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Sample records for calculated nuclide compositions

  1. The Chondrite Neagari: Petrography, Mineralogy, Chemical Compositions, and Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, A.; Komura, K.; Nagao, K.; Nishiizumi, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Sakamoto, K.; Ebihara, M.; Shima, M.

    1995-09-01

    ) have been identified and their contents were determined by using a mock sample having known amounts of natural radioactivities. Among these nuclides, ^44mSc has the shortest half life (2.44 d) and has also been measured in the Mihonoseki meteorite [1]. Cosmogenic components were also observed for ^3He, ^21Ne, and ^38Ar by noble gas mass spectrometry. Cosmic-ray exposure ages calculated from cosmogenic ^21Ne and ^38Ar contents coupled with production rates by Eugster [2] and Schultz et al. [3], respectively, seem to be consistent (about 45 Ma), but the age from ^3He is significantly lower. Considering the loss of radiogenic ^4He, the Neagari meteorite must have experienced a high temperature event in space. Cosmogenic radionuclides ^10Be, ^26Al, and ^36Cl were also measured in an aliquot (77 mg) of the Neagari meteorite using an AMS facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The concentrations of these nuclides in conjunction with the noble gas data as well as data of elemental abundances provide better knowledge of the exposure history of this meteorite. References: [1] Shima M. et al. (1993) LPS XXIV, 1297-1298. [2] Eugster O. (1988) GCA, 52, 1649-1662. [3] Schultz L. et al. (1991) GCA, 55, 59-66.

  2. Impact of Nuclear Data Uncertainties on Calculated Spent Fuel Nuclide Inventories and Advanced NDA Instrument Response

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianwei; Gauld, Ian C.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) project is nearing the final phase of developing several advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments designed to measure spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of improving nuclear safeguards. Current efforts are focusing on calibrating several of these instruments with spent fuel assemblies at two international spent fuel facilities. Modelling and simulation is expected to play an important role in predicting nuclide compositions, neutron and gamma source terms, and instrument responses in order to inform the instrument calibration procedures. As part of NGSI-SF project, this work was carried out to assess the impacts of uncertainties in the nuclear data used in the calculations of spent fuel content, radiation emissions and instrument responses. Nuclear data is an essential part of nuclear fuel burnup and decay codes and nuclear transport codes. Such codes are routinely used for analysis of spent fuel and NDA safeguards instruments. Hence, the uncertainties existing in the nuclear data used in these codes affect the accuracies of such analysis. In addition, nuclear data uncertainties represent the limiting (smallest) uncertainties that can be expected from nuclear code predictions, and therefore define the highest attainable accuracy of the NDA instrument. This work studies the impacts of nuclear data uncertainties on calculated spent fuel nuclide inventories and the associated NDA instrument response. Recently developed methods within the SCALE code system are applied in this study. The Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron instrument was selected to illustrate the impact of these uncertainties on NDA instrument response.

  3. Impact of Nuclear Data Uncertainties on Calculated Spent Fuel Nuclide Inventories and Advanced NDA Instrument Response

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Jianwei; Gauld, Ian C.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) project is nearing the final phase of developing several advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments designed to measure spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of improving nuclear safeguards. Current efforts are focusing on calibrating several of these instruments with spent fuel assemblies at two international spent fuel facilities. Modelling and simulation is expected to play an important role in predicting nuclide compositions, neutron and gamma source terms, and instrument responses in order to inform the instrument calibration procedures. As part of NGSI-SF project, this work was carried outmore » to assess the impacts of uncertainties in the nuclear data used in the calculations of spent fuel content, radiation emissions and instrument responses. Nuclear data is an essential part of nuclear fuel burnup and decay codes and nuclear transport codes. Such codes are routinely used for analysis of spent fuel and NDA safeguards instruments. Hence, the uncertainties existing in the nuclear data used in these codes affect the accuracies of such analysis. In addition, nuclear data uncertainties represent the limiting (smallest) uncertainties that can be expected from nuclear code predictions, and therefore define the highest attainable accuracy of the NDA instrument. This work studies the impacts of nuclear data uncertainties on calculated spent fuel nuclide inventories and the associated NDA instrument response. Recently developed methods within the SCALE code system are applied in this study. The Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron instrument was selected to illustrate the impact of these uncertainties on NDA instrument response.« less

  4. On the calculation of activity concentrations and nuclide ratios from measurements of atmospheric radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, A; Ringbom, A

    2014-09-01

    Motivated by the need for consistent use of concepts central to the reporting of results from measurements of atmospheric radioactivity, we discuss some properties of the methods commonly used. Different expressions for decay correction of the activity concentration for parent-daughter decay pairs are presented, and it is suggested that this correction should be performed assuming parent-daughter ingrowth in the sample during the entire measurement process. We note that, as has already been suggested by others, activities rather than activity concentrations should be used when nuclide ratios are calculated. In addition, expressions that can be used to transform activity concentrations to activity ratios are presented. Finally we note that statistical uncertainties for nuclide ratios can be properly calculated using the exact solution to the problem of confidence intervals for a ratio of two jointly normally distributed variables, the so-called Fieller׳s theorem.

  5. The CAIRN method: automated, reproducible calculation of catchment-averaged denudation rates from cosmogenic nuclide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marius Mudd, Simon; Harel, Marie-Alice; Hurst, Martin D.; Grieve, Stuart W. D.; Marrero, Shasta M.

    2016-08-01

    We report a new program for calculating catchment-averaged denudation rates from cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. The method (Catchment-Averaged denudatIon Rates from cosmogenic Nuclides: CAIRN) bundles previously reported production scaling and topographic shielding algorithms. In addition, it calculates production and shielding on a pixel-by-pixel basis. We explore the effect of sampling frequency across both azimuth (Δθ) and altitude (Δϕ) angles for topographic shielding and show that in high relief terrain a relatively high sampling frequency is required, with a good balance achieved between accuracy and computational expense at Δθ = 8° and Δϕ = 5°. CAIRN includes both internal and external uncertainty analysis, and is packaged in freely available software in order to facilitate easily reproducible denudation rate estimates. CAIRN calculates denudation rates but also automates catchment averaging of shielding and production, and thus can be used to provide reproducible input parameters for the CRONUS family of online calculators.

  6. Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C. (Editor); Englert, P. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclides are compiled. The major topic areas covered include: new techniques for measuring nuclides such as tandem accelerator and resonance mass spectrometry; solar modulation of cosmic rays; pre-irradiation histories of extraterrestrial materials; terrestrial studies; simulations and cross sections; nuclide production rate calculations; and meteoritic nuclides.

  7. CosmoCalc: An Excel add-in for cosmogenic nuclide calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2007-08-01

    As dating methods using Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclides (TCN) become more popular, the need arises for a general-purpose and easy-to-use data reduction software. The CosmoCalc Excel add-in calculates TCN production rate scaling factors (using Lal, Stone, Dunai, and Desilets methods); topographic, snow, and self-shielding factors; and exposure ages, erosion rates, and burial ages and visualizes the results on banana-style plots. It uses an internally consistent TCN production equation that is based on the quadruple exponential approach of Granger and Smith (2000). CosmoCalc was designed to be as user-friendly as possible. Although the user interface is extremely simple, the program is also very flexible, and nearly all default parameter values can be changed. To facilitate the comparison of different scaling factors, a set of converter tools is provided, allowing the user to easily convert cut-off rigidities to magnetic inclinations, elevations to atmospheric depths, and so forth. Because it is important to use a consistent set of scaling factors for the sample measurements and the production rate calibration sites, CosmoCalc defines the production rates implicitly, as a function of the original TCN concentrations of the calibration site. The program is best suited for 10Be, 26Al, 3He, and 21Ne calculations, although basic functionality for 36Cl and 14C is also provided. CosmoCalc can be downloaded along with a set of test data from http://cosmocalc.googlepages.com.

  8. Nuclide Composition Benchmark Data Set for Verifying Burnup Codes on Spent Light Water Reactor Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Inagawa, Jun; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Kurosawa, Setsumi; Kohno, Nobuaki; Onuki, Mamoru; Mochizuki, Hiroki

    2002-02-15

    To establish a nuclide composition benchmark data set for the verification of burnup codes, destructive analyses of light water reactor spent-fuel samples, which were cut out from several heights of spent-fuel rods, were carried out at the analytical laboratory at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The 16 samples from three kinds of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods and the 18 samples from two boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rods were examined. Their initial {sup 235}U enrichments and burnups were from 2.6 to 4.1% and from 4 to 50 GWd/t, respectively. One PWR fuel rod and one BWR fuel rod contained gadolinia as a burnable poison. The measurements for more than 40 nuclides of uranium, transuranium, and fission product elements were performed by destructive analysis using mass spectrometry, and alpha-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry. Burnup for each sample was determined by the {sup 148}Nd method. The analytical methods and the results as well as the related irradiation condition data are compiled as a complete benchmark data set.

  9. Nuclides Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Evgeny; Subbotin, Stanislav

    2007-07-01

    Traditionally the subject of discussion about the nuclear technology development is focused on the conditions that facilitate the nuclear power deployment. The main objective of this work is seeking of methodological basis for analysis of the coupling consequences of nuclear development. Nuclide economy is the term, which defines a new kind of society relations, dependent on nuclear technology development. It is rather closed to the setting of problems then to the solving of them. Last year Dr. Jonathan Tennenbaum published in Executive Intelligence Review Vol. 33 no 40 the article entitled as 'The Isotope Economy' where main interconnections for nuclear energy technologies and their infrastructure had been explained on the popular level. There he has given several answers and, therefore, just here we will try to expand this concept. We were interested by this publication because of similarity of our vision of resource base of technologies development. The main paradigm of 'Isotope economy' was expresses by Lyndon H. LaRouche: 'Instead of viewing the relevant resources of the planet as if they were a fixed totality, we must now assume responsibility of man's creating the new resources which will be more than adequate to sustain a growing world population at a constantly improved standard of physical per-capita output, and personal consumption'. We also consider the needed resources as a dynamic category. Nuclide economy and nuclide logistics both are needed for identifying of the future development of nuclear power as far we follow the holistic analysis approach 'from cave to grave'. Thus here we try to reasoning of decision making procedures and factors required for it in frame of innovative proposals development and deployment. The nuclear power development is needed in humanitarian scientific support with maximally deep consideration of all inter-disciplinary aspects of the nuclear power and nuclear technologies implementation. The main objectives for such

  10. Calculators to Motivate Infinite Composition of Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, E. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how calculators may be used to motivate a concept called infinite composition of functions. Several mathematical topics, such as continued square roots, continued fractions, and infinite products are treated and discussed as special cases. (Author/MK)

  11. Predicting the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The production rates of nuclides made by the galactic and solar cosmic rays are important in the interpretations of measurements made with lunar samples, meteorites, and cosmic spherules. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides have been predicted by a variety of methods that are reviewed in this paper, ranging from systematic studies of one or a group of meteorites to purely theoretical calculations. Production rates can vary with the chemical composition and the preatmospheric depth of the sample and with the size and shape of the object. While the production systematics for cosmogenic nuclides are fairly well known, our ability to predict their production rates can be improved, with a corresponding increase in the scientific return. Additional detailed studies of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial objects are needed, especially for fairly small and very large objects. Nuclides made in simulation experiments and cross sections for many major nuclear reactions should be measured. Such studies are especially needed for the long-lived radionuclides that have only recently become readily measurable by accelerator mass spectrometry. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  12. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevinitsa, V. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing 233U from 232Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  13. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nevinitsa, V. A. Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing {sup 233}U from {sup 232}Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  14. Factors affecting production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Good production rates are needed for cosmic-ray-produced nuclides to interpret their measurements. Rates depend on many factors, especially the pre-atmospheric object's size, the location of the sample in that object (such as near surface or deep inside), and the object's bulk composition. The bulk composition affects rates, especially in objects with very low and very high iron contents. Extraterrestrial materials with high iron contents usually have higher rates for making nuclides made by reactions with energetic particles and lower rates for the capture of thermal neutrons. In small objects and near the surface of objects, the cascade of secondary neutrons is being developed as primary particles are being removed. Deep in large objects, that secondary cascade is fully developed and the fluxes of primary particles are low. Recent work shows that even the shape of an object in space has a small but measureable effect. Work has been done and continues to be done on better understanding those and other factors. More good sets of measurements in meteorites with known exposure geometries in space are needed. With the use of modern Monte Carlo codes for the production and transport of particles, the nature of these effects have been and is being studied. Work needs to be done to improve the results of these calculations, especially the cross sections for making spallogenic nuclides.

  15. Calculating Masses, Densities, And Compositions Of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, H.

    1990-01-01

    Metallurgical Programs include three simple programs calculating solutions to problems common to metallurgical engineers and persons making metal castings. First program calculates mass of binary ideal mixture (alloy). Second, calculates densities of binary ideal mixture. Third, converts atomic percentages of binary mixture to weight percentages. Uses simple equations to assist with routine calculations. Written in Microsoft QuickBASIC.

  16. Nuclide Guide and International Chart of Nuclides - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golashvili, T.

    2009-08-01

    New versions of Nuclide Guide and Chart of the Nuclides were developed as a result of Russian-Chinese collaboration. The Nuclide Guide contains the basic information on more than 3000 radioactive and stable nuclides. The characteristics of isomers with half-lives more than 1 ms are included. For each nuclide spin, parity, mass of nuclide, magnetic moment (if available), mass excess, half-life or abundance, decay modes, branching ratios, emitted particles, energies of most intense gamma-rays and their intensities, decay energies and mean values of radiation energy per decay are given. For stable and natural long-lived nuclides cross-sections of thermal neutron induced activation are indicated. The information presented in the Guide was compiled from 5 sources: 1) ENSDF-2008, 2) atomic mass evaluation-2005 by Audi and Wapstra, 3) interactive data bases at web-sites , , 4) original evaluations of authors, 5) recent publications. The International Chart ot Nuclides was developed on the basis of information presented in Nuclide Guide.

  17. Chart of the Nuclides

    1999-03-23

    Nucleus is an interactive PC-based graphical viewer of NUBASE nuclear property data. NUBASE contains experimentally known nuclear properties, together with some values that have been estimated from extrapolation of experimental data for 3010 nuclides. NUBASE also contains data on those isomeric states that have half-lives greater than 1 millisecond; there are 669 such nuclides of which 58 have more than one isomeric state. The latest version of NUCLEUS-CHART has been corrected to include the namesmore » and the chemical symbols of the elements 104 to 109 that have been finally adopted by the Commission on Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (CNIC) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). They differ from those recommended by the same commission a few years before and that were widely used in the evaluations AME''95 and NUBASE''97. It results in some shuffling of the names and symbols, that may cause confusion in the near future. At AMDC we''ll be as careful as possible to try to avoid such confusion. In advance we apologize if any will occur in the future and recommend the user to always double check these few names.« less

  18. Chart of the Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, Enrico

    1999-03-23

    Nucleus is an interactive PC-based graphical viewer of NUBASE nuclear property data. NUBASE contains experimentally known nuclear properties, together with some values that have been estimated from extrapolation of experimental data for 3010 nuclides. NUBASE also contains data on those isomeric states that have half-lives greater than 1 millisecond; there are 669 such nuclides of which 58 have more than one isomeric state. The latest version of NUCLEUS-CHART has been corrected to include the names and the chemical symbols of the elements 104 to 109 that have been finally adopted by the Commission on Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (CNIC) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). They differ from those recommended by the same commission a few years before and that were widely used in the evaluations AME''95 and NUBASE''97. It results in some shuffling of the names and symbols, that may cause confusion in the near future. At AMDC we''ll be as careful as possible to try to avoid such confusion. In advance we apologize if any will occur in the future and recommend the user to always double check these few names.

  19. Cosmogenic nuclide budgeting of floodplain sediment transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, H.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2009-08-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides produced in quartz may either decay or accumulate while sediment is moved through a river basin. A change in nuclide concentration resulting from storage in a floodplain is potentially important in large drainage basins in which sediment is prone to repeated burial and remobilization as a river migrates through its floodplain. We have modeled depth- and time-dependent cosmogenic nuclide concentration changes for 10Be, 26Al, and 14C during sediment storage and mixing in various active floodplain settings ranging from confined, shallow rivers with small floodplains to foreland-basin scale floodplains traversed by deep rivers. Floodplain storage time, estimated from channel migration rates, ranges from 0.4 kyr for the Beni River basin (Bolivia) to 7 kyr for the Amazon River basin, while floodplain storage depth, estimated from channel depth, ranges from 1 to 25 m. For all modeled active floodplain settings, the long-lived nuclides 10Be and 26Al show neither significant increase in nuclide concentration from irradiation nor decrease from decay. We predict a hypothetical response time after which changes in 10Be or 26Al concentrations become analytically resolvable. This interval ranges from 0.07 to 2 Myr and exceeds in all cases the typical residence time of sediment in a floodplain. Due to the much shorter half life of 14C, nuclide concentrations modeled for the in situ-produced variety of this nuclide are, however, sensitive to floodplain storage on residence times of < 20 kyr. The cosmogenic nuclide composition of old deposits in currently inactive floodplains that have been isolated for periods of millions of years from the river that once deposited them is predicted to either increase or decrease in 10Be and 26Al concentration, depending on the depositional depth. These conditions can be evaluated using the 26Al/ 10Be ratio that readily discloses the depth and duration of storage. We illustrate these models with examples from the Amazon basin

  20. Origin and Evolution of the Light Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantzos, N.

    2007-06-01

    After a short historical (and highly subjective) introduction to the field, I discuss our current understanding of the origin and evolution of the light nuclides D, 3He, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10B and 11B. Despite considerable observational and theoretical progress, important uncertainties still persist for each and every one of those nuclides. The present-day abundance of D in the local interstellar medium is currently uncertain, making it difficult to infer the recent chemical evolution of the solar neighborhood. To account for the observed quasi-constancy of 3He abundance from the Big Bang to our days, the stellar production of that nuclide must be negligible; however, the scarce observations of its abundance in planetary nebulae seem to contradict this idea. The observed Be and B evolution as primaries suggests that the source composition of cosmic rays has remained ˜constant since the early days of the Galaxy, a suggestion with far reaching implications for the origin of cosmic rays; however, the main idea proposed to account for that constancy, namely that superbubbles are at the source of cosmic rays, encounters some serious difficulties. The best explanation for the mismatch between primordial Li and the observed “Spite-plateau” in halo stars appears to be depletion of Li in stellar envelopes, by some yet poorly understood mechanism. But this explanation impacts on the level of the recently discovered early “6Li plateau”, which (if confirmed), seriously challenges current ideas of cosmic ray nucleosynthesis.

  1. Origin and Evolution of the Light Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantzos, N.

    After a short historical (and highly subjective) introduction to the field, I discuss our current understanding of the origin and evolution of the light nuclides D, 3He, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10B and 11B. Despite considerable observational and theoretical progress, important uncertainties still persist for each and every one of those nuclides. The present-day abundance of D in the local interstellar medium is currently uncertain, making it difficult to infer the recent chemical evolution of the solar neighborhood. To account for the observed quasi-constancy of 3He abundance from the Big Bang to our days, the stellar production of that nuclide must be negligible; however, the scarce observations of its abundance in planetary nebulae seem to contradict this idea. The observed Be and B evolution as primaries suggests that the source composition of cosmic rays has remained ˜constant since the early days of the Galaxy, a suggestion with far reaching implications for the origin of cosmic rays; however, the main idea proposed to account for that constancy, namely that superbubbles are at the source of cosmic rays, encounters some serious difficulties. The best explanation for the mismatch between primordial Li and the observed "Spite-plateau" in halo stars appears to be depletion of Li in stellar envelopes, by some yet poorly understood mechanism. But this explanation impacts on the level of the recently discovered early "6Li plateau", which (if confirmed), seriously challenges current ideas of cosmic ray nucleosynthesis.

  2. Solar-Cosmic-Ray-Produced Nuclides in Extraterrestrial Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    There are two main types of cosmic rays that have sufficient energy to induce nuclear reactions -- the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar cosmic rays (also called solar energetic particles). Both types of particles can have production rates and production ratios in the small objects often found in cold and hot deserts that are different from those seen for most meteorites, which typically have radii of approx.10-100 centimeters. GCR production rates are often lower than those for most meteorites. GCR production ratios, such as Ne-22/Ne-21, are also often different in small objects. Smaller meteoroids also are more likely to have nuclides made by solar-cosmic-ray (SCR) particles than typically-sized meteorites. The very small meteorite Salem had large amounts of SCR-produced radionuclides. Meteorites recovered in Antarctica are more likely to contain SCR-produced nuclides than other meteorites. Martian and lunar meteorites are also likely to have SCR-produced nuclides. Production rates and profiles for SCR-produced nuclides in meteoroids have been calculated previously. However, the cross sections for the nuclear reactions making many SCR-produced nuclides, such as Be-10, were not well measured then. New rates and profiles are calculated here using good cross sections for the reactions making these nuclides.

  3. Solar-Cosmic-Ray-Produced Nuclides in Extraterrestrial Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    There are two main types of cosmic rays that have sufficient energy to induce nuclear reactions -- the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar cosmic rays (also called solar energetic particles). Both types of particles can have production rates and production ratios in the small objects often found in cold and hot deserts that are different from those seen for most meteorites, which typically have radii of approx. 10-100 centimeters. GCR production rates are often lower than those for most meteorites. GCR production ratios, such as Ne-22/Ne-21, are also often different in small objects. Smaller meteoroids also are more likely to have nuclides made by solar-cosmic-ray (SCR) particles than typically-sized meteorites. The very small meteorite Salem had large amounts of SCR-produced radionuclides. Meteorites recovered in Antarctica are more likely to contain SCR-produced nuclides than other meteorites. Martian and lunar meteorites are also likely to have SCR-produced nuclides. Production rates and profiles for SCR-produced nuclides in meteoroids have been calculated previously. However, the cross sections for the nuclear reactions making many SCR-produced nuclides, such as Be-10 were not well measured then. New rates and profiles are calculated here using good cross sections for the reactions making these nuclides.

  4. Nonlocal composite media in calculations of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Huang, Y.; Gao, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Casimir force between two inhomogeneous metal-dielectric composite slabs with spatial dispersion is investigated theoretically. The equivalent permittivity and permeability of the nonlocal metallic nanosphere is originally derived based on full-wave nonlocal Mie theory. We then adopt two nonlocal effective medium models to study the effective permittivity and permeability of the composite slabs and calculate the Casimir force with Casimir-Lifshitz theory. Due to the excitation of the longitudinal modes, the attractive Casimir force between nonlocal composite materials is much weaker than that of the local composites, and numerical results show that the relative errors between local and nonlocal calculations of Casimir force can be on the order of 25%. Moreover, the nonlocal effects on the Casimir force are strongly dependent on the microstructures, and they become significant near the percolation threshold of the composite media. The study may be of great interest for making a precise comparison between theoretical and experimental results on the Casimir force between inhomogeneous composite materials.

  5. Long fiber polymer composite property calculation in injection molding simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Han, Sejin

    2013-05-01

    Long fiber filled polymer composite materials have attracted a great attention and usage in recent years. However, the injection and compression molded long fiber composite materials possess complex microstructures that include spatial variations in fiber orientation and length. This paper presents the recent implemented anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model for predicting fiber orientation distribution[1] and a newly developed fiber breakage model[2] for predicting fiber length distribution in injection and compression molding simulation, and Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka model[3,4] with fiber-matrix de-bonding model[5] have been implemented to calculate the long fiber composite property distribution with predicted fiber orientation and fiber length distributions. A validation study on fiber orientation, fiber breakage and mechanical property distributions are given with injection molding process simulation.

  6. Composite electron propagator methods for calculating ionization energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ionization energies of molecules may be determined efficiently with composite electron-propagator (CEP) techniques. These methods estimate the results of a calculation with an advanced correlation method and a large basis set by performing a series of more tractable calculations in which large basis sets are used with simpler approximations and small basis sets are paired with more demanding correlation techniques. The performance of several CEP methods, in which diagonal, second-order electron propagator results with large basis sets are combined with higher-order results obtained with smaller basis sets, has been tested for the ionization energies of closed-shell molecules from the G2 set. Useful compromises of accuracy and computational efficiency employ complete-basis-set extrapolation for second-order results and small basis sets in third-order, partial third-order, renormalized partial-third order, or outer valence Green's function calculations. Analysis of results for vertical as well as adiabatic ionization energies leads to specific recommendations on the best use of regular and composite methods. Results for 22 organic molecules of interest in the design of photovoltaic devices, benzo[a]pyrene, Mg-octaethylporphyrin, and C60 illustrate the capabilities of CEP methods for calculations on large molecules.

  7. Composite electron propagator methods for calculating ionization energies.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Dolgounitcheva, O; Zakrzewski, V G; Ortiz, J V

    2016-06-14

    Accurate ionization energies of molecules may be determined efficiently with composite electron-propagator (CEP) techniques. These methods estimate the results of a calculation with an advanced correlation method and a large basis set by performing a series of more tractable calculations in which large basis sets are used with simpler approximations and small basis sets are paired with more demanding correlation techniques. The performance of several CEP methods, in which diagonal, second-order electron propagator results with large basis sets are combined with higher-order results obtained with smaller basis sets, has been tested for the ionization energies of closed-shell molecules from the G2 set. Useful compromises of accuracy and computational efficiency employ complete-basis-set extrapolation for second-order results and small basis sets in third-order, partial third-order, renormalized partial-third order, or outer valence Green's function calculations. Analysis of results for vertical as well as adiabatic ionization energies leads to specific recommendations on the best use of regular and composite methods. Results for 22 organic molecules of interest in the design of photovoltaic devices, benzo[a]pyrene, Mg-octaethylporphyrin, and C60 illustrate the capabilities of CEP methods for calculations on large molecules. PMID:27305999

  8. Clouds Composition in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to determine the composition of super-Earth atmospheres have so far been plagued by the presence of clouds. Yet the theoretical framework to understand these clouds is still in its infancy. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl, Na2S, and ZnS have been proposed as condensates that would form under the condition of chemical equilibrium, if the planet’s atmosphere has a bulk composition near solar. Condensation chemistry calculations have not been presented for a wider range of atmospheric bulk composition that is to be expected for super-Earth exoplanets. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds in atmospheres of varied composition by determining which condensates are likely to form, under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We model super-Earth atmospheres assuming they are formed by degassing of volatiles from a solid planetary core of chondritic material. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3,000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculations. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a diverse range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Some condensates appear across all of our models. However, the majority of condensed species appear only over specific ranges of H:O and C:O ratios. We find that for GJ 1214b, KCl is the primary cloud-forming condensate at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, where H:O is less than unity, K2SO4 clouds form instead. For carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds additionally appear. At

  9. Calculation of colour resulting from composite/compomer layering techniques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y-K; Powers, J M

    2004-11-01

    This study determined the influence of optical properties of constituent layers on the colour of double-layer aesthetic filling materials. Multiple regression equations for the Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) L*, a* and b* of layered materials were calculated from the optical values of the covering and underlying layers. Specimens (10 mm diameter, 1 mm thickness) of two light-cured resin composites and one compomer of seven to 11 shades were used. CIE L*, a* and b* values of each specimen were measured with a colour spectrophotometer backed by a standard white background. The scattering coefficient (S), absorption coefficient (K), contrast ratio (C) and translucency parameter (T) were calculated. Double-layered specimens were formed in optical contact by joining two different shades from the same material, or resin composite as covering with a compomer underlying layer. Each of the L*, a* and b* of layered material was used as a dependent variable, and 14 optical values of underlying and covering layers were used as independent variables in forward regression analysis (P = 0.01). CIE L* after layering had a positive correlation with S of covering layer (correlation coefficient; beta = 0.79-0.91, P < 0.01) and a correlation with L* of underlying layer (beta = 0.14-0.16). CIE a* after layering had a correlation with a* of covering layer (beta = 0.83-0.94) and a correlation with a* of underlying layer (beta = 0.30-0.56). CIE b* after layering had a correlation with b* of covering layer (beta = 0.77-0.90) and a correlation with T of covering layer (beta = 0.40-0.59). The layered colour of these materials can be predicted by the derived regression equations within the limitations of this study. CIE L*, a* and b* values of double-layer material are mainly influenced by S, CIE a* and b* of covering layer, respectively.

  10. Calculated dielectric parameters of barium titanate-lead zirconate composites as a function of composition and frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, S.K. )

    1990-03-01

    Some dielectric parameters e.g., dielectric constant, resistivity, dielectric strength, saturation polarization, loss tangent and coercive field of barium titanate-lead zirconate composites have been calculated as a function of composition and frequency. Most of the dielectric parameters have been found to vary linearly with composition and frequency. A 3-0 connectivity pattern of the composites has been assumed in calculating the dielectric parameters.

  11. Simulations of Terrestrial in-situ Cosmogenic-Nuclide Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Lal, D.; Arnold, J. R.; Englert, P. A. J.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Targets of silicon and silicon dioxide were irradiated with spallation neutrons to simulate the production of long-lived radionuclides in the surface of the Earth. Gamma-ray spectroscopy was used to measure Be-7 and Na-22, and accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure Be-10, C-14, and Al-26. The measured ratios of these nuclides are compared with calculated ratios and with ratios from other simulations and agree well with ratios inferred from terrestrial samples.

  12. Cosmic-ray interactions and dating of meteorite stranding surfaces with cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A wide variety of products from cosmic-ray interactions have been measured in terrestrial or extraterrestrial samples. These ''cosmogenic'' products include radiation damage tracks and rare nuclides that are made by nuclear reactions. They often have been used to determine the fluxes and composition of cosmic-ray particles in the past, but they are usually used to study the history of the ''target'' (such as the time period that it was exposed to cosmic-ray particles). Products made by both the high-energy galactic cosmic rays and energetic particles emitted irregularly from the Sun have been extensively studied. Some of these cosmogenic products, especially nuclides, have been or can be applied to studies of Antarctic meteorite stranding surfaces, the ice surfaces in Antarctica where meteorites have been found. Cosmogenic nuclides studied in samples from Antarctica and reported by others elsewhere in this volume include those in meteorites, especially radionuclides used to determine terrestrial ages, and those made in situ in terrestrial rocks. Cosmogenic nuclides made in the Earth's atmosphere or brought in with cosmic dust have also been studied in polar ice, and it should also be possible to measure nuclides made in situ in ice. As an introduction to cosmogenic nuclides and their applications, cosmic rays and their interactions will be presented below and production systematics of cosmogenic nuclides in these various media will be discussed later. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. "Sand bar" of actinoid and neighboring elements in a chart of nuclides.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, K; Sekine, T

    1982-03-01

    Inspection of a chart of nuclides reveals a "sand bar" of actinoid and neighboring elements when a suitable half-life level is chosen. A bay of alpha-instability lying between the nuclides of neutron magic number 126 and the beta-stability line in the actinoid group is a characteristic feature in this area. Calculation shows that fairly good agreement is obtained between the measured half-lives and those derived theoretically.

  14. Addressing nuclides not in the CAP88-PC Version-3 library.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Michael; Brock, Burgandy; Eisele, William; Fuehne, David; Green, Andrew; Whicker, Jeffrey

    2013-08-01

    Versions of the computer program, CAP88, are widely used to calculate the radiological doses from radionuclides emitted into the air. CAP88-PC Version-3 includes an extensive library of radionuclides, but there are many more that are not included. Surrogates are often used to substitute for nuclides not in the library, though the results are usually overestimates. This paper addresses nuclides that are not in the library and describes methods to obtain more accurate results.

  15. Statistical Uncertainty Analysis Applied to Criticality Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan; Susmikanti, Mike; Nursinta, A. W.

    2010-06-22

    In this paper, we present an uncertainty methodology based on a statistical approach, for assessing uncertainties in criticality prediction using monte carlo method due to uncertainties in the isotopic composition of the fuel. The methodology has been applied to criticality calculations with MCNP5 with additional stochastic input of the isotopic fuel composition. The stochastic input were generated using the latin hypercube sampling method based one the probability density function of each nuclide composition. The automatic passing of the stochastic input to the MCNP and the repeated criticality calculation is made possible by using a python script to link the MCNP and our latin hypercube sampling code.

