . . . Evidence Supporting a Group Cohesiveness- Conformity Relationship . . . . . . Evidence Supporting a...Response and Conformity Pressure . . . . Stress and ORC and TPN . . . . . . . . TPN and Space Crews . . . . . . . . . . Summary of Group

  11. Self-Dual Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunajski, Maciej; Tod, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We find necessary and sufficient conditions for a Riemannian four-dimensional manifold ( M, g) with anti-self-dual Weyl tensor to be locally conformal to a Ricci-flat manifold. These conditions are expressed as the vanishing of scalar and tensor conformal invariants. The invariants obstruct the existence of parallel sections of a certain connection on a complex rank-four vector bundle over M. They provide a natural generalisation of the Bach tensor which vanishes identically for anti-self-dual conformal structures. We use the obstructions to demonstrate that LeBrun's anti-self-dual metrics on connected sums of s are not conformally Ricci-flat on any open set. We analyze both Riemannian and neutral signature metrics. In the latter case we find all anti-self-dual metrics with a parallel real spinor which are locally conformal to Einstein metrics with non-zero cosmological constant. These metrics admit a hyper-surface orthogonal null Killing vector and thus give rise to projective structures on the space of β-surfaces.

  12. Interacting electrons in ballistic conformal billiard quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Ganpathy; Mathur, Harsh; Shankar, Ramamurti

    2004-03-01

    Interacting electrons in a ballistic quantum dot present a novel regime of disorder + interactions. An instability of the ground state towards a spontaneous deformation of the Fermi surface (the Pomeranchuk transition) has been found by the present authors[1], by assuming that Random Matrix Theory describes the states in the Thouless shell near the Fermi energy. However, the question of whether the mesoscopic transition occurs before the bulk transition remains open[2]. Here we describe calculations on the conformal billiard[3] and attempt to see how well RMT assumptions hold, and to what extent the physics of the transition is described by our previous work. 1. G. Murthy, R. Shankar, D. Herman, and H. Mathur, cond-mat/0306529. 2. S. Adam, P. W. Brouwer, and P. Sharma, cond-mat/0309074. 3. M. V. Berry and M. Robnik, J. Phys. A19, 669 (1986).

  13. Identification of Serine Conformers by Matrix-Isolation IR Spectroscopy Aided by Near-Infrared Laser-Induced Conformational Change, 2D Correlation Analysis, and Quantum Mechanical Anharmonic Computations.

    PubMed

    Najbauer, Eszter E; Bazsó, Gábor; Apóstolo, Rui; Fausto, Rui; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Tarczay, György

    2015-08-20

    The conformers of α-serine were investigated by matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy combined with NIR laser irradiation. This method, aided by 2D correlation analysis, enabled unambiguously grouping the spectral lines to individual conformers. On the basis of comparison of at least nine experimentally observed vibrational transitions of each conformer with empirically scaled (SQM) and anharmonic (GVPT2) computed IR spectra, six conformers were identified. In addition, the presence of at least one more conformer in Ar matrix was proved, and a short-lived conformer with a half-life of (3.7 ± 0.5) × 10(3) s in N2 matrix was generated by NIR irradiation. The analysis of the NIR laser-induced conversions revealed that the excitation of the stretching overtone of both the side chain and the carboxylic OH groups can effectively promote conformational changes, but remarkably different paths were observed for the two kinds of excitations.

  14. Toward Understanding the Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, V. A.; Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2017-03-01

    We constructed the conformally invariant model for scalar particle creation induced by strong gravitational fields. Starting from the usual hydrodynamic description of the particle motion written in the Eulerian coordinates, we substituted the particle number conservation law (which enters the formalism) by the particle creation law, proportional to the square of the Weyl tensor, following the famous result by Ya. B. Zel'dovich and A. A. Starobinsky. Then, demanding the conformal invariance of the whole dynamical system, we have got both the Weyl-conformal gravity and the Einstein-Hilbert dilaton gravity action integral. Thus, we obtained something like the induced gravity suggested first by A. D. Sakharov. It is shown that the resulting system is self-consistent.

  15. Partial masslessness and conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Joung, E.; Waldron, A.

    2013-05-01

    We use conformal, but ghostful, Weyl gravity to study its ghost-free, second derivative, partially massless (PM) spin-2 component in the presence of Einstein gravity with positive cosmological constant. Specifically, we consider both gravitational- and self-interactions of PM via the fully nonlinear factorization of conformal gravity’s Bach tensor into Einstein times Schouten operators. We find that extending PM beyond linear order suffers from familiar higher spin consistency obstructions: it propagates only in Einstein backgrounds, and the conformal gravity route generates only the usual safe, Noether, cubic order vertices. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Higher spin theories and holography’.

  16. Universality class in conformal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2013-07-01

    We develop a new class of chaotic inflation models with spontaneously broken conformal invariance. Observational consequences of a broad class of such models are stable with respect to strong deformations of the scalar potential. This universality is a critical phenomenon near the point of enhanced symmetry, SO(1,1), in case of conformal inflation. It appears because of the exponential stretching of the moduli space and the resulting exponential flattening of scalar potentials upon switching from the Jordan frame to the Einstein frame in this class of models. This result resembles stretching and flattening of inhomogeneities during inflationary expansion. It has a simple interpretation in terms of velocity versus rapidity near the Kähler cone in the moduli space, similar to the light cone of special theory of relativity. This effect makes inflation possible even in the models with very steep potentials. We describe conformal and superconformal versions of this cosmological attractor mechanism.

  17. Conformal deposition of LPCVD TEOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Paul; Somasundram, Kumar; Byrne, Stephen; Nevin, Andrew

    2001-09-01

    The step coverage of dielectrics is important for the microelectronics industry and critical to Micro-machined products and High Voltage MEMS drivers. The techniques used to fabricate MEMS structures require void free refill processes and even film deposition along deep trenches to protect against etch chemistries. High voltage drivers used to actuate MEMS devices benefit from dielectric isolation, which reduces the need for large tub formation between devices. It also enables 'system on chip' solutions for MEMs devices and protection against voltage spikes. This paper presents a process developed at Analog Devices Belfast that enables an LPCVD TEOS furnace to perform a highly conformal trench refill without equipment modification. The conformality is over 95% for 20 micrometer deep trenches and maintains a conformality greater than 85% in 50 micrometer deep trenches. This compares with 75% conformality which is considered excellent for 20 micrometer trench refills obtained using previous LPCVD TEOS processing. The process is shown to have benefits in conformality, breakdown voltage, and stress over standard trench fill processes including Ozone TEOS. The densification of the TEOS film has been optimized for electrical parameters using CV and IV techniques, while XPS, FTIR and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used for physical characterization. Stress is a very important parameter for micro-machining and the conformal TEOS has a film stress which is tensile 30 - 40 MPa as deposited and compressive 100 MPa after densification. The breakdown voltage has been measured at 8.5 MV/cm compared to 7.5 - 9 MV/cm for a typical densified TEOS film and the refractive index is 1.456 compared to 1.465 for a thermal oxide. Analog Devices Belfast is part of the Micro-machined Products division and provides SOI and customized SOI for the MEMs and IC market.

  18. NIR Laser Radiation Induced Conformational Changes and Tunneling Lifetimes of High-Energy Conformers of Amino Acids in Low-Temperature Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazso, Gabor; Najbauer, Eszter E.; Magyarfalvi, Gabor; Tarczay, Gyorgy

    2013-06-01

    We review our recent results on combined matrix isolation FT-IR and NIR laser irradiation studies on glycine alanine, and cysteine. The OH and the NH stretching overtones of the low-energy conformers of these amino acids deposited in Ar, Kr, Xe, and N_{2} matrices were irradiated. At the expense of the irradiated conformer, other conformers were enriched and new, high-energy, formerly unobserved conformers were formed in the matrices. This enabled the separation and unambiguous assignment of the vibrational transitions of the different conformers. The main conversion paths and their efficiencies are described qualitatively showing that there are significant differences in different matrices. It was shown that the high-energy conformer decays in the matrix by H-atom tunneling. The lifetimes of the high-energy conformers in different matrices were measured. Based on our results we conclude that some theoretically predicted low-energy conformers of amino acids are likely even absent in low-energy matrices due to fast H-atom tunneling. G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Mol. Struct. 1025 (Light-Induced Processes in Cryogenic Matrices Special Issue) 33-42 (2012). G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A 116 (43) 10539-10547 (2012). G. Bazso, E. E. Najbauer, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A in press, DOI: 10.1021/jp400196b. E. E. Najbauer, G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay in preparation.

  19. Cyclic AMP Analog Blocks Kinase Activation by Stabilizing Inactive Conformation: Conformational Selection Highlights a New Concept in Allosteric Inhibitor Design*

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Yunfeng, Gao; Ritchie, Mark; Akamine, Pearl; Wu, Jian; Kim, Choel W.; Taylor, Susan S.; Qingsong, Lin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory (R) subunit of protein kinase A serves to modulate the activity of protein kinase A in a cAMP-dependent manner and exists in two distinct and structurally dissimilar, end point cAMP-bound “B” and C-subunit-bound “H”-conformations. Here we report mechanistic details of cAMP action as yet unknown through a unique approach combining x-ray crystallography with structural proteomics approaches, amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange and ion mobility mass spectrometry, applied to the study of a stereospecific cAMP phosphorothioate analog and antagonist((Rp)-cAMPS). X-ray crystallography shows cAMP-bound R-subunit in the B form but surprisingly the antagonist Rp-cAMPS-bound R-subunit crystallized in the H conformation, which was previously assumed to be induced only by C-subunit-binding. Apo R-subunit crystallized in the B form as well but amide exchange mass spectrometry showed large differences between apo, agonist and antagonist-bound states of the R-subunit. Further ion mobility reveals the apo R-subunit as an ensemble of multiple conformations with collisional cross-sectional areas spanning both the agonist and antagonist-bound states. Thus contrary to earlier studies that explained the basis for cAMP action through “induced fit” alone, we report evidence for conformational selection, where the ligand-free apo form of the R-subunit exists as an ensemble of both B and H conformations. Although cAMP preferentially binds the B conformation, Rp-cAMPS interestingly binds the H conformation. This reveals the unique importance of the equatorial oxygen of the cyclic phosphate in mediating conformational transitions from H to B forms highlighting a novel approach for rational structure-based drug design. Ideal inhibitors such as Rp-cAMPS are those that preferentially “select” inactive conformations of target proteins by satisfying all “binding” constraints alone without inducing conformational changes necessary for activation. PMID:21081668

  20. Algebraic orbifold conformal field theories

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng

    2000-01-01

    The unitary rational orbifold conformal field theories in the algebraic quantum field theory and subfactor theory framework are formulated. Under general conditions, it is shown that the orbifold of a given unitary rational conformal field theory generates a unitary modular category. Many new unitary modular categories are obtained. It is also shown that the irreducible representations of orbifolds of rank one lattice vertex operator algebras give rise to unitary modular categories and determine the corresponding modular matrices, which has been conjectured for some time. PMID:11106383

  1. SUSY Unparticle and Conformal Sequestering

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yu; Nakayama, Yu

    2007-07-17

    We investigate unparticle physics with supersymmetry (SUSY). The SUSY breaking effects due to the gravity mediation induce soft masses for the SUSY unparticles and hence break the conformal invariance. The unparticle physics observable in near future experiments is only consistent if the SUSY breakingeffects from the hidden sector to the standard model sector are dominated by the gauge mediation, or if the SUSY breaking effects to the unparticle sector are sufficiently sequestered. We argue that the natural realization of the latter possibility is the conformal sequestering scenario.

  2. Nonlocal gravity: Conformally flat spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2016-04-01

    The field equations of the recent nonlocal generalization of Einstein’s theory of gravitation are presented in a form that is reminiscent of general relativity. The implications of the nonlocal field equations are studied in the case of conformally flat spacetimes. Even in this simple case, the field equations are intractable. Therefore, to gain insight into the nature of these equations, we investigate the structure of nonlocal gravity (NLG) in 2D spacetimes. While any smooth 2D spacetime is conformally flat and satisfies Einstein’s field equations, only a subset containing either a Killing vector or a homothetic Killing vector can satisfy the field equations of NLG.

  3. Social influence: compliance and conformity.

    PubMed

    Cialdini, Robert B; Goldstein, Noah J

    2004-01-01

    This review covers recent developments in the social influence literature, focusing primarily on compliance and conformity research published between 1997 and 2002. The principles and processes underlying a target's susceptibility to outside influences are considered in light of three goals fundamental to rewarding human functioning. Specifically, targets are motivated to form accurate perceptions of reality and react accordingly, to develop and preserve meaningful social relationships, and to maintain a favorable self-concept. Consistent with the current movement in compliance and conformity research, this review emphasizes the ways in which these goals interact with external forces to engender social influence processes that are subtle, indirect, and outside of awareness.

  4. Epigenetic Dominance of Prion Conformers

    PubMed Central

    Saijo, Eri; Kang, Hae-Eun; Bian, Jifeng; Bowling, Kristi G.; Browning, Shawn; Kim, Sehun; Hunter, Nora; Telling, Glenn C.

    2013-01-01

    Although they share certain biological properties with nucleic acid based infectious agents, prions, the causative agents of invariably fatal, transmissible neurodegenerative disorders such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, sheep scrapie, and human Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, propagate by conformational templating of host encoded proteins. Once thought to be unique to these diseases, this mechanism is now recognized as a ubiquitous means of information transfer in biological systems, including other protein misfolding disorders such as those causing Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. To address the poorly understood mechanism by which host prion protein (PrP) primary structures interact with distinct prion conformations to influence pathogenesis, we produced transgenic (Tg) mice expressing different sheep scrapie susceptibility alleles, varying only at a single amino acid at PrP residue 136. Tg mice expressing ovine PrP with alanine (A) at (OvPrP-A136) infected with SSBP/1 scrapie prions propagated a relatively stable (S) prion conformation, which accumulated as punctate aggregates in the brain, and produced prolonged incubation times. In contrast, Tg mice expressing OvPrP with valine (V) at 136 (OvPrP-V136) infected with the same prions developed disease rapidly, and the converted prion was comprised of an unstable (U), diffusely distributed conformer. Infected Tg mice co-expressing both alleles manifested properties consistent with the U conformer, suggesting a dominant effect resulting from exclusive conversion of OvPrP-V136 but not OvPrP-A136. Surprisingly, however, studies with monoclonal antibody (mAb) PRC5, which discriminates OvPrP-A136 from OvPrP-V136, revealed substantial conversion of OvPrP-A136. Moreover, the resulting OvPrP-A136 prion acquired the characteristics of the U conformer. These results, substantiated by in vitro analyses, indicated that co-expression of OvPrP-V136 altered the conversion potential of OvPrP-A136 from the S to the

  5. Patterns and conformations in molecularly thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnet, Prem B.

    Molecularly thin films have been a subject of great interest for the last several years because of their large variety of industrial applications ranging from micro-electronics to bio-medicine. Additionally, molecularly thin films can be used as good models for biomembrane and other systems where surfaces are critical. Many different kinds of molecules can make stable films. My research has considered three such molecules: a polymerizable phospholipid, a bent-core molecules, and a polymer. One common theme of these three molecules is chirality. The phospolipid molecules studied here are strongly chiral, which can be due to intrinsically chiral centers on the molecules and also due to chiral conformations. We find that these molecules give rise to chiral patterns. Bent-core molecules are not intrinsically chiral, but individual molecules and groups of molecules can show chiral structures, which can be changed by surface interactions. One major, unconfirmed hypothesis for the polymer conformation at surface is that it forms helices, which would be chiral. Most experiments were carried out at the air/water interface, in what are called Langmuir films. Our major tools for studying these films are Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM) coupled with the thermodynamic information that can be deduced from surface pressure isotherms. Phospholipids are one of the important constituents of liposomes -- a spherical vesicle com-posed of a bilayer membrane, typically composed of a phospholipid and cholesterol bilayer. The application of liposomes in drug delivery is well-known. Crumpling of vesicles of polymerizable phospholipids has been observed. With BAM, on Langmuir films of such phospholipids, we see novel spiral/target patterns during compression. We have found that both the patterns and the critical pressure at which they formed depend on temperature (below the transition to a i¬‘uid layer). Bent-core liquid crystals, sometimes knows as banana liquid crystals, have drawn

  6. Physical studies of conformational plasticity in a recombinant prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Stockel, J; Mehlhorn, I; Groth, D; Baldwin, M A; Prusiner, S B; James, T L; Cohen, F E

    1997-03-25

    PrP(Sc) is known to be the major, if not the only, component of the infectious prion. Limited proteolysis of PrP(Sc) produces an N-terminally truncated polypeptide of about 142 residues, designated PrP 27-30. Recently, a recombinant protein (rPrP) of 142 residues corresponding to the Syrian hamster PrP 27-30 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified (Mehlhorn et al., 1996). rPrP has been refolded into both alpha-helical and beta-sheet structures as well as various intermediates in aqueous buffers. The beta-sheet state and two pH-dependent alpha-helical states were characterized by CD and NMR. The alpha-helical conformation occurred only after the formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond, whereas the beta-sheet form was accessible either with or without the disulfide. Of the different alpha-helical forms studied, only those refolded in the pH range 5-8 were substantially soluble at physiological pH, exhibiting similar conformations and monomeric analytical sedimentation profiles throughout the above pH range. Furthermore, refolded alpha-rPrP showed NMR chemical shift dispersion typical of proteins with native conformations, although 2D NMR indicated large segments of conformational flexibility. It displayed a cooperative thermal denaturation transition; at elevated temperatures, it converted rapidly and irreversibly to the thermodynamically more stable beta-sheet form. Unfolding of alpha-rPrP by GdnHCl revealed a two-phase transition with a relatively stable folding intermediate at 2 M GdnHCl. The deltaG values were estimated to be 1.9 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol for the first phase and 6.5 +/- 1.2 kcal/mol for the second, consistent with a folding core surrounded by significant segments of flexible conformation. By NMR, alpha-rPrP(acid) isolated at pH 2 without refolding exhibited heterogeneous line widths, consistent with an acid-denatured molten globular state. We conclude that to the extent that rPrP constitutes a relevant folding domain of PrP(C), the various

  7. How fissors works: observing vibrationally adiabatic conformational change through femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A

    2013-07-25

    With the help of a two-dimensional model system comprising a slow conformational degree of freedom and a higher-frequency vibration, we investigate the molecular-level origin and dynamical information content of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (fissors) signals. Our treatment avails itself of the time scale separation between conformational and vibrational modes by incorporating a vibrationally adiabatic approximation to the conformational dynamics. We derive an expression for the fissors signal without resort to the macroscopic concepts of light- and phonon-wave propagation employed in prior coupled-wave analyses. Numerical calculations of fissors spectra illustrate the case of relatively small conformational mass (still large enough that conformational motion does not induce any change in the vibrational quantum number) in which conformational sidebands accompany a central peak in the Raman gain at a conformationally averaged vibrational transition frequency, and the case of a larger conformational mass in which the sidebands merge with the central peak and the frequency of the latter tracks the time-evolving conformational coordinate.