  16. Radioactive Nuclides and the Astrophysical P Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. M.

    1993-07-01

    The astrophysical p-process is the conversion via photodisintegration reactions and proton-capture reactions of a solar-system-like distribution of s- and r-process nuclei into the proton-rich p-nuclei [1,3]. This conversion can only take place on a hydrodynamical timescale when the radiation temperature is extremely high (T > 10^9 K). Type II supernovae are probably major contributors to the bulk of the solar-system p-nuclei because they contain zones with enrichments of s-process elements that are heated to such high temperatures by the expanding supernova shock wave. Type Ia supernovae may also contribute [1,2] if the surface composition of the exploding white dwarf is enriched in s-process elements. The p-processs produces in significant quantity several interesting radioactive nuclides with relatively long half-lives, including ^92Nb (tau(sub)1/2: 3.6 10^7 yr), ^97Tc (tau(sub)1/2: 2.6 10^6 yr), ^98Tc (tau(sub)1/2 4.2 10^6 yr) and ^146Sm (tau(sub)1/2: 1.08 10^8 yr). In principle, if the production rates of these radioactive nuclides are known, the measurement of their extinct radioactivity in meteorities can have them serve as chronometers for the astrophysical p-process and for supernovae nucleosynthesis. We will discuss the details of the production of these radionuclides in the astrophysical p-process and the implications for obeservation of their extinction in meteorites. Of all the possible p-process chronometers, ^146Sm is the most interesting, since evidence for its decay has been observed in meteorites. We will discuss in detail the production of ^146Sm and its dependence on the astrophysical environment and on nuclear physics quantities. For example, the production of ^146Sm critically depends on the competition between (gamma,alpha) and (gamma,n) reactions on ^148Gd and ^150Gd. We will discuss the implications of the measurements of the extinct ^146Sm in meteorites for the astrophysical p-process. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  17. A three dimensional calculation of elastic equilibrium for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lustman, Liviu R.; Rose, Milton E.

    1986-01-01

    A compact scheme is applied to three-dimensional elasticity problems for composite materials, involving simple geometries. The mathematical aspects of this approach are discussed, in particular the iteration method. A vector processor code implementing the compact scheme is presented, and several numerical experiments are summarized.

  18. A three dimensional calculation of elastic equilibrium for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lustman, Liviu R.; Rose, Milton E.

    1988-01-01

    A compact scheme is applied to three-dimensional elasticity problems for composite materials, involving simple geometries. The mathematical aspects of this approach are discussed, in particular the iteration method. A vector processor code implementing the compact scheme is presented, and several numerical experiments are summarized.

  19. Nuclear fission of neutron-deficient protactinium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Nishinaka, I.; Nagame, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Sueki, K.; Nakahara, H.; Tanikawa, M.; Ohtsuki, T.

    1997-08-01

    Fragment velocity, kinetic energy, mass yield, and element yield distributions in the fission of neutron-deficient Pa isotopes produced in the reactions of {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O on {sup 209}Bi have been measured at incident beam energies near and above the Coulomb barriers by the time-of-flight and radiochemical methods. An asymmetric mass-division component has been observed. Measured fission cross sections were compared with the results of statistical model calculations which take into account two fission barrier heights for symmetric and asymmetric yields. The fission barrier height deduced for the asymmetric fission is found slightly lower than that for the symmetric one. The difference between the two barrier heights in the fission of the present protactinium nuclides (N{approximately}135) is considerably smaller than that in the neutron-rich nuclide of {sup 233}Pa (N{approximately}142), indicating that the difference sensitively depends on the neutron number of the fissioning nuclide. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. MATERIAL COMPOSITIONS AND NUMBER DENSITIES FOR NEUTRONICS CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Thomas

    1996-01-02

    The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the number densities and isotopic weight percentages of the standard materials to be used in the neutronics (criticality and radiation shielding) evaluations by the Waste Package Development Department. The objective of this analysis is to provide material number density information which can be referenced by future neutronics design analyses, such as for those supporting the Conceptual Design Report.

  1. Cosmogenic nuclide-derived sediment budget of the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Dr.; von Blanckenburg, Dr.; Guyot, Dr.; Maurice, Dr.; Kubik, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    /yr. Coarse grain sizes (>500 µm) record the very low denudation rate of the cratonic shields. Given these low rates, the shields discharge only small amounts of sediment into the Amazon trunk stream. Multiplied with the area of the providing hinterland, we can use these erosion rates to calculate sediment mass budgets. The flux of sediment expected from cosmogenic nuclide-based denudation rates amounts to 540 Mt/yr at Óbidos. This flux compares to the total load of 1100 Mt/yr at Óbidos[1,2,3] as estimated from sediment gauging. This disparity is unexpected, as today at least 40% of the sediment discharged from the Andes is stored in floodplains[4]; a process not detected with cosmogenic 10Be. The longer denudation integration time scale of 8 kyr for cosmogenic nuclides possibly includes a period of drier climate than the wet conditions during the late Holocene, where a wetter modern climate possibly favors more rapid erosion in the Andes and more efficient sediment transport in the large rivers. 1 Gaillardet et al. (1997), Chemical Geology (142), 141-173. 2 Dunne et al. (1998), GSA Bulletin (110), 450-467. 3 Guyot et al. (2005), IAHS Publications (291), 1-8. 4 Guyot et al. (1996), IAHS Publications (236), 55-63.

  2. Surficial Studies of Mars Using Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides (CNs) are produced by cosmic-ray nuclear interactions with target nuclei in rocks, soils, ice, and the atmosphere. Cosmogenic nuclides have been widely used for investigation of solar system matter for several decades. Stable nuclides, such as He-3, Ne-21, and Ar-38, are built up over time as the surface is exposed to cosmic rays. The concentrations of cosmogenic radionuclides, such as Be-10, Al-26, and C-14 also build up with exposure time but reach saturation values after several half-lives. Especially since the development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), CNs in terrestrial samples have been routinely used for geomorphic studies such as glaciation, surface erosion, and tectonics, and studies of atmospheric and ocean circulation. Cosmogenic nuclides on Mars will be able to answer questions of exposure ages, erosion rates, tectonic events, and deposition rates of sediments and/or volatiles. The concentrations of cosmogenic stable nuclides give the integrated exposure time of the rock/mineral, and the activities of radionuclides give recent records for times back as long as a few half-lives.

  3. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  4. Characterization of nuclide inventories in waste streams from nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oppermann, U.; Mueller, W.

    1993-12-31

    Producers of radioactive waste are increasingly required to characterize the nuclide specific activity inventory of their wastes to demonstrate compliance with the acceptance criteria of interim storages or repositories for the final disposal of radioactive wastes. Nuclide specific characterization of activity inventories for nuclides that are hard to measure in nuclear power plant wastes in general is based on calculations by fixed correlations to easy measurable intense {gamma}-emitters (key nuclides). This method is establish within a CEC project for LWR waste streams from four European countries. First experiences from this project in comparison to data from the US and to earlier evaluations for German LWRs are presented. The applicability of the method is discussed with regard to the measurability of radiologically relevant nuclides comparability between different reactor systems and waste streams, and the availability of the necessary data. All topics are illustrated by examples for individual correlations. Conclusions are drawn for the degree of necessary differentiation and the main factors responsible for these differences.

  5. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-12-14

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 97}Mo, and {sup 90}Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the {sup 99}Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup.

  6. Neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper continues, with respect to the transplutonium nuclides, earlier efforts to collate and evaluate data from the scientific literature on the prompt neutron multiplicity distribution from fission and its first moment = ..sigma..nuPnu. The isotopes considered here for which P/sub nu/ and or data (or both) were found in the literature are of americium (Am), curium (Cm), berkelium (Bk), californium (Cf), einsteinium (Es), fermium (Fm), and nobelium (No).

  7. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  8. The Methodology of Calculation of Cutting Forces When Machining Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, D. A.; Yanyushkin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    Cutting of composite materials has specific features and is different from the processing of metals. When this characteristic intense wear of the cutting tool. An important criterion in the selection process parameters composite processing is the value of the cutting forces, which depends on many factors and is determined experimentally, it is not always appropriate. The study developed a method of determining the cutting forces when machining composite materials and the comparative evaluation of the calculated and actual values of cutting forces. The methodology for calculating cutting forces into account specific features of the cutting tool and the extent of wear, the strength properties of the processed material and cutting conditions. Experimental studies conducted with fiberglass milling cutter equipped with elements of hard metal VK3M. The discrepancy between the estimated and the actual values of the cutting force is not more than 10%.

  9. Mass Evaluation for Proton Rich Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-11-30

    The Atomic mass evaluation (AME) provides the reliable resource for the values related to atomic masses. Since the publication of the latest version of AME in 2003, many developments for atomic mass determination have been done and important results changed significantly our knowledge. A preliminary version of AME was released in April 2011, and an official version is foreseen to be published in early 2013. The general status of AME is presented and some specific features of AME for proton-rich nuclides are discussed.

  10. Mass measurements of exotic nuclides at SHIPTRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Eliseev, S.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Maero, G.; Martin, A.; Mazzocco, M.; Mukherjee, M.; Quint, W.; Rahaman, S.; Rauth, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Vorobjev, G.; Blaum, K.; Ferrer, R.; Weber, C.

    2007-05-22

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP is installed behind the velocity-filter SHIP at GSI for high-precision mass measurements of fusion-evaporation residues. To facilitate an efficient stopping of the reaction products a buffer gas stopping cell is utilized. In an investigation of neutron-deficient nuclides in the terbium-to-thulium region around A {approx_equal} 146, 18 new or improved mass values have been obtained, resulting in a more accurate determination of the proton drip line for holmium and thulium. With the present performance of SHIPTRAP, a first direct mass measurement of transuranium elements in the nobelium region is within reach.

  11. Comparisons of Neutron Cross Sections and Isotopic Composition Calculations for Fission-Product Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Heon; Gil, Choong-Sup; Chang, Jonghwa; Lee, Yong-Deok

    2005-05-01

    The neutron absorption cross sections for 18 fission products evaluated within the framework of the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute)-BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) international collaboration have been compared with ENDF/B-VI.7. Also, the influence of the new evaluations on the isotopic composition calculations of the fission products has been estimated through the OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks (Phase 1B) and the LWR/Pu recycling benchmarks. These calculations were performed by WIMSD-5B with the 69-group libraries prepared from three evaluated nuclear data libraries: ENDF/B-VI.7, ENDF/B-VI.8 including the new evaluations in the resonance region covering the thermal region, and the expected ENDF/B-VII including those in the upper resonance region up to 20 MeV. For Xe-131, the composition calculated with ENDF/B-VI.8 shows a maximum difference of 5.02% compared to ENDF/B-VI.7. However, the isotopic compositions of all the fission products calculated with the expected ENDF/B-VII show no differences when compared to ENDF/B-VI.7 for the thermal reactor benchmark cases.

  12. Chart of Nuclides from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Chart of Nuclides is a software product that allows users to search and plot nuclear structure and nuclear decay data interactively. The Chart of Nuclides was developed by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). It provides an interface between web users and several databases containing nuclear structure, nuclear decay and some neutron-induced nuclear reaction information. Using the Chart of Nuclides, it is possible to search for nuclear level properties (energy, half-life, spin-parity), gamma-ray information (energy, intensity, multipolarity, coincidences),radiation information following nuclear decay (energy, intensity, dose), and neutron-induced reaction data from the BNL-325 book (thermal cross section and resonance integral). The information provided by the Chart of Nuclides can be seen in tables, level schemes and an interactive chart of nuclides. (From the Chart of Nuclides Description at http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/help/index.jsp?product=chart)

  13. A new method for calculating the Glauber multiple scattering amplitude of composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Shun; Hu, Su-Fen; Yang, Chao-Yun; Liu, Ji-Feng

    1997-11-01

    The method for calculating the scattering of composite particles with several kinds of constituent is studied. The formulae are derived and the method for sorting all Glauber expansion terms into several classes is given. The method of the integration is different from that of Lin and co-workers (Lin Z J et al 1991 J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 17 1159) and its analytical expressions are introduced. We calculate the D - D, P - P, P - 0954-3899/23/11/005/img7 and 0954-3899/23/11/005/img8 - P elastic scatterings. These results are compared with the data.

  14. Benchmark data for validating irradiated fuel compositions used in criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.; Talbert, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    To establish criticality safety margins utilizing burnup credit in the storage and transport of spent reactor fuels requires a knowledge of the uncertainty in the calculated fuel composition used in making the reactivity assessment. To provide data for validating such calculated burnup fuel compositions, radiochemical assays have been obtained as part of the United States Department of Energy From-Reactor Cask Development Program. Assay results and associated operating histories on the initial three samples analyzed in this effort are presented. The three samples were taken from different axial regions of a Pressurized Water Reactor fuel rod and represent radiation exposures of about 37, 27, and 44 GWd/MTU. The data are presented in a benchmark type format to facilitate identification/referencing and computer code input.

  15. Special element approach for calculating the vibratory response of adhesively bonded and composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N. E.; Griffin, J. H.

    1994-02-01

    An approach is presented that may be used to calculate the natural frequencies and loss factors of composite sandwich beams or beams containing adhesively bonded joints. The approach uses special finite elements to represent either composite or joint elements and the modal strain energy method to calculate the loss factor for each vibratory mode of interest. The special element represents a section of the composite beam or the overlap joint as an element with four nodes. Its properties are calculated by using a generalization of the shape function concept from finite elements in which the shape function (displacement fields) in the special elements are determined by performing static stress analysis on the special element's substructure. The resulting special element has only a small number of degrees of freedom and, yet, accurately represents the geometrically complex substructure. Results obtained using this approach on sandwich beams compare well with an analytical solution published in the literature. In addition, it correlates reasonably well with data taken from tests on adhesively bonded beams.

  16. Structural predictions based on the compositions of cathodic materials by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Lian, Fang; Chen, Ning; Hao, Zhen-jia; Chou, Kuo-chih

    2015-05-01

    A first-principles method is applied to comparatively study the stability of lithium metal oxides with layered or spinel structures to predict the most energetically favorable structure for different compositions. The binding and reaction energies of the real or virtual layered LiMO2 and spinel LiM2O4 (M = Sc-Cu, Y-Ag, Mg-Sr, and Al-In) are calculated. The effect of element M on the structural stability, especially in the case of multiple-cation compounds, is discussed herein. The calculation results indicate that the phase stability depends on both the binding and reaction energies. The oxidation state of element M also plays a role in determining the dominant structure, i.e., layered or spinel phase. Moreover, calculation-based theoretical predictions of the phase stability of the doped materials agree with the previously reported experimental data.

  17. Prompt neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The direct determination of the average prompt neutron emission values is reviewed, and a method of comparing different sites of neutron emission multiplicity distribution values is described. Measured and recommended values are tabulated for these nuclides: /sup 241/Am, /sup 242/Am, /sup 242/Cm, /sup 243/Cm, /sup 244/Cm, /sup 246/Cm, /sup 247/Cm, /sup 248/Cm, /sup 250/Cm, /sup 245/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 246/Cf, /sup 249/Cf, /sup 250/Cf, /sup 252/Cf, /sup 254/Cf, /sup 251/Cf, /sup 253/Es, /sup 254/Es, /sup 244/Fm, /sup 246/Fm, /sup 255/Fm, /sup 252/No, /sup 254/Fm, /sup 256/Fm, /sup 257/Fm. 59 refs., 24 tabs. (LEW)

  18. Cosmogenic nuclides in football-sized rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlen, M.; Honda, M.; Imamura, M.; Fruchter, J. S.; Finkel, R. C.; Kohl, C. P.; Arnold, J. R.; Reedy, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    The activity of long- and short-lived isotopes in a series of samples from a vertical column through the center of rock 14321 was measured. Rock 14321 is a 9 kg fragmental rock whose orientation was photographically documented on the lunar surface. Also investigated was a sample from the lower portion of rock 14310, where, in order to study target effects, two different density fractions (mineral separates) were analyzed. A few nuclides in a sample from the comprehensive fines 14259 were measured. This material has been collected largely from the top centimeter of the lunar soil. The study of the deep samples of 14321 and 14310 provided values for the activity of isotopes at points where only effects produced by galactic cosmic rays are significant.

  19. Nuclide production in (very) small meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Nishiizumi, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most interesting open questions in the study of cosmic-ray effects in meteorites is the expected behavior of objects which are very small compared to the mean interaction length of primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles. A reasonable limit might be a pre-atmospheric radius of 5 gram/cm(2), or 1.5 cm for chondrites. These are interesting for at least three reasons: (1) this is a limiting case for large objects, and can help us make better models; (2) this size is intermediate between usual meteorites and irradiated grams (spherules); and (3) these are the most likely objects to show solar cosmic ray (SCR) effects. Reedy (1984) has recently proposed a model for production by GCR of radioactive and stable nuclides in spherical meteorites. Very small objects are expected to deviate from this model in the direction of fewer secondary particles (larger spectral shape parameter), at all depths. The net effect will be significantly lower production of such low-energy products as Mn-53 and Al-26. The SCR production of these and other nuclides will be lower, too, because meteorite orbits extend typically out into the asteroid belt, and the mean SCR flux must fall off approximately as r(-2) with distance from the Sun. Kepler's laws insure that for such orbits most of the exposure time is spent near aphelion. None the less the equivalent mean exposure distance, R(exp), is slightly less than the semimajor axis A because of the weighting by R(-2). For the three meteorite orbits we have, R(exp) has a narrow range, from about 1.6 to 2.1 a.u. This is probably true for the great majority of meteorites.

  20. Analysis of nuclide production in the MEGAPIE target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Fischer, U.; Zanini, L.

    2009-07-01

    MEGAPIE, the first liquid metal target irradiated by a proton beam at the MW power level, was successfully operated in 2006. A continuous beam of 575 MeV protons with a current up to 1.35 mA irradiated the liquid lead-bismuth target placed in the SINQ target location at PSI (Switzerland) for a period of 4 months. The activation of the lead-bismuth irradiated in MEGAPIE has been investigated. Experimental cross-sections and evaluated data available for neutron- and proton-induced reaction cross-sections at incident energies from 10 -5 eV to 600 MeV, and results of nuclear model calculations have been used to obtain nuclear reaction rates. Calculated nuclide and gas production rates are compared with calculations using the MCNPX and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes. The total activation of the LBE agrees well with the other codes. Discrepancies with FLUKA and MCNPX are mainly in two mass regions, where experimental data are scarce: the region 30< A<50, and the region 140< A<170. The results obtained can be used for the further study of the safe operation of liquid heavy metal targets of Accelerator-Driven Systems and spallation neutron sources and for the definition of the priorities in the development of evaluated nuclear data libraries at intermediate nucleon energies.

  1. Cosmogenic nuclides in the Martian surface: Constraints for sample recovery and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Peter A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects such as cosmic ray tracks can provide information on the surface history of Mars. A recent overview on developments in cosmogenic nuclide research for historical studies of predominantly extraterrestrial materials was published previously. The information content of cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects produced in the Martian surface is based on the different ways of interaction of the primary galactic and solar cosmic radiation (GCR, SCR) and the secondary particle cascade. Generally the kind and extent of interactions as seen in the products depend on the following factors: (1) composition, energy and intensity of the primary SCR and GCR; (2) composition, energy and intensity of the GCR-induced cascade of secondary particles; (3) the target geometry, i.e., the spatial parameters of Martian surface features with respect to the primary radiation source; (4) the target chemistry, i.e., the chemical composition of the Martian surface at the sampling location down to the minor element level or lower; and (5) duration of the exposure. These factors are not independent of each other and have a major influence on sample taking strategies and techniques.

  2. Bayesian estimation of a source term of radiation release with approximately known nuclide ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav; Hofman, Radek

    2016-04-01

    We are concerned with estimation of a source term in case of an accidental release from a known location, e.g. a power plant. Usually, the source term of an accidental release of radiation comprises of a mixture of nuclide. The gamma dose rate measurements do not provide a direct information on the source term composition. However, physical properties of respective nuclide (deposition properties, decay half-life) can be used when uncertain information on nuclide ratios is available, e.g. from known reactor inventory. The proposed method is based on linear inverse model where the observation vector y arise as a linear combination y = Mx of a source-receptor-sensitivity (SRS) matrix M and the source term x. The task is to estimate the unknown source term x. The problem is ill-conditioned and further regularization is needed to obtain a reasonable solution. In this contribution, we assume that nuclide ratios of the release is known with some degree of uncertainty. This knowledge is used to form the prior covariance matrix of the source term x. Due to uncertainty in the ratios the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix are considered to be unknown. Positivity of the source term estimate is guaranteed by using multivariate truncated Gaussian distribution. Following Bayesian approach, we estimate all parameters of the model from the data so that y, M, and known ratios are the only inputs of the method. Since the inference of the model is intractable, we follow the Variational Bayes method yielding an iterative algorithm for estimation of all model parameters. Performance of the method is studied on simulated 6 hour power plant release where 3 nuclide are released and 2 nuclide ratios are approximately known. The comparison with method with unknown nuclide ratios will be given to prove the usefulness of the proposed approach. This research is supported by EEA/Norwegian Financial Mechanism under project MSMT-28477/2014 Source-Term Determination of Radionuclide Releases

  3. Analytical source term optimization for radioactive releases with approximate knowledge of nuclide ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, Radek; Seibert, Petra; Kovalets, Ivan; Andronopoulos, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    We are concerned with source term retrieval in the case of an accident in a nuclear power with off-site consequences. The goal is to optimize atmospheric dispersion model inputs using inverse modeling of gamma dose rate measurements (instantaneous or time-integrated). These are the most abundant type of measurements provided by various radiation monitoring networks across Europe and available continuously in near-real time. Usually, a source term of an accidental release comprises of a mixture of nuclides. Unfortunately, gamma dose rate measurements do not provide a direct information on the source term composition; however, physical properties of respective nuclides (deposition properties, decay half-life) can yield some insight. In the method presented, we assume that nuclide ratios are known at least approximately, e.g. from nuclide specific observations or reactor inventory and assumptions on the accident type. The source term can be in multiple phases, each being characterized by constant nuclide ratios. The method is an extension of a well-established source term inversion approach based on the optimization of an objective function (minimization of a cost function). This function has two quadratic terms: mismatch between model and measurements weighted by an observation error covariance matrix and the deviation of the solution from a first guess weighted by the first-guess error covariance matrix. For simplicity, both error covariance matrices are approximated as diagonal. Analytical minimization of the cost function leads to a liner system of equations. Possible negative parts of the solution are iteratively removed by the means of first guess error variance reduction. Nuclide ratios enter the problem in the form of additional linear equations, where the deviations from prescribed ratios are weighted by factors; the corresponding error variance allows us to control how strongly we want to impose the prescribed ratios. This introduces some freedom into the

  4. Alpha-emitting nuclides in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentreath, R. J.

    1984-06-01

    The occurrence of alpha-emitting nuclides and their daughter products in the marine environment continues to be a subject of study for many reasons. Those nuclides which occur naturally, in the uranium, thorium and actinium series, are of interest because of their value in determining the rates of geological and geochemical processes in the oceans. Studies of them address such problems as the determination of rates of transfer of particulate matter, deposition rates, bioturbation rates, and so on. Two of the natural alpha-series nuclides in which a different interest has been expressed are 210Po and 226Ra, because their concentrations in marine organisms are such that they contribute to a significant fraction of the background dose rates sustained both by the organisms themselves and by consumers of marine fish and shellfish. To this pool of naturally-occurring nuclides, human activities have added the transuranium nuclides, both from the atmospheric testing of nuclear devices and from the authorized discharges of radioactive wastes into coastal waters and the deep sea. Studies have therefore been made to understand the chemistry of these radionuclides in sea water, their association with sedimentary materials, and their accumulation by marine organisms, the last of these being of particular interest because the transuranics are essentially "novel" elements to the marine fauna and flora. The need to predict the long-term behaviour of these nuclides has, in turn, stimulated research on those naturally-occurring nuclides which may behave in a similar manner.

  5. Multi-nuclide AMS performances at MALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Chuichiro; Tsuchiya, Yoko (Sunohara); Kato, Kazuhiro; Maejima, Yuji; Miyairi, Yosuke; Wakasa, Sachi; Aze, Takahiro

    2007-06-01

    MALT (Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator, The University of Tokyo) is a service and research facility for elemental and isotopic micro-analysis using a tandem accelerator, which was constructed in 1991-1993 and has been in operation since 1994. Since then, AMS, NRA and PIXE systems have been developed and highly refined. The accelerator of MALT is a 5UD Pelletron™ tandem van de Graaf (produced by National Electrostatics Corporation, USA) and maximum 5 MV voltage is available. MALT is equipped with two MC-SNICS ion sources (one of them dedicated for 14C-AMS), a sequential injection system and multi-Faraday cup systems. These equipment are all indispensable for a high precision and high efficiency AMS system. At MALT, high quality AMS of 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 26Al has been available. Recently, a 36Cl-AMS system using a gas-filled magnet was also greatly refined, and a new 129I-AMS system was developed and shows good performance. Now MALT is the only facility with multi-nuclide AMS in the Asian area. Over 40 projects are running at MALT every year. The total accelerator operation time in the 2004 season was 6363 h. In November 2004, the total operation time of the pelletron chain system since the construction of MALT went over 40,000 h without replacement.

  6. The puzzle of the synthesis of the rare nuclide 138La

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.; Borzov, I.; Rayet, M.

    2001-08-01

    The calculations of the p-process in the O/Ne layers of Type II supernovae are quite successful in reproducing the solar system content of p-nuclides. They predict, however, a significant underproduction of the rare odd-odd nuclide \\chem{138}{La}. A model for the explosion of a 25 Msun star with solar metallicity is used to suggest that nu_e -captures on \\chem{138}{Ba} may well be its most efficient production mechanism. The responsibility of an inadequate prediction of the \\chem{138}{La} and \\chem{139}{La} photodisintegration rates in the too low production of \\chem{138}{La} is also examined quantitatively. A detailed discussion of the theoretical uncertainties in these rates suggest that the required rate changes are probably too high to be fully plausible. Their measurement would be most welcome. They would help disentangling the relative contributions of thermonuclear and neutrino processes to the \\chem{138}{La} production.

  7. The even-odd systematics in R-process nuclide abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Suess, H. E.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reports and discusses solar system N(R) abundances for nuclides A greater than 70, obtained as differences between measured solar system abundances and calculated S-process contributions. The abundance peak at A of about 163 in the rare earth element region reveals properties which are similar to those of the R-process peaks corresponding to magic neutron numbers N = 82 and N = 126. Systematic differences in the N(R) abundances of even-A and odd-A nuclides are restricted to specific mass regions. It is concluded that these differences are most probably related to the properties of nuclear species during beta(-) decay to the stability valley.

  8. Approach for validating actinide and fission product compositions for burnup credit criticality safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Gauld, Ian C.; Ilas, Germina; Wagner, John C.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a depletion code validation approach for criticality safety analysis using burnup credit for actinide and fission product nuclides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) compositions. The technical basis for determining the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations is comparison of calculations to available measurements obtained from destructive radiochemical assay of SNF samples. Probability distributions developed for the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations were applied to the SNF compositions of a criticality safety analysis model by the use of a Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling method to determine bias and bias uncertainty in effective neutron multiplication factor. Application of the Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling approach is demonstrated for representative criticality safety analysis models of pressurized water reactor spent fuel pool storage racks and transportation packages using burnup-dependent nuclide concentrations calculated with SCALE 6.1 and the ENDF/B-VII nuclear data. Furthermore, the validation approach and results support a recent revision of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Interim Staff Guidance 8.

  9. Approach for validating actinide and fission product compositions for burnup credit criticality safety analyses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Gauld, Ian C.; Ilas, Germina; Wagner, John C.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a depletion code validation approach for criticality safety analysis using burnup credit for actinide and fission product nuclides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) compositions. The technical basis for determining the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations is comparison of calculations to available measurements obtained from destructive radiochemical assay of SNF samples. Probability distributions developed for the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations were applied to the SNF compositions of a criticality safety analysis model by the use of a Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling method to determine bias and bias uncertainty in effective neutron multiplication factor. Application ofmore » the Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling approach is demonstrated for representative criticality safety analysis models of pressurized water reactor spent fuel pool storage racks and transportation packages using burnup-dependent nuclide concentrations calculated with SCALE 6.1 and the ENDF/B-VII nuclear data. Furthermore, the validation approach and results support a recent revision of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Interim Staff Guidance 8.« less

  10. Monte Carlo calculation based on hydrogen composition of the tissue for MV photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Demol, Benjamin; Viard, Romain; Reynaert, Nick

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that Monte Carlo treatment planning systems require tissue characterization (density and composition) as a function of CT number. A discrete set of tissue classes with a specific composition is introduced. In the current work we demonstrate that, for megavoltage photon radiotherapy, only the hydrogen content of the different tissues is of interest. This conclusion might have an impact on MRI-based dose calculations and on MVCT calibration using tissue substitutes. A stoichiometric calibration was performed, grouping tissues with similar atomic composition into 15 dosimetrically equivalent subsets. To demonstrate the importance of hydrogen, a new scheme was derived, with correct hydrogen content, complemented by oxygen (all elements differing from hydrogen are replaced by oxygen). Mass attenuation coefficients and mass stopping powers for this scheme were calculated and compared to the original scheme. Twenty-five CyberKnife treatment plans were recalculated by an in-house developed Monte Carlo system using tissue density and hydrogen content derived from the CT images. The results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the original stoichiometric calibration. Between 300 keV and 3 MeV, the relative difference of mass attenuation coefficients is under 1% within all subsets. Between 10 keV and 20 MeV, the relative difference of mass stopping powers goes up to 5% in hard bone and remains below 2% for all other tissue subsets. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the treatment plans present no visual difference between the two schemes. Relative differences of dose indexes D98, D95, D50, D05, D02, and Dmean were analyzed and a distribution centered around zero and of standard deviation below 2% (3 σ) was established. On the other hand, once the hydrogen content is slightly modified, important dose differences are obtained. Monte Carlo dose planning in the field of megavoltage photon radiotherapy is fully achievable using

  11. Assessment of adult body composition using bioelectrical impedance: comparison of researcher calculated to machine outputted values

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Villoria, Maria; Wright, Charlotte M; McColl, John H; Sherriff, Andrea; Pearce, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the usefulness of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) for general use by identifying best-evidenced formulae to calculate lean and fat mass, comparing these to historical gold standard data and comparing these results with machine-generated output. In addition, we explored how to best to adjust lean and fat estimates for height and how these overlapped with body mass index (BMI). Design Cross-sectional observational study within population representative cohort study. Setting Urban community, North East England Participants Sample of 506 mothers of children aged 7–8 years, mean age 36.3 years. Methods Participants were measured at a home visit using a portable height measure and leg-to-leg BIA machine (Tanita TBF-300MA). Measures Height, weight, bioelectrical impedance (BIA). Outcome measures Lean and fat mass calculated using best-evidenced published formulae as well as machine-calculated lean and fat mass data. Results Estimates of lean mass were similar to historical results using gold standard methods. When compared with the machine-generated values, there were wide limits of agreement for fat mass and a large relative bias for lean that varied with size. Lean and fat residuals adjusted for height differed little from indices of lean (or fat)/height2. Of 112 women with BMI >30 kg/m2, 100 (91%) also had high fat, but of the 16 with low BMI (<19 kg/m2) only 5 (31%) also had low fat. Conclusions Lean and fat mass calculated from BIA using published formulae produces plausible values and demonstrate good concordance between high BMI and high fat, but these differ substantially from the machine-generated values. Bioelectrical impedance can supply a robust and useful field measure of body composition, so long as the machine-generated output is not used. PMID:26743700

  12. (The fate of nuclides in natural water systems)

    SciTech Connect

    Turekian, K.K. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1989-01-01

    Our research at Yale on the fate of nuclides in natural water systems has three components to it: the study of the atmospheric precipitation of radionuclides and other chemical species; the study of the behavior of natural radionuclides in groundwater and hydrothermal systems; and understanding the controls on the distribution of radionuclides and stable nuclides in the marine realm. In this section a review of our progress in each of these areas is presented.