  8. Combined Inhibitor Free-Energy Landscape and Structural Analysis Reports on the Mannosidase Conformational Coordinate**

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rohan J; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Stepper, Judith; Jackson, Adam; Thompson, Andrew J; Lowe, Elisabeth C; White, Jonathan M; Gilbert, Harry J; Rovira, Carme; Davies, Gideon J; Williams, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    Mannosidases catalyze the hydrolysis of a diverse range of polysaccharides and glycoconjugates, and the various sequence-based mannosidase families have evolved ingenious strategies to overcome the stereoelectronic challenges of mannoside chemistry. Using a combination of computational chemistry, inhibitor design and synthesis, and X-ray crystallography of inhibitor/enzyme complexes, it is demonstrated that mannoimidazole-type inhibitors are energetically poised to report faithfully on mannosidase transition-state conformation, and provide direct evidence for the conformational itinerary used by diverse mannosidases, including β-mannanases from families GH26 and GH113. Isofagomine-type inhibitors are poor mimics of transition-state conformation, owing to the high energy barriers that must be crossed to attain mechanistically relevant conformations, however, these sugar-shaped heterocycles allow the acquisition of ternary complexes that span the active site, thus providing valuable insight into active-site residues involved in substrate recognition. PMID:24339341

  9. Conformational stability and vibrational spectrum of glyoxilic acid oxime predicted from ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, N.; Bauer, G.; Georgieva, I.; Delchev, V.

    2002-02-01

    The conformational stability of glyoxilic acid oxime (HOOC-CH-NOH) (GAO) and its anions has been studied by ab initio calculations at different levels of the theory, HF/6-311G ∗∗, MP2/6-311G ∗∗ and B3LYP/6-311G ∗∗. Geometry optimization was performed for 16 conformations of GAO and five anions in Cs symmetry. The interconversion pathways for the four lowest energy conformers as well as the corresponding transition states have been investigated using QST3 and IRC techniques. The minima and the transition states obtained were estimated by calculations of the vibrational frequencies. The energy barriers of three interconversions, ectt-ecct, ectt-ettt and ectt-zccc, have been estimated. Vibrational spectra and IR intensities of the lowest energy conformers, zccc, ectt, ettt and ecct, have been calculated and discussed at HF/6-311G ∗∗ optimized geometries.

  10. Conformational dynamics of single pre-mRNA molecules during in vitro splicing.

    PubMed

    Abelson, John; Blanco, Mario; Ditzler, Mark A; Fuller, Franklin; Aravamudhan, Pavithra; Wood, Mona; Villa, Tommaso; Ryan, Daniel E; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Maeder, Corina; Guthrie, Christine; Walter, Nils G

    2010-04-01

    The spliceosome is a complex small nuclear RNA (snRNA)-protein machine that removes introns from pre-mRNAs via two successive phosphoryl transfer reactions. The chemical steps are isoenergetic, yet splicing requires at least eight RNA-dependent ATPases responsible for substantial conformational rearrangements. To comprehensively monitor pre-mRNA conformational dynamics, we developed a strategy for single-molecule FRET (smFRET) that uses a small, efficiently spliced yeast pre-mRNA, Ubc4, in which donor and acceptor fluorophores are placed in the exons adjacent to the 5' and 3' splice sites. During splicing in vitro, we observed a multitude of generally reversible time- and ATP-dependent conformational transitions of individual pre-mRNAs. The conformational dynamics of branchpoint and 3'-splice site mutants differ from one another and from wild type. Because all transitions are reversible, spliceosome assembly appears to be occurring close to thermal equilibrium.

  11. Deciphering Ligand Specificity of a Clostridium thermocellum Family 35 Carbohydrate Binding Module (CtCBM35) for Gluco- and Galacto- Substituted Mannans and Its Calcium Induced Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arabinda; Luís, Ana Sofia; Brás, Joana L. A.; Pathaw, Neeta; Chrungoo, Nikhil K.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Goyal, Arun

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the role of CBM35 from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM35) in polysaccharide recognition. CtCBM35 was cloned into pET28a (+) vector with an engineered His6 tag and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. A homogenous 15 kDa protein was purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography (IMAC). Ligand binding analysis of CtCBM35 was carried out by affinity electrophoresis using various soluble ligands. CtCBM35 showed a manno-configured ligand specific binding displaying significant association with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 14.3×104 M−1), carob galactomannan (Ka = 12.4×104 M−1) and negligible association (Ka = 12 µM−1) with insoluble mannan. Binding of CtCBM35 with polysaccharides which was calcium dependent exhibited two fold higher association in presence of 10 mM Ca2+ ion with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 41×104 M−1) and carob galactomannan (Ka = 30×104 M−1). The polysaccharide binding was further investigated by fluorescence spectrophotometric studies. On binding with carob galactomannan and konjac glucomannan the conformation of CtCBM35 changed significantly with regular 21 nm peak shifts towards lower quantum yield. The degree of association (Ka) with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan, 14.3×104 M−1 and 11.4×104 M−1, respectively, corroborated the findings from affinity electrophoresis. The association of CtCBM35with konjac glucomannan led to higher free energy of binding (ΔG) −25 kJ mole−1 as compared to carob galactomannan (ΔG) −22 kJ mole−1. On binding CtCBM35 with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan the hydrodynamic radius (RH) as analysed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) study, increased to 8 nm and 6 nm, respectively, from 4.25 nm in absence of ligand. The presence of 10 mM Ca2+ ions imparted stiffer orientation of CtCBM35 particles with increased RH of 4.52 nm. Due to such stiffer orientation CtCBM35 became more thermostable and its melting temperature was shifted

  12. Molecular mechanics conformational analysis of tylosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Petko M.

    1998-01-01

    The conformations of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotic tylosin were studied with molecular mechanics (AMBER∗ force field) including modelling of the effect of the solvent on the conformational preferences (GB/SA). A Monte Carlo conformational search procedure was used for finding the most probable low-energy conformations. The present study provides complementary data to recently reported analysis of the conformations of tylosin based on NMR techniques. A search for the low-energy conformations of protynolide, a 16-membered lactone containing the same aglycone as tylosin, was also carried out, and the results were compared with the observed conformation in the crystal as well as with the most probable conformations of the macrocyclic ring of tylosin. The dependence of the results on force field was also studied by utilizing the MM3 force field. Some particular conformations were computed with the semiempirical molecular orbital methods AM1 and PM3.

  13. Correct Representation of Conformational Equilibria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulop, F.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    In representing conformational equilibria of compounds having only one chiral center, erroneous formulas showing different antipodes on the two sides of the equilibrium are rare. In contrast, with compounds having two or more chiral centers especially with saturated heterocycles, this erroneous representation occurs frequently in the chemical…

  14. Conformal mapping for multiple terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weimin; Ma, Wenying; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Conformal mapping is an important mathematical tool that can be used to solve various physical and engineering problems in many fields, including electrostatics, fluid mechanics, classical mechanics, and transformation optics. It is an accurate and convenient way to solve problems involving two terminals. However, when faced with problems involving three or more terminals, which are more common in practical applications, existing conformal mapping methods apply assumptions or approximations. A general exact method does not exist for a structure with an arbitrary number of terminals. This study presents a conformal mapping method for multiple terminals. Through an accurate analysis of boundary conditions, additional terminals or boundaries are folded into the inner part of a mapped region. The method is applied to several typical situations, and the calculation process is described for two examples of an electrostatic actuator with three electrodes and of a light beam splitter with three ports. Compared with previously reported results, the solutions for the two examples based on our method are more precise and general. The proposed method is helpful in promoting the application of conformal mapping in analysis of practical problems.

  15. Conformal mapping for multiple terminals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weimin; Ma, Wenying; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao

    2016-11-10

    Conformal mapping is an important mathematical tool that can be used to solve various physical and engineering problems in many fields, including electrostatics, fluid mechanics, classical mechanics, and transformation optics. It is an accurate and convenient way to solve problems involving two terminals. However, when faced with problems involving three or more terminals, which are more common in practical applications, existing conformal mapping methods apply assumptions or approximations. A general exact method does not exist for a structure with an arbitrary number of terminals. This study presents a conformal mapping method for multiple terminals. Through an accurate analysis of boundary conditions, additional terminals or boundaries are folded into the inner part of a mapped region. The method is applied to several typical situations, and the calculation process is described for two examples of an electrostatic actuator with three electrodes and of a light beam splitter with three ports. Compared with previously reported results, the solutions for the two examples based on our method are more precise and general. The proposed method is helpful in promoting the application of conformal mapping in analysis of practical problems.

  16. Conformal mapping for multiple terminals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weimin; Ma, Wenying; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Conformal mapping is an important mathematical tool that can be used to solve various physical and engineering problems in many fields, including electrostatics, fluid mechanics, classical mechanics, and transformation optics. It is an accurate and convenient way to solve problems involving two terminals. However, when faced with problems involving three or more terminals, which are more common in practical applications, existing conformal mapping methods apply assumptions or approximations. A general exact method does not exist for a structure with an arbitrary number of terminals. This study presents a conformal mapping method for multiple terminals. Through an accurate analysis of boundary conditions, additional terminals or boundaries are folded into the inner part of a mapped region. The method is applied to several typical situations, and the calculation process is described for two examples of an electrostatic actuator with three electrodes and of a light beam splitter with three ports. Compared with previously reported results, the solutions for the two examples based on our method are more precise and general. The proposed method is helpful in promoting the application of conformal mapping in analysis of practical problems. PMID:27830746

  17. Temperature: Human Regulating, Ants Conforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Joe R.

    2007-01-01

    Biological processes speed up as temperature rises. Procedures for demonstrating this with ants traveling on trails, and data gathered by students on the Argentine ant ("Linepithema humile") are presented. The concepts of temperature regulation and conformity are detailed with a focus on the processes rather than on terms that label the organisms.

  18. Conformational activation of ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    South, Kieron; Luken, Brenda M; Crawley, James T B; Phillips, Rebecca; Thomas, Mari; Collins, Richard F; Deforche, Louis; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Lane, David A

    2014-12-30

    A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) is a metalloprotease that regulates von Willebrand factor (VWF) function. ADAMTS13-mediated proteolysis is determined by conformational changes in VWF, but also may depend on its own conformational activation. Kinetic analysis of WT ADAMTS13 revealed ∼ 2.5-fold reduced activity compared with ADAMTS13 lacking its C-terminal tail (MDTCS) or its CUB1-2 domains (WTΔCUB1-2), suggesting that the CUB domains naturally limit ADAMTS13 function. Consistent with this suggestion, WT ADAMTS13 activity was enhanced ∼ 2.5-fold by preincubation with either an anti-CUB mAb (20E9) or VWF D4CK (the natural binding partner for the CUB domains). Furthermore, the isolated CUB1-2 domains not only bound MDTCS, but also inhibited activity by up to 2.5-fold. Interestingly, a gain-of-function (GoF) ADAMTS13 spacer domain variant (R568K/F592Y/R660K/Y661F/Y665F) was ∼ 2.5-fold more active than WT ADAMTS13, but could not be further activated by 20E9 mAb or VWF D4CK and was unable to bind or to be inhibited by the CUB1-2 domains, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of the CUB domains involve an interaction with the spacer domain that is disrupted in GoF ADAMTS13. Electron microscopy demonstrated a "closed" conformation of WT ADAMTS13 and suggested a more "open" conformation for GoF ADAMTS13. The cryptic spacer domain epitope revealed by conformational unfolding also represents the core antigenic target for autoantibodies in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We propose that ADAMTS13 circulates in a closed conformation, which is maintained by a CUB-spacer domain binding interaction. ADAMTS13 becomes conformationally activated on demand through interaction of its C-terminal CUB domains with VWF, making it susceptible to immune recognition.

  19. Conformational control in a bipyridine linked π-conjugated oligomer: cation mediated helix unfolding and refolding.

    PubMed

    Divya, Kizhumuri P; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2010-11-28

    A chiral π-conjugated oligomer having alternate bipyridine and carbazole moieties connected through acetylinic bonds undergoes helical folding in chloroform-acetonitrile (40/60, v/v) as evident by fluorescence and circular dichroism changes. In the presence of transition metal cations such as Zn(2+) defolding of the helical conformation occurs. Upon decomplexation of the cation with EDTA, the helical conformation is regained.

  20. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices.

    PubMed

    Galak, Jeff; Gray, Kurt; Elbert, Igor; Strohminger, Nina

    2016-01-01

    How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women's shoes (16,236 transactions) across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size) when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context.

  1. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices

    PubMed Central

    Galak, Jeff; Gray, Kurt; Elbert, Igor; Strohminger, Nina

    2016-01-01

    How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women’s shoes (16,236 transactions) across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size) when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context. PMID:27144595

  2. Conformational distortion of α-phenylethyl amine in cryogenic matrices - a matrix isolation VCD study.

    PubMed

    Pollok, Corina H; Merten, Christian

    2016-05-21

    The chiral amine α-phenylethyl amine (PEA) was isolated in cryogenic matrices and investigated using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and infrared spectroscopy. The potential energy surface (PES) of PEA features five different conformers connected by relatively low conformational transition states. Based on the IR spectra, it could be confirmed that all conformational energy barriers are passed at a deposition temperature of 20 K, and that only the global minimum conformation of PEA is populated in both argon and nitrogen matrices. However, differences in the calculated and experimental VCD spectra indicate deviations from the minimum structure by perturbation of the phenyl ring as well as of the amine orientation. The degree of the perturbation is found to also depend on the choice of the host gas, which shows the subtle influence of the environment on the conformational distortion of PEA.

  3. Fake conformal symmetry in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We study Weyl symmetry (local conformal symmetry) in unimodular gravity. It is shown that the Noether currents for both Weyl symmetry and global scale symmetry vanish exactly as in conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. We clearly explain why in the class of conformally invariant gravitational theories, the Noether currents vanish by starting with conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. Moreover, we comment on both classical and quantum-mechanical equivalences in Einstein's general relativity, conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity, and the Weyl-transverse gravity. Finally, we discuss the Weyl current in the conformally invariant scalar action and see that it is also vanishing.

  4. Evidence of a calcium-induced structural change in the ATP-binding site of the sarcoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase using terbium formycin triphosphate as an analogue of Mg-ATP.

    PubMed

    Girardet, J L; Dupont, Y; Lacapere, J J

    1989-09-01

    Terbium ions and terbium formycin triphosphate have been used to investigate the interactions between the cation and nucleotide binding sites of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. Three classes of Tb3+-binding sites have been found: a first class of low-affinity (Kd = 10 microM) corresponds to magnesium binding sites, located near a tryptophan residue of the protein; a second class of much higher affinity (less than 0.1 microM) corresponds to the calcium transport sites, their occupancy by terbium induces the E1 to E2 conformational change of the Ca2+-ATPase; a third class of sites is revealed by following the fluorescence transfer from formycin triphosphate (FTP) to terbium, evidencing that terbium ions can also bind into the nucleotide binding site at the same time as FTP. Substitution of H2O by D2O shows that Tb-FTP binding to the enzyme nucleotide site is associated with an important dehydration of the terbium ions associated with FTP. Two terbium ions, at least, bind to the Ca2+-ATPase in the close vicinity of FTP when this nucleotide is bound to the ATPase nucleotide site. Addition of calcium quenches the fluorescence signal of the terbium-FTP complex bound to the enzyme. Calcium concentration dependence shows that this effect is associated with the replacement of terbium by calcium in the transport sites, inducing the E2----E1 transconformation when calcium is bound. One interpretation of this fluorescence quenching is that the E1----E2 transition induces an important structural change in the nucleotide site. Another interpretation is that the high-affinity calcium sites are located very close to the Tb-FTP complex bound to the nucleotide site.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of peptide conformations. These findings are consistent with experimental results, and give a molecular level interpretation for the reduced cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 to some extent upon graphene exposure. Meanwhile, this study provides some significant insights into the detailed mechanism of graphene-induced protein conformation transition.

  6. Conformal Killing-Yano tensors for the Plebanski-Demianski family of solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiznak, David; Krtous, Pavel

    2007-10-15

    We present explicit expressions for the conformal Killing-Yano tensors for the Plebanski-Demianski family of type D solutions in four dimensions. Some physically important special cases are discussed in more detail. In particular, it is demonstrated how the conformal Killing-Yano tensor becomes the Killing-Yano tensor for the solutions without acceleration. A possible generalization into higher dimensions is studied. Whereas the transition from the nonaccelerating to accelerating solutions in four dimensions is achieved by the conformal rescaling of the metric, we show that such a procedure is not sufficiently general in higher dimensions - only the maximally symmetric spacetimes in 'accelerated' coordinates are obtained.

  7. Enzymatic Detoxication, Conformational Selection, and the Role of Molten Globule Active Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Honaker, Matthew T.; Acchione, Mauro; Zhang, Wei; Mannervik, Bengt; Atkins, William M.

    2013-01-01

    The role of conformational ensembles in enzymatic reactions remains unclear. Discussion concerning “induced fit” versus “conformational selection” has, however, ignored detoxication enzymes, which exhibit catalytic promiscuity. These enzymes dominate drug metabolism and determine drug-drug interactions. The detoxication enzyme glutathione transferase A1–1 (GSTA1–1), exploits a molten globule-like active site to achieve remarkable catalytic promiscuity wherein the substrate-free conformational ensemble is broad with barrierless transitions between states. A quantitative index of catalytic promiscuity is used to compare engineered variants of GSTA1–1 and the catalytic promiscuity correlates strongly with characteristics of the thermodynamic partition function, for the substrate-free enzymes. Access to chemically disparate transition states is encoded by the substrate-free conformational ensemble. Pre-steady state catalytic data confirm an extension of the conformational selection model, wherein different substrates select different starting conformations. The kinetic liability of the conformational breadth is minimized by a smooth landscape. We propose that “local” molten globule behavior optimizes detoxication enzymes. PMID:23649628

  8. Correlated conformational fluctuations during enzymatic catalysis: Implications for catalytic rate enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Alper, Kutay O.; Singla, Manish; Stone, Jennifer L.; Bagdassarian, Carey K.

    2001-01-01

    Correlated enzymatic conformational fluctuations are shown to contribute to the rate of enhancement achieved during catalysis. Cytidine deaminase serves as a model system. Crystallographic temperature factor data for this enzyme complexed with substrate analog, transition-state analog, and product are available, thereby establishing a measure of atomic scale conformational fluctuations along the (approximate) reaction coordinate. First, a neural network-based algorithm is used to visualize the decreased conformational fluctuations at the transition state. Second, a dynamic diffusion equation along the reaction coordinate is solved and shows that the flux velocity through the associated enzymatic conformation space is greatest at the transition state. These results suggest (1) that there are both dynamic and energetic restrictions to conformational fluctuations at the transition state, (2) that enzymatic catalysis occurs on a fluctuating potential energy surface, and (3) a form for the potential energy. The Michaelis-Menten equations are modified to describe catalysis on this fluctuating potential energy profile, leading to enhanced catalytic rates when fluctuations along the reaction coordinate are appropriately correlated. This represents a dynamic tuning of the enzyme for maximally effective transformation of the ES complex into EP. PMID:11420434

  9. Conformal Window and Correlation Functions in Lattice Conformal QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Y.