  13. Production and Recoil Loss of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Presolar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappitsch, Reto; Leya, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Presolar grains are small particles that condensed in the vicinity of dying stars. Some of these grains survived the voyage through the interstellar medium (ISM) and were incorporated into meteorite parent bodies at the formation of the Solar System. An important question is when these stellar processes happened, i.e., how long presolar grains were drifting through the ISM. While conventional radiometric dating of such small grains is very difficult, presolar grains are irradiated with galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the ISM, which induce the production of cosmogenic nuclides. This opens the possibility to determine cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, i.e., how long presolar grains were irradiated in the ISM. Here, we present a new model for the production and loss of cosmogenic 3He, 6,7Li, and 21,22Ne in presolar SiC grains. The cosmogenic production rates are calculated using a state-of-the-art nuclear cross-section database and a GCR spectrum in the ISM consistent with recent Voyager data. Our findings are that previously measured 3He and 21Ne CRE ages agree within the (sometimes large) 2σ uncertainties and that the CRE ages for most presolar grains are smaller than the predicted survival times. The obtained results are relatively robust since interferences from implanted low-energy GCRs into the presolar SiC grains and/or from cosmogenic production within the meteoroid can be neglected.

  14. PRODUCTION CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CLASSICAL PET NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    FINN,R.; SCHLYER,D.

    2001-06-25

    Nuclear Medicine is the specialty of medical imaging, which utilizes a variety of radionuclides incorporated into specific compounds for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. During recent years, research efforts associated with this discipline have concentrated on the decay characteristics of particular radionuclides and the design of unique radiolabeled tracers necessary to achieve time-dependent molecular images. The specialty is expanding with specific Positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals allowing for an extension from functional process imaging in tissue to pathologic processes and nuclide directed treatments. PET is an example of a technique that has been shown to yield the physiologic information necessary for clinical oncology diagnoses based upon altered tissue metabolism. Most PET drugs are currently produced using a cyclotron at locations that are in close proximity to the hospital or academic center at which the radiopharmaceutical will be administered. In November 1997, a law was enacted called the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 which directed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to establish appropriate procedures for the approval of PET drugs in accordance with section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and to establish current good manufacturing practice requirements for such drugs. At this time the FDA is considering adopting special approval procedures and cGMP requirements for PET drugs. The evolution of PET radiopharmaceuticals has introduced a new class of ''drugs'' requiring production facilities and product formulations that must be closely aligned with the scheduled clinical utilization. The production of the radionuclide in the appropriate synthetic form is but one critical component in the manufacture of the finished radiopharmaceutical.

  15. Nuclear Properties and Decay Data Chart of Nuclides.

    2008-04-04

    Version 00 NUCHART displays nuclear decay data graphically on a PC and, includes a search routine for assigning gamma-ray energies to radionuclides. The numerical data included in NUCHART were taken from the online database "NUDAT" Version of March 1994. The following information is presented: (1) Nuclide information: for each nuclide, abundance, mass excess, (main) decay mode, half-life and uncertainty, branching ratio, decay Q; (2) decay radiation: for each nuclide, tables of radiation energy, intensity andmore » equivalent dose for the 5 most intense decay radiations of beta+, beta-, conversion electrons, gammas, alphas and x-rays, including electron Augers; (3) adopted gammas: for each nuclide, table containing energy, relative intensity, energy level of the main gamma lines and year of publication in Nuclear Data Sheets; (4) search gamma energies: for a specified interval of gamma energies all know gamma lines and their nuclides are displayed; the database contains 132,000 gamma lines; (5) a search mode by specific nuclide is also available. For the latest data and online tools for viewing the data, see NuDat 2.4 on the NNDC and IAEA NDS websites: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/ and http://www-nds.iaea.org/.« less

  16. Nuclear Properties and Decay Data Chart of Nuclides.

    SciTech Connect

    OSORIO, V. B.

    2008-04-04

    Version 00 NUCHART displays nuclear decay data graphically on a PC and, includes a search routine for assigning gamma-ray energies to radionuclides. The numerical data included in NUCHART were taken from the online database "NUDAT" Version of March 1994. The following information is presented: (1) Nuclide information: for each nuclide, abundance, mass excess, (main) decay mode, half-life and uncertainty, branching ratio, decay Q; (2) decay radiation: for each nuclide, tables of radiation energy, intensity and equivalent dose for the 5 most intense decay radiations of beta+, beta-, conversion electrons, gammas, alphas and x-rays, including electron Augers; (3) adopted gammas: for each nuclide, table containing energy, relative intensity, energy level of the main gamma lines and year of publication in Nuclear Data Sheets; (4) search gamma energies: for a specified interval of gamma energies all know gamma lines and their nuclides are displayed; the database contains 132,000 gamma lines; (5) a search mode by specific nuclide is also available. For the latest data and online tools for viewing the data, see NuDat 2.4 on the NNDC and IAEA NDS websites: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/ and http://www-nds.iaea.org/.

  17. Scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates using analytical approximations to atmospheric cosmic-ray fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been proposed for scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates from the relatively few sites where they have been measured to other sites of interest. Two main types of models are recognized: (1) those based on data from nuclear disintegrations in photographic emulsions combined with various neutron detectors, and (2) those based largely on neutron monitor data. However, stubborn discrepancies between these model types have led to frequent confusion when calculating surface exposure ages from production rates derived from the models. To help resolve these discrepancies and identify the sources of potential biases in each model, we have developed a new scaling model based on analytical approximations to modeled fluxes of the main atmospheric cosmic-ray particles responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide production. Both the analytical formulations and the Monte Carlo model fluxes on which they are based agree well with measured atmospheric fluxes of neutrons, protons, and muons, indicating they can serve as a robust estimate of the atmospheric cosmic-ray flux based on first principles. We are also using updated records for quantifying temporal and spatial variability in geomagnetic and solar modulation effects on the fluxes. A key advantage of this new model (herein termed LSD) over previous Monte Carlo models of cosmogenic nuclide production is that it allows for faster estimation of scaling factors based on time-varying geomagnetic and solar inputs. Comparing scaling predictions derived from the LSD model with those of previously published models suggest potential sources of bias in the latter can be largely attributed to two factors: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. Given that the LSD model generates flux spectra for each cosmic-ray particle of interest, it is also relatively straightforward to generate nuclide-specific scaling

  18. Interpretation of an index of phytoplankton population composition calculated from Remote Airborne Fluorsensor (RAF) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    The calculation of indices of phytoplankton population composition from chlorophyll a fluorescence at 685 nm excited by narrow band light at 454 and 539 nm is discussed. The ratio of the fluorescence excited by light of these two wavelengths is a function of the distribution of the phytoplankton between two color groups, designated the golden-brown and the green. The golden-brown group consists of those species which have the highly photosynthetically active carotenoid-chlorophyll-a-protein complexes, i.e. members of the classes Bacillariophyceae, diatoms Dinophyceae, dinoflagellates, and some members of the class Prymnesiophyceae. The green color group consists those species of phytoplankton which apparently lack those complexes, i.e. members of the classes Chlorophyceae, Euglenophyceae, Prasinophyceae, Eustigmatophyceae, Xanthophyceae, and a few members of the Prymnesiophyceae. A few species of phytoplankton appear to have intermediate characteristics, and would apparently belong to neither group. Most of these species are members of the class Cryptophyceae. The composition index for this class is examined in detail.

  19. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  20. Estimating radioactive nuclide inventories in waste drums with low- and intermediate-level waste from dismantling of a spent fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hanschke, C.; Stollenwerk, A.H.; Bopp, P.; Birringer, K.J

    1995-12-31

    The Karlsruhe reprocessing pilot plant, WAK, will be dismantled in the next few years. The radioactive nuclide inventory in the radioactive waste has to be determined according to legal requirements. During the operation time of WAK the declaration of radioactive waste was straightforward: the spectrum of nuclides in the waste was correlated to the fuel actually being processed. However, in decommissioning and dismantling a reprocessing plant, the accumulation of several nuclides in different parts of the plant has to be considered very carefully. Therefore the specific radioactive nuclide inventories must be determined by taking samples of the equipment in the rooms and cells. The samples are analyzed to their key nuclides (Co-60, Cs-137 etc.) and are representative for the dismantling of the equipment. The analytical results are the basis for the declaration of the waste. Nuclides which cannot be analyzed easily are correlated by a cell-burnup calculation (KORIGEN) and chemical knowledge. As was done during the operation time the radioactive waste is then declared on the basis of a shielding calculation and the measured dose rate on the surface of the drum.

  1. Initial Test Determination of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, H.; Caffee, M. W.; Nagao, K.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Long-lived radionuclides, such as 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl, are produced by cosmic rays in surficial materials on Earth, and used for determinations of cosmic-ray exposure ages and erosion rates. Quartz and limestone are routinely used as the target minerals for these geomorphological studies. Magnetite also contains target elements that produce abundant cosmogenic nuclides when exposed to the cosmic rays. Magnetite has several notable merits that enable the measurement of cosmogenic nuclides: (1) the target elements for production of cosmogenic nuclides in magnetite comprise the dominant mineral form of magnetite, Fe3O4; (2) magnetite can be easily isolated, using a magnet, after rock milling; (3) multiple cosmogenic nuclides are produced by exposure of magnetite to cosmic-ray secondaries; and (4) cosmogenic nuclides produced in the rock containing the magnetite, but not within the magnetite itself, can be separated using nitric acid and sodium hydroxide leaches. As part of this initial study, magnetite was separated from a basaltic sample collected from the Atacama Desert in Chili (2,995 m). Then Be, Al, Cl, Ca, and Mn were separated from ~2 g of the purified magnetite. We measured cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl concentrations in the magnetite by accelerator mass spectrometry at PRIME Lab, Purdue University. Cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne concentrations of aliquot of the magnetite were measured by mass spectrometry at the University of Tokyo. We also measured the nuclide concentrations from magnetite collected from a mine at Ishpeming, Michigan as a blank. The 10Be and 36Cl concentrations as well as 3He concentration produce concordant cosmic ray exposure ages of ~0.4 Myr for the Atacama basalt. However, observed high 26Al and 21Ne concentrations attribute to those nuclides incorporation from silicate impurity.

  2. Effect of elemental compositions on Monte Carlo dose calculations in proton therapy of eye tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S.; Farhad Masoudi, S.; Keshazare, Shiva; Jette, David

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies in eye plaque brachytherapy have found considerable differences between the dosimetric results by using a water phantom, and a complete human eye model. Since the eye continues to be simulated as water-equivalent tissue in the proton therapy literature, a similar study for investigating such a difference in treating eye tumors by protons is indispensable. The present study inquires into this effect in proton therapy utilizing Monte Carlo simulations. A three-dimensional eye model with elemental compositions is simulated and used to examine the dose deposition to the phantom. The beam is planned to pass through a designed beam line to moderate the protons to the desired energies for ocular treatments. The results are compared with similar irradiation to a water phantom, as well as to a material with uniform density throughout the whole volume. Spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) are created by adding pristine peaks to cover a typical tumor volume. Moreover, the corresponding beam parameters recommended by the ICRU are calculated, and the isodose curves are computed. The results show that the maximum dose deposited in ocular media is approximately 5-7% more than in the water phantom, and about 1-1.5% less than in the homogenized material of density 1.05 g cm-3. Furthermore, there is about a 0.2 mm shift in the Bragg peak due to the tissue composition difference between the models. It is found that using the weighted dose profiles optimized in a water phantom for the realistic eye model leads to a small disturbance of the SOBP plateau dose. In spite of the plaque brachytherapy results for treatment of eye tumors, it is found that the differences between the simplified models presented in this work, especially the phantom containing the homogenized material, are not clinically significant in proton therapy. Taking into account the intrinsic uncertainty of the patient dose calculation for protons, and practical problems corresponding to applying patient

  3. Re-calculating the pH record from boron isotopic composition of biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, G.; Gaillardet, J.; Louvat, P.

    2010-12-01

    The boron isotopic composition of marine carbonates (δ11Bcarb, ‰) has been proposed as a seawater paleo-acidity proxy (Hemming and Hanson, 1992; Vengosh et al., 1991). This proxy has been extensively used to reconstruct seawater paleo-pH and eventually atmospheric pCO2 during recent times or over short time-scales. However, it requires the knowledge of seawater δ11B value. Boron has a residence time of 10-20 My in seawater, longer than the mixing time of the ocean. The boron isotopic composition of seawater (δ11Bsw) is thus homogeneous in the modern ocean, yet it is not known in the past even though reconstruction and modeling have been attempted that rely on many hypotheses (Lemarchand et al., 2002; Pearson and Palmer, 2000). The boron isotopic composition of Cenozoic evaporites has been recently reconstructed using the direct record of Cenozoic evaporites (Paris et al., 2010). This reconstruction suggests that δ11Bsw has significantly changed along the last 40 Ma, in agreement with other parameters of the oceanic chemical composition. The δ11Bsw change amplitude appears to be stronger than suggested by models. In this presentation, we explore the consequences of this reconstruction on paleo-pH calculation for the late Cenozoic from published boron isotope record in biogenic carbonates (Pearson and Palmer, 2000; Pearson et al., 2009; Seki et al., 2010; Spivack et al., 1993). It points out the inconsistency between different dataset, due to the techniques used for boron isotopic measurement. In conclusion, we suggest that the seawater pH variations are not known with a sufficient precision over the last 35 My and that seawater surface pH could have likely remained constant. Hemming, N.G., and Hanson, G.N. (1992), Boron isotopic composition and concentration in modern marine carbonates: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v. 56, p. 537-543. Lemarchand, D., et al. (2002), Boron isotope systematics in large rivers: implications for the marine boron budget and

  4. Constraining local subglacial bedrock erosion rates with cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirsig, Christian; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Christl, Marcus; Reitner, Jürgen; Reindl, Martin; Bichler, Mathias; Vockenhuber, Christof; Akcar, Naki; Schlüchter, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The constant buildup of cosmogenic nuclides, most prominently 10Be, in exposed rock surfaces is routinely employed for dating various landforms such as landslides or glacial moraines. One fundamental assumption is that no cosmogenic nuclides were initially present in the rock, before the event to be dated. In the context of glacially formed landscapes it is commonly assumed that subglacial erosion of at least a few meters of bedrock during the period of ice coverage is sufficient to remove any previously accumulated nuclides, since the production of 10Be ceases at a depth of 2-3 m. Insufficient subglacial erosion leads to overestimation of surface exposure ages. If the time since the retreat of the glacier is known, however, a discordant concentration of cosmogenic nuclides delivers information about the depth of subglacial erosion. Here we present data from proglacial bedrock at two sites in the Alps. Goldbergkees in the Hohe Tauern National Park in Austria and Gruebengletscher in the Grimsel Pass area in Switzerland. Samples were taken inside as well as outside of the glaciers' Little Ice Age extent. Measured nuclide concentrations are analyzed with the help of a MATLAB model simulating periods of exposure or glacial cover of user-definable length and erosion rates.

  5. A Step Toward Physics-Based Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rates: Measurements of High-Energy Neutron Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Nakagaki, R.; Takahashi, N.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Shima, T.; Sekimoto, S.; Yashima, H.; Shibata, S.; Matsumura, H.; Bajo, K.; Nagao, K.; Satoh, D.; Iwamoto, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Shinohara, A.; Imamura, M.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2010-12-01

    Cosmic-ray produced nuclides are found in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. In extra-terrestrial materials it is in many instances possible to find samples with exposure times much longer than a specifc radionuclide’s half-life so the production rate for a specific geometry can be determined from the saturation activity. For most terrestrial applications this condition is not met, so an exposure age can only be determined if the production rate is independently determined. For terrestrial applications these production rates are ascertained by using geologic calibration sites. These calibrations themselves are not without ambiguity at times. Physics-based production rates are an alternative means by which production rates can be determined. Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are the essential tool in model calculations of cosmogenic nuclide production rates in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. However, even when the fundamental physics of neutron transport within planetary materials (atmospheres and surface materials) is modeled properly, the reliability of the results is limited by the lack of measured cross sections. Indeed, at the present time, the lack of the excitation functions for nuclides produced by high-energy neutrons that dominate the production of cosmogenic nuclides, is the largest uncertainty in cosmogenic nuclide production rate models. To improve the accuracy of cosmogenic nuclide production rates we are performing measurements of the high-energy neutron excitation functions [1]. Target materials, representing compounds found in naturally occurring minerals, were exposed to quasi-monoenergetic neutrons at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The neutrons are produced utilizing the reaction 7Li(p, n). The first two irradiations used 300 MeV and 392 MeV primary proton beams, yielding average neutron energies of 287 MeV and 370 MeV, respectively. After bombardment by neutrons, the short half

  6. Modeling for calculation of vanadium oxide film composition in reactive-sputtering process

    SciTech Connect

    Yu He; Jiang Yadong; Wang Tao; Wu Zhiming; Yu Junsheng; Wei Xiongbang

    2010-05-15

    A modified model describing the changing ratio of vanadium to oxide on the target and substrate as a function of oxygen flow is described. Actually, this ratio is extremely sensitive to the deposition conditions during the vanadium oxide (VO{sub x}) reactive magnetron-sputtering process. The method in this article is an extension of a previously presented Berg's model, where only a single stoichiometry compound layer was taken into consideration. This work deals with reactive magnetron sputtering of vanadium oxide films with different oxygen contents from vanadium metal target. The presence of vanadium mixed oxides at both target and substrate surface produced during reactive-sputtering process are included. It shows that the model can be used for the optimization of film composition with respect to oxygen flow in a stable hysteresis-free reactive-sputtering process. A systematic experimental study of deposition rate of VO{sub x} with respect to target ion current was also made. Compared to experimental results, it was verified that the theoretical calculation from modeling is in good agreement with the experimental counterpart.

  7. Variable temperature effects on release rates of readily soluble nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.L.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1988-02-01

    In this paper we study the effect of temperature on the release rate of readily soluble nuclides, as affected by a time-temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient. In this analysis ground water fills the voids in the waste package at t=0 and one percent of the inventories of cesium and iodine are immediately dissolved into the void water. Mass transfer resistance of partly failed container and cladding is conservatively neglected. The nuclides move through the void space into the surrounding rock under a concentration gradient. We use an analytic solution to compute the nuclide concentration in the gap or void, and the mass flux rate into the porous rock. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  8. rp Process and Masses of N{approx_equal}Z{approx_equal}34 Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Savory, J.; Schury, P.; Bachelet, C.; Block, M.; Bollen, G.; Facina, M.; Folden, C. M. III; Guenaut, C.; Kwan, E.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pang, G. K.; Prinke, A.; Ringle, R.; Schatz, H.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.

    2009-04-03

    High-precision Penning-trap mass measurements of the N{approx_equal}Z{approx_equal}34 nuclides {sup 68}Se, {sup 70}Se, {sup 70m}Br, and {sup 71}Br were performed, reaching experimental uncertainties of 0.5-15 keV. The new and improved mass data together with theoretical Coulomb displacement energies were used as input for rp process network calculations. An increase in the effective lifetime of the waiting point nucleus {sup 68}Se was found, and more precise information was obtained on the luminosity during a type I x-ray burst along with the final elemental abundances after the burst.

  9. Did Solar Energetic Particles Produce the Short-lived Nuclides Present in the Early Solar System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Marhas, K. K.; Sahijpal, S.

    2001-03-01

    Production of the short-lived nuclides 41Ca, 36Cl, 26Al, and 53Mn by solar energetic particles (SEP) interacting with dust grains of chondritic (=solar) composition is estimated considering a broad range of spectral parameters for the SEP and appropriate nuclear reaction cross sections. The dust grains are assumed to follow a power-law size distribution and to range in size from 10 μm to 1 cm. The possibility that an enhanced flux of SEP from an active early (T Tauri) Sun could have been responsible for the production of these short-lived nuclides in the early solar system is investigated. SEP production of 41Ca and 36Cl will match their abundances in the early solar system inferred from meteorite data if the SEP irradiation duration was ~5×105-106 yr and the SEP flux was higher by a factor of more than 5×103 than the contemporary long-term averaged value of Nproton (E>10 MeV)~100 cm-2 s-1. However, corresponding production of 26Al will be much below the level needed to match its inferred abundance in the early solar system. SEP production, therefore, fails to explain the observed correlated presence of 41Ca and 26Al with canonical initial abundances in early solar system solids. The abundance of 53Mn in the early solar system is not tightly constrained by the meteorite data, and the various estimates differ by a factor of 5. Coproduction of 41Ca, 36Cl, and 53Mn that will match the meteorite data for the higher initial abundance of 53Mn is possible if the SEP irradiation persisted for about a million years or more with a flux enhancement factor of ~5000-10,000. On the other hand, the lower initial value of 53Mn can also be matched by a flux enhancement factor of ~1000 and an irradiation duration of a few million years; the corresponding production of the other nuclides will be <=10% of the level needed to match their abundances in the early solar system. Target abundance consideration rules out the possibility of SEP production of 60Fe, another short

  10. Impact of dietary fiber energy on the calculation of food total energy value in the Brazilian Food Composition Database.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel de; Grande, Fernanda; Giuntini, Eliana Bistriche; Lopes, Tássia do Vale Cardoso; Dan, Milana Cara Tanasov; Prado, Samira Bernardino Ramos do; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo; Charrondière, U Ruth; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2016-02-15

    Dietary fiber (DF) contributes to the energy value of foods and including it in the calculation of total food energy has been recommended for food composition databases. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of including energy provided by the DF fermentation in the calculation of food energy. Total energy values of 1753 foods from the Brazilian Food Composition Database were calculated with or without the inclusion of DF energy. The energy values were compared, through the use of percentage difference (D%), in individual foods and in daily menus. Appreciable energy D% (⩾10) was observed in 321 foods, mainly in the group of vegetables, legumes and fruits. However, in the Brazilian typical menus containing foods from all groups, only D%<3 was observed. In mixed diets, the DF energy may cause slight variations in total energy; on the other hand, there is appreciable energy D% for certain foods, when individually considered.

  11. Calculation of the relative uniformity coefficient on the green composites reinforced with cotton and hemp fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, Florin; Hadǎr, Anton; Sava, Mihaela; Marinel, Stǎnescu Marius; Bolcu, Dumitru

    2016-06-01

    In this paper it is studied the influence of discontinuities on elastic and mechanical properties of green composite materials (reinforced with fabric of cotton or hemp). In addition, it is studied the way variations of the volume f the reinforcement influences the elasticity modulus and the tensile strength for the studied composite materials. In order to appreciate the difference in properties between different areas of the composite material, and also the dimensions of the defective areas, we have introduced a relative uniformity coefficient with which the mechanical behavior of the studied composite is compared with a reference composite. To validate the theoretical results we have obtained we made some experiments, using green composites reinforced with fabric, with different imperfection introduced special by cutting the fabric.

  12. Mid-Pleistocene cosmogenic minimum-age limits for pre-Wisconsinan glacial surfaces in southwestern Minnesota and southern Baffin Island: a multiple nuclide approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, Paul R.; Marsella, Kimberly A.; Patterson, Carrie; Davis, P. Thompson; Caffee, Marc

    1999-02-01

    Paired 10Be and 26Al analyses ( n=14) indicate that pre-Wisconsinan, glaciated bedrock surfaces near the northern (Baffin Island) and southern (Minnesota) paleo-margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet have long and complex histories of cosmic-ray exposure, including significant periods of partial or complete shielding from cosmic rays. Using the ratio, 26Al/ 10Be, we calculate that striated outcrops of Sioux Quartzite in southwestern Minnesota (southern margin) were last overrun by ice at least 500,000 years ago. Weathered bedrock tors on the once-glaciated uplands of Baffin Island (northern margin) are eroding no faster than 1.1 m Myr -1, the equivalent of at least 450,000 years of surface and near-surface exposure. Our data demonstrate that exposure ages and erosion rates calculated from single nuclides can underestimate surface stability dramatically because any intermittent burial, and the resultant lowering of nuclide production rates and nuclide abundances, will remain undetected.

  13. Mid-Pleistocene cosmogenic minimum-age limits for pre-Wisconsinan glacial surfaces in southwestern Minnesota and southern Baffin Island: A multiple nuclide approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bierman, P.R.; Marsella, K.A.; Patterson, Chris; Davis, P.T.; Caffee, M.

    1999-01-01

    Paired 10Be and 26Al analyses (n = 14) indicate that pre-Wisconsinan, glaciated bedrock surfaces near the northern (Baffin Island) and southern (Minnesota) paleo-margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet have long and complex histories of cosmic-ray exposure, including significant periods of partial or complete shielding from cosmic rays. Using the ratio, 26Al/10Be, we calculate that striated outcrops of Sioux Quartzite in southwestern Minnesota (southern margin) were last overrun by ice at least 500,000 years ago. Weathered bedrock tors on the once-glaciated uplands of Baffin Island (northern margin) are eroding no faster than 1.1 m Myr-1, the equivalent of at least 450,000 years of surface and near-surface exposure. Our data demonstrate that exposure ages and erosion rates calculated from single nuclides can underestimate surface stability dramatically because any intermittent burial, and the resultant lowering of nuclide production rates and nuclide abundances, will remain undetected.

  14. Thermodynamic calculation and interatomic potential to predict the favored composition region for the Cu-Zr-Al metallic glass formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y Y; Wang, T L; Li, J H; Dai, Y; Liu, B X

    2011-03-01

    For the Cu-Zr-Al system, the glass forming compositions were firstly calculated based on the extended Miedema's model, suggesting that the amorphous phase could be thermodynamically favored over a large composition region. An n-body potential was then constructed under the smoothed and long-range second-moment-approximation of tight-binding formulism. Applying the constructed Cu-Zr-Al potential, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted using solid solution models to compare relative stability of crystalline solid solution versus its disordered counterpart. Simulations reveal that the physical origin of metallic glass formation is crystalline lattice collapsing while solute concentration exceeding the critical value, thus predicting a hexagonal composition region, within which the Cu-Zr-Al ternary metallic glass formation is energetically favored. The molecular dynamics simulations predicted composition region is defined as the quantitative glass-forming-ability or glass-forming-region of the Cu-Zr-Al system. PMID:21229150

  15. Shielding and activity estimator for template-based nuclide identification methods

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-04-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides includes receiving one or more templates, the one or more templates corresponding to one or more radio-nuclides which contribute to a probable solution, receiving one or more weighting factors, each weighting factor representing a contribution of one radio-nuclide to the probable solution, computing an effective areal density for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective atomic number (Z) for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective metric for each of the one or more radio-nuclides, and computing an estimated activity for each of the one or more radio-nuclides. In other embodiments, computer program products, systems, and other methods are presented for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides.

  16. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  17. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  18. Cross Sections for the Production of Cosmogenic Nuclides with Protons up to 400 MeV for the Interpretation of Cosmic-Ray-produced Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiekel, Th.; Rosel, R.; Herpers, U.; Bodemann, R.; Leya, I.; Gloris, M.; Michel, R.; Dittrich, B.; Kubik, P.; Suter, M.

    1993-07-01

    Integral excitation functions of the cosmogenic nuclides are the basic requirement for the interpretation of interactions between cosmic ray particles and extraterrestrial and terrestrial matter. Together with the knowledge of primary and secondary particle fields inside an irradiated body, model calculations can be developed to interpret abundances of cosmogenic nuclides in dependencies of the irradiation history of the irradiated body and of the cosmic particle ray itself. The quality of those model calculations depends on the quality of the available cross-section database, which is neither comprehensive nor reliable for the most important nuclides like the long-lived radionuclides (i.e., 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca) and the stable rare gas isotopes. For a systematic investigation in this field of science we carried out several irradiation experiments with protons in the energy region between 45 MeV and 400 MeV at the Paul Scherrer Institut (Villigen, Switzerland) and the Laboratoire Nationale Saturne (Saclay, France) using the stacked foil technique. We included 21 different target elements with Z between 6 and 79 (C, N as Si3N4, O as SiO2, Mg, Al, Si, Ca as CaC2H2O4, Ti, V, Mn as Mn/Ni alloy, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Sr as SrF2, Y, Zr, Nb, Rh, Ba as Ba containing glass and Au) in our experiments. The proton fluxes were monitored via the reaction 27Al(p,3p3n)22Na using the evaluated data of [1]. Residual nuclides were measured by X-, gamma-, and after a chemical separation by accelerator mass spectrometry. In order to check the quality of our experimental procedures we included some target elements in our new experiments for which consistent excitation functions have already been determined [2,3,4]. Our new data show excellent agreement with the earlier measurements. We measured cross sections for more than 120 different reactions. Here we report on the results for target elements with Z up to 28. The exsisting database of experimental excitation functions for the production

  19. Walker Diffusion Method for Calculation of Transport Properties of Finite Composite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Van Siclen, Clinton D

    2002-01-01

    A heterogeneous medium may be represented by a scalar field of local transport coefficients (e.g., conductivity) or by a “resistor network” derived from that scalar field. In either case the effective (macroscopic) and local (microscopic) transport properties may be calculated by the walker diffusion method. Some sample calculations for disordered systems are presented to demonstrate the method.

  20. Calculation of the elastic properties of a triangular cell core for lightweight composite mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penado, F. Ernesto; Clark, James H., III; Walton, Joshua P.; Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.

    2007-09-01

    The use of composite materials in the fabrication of optical telescope mirrors offers many advantages over conventional methods, including lightweight, portability and the potential for lower manufacturing costs. In the construction of the substrate for these mirrors, sandwich construction offers the advantage of even lower weight and higher stiffness. Generally, an aluminum or Nomex honeycomb core is used in composite applications requiring sandwich construction. However, the use of a composite core offers the potential for increased stiffness and strength, low thermal distortion compatible with that of the facesheets, the absence of galvanic corrosion and the ability to readily modify the core properties. In order to design, analyze and optimize these mirrors, knowledge of the mechanical properties of the core is essential. In this paper, the mechanical properties of a composite triangular cell core (often referred to as isogrid) are determined using finite element analysis of a representative unit cell. The core studied offers many advantages over conventional cores including increased thermal and dimensional stability, as well as low weight. Results are provided for the engineering elastic moduli of cores made of high stiffness composite material as a function of the ply layup and cell size. Finally, in order to illustrate the use of these properties in a typical application, a 1.4-m diameter composite mirror is analyzed using the finite element method, and the resulting stiffness and natural frequencies are presented.

  1. Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, K. K.; Bierman, P. R.; Hooke, R. L.; Eppes, M. C.; Persico, L.; Caffee, M.; Finkel, R.

    2001-12-01

    Low-gradient alluvial piedmonts are common in desert areas throughout the world; however, long-term rates of processes that modify these landscapes are poorly understood. Using cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al, we attempt to quantify the long-term (>103 y) behavior of desert piedmonts in Southern California. We measured the activity of 10Be and 26Al in three samples of drainage basin alluvium and six amalgamated samples from transects spaced at 1-km intervals down a piedmont in Fort Irwin, Mojave Desert, California. Each transect sample consists of sediment from 21 collection sites spaced at 150 m intervals. Such sampling averages the variability of nuclide activity between sub-sample locations and thus gives a long-term dosing history of sediment as it is transported from uplands to the distal piedmont. The piedmont is heavily used during military training exercises during which hundreds of wheeled and tracked vehicles traverse the surface. The piedmont surface is planar, and fan-head incision is minimal at the rangefront decreasing to zero between the first and second transects, 1.5 km from the rangefront. 10Be activity increases steadily from 5.87 X 105 atoms g-1 at the rangefront to 1.02 X 6 atoms g-1 at the piedmont bottom. Nuclide activity and distance are well correlated (r2 = 0.95) suggesting that sediment is dosed uniformly as it is transported down piedmont. We have measured similar increases in nuclide activity in transect samples collected from two other Mojave Desert piedmonts, those fringing the Iron and Granite Mountains (Nichols et al, in press, Geomorphology). These piedmonts have nuclide activities that also correlate well with distance (r2 = 0.98 and 0.96, respectively) from their rangefronts, but nuclides increase at a lower rate down piedmont. Modeled sediment transport speeds for the Iron and Granite Mountain piedmonts are decimeters per year. The regular increase in nuclide activities down three different Mojave Desert piedmonts suggests that

  2. Sand residence times of one million years in the Namib Sand Sea from cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.; Fenton, C. R.; Kober, F.; Wiggs, G. F. S.; Bristow, C. S.; Xu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Namib Sand Sea is one of the world's oldest and largest sand deserts, yet little is known about the source of the sand in this, or other large deserts. In particular, it is unclear whether the sand is derived from local sediment or comes from remote sources. The relatively uniform appearance of dune sands and low compositional variability within dune fields make it difficult to address this question. Here we combine cosmogenic-nuclide measurements and geochronological techniques to assess the provenance and migration history of sand grains in the Namib Sand Sea. We use U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircons to show that the primary source of sand is the Orange River at the southern edge of the Namib desert. Our burial ages obtained from measurements of the cosmogenic nuclides 10Be, 26Al and 21Ne suggest that the residence time of sand within the sand sea is at least one million years. We therefore conclude that, despite large climatic changes in the Namib region associated with Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles, the area currently occupied by the Namib Sand Sea has never been entirely devoid of sand during the past million years.

  3. Radio-nuclide mixture identification using medium energy resolution detectors

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-09-17

    According to one embodiment, a method for identifying radio-nuclides includes receiving spectral data, extracting a feature set from the spectral data comparable to a plurality of templates in a template library, and using a branch and bound method to determine a probable template match based on the feature set and templates in the template library. In another embodiment, a device for identifying unknown radio-nuclides includes a processor, a multi-channel analyzer, and a memory operatively coupled to the processor, the memory having computer readable code stored thereon. The computer readable code is configured, when executed by the processor, to receive spectral data, to extract a feature set from the spectral data comparable to a plurality of templates in a template library, and to use a branch and bound method to determine a probable template match based on the feature set and templates in the template library.

  4. Measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in lunar rock 64455

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Kohl, C. P.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Finkel, R. C.; Southon, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Eleven samples were ground from the glass coated surface of lunar rock 64455,82 with an average depth resolution of 50 microns and were measured for Be-10, Al-26, and Cl-36 using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry). Results show no evidence of SCR (solar cosmic ray) effects. The flat cosmogenic nuclide profiles and activity levels are consistent with a 2 My exposure history for the rock and a sample location on the bottom of the rock. These AMS measurements are some of the most precise ever obtained for these three nuclides. This precision and the demonstrated fine depth resolution will enable us to conduct a number of detailed studies of depth effects in lunar and meteoritic samples, including investigating SCR effects in the surface exposed top of the glass coating of 64455 and possibly in the underlying rock.

  5. Production rates of terrestrial in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.; Tuniz, C.; Fink, D.

    1993-12-31

    Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides made in situ in terrestrial samples and how they are applied to the interpretation of measured radionuclide concentrations were discussed at a one-day Workshop held 2 October 1993 in Sydney, Australia. The status of terrestrial in-situ studies using the long-lived radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and {sup 41}Ca and of various modeling and related studies were presented. The relative uncertainties in the various factors that go into the interpretation of these terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides were discussed. The magnitudes of the errors for these factors were estimated and none dominated the final uncertainty.

  6. Adding glycaemic index and glycaemic load functionality to DietPLUS, a Malaysian food composition database and diet intake calculator.

    PubMed

    Shyam, Sangeetha; Wai, Tony Ng Kock; Arshad, Fatimah

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the methodology to add glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) functionality to food DietPLUS, a Microsoft Excel-based Malaysian food composition database and diet intake calculator. Locally determined GI values and published international GI databases were used as the source of GI values. Previously published methodology for GI value assignment was modified to add GI and GL calculators to the database. Two popular local low GI foods were added to the DietPLUS database, bringing up the total number of foods in the database to 838 foods. Overall, in relation to the 539 major carbohydrate foods in the Malaysian Food Composition Database, 243 (45%) food items had local Malaysian values or were directly matched to International GI database and another 180 (33%) of the foods were linked to closely-related foods in the GI databases used. The mean ± SD dietary GI and GL of the dietary intake of 63 women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus, calculated using DietPLUS version3 were, 62 ± 6 and 142 ± 45, respectively. These values were comparable to those reported from other local studies. DietPLUS version3, a simple Microsoft Excel-based programme aids calculation of diet GI and GL for Malaysian diets based on food records.

  7. Investigations of cosmic-ray-produced nuclides in iron meteorites. VI - The Signer-Nier model and the history of the cosmic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshage, H.

    1984-11-01

    The simple model first proposed by Martin (1953) to describe the interaction of cosmic rays with meteoritic iron and subsequently used by Signer and Nier (1960) to calculate the spatial distribution of cosmogenic noble gas nuclides in spherical meteoroids is presently subjected to a rigorous mathematical evaluation. In the framework of the model, the abundance ratio of any two of the cosmogenic nuclides He-3, He-4, Ne-21, and Ar-38, is correlated with the ratio of any other pair of these nuclides. These ratios depend only on the effective irradiation hardness in the sample. The model-derived correlations agree with the corresponding experimental correlations, except for samples from relatively great depths. The model also makes it possible to derive a P(21)-He-4/Ne-21 diagram that predicts dependences on meteoroid size and sample depth; each location in this field being associated with a distinct combination of meteoroid size and sample depth.

  8. Hot demonstration of proposed commercial nuclide removal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.

    1996-10-01

    This task covers the development and operation of an experimental test unit located in a Building 4501 hot cell within Building 4501 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This equipment is designed to test radionuclides removal technologies under continuous operatoin on actual ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernatant, Savannah River high-level waste supernatant, and Hanford supernatant. The latter two may be simulated by adding the appropriate chemicals and/or nuclides to the MVST supernatant.

  9. Stress Free Temperature Testing and Calculations on Out-of-Autoclave Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Tate, LeNetra C.; Danley, Susan E.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Taylor, Brian J.; Sutter, James K.; Miller, Sandi G.

    2013-01-01

    Future launch vehicles will require the incorporation of large composite parts that will make up primary and secondary components of the vehicle. NASA has explored the feasibility of manufacturing these large components using Out-of-Autoclave impregnated carbon fiber composite systems through many composites development projects. Most recently, the Composites for Exploration Project has been looking at the development of a 10 meter diameter fairing structure, similar in size to what will be required for a heavy launch vehicle. The development of new material systems requires the investigation of the material properties and the stress in the parts. Residual stress is an important factor to incorporate when modeling the stresses that a part is undergoing. Testing was performed to verify the stress free temperature with two-ply asymmetric panels. A comparison was done between three newly developed out of autoclave IM7/Bismaleimide (BMI) systems. This paper presents the testing results and the analysis performed to determine the stress free temperature of the materials

  10. Stress Free Temperature Testing and Residual Stress Calculations on Out-of-Autoclave Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah; Tate, LaNetra C.; Danley, Susan; Sampson, Jeff; Taylor, Brian; Miller, Sandi

    2012-01-01

    Future launch vehicles will require the incorporation large composite parts that will make up primary and secondary components of the vehicle. NASA has explored the feasibility of manufacturing these large components using Out-of-Autoclave impregnated carbon fiber composite systems through many composites development projects. Most recently, the Composites for Exploration Project has been looking at the development of a 10 meter diameter fairing structure, similar in size to what will be required for a heavy launch vehicle. The development of new material systems requires the investigation of the material properties and the stress in the parts. Residual stress is an important factor to incorporate when modeling the stresses that a part is undergoing. Testing was performed to verify the stress free temperature with two-ply asymmetric panels. A comparison was done between three newly developed out of autoclave IM7 /Bismalieimide (BMI) systems. This paper presents the testing results and the analysis performed to determine the residual stress of the materials.

  11. Computer program for calculation of complex chemical equilibrium compositions and applications. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the latest in a number of versions of chemical equilibrium and applications programs developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center over more than 40 years. These programs have changed over the years to include additional features and improved calculation techniques and to take advantage of constantly improving computer capabilities. The minimization-of-free-energy approach to chemical equilibrium calculations has been used in all versions of the program since 1967. The two principal purposes of this report are presented in two parts. The first purpose, which is accomplished here in part 1, is to present in detail a number of topics of general interest in complex equilibrium calculations. These topics include mathematical analyses and techniques for obtaining chemical equilibrium; formulas for obtaining thermodynamic and transport mixture properties and thermodynamic derivatives; criteria for inclusion of condensed phases; calculations at a triple point; inclusion of ionized species; and various applications, such as constant-pressure or constant-volume combustion, rocket performance based on either a finite- or infinite-chamber-area model, shock wave calculations, and Chapman-Jouguet detonations. The second purpose of this report, to facilitate the use of the computer code, is accomplished in part 2, entitled 'Users Manual and Program Description'. Various aspects of the computer code are discussed, and a number of examples are given to illustrate its versatility.

  12. Identification of Heavy and Superheavy Nuclides Using Chemical Separator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Turler, Andreas

    1999-12-31

    With the recent synthesis of superheavy nuclides produced in the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 238}U and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 242,244}Pu, much longer-lived nuclei than the previously known neutron-deficient isotopes of the heaviest elements have been identified. Half-lives of several hours and up to several years have been predicted for the longest-lived isotopes of these elements. Thus, the sensitivity of radiochemical separation techniques may present a viable alternative to physical separator systems for the discovery of some of the predicted longer-lived heavy and superheavy nuclides. The advantages of chemical separator systems in comparison to kinematic separators lie in the possibility of using thick targets, high beam intensities spread over larger target areas and in providing access to nuclides emitted under large angles and low velocities. Thus, chemical separator systems are ideally suited to study also transfer and (HI, axn) reaction products. In the following, a study of (HI, axn) reactions will be presented and prospects to chemically identify heavy and superheavy elements discussed.

  13. Recent developments in cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) enables identification and quantification of the biases in previously published models (Lifton, N., Sato, T., Dunai, T., in review, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett.). Scaling predictions derived from the new model (termed LSD) suggest two potential sources of bias in the previous models: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. In addition, the particle flux spectra generated by the LSD model allow one to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors that reflect the influences of the flux energy distribution and the relevant excitation functions (probability of nuclide production in a given nuclear reaction as a function of energy). Resulting scaling factors indicate 3He shows the strongest positive deviation from the flux-based scaling, while 14C exhibits a negative deviation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increasing 3He/10Be ratio with altitude in the Himalayas, but with a much lower magnitude for the effect. Furthermore, the new model provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of future advances in model inputs. For example, the effects of recently updated paleomagnetic models (e.g. Korte et al., 2011, Earth and Planet Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) on scaling predictions will also be presented.

  14. Cosmogenic nuclide age constraints on Middle Stone Age lithics from Niassa, Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercader, Julio; Gosse, John C.; Bennett, Tim; Hidy, Alan J.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2012-07-01

    The late phases of the Middle Stone Age (MSA) in the East African Rift System (EARS) are known for their evolutionary shifts and association with bottlenecks, transcontinental expansion, and climatic fluctuations. The chronology of MSA sites contemporaneous with these eco-demographic upheavals is uncertain because of the scarcity of datable sites and the poor understanding of their depositional and erosional histories. We apply terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating in a stratigraphic section with a complex exposure history to the study of the Luchamange Beds, a widespread sedimentological unit underlying MSA sites from the shores of Lake Niassa (Mozambican EARS). We use an innovative approach, which may be applicable elsewhere, to calculate their age using a Monte Carlo-based Bayesian model that links depth profiles of 26Al and 10Be, and uses other geomorphic and cosmogenic nuclide age constraints on episodic erosion and burial. The age of the basal Luchamange Beds is 42 + 77/-15 ka, and the MSA occupation on top is 29 + 3/-11 ka. These dates suggest temporal overlap between MSA and the earliest Later Stone Age and diversity in cultural manifestations at the end of the MSA.

  15. Navier-Stokes Calculations For a Venus Composition Probe With Ablation And Wake Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olynick, David R.; Henline, William D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A numerical investigation is carried out to determine the magnitude of wake radiation for a proposed Venus composition probe. One of the scientific goals of the mission is to determine the atmospheric composition of Venus by examining the intensity of scattered sunlight through the wake of the vehicle during planetary entry. In the wake of the vehicle, excited particles generated in the bow shock and boundary layers absorb and emit radiation. Thus, the purpose of this study is to determine if the radiation sensor will be able to sense the incoming solar radiative flux relative to the radiative flux generated in the wake. During portions of the entry trajectory the incident surface heat flux will be high enough to produce significant ablation. Ablation products such as CN are known to be strong radiators. Also, the ablation will be driven by strong radiation emanating from the bow shock. Thus, radiation and ablation will be coupled into the Navier-Stokes flow solutions.

  16. Computer program for calculation of complex chemical equilibrium compositions and applications. Supplement 1: Transport properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S.; Mcbride, B.; Zeleznik, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    An addition to the computer program of NASA SP-273 is given that permits transport property calculations for the gaseous phase. Approximate mixture formulas are used to obtain viscosity and frozen thermal conductivity. Reaction thermal conductivity is obtained by the same method as in NASA TN D-7056. Transport properties for 154 gaseous species were selected for use with the program.

  17. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Gabriel, T.A.; Lazareth, O.W.; Spergel, M.S.; Ward, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn production due to spallation induced by cosmogenic protons in model meteorite composition similar to L Chondrite has yielded predictions which are consistent with the observed decay rates in L Chondrite stony meteorites. The calculated /sup 26/Al production rate (54 dpm/kg) in a 1 m diameter meteorite is within 1/2 S.D. of the mean (49 +- 11 dpm/kg) taken from 100 bulk determinations in L Chondrite samples compiled in Nishiizumi (1987). Similarly calculated average value for /sup 53/Mn (223 dpm/kg) is consistent with one S.D. off the mean in the widely scattered /sup 53/Mn data (362 +- 113 dpm/kg) compiled by Nishiizumi (1987). 9 refs.

  18. An Approach to Calculate Mineralś Bulk Moduli KS from Chemical Composition and Density ρ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, S.; Schilling, F. R.; Mueller, B.; Drüppel, K.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are fundamental parameters for technical and geotechnical applications and an important research topic towards a better understanding of the Earth's interior. Published elastic properties, chemical composition, and density data of 86 minerals (total of 258 data including properties of minerals at various p, T conditions) were collected into a database. It was used to test different hypotheses about relationships between these properties (e.g. water content in minerals and their Poisson's ratio). Furthermore, a scheme to model the average elastic properties, i.e. the bulk modulus KS, based on mineral density and composition was developed. Birch's law, a linearity between density ρ and wave velocity (e.g. vp.), is frequently used in seismic and seismology to derive density of the Earth's interior from seismic velocities. Applying the compiled mineral data contradicts the use of a simple velocity-density relation (e.g. Gardneŕs relation, 1974). The presented model-approach to estimate the mineralś bulk moduli Ks (as Voigt-Reuss-Hill average) is based on the idea of pressure-temperature (p-T) dependent ionś bulk moduli. Using a multi-exponential regression to ascertain the ionś bulk moduli and by applying an exponential scaling with density ρ, their bulk moduli could be modelled. As a result, > 88 % of the 258 bulk moduli data are predicted with an uncertainty of < 20 % compared to published values. Compared to other models (e.g. Anderson et al. 1970 and Anderson & Nafe 1965), the here presented approach to model the bulk moduli only requires the density ρ and chemical composition of the mineral and is not limited to a specific group of minerals, composition, or structure. In addition to this, by using the pressure and temperature dependent density ρ(p, T), it is possible to predict bulk moduli for varying p-T conditions. References:Gardner, G.H.F, Gardner, L.W. and Gregory, A.R. (1974). Geophysics, 39, No. 6, 770

  19. Calculation of stresses and forces between the skin and stiffener in composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cohen, David

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for computing the stresses at the interface between the skin and stiffener in stiffened composite panels is described. The methodology is based on finite-element analyses and on elasticity solution. The finite-element analyses are standard, while the elasticity solution is based on eigenvalue expansions of the stress function. The eigenvalue expansions are assumed to be valid in the local region where the stiffener flange terminates. The local elasticity solution is coupled to the global finite-element analysis using collocation on the boundary of the local region. Accuracy and convergence of the method are discussed and several examples of its utility are presented.

  20. Chemical composition data and calculated aquifer temperature for selected wells and springs of Honey Lake Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1976-01-01

    Major element, minor element, and gas composition data are tabulated for 15 springs and wells in Honey Lake Valley, California. Wendel and Amedee hot springs issue Na-S04-C1 waters at boiling or near boiling temperatures; the remaining springs and wells issue Na-HC03 waters at temperatures ranging from 14 to 33 deg C. Gases escaping from the hot springs are principally nitrogen with minor amounts of methane. The geothermometers calculated from the chemical data are also tabulated for each spring. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Electronic interaction in composites of a conjugated polymer and carbon nanotubes: first-principles calculation and photophysical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wéry, Jany; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Lefrant, Serge; Yaya, Abu; Ewels, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that control the photophysics of composite films made of a semiconducting conjugated polymer (poly(paraphenylene vinylene), PPV) mixed with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) up to a concentration of 64 wt % are determined by using photoexcitation techniques and density functional theory. Charge separation is confirmed experimentally by rapid quenching of PPV photoluminescence and changes in photocurrent starting at relatively low concentrations of SWNT. Calculations predict strong electronic interaction between the polymer and the SWNT network when nanotubes are semiconducting. PMID:26171290

  2. Calculation of skin-stiffener interface stresses in stiffened composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, David; Hyer, Michael W.

    1987-01-01

    A method for computing the skin-stiffener interface stresses in stiffened composite panels is developed. Both geometrically linear and nonlinear analyses are considered. Particular attention is given to the flange termination region where stresses are expected to exhibit unbounded characteristics. The method is based on a finite-element analysis and an elasticity solution. The finite-element analysis is standard, while the elasticity solution is based on an eigenvalue expansion of the stress functions. The eigenvalue expansion is assumed to be valid in the local flange termination region and is coupled with the finite-element analysis using collocation of stresses on the local region boundaries. Accuracy and convergence of the local elasticity solution are assessed using a geometrically linear analysis. Using this analysis procedure, the influence of geometric nonlinearities and stiffener parameters on the skin-stiffener interface stresses is evaluated.

  3. Theoretical calculation of a composite pulse for 2H broadband excitation by average Hamiltonian theory

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ming; Roopchand, Rabia; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Chen, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Quadrupolar echo NMR spectroscopy of solids often requires RF pulse excitation that covers spectral widths exceeding 100 kHz. In a recent work we found out that a four pulse, composite pulse COM-II ( 90180¯90135¯45 ), provided robust broadband excitation for deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy. Moreover, when combined with an eight step phase cycle, spectral distortions arising from finite pulse widths were greatly supressed. In this paper we report on a theoretical analysis COM-II with 8-step phase cycle by average Hamiltonian theory. This treatment is combined with the fictitious spin-1 operator formalism, and the mechanism of the 8-step phase cycling that minimizes the spectral distortions is discussed. PMID:26681896

  4. Notre Dame Nuclear Database: A New Chart of Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Khouw, Timothy; Fasano, Patrick; Mumpower, Matthew; Aprahamian, Ani

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear data is critical to research fields from medicine to astrophysics. We are creating a database, the Notre Dame Nuclear Database, which can store theoretical and experimental datasets. We place emphasis on storing metadata and user interaction with the database. Users are able to search in addition to the specific nuclear datum, the author(s), the facility where the measurements were made, the institution of the facility, and device or method/technique used. We also allow users to interact with the database by providing online search, an interactive nuclide chart, and a command line interface. The nuclide chart is a more descriptive version of the periodic table that can be used to visualize nuclear properties such as half-lives and mass. We achieve this by using D3 (Data Driven Documents), HTML, and CSS3 to plot the nuclides and color them accordingly. Search capabilities can be applied dynamically to the chart by using Python to communicate with MySQL, allowing for customization. Users can save the customized chart they create to any image format. These features provide a unique approach for researchers to interface with nuclear data. We report on the current progress of this project and will present a working demo that highlights each aspect of the aforementioned features. This is the first time that all available technologies are put to use to make nuclear data more accessible than ever before in a manner that is much easier and fully detailed. This is a first and we will make it available as open source ware.

  5. An Analytical Investigation of Three General Methods of Calculating Chemical-Equilibrium Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1960-01-01

    The Brinkley, Huff, and White methods for chemical-equilibrium calculations were modified and extended in order to permit an analytical comparison. The extended forms of these methods permit condensed species as reaction products, include temperature as a variable in the iteration, and permit arbitrary estimates for the variables. It is analytically shown that the three extended methods can be placed in a form that is independent of components. In this form the Brinkley iteration is identical computationally to the White method, while the modified Huff method differs only'slightly from these two. The convergence rates of the modified Brinkley and White methods are identical; and, further, all three methods are guaranteed to converge and will ultimately converge quadratically. It is concluded that no one of the three methods offers any significant computational advantages over the other two.

  6. ANDROS: A code for Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, C.L.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

    1986-11-01

    ANDROS (Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection) is a computer code written to compute doses and health effects from atmospheric releases of radionuclides. ANDROS has been designed as an integral part of the CRRIS (Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System). ANDROS reads air concentrations and environmental concentrations of radionuclides to produce tables of specified doses and health effects to selected organs via selected pathways (e.g., ingestion or air immersion). The calculation may be done for an individual at a specific location or for the population of the whole assessment grid. The user may request tables of specific effects for every assessment grid location. Along with the radionuclide concentrations, the code requires radionuclide decay data, dose and risk factors, and location-specific data, all of which are available within the CRRIS. This document is a user manual for ANDROS and presents the methodology used in this code.

  7. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project: Evaluation of Models to Calculate Thermal Diffusivity of Layered Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Amanda J.; Gardner, Levi D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.; Breitkreutz, Harald

    2015-02-11

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate samples and perform analyses in support of the Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. A key portion of the scope associated with this project was to measure the thermal properties of fuel segments harvested from plates that were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Thermal diffusivity of samples prepared from the fuel segments was measured using laser flash analysis. Two models, one developed by PNNL and the other developed by the Technische Universität München (TUM), were evaluated to extract the thermal diffusivity of the uranium-molybdenum alloy from measurements made on the irradiated, layered composites. The experimental data of the “TC” irradiated fuel segment was evaluated using both models considering a three-layer and five-layer system. Both models are in acceptable agreement with one another and indicate that the zirconium diffusion barrier has a minimal impact on the overall thermal diffusivity of the monolithic U-Mo fuel.

  8. Penning trap mass measurements of nuclides along the astrophysical rp- and νp- process paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jason

    2009-10-01

    X-ray bursters and supernovae are examples of explosive stellar phenomena in which nuclides are quickly produced in great quantities. Observed as x-ray bursts, thermonuclear runaways on the surface of neutron stars accreting material from its binary star companion create elements by a nucleosynthetic procoess which involves a series of rapid proton-capture reactions, termed the rp process. The timescale, nuclides produced, and energy released during the rp process are very sensitive to delays encountered at waiting-point nuclides, nuclides in which their slow β decay is more probable than net proton capture. A possible mechanism to bypass the waiting-point nuclides is through the νp process, in which (n,p) and (n,γ) reactions on the waiting-point nuclides, in addition to the proton-capture reactions, are possible. Supernovae are possible sites for the νp process as the proton-rich ejecta can absorb antineutrinos to produce the required free neutrons. It is this νp process which may resolve the long-standing discrepancy between the observed and predicted abundances of ^92Mo and ^94Mo. Proton-capture Q values of nuclides along the rp- and νp- process paths are required to accurately model the nucleosynthesis, especially at the waiting-point nuclides. In recent years, Penning traps have become the preferred tool to make precise mass measurements of stable and unstable nuclides. To make the best use of these devices in measuring the masses of radioactive nuclides, systems have been developed to quickly, cleanly, and efficiently transport the short-lived, weakly produced nuclides to the Penning traps. This talk will discuss the rp and νp nucleosynthetic processes and will highlight the precise Penning trap mass measurements of nuclides along these process paths.

  9. Calculation of optical properties of dental composites as a basis for determining color impression and penetration depth of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weniger, Kirsten K.; Muller, Gerhard J.

    2005-03-01

    In order to achieve esthetic dental restorations, there should be no visible difference between restorative material and treated teeth. This requires a match of the optical properties of both restorative material and natural teeth. These optical properties are determined by absorption and scattering of light emerging not only on the surface but also inside the material. Investigating different dental composites in several shades, a method has been developed to calculate the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g and reduced scattering coefficient μs'. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer, followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Determination of optical properties is more precise and comprehensive than with the previously used Kubelka Munk theory because scattering can be looked at separated into pure scattering with the scattering coefficient μs and its direction with the anisotropy factor g. Moreover the use of the inverse Monte Carlo simulation not only minimizes systematic errors and considers the scattering phase function, but also takes into account the measuring geometry. The compilation of a data pool of optical parameters now enables the application of further calculation models as a basis for optimization of the composition of new materials. For example, a prediction of the general color impression for multiple layers can be carried out as well as the calculation of the wavelength dependent penetration depths of light with regard to photo polymerization. Further applications are possible in the area of laser ablation.

  10. Constraints on Abundances and Compositional Ranges of X-Ray Amorphous Components in Soils and Rocks at Gale Crater from Mass Balance Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehouck, E.; McLennan, S. M.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Cousin, A.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Lanza, N. L.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Rapin, W.; MSL Science Team

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of mass balance calculations that explore the domain of possible chemical compositions (with constraints on abundances) of the amorphous component detected by Curiosity within the Rocknest and Cumberland samples.

  11. Some theoretical derivations relating to the tissue dosimetry of brachytherapy nuclides, with particular reference to iodine-125

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, R.G.

    1983-03-01

    Using a Monte Carlo computer technique, tables of parameters have been derived which are of use in the dosimetry of brachytherapy nuclides in a variety of tissues and organs. From the results, it has been possible to derive relationships linking the composition of a tissue with the dose received at any location around an implanted source. Other factors, such as the relative importance of scattered radiation, spectral degradation, and integral dose, are also discussed. In particular, attention is drawn to possible dosimetric problems arising from the clinical use of /sup 125/I.

  12. ICoN, the Interactive Chart of Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Mumpower, Matthew; Aprahamian, Ani

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear data is critical to research fields from medicine to astrophysics. The chart of nuclides is a more descriptive version of the periodic table that can be used to visualize nuclear properties such as half-lives and mass. We have created ICoN (simply short for Interactive Chart of Nuclides), an API which can be used to visualize theoretical and experimental datasets. This visualization is achieved by using D3 (Data Driven Documents), HTML, and CSS3 to plot the elements and color them accordingly. ICoN features many customization options that users can access that are dynamically applied to the chart without reloading the page. Users can save the customized chart they create to various formats. We have constructed these features in order to provide a unique approach for researchers to interface with nuclear data. ICoN can also be used on all electronic devices without loss of support. We report on the current progress of this project and will present a working demo that highlights each aspect of the aforementioned features. This is the first time that all available technologies are put to use to make nuclear data more accessible than ever before. This is a first and we will make it available as open source ware.

  13. Forbush decreases geomagnetic and atmospheric effects cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, E. O.

    1986-01-01

    An overview and synthesis is given of recent developments that have occurred in the areas of Forbush decreases, geomagnetic and atmospheric effects, and cosmogenic nuclides. Experimental evidence has been found for substantial differences in the effects of the various types of interplanetary perturbations on cosmic rays, and for a dependence of these effects on the three-dimensional configuration of the interplanetary medium. In order to fully understand and to be able to simulate the solar cosmic ray particle access to the polar regions of the earth we need accurate models of the magnetospheric magnetic field. These models must include all major magnetospheric current systems (in particular the field aligned currents), and they should represent magnetically quiet time periods as well as different levels of geomagnetic activity. In the evolution of magnetospheric magnetic field models, cosmic ray and magnetospheric physicists should work closely together since cosmic ray measurements are a powerful additional tool in the study of the perturbed magnetosphere. In the field of cosmogenic nuclides, finally, exciting new results and developments follow in rapid succession. Thanks to new techniques and new isotopes the analysis of cosmic ray history has entered into a new dimension.

  14. Bridging the timescales between thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of Earth's landscape is a key to understand its future evolution and to identify the driving forces that shape Earth's surface. Cosmogenic nuclide and thermochronological methods are routinely used to quantify Earth surface processes over 102-104 yr and 106-107 yr, respectively (e.g. Lal 1991; Reiners and Ehlers 2005; von Blanckenburg 2006). A comparison of the rates of surface processes derived from these methods is, however, hampered by the large difference in their timescales. For instance, a constant erosion rate of 0.1 mm/yr yield an apatite (U-Th)/He age of ~24 Ma and a 10Be age of ~6 ka, respectively. Analytical methods that bridge this time gap are on the way, but are not yet fully established (e.g. Herman et al. 2010). A ready to use alternative are river profiles, which record the regional uplift history over 102-107 yr (e.g. Pritchard et al. 2009). Changes in uplift are retained in knickzones that propagate with a distinct velocity upstream, and therefore the time of an uplift event can be estimated. Here I present an integrative inverse modelling approach to simultaneously reconstruct river profiles, model thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data and to derive robust information about landscape evolution over thousands to millions of years. An efficient inversion routine is used to solve the forward problem and find the best uplift history and erosional parameters that reproduce the observed data. I test the performance of the algorithm by inverting a synthetic dataset and a dataset from the Sila massif (Italy). Results show that even complicated uplift histories can be reliably retrieved by the combined interpretation of river profiles, thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data. References Gallagher, K., Brown, R. & Johnson, C. (1998): Fission track analysis and its applications to geological problems. - Annu. Rev. Earth Planet., 26: 519-572. Herman, F., Rhodes, E.J., Braun, J. & Heiniger, L. (2010): Uniform

  15. Removal of radio nuclides of the U- and Th- series from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto Polyacryamide-expanded perlite: Effects of pH, concentration and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaya, Recep

    2012-10-01

    Poly (Acryamide-expanded perlite) [P(AAm-EP)], was synthesized. The influence of process parameters: initial pH and five radio nuclides of the U- and Th- series (TI+, Ra2+, Bi3+, Ac3+ and Pb2+ in a leaching solution) concentration, on sorption thermodynamic was studied and discussed. The five natural radio nuclides were counted by gamma spectrometer using a type NAI (Tl) detector. The amounts of five radio nuclides sorbed at equlibrium were well represented by Langmuir and Freundlich type isotherms. The Langmuir adsorption capacities (XL) were in the order of 208Tl (0.4 MBq kg-1)>212Pb and 212Bi (0.3 MBq kg-1)>228Ac and (0.1 MBq kg-1)>226Ra (0.04 MBq kg-1). These results demonstrated that P(AAm-EP) had high affinity to the five natural radio nuclides. In order to specify the type of adsorption reaction, thermodynamic parameters such as the standard enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy were also determined. It was also demonstrated that the adsorption mechanism was spontaneous (ΔG<0), the process was exothermic (ΔH<0) thus increasing entropy (ΔS>0). The composite was reused for four more times after regeneration without any detectable changes either in its structure or adsorptive capability.

  16. On the Production of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Extraterrestrial Bodies by Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chochula, P.; Masarik, J.; Povinec, P.

    1993-07-01

    In the interplanetary space, meteoroids are continuously irradiated by high-energy ray particles. These particles have enough energy to penetrate into and interact with matter in the solar system. Some of these interactions leave reaction products that persist for long period of time. These reaction products can be used both to determine the nature and behavior of cosmic rays in the past and to study the history of the target. The accurate modeling of the reaction products is necessary for the interpretation of measured values. In this paper we present the results of the simulation of production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in lunar and meteoritic samples. The presented calculations use the system of coupled Monte Carlo codes KASKADA [1]. These treat different physical phenomena that have to be considered in the accurate computer simulation of radiation transport and interaction. The simulation of the interaction of an incoming high-energy particle is started by a choice of primary particle coordinates and direction relative to the target. The incident particle is followed to its first collision with a target nucleus, in which the production of secondaries is performed using the intranuclear cascade- evaporation model. Then the histories of individual secondary particles are followed one after the other until the predefined cut-off energies are reached or the geometry is left. Production rate P(sub)j of cosmogenic nuclide j at depth d in an irradiated body was calculated with the equation, which appears below in the hard copy. Where N is the number of atoms for target element i per kg material in the sample, sigma is the cross section for the production of nuclide j from target element i by particle k, and J is flux of primary and secondary particles of type k with energy E(sub)k. In the case of meteoroids the irradiated body was divided into concentric shells. The lunar surface was simulated with a large cylinder, which was also divided into smaller cylindrical

  17. An approximate method for calculating composition of the non-equilibrium explosion products of hydrocarbons and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shargatov, V. A.; Gubin, S. A.; Okunev, D. Yu

    2016-09-01

    We develop a method for calculating the changes in composition of the explosion products in the case where the complete chemical equilibrium is absent but the bimolecular reactions are in quasi-equilibrium with the exception bimolecular reactions with one of the components of the mixture. We investigate the possibility of using the method of "quasiequilibrium" for mixtures of hydrocarbons and oxygen. The method is based on the assumption of the existence of the partial chemical equilibrium in the explosion products. Without significant loss of accuracy to the solution of stiff differential equations detailed kinetic mechanism can be replaced by one or two differential equation and a system of algebraic equations. This method is always consistent with the detailed mechanism and can be used separately or in conjunction with the solution of a stiff system for chemically non-equilibrium mixtures replacing it when bimolecular reactions are near to equilibrium.