    We discuss various aspects of Conformal Field Theories on the Lattice. We mainly investigate the SU(3) gauge theory with Nf degenerate fermions in the fundamental representation, employing the one-plaquette gauge action and the Wilson fermion action. First we make a brief review of our previous works on the phase structure of lattice gauge theories in terms of the gauge coupling constant and the quark mass. We thereby clarify the reason why we conjecture that the conformal window is 7 ≤ Nf ≤ 16. Secondly, we introduce a new concept, "conformal theories with IR cutof" and point out that any numerical simulation on a lattice is bounded by an IR cutoff ∧IR. Then we make predictions that when Nf is within the conformal window, the propagator of a meson G(t) behaves at large t, as G(t) = c exp (-mHt)/tα, that is, a modified Yukawa-type decay form, instead of the usual exponential decay form exp (-mHt), in the small quark mass region. This holds on an any lattice for any coupling constant g, as far as g is between 0 and g*, where g* is the IR fixed point. We verify that numerical results really satisfy the predictions for the Nf = 7 case and the Nf = 16 case. Thirdly, we discuss small number of flavors (Nf = 2 ˜ 6) QCD at finite temperatures. We point out theoretically and verify numerically that the correlation functions at T/Tc > 1 exhibit the characteristics of the conformal function with IR cutoff, an exponential decay with power correction. Investigating our numerical data by a new method which we call the "local-analysis" of propagators, we observe that the Nf = 7 case and the Nf = 2 at T ˜ 2Tc case are similar to each other, while the Nf = 16 case and the Nf = 2 at T = 102 ˜ 105Tc cases are similar to each other. Further, we observe our data are consistent with the picture that the Nf = 7 case and the Nf = 2 at T ˜ 2Tc case are close to the meson unparticle model. On the other hand, the Nf = 16 case and the Nf = 2 at T = 102 ˜ 105Tc cases are close to

  10. Nucleosome geometry and internucleosomal interactions control the chromatin fiber conformation.

    PubMed

    Kepper, Nick; Foethke, Dietrich; Stehr, Rene; Wedemann, Gero; Rippe, Karsten

    2008-10-01

    Based on model structures with atomic resolution, a coarse-grained model for the nucleosome geometry was implemented. The dependence of the chromatin fiber conformation on the spatial orientation of nucleosomes and the path and length of the linker DNA was systematically explored by Monte Carlo simulations. Two fiber types were analyzed in detail that represent nucleosome chains without and with linker histones, respectively: two-start helices with crossed-linker DNA (CL conformation) and interdigitated one-start helices (ID conformation) with different nucleosome tilt angles. The CL conformation was derived from a tetranucleosome crystal structure that was extended into a fiber. At thermal equilibrium, the fiber shape persisted but relaxed into a structure with a somewhat lower linear mass density of 3.1 +/- 0.1 nucleosomes/11 nm fiber. Stable ID fibers required local nucleosome tilt angles between 40 degrees and 60 degrees. For these configurations, much higher mass densities of up to 7.9 +/- 0.2 nucleosomes/11 nm fiber were obtained. A model is proposed, in which the transition between a CL and ID fiber is mediated by relatively small changes of the local nucleosome geometry. These were found to be in very good agreement with changes induced by linker histone H1 binding as predicted from the high resolution model structures.

  11. Bi-scalar modified gravity and cosmology with conformal invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Tsoukalas, Minas E-mail: minasts@central.ntua.gr

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the cosmological applications of a bi-scalar modified gravity that exhibits partial conformal invariance, which could become full conformal invariance in the absence of the usual Einstein-Hilbert term and introducing additionally either the Weyl derivative or properly rescaled fields. Such a theory is constructed by considering the action of a non-minimally conformally-coupled scalar field, and adding a second scalar allowing for a nonminimal derivative coupling with the Einstein tensor and the energy-momentum tensor of the first field. At a cosmological framework we obtain an effective dark-energy sector constituted from both scalars. In the absence of an explicit matter sector we extract analytical solutions, which for some parameter regions correspond to an effective matter era and/or to an effective radiation era, thus the two scalars give rise to 'mimetic dark matter' or to 'dark radiation' respectively. In the case where an explicit matter sector is included we obtain a cosmological evolution in agreement with observations, that is a transition from matter to dark energy era, with the onset of cosmic acceleration. Furthermore, for particular parameter regions, the effective dark-energy equation of state can transit to the phantom regime at late times. These behaviors reveal the capabilities of the theory, since they arise purely from the novel, bi-scalar construction and the involved couplings between the two fields.

  12. Flow of structural information between four DNA conformational levels.

    PubMed

    Levin-Zaidman, S; Reich, Z; Wachtel, E J; Minsky, A

    1996-03-05

    Closed-circular supercoiled DNA molecules have been shown to form a cholesteric assembly within bacteria as well as in vitro under physiological DNA and salt concentrations. Circular dichroism and X-ray scattering studies indicate that the macroscopic structural properties of the chiral mesophase are directly and uniquely dictated by the supercoiling parameters of the constituent molecules. Specifically, we find that the pitch of the DNA cholesteric phase derived from supercoiled DNA is determined by the superhelical density, which, in turn, is modulated by secondary conformational changes. A direct interrelationship among four DNA structural levels, namely, DNA sequence, secondary structural transitions, the tertiary superhelical conformation, and the quaternary, supramolecular organization is accordingly pointed out. Since secondary conformational changes are both sequence and environment dependent, alterations of cellular conditions may effectively modulate the properties of the packed DNA organization, through their effects on secondary structural transitions and hence on the superhelical parameters. On the basis of these results we suggest that liquid crystallinity represents an effectively regulated packaging mode of plectonemic, nucleosome-free DNA molecules in living systems.

  13. Electrochemical evidence on the molten globule conformation of cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Pineda, T; Sevilla, J M; Román, A J; Blázquez, M

    1997-12-05

    To explore a new approach for characterizing the molten globule conformation, cyclic voltammetric studies of salt induced transitions at acidic pH of cyt c have been carried out. The use of modified electrodes has made the observation of direct electrochemistry in native cyt c possible. However, most of these electrodes do not show reversible responses at acidic pH, due to the fact that, for this system, a deprotonated electrode surface is needed. In these studies, we have used a 6-mercaptopurine and cysteine-modified gold electrodes which are effective for direct rapid electron transfer to cyt c, even in acid solutions. The change in the absorption bands of cyt c are used to monitor the conformational states and, hence, to compare the voltammetric results. Under the experimental conditions where the A state of cyt c is obtained, a reversible voltammetric signal is observed. The midpoint peak potentials are found to be very close to the formal potential of native cyt c. Results are discussed in terms of a cooperative two-state transition between the acid unfolded and the globular acidic states of cyt c. This finding establishes, for the first time, the similarity of both the native and the molten globule-like conformations in terms of its redox properties.

  14. Gauge natural formulation of conformal gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Campigotto, M.; Fatibene, L.

    2015-03-15

    We consider conformal gravity as a gauge natural theory. We study its conservation laws and superpotentials. We also consider the Mannheim and Kazanas spherically symmetric vacuum solution and discuss conserved quantities associated to conformal and diffeomorphism symmetries.

  15. Killing Initial Data on spacelike conformal boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetz, Tim-Torben

    2016-08-01

    We analyze Killing Initial Data on Cauchy surfaces in conformally rescaled vacuum space-times satisfying Friedrich's conformal field equations. As an application, we derive the KID equations on a spacelike ℐ-.

  16. Generative models of conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Langmead, Christopher James

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of the conformational dynamics of proteins can be performed using either Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo procedures. The ensembles of three-dimensional structures produced during simulation can be analyzed in a number of ways to elucidate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system. The goal of this chapter is to review both traditional and emerging methods for learning generative models from atomistic simulation data. Here, the term 'generative' refers to a model of the joint probability distribution over the behaviors of the constituent atoms. In the context of molecular modeling, generative models reveal the correlation structure between the atoms, and may be used to predict how the system will respond to structural perturbations. We begin by discussing traditional methods, which produce multivariate Gaussian models. We then discuss GAMELAN (GRAPHICAL MODELS OF ENERGY LANDSCAPES), which produces generative models of complex, non-Gaussian conformational dynamics (e.g., allostery, binding, folding, etc.) from long timescale simulation data.

  17. Conformal Bootstrap in Mellin Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopakumar, Rajesh; Kaviraj, Apratim; Sen, Kallol; Sinha, Aninda

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach towards analytically solving for the dynamical content of conformal field theories (CFTs) using the bootstrap philosophy. This combines the original bootstrap idea of Polyakov with the modern technology of the Mellin representation of CFT amplitudes. We employ exchange Witten diagrams with built-in crossing symmetry as our basic building blocks rather than the conventional conformal blocks in a particular channel. Demanding consistency with the operator product expansion (OPE) implies an infinite set of constraints on operator dimensions and OPE coefficients. We illustrate the power of this method in the ɛ expansion of the Wilson-Fisher fixed point by reproducing anomalous dimensions and, strikingly, obtaining OPE coefficients to higher orders in ɛ than currently available using other analytic techniques (including Feynman diagram calculations). Our results enable us to get a somewhat better agreement between certain observables in the 3D Ising model and the precise numerical values that have been recently obtained.

  18. Geodesics and submanifold structures in conformal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgun, Florin

    2015-05-01

    A conformal structure on a manifold Mn induces natural second order conformally invariant operators, called Möbius and Laplace structures, acting on specific weight bundles of M, provided that n ≥ 3. By extending the notions of Möbius and Laplace structures to the case of surfaces and curves, we develop here the theory of extrinsic conformal geometry for submanifolds, find tensorial invariants of a conformal embedding, and use these invariants to characterize various notions of geodesic submanifolds.

  19. Stabilizing the boat conformation of cyclohexane rings

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.; Goddard, W.A. III; Moldowan, J.M.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Goddard, W.A. III.

    1995-06-21

    In calculating the energetics for various conformers of the A, B, and C series of hopanoid hydrocarbons present in mature oil reservoirs, we find that the B series prefers the boat conformation (by 1.3-2.5 kcal/mol) for the D cyclohexane ring. We analyze the structural elements responsible for stabilizing this boat conformation, identify the key features, and illustrate how one might stabilize boat conformations of other systems. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. DoD Biometric Conformity Assessment Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    REPORT DATE APR 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-04-2005 to 00-06-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DoD Biometric Conformity Assessment...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 dsp.dla.mil 21 DSP JOURNAL April/June 200522 The comprehensive discipline of conformity assess- ment involves conformance ... conformity assessment, and details the steps the DoD Biometrics Management Office (BMO) and its subordinate technology center, the DoD Biometrics Fusion

  1. Conformal microstrip arrays on cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, J.; Shtrikman, S.; Treves, D.

    1988-04-01

    Design and measured results for two X-band conformal microstrip arrays are presented. The two 4 x 4 arrays are built on the surface of a cylinder of small radius. They differ by the orientation of small radius. They differ by the orientation of the elements relative to the cylinder axis. The measured directivities and radiation patterns are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions.

  2. Conformal Antenna Array Design Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    PLANAR ARRAY PHASE C LbP=IowITH CORRECT CONFORMAL ARRAY PHASE C NbPt NOe OF PhS&. SH-IFT UITSPII- NoP*.GT*1O CONRCLT PHASES ARE USED C TAP19PATTLRN...of Antenna Arrays, Radio Science , Vol. 3, May 1968, pp. 401-522. M. T. Ma, "Theory and Application of Antenna Arrays", Wiley, New York, 1974, Chapter

  3. New potentials for conformal mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, G.

    2013-04-01

    We find under some mild assumptions that the most general potential of one-dimensional conformal systems with time-independent couplings is expressed as V = V0 + V1, where V0 is a homogeneous function with respect to a homothetic motion in configuration space and V1 is determined from an equation with source a homothetic potential. Such systems admit at most an SL(2,{R}) conformal symmetry which, depending on the couplings, is embedded in {Diff}({R}) in three different ways. In one case, SL(2,{R}) is also embedded in Diff(S1). Examples of such models include those with potential V = αx2 + βx-2 for arbitrary couplings α and β, the Calogero models with harmonic oscillator couplings and nonlinear models with suitable metrics and potentials. In addition, we give the conditions on the couplings for a class of gauge theories to admit a SL(2,{R}) conformal symmetry. We present examples of such systems with general gauge groups and global symmetries that include the isometries of AdS2 × S3 and AdS2 × S3 × S3 which arise as backgrounds in AdS2/CFT1.

  4. The Conformational Landscape of Serinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia; Loru, Donatella; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the amino alcohol serinol CH_2OH--CH(NH_2)--CH_2OH, which constitutes the hydrophilic head of the lipid sphingosine, has been investigated using chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in combination with laser ablation Five different forms of serinol have been observed and conclusively identified by the comparison between the experimental values of their rotational and 14N quadrupole coupling constants and those predicted by ab initio calculations. In all observed conformers several hydrogen bonds are established between the two hydroxyl groups and the amino groups in a chain or circular arrangement. The most abundant conformer is stabilised by O--H···N and N--H···O hydrogen bonds forming a chain rather than a cycle. One of the detected conformers presents a tunnelling motion of the hydrogen atoms of the functional groups similar to that observed in glycerol. S. Mata, I. Peña, C. Cabezas, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 2012, 280, 91 V. V. Ilyushin, R. A. Motiyenko, F. J. Lovas, D. F. Plusquellic, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 2008, 251, 129.

  5. Electrophysiological precursors of social conformity.

    PubMed

    Shestakova, Anna; Rieskamp, Jörg; Tugin, Sergey; Ossadtchi, Alexey; Krutitskaya, Janina; Klucharev, Vasily

    2013-10-01

    Humans often change their beliefs or behavior due to the behavior or opinions of others. This study explored, with the use of human event-related potentials (ERPs), whether social conformity is based on a general performance-monitoring mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that conflicts with a normative group opinion evoke a feedback-related negativity (FRN) often associated with performance monitoring and subsequent adjustment of behavior. The experimental results show that individual judgments of facial attractiveness were adjusted in line with a normative group opinion. A mismatch between individual and group opinions triggered a frontocentral negative deflection with the maximum at 200 ms, similar to FRN. Overall, a conflict with a normative group opinion triggered a cascade of neuronal responses: from an earlier FRN response reflecting a conflict with the normative opinion to a later ERP component (peaking at 380 ms) reflecting a conforming behavioral adjustment. These results add to the growing literature on neuronal mechanisms of social influence by disentangling the conflict-monitoring signal in response to the perceived violation of social norms and the neural signal of a conforming behavioral adjustment.

  6. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; ...

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads tomore » new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.« less

  7. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  8. Conformal Invariance of Graphene Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Giordanelli, I.; Posé, N.; Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Suspended graphene sheets exhibit correlated random deformations that can be studied under the framework of rough surfaces with a Hurst (roughness) exponent 0.72 ± 0.01. Here, we show that, independent of the temperature, the iso-height lines at the percolation threshold have a well-defined fractal dimension and are conformally invariant, sharing the same statistical properties as Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLEκ) curves with κ = 2.24 ± 0.07. Interestingly, iso-height lines of other rough surfaces are not necessarily conformally invariant even if they have the same Hurst exponent, e.g. random Gaussian surfaces. We have found that the distribution of the modulus of the Fourier coefficients plays an important role on this property. Our results not only introduce a new universality class and place the study of suspended graphene membranes within the theory of critical phenomena, but also provide hints on the long-standing question about the origin of conformal invariance in iso-height lines of rough surfaces. PMID:26961723

  9. An extension theorem for conformal gauge singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübbe, Christian; Tod, Paul

    2009-11-01

    We analyze conformal gauge, or isotropic, singularities in cosmological models in general relativity. Using the calculus of tractors, we find conditions in terms of tractor curvature for a local extension of the conformal structure through a cosmological singularity and prove a local extension theorem along a congruence of timelike conformal geodesics.

  10. 40 CFR 52.2133 - General conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General conformity. 52.2133 Section 52...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Carolina § 52.2133 General conformity. The General Conformity regulations adopted into the South Carolina State Implementation Plan...

  11. 40 CFR 51.854 - Conformity analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conformity analysis. 51.854 Section 51... FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans § 51.854 Conformity analysis. Link to...

  12. 40 CFR 52.938 - General conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General conformity. 52.938 Section 52...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.938 General conformity. The General Conformity regulations were submitted on November 10, 1995, and adopted into the Kentucky...

  13. 40 CFR 52.2133 - General conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General conformity. 52.2133 Section 52...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Carolina § 52.2133 General conformity. The General Conformity regulations adopted into the South Carolina State Implementation Plan...

  14. 40 CFR 52.799 - Transportation conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation conformity. 52.799... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.799 Transportation conformity. On June 4, 2010, Indiana submitted the Transportation Conformity Consultation SIP consisting...

  15. 40 CFR 52.938 - General conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General conformity. 52.938 Section 52...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.938 General conformity. The General Conformity regulations were submitted on November 10, 1995, and adopted into the Kentucky...

  16. 1,3-Propanediol millimeter wave spectrum: Conformers I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Piddyachiy, V. I.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Motiyenko, R. A.

    2013-11-01

    We present a new study of the millimeter wave spectrum of the lowest two conformers of the 1,3-propanediol (CH2OHCH2CH2OH) molecule. The new measurements involving rotational transitions with J up to 65 and Ka up to 30 for conformer I and J up to 59 and Ka up to 29 for conformer II have been carried out between 49 and 237 GHz using the Kharkov millimeter wave spectrometer. The new data were combined with previously published measurements and fitted using a model that assumes a symmetric potential energy surface with two minima between which the system tunnels. The final fit included 19 parameters for conformer I and 23 parameters for conformer II with weighted root-mean-square deviations of 0.81 and 0.73 achieved for datasets consisting of 3384 and 2947 line frequencies belonging to the ground states of conformer I and conformer II, respectively. The millimeter wave spectra of both conformers reveal a rather strong influence of the Coriolis type perturbation, which previously was not taken into account in the analysis of the 1,3-propanediol spectrum.

  17. Computational Design of Experiment Unveils the Conformational Reaction Coordinate of GH125 α-Mannosidases.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Gil, Santiago; Males, Alexandra; Fernandes, Pearl Z; Williams, Spencer J; Davies, Gideon J; Rovira, Carme

    2017-01-25

    Conformational analysis of enzyme-catalyzed mannoside hydrolysis has revealed two predominant conformational itineraries through B2,5 or (3)H4 transition-state (TS) conformations. A prominent unassigned catalytic itinerary is that of exo-1,6-α-mannosidases belonging to CAZy family 125. A published complex of Clostridium perfringens GH125 enzyme with a nonhydrolyzable 1,6-α-thiomannoside substrate mimic bound across the active site revealed an undistorted (4)C1 conformation and provided no insight into the catalytic pathway of this enzyme. We show through a purely computational approach (QM/MM metadynamics) that sulfur-for-oxygen substitution in the glycosidic linkage fundamentally alters the energetically accessible conformational space of a thiomannoside when bound within the GH125 active site. Modeling of the conformational free energy landscape (FEL) of a thioglycoside strongly favors a mechanistically uninformative (4)C1 conformation within the GH125 enzyme active site, but the FEL of corresponding O-glycoside substrate reveals a preference for a Michaelis complex in an (O)S2 conformation (consistent with catalysis through a B2,5 TS). This prediction was tested experimentally by determination of the 3D X-ray structure of the pseudo-Michaelis complex of an inactive (D220N) variant of C. perfringens GH125 enzyme in complex with 1,6-α-mannobiose. This complex revealed unambiguous distortion of the -1 subsite mannoside to an (O)S2 conformation, matching that predicted by theory and supporting an (O)S2 → B2,5 → (1)S5 conformational itinerary for GH125 α-mannosidases. This work highlights the power of the QM/MM approach and identified shortcomings in the use of nonhydrolyzable substrate analogues for conformational analysis of enzyme-bound species.