  18. A comparison of finite-difference and finite-element methods for calculating free edge stresses in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.; Tzeng, L.-S.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that edge delamination is a serious failure mechanism for laminated composite materials. Various numerical methods have been utilized in attempts to calculate the interlaminar stress components which precede delamination in a laminate. There are, however, discrepancies regarding the results provided by different methods, taking into account a finite-difference procedure, a perturbation procedure, and finite element approaches. The present investigation has the objective to assess the capacity of a finite difference method to predict the character and magnitude of the interlaminar stress distributions near an interface corner. A second purpose of the investigation is to determine if predictions by finite element method in-plane, interlaminar stress components near an interface corner represent actual laminate behavior.

  19. Development of mathematical models and methods for calculation of rail steel deformation resistance of various chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, A. A.; Golovatenko, A. V.; Kadykov, V. N.; Dumova, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    Using the device of the complex “Gleeble System 3800” the physical experimental studies of deformation resistance of chrome rail steel at different thermo-mechanical deformation parameters were carried out. On the basis of mathematical processing of experimental data the statistical model of dependence of the rail steel deformation resistance on the simultaneous influence of deformation degree, rate and temperature, as well as the steel chemical composition, was developed. The nature of influence of deformation parameters and the content of chemical elements in steel on its resistance to plastic deformation is scientifically substantiated. Verification of the adequacy of the proposed model by the comparative analysis of the calculated and actual rolling forces during passes in the universal rail-and-structural steel mill JSC “EVRAZ Consolidated West Siberian Metallurgical Plant” (“EVRAZ ZSMK”) showed the possibility of its use for development and improvement of new modes of rails rolling.

  20. Uncertainty in nutrient loads from tile-drained landscapes: Effect of sampling frequency, calculation algorithm, and compositing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark R.; King, Kevin W.; Macrae, Merrin L.; Ford, William; Van Esbroeck, Chris; Brunke, Richard I.; English, Michael C.; Schiff, Sherry L.

    2015-11-01

    Accurate estimates of annual nutrient loads are required to evaluate trends in water quality following changes in land use or management and to calibrate and validate water quality models. While much emphasis has been placed on understanding the uncertainty of nutrient load estimates in large, naturally drained watersheds, few studies have focused on tile-drained fields and small tile-drained headwater watersheds. The objective of this study was to quantify uncertainty in annual dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) load estimates from four tile-drained fields and two small tile-drained headwater watersheds in Ohio, USA and Ontario, Canada. High temporal resolution datasets of discharge (10-30 min) and nutrient concentration (2 h to 1 d) were collected over a 1-2 year period at each site and used to calculate a reference nutrient load. Monte Carlo simulations were used to subsample the measured data to assess the effects of sample frequency, calculation algorithm, and compositing strategy on the uncertainty of load estimates. Results showed that uncertainty in annual DRP and NO3-N load estimates was influenced by both the sampling interval and the load estimation algorithm. Uncertainty in annual nutrient load estimates increased with increasing sampling interval for all of the load estimation algorithms tested. Continuous discharge measurements and linear interpolation of nutrient concentrations yielded the least amount of uncertainty, but still tended to underestimate the reference load. Compositing strategies generally improved the precision of load estimates compared to discrete grab samples; however, they often reduced the accuracy. Based on the results of this study, we recommended that nutrient concentration be measured every 13-26 h for DRP and every 2.7-17.5 d for NO3-N in tile-drained fields and small tile-drained headwater watersheds to accurately (±10%) estimate annual loads.

  1. A geologically constrained Monte Carlo approach to modeling exposure ages from profiles of cosmogenic nuclides: An example from Lees Ferry, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidy, Alan J.; Gosse, John C.; Pederson, Joel L.; Mattern, Jann Paul; Finkel, Robert C.

    2010-09-01

    We present a user-friendly and versatile Monte Carlo simulator for modeling profiles of in situ terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs). Our program (available online at http://geochronology.earthsciences.dal.ca/downloads-models.html) permits the incorporation of site-specific geologic knowledge to calculate most probable values for exposure age, erosion rate, and inherited nuclide concentration while providing a rigorous treatment of their uncertainties. The simulator is demonstrated with 10Be data from a fluvial terrace at Lees Ferry, Arizona. Interpreted constraints on erosion, based on local soil properties and terrace morphology, yield a most probable exposure age and inheritance of 83.9-14.1+19.1 ka, and 9.49-2.52+1.21 × 104 atoms g-1, respectively (2σ). Without the ability to apply some constraint to either erosion rate or age, shallow depth profiles of any cosmogenic nuclide (except for nuclides produced via thermal and epithermal neutron capture, e.g., 36Cl) cannot be optimized to resolve either parameter. Contrasting simulations of 10Be data from both sand- and pebble-sized clasts within the same deposit indicate grain size can significantly affect the ability to model ages with TCN depth profiles and, when possible, sand—not pebbles—should be used for depth profile exposure dating.

  2. Snow shielding factors for cosmogenic nuclide dating inferred from Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweck, Christopher; Zreda, Marek; Desilets, Darin

    2013-10-01

    Conventional formulations of changes in cosmogenic nuclide production rates with snow cover are based on a mass-shielding approach, which neglects the role of neutron moderation by hydrogen. This approach can produce erroneous correction factors and add to the uncertainty of the calculated cosmogenic exposure ages. We use a Monte Carlo particle transport model to simulate fluxes of secondary cosmic-ray neutrons near the surface of the Earth and vary surface snow depth to show changes in neutron fluxes above rock or soil surface. To correspond with shielding factors for spallation and low-energy neutron capture, neutron fluxes are partitioned into high-energy, epithermal and thermal components. The results suggest that high-energy neutrons are attenuated by snow cover at a significantly higher rate (shorter attenuation length) than indicated by the commonly-used mass-shielding formulation. As thermal and epithermal neutrons derive from the moderation of high-energy neutrons, the presence of a strong moderator such as hydrogen in snow increases the thermal neutron flux both within the snow layer and above it. This means that low-energy production rates are affected by snow cover in a manner inconsistent with the mass-shielding approach and those formulations cannot be used to compute snow correction factors for nuclides produced by thermal neutrons. Additionally, as above-ground low-energy neutron fluxes vary with snow cover as a result of reduced diffusion from the ground, low-energy neutron fluxes are affected by snow even if the snow is at some distance from the site where measurements are made.

  3. Copper-67 as a therapeutic nuclide for radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Novak-Hofer, Ilse; Schubiger, P August

    2002-06-01

    The application of the beta particle-emitting nuclide 67Cu in radioimmunotherapy is reviewed. The production of the nuclide is outlined, and different production modes are discussed with an emphasis on cyclotron production. A short survey of copper chelators currently used for antibody labelling and their impact on the pharmacokinetics of 67Cu-labelled immunoconjugates is provided. Protocols for antibody labelling with 67Cu as well as quality control procedures for 67Cu-labelled antibodies are described. Preclinical data on the biological properties of 67Cu-labelled immunoconjugates are reported and discussed. 67Cu-labelled antibodies show higher and more persistent tumour uptake than their radioiodinated counterparts due to accumulation of labelled metabolites in tumour cells. Biodistribution of 67Cu-labelled antibody fragments has been improved by selection of negatively charged chelators and peptide linkers. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the accumulated dose in tumour and critical organs such as the kidney and liver indicates that, despite this improvement, intact 67Cu-labelled antibodies achieve higher tumour uptake and better therapeutic ratios than 67Cu-labelled antibody fragments and that they are at present the logical choice for clinical studies. Clinical studies using 67Cu-labelled antibodies in lymphoma, colon carcinoma and bladder cancer patients are reviewed. Some of the advantages over radioiodinated antibodies found in the preclinical work, such as higher tumour uptake and better tumour/blood ratios, have also been found with systemic application in lymphoma and colon carcinoma. However, in both lymphoma and colon carcinoma patients, the radiation dose to the liver has been found to be higher from 67Cu- than from 131I-labelled antibodies. The intravesical application of 67Cu-labelled antibody has been shown to be a promising approach for targetting cytotoxic radiation to superficial bladder tumours, without detectable systemic absorption. Given the

  4. ACDOS1: a computer code to calculate dose rates from neutron activation of neutral beamlines and other fusion-reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Keney, G.S.

    1981-08-01

    A computer code has been written to calculate neutron induced activation of neutral-beam injector components and the corresponding dose rates as a function of geometry, component composition, and time after shutdown. The code, ACDOS1, was written in FORTRAN IV to calculate both activity and dose rates for up to 30 target nuclides and 50 neutron groups. Sufficient versatility has also been incorporated into the code to make it applicable to a variety of general activation problems due to neutrons of energy less than 20 MeV.

  5. Excited states in the heavy nuclide {sup 254}No

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanpaeae, H.; Leino, M.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Dorvaux, O.; Helariutta, K.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Muikku, M.; Nieminen, P.; Rahkila, P.; Savelius, A.; Trzaska, W. H.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Chewter, A. J.; Butler, P. A.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, G. D.

    1999-11-16

    In-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the excited states in the heavy nuclide {sup 254}No have been studied in the reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 48}Ca,2n){sup 254}No. The techniques of recoil-gating and recoil-decay-tagging were needed due to the dominant fission background. Prompt {gamma}-rays were detected with a Ge detector array, consisting of four clover detectors in close geometry, and a gas-filled recoil separator (RITU) was used for detecting recoils and their {alpha}-decays. The observed six {gamma}-rays were associated with E2-transitions in the ground state rotational band of {sup 254}No. The value {beta}{sub 2}=0.27{+-}0.03 was extracted for the quadrupole deformation from the extrapolated 2{sup +} excitation energy.

  6. A background simulation method for cosmogenic nuclides inside HPGe detectors for rare event experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jian; Zeng, Zhi; Ma, Hao; Yue, Qian; Cheng, Jianping; Li, Jin

    2014-11-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides inside germanium detectors contribute background noise spectra quite different from ordinary external sources. We propose and discuss a nuclide decay and level transition model based on graph theory to understand the background contribution of the decay of cosmogenic nuclides inside a germanium crystal. In this work, not only the level transition process, but the detector response time was also taken into consideration to decide whether or not to apply coincidence summing-up. We simulated the background spectrum of the internal cosmogenic nuclides in a germanium detector, and found some unique phenomena caused by the coincidence summing-up effect in the simulated spectrum. Thus, the background spectrum of each cosmogenic nuclide can be quantitatively obtained.

  7. Facies composition calculated from the sonic, neutron, and density log suite, upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Sandstones and dolomites of the Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation are treated here as four-component systems consisting of fluid-filled pore space, quartz, dolomite, and anhydrite. Response equations of sonic, neutron, and density logs form a system of four simultaneous equations. With four equations and four unknowns, the composition of upper Minnelusa facies is defined by the three-log suite and can be calculated by solving a 4 ?? 4 matrix. Such calculations of facies composition help in establishing subsurface correlations and yield information on the diagenesis and physical character of upper Minnelusa sandstones and dolomites. Applications of composition calculations are illustrated by examples drawn from the area of the West Mellott field (T52N, R68W), where the upper Minnelusa is at depths of about 7000 ft (2100m). -from Authors

  8. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Möller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-12

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ≤ A ≤ 330. The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop (FRLDM) with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than five million different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (ϵ) and the spherical-harmonic (β) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (ϵ,γ) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about one MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on β-delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. In addition these studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.

  9. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Möller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-12

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ≤ A ≤ 330. The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop (FRLDM) with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than five million different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (ϵ) andmore » the spherical-harmonic (β) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (ϵ,γ) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about one MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on β-delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. In addition these studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.« less

  10. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ≤A ≤330 . The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop model with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than 5 000 000 different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (ɛ ) and the spherical-harmonic (β ) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (ɛ ,γ ) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about 1 MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on β -delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. These studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.

  11. Steady-state creep of bent reinforced metal-composite plates with consideration of their reduced resistance to transverse shear 2. Analysis of calculated results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovskii, A. P.

    2014-07-01

    Deformation of annular plates with different structures of helical reinforcement is studied. It is demonstrated that the use of the classical theory for calculating steady-state creep for thick reinforced plates subjected to bending leads to underprediction of the compliance of thin-walled metal-composite structures. It is also shown that there are significant shear strain rates in the binder of such plates, which has to be taken into account and which is mainly responsible for creep strain accumulation. Results calculated by two different models, which take into account the composite structure, are compared.

  12. Regolith history from cosmic-ray-produced nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A model is given for regolith development by which the meteoroid impact parameters (time of last major impact, soil escape rate, and soil turnover depths) are determined from the Gd isotope data for the Apollo 15 and 16 drill stems. The time of the last major impact, cosmic-ray-produced-nuclide-clock reset time, at the Apollo 15 site is 0.6-1.3 aeon. The reset time at the Apollo 16 site is between 1.54 plus or minus 0.14 and 3.3-4.0 aeon. The average soil escape rate from the moon corresponding to the 1.54 plus or minus 0.14 aeon reset time is between 70 and 110 cm/aeon and corresponding to the 3.3 and 4.0 aeon reset time is between 36 and 56 cm/aeon. The soil turnover depth for the 1.54 plus or minus 0.14 aeon reset time is 250 cm and for the 3.3-4.0 aeon reset time is 750 cm. The Gd data restrict the change with time of the meteoroid flux during the past 1.4 aeon.

  13. Detection of landscape transience using cosmogenic nuclides and topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Upland landscapes are frequently perturbed by changing tectonics and climate, which can lead to temporally and spatially varying erosion rates. Hillslopes and channels respond to these changes with different rates, and the dissonance between hillslope and channel response times can be exploited to gain information about the nature and timing of landscape transience. I explore the limits to which differences between channel and hillslope processes can be used to detect transience. Slowing channel erosion rates are difficult to detect, whereas increased erosion rates can be detected if erosion rates more than double. Signals of transient erosion driven by upslope propagation of channel incision can persist for thousands to tens of thousands of years; the time perturbations can be detected is proportional to the square of the hillslope length and the inverse of the hillslope sediment transport coefficient. Climate driven ("top down") and tectonic driven ("bottom up") have different responses to transient perturbation, and lead to different sediment flux responses that are reflected in basinwide cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. Climate driven perturbations are mirrored in cosmogenic concentrations leaving basins whereas tectonic perturbations tend to be averaged when estimated from basinwide cosmogenics.

  14. Modified microspheres for cleaning liquid wastes from radioactive nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Danilin, Lev; Drozhzhin, Valery

    2007-07-01

    An effective solution of nuclear industry problems related to deactivation of technological and natural waters polluted with toxic and radioactive elements is the development of inorganic sorbents capable of not only withdrawing radioactive nuclides, but also of providing their subsequent conservation under conditions of long-term storage. A successful technical approach to creation of sorbents can be the use of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres. Such microspheres are formed from mineral additives during coal burning in furnaces of boiler units of electric power stations. Despite some reduction in exchange capacity per a mass unit of sorbents the latter have high kinetic characteristics that makes it possible to carry out the sorption process both in static and dynamic modes. Taking into account large industrial resources of microspheres as by-products of electric power stations, a comparative simplicity of the modification process, as well as good kinetic and capacitor characteristics, this class of sorbents can be considered promising enough for solving the problems of cleaning liquid radioactive wastes of various pollution levels. (authors)

  15. Engineering refinements to overcome default nuclide regulatory constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R.; Capitelli, P.; Sheh, Y.; Lom, C.; Graham, M.; Germain, J. St.

    2005-12-01

    The "classical" positron emitting radionuclides include oxygen-15, nitrogen-13 and carbon-11 which possess unique properties for medical imaging. They are radionuclides of the fundamental elements of biological matter. They each possess short half-lives which allow their use in designed radiotracers for clinical investigations with minimal risk and they are readily able to be produced in sufficient activities by low energy nuclear reactions. At present several accelerator manufacturers offer production packages for these radionuclides emphasizing targetry with consideration of the cyclotron extracted energies for nuclide production and on-line chemistry systems for the continuous production of specific precursors or radiotracers. Following the installation and acceptance of the MSKCC TR 19/9 Cyclotron, our experience with the procured chemistry module for the preparation of oxygen-15 labeled water has forced us to examine the design and the operation of the synthetic unit with a view toward the state of New York's regulations addressing the environmental pollution from radioactive materials. The chemistry module was refined with subtle modifications to the chemistry procedure/unit and our experience with the unit is presented as an example of our approach to insure regulatory compliance.

  16. Phase II Nuclide Partition Laboratory Study Influence of Cellulose Degradation Products on the Transport of Nuclides from SRS Shallow Land Burial Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-10-04

    Degradation products of cellulosic materials (e.g., paper and wood products) can significantly influence the subsurface transport of metals and radionuclides. Codisposal of radionuclides with cellulosic materials in the E-Area slit trenches at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is, therefore, expected to influence nuclide fate and transport in the subsurface. Due to the complexities of these systems and the scarcity of site-specific data, the effects of cellulose waste loading and its subsequent influence on nuclide transport are not well established.

  17. Recommended Partition Coefficient (Kd) Values for Nuclide Partitioning in the Presence of Cellulose Degradation Products

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2001-02-23

    This report documents the data analysis of the results of the described laboratory studies in order to recommend Kd values for use in Performance Assessment modeling of nuclide transport in the presence of CDP.

  18. Measurements of Cosmogenic Nuclides in and their Significance for Samples Returned from Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Herzog, G. F.; Reedy, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with matter produce cosmogenic nuclides (CNs). Ever since they were first measured nearly 50 years ago, cosmogenic nuclides have been used to infer the irradiation histories of terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. Here we call for an extension of such measurements to samples returned from an asteroidal surface. The information gained in this way will be important for elucidating the evolution of the asteroidal surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2011-12-26

    One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

  20. Fluvial Bedrock Incision Rates in Taroko Gorge (Taiwan) From in Situ-Produced Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, M.; Hovius, N.; Willett, S.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Synal, H.

    2003-12-01

    Climate, through its influence on erosion, plays a key role in the tectonic evolution of the continental crust. Tectonics may in turn moderate both local and global climate, for example through the construction of mountain belts. Geodynamic modeling has yielded testable hypotheses concerning the feedbacks between climate, erosion and tectonics. The models, however, are not matched by an observational data base to test their predictions. This is primarily because erosion, the key parameter linking cause and consequence, has proved difficult to measure. Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations can be used to determine present and past rates of river incision, a key erosional process, and thus establish how bedrock rivers have responded to recent change of climate. The effects of such changes are recorded in fluvially sculpted landforms in mountain valleys. The age of these fluvially sculpted surfaces can be dated by cosmogenic nuclides. The concentration of cosmogenic nuclides in rocks exposed at the Earth's surface is proportional to the total duration of their exposure. The age of the surface and their absolute altitude above the active river channel is used to constrain valley lowering rates. We applied this approach in the Taroko gorge of the Liwu Chi river, Taiwan, an ideal natural laboratory for fluvial erosion studies because of its extreme, monsoonal climate and steady tectonic forcing, absence of significant glaciation, and availability of high-quality measurements of present day erosion. Fluvial incision rates between February 2000 and May 2002 are around 5 mm/yr (Hartshorn et al., 2002). Similar to these short-term incision rates are the long-term exhumation rates estimated from apatite fission tracks. However, 2.4 kyr old terrace deposits upstream of the Taroko gorge imply higher intermediate-term incision rates of 11 mm/yr (Liew, 1988). Minimum surface exposure ages derived from the concentration of in situ-produced 36Cl in marble, and corrected for topographic

  1. Burnup calculations and chemical analysis of irradiated fuel samples studied in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, P.; Guenther-Leopold, I.; Berger, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The isotopic compositions of 5 UO{sub 2} samples irradiated in a Swiss PWR power plant, which were investigated in the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II programme, were calculated using the CASMO-4 and BOXER assembly codes. The burnups of the samples range from 50 to 90 MWd/kg. The results for a large number of actinide and fission product nuclides were compared to those of chemical analyses performed using a combination of chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry. A good agreement of calculated and measured concentrations is found for many of the nuclides investigated with both codes. The concentrations of the Pu isotopes are mostly predicted within {+-}10%, the two codes giving quite different results, except for {sup 242}Pu. Relatively significant deviations are found for some isotopes of Cs and Sm, and large discrepancies are observed for Eu and Gd. The overall quality of the predictions by the two codes is comparable, and the deviations from the experimental data do not generally increase with burnup. (authors)

  2. A MATLAB toolbox and Excel workbook for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and major element composition of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, Geoffrey A.; Hacker, Bradley R.

    2016-02-01

    To interpret seismic images, rock seismic velocities need to be calculated at elevated pressure and temperature for arbitrary compositions. This technical report describes an algorithm, software, and data to make such calculations from the physical properties of minerals. It updates a previous compilation and Excel® spreadsheet and includes new MATLAB® tools for the calculations. The database of 60 mineral end-members includes all parameters needed to estimate density and elastic moduli for many crustal and mantle rocks at conditions relevant to the upper few hundreds of kilometers of Earth. The behavior of α and β quartz is treated as a special case, owing to its unusual Poisson's ratio and thermal expansion that vary rapidly near the α-β transition. The MATLAB tools allow integration of these calculations into a variety of modeling and data analysis projects.

  3. Calculation of 2-temperature plasma thermo-physical properties considering condensed phases: application to CO2-CH4 plasma: part 1. Composition and thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Rong, Mingzhe; Cressault, Yann; Yang, Fei; Niu, Chunping; Sun, Hao

    2016-10-01

    As the first part of this series of papers, a new calculation method for composition and thermodynamic properties of 2-temperature plasma considering condensed species under local chemical equilibrium (LCE) and local phase equilibrium assumption is presented. The 2-T mass action law and chemical potential are used to determine the composition of multiphase system. The thermo-physical properties of CO2-CH4 mixture, which may be a possible substitution for SF6, are calculated by this method as an example. The influence of condensed graphite, non-LTE effect, mixture ratio and pressure on the thermo-physical properties has been discussed. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of CO2-CH4 plasmas.

  4. Calculation of the Rate of Combustion of a Metallized Composite Solid Propellant with Allowance for the Size Distribution of Agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poryazov, V. A.; Krainov, A. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    A physicomathematical model of combustion of a metallized composite solid propellant based on ammonium perchlorate has been presented. The model takes account of the thermal effect of decomposition of a condensed phase (c phase), convection, diffusion, the exothermal chemical reaction in a gas phase, the heating and combustion of aluminum particles in the gas flow, and the velocity lag of the particles behind the gas. The influence of the granulometric composition of aluminum particles escaping from the combustion surface on the linear rate of combustion has been investigated. It has been shown that information not only on the kinetics of chemical reactions in the gas phase, but also on the granulometric composition of aluminum particles escaping from the surface of the c phase into the gas, is of importance for determination of the linear rate of combustion.

  5. The uranium and thorium decay series nuclides in Mt. St. Helens effusives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J. T.; Krishnaswami, S.; Turekian, K. K.; Melson, W. G.; Hopson, C. A.

    1982-08-01

    The concentrations of the radionuclides 238U, 230Th, 226Ra, 210Pb, 210Po, 232Th, 228Ra and 228Th and the abundances of major elements were determined in samples from all major eruptions of Mt. St. Helens from May 18, 1980 through June 21, 1981. During this time the effusives changed from plagioclase-phyric dacite to a more andesitic composition but the concentrations of U and Th series nuclides were measurably invariant. The average 232Th/ 238U weight ratio in the rocks is 2.4 and the 230Th/ 232Th activity ratio equals the 238U/ 232Th activity ratio indicating no fractionation of U from Th during magma genesis. 226Ra activity is in excess (˜40% on average) of its parent 230Th whereas 228Ra is in radioactive equilibrium with its parent 232Th, constraining the time of magma formation between 30 and 10 4 years prior to eruption. The 210Pb/ 226Ra activity ratios in the samples average 1.0, with a 20% scatter on either side, but allowing for volatile 210Pb loss at time of eruption excess 210Pb over 226Ra is inferred, indicating that the time of magma formation was within the last 150 years. 210Po was virtually absent in the samples immediately after eruption, indicating its total loss by volatilization during eruption. The quantity of 210Po volatilized during the May 18, 1980 event is estimated to be in the range of 300 Ci from the effusives and as much as 5000 Ci total including losses from heated slide material. The 222Rn activity volatilized should have been comparable to the 210Po activity released.

  6. Experimental determination of elemental compositions and densities of several common liquid scintillators.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barquero, Leonor; Los Arcos, José M

    2010-01-01

    New accurate data for the density and the elemental composition of several common liquid scintillators have been determined in this work. These data can be used to correctly determine or calculate the counting efficiency of radio-nuclides as well as to evaluate more accurately the uncertainties in LSC measurements due to variability on the composition of scintillators. The discrepancy between nominal densities at 20 degrees C and the real densities at 20 degrees C or 16 degrees C can reach up to 4% among different batches of commercial scintillators all having the same nominal composition. Also significant differences in the elemental composition of commercial cocktails have been found compared to the nominal values. These differences range from 2% up to 260% depending on the element and the scintillator being measured. PMID:20106669

  7. Implementation of Improved Transverse Shear Calculations and Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Analyses of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lin-Fa; Kim, Soo; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear and strain rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composite laminated plates under high strain rate impact loadings. A recently developed strength of materials based micromechanics model, incorporating a set of nonlinear, strain rate dependent constitutive equations for the polymer matrix, is extended to account for the transverse shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of transverse shear deformation are investigated in order to improve the developed strain rate dependent micromechanics model. The validities of these assumptions are investigated using numerical and theoretical approaches. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio of the composite is developed. The revised micromechanics model is then implemented into a higher order laminated plate theory which is modified to include the effects of inelastic strains. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the mechanical response of composite plates under high strain rate loadings. Results show the transverse shear stresses cannot be neglected in the impact problem. A significant level of strain rate dependency and material nonlinearity is found in the deformation response of representative composite specimens.

  8. The Navy/NASA Engine Program (NNEP89): Interfacing the program for the calculation of complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions (CEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    The NNEP is a general computer program for calculating aircraft engine performance. NNEP has been used extensively to calculate the design and off-design (matched) performance of a broad range of turbine engines, ranging from subsonic turboprops to variable cycle engines for supersonic transports. Recently, however, there has been increased interest in applications for which NNEP is not capable of simulating, such as the use of alternate fuels including cryogenic fuels and the inclusion of chemical dissociation effects at high temperatures. To overcome these limitations, NNEP was extended by including a general chemical equilibrium method. This permits consideration of any propellant system and the calculation of performance with dissociation effects. The new extended program is referred to as NNEP89.

  9. Constraining Landscape History and Glacial Erosivity Using Paired Cosmogenic Nuclides in Upernavik, Northwest Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Graly, Joseph A.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude landscape evolution processes have the potential to preserve old, relict surfaces through burial by cold-based, nonerosive glacial ice. To investigate landscape history and age in the high Arctic, we analyzed in situ cosmogenic Be(sup 10) and Al (sup 26) in 33 rocks from Upernavik, northwest Greenland. We sampled adjacent bedrock-boulder pairs along a 100 km transect at elevations up to 1000 m above sea level. Bedrock samples gave significantly older apparent exposure ages than corresponding boulder samples, and minimum limiting ages increased with elevation. Two-isotope calculations Al(sup26)/B(sup 10) on 20 of the 33 samples yielded minimum limiting exposure durations up to 112 k.y., minimum limiting burial durations up to 900 k.y., and minimum limiting total histories up to 990 k.y. The prevalence of BE(sup 10) and Al(sup 26) inherited from previous periods of exposure, especially in bedrock samples at high elevation, indicates that these areas record long and complex surface exposure histories, including significant periods of burial with little subglacial erosion. The long total histories suggest that these high elevation surfaces were largely preserved beneath cold-based, nonerosive ice or snowfields for at least the latter half of the Quaternary. Because of high concentrations of inherited nuclides, only the six youngest boulder samples appear to record the timing of ice retreat. These six samples suggest deglaciation of the Upernavik coast at 11.3 +/- 0.5 ka (average +/- 1 standard deviation). There is no difference in deglaciation age along the 100 km sample transect, indicating that the ice-marginal position retreated rapidly at rates of approx.120 m yr(sup-1).

  10. New effective moduli of isotropic viscoelastic composites. Part II. Comparison of approximate calculation with the analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, N. A.; Simankin, F. A.; Manabaev, K. K.

    2016-04-01

    A new approximate algorithm for calculating a stress-strain state of viscoelastic bodies is used. The algorithm is based on the derivation of the expressions of time-effective modules. These modules are obtained by iterative changes, compressing the fork of Voigt-Reuss. As an example the analytic solution about the action of a concentrated force on the viscoelastic half-space is compared with the approximate solution. Numerical calculations are performed for a wide range of relaxation characteristics of a viscoelastic half-space. Results of the comparison of stresses and displacements with the analytic solution give coincidence within 3... 15%.

  11. Assessment of experimental bond dissociation energies using composite ab initio methods and evaluation of the performances of density functional methods in the calculation of bond dissociation energies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jin-Ti; Huang, Hao; Guo, Qing-Xiang

    2003-01-01

    Composite ab initio CBS-Q and G3 methods were used to calculate the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of over 200 compounds listed in CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (2002 ed.). It was found that these two methods agree with each other excellently in the calculation of BDEs, and they can predict BDEs within 10 kJ/mol of the experimental values. Using these two methods, it was found that among the examined compounds 161 experimental BDEs are valid because the standard deviation between the experimental and theoretical values for them is only 8.6 kJ/mol. Nevertheless, 40 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be highly inaccurate as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 20 kJ/mol. Furthermore, 11 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be seriously flawed as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 40 kJ/mol. Using the 161 cautiously validated experimental BDEs, we then assessed the performances of the standard density functional (DFT) methods including B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91, and BH&HLYP in the calculation of BDEs. It was found that the BH&HLYP method performed poorly for the BDE calculations. B3LYP, B3P86, and B3PW91, however, performed reasonably well for the calculation of BDEs with standard deviations of about 12.1-18.0 kJ/mol. Nonetheless, all the DFT methods underestimated the BDEs by 4-17 kJ/mol in average. Sometimes, the underestimation by the DFT methods could be as high as 40-60 kJ/mol. Therefore, the DFT methods were more reliable for relative BDE calculations than for absolute BDE calculations. Finally, it was observed that the basis set effects on the BDEs calculated by the DFT methods were usually small except for the heteroatom-hydrogen BDEs. PMID:14632451

  12. Assessment of experimental bond dissociation energies using composite ab initio methods and evaluation of the performances of density functional methods in the calculation of bond dissociation energies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jin-Ti; Huang, Hao; Guo, Qing-Xiang

    2003-01-01

    Composite ab initio CBS-Q and G3 methods were used to calculate the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of over 200 compounds listed in CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (2002 ed.). It was found that these two methods agree with each other excellently in the calculation of BDEs, and they can predict BDEs within 10 kJ/mol of the experimental values. Using these two methods, it was found that among the examined compounds 161 experimental BDEs are valid because the standard deviation between the experimental and theoretical values for them is only 8.6 kJ/mol. Nevertheless, 40 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be highly inaccurate as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 20 kJ/mol. Furthermore, 11 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be seriously flawed as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 40 kJ/mol. Using the 161 cautiously validated experimental BDEs, we then assessed the performances of the standard density functional (DFT) methods including B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91, and BH&HLYP in the calculation of BDEs. It was found that the BH&HLYP method performed poorly for the BDE calculations. B3LYP, B3P86, and B3PW91, however, performed reasonably well for the calculation of BDEs with standard deviations of about 12.1-18.0 kJ/mol. Nonetheless, all the DFT methods underestimated the BDEs by 4-17 kJ/mol in average. Sometimes, the underestimation by the DFT methods could be as high as 40-60 kJ/mol. Therefore, the DFT methods were more reliable for relative BDE calculations than for absolute BDE calculations. Finally, it was observed that the basis set effects on the BDEs calculated by the DFT methods were usually small except for the heteroatom-hydrogen BDEs.