  18. Work transitions.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Nadya A; Bynner, John

    2008-01-01

    Individuals make choices in, and adjust to, a world of work that is often a moving target. Because work is so central to human functioning, and transitions in and out of work can have major mental health repercussions, the authors argue that applied psychologists in health services need to understand those transitions. This article focuses on the different types of transition throughout a person's working life and the resources needed at different stages to ensure the success of these transitions. The authors start by examining the roles of capability and adaptability in supporting and facilitating adjustment to work transitions and their relation to identity development. They then examine the role of social and institutional contexts in shaping work transitions and their outcomes. The authors focus on voluntary versus involuntary transitions and then broaden the lens in discussing the policy implications of research on work transitions.

  19. An automated and efficient conformational search of glycine and a glycine-water heterodimer both in vacuum and in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Stable conformers and the conformational isomerization pathways of glycine and the glycine-H2O heterodimer were explored using an efficient automated conformational searching method. The Gibbs energies of the conformers and transition structures of glycine and a glycine-H2O heterodimer at 400, 298, and 150 K were also calculated. In addition, estimated ratios of conformers, assuming thermodynamic equilibrium, were calculated and compared with the results of spectroscopic experiments. Solvent effects were introduced into the exploration process using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and conversion (tautomerization) pathways from neutral to zwitterionic states for both glycine and a glycine-H2O heterodimer in aqueous solution were compared.

  20. Using Multi Resonance Effects Towards Single Conformer Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Hays, Brian M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between the molecular structure and rotational frequencies makes rotational spectroscopy highly structural specific and an ideal tool for complex mixture analysis. The modern developments in broadband microwave techniques have immensely reduced the data acquisition time, while creating a need for high speed data analysis procedures. A new microwave-microwave double resonance method will be introduced, to perform single conformer/isomer microwave spectroscopy in complex chemical mixtures. The method combines the selective excitation schemes possible in chirped pulse microwave spectroscopy with multi-resonance effects observed upon sweeping in the rapid adiabatic passage regime, enabling perturbations to be induced in the intensities of most of the transitions ascribable to a single molecular constituent (e.g. a conformational isomer) in a mixture. Details of the method, experimental implementation and future challenges will be discussed.

  1. Conformal Invariance in Driven Diffusive Systems at High Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karevski, D.; Schütz, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider space-time correlations in driven diffusive systems which undergo a fluctuation into a regime with an atypically large current or dynamical activity. For a single conserved mass we show that the spatiotemporal density correlations in one space dimension are fully determined by conformal field theory with central charge c =1 , corresponding to a ballistic universality class with dynamical exponent z =1 . The full phase diagram for general atypical behavior exhibits the conformally invariant regime and, for atypically low current or activity, a region of phase separation. The phase transition line between these two regimes corresponds to typical behavior and the dynamics belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class with dynamical exponent z =3 /2 , except for a diffusive point with z =2 . The exact universal dynamical structure function is obtained in explicit form from the one-dimensional asymmetric simple exclusion process with periodic and open boundaries in the limit of maximal current.

  2. Transitions of tethered chain molecules under tension.

    PubMed

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Binder, Kurt

    2014-09-21

    An applied tension force changes the equilibrium conformations of a polymer chain tethered to a planar substrate and thus affects the adsorption transition as well as the coil-globule and crystallization transitions. Conversely, solvent quality and surface attraction are reflected in equilibrium force-extension curves that can be measured in experiments. To investigate these effects theoretically, we study tethered chains under tension with Wang-Landau simulations of a bond-fluctuation lattice model. Applying our model to pulling experiments on biological molecules we obtain a good description of experimental data in the intermediate force range, where universal features dominate and finite size effects are small. For tethered chains in poor solvent, we observe the predicted two-phase coexistence at transitions from the globule to stretched conformations and also discover direct transitions from crystalline to stretched conformations. A phase portrait for finite chains constructed by evaluating the density of states for a broad range of solvent conditions and tensions shows how increasing tension leads to a disappearance of the globular phase. For chains in good solvents tethered to hard and attractive surfaces we find the predicted scaling with the chain length in the low-force regime and show that our results are well described by an analytical, independent-bond approximation for the bond-fluctuation model for the highest tensions. Finally, for a hard or slightly attractive surface the stretching of a tethered chain is a conformational change that does not correspond to a phase transition. However, when the surface attraction is sufficient to adsorb a chain it will undergo a desorption transition at a critical value of the applied force. Our results for force-induced desorption show the transition to be discontinuous with partially desorbed conformations in the coexistence region.

  3. Targeted Conformational Search with Map-Restrained Self-Guided Langevin Dynamics: Application to Flexible Fitting of Electron Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiongwu; Subramaniam, Sriram; Case, David A.; Wu, Katherine W.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a map-restrained self-guided Langevin dynamics (MapSGLD) simulation method for efficient targeted conformational search. The targeted conformational search represents simulations under restraints defined by experimental observations and/or by user specified structural requirements. Through map-restraints, this method provides an efficient way to maintain substructures and to set structure targets during conformational searching. With an enhanced conformational searching ability of self-guided Langevin dynamics, this approach is suitable for simulating large-scale conformational changes, such as the formation of macromolecular assemblies and transitions between different conformational states. Using several examples, we illustrate the application of this method in flexible fitting of atomic structures into density maps from cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:23876978

  4. Conformation and chirality in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, John L.; Zhao, Lei

    2013-09-01

    High helical twisting powerchiral additives are required for an expanding variety of liquid crystal displays and devices. Molecular conformation plays a critical role in determining the helical twisting power, HTP, of chiral additives. We studied additives based on an isosorbide benzoate ester core. Molecular modeling revealed two low energy states with very different conformations for this core The ultra-violet absorption and NMR spectra show two stable isosorbide conformers These spectra reveal how the relative populations of these two conformations change with temperature and how this is related to the helical twisting power. Conformation changes can explain many of the observed anomalous responses of HPT to temperature.

  5. Measuring Conformational Dynamics of Single Biomolecules Using Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhterov, Maxim V.; Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick C.; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Gul, O. Tolga; Corso, Brad L.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2014-03-01

    Molecular motion can be a rate-limiting step of enzyme catalysis, but motions are typically too quick to resolve with fluorescent single molecule techniques. Recently, we demonstrated a label-free technique that replaced fluorophores with nano-electronic circuits to monitor protein motions. The solid-state electronic technique used single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors to monitor conformational motions of a single molecule of T4 lysozyme while processing its substrate, peptidoglycan. As lysozyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds, two protein domains undergo 8 Å hinge bending motion that generates an electronic signal in the SWNT transistor. We describe improvements to the system that have extended our temporal resolution to 2 μs . Electronic recordings at this level of detail directly resolve not just transitions between open and closed conformations but also the durations for those transition events. Statistical analysis of many events determines transition timescales characteristic of enzyme activity and shows a high degree of variability within nominally identical chemical events. The high resolution technique can be readily applied to other complex biomolecules to gain insights into their kinetic parameters and catalytic function.

  6. Probing a classically conformal B -L model with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    We study the cosmological history of the classical conformal B -L gauge extension of the standard model, in which the physical scales are generated via the Coleman-Weinberg-type symmetry breaking. In particular, we consider the thermal phase transition of the U (1 )B -L symmetry in the early Universe and resulting gravitational wave production. Due to the classical conformal invariance, the phase transition tends to be a first-order one with ultra-supercooling, which enhances the strength of the produced gravitational waves. We show that, requiring (1) U (1 )B -L is broken after the reheating, (2) the B -L gauge coupling does not blow up below the Planck scale, and (3) the thermal phase transition completes in almost all the patches in the Universe, the gravitational wave spectrum can be as large as ΩGW˜10-8 at the frequency f ˜0.01 - 1 Hz for some model parameters, and a vast parameter region can be tested by future interferometer experiments.

  7. The biological bases of conformity.

    PubMed

    Morgan, T J H; Laland, K N

    2012-01-01

    Humans are characterized by an extreme dependence on culturally transmitted information and recent formal theory predicts that natural selection should favor adaptive learning strategies that facilitate effective copying and decision making. One strategy that has attracted particular attention is conformist transmission, defined as the disproportionately likely adoption of the most common variant. Conformity has historically been emphasized as significant in the social psychology literature, and recently there have also been reports of conformist behavior in non-human animals. However, mathematical analyses differ in how important and widespread they expect conformity to be, and relevant experimental work is scarce, and generates findings that are both mutually contradictory and inconsistent with the predictions of the models. We review the relevant literature considering the causation, function, history, and ontogeny of conformity, and describe a computer-based experiment on human subjects that we carried out in order to resolve ambiguities. We found that only when many demonstrators were available and subjects were uncertain was subject behavior conformist. A further analysis found that the underlying response to social information alone was generally conformist. Thus, our data are consistent with a conformist use of social information, but as subjects' behavior is the result of both social and asocial influences, the resultant behavior may not be conformist. We end by relating these findings to an embryonic cognitive neuroscience literature that has recently begun to explore the neural bases of social learning. Here conformist transmission may be a particularly useful case study, not only because there are well-defined and tractable opportunities to characterize the biological underpinnings of this form of social learning, but also because early findings imply that humans may possess specific cognitive adaptations for effective social learning.

  8. Gauge Choice in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2017-01-01

    In a recent paper (MNRAS 458, 4122 (2016)) K. Horne examined the effect of a conformally coupled scalar field (referred to as Higgs field) on the Mannheim-Kazanas metric gμν, i.e. the static spherically symmetric metric within the context of conformal gravity (CG), and studied its effect on the rotation curves of galaxies. He showed that for a Higgs field of the form S(r) = S0a/(r + a), where a is a radial length scale, the equivalent Higgs-frame Mannheim-Kazanas metric tilde{g}_{μ ν } = Ω ^2 g_{μ ν }, with Ω = S(r)/S0, lacks the linear γr term, which has been employed in the fitting of the galactic rotation curves without the need to invoke dark matter. In this brief note we point out that the representation of the Mannheim-Kazanas metric in a gauge where it lacks the linear term has already been presented by others, including Mannheim and Kazanas themselves, without the need to introduce a conformally coupled Higgs field. Furthermore, Horne argues that the absence of the linear term resolves the issue of light bending in the wrong direction, i.e. away from the gravitating mass, if γr > 0 in the Mannheim-Kazanas metric, a condition necessary to resolve the galactic dynamics in the absence of dark matter. In this case we also point out that the elimination of the linear term is not even required because the sign of the γr term in the metric can be easily reversed by a simple gauge transformation, and also that the effects of this term are indeed too small to be observed.

  9. Conformance Testing: Measurement Decision Rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimbs, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of a Quality Management System (QMS) as specified in ISO 9001 and AS9100 is to provide assurance to the customer that end products meet specifications. Measuring devices, often called measuring and test equipment (MTE), are used to provide the evidence of product conformity to specified requirements. Unfortunately, processes that employ MTE can become a weak link to the overall QMS if proper attention is not given to the measurement process design, capability, and implementation. Documented "decision rules" establish the requirements to ensure measurement processes provide the measurement data that supports the needs of the QMS. Measurement data are used to make the decisions that impact all areas of technology. Whether measurements support research, design, production, or maintenance, ensuring the data supports the decision is crucial. Measurement data quality can be critical to the resulting consequences of measurement-based decisions. Historically, most industries required simplistic, one-size-fits-all decision rules for measurements. One-size-fits-all rules in some cases are not rigorous enough to provide adequate measurement results, while in other cases are overly conservative and too costly to implement. Ideally, decision rules should be rigorous enough to match the criticality of the parameter being measured, while being flexible enough to be cost effective. The goal of a decision rule is to ensure that measurement processes provide data with a sufficient level of quality to support the decisions being made - no more, no less. This paper discusses the basic concepts of providing measurement-based evidence that end products meet specifications. Although relevant to all measurement-based conformance tests, the target audience is the MTE end-user, which is anyone using MTE other than calibration service providers. Topics include measurement fundamentals, the associated decision risks, verifying conformance to specifications, and basic measurement

  10. The Biological Bases of Conformity

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, T. J. H.; Laland, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are characterized by an extreme dependence on culturally transmitted information and recent formal theory predicts that natural selection should favor adaptive learning strategies that facilitate effective copying and decision making. One strategy that has attracted particular attention is conformist transmission, defined as the disproportionately likely adoption of the most common variant. Conformity has historically been emphasized as significant in the social psychology literature, and recently there have also been reports of conformist behavior in non-human animals. However, mathematical analyses differ in how important and widespread they expect conformity to be, and relevant experimental work is scarce, and generates findings that are both mutually contradictory and inconsistent with the predictions of the models. We review the relevant literature considering the causation, function, history, and ontogeny of conformity, and describe a computer-based experiment on human subjects that we carried out in order to resolve ambiguities. We found that only when many demonstrators were available and subjects were uncertain was subject behavior conformist. A further analysis found that the underlying response to social information alone was generally conformist. Thus, our data are consistent with a conformist use of social information, but as subjects’ behavior is the result of both social and asocial influences, the resultant behavior may not be conformist. We end by relating these findings to an embryonic cognitive neuroscience literature that has recently begun to explore the neural bases of social learning. Here conformist transmission may be a particularly useful case study, not only because there are well-defined and tractable opportunities to characterize the biological underpinnings of this form of social learning, but also because early findings imply that humans may possess specific cognitive adaptations for effective social learning. PMID:22712006

  11. Chromosome Conformation Capture in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Linear chromatin fiber is packed inside the nuclei as a complex three-dimensional structure, and the organization of the chromatin has important roles in the appropriate spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression. To understand how chromatin organizes inside nuclei, and how regulatory proteins physically interact with genes, chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique provides a powerful and sensitive tool to detect both short- and long-range DNA-DNA interaction. Here I describe the 3C technique to detect the DNA-DNA interactions mediated by insulator proteins that are closely related to PcG in Drosophila, which is also broadly applicable to other systems.

  12. From conformal to Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Giorgos; Olea, Rodrigo

    2016-10-01

    We provide a simple derivation of the equivalence between Einstein and conformal gravity (CG) with Neumann boundary conditions given by Maldacena. As Einstein spacetimes are Bach flat, a generic solution to CG would contain both Einstein and non-Einstein parts. Using this decomposition of the spacetime curvature in the Weyl tensor makes manifest the equivalence between the two theories, both at the level of the action and the variation of it. As a consequence, we show that the on-shell action for critical gravity in four dimensions is given uniquely in terms of the Bach tensor.

  13. Determination of conformational free energies of peptides by multidimensional adaptive umbrella sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Gu, Yan; Liu, Haiyan

    2006-09-01

    We improve the multidimensional adaptive umbrella sampling method for the computation of conformational free energies of biomolecules. The conformational transition between the α-helical and β-hairpin conformational states of an alanine decapeptide is used as an example. Convergence properties of the weighted-histogram-analysis-based adaptive umbrella sampling can be improved by using multiple replicas in each adaptive iteration and by using adaptive updating of the bounds of the umbrella potential. Using positional root-mean-square deviations from structures of the α-helical and β-hairpin reference states as reaction coordinates, we obtained well-converged free energy surfaces of both the in-vacuum and in-solution decapeptide systems. From the free energy surfaces well-converged relative free energies between the two conformational states can be derived. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods for obtaining conformational free energies as well as implications of our results in studying conformational transitions of proteins and in improving force field are discussed.

  14. Conformational Properties of Helical Protein Polymers with Varying Densities of Chemically Reactive Groups.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Robin S; Argust, Lindsey M; Sharp, Jared D; Kiick, Kristi L

    2006-01-01

    Protein engineering strategies have proven valuable for the production of a variety of well-defined macromolecular materials with controlled properties that have enabled their use in a range of materials and biological applications. In this work, such biosynthetic strategies have been employed in the production of monodisperse alanine-rich, helical protein polymers with the sequences [AAAQEAAAAQAAAQAEAAQAAQ](3) and [AAAQAAQAQAAAEAAAQAAQAQ](6). The composition of these protein polymers is similar to that of a previously reported family of alanine-rich protein polymers, but the density and placement of chemically reactive residues has been varied to facilitate the future use of these macromolecules in elucidating polymeric structure-function relationships in biological recognition events. Both protein polymers are readily expressed from E. coli and purified to homogeneity; characterization of their conformational behavior via circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD) indicates that they adopt highly helical conformations under a range of solution conditions. Differential scanning calorimetry, in concert with CD, demonstrates that the conformational transition from helix to coil in these macromolecules can be well-defined, with helicity, conformational transitions, T(m) values, and calorimetric enthalpies that vary with the molecular weight of the protein polymers. A combination of infrared spectroscopy and CD also reveals that the macromolecules can adopt beta-sheet structures at elevated temperatures and concentrations and that the existence and kinetics of this conformational transition appear to be related to the density of charged groups on the protein polymer.

  15. Parity Doubling and the S Parameter Below the Conformal Window

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T; Babich, R; Brower, R C; Cheng, M; Clark, M A; Cohen, S D; Fleming, G T; Kiskis, J; Lin, M F; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Schaich, D; Vranas, P M

    2011-10-21

    We describe a lattice simulation of the masses and decay constants of the lowest-lying vector and axial resonances, and the electroweak S parameter, in an SU(3) gauge theory with N{sub f} = 2 and 6 fermions in the fundamental representation. The spectrum becomes more parity doubled and the S parameter per electroweak doublet decreases when N{sub f} is increased from 2 to 6, motivating study of these trends as N{sub f} is increased further, toward the critical value for transition from confinement to infrared conformality.

  16. Coexisting stable conformations of gaseous protein ions.

    PubMed Central

    Suckau, D; Shi, Y; Beu, S C; Senko, M W; Quinn, J P; Wampler, F M; McLafferty, F W

    1993-01-01

    For further insight into the role of solvent in protein conformer stabilization, the structural and dynamic properties of protein ions in vacuo have been probed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. Multiply charged ions generated by electrospray ionization of five proteins show exchange reactions with 2H2O at 10(-7) torr (1 torr = 133.3 Pa) exhibiting pseudo-first-order kinetics. Gas-phase compactness of the S-S cross-linked RNase A relative to denatured S-derivatized RNase A is indicated by exchange of 35 and 135 hydrogen atoms, respectively. For pure cytochrome c ions, the existence of at least three distinct gaseous conformers is indicated by the substantially different values--52, 113, and 74--of reactive H atoms; the observation of these same values for ions of a number--2, 7, and 5, respectively--of different charge states indicates conformational insensitivity to coulombic forces. For each of these conformers, the compactness in vacuo indicated by these values corresponds directly to that of a known conformer structure in the solution from which the conformer ions are produced by electrospray. S-derivatized RNase A ions also exist as at least two gaseous conformers exchanging 50-140 H atoms. Gaseous conformer ions are isometrically stable for hours; removal of solvent greatly increases conformational rigidity. More specific ion-molecule reactions could provide further details of conformer structures. Images PMID:8381533

  17. Generative Models of Conformational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Langmead, Christopher James

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of the conformational dynamics of proteins can be performed using either Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo procedures. The ensembles of three-dimensional structures produced during simulation can be analyzed in a number of ways to elucidate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system. The goal of this chapter is to review both traditional and emerging methods for learning generative models from atomistic simulation data. Here, the term ‘generative’ refers to a model of the joint probability distribution over the behaviors of the constituent atoms. In the context of molecular modeling, generative models reveal the correlation structure between the atoms, and may be used to predict how the system will respond to structural perturbations. We begin by discussing traditional methods, which produce multivariate Gaussian models. We then discuss GAMELAN (GrAphical Models of Energy LANdscapes), which produces generative models of complex, non-Gaussian conformational dynamics (e.g., allostery, binding, folding, etc) from long timescale simulation data. PMID:24446358

  18. Natively unfolded human prothymosin alpha adopts partially folded collapsed conformation at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Uversky, V N; Gillespie, J R; Millett, I S; Khodyakova, A V; Vasiliev, A M; Chernovskaya, T V; Vasilenko, R N; Kozlovskaya, G D; Dolgikh, D A; Fink, A L; Doniach, S; Abramov, V M

    1999-11-09

    Prothymosin alpha has previously been shown to be unfolded at neutral pH, thus belonging to a growing family of "natively unfolded" proteins. The structural properties and conformational stability of recombinant human prothymosin alpha were characterized at neutral and acidic pH by gel filtration, SAXS, circular dichroism, ANS fluorescence, (1)H NMR, and resistance to urea-induced unfolding. Interestingly, prothymosin alpha underwent a cooperative transition from the unfolded state into a partially folded conformation on lowering the pH. This conformation of prothymosin alpha is a compact denatured state, with structural properties different from those of the molten globule. The formation of alpha-helical structure by the glutamic acid-rich elements of the protein accompanied by the partial hydrophobic collapse is expected at lower pH due to the neutralization of the negatively charged residues. It is possible that such conformational changes may be associated with the protein function.