  13. The isotopic composition of iron-group galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Leske, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Results from studies of the isotopic composition of iron group elements in the galactic cosmic radiation are reviewed, emphasizing recently reported measurements from the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The observed isotope distributions for the elements Ti through Mn are in good agreement with those expected for a propagated solar-like source composition, with the possible exception of an enhanced abundance of Ti-50. It is found that a significant fraction of the radioactive secondary nuclide Mn-54 has decayed, indicating a confinement time of iron group cosmic rays in the galaxy of at least 2 Myr. The source ratio Fe-54/Fe-56 is found to be consistent with the solar value, but the ratio Ni-60/Ni-58 is greater than solar by a factor of 2.8+/-1.0. The measured abundance of Co-59 is significantly greater than the calculated secondary contribution, suggesting that this nuclide has been produced in the source regions by the electron capture decay of Ni-59 and implying a time delay between nucleosynthesis and acceleration approximately greater than 10(exp 5) yr.

  14. Applications of in situ cosmogenic nuclides in the geologic site characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gosse, J.C.; Harrington, C.D.; Whitney, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The gradual buildup of rare isotopes from interactions between cosmic rays and atoms in an exposed rock provides a new method of directly determining the exposure age of rock surfaces. The cosmogenic nuclide method can also provide constraints on erosion rates and the length of time surface exposure was interrupted by burial. Numerous successful applications of the technique have been imperative to the complete surface geologic characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential high level nuclear waste repository. In this short paper, we summarize the cosmogenic nuclide method and describe with examples some the utility of the technique in geologic site characterization. We report preliminary results from our ongoing work at Yucca Mountain.

  15. Reprocessing system with nuclide separation based on chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tachibana, Yu; Koyama, Shi-ichi

    2013-07-01

    We have proposed the reprocessing system with nuclide separation processes based on the chromatographic technique in the hydrochloric acid solution system. Our proposed system consists of the dissolution process, the reprocessing process, the minor actinide separation process, and nuclide separation processes. In the reprocessing and separation processes, the pyridine resin is used as a main separation media. It was confirmed that the dissolution in the hydrochloric acid solution is easily achieved by the plasma voloxidation and by the addition of oxygen peroxide into the hydrochloric acid solution.

  16. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, John T.; Kunz, Walter E.; Cates, Michael R.; Franks, Larry A.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fissions are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for .sup.239 Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  17. Isotopic hysteresis in detrital cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rate studies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, J.; Gasparini, N. M.; Crosby, B. T.; Brocard, G. Y.; Belmont, P.

    2013-12-01

    In equilibrium landscapes, the concentration of beryllium-10 (10Be) from fluvially transported material is expected to quantitatively reflect basin-wide denudation rates. No isotopic time-dependent path is considered because the concentrations reflect an integrated measurement over a sufficiently long period of time to be static. However, the responses of landscapes to changing conditions are often addressed with cosmogenic nuclides in transient landscapes to identify and quantify the primary topographic and climatic controls on erosion. With the advent of techniques that allow event-scale measurement of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations over the course of a flood wave, in the case of meteoric 10Be, or over the course of an uplift wave, in the case of in situ-produced 10Be, we can now evaluate the how the isotope changes and what the 'mean' denudation rate from a single time means. Meteoric 10Be concentrations can be extracted from, and measured in, milligram-sized sediment samples. This attribute enables us to measure suspended sediment through a hydrograph. Here, we give a case study in an agricultural setting. The meteoric 10Be concentration in river sediment changes with the source areas of the fine sediment and fluxes of material supplied to the stream. The average concentration from the couplet of the rising and falling limbs of the hydrograph can differ from the concentration of the sediment that is preserved in depo-centers. Using traditional in situ-produced 10Be, the timescale of the perturbation must be sufficiently long to change the isotopic composition of the bedload, but also for the landscape to respond to the forcing factor. Here, we give an example from a transient landscape where a wave of uplift moves through the basin and a wave of incision follows in its wake. In this setting, 10Be from detrital quartz is derived from both the incising, adjusting lowland and the unadjusted, relict upland, and the integrated 10Be concentrations still provide a

  18. Measuring the noble metal and iodine composition of extracted noble metal phase from spent nuclear fuel using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Palomares, R I; Dayman, K J; Landsberger, S; Biegalski, S R; Soderquist, C Z; Casella, A J; Brady Raap, M C; Schwantes, J M

    2015-04-01

    Masses of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and radionuclides are identified and the masses quantified using neutron activation analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. PMID:25644079

  19. 26Al - 10Be cosmogenic nuclide isochron burial dating in combination with luminescence dating of two Danube terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhuber, Stephanie; Braumann, Sandra; Lüthgens, Christopher; Fiebig, Markus; Häuselmann, Philipp; Schäfer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Quaternary sediment record in the Vienna Basin is influenced by two main factors: (1) the tectonic development of a pull apart basin along a sinistral strike slip fault system between the Eastern Alps and the West Carpathians and by (2) strongly varying sediment supply during the Plio- and Pleistocene. From the Late Pannonian (8.8 Ma) onward a large-scale regional uplift (Decker et al., 2005) controls terrace formation in the Vienna Basin. The main sediment supply into the Vienna Basin originates from the Danube, and subordinately from tributaries to the south such as Piesting, Fischa, Leitha and from the north by the river March. Today the Danube forms a large floodplain that is bordered to the north by one large Pleistocene terrace, the Gänserndorf Terrace that is situated 17 m above todays water level. Farther to the east a smaller terrace, the Schlosshof Terrace, reaches 25 m above todays water level. These terrace levels are tilted by movement of underlying blocks (Peresson, 2006). Both, the Schlosshof and Gänserndorf terraces consist of successions of up to 2 m thick gravel beds with intercalated sand layers or -lenses that may locally reach thicknesses up to 0.8 m. At each terrace one gavel pit was selected to calculate the time of terrace deposition by luminescence dating in combination with 26Al/10Be cosmogenic nuclide isochrone dating (Balco and Rovery, 2008). Five quartz stones from the base of each terrace were physically and chemically processed to obtain Al and Be oxides for Acceleration Mass Spectrometry. Sand samples for luminescence dating were taken above the cosmogenic nuclide samples from the closest suitable sand body. Decker et al., 2005. QSR 24, 307-322 Peresson, 2006 Geologie der österreichischen Bundesländer Niederösterreich 255-258 Balco and Rovey, 2008. AJS 908, 1083-1114 Thanks to FWF P 23138-N19, OMAA 90öu17

  20. Synthesis, microwave spectrum, quantum chemical calculations, and conformational composition of the novel compound cyclopropylethylidynephosphine (C₃H₅CH₂C≡P).

    PubMed

    Samdal, Svein; Møllendal, Harald; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2014-10-30

    The synthesis of the novel compound cyclopropylethylidynephosphine (C3H5CH2C≡P) and its microwave spectrum are reported together with quantum chemical calculations. The spectrum, which reveals the existence of two conformers, has been recorded in the 38-109 GHz spectral range at room temperature. The H-C-CH2-C chain of atoms is synclinal in one rotamer denoted sc, and antiperiplanar in the second conformer called ap. The spectra of the ground vibrational state and two vibrationally excited states were assigned for each rotamer. The vibrational frequencies of these excited states were determined by relative intensity measurements. Relative intensity measurements were also conducted to determine the energy difference between ap and sc. The latter conformer was found to be the lower-energy form and E(ap) - E(sc) was determined to be 0.9(4) kJ/mol. The microwave study has been augmented by quantum chemical calculations at the CCSD/cc-pVQZ and MP2/cc-pVTZ levels of theory. The CCSD predictions were generally in good agreement with experiment, while somewhat mixed results were obtained in the MP2 calculations.

  1. Comparison of RESRAD with hand calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is a continuation of an earlier comparison done with two other computer programs, GENII and PATHRAE. The dose calculations by the two programs were compared with each other and with hand calculations. These band calculations have now been compared with RESRAD Version 5.41 to examine the use of standard models and parameters in this computer program. The hand calculations disclosed a significant computational error in RESRAD. The Pu-241 ingestion doses are five orders of magnitude too small. In addition, the external doses from some nuclides differ greatly from expected values. Both of these deficiencies have been corrected in later versions of RESRAD.

  2. COMPONENTS OF LASER SYSTEMS AND STABILITY PROBLEMS: Diffraction calculation of the field in a composite three-mirror unstable resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkin, N. N.; Korotkov, V. A.; Napartovich, A. P.; Troshchiev, V. E.

    1988-08-01

    A numerical investigation is made of a two-dimensional model of a composite unstable resonator with three mirrors. The relevant parabolic equations are solved using a three-layer scheme and a fast Fourier transformation algorithm. A strong dependence of the distribution of the intensity of the output wave and of the distribution of the radiation in the far-field zone on the displacement of a reference mirror over distances of the order of one wavelength provides an opportunity for the control of optical characteristics of a system.

  3. MAGMIX: a basic program to calculate viscosities of interacting magmas of differing composition, temperature, and water content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frost, T.P.; Lindsay, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    MAGMIX is a BASIC program designed to predict viscosities at thermal equilibrium of interacting magmas of differing compositions, initial temperatures, crystallinities, crystal sizes, and water content for any mixing proportion between end members. From the viscosities of the end members at thermal equilibrium, it is possible to predict the styles of magma interaction expected for different initial conditions. The program is designed for modeling the type of magma interaction between hypersthenenormative magmas at upper crustal conditions. Utilization of the program to model magma interaction at pressures higher than 200 MPa would require modification of the program to account for the effects of pressure on heat of fusion and magma density. ?? 1988.

  4. Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions, Rocket Performance, Incident and Reflected Shocks, and Chapman-Jouguet Detonations. Interim Revision, March 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed description of the equations and computer program for computations involving chemical equilibria in complex systems is given. A free-energy minimization technique is used. The program permits calculations such as (1) chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states (T,P), (H,P), (S,P), (T,V), (U,V), or (S,V), (2) theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion, (3) incident and reflected shock properties, and (4) Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties. The program considers condensed species as well as gaseous species.

  5. Development of Advanced Nuclide Separation and Recovery Methods using Ion-Exchanhge Techniques in Nuclear Backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi

    The development of compact separation and recovery methods using selective ion-exchange techniques is very important for the reprocessing and high-level liquid wastes (HLLWs) treatment in the nuclear backend field. The selective nuclide separation techniques are effective for the volume reduction of wastes and the utilization of valuable nuclides, and expected for the construction of advanced nuclear fuel cycle system and the rationalization of waste treatment. In order to accomplish the selective nuclide separation, the design and synthesis of novel adsorbents are essential for the development of compact and precise separation processes. The present paper deals with the preparation of highly functional and selective hybrid microcapsules enclosing nano-adsorbents in the alginate gel polymer matrices by sol-gel methods, their characterization and the clarification of selective adsorption properties by batch and column methods. The selective separation of Cs, Pd and Re in real HLLW was further accomplished by using novel microcapsules, and an advanced nuclide separation system was proposed by the combination of selective processes using microcapsules.

  6. An improved choice of oscillator basis for banana shaped nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1994-03-01

    The question of the appropriate choice of oscillator basis functions for studying exotic nuclear shapes is raised. Difficulties with the conventional choice of oscillator basis states are noted for shapes having a large banana component. A prescription for an improved oscillator basis to study these shapes is given. It can be applied in a more general context. New calculations with this improved basis are presented for the banana deformation mode. The change of basis gives results that improve the prospects of finding states in the banana minimum for many isotopes of Tl, Pb and Bi.

  7. Kinetics analysis and quantitative calculations for the successive radioactive decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiping; Yan, Deyue; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2015-01-01

    The general radioactive decay kinetics equations with branching were developed and the analytical solutions were derived by Laplace transform method. The time dependence of all the nuclide concentrations can be easily obtained by applying the equations to any known radioactive decay series. Taking the example of thorium radioactive decay series, the concentration evolution over time of various nuclide members in the family has been given by the quantitative numerical calculations with a computer. The method can be applied to the quantitative prediction and analysis for the daughter nuclides in the successive decay with branching of the complicated radioactive processes, such as the natural radioactive decay series, nuclear reactor, nuclear waste disposal, nuclear spallation, synthesis and identification of superheavy nuclides, radioactive ion beam physics and chemistry, etc.

  8. Calculated absorption and scattering properties of gold nanoparticles of different size, shape, and composition: applications in biological imaging and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prashant K; Lee, Kyeong Seok; El-Sayed, Ivan H; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2006-04-13

    The selection of nanoparticles for achieving efficient contrast for biological and cell imaging applications, as well as for photothermal therapeutic applications, is based on the optical properties of the nanoparticles. We use Mie theory and discrete dipole approximation method to calculate absorption and scattering efficiencies and optical resonance wavelengths for three commonly used classes of nanoparticles: gold nanospheres, silica-gold nanoshells, and gold nanorods. The calculated spectra clearly reflect the well-known dependence of nanoparticle optical properties viz. the resonance wavelength, the extinction cross-section, and the ratio of scattering to absorption, on the nanoparticle dimensions. A systematic quantitative study of the various trends is presented. By increasing the size of gold nanospheres from 20 to 80 nm, the magnitude of extinction as well as the relative contribution of scattering to the extinction rapidly increases. Gold nanospheres in the size range commonly employed ( approximately 40 nm) show an absorption cross-section 5 orders higher than conventional absorbing dyes, while the magnitude of light scattering by 80-nm gold nanospheres is 5 orders higher than the light emission from strongly fluorescing dyes. The variation in the plasmon wavelength maximum of nanospheres, i.e., from approximately 520 to 550 nm, is however too limited to be useful for in vivo applications. Gold nanoshells are found to have optical cross-sections comparable to and even higher than the nanospheres. Additionally, their optical resonances lie favorably in the near-infrared region. The resonance wavelength can be rapidly increased by either increasing the total nanoshell size or increasing the ratio of the core-to-shell radius. The total extinction of nanoshells shows a linear dependence on their total size, however, it is independent of the core/shell radius ratio. The relative scattering contribution to the extinction can be rapidly increased by increasing

  9. Comparative evaluation of body composition methods and predictions, and calculation of density and hydration fraction of fat-free mass, in obese women.

    PubMed

    Fuller, N J; Sawyer, M B; Elia, M

    1994-07-01

    The objective of this study was to apply a three-component model of body composition to a group of obese women in order to (a) establish the relative value of a number of readily available prediction equations by comparison of the extent of agreement between these predictions and body composition estimated by the model and other reference methods and (b) evaluate density and hydration of fat-free mass. Estimation of body composition was carried out by reference methods and prediction equations and the usefulness of these prediction equations for application specifically to obese women was evaluated. The subjects were 15 obese, otherwise healthy, Caucasian women (body mass index > 30kg/m2 and body fat > 40% of body weight, as originally determined using densitometry). Body composition was estimated using three established reference methods (deuterium dilution which primarily measures total body water, densitometry for body fat and fat-free mass and total body potassium) and the three component model constructed from deuterium dilution and densitometry. Density and hydration fraction of the fat-free mass were calculated from appropriate values obtained as integral parts of the three-component model. In addition, body composition was predicted from various prediction equations incorporating weight and height (some of which include a factor for age), from a number of prediction equations utilizing different terms involving the same whole-body bio-electrical impedance measurement and from measurements of skinfold thickness and near infrared interactance. The extent of agreement between methods was assessed using bias and 95% limits of agreement. Mean density of fat-free mass was found to be 1.104 kg/l (s.d. 0.006kg/l) with a range of 1.093 to 1.117 kg/l, and mean hydration fraction was 0.712 (s.d. 0.016) with a range of hydration from 68.2% to 75.1% (all values were calculated from the three-component model). In general, the reference methods (densitometry, deuterium

  10. The light curve of SN 1987A revisited: constraining production masses of radioactive nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Timmes, F. X.; Magkotsios, Georgios

    2014-09-01

    We revisit the evidence for the contribution of the long-lived radioactive nuclides {sup 44}Ti, {sup 55}Fe, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, and {sup 60}Co to the UVOIR light curve of SN 1987A. We show that the V-band luminosity constitutes a roughly constant fraction of the bolometric luminosity between 900 and 1900 days, and we obtain an approximate bolometric light curve out to 4334 days by scaling the late time V-band data by a constant factor where no bolometric light curve data is available. Considering the five most relevant decay chains starting at {sup 44}Ti, {sup 55}Co, {sup 56}Ni, {sup 57}Ni, and {sup 60}Co, we perform a least squares fit to the constructed composite bolometric light curve. For the nickel isotopes, we obtain best fit values of M({sup 56}Ni) = (7.1 ± 0.3) × 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉} and M({sup 57}Ni) = (4.1 ± 1.8) × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}. Our best fit {sup 44}Ti mass is M({sup 44}Ti) = (0.55 ± 0.17) × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}, which is in disagreement with the much higher (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} recently derived from INTEGRAL observations. The associated uncertainties far exceed the best fit values for {sup 55}Co and {sup 60}Co and, as a result, we only give upper limits on the production masses of M({sup 55}Co) < 7.2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} and M({sup 60}Co) < 1.7 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. Furthermore, we find that the leptonic channels in the decay of {sup 57}Co (internal conversion and Auger electrons) are a significant contribution and constitute up to 15.5% of the total luminosity. Consideration of the kinetic energy of these electrons is essential in lowering our best fit nickel isotope production ratio to [{sup 57}Ni/{sup 56}Ni] = 2.5 ± 1.1, which is still somewhat high but is in agreement with gamma-ray observations and model predictions.

  11. Molecular structures and conformational compositions of 2-chlorobutane and 2-bromobutane; an investigation using gas-phase electron-diffraction data and ab initio molecular orbital calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarset, Kirsten; Hagen, Kolbjørn; Stølevik, Reidar

    2001-06-01

    The structure and conformational composition of 2-chlorobutane and 2-bromobutane have been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) at 25°C, together with ab initio molecular orbital calculations (HF/6-311+G(d,p)). These molecules may exist as three distinguishable conformers (G+, A, and G-). The symbols refer to anti (A) with a torsion angle Φ2(X 8-C 2-C 3-C 4) of about 180° and gauche (G+ and G-) with torsion angles Φ2(X 8-C 2-C 3-C 4) of about +60° and 300°(-60°), respectively. It was not possible; from our GED-data alone, to accurately determine the conformational composition because the distance distributions for two of the conformers (G+ and G-) are very similar. The conformational composition for 2-chlorobutane obtained from the ab initio calculations (G+ 62%, A 25% G- 13%) was found to fit the experimental data quite well. For 2-bromobutane the ab initio calculated conformational composition (G+ 58%, A 28% G- 14%) did not, however, fit the experimental data. Here a much better fit was obtained by using only 10% of the A conformer and using the relative energy for the two gauche conformers, as obtained in the ab initio molecular orbital calculations, to calculate the relative amounts of the two gauche forms (G+ 73%, A 10% G- 17%). The results for the principal distances ( rg) and angles ∠ α for the G+ conformer of 2-chlorobutane, with estimated 2 σ uncertainties, obtained from the combined GED/ab initio study are: r( C1- C2)=1.524(3) Å, r( C2- C3)=1.528(3) Å, r( C3- C4)=1.539(3) Å, r( C- Cl)=1.812(3) Å, r( C- H) ave=1.098(4) Å, ∠C 1C 2C 3=111.5(16)°, ∠C 2C 3C 4=113.3(5)°, ∠C 1C 2C1=110.4(9)°. The results for the G+ conformer of 2-bromobutane are: r( C1- C2)=1.526(4) Å, r( C2- C3)=1.530(4) Å, r( C3- C4)=1.540(4) Å, r( C- Br)=1.982(5) Å, r( C- H) ave=1.111(8) Å, ∠C 1C 2C 3=112.5(16)°, ∠C 2C 3C 4=114.6(15)°, ∠C 1C 2Br=110.1(16)°. Only average values for r(C-C), r(C-H), ∠CCC, and ∠CCH could be determined in the

  12. Investigations of cosmic-ray-produced nuclides in iron meteorites. V - More data on the nuclides of potassium and noble gases, on exposure ages and meteoroid sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshage, H.; Feldmann, H.; Braun, O.

    1983-02-01

    The concentrations of the cosmic-ray-produced He-, Ne-, and ArSPEC sp -nuclides in samples of 31 iron meteorites have been determineSPEC sp d by mass spectrometry. A critical examination of the results SPEC sp was performed. The data of at least 52 samples prove to be useSPEC sp ful to describe the "normal" abundance patterns of cosmogenic SPEC sp noble gases in iron meteorites; the description is accomplisheSPEC sp d by a new system of equations that correlate some properly seSPEC sp lected abundance ratios with one another. SPEC sp

  13. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  14. A model for the production of cosmogenic nuclides in chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, TH.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.

    1990-01-01

    A model is presented for calculating the production rates of cosmic-ray-produced He, Ne, and Ar as well as Be-10, Al-26, and Mn-53 in chondrites of variable size and shape. The predictions of this model are compared with published data for the meteorites ALH78084, St. Severin, and Keyes. The agreement is found to be about 5 percent for the concentrations of Be-10, Ne-21, Ne-22, Ar-38, and Mn-53, and to be better than 1 percent for the Ne-22/Ne-21 ratios. The correlation between P(Be-10)/P(Ne-21) and Ne-22/Ne-21 ratios is experimentally verified over a wide range of irradiation conditions.

  15. Nuclide Importance to Criticality Safety, Decay Heating, and Source Terms Related to Transport and Interim Storage of High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I. C.; Ryman, J. C.

    2000-12-11

    This report investigates trends in the radiological decay properties and changes in relative nuclide importance associated with increasing enrichments and burnup for spent LWR fuel as they affect the areas of criticality safety, thermal analysis (decay heat), and shielding analysis of spent fuel transport and storage casks. To facilitate identifying the changes in the spent fuel compositions that most directly impact these application areas, the dominant nuclides in each area have been identified and ranked by importance. The importance is investigated as a function of increasing burnup to assist in identifying the key changes in spent fuel characteristics between conventional- and extended-burnup regimes. Studies involving both pressurized water-reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies and boiling-water-reactor (BWR) assemblies are included. This study is seen to be a necessary first step in identifying the high-burnup spent fuel characteristics that may adversely affect the accuracy of current computational methods and data, assess the potential impact on previous guidance on isotopic source terms and decay-heat values, and thus help identify areas for methods and data improvement. Finally, several recommendations on the direction of possible future code validation efforts for high-burnup spent fuel predictions are presented.

  16. The exposure history of Jilin and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heusser, G.

    1986-01-01

    Jilin, the largest known story meteorite, is a very suitable object for studying the systematics of cosmic ray produced nuclides in stony meteorites. Its well established two stage exposure history even permits to gain information about two different irradiation geometries (2pi and 4pi). All stable and long-lived cosmogenic nuclides measured in Jilin so far correlate well with each other. An example is shown where the Al-26 activities are plotted vs. the spallogenic Ne-21 concentration. These records of cosmic-ray interaction in Jilin can be used both to determine the history of the target and to study the nature of production rate profiles. This is unavoidably a bootstrap process, involving studying one with assumption about the other. Production rate equations are presented and discussed.

  17. The behavior of U- and Th-series nuclides in the estuarine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Porcelli, D.; Andersson, P.S.; Smoak, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Rivers carry the products of continental weathering, and continuously supply the oceans with a broad range of chemical constituents. This erosional signature is, however, uniquely moderated by biogeochemical processing within estuaries. Estuaries are commonly described as complex filters at land-sea margins, where significant transformations can occur due to strong physico-chemical gradients. These changes differ for different classes of elements, and can vary widely depending on the geographic location. U- and Th-series nuclides include a range of elements with vastly different characteristics and behaviors within such environments, and the isotopic systematics provide methods for investigating the transport of these nuclides and other analog species across estuaries and into the coastal ocean.

  18. Determination of Concentrations of Radioactive Nuclides in Soil Samples using Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil, Arsalan; Weaver, Joshua

    2015-10-01

    A hyper-pure Germanium detector system was used to determine the contents and concentrations of various nuclides in soil samples collected from different parts of the United States. These include areas in close proximity to nuclear power plants, areas susceptible to nuclear fallout from weapons testing from the pre Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) period, and areas vulnerable to fallout from Fukushima from the west coast. The concentrations of naturally occurring nuclides in the 238U, 232Th, and 40K decay chains as well as that of synthetic isotopes of 137Cs and 60Co were measured with the aid of Genie-2000 and Radware (gf3m). An efficiency curve was obtained by designing a simulation and compared with standard sources. The research, now in its next stage, aims to do the same in samples from Karachi (Pakistan) which is home to three nuclear power plant projects but has no available baseline radioactivity measurements. University of Richmond.

  19. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  20. Cross sections for the production of residual nuclides by low- and medium-energy protons from the target elements C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R.; Bodemann, R.; Busemann, H.; Daunke, R.; Gloris, M.; Lange, H.-J.; Klug, B.; Krins, A.; Leya, I.; Lüpke, M.; Neumann, S.; Reinhardt, H.; Schnatz-Büttgen, M.; Herpers, U.; Schiekel, Th.; Sudbrock, F.; Holmqvist, B.; Condé, H.; Malmborg, P.; Suter, M.; Dittrich-Hannen, B.; Kubik, P.-W.; Synal, H.-A.; Filges, D.

    1997-07-01

    Cross sections for residual nuclide production by p-induced reactions were measured from thresholds up to 2.6 GeV using accelerators at CERN/Geneve, IPN/Orsay, KFA/Jülich, LANL/Los Alamos, LNS/Saclay, PSI/Villigen, TSL/Uppsala, LUC/Louvain La Neuve. The target elements C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba and Au were investigated. Residual nuclides were measured by X- and γ-spectrometry and by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The measured cross sections were corrected for interfering secondary particles in experiments with primary proton energies above 200 MeV. Our consistent database covers presently ca 550 nuclear reactions and contains nearly 15000 individual cross sections of which about 10000 are reported here for the first time. They provide a basis for model calculations of the production of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter by solar and galactic cosmic ray protons. They are of importance for many other applications in which medium energy nuclear reactions have to be considered ranging from astrophysics over space and environmental sciences to accelerator technology and accelerator-based nuclear waste transmutation and energy amplification. The experimental data are compared with theoretical ones based on calculations using an INC/E model in form of the HETC/KFA2 code and on the hybrid model of preequilibrium reactions in form of the AREL code.>

  1. Heavy mass elements total half-lives for selected long-lived nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, many compilations and evaluations of half-lives have been made which have uncritically accepted authors' values and uncertainties. They have merely recommended weight-averaged reported results. This evaluation attempts to reanalyze each experiment in the literature including an estimate of the standard deviation utilizing, where possible, an estimate of the systematic error. This paper constitutes a preliminary step in the process of recommending values. The long-lived nuclides of heavy mass elements are of interest in determining geological ages using the Re-Os or the Lu-Hf dating methods, in supplying information on the p-process (proton capture) of nucleo-synthesis, in providing information on lepton number conservation and the rest mass for the electron neutrino from double ..beta.. decay processes and in the case of tantalum because it represents the first long-lived state which is actually an isomer. Experimental data on the half-lives of selected nuclides have been evaluated and recommended values and uncertainties are presented for the following nuclides: /sup 128/Te, /sup 130/Te, /sup 129/I, /sup 138/La, /sup 144,145/Nd, /sup 146,147,148/Sm, /sup 152/Gd, /sup 154/Dy, /sup 176/Lu, /sup 174/Hf, /sup 180/Ta, /sup 187/Re, /sup 186/Os, /sup 190/Pt, /sup 204,205/Pb and /sup 230,232/Th. It is shown that /sup 204/Pb, which was previously thought to be radioactive, is stable. For /sup 205/Pb, the L electron capture x-rays have been revised for the M and higher x-ray yields. The resulting half-life for /sup 205/Pb is 1.9 +- 0.3 x 10/sup 7/ years. /sup 146/Sm with a half-life of 1.03 +- 0.05 x 10/sup 8/ years is the longest-lived extinct natural nuclide. 21 tabs.

  2. Weathering histories of Chinese loess deposits based on uranium and thorium series nuclides and cosmogenic {sup 10}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Z.Y. |; Lal, D.; Liu, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    The long, continuous deposition of dust in the Chinese loess plateau offers an unique opportunity to study the nature of soil weathering in a wide range of climatic conditions. In this paper we report on measurements of concentrations of U- and Th-series nuclides and of major cations in 150 loess and paleosol samples from five sites, going back 2.5 Ma. Using the results for {sup 10}Be concentrations in these soils, we determined the absolute amounts of water added to several soil units and obtained: (1) first-order leaching constants for U and several cations and (2) the compositions of the soils contributing to the dust-source regions and of the dust at deposition. Further, based on analyses of {sup 230}Th in soils deposited in the past ca. 140 ka, we determined when the soils weathered in the source regions. We conclude that most of the weathering in the dust-source regions may have occurred during the interglacials. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Grain size bias in cosmogenic nuclide studies of stream sediment in steep terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukens, Claire E.; Riebe, Clifford S.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Shuster, David L.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides in stream sediment are widely used to quantify catchment-average erosion rates. A key assumption is that sampled sediment is representative of erosion from the entire catchment. Here we show that the common practice of collecting a narrow range of sizes—typically sand—may not yield a representative sample when the grain size distribution of sediment produced on slopes is spatially variable. A grain size bias arises when some parts of the catchment produce sand more readily than others. To identify catchments that are prone to this bias, we used a forward model of sediment mixing and erosion to explore the effects of catchment relief and area across a range of altitudinal gradients in sediment size and erosion rate. We found that the bias increases with increasing relief, because higher-relief catchments have a larger fraction of high elevations that are underrepresented in the sampled sand when grain size increases with altitude. The bias also increases with catchment area, because sediment size reduction during transport causes an underrepresentation of more distal, higher elevations within the catchment. Our analysis indicates that grain size bias may be significant at many sites where cosmogenic nuclides have been used to quantify catchment-average erosion rates. We discuss how to quantify and account for the bias using cosmogenic nuclides and detrital thermochronometry in multiple sediment sizes.

  4. Light nuclides produced in the proton-induced spallation of {sup 238}U at 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M.V.; Armbruster, P.; Enqvist, T.; Kelic, A.; Rejmund, F.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Yordanov, O.; Benlliure, J.; Pereira, J.; Bernas, M.; Mustapha, B.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.

    2006-01-15

    The production of light and intermediate-mass nuclides formed in the reaction {sup 1}H+{sup 238}U at 1 GeV was measured at the Fragment Separator at GSI, Darmstadt. The experiment was performed in inverse kinematics, by shooting a 1 A GeV {sup 238}U beam on a thin liquid-hydrogen target. A total of 254 isotopes of all elements in the range 7{<=}Z{<=}37 were unambiguously identified, and the velocity distributions of the produced nuclides were determined with high precision. The results show that the nuclides are produced in a very asymmetric binary decay of heavy nuclei originating from the spallation of uranium. All the features of the produced nuclides merge with the characteristics of the fission products as their mass increases.

  5. A Method for Calculating Strain Energy Release Rates in Preliminary Design of Composite Skin/Stringer Debonding Under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Three simple procedures were developed to determine strain energy release rates, G, in composite skin/stringer specimens for various combinations of unaxial and biaxial (in-plane/out-of-plane) loading conditions. These procedures may be used for parametric design studies in such a way that only a few finite element computations will be necessary for a study of many load combinations. The results were compared with mixed mode strain energy release rates calculated directly from nonlinear two-dimensional plane-strain finite element analyses using the virtual crack closure technique. The first procedure involved solving three unknown parameters needed to determine the energy release rates. Good agreement was obtained when the external loads were used in the expression derived. This superposition technique was only applicable if the structure exhibits a linear load/deflection behavior. Consequently, a second technique was derived which was applicable in the case of nonlinear load/deformation behavior. The technique involved calculating six unknown parameters from a set of six simultaneous linear equations with data from six nonlinear analyses to determine the energy release rates. This procedure was not time efficient, and hence, less appealing. A third procedure was developed to calculate mixed mode energy release rates as a function of delamination lengths. This procedure required only one nonlinear finite element analysis of the specimen with a single delamination length to obtain a reference solution for the energy release rates and the scale factors. The delamination was extended in three separate linear models of the local area in the vicinity of the delamination subjected to unit loads to obtain the distribution of G with delamination lengths. This set of sub-problems was Although additional modeling effort is required to create the sub- models, this local technique is efficient for parametric studies.