  19. Conformational analysis of ethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate by FTMW spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, Carlos; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Endo, Yasuki

    2016-12-01

    Ethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, C2H5CHOO, has been generated in the discharged plasma of a 1,1-diiodopropane/O2 gas mixture and spectroscopically characterized by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in a pulsed supersonic jet. The comparison between the experimental rotational constants and those calculated ab initio unambiguously confirms the identification of three conformers, providing the definitive probe for their molecular structures. Some of the observed pure rotational transitions show small splittings corresponding to the A/E components due to the threefold methyl internal rotation, which made it possible to determine the barrier heights of the hindered methyl rotation. The conformational abundances as well as the non observation of a plausible fourth conformer have been rationalized in terms of interconversion processes between conformers and interactions between the terminal oxygen and the protons of the ethyl moiety.

  20. Conformational analysis of ethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate by FTMW spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Carlos; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Endo, Yasuki

    2016-12-14

    Ethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, C2H5CHOO, has been generated in the discharged plasma of a 1,1-diiodopropane/O2 gas mixture and spectroscopically characterized by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in a pulsed supersonic jet. The comparison between the experimental rotational constants and those calculated ab initio unambiguously confirms the identification of three conformers, providing the definitive probe for their molecular structures. Some of the observed pure rotational transitions show small splittings corresponding to the A/E components due to the threefold methyl internal rotation, which made it possible to determine the barrier heights of the hindered methyl rotation. The conformational abundances as well as the non observation of a plausible fourth conformer have been rationalized in terms of interconversion processes between conformers and interactions between the terminal oxygen and the protons of the ethyl moiety.

  1. Understanding the connection between conformational changes of peptides and equilibrium thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Soler, Miguel A; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing evidence that conformational transitions in peptides and proteins are driven by specific vibrational energy pathways along the molecule, the current experimental techniques of analysis do as yet not allow to study these biophysical processes in terms of anisotropic energy flows. Computational methods offer a complementary approach to obtain a more detailed understanding of the vibrational and conformational dynamics of these systems. Accordingly, in this work we investigate jointly the vibrational energy distribution and the conformational dynamics of trialanine peptide in water solution at room temperature by applying the Instantaneous Normal Mode analysis to the results derived from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that conformational changes in trialanine are triggered by the vibrational energy accumulated in the low-frequency modes of the molecule, and that excitation is caused exclusively by thermal fluctuations of the solute-solvent system, thus excluding the possibility of an intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution process.

  2. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W.; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-07-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model — using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation.

  3. Conformational Dynamics of the Single Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen in Solution.

    PubMed

    Galochkina, Tatiana; Zlenko, Dmitry; Nesterenko, Alexey; Kovalenko, Ilya; Strakhovskaya, Marina; Averyanov, Alexander; Rubin, Andrey

    2016-09-19

    The O-antigen is the most variable and highly immunogenic part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule that covers the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and makes up the first line of cellular defense. To provide insight into the details of the O-antigen arrangement on the membrane surface, we simulated its behavior in solution by molecular dynamics. We developed the energetically favorable O-antigen conformation by analyzing free-energy distributions for its disaccharide fragments. Starting from this conformation, we simulated the behavior of the O-antigen chain on long timescales. Depending on the force field and temperature, the single molecule can undergo reversible or irreversible coil-to-globule transitions. The mechanism of these transitions is related either to the rotation of the carbohydrate residues around O-glycosidic bonds or to flips of the pyranose rings. We found that the presence of rhamnose in the O-antigen chain crucially increases its conformational mobility.

  4. a Study of the Conformational Isomerism of 1-IODOBUTANE by Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Eric A.; Obenchain, Daniel A.; Cooke, S. A.; Blake, Thomas A.; Novick, Stewart E.

    2016-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of 1-iodobutane was measured in a frequency range of 7-13 GHz, revealing a dense set of rotational transitions. Over 400 of the observed transitions were assigned to three different low energy conformational isomers. A previous low resolution microwave study of 1-haloalkanes, including 1-iodobutane, confirmed that the three conformers present are the anti-anti, gauche-anti, and gauche-gauche species. From this high resolution study, the complete nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor of iodine was determined for each conformer. Rotational, centrifugal distortion, nuclear spin-rotation coupling constants will be discussed. Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants will also be presented and compared to other iodoalkane species. Steinmetz, W. E.; Hickernell, F.; Mun, I. K.; Scharpen, L. H. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 1977, 68, 173-182.

  5. Coarse-grained free energy functions for studying protein conformational changes: a double-well network model.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jhih-Wei; Voth, Gregory A

    2007-12-01

    In this work, a double-well network model (DWNM) is presented for generating a coarse-grained free energy function that can be used to study the transition between reference conformational states of a protein molecule. Compared to earlier work that uses a single, multidimensional double-well potential to connect two conformational states, the DWNM uses a set of interconnected double-well potentials for this purpose. The DWNM free energy function has multiple intermediate states and saddle points, and is hence a "rough" free energy landscape. In this implementation of the DWNM, the free energy function is reduced to an elastic-network model representation near the two reference states. The effects of free energy function roughness on the reaction pathways of protein conformational change is demonstrated by applying the DWNM to the conformational changes of two protein systems: the coil-to-helix transition of the DB-loop in G-actin and the open-to-closed transition of adenylate kinase. In both systems, the rough free energy function of the DWNM leads to the identification of distinct minimum free energy paths connecting two conformational states. These results indicate that while the elastic-network model captures the low-frequency vibrational motions of a protein, the roughness in the free energy function introduced by the DWNM can be used to characterize the transition mechanism between protein conformations.

  6. Decoupling of crystalline and conformational degrees of freedom in lipid monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipsen, John Hjort; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.

    1989-08-01

    A theoretical study is performed on a microscopic interaction model which describes the transitions between liquid and solid phases of lipid monolayers spread on air/water interfaces. The model accounts for condensation in terms of acyl-chain conformational degrees of freedom as well as in terms of variables which describe the orientations of crystalline domains in the solid. The phase behavior of the model as a function of temperature and lateral pressure is explored using mean-field theory and computer-simulation techniques. Attention is paid to the particular interplay between the two types of condensation processes and effects on the phase behavior due to decoupling of crystalline and conformational order parameters. In the case of decoupling, the model predicts that the high-pressure solid-conformationally ordered phase is separated from the low-pressure liquid-conformationally disordered phase by a liquid-conformationally ordered phase. This prediction is consistent with synchrotron x-ray experiments which show that the chain-ordering transition and the crystallization process need not take place at the same lateral pressure. A characterization is provided of the nonequilibrium effects and pattern-formation processes observed along the isotherms in the phase diagram spanned by lateral pressure and area. A description is given of the kinetics of the nonequilibrium phase transitions and the concomitant heterogeneous microstructure of the monolayer. This leads to an explanation of the peculiarities of the experimentally observed isotherms of lipid monolayer phase behavior. It is pointed out that cholesterol, which promotes lipid-chain conformational order, has a unique capacity of acting as a `crystal breaker' in the solid monolayer phases and therefore provides a molecular mechanism for decoupling crystalline and conformational order in lipid monolayers containing cholesterol. The phase diagram of mixed cholesterol-lipid monolayers is derived and discussed in

  7. 40 CFR 93.109 - Criteria and procedures for determining conformity of transportation plans, programs, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Laws funds, the local air quality agency, the State air quality agency, and the State department of... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DETERMINING... U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.109 Criteria and procedures for determining conformity...

  8. Gramicidin conformational studies with mixed-chain unsaturated phospholipid bilayer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, K.J.; Ho, Cojen; Lombardi, J.V.; Stubbs, C.D. )

    1992-02-04

    The transition of gramicidin from a nonchannel to a channel form was investigated using mixed-chain phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Gramicidin and phospholipids were codispersed, after removal of the solvents chloroform/methanol or trifluoroethanol which resulted in nonchannel and channel conformations, respectively, as confirmed using circular dichroism (CD). The fluorescence emission maxima of the nonchannel form were shifted toward shorter wavelengths by heating at 60C (for 0-12 h), which converted it to a channel form, again as confirmed by CD. The channel form did not respond to heat treatment. Heat treatment also increased the fluorescence anisotropy of the nonchannel gramicidin tryptophans. The rate of transition from the nonchannel to channel conformation was found to be faster is phosphatidylethanolamine was present in combination with phosphatidylcholine compared to phosphatidylcholine alone. Using the fluorescence anisotropy of the membrane lipid probe, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, it was also shown that the motional properties of the surrounding lipid acyl chains differed for the channel and nonchannel gramicidin conformations. The possibility that lipids tending to favor the hexagonal phase (H{sub II}) would enhance the rate of the nonchannel to channel transition was supported by {sup 31}P NMR which revealed the presence of some H{sub II} lipids in the channel preparations. The results of this study suggest that gramicidin may serve as a useful model for similar conformational transitions in other more complex membrane proteins.

  9. Temperature-dependent conformational variation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter and its consequent interaction with phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Temperature variation caused by climate change, seasonal variation and geographic locations affects the physicochemical compositions of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), resulting in difference in the fates of CDOM-related environmental pollutants. Exploration into the thermal induced structural transition of CDOM can help to better understand their environmental impacts, but information on this aspect is still lacking. Through integrating fluorescence excitation-emission matrix coupled parallel factor analysis with synchronous fluorescence two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, this study provides an in-depth insight into the temperature-dependent conformational transitions of CDOM and their impact on its hydrophobic interaction with persistent organic pollutants (with phenanthrene as an example) in water. The fluorescence components in CDOM change linearly to water temperature with different extents and different temperature regions. The thermal induced transition priority in CDOM is protein-like component → fulvic-like component → humic-like component. Furthermore, the impact of thermal-induced conformational transition of CDOM on its hydrophobic interaction with phenanthrene is observed and explored. The fluorescence-based analytic results reveal that the conjugation degree of the aromatic groups in the fulvic- and humic-like substances, and the unfolding of the secondary structure in the protein-like substances with aromatic structure, contribute to the conformation variation. This integrated approach jointly enhances the characterization of temperature-dependent conformational variation of CDOM, and provides a promising way to elucidate the environmental behaviours of CDOM.

  10. Spectroscopic studies on the conformational stability of subtilisins in the presence of urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopova, M.; Boteva, R.; Genov, N.

    1984-03-01

    Conformational stabilities of four alkaline bacterial proteases in the presence of 8 M urea at neutral pH were studied. The transitions were investigated by examining protein fluorescence, circular dichroism properties and catalytic activity. On the basis of their stability in urea solutions the enzymes could be ordered as follows: subtilisins Carlsberg and DY > subtilisin Novo > mesentericopeptidase.

  11. 12 CFR 23.22 - Transition rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... were made. (b) Renewal of non-conforming leases. A national bank may renew a Section 24(Seventh) Lease... Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEASING Section 24(Seventh) Leases § 23.22 Transition rule. (a) Exclusion. A Section 24(Seventh) Lease entered into prior to June 12, 1979, may...

  12. Conformal regularization of Einstein's field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhr, Niklas; Uggla, Claes

    2005-09-01

    To study asymptotic structures, we regularize Einstein's field equations by means of conformal transformations. The conformal factor is chosen so that it carries a dimensional scale that captures crucial asymptotic features. By choosing a conformal orthonormal frame, we obtain a coupled system of differential equations for a set of dimensionless variables, associated with the conformal dimensionless metric, where the variables describe ratios with respect to the chosen asymptotic scale structure. As examples, we describe some explicit choices of conformal factors and coordinates appropriate for the situation of a timelike congruence approaching a singularity. One choice is shown to just slightly modify the so-called Hubble-normalized approach, and one leads to dimensionless first-order symmetric hyperbolic equations. We also discuss differences and similarities with other conformal approaches in the literature, as regards, e.g., isotropic singularities.

  13. On the conformation of the propranolol molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadlej-Sosnowska, N.; Dobrowolski, J. Cz; Mazurek, A. P.

    2000-03-01

    The structure of the propranolol molecule has been optimized within the AM1 and PM3 semiempirical framework followed by ab initio HF/6-31G ∗ refinement. On each calculation level the conformational space was sampled to search for the lowest-energy conformer(s) from among a few hundreds of conformers at the semiempirical step and next from among a few dozens of conformers at the ab initio level. Finally, five stable conformers were found; each stabilized by one or two of the three possible hydrogen bonds. The geometrical and electronic parameters were established and found to differ only slightly in the structures with the hydrogen bond either present or not.

  14. Terbium luminescence-lifetime heterogeneity and protein equilibrium conformational dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, R H; Stein, D L; Wang, J

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence decay of the rare earth terbium when bound to the protein calmodulin changes from a simple exponential decay to a complex nonexponential decay as the temperature is lowered below 200 K. We have fit the observed decay curves by assuming that the terbium emission is a forced electric dipole transition and proteins have a distribution of continuous conformational states. Quantitative fits to the data indicate that the root-mean-square configurational deviation of the atoms surrounding the terbium ion is 0.2 A, in good agreement with other measurements. We further point out that because the protein seems to undergo a glass transition yet retains configurational order at room temperature, the proper name for the physical state of a protein at room temperature is the rubber-like state. PMID:3470740

  15. Scattering Via Conformal Higher Spin Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseytlin, A. A.

    We consider a model of massless scalars interacting (via bilinear conserved currents) with conformal higher spin fields in flat space. We compute the tree-level four-scalar scattering amplitude using a natural prescription for summation over an infinite set of conformal higher spin exchanges and find that it vanishes. Independently, we show that the vanishing of the scalar scattering amplitude is, in fact, implied by the global conformal higher spin symmetry of this model.

  16. Conformal Electromagnetic Particle in Cell: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, Collin S.; Greenwood, Andrew D.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-10-26

    We review conformal (or body-fitted) electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) numerical solution schemes. Included is a chronological history of relevant particle physics algorithms often employed in these conformal simulations. We also provide brief mathematical descriptions of particle-tracking algorithms and current weighting schemes, along with a brief summary of major time-dependent electromagnetic solution methods. Several research areas are also highlighted for recommended future development of new conformal EM-PIC methods.

  17. Simple Model Study of Phase Transition Properties of Isolated and Aggregated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yong-Yun; Yi, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Lin-Xi

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the phase transition properties of isolated and aggregated protein by exhaustive numerical study in the confined conformation space with maximally compact lattice model. The study within the confined conformation space shows some general folding properties. Various sequences show different folding properties: two-state folding, three-state folding and prion-like folding behavior. We find that the aggregated protein holds a more evident transition than isolated one and the transition temperature is generally lower than that in isolated case.

  18. Solution conformational study of Scyliorhinin I analogues with conformational constraints by two-dimensional NMR and theoretical conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodziewicz-Motowidło, S; Legowska, A; Qi, X F; Czaplewski, C; Liwo, A; Sowiński, P; Mozga, W; Olczak, J; Zabrocki, J; Rolka, K

    2000-09-01

    Two analogues of Scyliorhinin I (Scyl), a tachykinin with N-MeLeu in position 8 and a 1,5-disubstituted tetrazole ring between positions 7 and 8, introduced in order to generate local conformational constraints, were synthesized using the solid-phase method. Conformational studies in water and DMSO-d6 were performed on these peptides using a combination of the two-dimensional NMR technique and theoretical conformational analysis. The algorithm of conformational search consisted of the following three stages: (i) extensive global conformational analysis in order to find all low-energy conformations; (ii) calculation of the NOE effects and vicinal coupling constants for each of the low energy conformations; (iii) determining the statistical weights of these conformations by means of a nonlinear least-squares procedure, in order to obtain the best fit of the averaged simulated spectrum to the experimental one. In both solvents the three-dimensional structure of the analogues studied can be interpreted only in terms of an ensemble of multiple conformations. For [MeLeu8]Scyl, the C-terminal 6-10 fragment adopts more rigid structure than the N-terminal one. In the case of the analogue with the tetrazole ring in DMSO-d6 the three-dimensional structure is characterized by two dominant conformers with similar geometry of their backbones. They superimpose especially well (RMSD = 0.28 A) in the 6-9 fragments. All conformers calculated in both solvents superimpose in their C-terminal fragments much better than those of the first analogue. The results obtained indicate that the introduction of the tetrazole ring into the Scyl molecule rigidifies its structure significantly more than that of MeLeu.

  19. Conformational Dynamics of o-Fluoro-Substituted Z-Azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, S K; Rogers, R A; Shi, J; Gao, C; Rinaldi, P L; Brittain, W J

    2015-11-20

    A conformational analysis of o-fluoro Z-azobenzene reveals a slight preference for aromatic C-F/π interaction. Density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the conformation with a C-F/π interaction is preferred by approximately 0.3-0.5 kcal/mol. Ground-state conformations were corroborated with X-ray crystallography. (Z)-Azobenzene (Z-AB) with at least one o-fluoro per ring displays (19)F-(19)F through-space (TS) coupling. 2D J-resolved NMR was used to distinguish through-bond from TS coupling ((TS)JFF). (TS)JFF decreases as the temperature is lowered and the multiplets coalesce into broad singlets. We hypothesize that the coalescence temperature (Tc) corresponds to the barrier for phenyl rotation. The experimentally determined barrier of 8-10 kcal/mol has been qualitatively verified by DFT where transition states with a bisected geometry were identified with zero-point energies of 6-9 kcal/mol relative to ground state. These values are significantly higher that values estimated from previous theoretical studies but lie within a reasonable range for phenyl rotation in hydrocarbon systems.

  20. Dissecting Protein Configurational Entropy into Conformational and Vibrational Contributions.

    PubMed

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-10-01

    Quantifying how the rugged nature of the underlying free-energy landscape determines the entropic cost a protein must incur upon folding and ligand binding is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach that dissects the protein configurational entropy on the basis of the classification of protein dynamics on the landscape into two separate components: short-term vibrational dynamics related to individual free-energy wells and long-term conformational dynamics associated with transitions between wells. We apply this method to separate the configurational entropy of the protein villin headpiece subdomain into its conformational and vibrational components. We find that the change in configurational entropy upon folding is dominated by the conformational entropy despite the fact that the magnitude of the vibrational entropy is the significantly larger component in each of the folded and unfolded states, which is in accord with the previous empirical estimations. The straightforward applicability of our method to unfolded proteins promises a wide range of applications, including those related to intrinsically disordered proteins.

  1. Conformity in condylar replacement knee prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Walker, P S; Hsieh, H H

    1977-05-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conformity between the femoral and tibial condyles in condylar replacement knee prostheses. Wear tests and observations from removed prostheses indicated that both high and low conformity produced characteristic abrasion and fatigue. Partly conforming condyles provided stability under load-bearing but allowed laxity to occur. Fixation to resist the various forces on the tibial components was enhanced by a short central intramedullary peg. Partial conformity is proposed as the optimum configuration between femoral and tibial components.

  2. Rotational Spectroscopy Unveils Eleven Conformers of Adrenaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Cortijo, V.; Mata, S.; Lopez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Recent improvements in our LA-MB-FTMW instrumentation have allowed the characterization of eleven and eight conformers for the neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline respectively. The observation of this rich conformational behavior is in accordance with the recent observation of seven conformers for dopamine and in sharp contrast with the conformational reduction proposed for catecholamines. C. Cabezas, I. Peña, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 486. H. Mitsuda, M. Miyazaki, I. B. Nielsen, P. Carcabal,C. Dedonder, C. Jouvet, S. Ishiuchi, M. Fujii J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 1130.

  3. Conformal and projective symmetries in Newtonian cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horváthy, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    Definitions of non-relativistic conformal transformations are considered both in the Newton-Cartan and in the Kaluza-Klein-type Eisenhart/Bargmann geometrical frameworks. The symmetry groups that come into play are exemplified by the cosmological, and also the Newton-Hooke solutions of Newton's gravitational field equations. It is shown, in particular, that the maximal symmetry group of the standard cosmological model is isomorphic to the 13-dimensional conformal-Newton-Cartan group whose conformal-Bargmann extension is explicitly worked out. Attention is drawn to the appearance of independent space and time dilations, in contrast with the Schrödinger group or the Conformal Galilei Algebra.

  4. Proline Conformation in a Functional Tau Fragment.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Puneet; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lopez, Juan; Smet, Caroline; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, G

    2016-01-16

    The conformational state of distinct prolines can determine the folding of a protein but equally other biological processes when coupled to a conformation-sensitive secondary reaction. For the neuronal tau protein, the importance of proline conformation is underscored by its interaction with different prolyl cis/trans isomerases. The proline conformation would gain even further importance after phosphorylation of the preceding residue by various proline-directed kinases. A number of molecular diseases including Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury were thereby recently qualified as "cistauosis", as they would imply a cis conformation for the pThr231-Pro232 prolyl bond. We here investigate by NMR spectroscopy the conformation of all prolines in a functional Tau fragment, Tau[208-324]. Although we can detect and identify some minor conformers in the cis form, we show that all prolines are for over 90% in the trans conformation. Phosphorylation by CDK2/CycA3, which notably leads to complete modification of the Thr231 residue, does not change this conclusion. Our data hence disagree with the notion that specific prolyl bonds in tau would adopt preferentially the cis conformation.

  5. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  6. Conformal frame dependence of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Domènech, Guillem; Sasaki, Misao E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-04-01

    Physical equivalence between different conformal frames in scalar-tensor theory of gravity is a known fact. However, assuming that matter minimally couples to the metric of a particular frame, which we call the matter Jordan frame, the matter point of view of the universe may vary from frame to frame. Thus, there is a clear distinction between gravitational sector (curvature and scalar field) and matter sector. In this paper, focusing on a simple power-law inflation model in the Einstein frame, two examples are considered; a super-inflationary and a bouncing universe Jordan frames. Then we consider a spectator curvaton minimally coupled to a Jordan frame, and compute its contribution to the curvature perturbation power spectrum. In these specific examples, we find a blue tilt at short scales for the super-inflationary case, and a blue tilt at large scales for the bouncing case.

  7. Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Mary; Keating, Stacen A.

    2008-01-01

    Transitional care encompasses a broad range of services and environments designed to promote the safe and timely passage of patients between levels of health care and across care settings. High-quality transitional care is especially important for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complex therapeutic regimens, as well as for their…

  8. Conformational equilibria and large-amplitude motions in dimers of carboxylic acids: rotational spectrum of acetic acid-difluoroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gou, Qian; Feng, Gang; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther

    2014-10-06

    We report the rotational spectra of two conformers of the acetic acid-difluoroacetic acid adduct (CH3COOH-CHF2COOH) and supply information on its internal dynamics. The two conformers differ from each other, depending on the trans or gauche orientation of the terminal -CHF2 group. Both conformers display splittings of the rotational transitions, due to the internal rotation of the methyl group of acetic acid. The corresponding barriers are determined to be V3(trans)=99.8(3) and V3(gauche)=90.5(9) cm(-1) (where V3 is the methyl rotation barrier height). The gauche form displays a further doubling of the rotational transitions, due to the tunneling motion of the -CHF2 group between its two equivalent conformations. The corresponding B2 barrier is estimated to be 108(2) cm(-1). The increase in the distance between the two monomers upon OH→OD deuteration (the Ubbelohde effect) is determined.

  9. Quantum charge transport and conformational dynamics of macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Boninsegna, L; Faccioli, P

    2012-06-07

    We study the dynamics of quantum excitations inside macromolecules which can undergo conformational transitions. In the first part of the paper, we use the path integral formalism to rigorously derive a set of coupled equations of motion which simultaneously describe the molecular and quantum transport dynamics, and obey the fluctuation/dissipation relationship. We also introduce an algorithm which yields the most probable molecular and quantum transport pathways in rare, thermally activated reactions. In the second part of the paper, we apply this formalism to simulate the propagation of a quantum charge during the collapse of a polymer from an initial stretched conformation to a final globular state. We find that the charge dynamics is quenched when the chain reaches a molten globule state. Using random matrix theory we show that this transition is due to an increase of quantum localization driven by dynamical disorder. We argue that collapsing conducting polymers may represent a physical realization of quantum small-world networks with dynamical rewiring probability.

  10. Coupling of the guanosine glycosidic bond conformation and the ribonucleotide cleavage reaction: implications for barnase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Roca, Maite; De Maria, Leonardo; Wodak, Shoshana J; Moliner, Vicente; Tuñón, Iñaki; Giraldo, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    To examine the possible relationship of guanine-dependent GpA conformations with ribonucleotide cleavage, two potential of mean force (PMF) calculations were performed in aqueous solution. In the first calculation, the guanosine glycosidic (Gchi) angle was used as the reaction coordinate, and computations were performed on two GpA ionic species: protonated (neutral) or deprotonated (negatively charged) guanosine ribose O2 '. Similar energetic profiles featuring two minima corresponding to the anti and syn Gchi regions were obtained for both ionic forms. For both forms the anti conformation was more stable than the syn, and barriers of approximately 4 kcal/mol were obtained for the anti --> syn transition. Structural analysis showed a remarkable sensitivity of the phosphate moiety to the conformation of the Gchi angle, suggesting a possible connection between this conformation and the mechanism of ribonucleotide cleavage. This hypothesis was confirmed by the second PMF calculations, for which the O2 '--P distance for the deprotonated GpA was used as reaction coordinate. The computations were performed from two selected starting points: the anti and syn minima determined in the first PMF study of the deprotonated guanosine ribose O2'. The simulations revealed that the O2 ' attack along the syn Gchi was more favorable than that along the anti Gchi: energetically, significantly lower barriers were obtained in the syn than in the anti conformation for the O--P bond formation; structurally, a lesser O2 '--P initial distance, and a better suited orientation for an in-line attack was observed in the syn relative to the anti conformation. These results are consistent with the catalytically competent conformation of barnase-ribonucleotide complex, which requires a guanine syn conformation of the substrate to enable abstraction of the ribose H2 ' proton by the general base Glu73, thereby suggesting a coupling between the reactive substrate conformation and enzyme structure

  11. Magnetically-conformed, Variable Area Discharge Chamber for Hall Thruster, and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention is a Hall thruster that incorporates a discharge chamber having a variable area channel including an ionization zone, a transition region, and an acceleration zone. The variable area channel is wider through the acceleration zone than through the ionization zone. An anode is located in a vicinity of the ionization zone and a cathode is located in a vicinity of the acceleration zone. The Hall thruster includes a magnetic circuit which is capable of forming a local magnetic field having a curvature within the transition region of the variable area channel whereby the transition region conforms to the curvature of the local magnetic field. The Hall thruster optimizes the ionization and acceleration efficiencies by the combined effects of the variable area channel and magnetic conformity.

  12. Conformity to Peer Pressure in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Daniel B. M.; Tomasello, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Both adults and adolescents often conform their behavior and opinions to peer groups, even when they themselves know better. The current study investigated this phenomenon in 24 groups of 4 children between 4;2 and 4;9 years of age. Children often made their judgments conform to those of 3 peers, who had made obviously erroneous but unanimous…

  13. A model of protein conformational substates

    PubMed Central

    Stein, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Many proteins have been observed to exist in a large number of conformations that are believed to play an important role in their dynamics. A model of protein conformational substates that incorporates the ideas of frustration and disorder in analogy to glasses and spin glasses is proposed. Applications to x-ray diffraction, Mössbauer studies, and recombination experiments are discussed. PMID:16593568

  14. Conformational Sampling of Peptides in Cellular Environments☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Clifford, Jacob; Connelly, Brian D.; Feig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Biological systems provide a complex environment that can be understood in terms of its dielectric properties. High concentrations of macromolecules and cosolvents effectively reduce the dielectric constant of cellular environments, thereby affecting the conformational sampling of biomolecules. To examine this effect in more detail, the conformational preference of alanine dipeptide, poly-alanine, and melittin in different dielectric environments is studied with computer simulations based on recently developed generalized Born methodology. Results from these simulations suggest that extended conformations are favored over α-helical conformations at the dipeptide level at and below dielectric constants of 5–10. Furthermore, lower-dielectric environments begin to significantly stabilize helical structures in poly-alanine at ɛ = 20. In the more complex peptide melittin, different dielectric environments shift the equilibrium between two main conformations: a nearly fully extended helix that is most stable in low dielectrics and a compact, V-shaped conformation consisting of two helices that is preferred in higher dielectric environments. An additional conformation is only found to be significantly populated at intermediate dielectric constants. Good agreement with previous studies of different peptides in specific, less-polar solvent environments, suggest that helix stabilization and shifts in conformational preferences in such environments are primarily due to a reduced dielectric environment rather than specific molecular details. The findings presented here make predictions of how peptide sampling may be altered in dense cellular environments with reduced dielectric response. PMID:17905846

  15. Regulatory Conformance Checking: Logic and Logical Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinesh, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of checking whether an organization conforms to a body of regulation. Conformance is studied in a runtime verification setting. The regulation is translated to a logic, from which we synthesize monitors. The monitors are evaluated as the state of an organization evolves over time, raising an alarm if a violation is…

  16. Starkweather Social Conformity Test for Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkweather, Elizabeth K.

    The Starkweather Social Conformity Test is a research instrument designed to measure conforming and nonconforming behavior by providing the young child with opportunities to make choices in a situation in which he can follow a model or respond freely according to his own preferences. The test discriminates between compulsive conformists or…

  17. Conformational analysis of thiophene analogs of propranolol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, Carlos; Donoso, Rosa; Elguero, Jose; Goya, Pilar; Lissavetzky, Jaime; Rozas, Isabel

    1990-10-01

    Conformation of 3-tert-butylamino-1-thienyloxy-2-propanol, a thiophene analogue of propanolol, have been theoretically investigated by molecular mechanics and semiempirical calculations. The conformational minima obtained have been compared with those reported for propranolol using molecular graphics. The good "fit" obtained can account for the similar biological activity of these compounds.

  18. Transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals such as Iron (Fe) and Copper (Cu) are essential for plant cell development. At the same time, due their capability to generate hydroxyl radicals they can be potentially toxic to plant metabolism. Recent works on hydroxyl-radical activation of ion transporters suggest that hydroxyl radicals generated by transition metals could play an important role in plant growth and adaptation to imbalanced environments. In this mini-review, the relation between transition metals uptake and utilization and oxidative stress-activated ion transport in plant cells is analyzed, and a new model depicting both apoplastic and cytosolic mode of ROS signaling to plasma membrane transporters is suggested. PMID:23333964

  19. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widom, Julia R.; Johnson, Neil P.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2013-02-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analogue of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS)—a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy—to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 ± 0.5 Å , twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5° ), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  20. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  1. Nucleosome structure and conformational changes

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, J.D.; Felsenfeld, G.; Eisenberg, H.

    1980-10-01

    We have used a variety of chemical probes to measure the accessibility of DNA on the surface of the nucleosome. We review these results, and describe new experiments which show that T4 phage DNA can form complexes with the core histones, possessing the properties of normal nucleosomes. Since T4 DNA is largely occupied by glucose residues in the major groove, this suggests that the major groove is not filled with histone amino acid side chains. We also report results of recent measurements which appear to show that only a few strong charge interactions are involved in the attachment of the terminal 20 nucleotide pairs at each end of nucleosome core DNA. We speculate on the possible functional significance of the accessibility of DNA revealed by all of these experiments. We have also examined conformational changes induced in nucleosomes at high ionic strength (0.5 to 0.7M NaCl). The frictional coefficient is found to undergo a small increase in this region, not consistent with models in which the nucleosome is completely unfolded, but possibly reflecting the dissociation of terminal DNA from the nucleosome surface.

  2. Conforming Morse-Smale Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, Attila; Gunther, David; Levine, Joshua A.; Tierny, Julien; Pascucci, Valerio

    2014-08-11

    Morse-Smale (MS) complexes have been gaining popularity as a tool for feature-driven data analysis and visualization. However, the quality of their geometric embedding and the sole dependence on the input scalar field data can limit their applicability when expressing application-dependent features. In this paper we introduce a new combinatorial technique to compute an MS complex that conforms to both an input scalar field and an additional, prior segmentation of the domain. The segmentation constrains the MS complex computation guaranteeing that boundaries in the segmentation are captured as separatrices of the MS complex. We demonstrate the utility and versatility of our approach with two applications. First, we use streamline integration to determine numerically computed basins/mountains and use the resulting segmentation as an input to our algorithm. This strategy enables the incorporation of prior flow path knowledge, effectively resulting in an MS complex that is as geometrically accurate as the employed numerical integration. Our second use case is motivated by the observation that often the data itself does not explicitly contain features known to be present by a domain expert. We introduce edit operations for MS complexes so that a user can directly modify their features while maintaining all the advantages of a robust topology-based representation.

  3. Cosmology in Conformally Flat Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endean, Geoffrey

    1997-04-01

    A possible solution to cosmological age and redshift-distance difficulties has recently been proposed by applying the appropriate conformally flat spacetime (CFS) coordinates to the standard solution of the field equations in a standard dust model closed universe. Here it is shown that CFS time correctly measures the true age of the universe, thus answering a major theoretical objection to the proposal. It is also shown that the CFS interpretation leads to a strong Copernican principle and is in all other respects wholly self-consistent. The deceleration parameter q0 is related to t0, the present age of the universe divided by L, the scale length of its curvature (an absolute constant). The values of q0 and L are approximately 5/6 and 9.2 × 109 yr, respectively. It is shown that the universe started everywhere simultaneously, with no recession velocity until the effects of its closed topology became significant. Conclusions to the contrary in standard theory (the big bang) stem from a different definition of recession velocity. The theoretical present cosmological mass density is quantified as 4.4 × 10-27 kg m-3 approximately, thus greatly reducing, in a closed universe, the observational requirement to find hidden mass. It is also shown that the prediction of standard theory, for a closed universe, of collapse toward a big crunch termination, will not in fact take place.

  4. Miniaturization techniques benefit conformal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, C. A.; Martin, D. J.; Moldovan, N.

    1984-03-01

    Crucial design tools for lightweight conformal arrays include low-loss, lightweight microstrip elements and substrates, the optimization of fabrication methods, and the design of the radome. It is noted that all these have demonstrated their effectiveness in the design of an S-band receive array. This new receive array comprises the radiation aperture, substrate, feed, and bonding skins. A circular microstrip patch is chosen as the lightweight radiation element owing to its small size and well-known performance characteristics. It is noted that honeycomb materials with bonding skins have proven to be excellent substrates for these elements. A honeycomb substrate material made up of a uniform lattice of circular cells extruded from a polycarbonate thermoplastic resin forms the element, which typically weighs less than 4 oz. per square foot. This honeycomb possesses good RF properties and affords very high resistance to rain and hail impact without sacrificing electrical performance. The design of the array grid is optimized by considering the effects of grating lobes, sidelobes, and the expected scanning performance.

  5. Conformational flexibility in biochemical regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    1993-09-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering have proven extremely useful for studying the evolutionarily related dumbbell-shaped Ca {sup 2+} -binding proteins calmodulin and troponin C and their interactions with the target proteins whose activity they regulate. Calmodulin contracts about target enzyme binding domains with the common characteristic of having a high propensity for forming a basic, amphipathic a-helix. The contraction is achieved via flexibility in the interconnecting helix region of the molecule that links its two globular domains. This flexibility allows calmodulin to optimize its binding to different arrangements of hydrophobic and charged residues important in forming these complexes. In contrast calmodulin remains extended in its interaction with the catalytic subunit of phosphorylase kinase. There are structural and functional similarities between this interaction and that of troponin C and troponin I. Our most recent neutron scattering experiments confirm our prediction that troponin C also remains extended in this complex. The ability of the dumbbell-shaped Ca {sup 2+} -binding proteins to modulate their conformations via flexibility in the interconnecting helix region in order to accommodate different target binding domains is a remarkable example nature building functional diversity as well as specificity into a compact and unusual shape.

  6. Transition path theory analysis of c-Src kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yilin; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.; Roux, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Nonreceptor tyrosine kinases of the Src family are large multidomain allosteric proteins that are crucial to cellular signaling pathways. In a previous study, we generated a Markov state model (MSM) to simulate the activation of c-Src catalytic domain, used as a prototypical tyrosine kinase. The long-time kinetics of transition predicted by the MSM was in agreement with experimental observations. In the present study, we apply the framework of transition path theory (TPT) to the previously constructed MSM to characterize the main features of the activation pathway. The analysis indicates that the activating transition, in which the activation loop first opens up followed by an inward rotation of the αC-helix, takes place via a dense set of intermediate microstates distributed within a fairly broad “transition tube” in a multidimensional conformational subspace connecting the two end-point conformations. Multiple microstates with negligible equilibrium probabilities carry a large transition flux associated with the activating transition, which explains why extensive conformational sampling is necessary to accurately determine the kinetics of activation. Our results suggest that the combination of MSM with TPT provides an effective framework to represent conformational transitions in complex biomolecular systems. PMID:27482115

  7. Conformational Changes Underlying Desensitization of the Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channel ELIC

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Chen, Qiang; Lawless, Matthew J.; Mowrey, David D.; Xu, Jiawei; Saxena, Sunil; Xu, Yan; Tang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Structural rearrangements underlying functional transitions of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are not fully understood. Using 19F NMR and ESR spectroscopy, we found that ELIC, a pLGIC from Erwinia chrysanthemi, expanded the extracellular end and contracted the intracellular end of its pore during transition from the resting to an apparent desensitized state. Importantly, the contraction at the intracellular end of the pore likely forms a gate to restrict ion transport in the desensitized state. This gate differs from the hydrophobic gate present in the resting state. Conformational changes of the TM2-TM3 loop were limited to the N-terminal end. The TM4 helices and the TM3-TM4 loop appeared relatively insensitive to agonist-mediated structural rearrangement. These results indicate that conformational changes accompanying functional transitions are not uniform among different ELIC regions. This work also revealed the co-existence of multiple conformations for a given state and suggested asymmetric conformational arrangements in a homomeric pLGIC. PMID:25960405

  8. 47 CFR 2.1072 - Limitation on Declaration of Conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on Declaration of Conformity. 2.1072... Conformity § 2.1072 Limitation on Declaration of Conformity. (a) The Declaration of Conformity signifies that...'s rules. (b) A Declaration of Conformity by the responsible party is effective until a...