  6. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Pietrzak, K.; Rojek, J.; Strojny-Nędza, A.; Mackiewicz, S.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    It is commonly known that the properties of sintered materials are strongly related to technological conditions of the densification process. This paper shows the sintering behavior of a NiAl-Al2O3 composite, and its individual components sintered separately. Each kind of material was processed via the powder metallurgy route (hot pressing). The progress of sintering at different stages of the process was tested. Changes in the microstructure were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Metal-ceramics interface was clean and no additional phases were detected. Correlation between the microstructure, density, and mechanical properties of the sintered materials was analyzed. The values of elastic constants of NiAl/Al2O3 were close to intermetallic ones due to the volume content of the NiAl phase particularly at low densities, where small alumina particles had no impact on the composite's stiffness. The influence of the external pressure of 30 MPa seemed crucial for obtaining satisfactory stiffness for three kinds of the studied materials which were characterized by a high dense microstructure with a low number of isolated spherical pores.

  7. Recent evolution of permafrost soils: insight from U-Th series nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagard, marie-laure; Chabaux, Francois; Rihs, Sophie; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Viers, Jérome

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost ecosystems are particularly sensitive to climate warming, which notably induces a deepening of the active layer (the maximum thawing depth during summer time). As a consequence, geochemical and hydrological fluxes within boreal areas are expected to be significantly affected in the future. Understanding the relationship between environmental changes and permafrost modifications is then a major challenge. This work aims to evaluate in a Siberian watershed the dynamics of the permafrost active layer and their recent modifications by combining a classic study of long-lived nuclides to the study of short-lived nuclides of U and Th decay series in two soil profiles. These profiles, located on opposite slopes (north- and south-facing slopes) of the Kulingdakan watershed (Putorana Plateau, Central Siberia), were sampled at several depths within the active layer and (238U), (230Th), (232Th), (226Ra), (228Ra), (228Th), (210Pb) were measured on bulk soil samples by TIMS or gamma spectrometry. Our results show that south-facing and north-facing soil profiles are significantly different in terms of evolution of chemical concentrations and nuclide activities; north-facing soil profile is strongly affected by atmospheric inputs whereas long-lived nuclide dynamics within south-facing soil profile are dominated by weathering and exhibit more complex patterns. The amount of above-ground biomass being the single varying parameter between the two slopes of the watershed, we suggest that the structuring of permafrost active layer is very sensitive to vegetation activity and that the functioning of boreal soils will be significantly modified by its development due to more favorable climatic conditions. Moreover, the coupling of long and short-lived nuclides highlights the superimposition of a recent mobilization of chemical elements within soils (<10 years) over a much older soil structuring (>8000 years), which can be observed for both soil profiles. The shallowest layer of

  8. Long- and short-lived nuclide constraints on the recent evolution of permafrost soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagard, M.; Chabaux, F. J.; Rihs, S.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Prokushkin, A. S.; Viers, J.

    2011-12-01

    Frozen permafrost ecosystems are particularly sensitive to climate warming, which notably induces a deepening of the active layer (the maximum thawing depth during summer time). As a consequence, geochemical and hydrological fluxes within boreal areas are expected to be significantly affected in the future. Understanding the relationship between environmental changes and permafrost modifications is then a major challenge. This work aims to evaluate in a Siberian watershed the dynamics of the permafrost active layer and their recent modifications by combining a classic study of long-lived nuclides to the study of short-lived nuclides of U and Th decay series. Two soil profiles, located on opposite slopes (north- and south-facing slopes) of the Kulingdakan watershed (Putorana Plateau, Central Siberia), were sampled at several depths within the active layer and (238U), (234U), (232Th), (230Th), (226Ra), (228Ra), (228Th) and (210Pb) were measured on bulk soil samples by TIMS or gamma spectrometry. Our results show that south-facing and north-facing soil profiles are significantly different in terms of evolution of chemical concentrations and nuclide activities; north-facing soil profile is strongly affected by atmospheric inputs whereas long-lived nuclide dynamics within south-facing soil profile are dominated by weathering and exhibit more complex patterns. The amount of above-ground biomass being the single varying parameter between the two slopes of the watershed, we suggest that the structuring of permafrost active layer is very sensitive to vegetation activity and that the functioning of boreal soils will be significantly modified by its development due to more favorable climatic conditions. Moreover, the coupling of long and short-lived nuclides highlights the superimposition of a recent mobilization of chemical elements within soils (<10 years) over a much older soil structure (>8000 years), which can be observed for both soil profiles. The shallowest layer of

  9. An empirical method for calculating melt compositions produced beneath mid-ocean ridges: Application for axis and off-axis (seamounts) melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yaoling; Batiza, Rodey

    1991-12-01

    We present a new method for calculating the major element compositions of primary melts parental to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). This model is based on the experimental data of Jaques and Green (1980), Falloon et al. (1988), and Falloon and Green (1987, 1988) which are ideal for this purpose. Our method is empirical and employs solid-liquid partition coefficients (Di) from the experiments. We empirically determine Di = ƒ(P,F) and use this to calculate melt compositions produced by decompression-induced melting along an adiabat (column melting). Results indicate that most MORBs can be generated by 10-20% partial melting at initial pressures (P0) of 12-21 kbar. Our primary MORB melts have MgO = 10-12 wt %. We fractionate these at low pressure to an MgO content of 8.0 wt % in order to interpret natural MORB liquids. This model allows us to calculate Po, Pƒ, To, Tƒ, and F for natural MORB melts. We apply the model to interpret MORB compositions and mantle upwelling patterns beneath a fast ridge (East Pacific Rise (EPR)8°N to 14°N), a slow ridge (mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 26°S), and seamounts near the EPR (Lament seamount chain). We find mantle temperature differences of up to 50°-60°C over distances of 30-50 km both across axis and along axis at the EPR. We propose that these are due to upward mantle flow in a weakly conductive (versus adiabatic) temperature gradient. We suggest that the EPR is fed by a wide (-100 km) zone of upwelling due to plate separation but has a central core of faster buoyant flow. An along-axis thermal dome between the Siqueiros transform and the 11°45' Overlapping Spreading center (OSC) may represent such an upwelling; however, in general there is a poor correlation between mantle temperature, topography, and the segmentation pattern at the EPR. For the Lament seamounts we find regular across-axis changes in Po and F suggesting that the melt zone pinches out off axis. This observation supports the idea that the EPR is fed by a

  10. An empirical method for calculating melt compositions produced beneath mid-ocean ridges: for axis and off-axis (seamounts) melting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batiza, Rodey

    1991-12-01

    We present a new method for calculating the major element compositions of primary melts parental to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). This model is based on the experimental data of Jaques and Green (1980), Falloon et al. (1988), and Falloon and Green (1987, 1988) which are ideal for this purpose. Our method is empirical and employs solid-liquid partition coefficients (Di) from the experiments. We empirically determine Di=f(P,F) and use this to calculate melt compositions produced by decompression-induced melting along an adiabat (column melting). Results indicate that most MORBs can be generated by 10-20% partial melting at initial pressures (P0) of 12-21 kbar. Our primary MORB melts have MgO=10-12 wt %. We fractionate these at low pressure to an MgO content of 8.0 wt% in order to interpret natural MORB liquids. This model allows us to calculate Po, Pf, To, Tf, and F for natural MORB melts. We apply the model to interpret MORB compositions and mantle upwelling patterns beneath a fast ridge (East Pacific Rise (EPR) 8°N to 14°N), a slow ridge (mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 26°S), and seamounts near the EPR (Lamont seamount chain). We find mantle temperature differences of up to 50°-60°C over distances of 30-50 km both across axis and along axis at the EPR. We propose that these are due to upward mantle flow in a weakly conductive (versus adiabatic) temperature gradient. We suggest that the EPR is fed by a wide (~100 km) zone of upwelling due to plate separation but has a central core of faster buoyant flow. An along-axis thermal dome between the Siqueiros transform and the 11°45' Overlapping Spreading Center (OSC) may represent such an upwelling; however, in general there is a poor correlation between mantle temperature, topography, and the segmentation pattern at the EPR. For the Lamont seamounts we find regular across-axis changes in Po and F suggesting that the melt zone pinches out off axis. This observation supports the idea that the EPR is fed by a broad

  11. Cross Sections of P-Induced Reactions up to 100 MeV for the Interpretation of Solar Cosmic Ray Produced Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiekel, T.; Rosel, R.; Herpers, U.; Bodemann, R.; Michel, R.; Dittrich, B.; Hofmann, H. J.; Suter, M.; Wolfli, W.; Holmqvist, B.; Conde, H.; Malmborg, P.

    1992-07-01

    Integral excitation functions for the production of residual nuclides by proton-induced reactions are the basic data for an accurate modelling of the interactions of solar cosmic ray (SCR) particles with extraterrestrial matter. Due to the relatively low energies (<200 MeV/A) of SCR particles the production of nuclear active secondary particles can be widely neglected and theoretical production rate depth profiles can be calculated by simply folding the depth dependent SCR spectra with thin target cross sections of the underlying nuclear reactions. The accuracy of such calculations exclusively depends on the quality of the available cross sections. For many nuclides, in particular for long-lived radionuclides and stable rare gas isotopes, the exis- ting cross section database is neither comprehensive nor reliable. Therefore, we started a series of experiments to improve this situation. Eighteen elements (C, N as Si3N4, O as SiO2, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, V, Mn as Mn/Ni-alloy, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Rh, Ba as Ba-contai- ning glass, and Au) were irradiated with 94 and 99 MeV protons at the external beam of the TSL-cyclotron at Uppsala. Cross sections were determined using the stacked foil technique. Beam monitoring was done by investigating the production of ^22Na from Al, for which evaluated cross sections exist. Residual nuclides were measured by X-, gamma- and accelerator-mass spectrometry. In order to check the quality of our experimental procedure some target elements (22 <= Z <= 28) were included in the new exper- iments, which had been formerly irradiated at Julich, at Louvain La Neuve, and at IPN Orsay. Comparisons between the earlier measurements (1,2) and the new cross sections showed excellent agreement. Up to now, cross sections were measured for more than 120 different reactions. Here, we report on the results obtained for the target elements C, N, O, Mg, Al, and Si. The status of experimental excitation functions for the production of some radionuclides

  12. Nuclear event zero-time calculation and uncertainty evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Pujing; Ungar, R Kurt

    2012-04-01

    It is important to know the initial time, or zero-time, of a nuclear event such as a nuclear weapon's test, a nuclear power plant accident or a nuclear terrorist attack (e.g. with an improvised nuclear device, IND). Together with relevant meteorological information, the calculated zero-time is used to help locate the origin of a nuclear event. The zero-time of a nuclear event can be derived from measured activity ratios of two nuclides. The calculated zero-time of a nuclear event would not be complete without an appropriately evaluated uncertainty term. In this paper, analytical equations for zero-time and the associated uncertainty calculations are derived using a measured activity ratio of two nuclides. Application of the derived equations is illustrated in a realistic example using data from the last Chinese thermonuclear test in 1980.

  13. Impact of vegetation change on the mobility of uranium- and thorium-series nuclides in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontier, A.; Rihs, S.; Turpault, M.-P.; Chabaux, F.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of land cover change on chemical mobility and soil response was investigated using short- and long-lived nuclides from the U- and Th series. Indeed, the matching of these nuclides half-live to the pedogenic processes rates make these nuclides especially suitable to investigate either time or mechanism of transfers within a soil-water-plant system. This study was carried out from the experimental Breuil-Chenue site (Morvan mountains, France). The native forest (150 year-old) was partially clear-felled and replaced in 1976 by mono-specific plantations distributed in different stands. Following this cover-change, some mineralogical changes in the acid brown soil were recognized (Mareschal, 2008). Three soil sections were sampled under the native forest and the replanted oak and Douglas spruce stands respectively. The (238U), (234U), (230Th), (226Ra), (232Th) and (228Ra) activities were analysed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and gamma spectrometry. Significant differences in U, Th, and Ra activities were observed between the soils located under the native forest or the replanted-trees stands, mostly dominated by a large uranium mobilization from the replanted soils. Moreover, all the investigated U and Th-series activity ratios show a contrasted trend between the shallowest horizons (0-50cm) and the deepest one (below 50cm), demonstrating the chemical effect of the vegetation change on the shallow soil layers. Using a continuous open-system leaching model, the coupled radioactive disequilibria measured in the different soil layers permit to quantify the rate of the radionuclides mobilities. Reference: Mareschal, L., 2008. Effet des substitutions d'essences forestières sur l'évolution des sols et de leur minéralogie : bilan après 28 ans dans le site expérimental de Breuil (Morvan) Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy-I.

  14. REVIEW OF RESULTS FOR THE OECD/NEA PHASE VII BENCHMARK: STUDY OF SPENT FUEL COMPOSITIONS FOR LONG TERM DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Wagner, John C

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the problem specification and compares participants results for the OECD/NEA/WPNCS Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Phase VII Benchmark Study of Spent Fuel Compositions for Long-Term Disposal. The Phase VII benchmark was developed to study the ability of relevant computer codes and associated nuclear data to predict spent fuel isotopic compositions and corresponding keff values in a cask configuration over the time duration relevant to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal. The benchmark was divided into two sets of calculations: (1) decay calculations out to 1,000,000 years for provided pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) UO2 discharged fuel compositions and (2) burnup credit criticality calculations for a representative cask model at selected time steps. Contributions from 15 organizations and companies in 10 countries were submitted to the Phase VII benchmark exercise. This paper provides a description of the Phase VII benchmark and detailed comparisons of the participants isotopic compositions and keff values that were calculated with a diversity of computer codes and nuclear data sets. Differences observed in the calculated time-dependent nuclide densities are attributed to different decay data or code-specific numerical approximations. The variability of the keff results is consistent with the evaluated uncertainty associated with cross-section data.

  15. Tantalum-178--a short-lived nuclide for nuclear medicine: development of a potential generator system.

    PubMed

    Neirinckx, R D; Jones, A G; Davis, M A; Harris, G I; Holman, B L

    1978-05-01

    We describe a chemical separation that may form the basis of a generator system for the short-lived radionuclide Ta-178 (T 1/2 = 9 min). The parent nuclide W-178 (T 1/2 = 21.7 days) is loaded on an anion-exchange column and the daughter eluted with a mixture of dilute hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The yields of tantalum and the breakthrough of the tungsten parent as a function of the eluting conditions are discussed, and preliminary animal distribution data are presented for various treatments of the eluant solution. PMID:641574

  16. Distribution of U-Th nuclides in the riverine and coastal environments of the tropical southwest coast of India.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, K; Shankar, R; Sarin, M M; Manjunatha, B R

    2001-01-01

    A reconnaissance study has been made on the distribution of 238U, 234U, 232Th and 230Th in soils, water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and bottom sediments in the Kali river basin around Kaiga, its estuarine region and the adjacent Arabian Sea to obtain the baseline data of U-Th series nuclides in view of the commissioning of nuclear power reactors at Kaiga, near Karwar, on the southwest coast of India. Drainage basin soils developed over greywackes (the dominant litho-unit upstream) are lower in 238U/Al and 232Th/Al ratios by factors of 3-5 in comparison with those developed over tonalitic gneisses (the dominant litho-unit downstream). The dominance of the former type of soils is reflected in the composition of river-bottom sediments derived from the upstream drainage basin during the monsoon. The 232Th in bottom sediments tends to increase towards the estuarine and coastal areas, presumably due to deposition of heavy minerals and onshore transport of coastal sediments into the estuary. The dissolved U in the Kali river is low (0.001-0.02 microg/l) when compared to the major Indian rivers as the Kali river flows through U-poor greywackes. Thus, the input of dissolved U to the Kali estuary is dominated by sea water. Although there is some evidence for the removal of dissolved U at low salinity during estuarine mixing, its behaviour is conservative in the lower estuary (at higher salinities). The removal rate of dissolved U from the Kali river basin is similar to that reported from other tropical river basins. The U flux from all the west-flowing rivers of Peninsular India is estimated at 26.3 x 10(6) g/yr to the Arabian Sea which is about 2% of the flux from the Himalayan rivers to the Bay of Bengal. PMID:11499608

  17. [Determination of natural radioactive nuclides in the travertine samples from Tamagawa hot spring].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Masumura, S; Takahashi, K; Sotobayashi, T

    1982-07-01

    The determination of natural radioactive nuclides was carried out for 7 travertine samples collected from Tamagawa hot spring by means of the non-distructive gamma-ray spectrometry and of the alpha-ray spectrometry. From the former measurements, the relative activity strength, due to 223Ra, 226Ra, and 228Th, and their ratios was obtained in comparison with the photopeak strength due to respective daughters, 228Ac, 214Bi, and 212Pb, and with the results from a monazite sand standard. One travertine sample was engaged to the alpha-ray spectrometric determination of Th isotopes after the chemical purification using a 234Th-yield tracer. On the basis of the resultant absolute content of 228Th, the 228Ra and 228Th contents in the remainder samples were evaluated to be the range of 3 approximately 80 Bq (81 approximately 2160 pCi)/g and 2 approximately 20 Bq (54 approximately pCi)/g respectively. These radioactive nuclides were verified to exist almost within a Hokutolite small crystals up to 90% and there are apparently the radioactive disequilibrium relations between 228Ra and 228Th among freshly deposited travertines. The presence of 227Ac in Hokutolite was also suggested from the detection of 227Th owing to 215Po-alpha peak. PMID:7178540

  18. Runoff and sediment yield model for predicting nuclide transport in watersheds using BIOTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, A.F.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1990-09-01

    The environmental risk simulation model BIOTRAN was interfaced with a series of new subroutines (RUNOFF, GEOFLX, EROSON, and AQUIFER) to predict the movement of nuclides, elements, and pertinent chemical compounds in association with sediments through lateral and channel flow of runoff water. In addition, the movement of water into and out of segmented portions of runoff channels was modeled to simulate the dynamics of moisture flow through specified aquifers within the watershed. The BIOTRAN soil water flux subroutine, WATFLX, was modified to interface the relationships found in the SPUR model for runoff and sediment transport into channels with the particle sorting relationships to predict radionuclide enrichment and movement in watersheds. The new subroutines were applied specifically to Mortandad Canyon within Los Alamos National Laboratory by simultaneous simulation of eight surface vegetational subdivisions and associated channel and aquifer segments of this watershed. This report focuses on descriptions of the construction and rationale for the new subroutines and on discussing both input characteristics and output relationships to known runoff events from Mortandad Canyon. Limitations of the simplified input on model behavior are also discussed. Uranium-238 was selected as the nuclide for demonstration of the model because it could be assumed to be homogeneously distributed over the watershed surface. 22 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Short-lived nuclides in hibonite grains from Murchison: evidence for solar system evolution.

    PubMed

    Marhas, K K; Goswami, J N; Davis, A M

    2002-12-13

    Records of now-extinct short-lived nuclides in meteorites provide information about the formation and evolution of the solar system. We have found excess 10B that we attribute to the decay of short-lived 10Be (half-life 1.5 million years) in hibonite grains from the Murchison meteorite. The grains show no evidence of decay of two other short-lived nuclides-26Al (half-life 700,000 years) and 41Ca (half-life 100,000 years)-that may be present in early solar system solids. One plausible source of the observed 10Be is energetic particle irradiation of material in the solar nebula. An effective irradiation dose of approximately 2 x 10(18) protons per square centimeter with a kinetic energy of >/=10 megaelectronvolts per atomic mass unit can explain our measurements. The presence of 10Be, coupled with the absence of 41Ca and 26Al, may rule out energetic particle irradiation as the primary source of 41Ca and 26Al present in some early solar system solids and strengthens the case of a stellar source for 41Ca and 26Al.

  20. HALF-LIVES OF LONG-LIVED A-DECAY, B-DECAY, BB-DECAY AND SPONTANEOUS FISSION NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    In his review of radionuclides for dating purposes, Roth noted that there were a large number of nuclides, normally considered ''stable'' but which are radioactive with a very long half-life. Roth suggested that I review the data on the half-life values of these long-lived nuclides for a discussion session at the next meeting. These half-life values for long-lived nuclides include those due to various decay modes, {alpha}-decay, {beta}-decay, electron capture decay, {beta}{beta}-decay and spontaneous fission decay. This report is preliminary but will provide a quick overview of the extensive table of data on the recommendations from that review.

  1. Identification of artificial gamma-emitting nuclides using a scintillator-based gamma-ray spectral logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Conaway, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The standard spectral gamma ray logging system used at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) contains a large sodium iodide detector which provides high efficiency but low energy resolution. To enhance the capabilities of this system for identifying artificial gamma-emitting nuclides, I developed and implemented a simple procedure for extracting artificial components from low-resolution gamma-ray spectra. This procedures uses three bias spectra, developed by a consultant using numerical modeling, representing the spectral response of the downhole instrument to naturally occurring potassium, uranium and thorium family gamma rays in a large-diameter air-filled borehole. To extract the artificial spectral components, the three basis spectra are first scaled to the recorded field spectrum using the usual spectral windows for K, U and Th; these windows bracket the photopeaks at 1.46, 1.76 and 2.61 MeV. Since most of the contribution from artificial nuclides will fall below 1.26 MeV (the lower limit of the potassium window) this scaling process should be insensitive to the presence of artificial nuclides. The scaled basis spectra are then subtracted from the field data, leaving a residual spectrum consisting of noise plus the contribution of any artificial gamma-emitting nuclides. This process is repeated for each spectrum in the log, or the spectra can be accumulated over any desired depth range for better statistics. Rather than inspect each spectrum visually, a parameter can be computed which indicates the presence of artificial nuclides; this parameter can be plotted along with the usual K, U and Th concentration estimates as a function of depth. These techniques have been used successfully on field data and provide us with an inexpensive screening tool to detect artificial nuclides along boreholes. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Cates, M.R.; Franks, L.A.

    1982-07-07

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fission are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for /sup 239/Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  3. Regional Dispersal of Fukushima-derived Fission Nuclides by East Asia Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chih-An; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Hsu, Shih-Chieh

    2013-04-01

    Since the Fukushima nuclear accident happened on 12 March 2011, there have been a plethora of publications about the dispersion of radioactive material from the damaged reactors. Most of these works dealt with global transport of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the northern hemisphere and local transport in the vicinity of Fukushima and around Japan. In contrast, few works investigated into dispersal of radiation plumes from Japan to other areas on regional scales. This is because regional dispersal out of Japan in the springtime is most likely dominated by the northeastern monsoon, whereas there are few monitoring stations downwind in the southeastern Asia region. In this respect, we are only aware of the data in Vietnam published by Long et al (2012) in addition to our own data obtained in and around Taiwan (Huh et al., 2012; Hsu et al., 2012). By integrating the data published in the literature plus those that can be searched from relevant websites, we try to further elucidate the dispersal of Fukushima-derived radiation toward the southeastern Asia region. The WRF/Chem tracer model is employed to simulate the dispersal of radiation plumes from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. From a vis-à-vis comparison between the model simulation and the time-series of Fukushima-derived fission nuclides monitored around the southeastern Asia, we can distinguish between global transport by the Westerlies in the free troposphere and regional transport by the northeast monsoon in the planetary boundary layer. In general, regional (mainly meridional) transport carried more weight than global (mainly zonal) transport in contributing Fukushima-derived radioactivity to the area covered in this review, particularly at the ground-level sites. References 1. Hsu, S.C., Huh, C.A., Chan, C.Y., Lin, S.H., Lin, F.J. and Liu, S.C. (2012). Hemispheric dispersion of radioactive plume laced with fission nuclides from the Fukushima nuclear event. Geophys. Res. Lett. 39, L00

  4. Cosmogenic Nuclide Studies And Geomorphological Implications In The Hyperarid Central Western Andes, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kober, F.; Schlunegger, F.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Baur, H.; Wieler, R.; Kubik, P. W.; Schneider, H.

    2003-12-01

    We have conducted geomorphological and cosmogenic nuclide studies in the central Andes of Northern Chile (Arica area) in order to quantify landscape evolution at the Western Andean Escarpment. The area is characterized by broad abandoned middle to late Miocene plains that are cut by deeply incised rivers. The major phase of incision has been active since ca. 8 My with different magnitudes and accelerated backward erosion forces through time. Important processes must have been a base level change in the Coastal Cordillera area and climatic changes driven by orogenic growth. Fluvial incision rates are ca. 50m/My across the Escarpment during the middle/late Miocene and early Pliocene and about two to four times higher from the Pliocene until the present, especially in more distal parts relative to the pinned base level control (enhanced backward erosion). Bedrock erosion rates on the broad plains determined with cosmogenic nuclides are several orders of magnitude lower than fluvial incision rates. Erosion rates of ignimbrites determined by paired studies of radionuclides (10Be, 26Al) and stable 21Ne are 10 to 100cm/My at medium elevations and increase towards the high Andes to >250cm/My. This increase is largely controlled by the effect of orographic precipitation that correlates with increasing rates and intensities of rainfall towards the Western Cordillera. Coastal areas, subjected only to coastal fog, show abandoned hanging rivers and smoothed diffusive hillslopes. These landscapes exhibit also extremely low cosmogenically derived erosion rates (<100cm/My). Therefore, the large parts of the landscapes at the northern tip of the Atacama Desert have retained their relict landscape aspect since they formed in Middle Micocene. The comparison of river incision and bedrock erosion clearly shows a strong decoupling between both geomorphic landscape units. A change towards a coupled system can only be found in the high, rainy parts of the Andes (>3500m), which are

  5. Implications of two Holocene time-dependent geomagnetic models for cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    The geomagnetic field is a major influence on in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates at a given location (in addition to atmospheric pressure and, to a lesser extent, solar modulation effects). A better understanding of how past fluctuations in these influences affected production rates should allow more accurate application of cosmogenic nuclides. As such, this work explores the cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter.188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models with new paleomagnetic data from sediment cores in addition to new archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved resolution and accuracy over the previous versions, in part due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. In addition, Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109) developed another time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field, based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data from the same underlying paleomagnetic database as the Korte et al. models, but extending to 14 ka. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC - the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to each other and to results using the earlier models. In addition, predictions of each new model using RC are tested empirically using recently published production rate calibration data for both 10Be and 3He, and compared to predictions using corresponding time-varying geocentric dipolar RC formulations and a static geocentric axial dipole (GAD) model. Results for the few calibration sites from geomagnetically sensitive regions suggest that the

  6. Comparing Time-Dependent Geomagnetic and Atmospheric Effects on Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rate Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    A recently published cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) (Lifton et al., 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 386, 149-160: termed the LSD model) provides two main advantages over previous scaling models: identification and quantification of potential sources of bias in the earlier models, and the ability to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors easily for a wide range of input parameters. The new model also provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of advances in model inputs. In this work, the scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene will be explored. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. 188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models used by Lifton et al. (2014) with paleomagnetic measurements from sediment cores in addition to archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved accuracy over the previous versions, in part to due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC- the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to the earlier models. These results will be compared to scaling predictions using another recent time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field by Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109), based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data, but extending to 14 ka. In addition, the potential effects of time-dependent atmospheric models on LSD scaling predictions will be presented. Given the typical dominance of altitudinal over

  7. Improvement of nuclide leaching resistance of paraffin waste form with low density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Lak; Park, Joo Wan; Kim, Ju Youl; Chung, Chang Hyun

    2002-01-01

    Low-level liquid borate wastes have been immobilized with paraffin wax using a concentrate waste drying system (CWDS) in Korean nuclear power plants. The possibility for improving chemical durability of paraffin waste form was suggested in this study. A small amount of low density polyethylene (LDPE) was added to increase the leaching resistance of the existing paraffin waste form. The influence of LDPE on the leaching behavior of waste form was investigated by performing leaching test according to ANSI/ANS-16.1 procedure during 325 days. It was observed that the leaching of nuclides immobilized within paraffin waste form made a marked reduction although little content of LDPE was added to waste form. The acceptance criteria of paraffin waste form associated with leachability index (LI) and compressive strength after the leaching test were fully satisfied with the help of LDPE.

  8. [Concentration of natural radioactive nuclide (pb-214 and bi-214) in foods from Yamanashi].

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Miki; Kazama, Daigo; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of Pb-214 and Bi-214 in groundwaters and agricultural products from several geologically distinct parts of the Yamanashi region of Japan were measured and compared. The concentrations of Pb-214 and Bi-214 in groundwaters were well correlated with each other, and were consistent with the predominant geology in each area. The concentrations of both radio-nuclides in agricultural products were much lower than the levels in groundwaters, and did not appear to be related to local geology or habitat. Freshwater fish showed higher levels than agricultural products, though the levels were lower than those in groundwaters. Unexpectedly, wild mushrooms (but not cultivated mushrooms) showed relatively high levels of Bi-214, though their levels of Pb-214 were undetectable. Based on the levels of Pb-214 and Bi-214 detected here, annual internal radiation exposure of humans from these sources is considered to be extremely low.

  9. Atomic mass measurements of short-lived nuclides around the doubly-magic 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Audi, G.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Herfurth, F.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lunney, D.; Schwarz, S.

    2008-04-01

    Accurate atomic mass measurements of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclides around the doubly-magic 208Pb and of neutron-rich cesium isotopes were performed with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. The masses of 145,147Cs, 181,183Tl, 186Tl m, 187Tl m, 196Tl m, 205Tl, 197Pb m, 208Pb, 190-197Bi, 209,215,216Bi, 203,205,229Fr, and 214,229,230Ra were determined. The obtained relative mass uncertainty in the range of 2×10 to 2×10 is not only required for safe identification of isomeric states but also allows mapping the detailed structure of the mass surface. A mass adjustment procedure was carried out and the results included into the Atomic Mass Evaluation. The resulting separation energies are discussed and the mass spectrometric and laser spectroscopic data are examined for possible correlations.

  10. Using Multiple Cosmogenic Nuclides to Investigate Ice Elevation Changes in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Shasta; Hein, Andy; Sugden, David; Woodward, John; Dunning, Stuart; Freeman, Stewart; Shanks, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Well-dated geologic data points provide important indicators that can be used for the reconstruction of ice sheet dynamics and as constraints in ice sheet models predicting future change. Cosmogenic nuclides, which accumulate in rocks exposed at the earth's surface, can be used to directly date the exposure age of the rock surfaces that have been created through glacial erosion or deposition. The technique requires a detailed understanding of the local geomorphology as well as awareness of the post-depositional processes that may affect the interpretation of exposure ages. Surface exposure ages (10Be, 26Al, 21Ne, and 36Cl) from local limestone bedrock and other glacially deposited exotic lithologies provide a history spanning from 0 to more than 1 million years in the Patriot, Independence, and Marble Hills in the southern Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. Using the new surface exposure ages combined with geomorphological mapping, we will discuss the implications for the glacial history of the southern Ellsworth Mountains.

  11. Ice Elevation Changes in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica Using Multiple Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, S.; Hein, A.; Sugden, D.; Woodward, J.; Dunning, S.; Reid, K.

    2014-12-01

    Well-dated geologic data points provide important indicators that can be used for the reconstruction of ice sheet dynamics and as constraints in ice sheet models predicting future change. Cosmogenic nuclides, which accumulate in rocks exposed at the earth's surface, can be used to directly date the exposure age of the rock surfaces that have been created through glacial erosion or deposition. The technique requires a detailed understanding of the local geomorphology as well as awareness of the post-depositional processes that may affect the interpretation of exposure ages. Initial surface exposure ages (10Be, 26Al, 21Ne, and 36Cl ) from local limestone bedrock and other glacially deposited exotic lithologies provide a history spanning from 0 to 1.1 Ma in the Patriot, Independence, and Marble Hills in the southern Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. Using the new surface exposure ages combined with geomorphological mapping, we will discuss the implications for the glacial history of the southern Ellsworth Mountains.

  12. Code System to Calculate Mixed Cores in TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor.

    2001-08-29

    Version 00 TRIGLAV is a computer program for reactor calculations of mixed cores in a TRIGA Mark II research reactor. It can be applied for fuel element burn-up calculations, for power and flux distributions calculations and for reactivity predictions. The TRIGLAV program requires the WIMS-D4 program with the original WIMS cross-section library extended for TRIGA reactor specific nuclides. This package includes the code TRIGAC, which is a new version of TRIGAP.

  13. Constraining landscape development of the Sri Lankan escarpment with cosmogenic nuclides in river sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacker, V.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Hewawasam, T.; Kubik, P. W.