  9. Perceived Symbols of Authority and Their Influence on Conformity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushman, Brad J.

    Although there are many variables that influence conformity, Bickman (1974) found that the apparel of the person making a request had a significant influence on conformity. To evaluate other factorswhicn may influence conformity (gender, age, status of the conforming subject, and altruism in conforming), 150 adult pedestrians (45% female, 71%…

  10. C-metric solution for conformal gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kun; Zhao, Liu

    2017-02-01

    The C-metric solution of conformal gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field is presented. The solution belongs to the class of Petrov type D spacetimes and is conformal to the standard AdS C-metric appeared in vacuum Einstein gravity. For all parameter ranges, we identify some of the physically interesting static regions and the corresponding coordinate ranges. The solution may contain a black hole event horizon, an acceleration horizon, either of which may be cut by the conformal infinity or be hidden behind the conformal infinity. Since the model is conformally invariant, we also discussed the possible effects of the conformal gauge choices on the structure of the spacetime.

  11. Locally accessible conformations of proteins: multiple molecular dynamics simulations of crambin.

    PubMed Central

    Caves, L. S.; Evanseck, J. D.; Karplus, M.

    1998-01-01

    Multiple molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of crambin with different initial atomic velocities are used to sample conformations in the vicinity of the native structure. Individual trajectories of length up to 5 ns sample only a fraction of the conformational distribution generated by ten independent 120 ps trajectories at 300 K. The backbone atom conformational space distribution is analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA). Four different major conformational regions are found. In general, a trajectory samples only one region and few transitions between the regions are observed. Consequently, the averages of structural and dynamic properties over the ten trajectories differ significantly from those obtained from individual trajectories. The nature of the conformational sampling has important consequences for the utilization of MD simulations for a wide range of problems, such as comparisons with X-ray or NMR data. The overall average structure is significantly closer to the X-ray structure than any of the individual trajectory average structures. The high frequency (less than 10 ps) atomic fluctuations from the ten trajectories tend to be similar, but the lower frequency (100 ps) motions are different. To improve conformational sampling in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins, as in nucleic acids, multiple trajectories with different initial conditions should be used rather than a single long trajectory. PMID:9541397

  12. Conformational Substrate Selection Contributes to the Enzymatic Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Pin1.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Dörner, Ciro

    2016-12-15

    Conformational changes in enzymes and their role in their catalytic activity have been thoroughly addressed experimentally and theoretically. There is a vivid discussion in the field of enzyme catalysis on whether conformational changes of the enzyme are coupled to catalysis, or whether transition state stabilization through the preorganized protein and its electrostatic properties govern the catalysis. In this study, an additional contribution to the catalysis of one specific enzyme, Pin1, is proposed, which arises from its conformational selection of the peptide substrate from aqueous solution with the lowest activation barrier. The most stable conformers of the reactant (cis) and product (trans) peptide were identified through molecular dynamics simulations in combination with metadynamics. The cis-trans isomerization reaction was studied with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory together with the mean reaction force, which allows us to separate structural and electronic contributions to the activation barrier. Our results show that enzyme Pin1 binds the trans isomer in the conformation of the peptide with the smallest activation barrier and reduces the barrier further through specific substrate-enzyme interactions, as we have shown previously. The activation barrier of the cis peptide is independent of the conformer and remains unchanged in the enzyme.

  13. Rotational spectra of methyl ethyl and methyl propyl nitrosamines. Conformational assignment, internal rotation and quadrupole coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Lou, Qi; Bohn, Robert K.; Novick, Stewart E.

    1995-02-01

    A structural determination of two carcinogenic nitrosamines, methyl ethyl and methyl propyl nitrosamine, was performed. Microwave spectra were gathered from both a Stark cell spectrometer and a pulsed jet Fabry-Perot Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Each rotational transition is split into quadrupole hyperfine components by two nitrogen nuclei. This quadrupole pattern is doubled by a low barrier methyl rotor which produces resolvable A and E states. Rotational spectra were assigned for one conformer of methyl ethyl nitrosamine and two conformers of methyl propyl nitrosamine. The lowest energy conformers of each compound, according to empirical force field calculations, were assigned. The structure found for methyl ethyl nitrosamine has the nitrosyl oxygen on the methyl side with the terminal methyl group of the ethyl chain in the gauche position (OMG). Both conformers of methyl propyl nitrosamine have the same skeletal structure as the methyl ethyl compound; one conformer has the terminal methyl of the propyl group in the anti position (OMGA) while the other conformer has this methyl in the gauche position (OMGG -). Rotational constants and quadrupole coupling constants are reported for each assigned species. A barrier to internal rotation of the N-methyl group in each compound is also reported.

  14. Contribution of high-energy conformations to NMR chemical shifts, a DFT-BOMD study.

    PubMed

    Goursot, A; Mineva, T; Vásquez-Pérez, J M; Calaminici, P; Köster, A M; Salahub, D R

    2013-01-21

    This paper highlights the relevance of including the high-energy conformational states sampled by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) in the calculation of time-averaged NMR chemical shifts. Our case study is the very flexible glycerol molecule that undergoes interconversion between conformers in a nonrandom way. Along the sequence of structures from one backbone conformer to another, transition states have been identified. The three (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were estimated by averaging their calculated values over a large set of BOMD snapshots. The simulation time needed to obtain a good agreement with the two signals present in the experimental spectrum is shown to be dependent on the atomic orbital basis set used for the dynamics, with a necessary longer trajectory for the most extended basis sets. The large structural deformations with respect to the optimized conformer geometries that occur along the dynamics are related to a kinetically driven conformer distribution. Calculated conformer type populations are in good agreement with experimental gas phase microwave results.

  15. ClustENM: ENM-Based Sampling of Essential Conformational Space at Full Atomic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Bahar, Ivet; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Accurate sampling of conformational space and, in particular, the transitions between functional substates has been a challenge in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of large biomolecular systems. We developed an Elastic Network Model (ENM)-based computational method, ClustENM, for sampling large conformational changes of biomolecules with various sizes and oligomerization states. ClustENM is an iterative method that combines ENM with energy minimization and clustering steps. It is an unbiased technique, which requires only an initial structure as input, and no information about the target conformation. To test the performance of ClustENM, we applied it to six biomolecular systems: adenylate kinase (AK), calmodulin, p38 MAP kinase, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), and the 70S ribosomal complex. The generated ensembles of conformers determined at atomic resolution show good agreement with experimental data (979 structures resolved by X-ray and/or NMR) and encompass the subspaces covered in independent MD simulations for TIM, p38, and RT. ClustENM emerges as a computationally efficient tool for characterizing the conformational space of large systems at atomic detail, in addition to generating a representative ensemble of conformers that can be advantageously used in simulating substrate/ligand-binding events. PMID:27494296

  16. Rotational spectra, nuclear quadrupole hyperfine tensors, and conformational structures of the mustard gas simulent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubergen, M. J.; Lesarri, A.; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, A. C.; Jensen, J. O.; Ellzy, M. W.; Lochner, J. M.

    2005-10-01

    Rotational spectra have been recorded for both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopic forms of two structural conformations of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The rotational constants of the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopomers were used to identify the conformational isomers. A total of 236 hyperfine transitions have been assigned for 47 rotational transitions of the 35Cl isotope of a GGT conformer, and 146 hyperfine have been assigned for 37 rotational transitions of the 37Cl isotopomer. For the second conformer, a total of 128 (110) hyperfine and 30 (28) rotational transitions have also been assigned to the 35Cl ( 37Cl) isotopes of a TGT conformation. The extensive hyperfine splitting data, measured to high resolution with a compact Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, were used to determine both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the 35Cl and 37Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors in the inertial tensor principal axis system. The experimental rotational constant data, as well as the 35Cl and 37Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors, were compared to the results from 27 optimized ab initio (HF/6-311++G ∗∗ and MP2/6-311++G ∗∗) model structures.

  17. A search for the lowest-energy conformer of interstellar glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Snyder, L. E.; Suenram, R. D.; Lovas, F. J.

    1980-11-01

    The first search for the lowest-energy conformation of interstellar glycine has been carried out. An emission line has been detected in Sgr B2 which is coincident in frequency with the J(K-K+) = 14(1, 14)-13(1, 13) transition of conformer I glycine; while the carrier of the observed line is uncertain, no other frequency-coincident species are known, and hence glycine cannot be ruled out. Several previously unidentified lines have been identified as methyl formate. Evidence for the existence of the elusive interstellar ethylene oxide, the only reported interstellar ring-structure molecule, is discussed.

  18. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg2+ ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg2+ or Na+, benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg2+ bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by

  19. Topological conformal defects with tensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauru, Markus; Evenbly, Glen; Ho, Wen Wei; Gaiotto, Davide; Vidal, Guifre

    2016-09-01

    The critical two-dimensional classical Ising model on the square lattice has two topological conformal defects: the Z2 symmetry defect Dɛ and the Kramers-Wannier duality defect Dσ. These two defects implement antiperiodic boundary conditions and a more exotic form of twisted boundary conditions, respectively. On the torus, the partition function ZD of the critical Ising model in the presence of a topological conformal defect D is expressed in terms of the scaling dimensions Δα and conformal spins sα of a distinct set of primary fields (and their descendants, or conformal towers) of the Ising conformal field theory. This characteristic conformal data {Δα,sα}D can be extracted from the eigenvalue spectrum of a transfer matrix MD for the partition function ZD. In this paper, we investigate the use of tensor network techniques to both represent and coarse grain the partition functions ZDɛand ZD σ of the critical Ising model with either a symmetry defect Dɛ or a duality defect Dσ. We also explain how to coarse grain the corresponding transfer matrices MDɛand MD σ, from which we can extract accurate numerical estimates of {Δα,sα}Dɛ and {Δα,sα}Dσ. Two key ingredients of our approach are (i) coarse graining of the defect D , which applies to any (i.e., not just topological) conformal defect and yields a set of associated scaling dimensions Δα, and (ii) construction and coarse graining of a generalized translation operator using a local unitary transformation that moves the defect, which only exist for topological conformal defects and yields the corresponding conformal spins sα.

  20. Conformal dynamical equivalence and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, N. K.

    2011-02-01

    The "Conformal Dynamical Equivalence" (CDE) approach is briefly reviewed, and some of its applications, at various astrophysical levels (Sun, Solar System, Stars, Galaxies, Clusters of Galaxies, Universe as a whole), are presented. According to the CDE approach, in both the Newtonian and general-relativistic theories of gravity, the isentropic hydrodynamic flows in the interior of a bounded gravitating perfect-fluid source are dynamically equivalent to geodesic motions in a virtual, fully defined fluid source. Equivalently, the equations of hydrodynamic motion in the former source are functionally similar to those of the geodesic motions in the latter, physically, fully defined source. The CDE approach is followed for the dynamical description of the motions in the fluid source. After an observational introduction, taking into account all the internal physical characteristics of the corresponding perfect-fluid source, and based on the property of the isentropic hydrodynamic flows (quite reasonable for an isolated physical system), we examine a number of issues, namely, (i) the classical Newtonian explanation of the celebrated Pioneer-Anomaly effect in the Solar System, (ii) the possibility of both the attractive gravity and the repulsive gravity in a non-quantum Newtonian framework, (iii) the evaluation of the masses - theoretical, dynamical, and missing - and of the linear dimensions of non-magnetized and magnetized large-scale cosmological structures, (iv) the explanation of the flat-rotation curves of disc galaxies, (v) possible formation mechanisms of winds and jets, and (vi) a brief presentation of a conventional approach - toy model to the dynamics of the Universe, characterized by the dominant collisional dark matter (with its subdominant luminous baryonic "contamination"), correctly interpreting the cosmological observational data without the need of the notions dark energy, cosmological constant, and universal accelerating expansion.

  1. Conformity and Dissonance in Generalized Voter Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Scott E.; Sander, Leonard M.; Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.

    2007-09-01

    We generalize the voter model to include social forces that produce conformity among voters and avoidance of cognitive dissonance of opinions within a voter. The time for both conformity and consistency (which we call the exit time) is, in general, much longer than for either process alone. We show that our generalized model can be applied quite widely: it is a form of Wright's island model of population genetics, and is related to problems in the physical sciences. We give scaling arguments, numerical simulations, and analytic estimates for the exit time for a range of relative strengths in the tendency to conform and to avoid dissonance.

  2. Conformable Fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayer, H.; Demirhan, D.; Büyükkılıç, F.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce conformable fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method by means of conformable fractional derivative which is the most natural definition in non-integer calculus. Since, NU method gives exact eigenstate solutions of Schrödinger equation (SE) for certain potentials in quantum mechanics, this method is carried into the domain of fractional calculus to obtain the solutions of fractional SE. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the conformable fractional NU method, we solve fractional SE for harmonic oscillator potential, Woods—Saxon potential, and Hulthen potential.

  3. Conformational and Vibrational Studies of Triclosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özişik, Haci; Bayari, S. Haman; Saǧlam, Semran

    2010-01-01

    The conformational equilibrium of triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2, 4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFTe/B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p)) method. Four different geometries were found to correspond to energy minimum conformations. The IR spectrum of triclosan was measured in the 4000-400 cm-1 region. We calculated the harmonic frequencies and intensities of the most stable conformers in order to assist in the assignment of the vibrational bands in the experimental spectrum. The fundamental vibrational modes were characterized depending on their total energy distribution (TED%) using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) force field method.

  4. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  5. Electroweak phase transition in ultraminimal technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Ryttov, Thomas A.

    2009-05-01

    We unveil the temperature-dependent electroweak phase transition in new extensions of the standard model in which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken via strongly coupled, nearly conformal dynamics achieved by the means of multiple matter representations. In particular, we focus on the low energy effective theory introduced to describe ultra minimal walking technicolor at the phase transition. Using the one-loop effective potential with ring improvement, we identify regions of parameter space, which yield a strong first-order transition. A striking feature of the model is the existence of a second phase transition associated to the electroweak-singlet sector. The interplay between these two transitions leads to an extremely rich phase diagram.

  6. Mechanical Model of Globular Transition in Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Tricard, Simon; Shepherd, Robert F.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Snyder, Phillip W.; Cademartiri, Rebecca; Zhu, Danny; Aranson, Igor S.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.; Whitesides, George M.

    2014-07-30

    In complex, multicomponent systems, polymers often undergo phase transitions between distinct conformations. This paper reports a millimeter-scale granular model of coil-to-globule transitions: one “polymer” chain—a cylinders-on-a-string “pearl necklace”—and many spheres, all shaken on a horizontal surface. It is possible to describe the behavior of this granular system by using formalisms generally used in statistical physics of polymers. Two sets of experiments allowed the observation of first- and second- order coil-to-globule transitions. The model shows that the competition between long- and short range interactions leads to a first-order transition. Well-designed granular system represents another kind of approach to the study of polymer phase transitions and might inspire future designs of polymer-like mesoscale systems.

  7. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  8. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    SciTech Connect

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2015-06-28

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data.

  9. Voltage-dependent conformational changes in connexin channels✩

    PubMed Central

    Bargiello, Thaddeus A.; Tang, Qingxiu; Oh, Seunghoon; Kwon, Taekyung

    2011-01-01

    Channels formed by connexins display two distinct types of voltage-dependent gating, termed Vj- or fast-gating and loop- or slow-gating. Recent studies, using metal bridge formation and chemical cross-linking have identified a region within the channel pore that contributes to the formation of the loop-gate permeability barrier. The conformational changes are remarkably large, reducing the channel pore diameter from 15 to 20 Å to less than 4 Å. Surprisingly, the largest conformational change occurs in the most stable region of the channel pore, the 310 or parahelix formed by amino acids in the 42–51 segment. The data provide a set of positional constraints that can be used to model the structure of the loop-gate closed state. Less is known about the conformation of the Vj-gate closed state. There appear to be two different mechanisms; one in which conformational changes in channel structure are linked to a voltage sensor contained in the N-terminus of Cx26 and Cx32 and a second in which the C-terminus of Cx43 and Cx40 may act either as a gating particle to block the channel pore or alternatively to stabilize the closed state. The later mechanismutilizes the same domains as implicated in effecting pH gating of Cx43 channels. It is unclear if the two Vj-gating mechanisms are related or if they represent different gating mechanisms that operate separately in different subsets of connexin channels. A model of the Vj-closed state of Cx26 hemichannel that is based on the X-ray structure of Cx26 and electron crystallographic structures of a Cx26 mutation suggests that the permeability barrier for Vj-gating is formed exclusively by the N-terminus, but recent information suggests that this conformation may not represent a voltage-closed state. Closed state models are considered from a thermodynamic perspective based on information from the 3.5 Å Cx26 crystal structure and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The applications of computational and experimental methods to

  10. [Self-conciousness and conformity: moderating effects of conformity motives and task-interest].

    PubMed

    Oshimi, T

    2000-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between self-consciousness and conforming behavior, with conformity motives and task-interest as their moderator variables. One hundred fifty-six (156) participants were asked to imagine themselves in a hypothetical conforming situation, and estimate the probability of their conforming behavior and various conformity motives behind it, as well as their interest in the task. They also completed Self-Consciousness Scale. Among low task-interest participants, those high on private self-consciousness conformed more than the low if either motive for avoidance of isolation or motive for fairness was high, while those high on public self-consciousness conformed more than the low if motive for avoidance of isolation was high. Among high task-interest participants, those high on private self-consciousness conformed less than the low, while those high on public self-consciousness conformed more than the low if motive for fairness was high. The relationship between conformity motives and standards of behavior was discussed.

  11. Conformational Dynamics in FKBP Domains: Relevance to Molecular Signaling and Drug Design.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Hernandez, Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Among the 22 FKBP domains in the human genome, FKBP12.6 and the first FKBP domains (FK1) of FKBP51 and FKBP52 are evolutionarily and structurally most similar to the archetypical FKBP12. As such, the development of inhibitors with selectivity among these four FKBP domains poses a significant challenge for structure-based design. The pleiotropic effects of these FKBP domains in a range of signaling processes such as the regulation of ryanodine receptor calcium channels by FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 and steroid receptor regulation by the FK1 domains of FKBP51 and FKBP52 amply justify the efforts to develop selective therapies. In contrast to their close structural similarities, these four FKBP domains exhibit a substantial diversity in their conformational flexibility. A number of distinct conformational transitions have been characterized for FKBP12 spanning timeframes from 20 s to 10 ns and in each case these dynamics have been shown to markedly differ from the conformational behavior for one or more of the other three FKBP domains. Protein flexibilitybased inhibitor design could draw upon the transitions that are significantly populated in only one of the targeted proteins. Both the similarities and differences among these four proteins valuably inform the understanding of how dynamical effects propagate across the FKBP domains as well as potentially how such intramolecular transitions might couple to the larger scale transitions that are central to the signaling complexes in which these FKBP domains function.

  12. Nanoporous films: From conventional to the conformal

    DOE PAGES

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie

    2015-12-14

    Here, thin and continuous films of porous metal-organic frameworks can now be conformally deposited on various substrates using a vapor-phase synthesis approach that departs from conventional solution-based routes.

  13. Conformal Surface Parameterization for Texture Mapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-25

    Conformal Surface Parameterization for Texture Mapping Steven Haker Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Minnesota...also like to thank Professor Victoria Interrante for some very helpful conversations on texture mappings. References [1] S. Angenent, S. Haker , A

  14. The Conformational Behaviour of the Odorant Dihydrocarveol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loru, Donatella; Jarman, Natasha; Sanz, M. Eugenia

    2016-06-01

    The odorant dihydrocarveol (C10H18O) has been investigated in the gas phase using a 2-8 GHz chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Dihydrocarveol was purchased as a mixture of n-, iso-, neo-, and neoiso- isomers. The sample was placed in a bespoke heating nozzle at about 85°C and seeded in Ne at 5 bar. Three conformers were observed and their rotational constants were determined. By comparing the experimental rotational constants with those calculated ab initio the three conformers were identified as belonging to n-dihydrocarveol. In all three conformers the isopropenyl group is in equatorial position with respect to the six-membered ring, and the OH group maintains the same configuration. The conformers differ in the orientation of the isopropenyl group.

  15. Conformable apparatus in a drill string

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Fox, Joe

    2007-08-28

    An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube. The metal tube may be adapted to stretch as the drill pipes stretch.

  16. Conformational Electroresistance and Hysteresis in Nanoclusters

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xiangguo; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2014-07-02

    Among many mechanisms proposed for electroresistance, ones involving structural changes are the least understood because of challenges of controllability and repeatability. Yet structural changes can cause dramatic changes in electronic properties, leading to multiple ways in which conduction paths can be opened and closed, not limited to filament movement or variation in molecular conductance. Here we show at least another way: conformational dependence of the Coulomb charging energy of a nanocluster, where charging induced conformational distortion changes the blockade voltage, which in turn leads to a giant electroresistance. This intricate interplay between charging and conformation change is demonstrated in amore » nanocluster Zn3O4 by combining a first-principles calculation with a temperature dependent transport model. The predicted hysteretic Coulomb blockade staircase in the current-voltage curve adds another dimension to the rich phenomenon of tunneling electroresistance. The new mechanism also provides a better controlled and repeatable platform to study conformational electroresistance.« less

  17. Galilean conformal mechanics from nonlinear realizations

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoruk, Sergey; Ivanov, Evgeny; Lukierski, Jerzy

    2011-04-15

    We apply the nonlinear realizations method for constructing new Galilean conformal mechanics models. Our starting point is the Galilean conformal algebra which is a nonrelativistic contraction of its relativistic counterpart. We calculate Maurer-Cartan one-forms, examine various choices of the relevant coset spaces, and consider the geometric inverse Higgs-type constraints which reduce the number of the independent coset parameters and, in some cases, provide dynamical equations. New Galilean conformally invariant actions are derived in arbitrary space-time dimension D=d+1 (no central charges), as well as in the special dimension D=2+1 with one exotic central charge. We obtain new classical mechanics models which extend the standard (D=0+1) conformal mechanics in the presence of d nonvanishing space dimensions.

  18. Conformational Electroresistance and Hysteresis in Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiangguo; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2014-07-02

    Among many mechanisms proposed for electroresistance, ones involving structural changes are the least understood because of challenges of controllability and repeatability. Yet structural changes can cause dramatic changes in electronic properties, leading to multiple ways in which conduction paths can be opened and closed, not limited to filament movement or variation in molecular conductance. Here we show at least another way: conformational dependence of the Coulomb charging energy of a nanocluster, where charging induced conformational distortion changes the blockade voltage, which in turn leads to a giant electroresistance. This intricate interplay between charging and conformation change is demonstrated in a nanocluster Zn3O4 by combining a first-principles calculation with a temperature dependent transport model. The predicted hysteretic Coulomb blockade staircase in the current-voltage curve adds another dimension to the rich phenomenon of tunneling electroresistance. The new mechanism also provides a better controlled and repeatable platform to study conformational electroresistance.

  19. Conformity and Anticonformity Among Americans and Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Robert D.; Barnard, William A.

    1973-01-01

    Using a three-variable design, this study investigated conformity to male and female group pressures among Chinese and American male college students. Americans showed a greater tendency toward anticonformity than did Chinese. (JB)

  20. Social conformity despite individual preferences for distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Smaldino, Paul E; Epstein, Joshua M

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that individual behaviours directed at the attainment of distinctiveness can in fact produce complete social conformity. We thus offer an unexpected generative mechanism for this central social phenomenon. Specifically, we establish that agents who have fixed needs to be distinct and adapt their positions to achieve distinctiveness goals, can nevertheless self-organize to a limiting state of absolute conformity. This seemingly paradoxical result is deduced formally from a small number of natural assumptions and is then explored at length computationally. Interesting departures from this conformity equilibrium are also possible, including divergence in positions. The effect of extremist minorities on these dynamics is discussed. A simple extension is then introduced, which allows the model to generate and maintain social diversity, including multimodal distinctiveness distributions. The paper contributes formal definitions, analytical deductions and counterintuitive findings to the literature on individual distinctiveness and social conformity.

  1. Conformally covariant parametrizations for relativistic initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delay, Erwann

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the Lichnerowicz-York method, and an alternative method of York, in order to obtain some conformally covariant systems. This type of parametrization is certainly more natural for non constant mean curvature initial data.

  2. Mesh generation by conformal and quasiconformal mappings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. W.; Thompson, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that many recent advances in the finite-difference solution of elliptic equations have been limited to regions whose boundary contours coincide with coordinate lines of the Cartesian coordinate system. The reason for this is related to the fact that in the case of an arbitrary curvilinear coordinate system the original equation becomes much more complex. However, there is no added complexity if an orthogonal coordinate system is generated from a conformal mapping. In the present investigation, a finite difference method developed for the construction of conformal mappings has been generalized to construct quasi-conformal mappings. It is expected that the use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms could lead to improvements in both speed and accuracy. Quasi-conformal mappings have applications not only in the solution of elliptic equations but also in other areas such as orthogonal mesh generation on surfaces and the solution of certain fluid flow problems.

  3. Conformity, Anticonformity, andIndependence: Their Dimensionality and Generality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, Lawrence J.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Examines response to group pressure involving different judgments and social situations. One bipolar dimension included conformity and anticonformity, the other, conformity and independence. Tables, graphs, and bibliography. (RW)

  4. Conformal universe as false vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libanov, M.; Rubakov, V.

    2015-05-01

    We point out that the (pseudo)conformal universe scenario may be realized as the decay of a conformally invariant, metastable vacuum, which proceeds via spontaneous nucleation and subsequent growth of a bubble of a putative new phase. We study perturbations about the bubble and show that their leading late-time properties coincide with those inherent in the original models with homogeneously rolling backgrounds. In particular, the perturbations of a spectator dimension-zero field have a flat power spectrum.

  5. On useful conformal tranformations in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, D. F.; Freiras, E. A.; Gonçalves, B.; de Lima, A. G.; Shapiro, I.

    2004-12-01

    Local conformal transformations are known as a useful tool in various applications of the gravitational theory, especially in cosmology. We describe some new aspects of these transformations, in particular using them for derivation of Einstein equations for the cosmological and Schwarzschild metrics. Furthermore, the conformal transformation is applied for the dimensional reduction of the Gauss-Bonnet topological invariant in $d=4$ to the spaces of lower dimensions.

  6. The conformal transformation of the night sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2016-12-01

    We give a simple differential geometric proof of the conformal transformation of the night sky under change of observer. The proof does not use the four dimensionality of spacetime or spinor methods. Furthermore, it really shows that the result does not depend on Lorentz transformations. This approach, by giving a transparent covariant expression to the conformal factor, shows that in most situations it is possible to define a thermal sky metric independent of the observer.

  7. A Lewis acid-mediated conformational switch.

    PubMed

    Knipe, Peter C; Lingard, Hannah; Jones, Ian M; Thompson, Sam; Hamilton, Andrew D

    2014-10-28

    Molecules that change conformation in response to a stimulus have numerous uses, such as artificial chemoreceptors, novel drug delivery strategies and liquid crystal technology. Here we describe the design, synthesis and conformational behaviour of an isonicotinamide-substituted diphenylacetylene upon recognition of Lewis acids, including metalloporphyrins. Binding of these at a remote site - the pyridyl nitrogen - increases hydrogen-bond donor ability of the proximal amide NH, causing an increased preference for the alkyne rotamer in which this hydrogen bond is maintained.

  8. On being loud and proud: non-conformity and counter-conformity to group norms.

    PubMed

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Majkut, Louise; Terry, Deborah J; McKimmie, Blake M

    2003-09-01

    Most experiments on conformity have been conducted in relation to judgments of physical reality; surprisingly few papers have experimentally examined the influence of group norms on social issues with a moral component. In response to this, participants were told that they were either in a minority or in a majority relative to their university group in terms of their attitudes toward recognition of gay couples in law (Expt 1: N = 205) and a government apology to Aborigines (Expt 2: N = 110). In both experiments, it was found that participants who had a weak moral basis for their attitude conformed to the group norm on private behaviours. In contrast, those who had a strong moral basis for their attitude showed non-conformity on private behaviours and counter-conformity on public behaviours. Incidences of non-conformity and counter-conformity are discussed with reference to theory and research on normative influence.

  9. Controlling complex networks with conformity behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Wen; Nie, Sen; Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Controlling complex networks accompanied by common conformity behavior is a fundamental problem in social and physical science. Conformity behavior that individuals tend to follow the majority in their neighborhood is common in human society and animal communities. Despite recent progress in understanding controllability of complex networks, the existent controllability theories cannot be directly applied to networks associated with conformity. Here we propose a simple model to incorporate conformity-based decision making into the evolution of a network system, which allows us to employ the exact controllability theory to explore the controllability of such systems. We offer rigorous theoretical results of controllability for representative regular networks. We also explore real networks in different fields and some typical model networks, finding some interesting results that are different from the predictions of structural and exact controllability theory in the absence of conformity. We finally present an example of steering a real social network to some target states to further validate our controllability theory and tools. Our work offers a more realistic understanding of network controllability with conformity behavior and can have potential applications in networked evolutionary games, opinion dynamics and many other complex networked systems.

  10. Conformational properties of oxazoline-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staś, Monika; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Siodłak, Dawid

    2016-04-01

    Oxazoline-amino acids (Xaa-Ozn) occur in natural peptides of potentially important bioactivity. The conformations of the model compounds: Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4R-Me), Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4S-Me), and (gauche+, gauche-, anti) Ac-(S)-Val-Ozn(4R-Me) were studied at meta-hybrid M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) method including solvent effect. Boc-L-Ala-L-Ozn-4-COOMe and Boc-L-Val-L-Ozn-4-COOMe were synthesized and studied by FT-IR and NMR-NOE methods. The conformations in crystal state were gathered from the Cambridge Structural Data Base. The main conformational feature of the oxazoline amino acids is the conformation β2 (ϕ,ψ ∼ -161°, -6°), which predominates in weakly polar environment and still is accessible in polar surrounding. The changes of the conformational preferences towards the conformations αR (ϕ,ψ ∼ -70°, -15°) and then β (ϕ,ψ ∼ -57°, -155°) are observed with increase of the environment polarity.

  11. Health care for gender variant or gender non-conforming children.

    PubMed

    Forcier, Michelle M; Haddad, Emily

    2013-04-01

    Most children explore various aspects of gender and sexuality as children. Youth with consistent, persistent, and insistent gender non-conformity or gender dysphoria are important to identify in the pre- and early-pubertal years as early intervention and support may be lifesaving. Those whose gender non-conformity persists into puberty and adolescence are most likely to identify as transgender. Blocking pubertal development at Tanner stage 2 for pre-pubertal, gender non-conforming children is a relatively new but reversible and highly beneficial strategy to delay puberty, giving patients and families time to come up with a transition plan. Early identification, collaborative support from healthcare providers and mental health clinicians, and supportive interventions for both children and families grappling with gender variance may improve social and mental health outcomes for what has traditionally been considered a high-risk, vulnerable population.

  12. Autophosphorylation Activity of a Soluble Hexameric Histidine Kinase Correlates with the Shift in Protein Conformational Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wojnowska, Marta; Yan, Jun; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Cryar, Adam; Gor, Jayesh; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a commonly accepted model, in response to stimuli, bacterial histidine kinases undergo a conformational transition between an active and inactive form. Structural information on histidine kinases is limited. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate an exchange between two conformational populations of histidine kinase ExsG that are linked to different levels of kinase activity. ExsG is an atypical signaling protein that incorporates an uncommon histidine kinase catalytic core at the C terminus preceded by an N-terminal “receiver domain” that is normally associated with the response regulator proteins in two-component signal transduction systems. IM-MS analysis and enzymatic assays indicate that phosphorylation of the ExsG receiver domain stabilizes the “compact” form of the protein and inhibits kinase core activity; in contrast, nucleotide binding required for kinase activity is associated with the more open conformation of ExsG. PMID:24210218

  13. Finding Stable Graphene Conformations from Pull and Release Experiments with Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yamaletdinov, Ruslan D.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that stable conformations of graphene nanoribbons can be identified using pull and release experiments, when the stretching force applied to a single-layer graphene nanoribbon is suddenly removed. As it is follows from our numerical experiments performed by means of molecular dynamics simulations, in such experiments, favorable conditions for the creation of folded structures exist. Importantly, at finite temperatures, the process of folding is probabilistic. We have calculated the transition probabilities to folded conformations for a graphene nanoribbon of a selected size. Moreover, the ground state conformation has been identified and it is shown that its type is dependent on the nanoribbon length. We anticipate that the suggested pull and release approach to graphene folding may find applications in the theoretical studies and fabrication of emergent materials and their structures. PMID:28195156

  14. Finding Stable Graphene Conformations from Pull and Release Experiments with Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaletdinov, Ruslan D.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate that stable conformations of graphene nanoribbons can be identified using pull and release experiments, when the stretching force applied to a single-layer graphene nanoribbon is suddenly removed. As it is follows from our numerical experiments performed by means of molecular dynamics simulations, in such experiments, favorable conditions for the creation of folded structures exist. Importantly, at finite temperatures, the process of folding is probabilistic. We have calculated the transition probabilities to folded conformations for a graphene nanoribbon of a selected size. Moreover, the ground state conformation has been identified and it is shown that its type is dependent on the nanoribbon length. We anticipate that the suggested pull and release approach to graphene folding may find applications in the theoretical studies and fabrication of emergent materials and their structures.

  15. Real-time observation of the conformational dynamics of mitochondrial Hsp70 by spFRET.

    PubMed

    Sikor, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; von Voithenberg, Lena Voith; Mokranjac, Dejana; Lamb, Don C

    2013-05-29

    The numerous functions of the important class of molecular chaperones, heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70), rely on cycles of intricate conformational changes driven by ATP-hydrolysis and regulated by cochaperones and substrates. Here, we used Förster resonance energy transfer to study the conformational dynamics of individual molecules of Ssc1, a mitochondrial Hsp70, in real time. The intrinsic dynamics of the substrate-binding domain of Ssc1 was observed to be uncoupled from the dynamic interactions between substrate- and nucleotide-binding domains. Analysis of the fluctuations in the interdomain separation revealed frequent transitions to a nucleotide-free state. The nucleotide-exchange factor Mge1 did not induce ADP release, as expected, but rather facilitated binding of ATP. These results indicate that the conformational cycle of Ssc1 is more elaborate than previously thought and provide insight into how the Hsp70s can perform a wide variety of functions.

  16. Presidential Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-09

    Podesta for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies, “Presidential Transition Guidance,” Nov. 13, 2000. 89 U.S. General Services Administration...2000, presidential election, White House Chief of Staff John Podesta issued a November 13, 2000, memorandum to executive branch agencies stating that

  17. Tessellations & Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  18. From Stability to Mobility: African Secondary School Aged Adolescents' Transition to Mainstream Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunasekera, Sashya; Houghton, Stephen; Glasgow, Kenneth; Boyle, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Setting clear achievable goals that enhance reputational status has been shown to direct the energies of adolescents into socially conforming or non-conforming activities. It appears to be the case that following transition from Intensive English Centres (IECs) into mainstream schooling, students from African refugee backgrounds experience…

  19. Conformational changes in dopamine transporter intracellular regions upon cocaine binding and dopamine translocation.

    PubMed

    Dehnes, Yvette; Shan, Jufang; Beuming, Thijs; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2014-07-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, mediates the reuptake of dopamine at the synaptic cleft. DAT is the primary target for psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. We previously demonstrated that cocaine binding and dopamine transport alter the accessibility of Cys342 in the third intracellular loop (IL3). To study the conformational changes associated with the functional mechanism of the transporter, we made cysteine substitution mutants, one at a time, from Phe332 to Ser351 in IL3 of the background DAT construct, X7C, in which 7 endogenous cysteines were mutated. The accessibility of the 20 engineered cysteines to polar charged sulfhydryl reagents was studied in the absence and presence of cocaine or dopamine. Of the 11 positions that reacted with methanethiosulfonate ethyl ammonium, as evidenced by inhibition of ligand binding, 5 were protected against this inhibition by cocaine and dopamine (S333C, S334C, N336C, M342C and T349C), indicating that reagent accessibility is affected by conformational changes associated with inhibitor and substrate binding. In some of the cysteine mutants, transport activity is disrupted, but can be rescued by the presence of zinc, most likely because the distribution between inward- and outward-facing conformations is restored by zinc binding. The experimental data were interpreted in the context of molecular models of DAT in both the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Differences in the solvent accessible surface area for individual IL3 residues calculated for these states correlate well with the experimental accessibility data, and suggest that protection by ligand binding results from the stabilization of the outward-facing configuration. Changes in the residue interaction networks observed from the molecular dynamics simulations also revealed the critical roles of several positions during the conformational transitions. We conclude that the IL3 region of DAT

  20. Conformational plasticity of an enzyme during catalysis: intricate coupling between cyclophilin A dynamics and substrate turnover.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Lauren C; Hamelberg, Donald

    2013-01-08

    Enzyme catalysis is central to almost all biochemical processes, speeding up rates of reactions to biological relevant timescales. Enzymes make use of a large ensemble of conformations in recognizing their substrates and stabilizing the transition states, due to the inherent dynamical nature of biomolecules. The exact role of these diverse enzyme conformations and the interplay between enzyme conformational dynamics and catalysis is, according to the literature, not well understood. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study human cyclophilin A (CypA), in order to understand the role of enzyme motions in the catalytic mechanism and recognition. Cyclophilin A is a tractable model system to study using classical simulation methods, because catalysis does not involve bond formation or breakage. We show that the conformational dynamics of active site residues of substrate-bound CypA is inherent in the substrate-free enzyme. CypA interacts with its substrate via conformational selection as the configurations of the substrate changes during catalysis. We also show that, in addition to tight intermolecular hydrophobic interactions between CypA and the substrate, an intricate enzyme-substrate intermolecular hydrogen-bonding network is extremely sensitive to the configuration of the substrate. These enzyme-substrate intermolecular interactions are loosely formed when the substrate is in the reactant and product states and become well formed and reluctant to break when the substrate is in the transition state. Our results clearly suggest coupling among enzyme-substrate intermolecular interactions, the dynamics of the enzyme, and the chemical step. This study provides further insights into the mechanism of peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases and the general interplay between enzyme conformational dynamics and catalysis.