    2007-01-01

    Escarpments are prominent morphological features along high-elevation passive margins. Recent studies integrating geomorphology, thermochronology, and cosmogenic nuclide-based denudation rate estimates suggest a rapid phase of denudation immediately after the earliest stages of seafloor spreading, and subsequent slow denudation rates since. To constrain the geomorphic evolution of passive margins, we have examined the development of the Sri Lankan escarpment. Cosmogenic nuclide data on river sediment along a north-south transect across the southern escarpment reveal that the landscape is eroding ten times more rapidly in the escarpment zone (26 to 71 mm kyr - 1 ) than in the high-elevation plateau above it and in the lowland plain beneath it (2.6 to 6.2 mm kyr - 1 ). Unlike these low denudation rate areas, the escarpment denudation is strongly and linearly hill slope-dependent. This shows that denudation and retreat are tightly interlinked within the escarpment, which suggests that the escarpment is evolving by rift-parallel retreat, rather than by escarpment downwearing. Supporting evidence is provided by the morphology of rivers draining the escarpment zone. These have steep bedrock channels which show sharp and prominent knickpoints along their longitudinal profiles. It appears that fluvial processes are driving escarpment retreat, as rivers migrate headwards were they incise into the high-elevation plateau. However, the average catchment-wide denudation rates of the escarpment zone are low compared to the denudation rates that are estimated for constant escarpment retreat since rifting. In common with other escarpments worldwide, causes for this slow down can be tectonic change related to flexural bending of the lithosphere, climate change that would vary the degree of precipitation focused into the escarpment, or the decrease in the contributing catchment area, which would reduce the stream power available for fluvial erosion.

  14. Transfer time and source tracing in the soil - water- -plant system deciphered by the U-and Th-series short-lived nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihs, S.; Pierret, M.; Chabaux, F.

    2011-12-01

    within the first 70cm of the soil layer, either by plant uptake, or adsorption/ precipitation in particular soil layers. Consistently, the Ra isotope ratio in the spring water is similar to the inherited primary soil fraction, suggesting a "deep" (i.e. below the shallow 70cm of soil layer) origin of the exported dissolved radium and the short-scale effect of vegetation cycling onto radium transfer. The radium isotopic ratio in the trees roots does not match the soil exchangeable fraction, nor the seepage waters, but rather the bulk soil, suggesting a large and mixed pool of radium for roots uptake. Decay of 228Ra within the various parts of the trees allows calculating a vegetation cycling duration of about 10 years for this nuclide. Finally an unexpected large amount of unsupported 228Th in the tree leaves can only be explained by a preferential migration of the 228Ac (228Th precursor). The very short life of this nuclide allows therefore assessing that such transport from roots and deposition within stem and leaves take place within 30 hours at the most.

  15. Can Morasko and Mundrabilla help Reconstructing Production Rates and Nuclear Reaction Cross-Sections for Light Cosmogenic Nuclides?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchel, S.; Smith, T.; Leya, I.; Pavetich, S.; Rugel, G.; Scharf, A.; Muszynski, A.

    2016-08-01

    Lighter nuclides of He, Ne, and Ar, and radionuclides Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36 and Ca-41 are measured in troilite, schreibersite and bulk metal of Mundrabilla and Morasko. Traces of S largely enhance Al-26 production. Cl-36-Ar-36 CRE ages are undisturbed.

  16. Probing the nuclides {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, M.; Blaum, K.; Eliseev, S.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Droese, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Zuber, K.

    2011-08-15

    The Q values for double-electron capture in {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm have been measured by Penning-trap mass spectrometry. The results exclude at present all three nuclides from the list of suitable candidates for a search for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture.

  17. The tendency analytical equations of stable nuclides and the superluminal velocity motion laws of matter in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Kun

    In this paper, by discussing the existent distribution trend of relation for the proton number and the neutron number to be included by the stable nuclides in geospace, the tendency analytical method and it's periodic distribution equation forms of the stable nuclides are expressed at first. Then the comparison result between the curve of the theoretical equation analysis and the points of the experimental distribution data of the stable nuclides in geospace are given. Further more, the stable nuclide limit and the chemical element limit for the chemical element periodic table are given, and the possible corresponding relation equation with the positron-particle annihilation is expressed, which includes the estimation of the order of the static mass to be situated nearby at the electron neutrino structural dimension. Subsequently, by forming two hypotheses about the energy state of vacuum matter, and basing on the equivalent Binet equation, the mass equations and the energy equations of the partial moving with light-velocity or superluminal-velocity motion fusing with the results of Einstein special relativity are expressed. As inference, the possible corresponding relations between the mass equations and energy equations with the dark matter and dark energy are discussed tentatively.

  18. Measuring the Noble Metal and Iodine Composition of Extracted Noble Metal Phase from Spent Nuclear Fuel Using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares, R. I.; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Biegalski, Steven R.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Casella, Amanda J.; Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-04-01

    Mass quantities of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA). Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and mass quantification is derived from standard gamma spectroscopy and radionuclide decay analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. Lastly, the implications of the rapid analytic speed of instrumental NAA are discussed in relation to potential nuclear forensics applications.

  19. Incision of the Yangtze River at the First Bend Determined by Three-Nuclide Burial Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, D. F.; Hoke, G. D.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    On the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau, the evolution of the Yangtze River and its major tributaries has become an important source of data for investigating geodynamics. In particular, the timing of river incision is frequently interpreted as a proxy for the timing of surface uplift in the absence of structural evidence. We investigate the timing of the incision of the gorge at the First Bend using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of coarse, quartz sediments from caves. Sediments were deposited when the caves were near river level and subsequently abandoned as the river incised. To resolve burial ages >5 Ma, we measured the radionuclides 10Be and 26Al, and the stable nuclide 21Ne. Results from 4 caves show that 26Al and 10Be concentrations are an order of magnitude lower in abandoned cave samples than in a river-level cave sample where deposition is active (10Be: 1.3x104 and 3.4x105 at/g). In contrast, 26Al/10Be ratios in all caves are ≥6.2 and indistinguishable within error. 21Ne concentrations range from 2.1x106 to 7.8x106 at/g. The results are consistent with an old age for the abandoned cave deposits, such that most of the radionuclides initially present have decayed and the concentrations that we measure today are the result of millions of years of exposure to muons. We solve for burial ages, taking into account in situ muogenic production, and find that the majority of the gorge (1 km) was likely incised between ~12 and 9 Ma. The results also require that the rate of river incision declined after the gorge was cut below the lowest elevation cave at 9 Ma. Inverse modeling of published low-temperature thermochronology (Ouimet et al., 2010) supports our burial age results. River capture near the First Bend, which likely integrated the modern Yangtze, likely occurred prior to the mid-Miocene incision of the gorge. In view of the geographic position of the First Bend—just downslope from the southeast margin of the Plateau—it is difficult to explain

  20. Timing of European fluvial terrace formation and incision rates constrained by cosmogenic nuclide dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Mirjam; Ehlers, Todd A.; Stor, Tomas; Torrent, Jose; Lobato, Leonardo; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2016-10-01

    Age constraints of late Cenozoic fluvial terraces are important for addressing surface process questions related to the incision rates of rivers, or tectonic and climate controls on denudation and sedimentation. Unfortunately, absolute age constraints of fluvial terraces are not always possible, and many previous studies have often dated terraces with relative age constraints that do not allow for robust interpretations of incision rates and timing of terrace formation. However, in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides allow absolute age determination, and hence incision rates, of fluvial deposits back to 5 Ma. Here we present, cosmogenic depth profile dating and isochron burial dating of four different river systems in Europe spanning 12° of latitude. We do this to determine river incision rates and spatial variations in the timing of terrace formation. Isochron burial age constraints of four selected terraces from the Vltava river (Czech Republic) range between 1.00 ± 0.21 to 1.99 ± 0.45Ma. An isochron burial age derived for the Allier river (Central France) is 2.00 ± 0.17Ma. Five terrace levels from the Esla river (NW Spain) were dated between 0.08 + 0.04 / - 0.01Ma and 0.59 + 0.13 / - 0.20Ma with depth profile dating. The latter age agrees with an isochron burial age of 0.52 ± 0.20Ma. Two terrace levels from the Guadalquivir river (SW Spain) were dated by depth profile dating to 0.09 + 0.03 / - 0.02Ma and 0.09 + 0.04 / - 0.03Ma. The one terrace level from the Guadalquivir river dated by isochron burial dating resulted in an age of 1.79 ± 0.18Ma. Results indicate that the cosmogenic nuclide-based ages are generally older than ages derived from previous relative age constraints leading to a factor 2-3 lower incision rates than previous work. Furthermore, the timing of terrace formation over this latitudinal range is somewhat obscured by uncertainties associated with dating older terraces and not clearly synchronous with global climate variations.

  1. Erosion of mountain plateaus along Sognefjord, Norway, constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David L.; Knudsen, Mads F.; Linge, Henriette; Jansen, John D.

    2016-04-01

    Norway is famous for its deeply incised, steep-sided fjords, carved out by glacial erosion. The high relief of the fjords stands in contrast to the extensive areas of relatively low relief found between the fjords. The origin and development of these low-relief areas remain debated. The classical interpretation relates them to a Mesozoic peneplanation surface, uplifted to the current high elevation in the early Cenozoic (e.g. Nesje, 1994). The validity of this interpretation has, however, been repeatedly questioned in recent times (e.g. Nielsen et al. 2009, Steer et al. 2012). Recent studies point instead to a significant impact of glacial and periglacial erosion processes on the long-term development of the low-relief surfaces (Egholm et al. 2015). Here, we present a large new dataset of in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in bedrock and boulders from the high, flat summit surfaces along a transect from the coast to the inner parts of Sognefjorden in Norway. Our results indicate substantial glacial modification of the sampled low-relief surfaces within the last 50 ka. Close to the coast, at an elevation of around 700 meters, the cosmogenic nuclide signal was reset around the Younger Dryas due to extensive glacial erosion. Regarding the higher surfaces further inland, our results indicate a maximum cosmogenic nuclide inheritance of 20-30 ka prior to the last deglaciation. We do not find any signs of exceptional longevity of the low-relief landscape. In contrast, our results indicate that the low-relief areas were continuously eroded by glacial and periglacial processes in the Quaternary. Nesje & Whillans. Erosion of Sognefjord, Norway. Geomorphology 9(1), 33-45, 1994. Nielsen et al. The evolution of western Scandinavian topography: a review of Neogene uplift versus the ICE (isostasy-climate-erosion) hypothesis. Journal of Geodynamics 47(2), 72-95, 2009. Steer et al. Bimodal Plio-Quaternary glacial erosion of fjords and low-relief surfaces in Scandinavia

  2. Studies of Itokawa's Surface Exposure by Measurements of Cosmic-ray Produced Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Nishiizumi, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Uesugi, M.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    We plan to investigate the evolutionary history of surface materials from 25143 Itokawa, the Hayabusa samples. Our studies are based on the measurement of nuclides produced in asteroidal surface materials by cosmic rays. Cosmogenic radionuclides are used to determine the duration and nature of the exposure of materials to energetic particles. Our goals are to understand both the fundamental processes on the asteroidal surface and the evolutionary history of its surface materials. They are also key to understanding the history of Itokawa's surface and asteroid-meteoroid evolutionary dynamics. To achieve our key goals, in particular reconstructing the evolutionary histories of the asteroidal surface, we proposed: (1) characterizing Itokawa particles using SXCT, SXRD, and FE-SEM without modification of the sample; (2) embedding each particle in acrylic resin, then slicing a small corner with an ultra-microtome and examining it using super-STEM and SIMS for characterizing surface morphology, space weathering, and oxygen three-isotope analysis; and finally (3) measuring small amounts of cosmogenic radionuclides (104-105 atoms) in Hayabusa samples by AMS. However, we have to modify our plan due to unexpected situation.

  3. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of Sahelanthropus tchadensis and Australopithecus bahrelghazali: Mio-Pliocene hominids from Chad.

    PubMed

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Bourlès, Didier L; Duringer, Philippe; Jolivet, Marc; Braucher, Régis; Carcaillet, Julien; Schuster, Mathieu; Arnaud, Nicolas; Monié, Patrick; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Ages were determined at two hominid localities from the Chad Basin in the Djurab Desert (Northern Chad). In the Koro Toro fossiliferous area, KT 12 locality (16 degrees 00'N, 18 degrees 53'E) was the site of discovery of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) and in the Toros-Menalla fossiliferous area, TM 266 locality (16 degrees 15'N, 17 degrees 29'E) was the site of discovery of Sahelanthropus tchadensis (Toumaï). At both localities, the evolutive degree of the associated fossil mammal assemblages allowed a biochronological estimation of the hominid remains: early Pliocene (3-3.5 Ma) at KT 12 and late Miocene ( approximately 7 Ma) at TM 266. Atmospheric (10)Be, a cosmogenic nuclide, was used to quasicontinuously date these sedimentary units. The authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be dating of a pelite relic within the sedimentary level containing Abel yields an age of 3.58 +/- 0.27 Ma that points to the contemporaneity of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) with Australopithecus afarensis (Lucy). The 28 (10)Be/(9)Be ages obtained within the anthracotheriid unit containing Toumaï bracket, by absolute dating, the age of Sahelanthropus tchadensis to lie between 6.8 and 7.2 Ma. This chronological constraint is an important cornerstone both for establishing the earliest stages of hominid evolution and for new calibrations of the molecular clock.

  4. Activity concentration of natural radioactive nuclides in nonmetallic industrial raw materials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Tabe, Hiroyuki; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-11-01

    Natural materials such as rock, ore, and clay, containing natural radioactive nuclides are widely used as industrial raw materials in Japan. If these are high concentrations, the workers who handle the material can be unknowingly exposed to radiation at a high level. In this study, about 80 nonmetallic natural materials frequently used as industrial raw materials in Japan were comprehensively collected from several industrial companies, and the activity concentrations of (238)U series, (232)Th series and (40)K in the materials was determined by ICP-MS (inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and gamma ray spectrum analyses. Effective doses to workers handling them were estimated by using methods for dose estimation given in the RP 122. We found the activity concentrations to be lower than the critical values defined by regulatory requirements as described in the IAEA Safety Guide. The maximum estimated effective dose to workers handling these materials was 0.16 mSv y(-1), which was lower than the reference level (1-20 mSv y(-1)) for existing situation given in the ICRP Publ.103.

  5. Applications of in situ cosmogenic nuclides in the geologic site characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gosse, J.C.; Harrington, C.D.; Whitney, J.W.

    1996-08-01

    The gradual buildup of rare isotopes from interactions between cosmic rays and atoms in an exposed rock provides a new method of directly determining the exposure age of rock surfaces. The cosmogenic nuclide method can also provide constraints on erosion rates and the length of time surface exposure was interrupted by burial. Numerous successful applications of the technique have been imperative to the complete surface geologic characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential high level nuclear waste repository. The {sup 10}Be exposure age of Black Cone lava, within a ten mile radius of the proposed repository site, is 840 {+-} 210 kyr (in agreement with previous K/Ar dates of 1.0 {+-} 0.1 Ma). Rates of erosion of the tuff bedrock (< 0.4 cm/kyr from 7 {sup 10}Be measurements) and of hillslope colluvium ({approximately} 0.5 cm/kyr from {sup 10}Be dates on boulder deposits) preclude denudation of the mountain as a concern. Neotectonic concerns (rate of slip and timing of last significant movement along faults) are also being addressed with in situ {sup 14}C and {sup 10}Be measurements on scarp surfaces and on fault-dissected landforms where no surficial expression of the fault is preserved.

  6. Chemical isolation of quartz for measurement of in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, C.P.; Nishiizumi, K. )

    1992-09-01

    Measurement of cosmogenic nuclides produced in situ in terrestrial samples shows great potential as a tool for quantifying continental erosion rates, determining exposure ages of rocks, dating various geologic events, and elucidating past climates. An isolation method relying totally on chemical steps was developed to separate large quantities (10-200 g) of clean mono-minerallic quartz samples from a variety of terrestrial rocks and soils for the purpose of measuring [sup 10]Be (t[sub 1/2] = 1.5 Myr) and [sup 26]Al (t[sub 1/2] = 0.705 Myr) produced by cosmic rays in situ in the quartz phase. The procedure consists of grinding the sample, heating it in HCl, and treating it with a series of leaches using a dilute HF/HNO[sub 3] mixture in a heated ultrasonic tank. The purified quartz was also used for the measurements of in-situ-cosmic-ray-produced [sup 21]Ne and [sup 14]C (t[sub 1/2] = 5,730 yr). The method is applicable to any problem requiring purified quartz on a large scale.

  7. Development of the sampling and nuclide analysis methods for spent HEPA filter wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Yong Ji; Dae Seok Hong; Il-Sik Kang; Bum-Kyoung Seo; Jong-Sik Shon

    2007-07-01

    Spent filter wastes of about 2,160 units have been stored in the waste storage facility of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute since its operation. These spent filters have generally consisted of a HEPA filter after its filtering of all the contaminants in the gas stream generated during the operation of the HANARO research reactor and the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. At the moment, to secure enough storage space, it is necessary to make a volume reduction of the stored radioactive wastes through a compression treatment or a regulatory clearance. There have been many studies on a treatment and a clearance of the low level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear facilities. These methods are used in view of a reduction of a management cost and disposal cost and the security of free space for a waste storage facility approaching saturation. In order to dispose of the spent filters, it is first necessary to conduct a radionuclide assessment of them. To do that, a sampling procedure should be prepared to obtain a representative sample from a spent filter. As for conducting a nuclide analysis for this representative sample, a corresponding spent filter can be determined as either a regulatory clearance waste or a radioactive waste. (authors)

  8. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J.; Simon, M. C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mane, E.; Delheij, P.; Pearson, M. R.; Brunner, T.; Chowdhury, U.; Simon, V. V.; Brodeur, M.; Andreoiu, C.; Audi, G.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.; Gwinner, G.; Lapierre, A.; Lunney, D.; Ringle, R.

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {beta} emitter {sup 74}Rb (T{sub 1/2}=65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q{sub EC} value are presented.

  9. First use of high charge states for mass measurements of short-lived nuclides in a Penning trap.

    PubMed

    Ettenauer, S; Simon, M C; Gallant, A T; Brunner, T; Chowdhury, U; Simon, V V; Brodeur, M; Chaudhuri, A; Mané, E; Andreoiu, C; Audi, G; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Delheij, P; Gwinner, G; Lapierre, A; Lunney, D; Pearson, M R; Ringle, R; Ullrich, J; Dilling, J

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed β emitter 74Rb (T(1/2)=65  ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q(EC) value are presented.

  10. Cosmogenic nuclides in core samples of the Chico L6 chondrite - Evidence for irradiation under high shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.; Dezfouly-Arjomandy, B.; Middleton, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of core samples obtained from different depths of the Chico (New Mexico) L6 chondrite for various cosmogenic nuclides (Be-10, Al-26, and stable isotopes of He, Ne, and Ar). The relationships between the measured abundances of cosmogenic nuclides and cosmogenic Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio were compared with predictions of recent semiempirical models of Graf et al. (1990) and Reedy (1991), and it was found that both models closely reproduce the observed trends and absolute values of the data obtained. Noble gas data indicate that Chico experienced shielding similar to that of Jilin and greater than those of the Knyahinya or the Keyes chondrites. The exposure history for Chico is discussed.

  11. Cosmogenic nuclides in core samples of the Chico L6 chondrite - Evidence for irradiation under high shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.; Dezfouly-Arjomandy, B.; Middleton, R.

    1992-09-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of core samples obtained from different depths of the Chico (New Mexico) L6 chondrite for various cosmogenic nuclides (Be-10, Al-26, and stable isotopes of He, Ne, and Ar). The relationships between the measured abundances of cosmogenic nuclides and cosmogenic Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio were compared with predictions of recent semiempirical models of Graf et al. (1990) and Reedy (1991), and it was found that both models closely reproduce the observed trends and absolute values of the data obtained. Noble gas data indicate that Chico experienced shielding similar to that of Jilin and greater than those of the Knyahinya or the Keyes chondrites. The exposure history for Chico is discussed.

  12. Exchange interactions and Curie temperatures in Cr-based alloys in the zinc blende structure: Volume- and composition-dependence from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S. K.; Kudrnovský, J.

    2010-02-01

    We present calculations of the exchange interactions and Curie temperatures in Cr-based pnictides and chalcogenides of the form CrX , with X=As , Sb, S, Se, and Te, and the mixed alloys CrAs50X50 , with X=Sb , S, Se, and Te. The calculations are performed for zinc blende structure for 12 values of the lattice parameter between 5.44 and 6.62Å , appropriate for some typical II-VI and III-V semiconducting substrates. Electronic structure is calculated via the linear muffin-tin-orbitals (LMTOs) method in the atomic sphere approximation (ASA) using empty spheres to optimize ASA-related errors. Whenever necessary, the results have been verified using the full-potential version of the method, FP-LMTO. The disorder effect in the As-sublattice for CrAs50X50 (X=Sb,S,Se,Te) alloys is taken into account via the coherent-potential approximation. Exchange interactions are calculated using the linear-response method for the ferromagnetic (FM) reference states of the alloys as well as the disordered local moments (DLM) states. These results are then used to estimate the Curie temperature from the low- and high-temperature sides of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition. Estimates of the Curie temperature are provided based on the mean field and the more accurate random-phase approximations. Dominant antiferromagnetic exchange interactions for some low values of the lattice parameter for the FM reference states in CrS, CrSe, and CrTe prompted us to look for antiferromagnetic (AFM) configurations for these systems with energies lower than the corresponding FM and DLM values. Results for a limited number of such AFM calculations are discussed, identifying the AFM[111] state as a likely candidate for the ground state for these cases.

  13. Instrumental activation analysis of coal and fly ash with thermal and epithermal neutrons and short-lived nuclides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinnes, E.; Rowe, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis is applied to the determination of about 25 elements in coals and fly ash by means of nuclides with half-lives of less than 48 h ; thermal and epithermal irradiations are used. The results indicate that epithermal activation is preferable for twelve of the elements (Ga, As, Br, Sr, In, Cs, Ba, La, Sm, Ho, W and U). Data for SRM 1632 (coal) and SRM 1633 (fly ash) compare favorably with the results obtained by other investigators. ?? 1976.

  14. Impact of Tumor Localization and Method of Preoperative Biopsy on Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping After Periareolar Nuclide Injection

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Julia; Dutschke, Anja; Kaiser, Clemens G.; Schnitzer, Andreas; Gerhardt, Axel; Radosa, Julia C.; Brade, Joachim; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Wasser, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether tumor localization and method of preoperative biopsy affect sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection after periareolar nuclide injection in breast cancer patients. Methods and Findings 767 breast cancer patients were retrospectively included. For lymphscintigraphy periareolar nuclide injection was performed and the SLN was located by gamma camera. Patient and tumor characteristics were correlated to the success rate of SLN mapping. SLN marking failed in 9/61 (14.7%) patients with prior vacuum-assisted biopsy and 80/706 (11.3%) patients with prior core needle biopsy. Individually evaluated, biopsy method (p = 0.4) and tumor localization (p = 0.9) did not significantly affect the SLN detection rate. Patients with a vacuum-assisted biopsy of a tumor in the upper outer quadrant had a higher odds ratio of failing in SLN mapping (OR 3.8, p = 0.09) compared to core needle biopsy in the same localization (OR 0.9, p = 0.5). Conclusions Tumor localization and preoperative biopsy method do not significantly impact SLN mapping with periareolar nuclide injection. However, the failure risk tends to rise if vacuum-assisted biopsy of a tumor in the upper outer quadrant is performed. PMID:26867137

  15. Measurements of cross sections for production of light nuclides by 120 GeV proton bombardment of Ni and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Shintaro; Sekimoto, Shun; Yashima, Hiroshi; Matsushi, Yuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Seiichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu

    2014-09-01

    Production cross sections for long-lived cosmogenic nuclides, such as Be-10 and Al-26 have a very practical benefit for health and safety in radiation protection; they serve as a comprehensive nuclear database that can be used to estimate residual radioactivities in accelerator facilities. Cross sections are also indispensable for studying the specific formation mechanisms of these nuclides, where spallation, fission, or fragmentation is a dominant process. The fragmentation process is usually studied by production cross sections of light nuclides which are best measured by AMS. For energies above 100 MeV few measurements have been made and published. We have measured and report the first Be-10 and Al-26 production cross sections from Ni and Au produced by 120 GeV protons. The proton irradiation at 120 GeV was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The AMS measurements were performed at MALT, University of Tokyo. We will discuss the production mechanism of Be-10 and Al-26 by spallation and fragmentation.

  16. Chemical composition analysis of the essential oil of Melissa officinalis L. from Kurdistan, Iran by HS/SPME method and calculation of the biophysicochemical coefficients of the components.

    PubMed

    Taherpour, Avat Arman; Maroofi, Hossein; Rafie, Zeinab; Larijani, Kambiz

    2012-01-01

    The volatile constituents of the essential oil of wild Melissa officinalis L. obtained from the Kurdistan province of Iran were extracted by headspace/solid-phase micro-extraction and were analysed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Of a total of 14 compounds in the oil, 12 (85.7%) were identified. The main components were as follows: (E)-citral (37.2%), neral (23.9%) and citronellal (20.3%). Some physicochemical properties, such as the logarithm of calculated octanol-water partitioning coefficients (log K (ow))(,) total biodegradation (TB (d) in mol h(-1) and g h(-1)), water solubility (S (w), mg L(-1) at 25°C) and median lethal concentration 50 (LC(50)), were calculated for compounds 1-14 from M. officinalis L.

  17. A counter-intuitive approach to calculating non-exchangeable 2H isotopic composition of hair: treating the molar exchange fraction fE as a process-related rather than compound-specific variable

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landwehr, J.M.; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H.F.

    2011-01-01

    Hair is a keratinous tissue that incorporates hydrogen from material that an animal consumes but it is metabolically inert following synthesis. The stable hydrogen isotope composition of hair has been used in ecological studies to track migrations of mammals as well as for forensic and archaeological purposes to determine the provenance of human remains or the recent geographic life trajectory of living people. Measurement of the total hydrogen isotopic composition of a hair sample yields a composite value comprised of both metabolically informative, non-exchangeable hydrogen and exchangeable hydrogen, with the latter reflecting ambient or sample preparation conditions. Neither of these attributes is directly measurable, and the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition is obtained by estimation using a commonly applied mathematical expression incorporating sample measurements obtained from two distinct equilibration procedures. This commonly used approach treats the fraction of exchangeable hydrogen as a mixing ratio, with a minimal procedural fractionation factor assumed to be close or equal to 1. Instead, we propose to use full molar ratios to derive an expression for the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition explicitly as a function of both the procedural fractionation factor α and the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE. We apply these derivations in a longitudinal study of a hair sample and demonstrate that the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE should, like the procedural fractionation factor α, be treated as a process-dependent parameter, i.e. a reaction-specific constant. This is a counter-intuitive notion given that maximum theoretical values for the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE can be calculated that are arguably protein-type specific and, as such, fE could be regarded as a compound-specific constant. We also make some additional suggestions for future approaches to determine the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition of hair and the use of

  18. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  19. Vapor pressures and calculated heats of vaporization of concentrated nitric acid solutions in the composition range 71 to 89 percent nitrogen dioxide, 1 to 10 percent water, and in the temperature range 10 to 60 degrees C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, A B; Belles, Frank E

    1954-01-01

    Total vapor pressures were measured for 16 acid mixtures of the ternary system nitric acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water within the temperature range 10 degrees to 60 degrees Celsius, and with the composition range 71 to 89 weight percent nitric acid, 7 to 20 weight percent nitrogen dioxide, and 1 to 10 weight percent water. Heats of vaporization were calculated from the vapor pressure measurements for each sample for the temperatures 25, 40, and 60 degrees Celsius. The ullage of the apparatus used for the measurements was 0.46. Ternary diagrams showing isobars as a function of composition of the system were constructed from experimental and interpolated data for the temperatures 25, 40, 45, and 60 degrees C and are presented herein.

  20. Chaotic Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    Uses chaos theory to investigate the nonlinear phenomenon of population growth fluctuation. Illustrates the use of computers and computer programs to make calculations in a nonlinear difference equation system. (MDH)

  1. High-precision Penning trap mass measurements of 9,10Be and the one-neutron halo nuclide 11Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringle, R.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Ettenauer, S.; Smith, M.; Lapierre, A.; Ryjkov, V. L.; Delheij, P.; Drake, G. W. F.; Lassen, J.; Lunney, D.; Dilling, J.

    2009-05-01

    Penning trap mass measurements of 9Be, 10Be (t1 / 2 = 1.51 My), and the one-neutron halo nuclide 11Be (t1 / 2 = 13.8 s) have been performed using TITAN at TRIUMF. The resulting 11Be mass excess (ME = 20 177.60 (58) keV) is in agreement with the current Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME03) [G. Audi, et al., Nucl. Phys. A 729 (2003) 337] value, but is over an order of magnitude more precise. The precision of the mass values of 9,10Be have been improved by about a factor of four and reveal a ≈ 2 σ deviation from the AME mass values. Results of new atomic physics calculations are presented for the isotope shift of 11Be relative to 9Be, and it is shown that the new mass values essentially remove atomic mass uncertainties as a contributing factor in determining the relative nuclear charge radius from the isotope shift. The new mass values of 10,11Be also allow for a more precise determination of the single-neutron binding energy of the halo neutron in 11Be.

  2. Feasibility Study: Applicability of geochronologic methods involving radiocarbon and other nuclides to the groundwater hydrology of the Rustler Formation, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, S.J.

    1987-12-01

    Radiocarbon, tritium, and /sup 36/Cl were measured in groundwaters from the dolomite aquifers of the Rustler Formation in the northern Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico to determine the feasibility of using these nuclides in dating the groundwater at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a facility for geological disposal of Radioactive waste. No measurable /sup 36/Cl was found in any of these groundwaters, which derive their dissolved chloride from Permian evaporites. Demonstrably uncontaminated groundwaters contained no significant amounts of tritium (<0.2 TU). Percent modern carbon (PMC) correlates linearly and directly with bicarbonate concentration, indicating mixing of a high-PMC/high-bicarbonate reservoir with a low-PMC/low-bicarbonate reservoir. This relationship together with the history of development of the wells sampling the groundwaters, indicates contamination by anthropogenic modern carbon rather than simple dilution by dissolving rock carbonate. /delta//sup 13/C does not linearly correlate with bicarbonate, indicating no single source of contaminant radiocarbon. Values of PMC and /delta//sup 13/C for groundwaters were used to calculate apparent radiocarbon ages according to an interpretive model that accounts for water/rock interactions in carbonate aquifers. All but six pairs of values give significant negative ages (/minus/1,000 to /minus/7,000 years). This suggests that in contaminated samples the model over-adjusts (based on /delta//sup 13/C) for radiocarbon loss due to dilution and isotopic exchange with the rock. 52 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Old transient landscapes and surface processes: Multiple cosmogenic nuclide and sediment yield data from the Central Andes of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kober, F.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Schlunegger, F.; Zeilinger, G.; Kubik, P. W.; Baur, H.; Wieler, R.

    2005-12-01

    The desert parts of the Andes of northern Chile are regarded as being one of the oldest landscapes on Earth and hence landscape forming processes must act at very slow rates. These slow rates have promoted controversial ideas on the evolution of the Andean mountain chain and discussions whether climatic or tectonic forces predominate the geodynamic evolution of the Andes. Here we present erosion rates of hillslope interfluves across the slope of the western Central Andes (Arica area, northern Chile) derived from several long-lived terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (10Be, 21Ne, 26Al). Erosion rates positively correlate with elevation and the historical precipitation record, suggesting a coupling between climate and erosion. In addition, it is suggested that the very old landscapes could be preserved in the western Central Andes thanks to low tectonic activity and the prevailing dry climate. Erosion rates estimated back into the middle to late Miocene are on the order of 10-100cm/My at the hyperarid Western Escarpment (Atacama Desert) and the Costal Cordillera. In contrast, erosion rates for the semiarid Western Cordillera are up to >3000cm/My, at least back into the Holocene/late Pleistocene. Here sediment yield data obtained on a decadal scale indicate denudation rates of a similar order of magnitude. In comparison, erosion rates obtained from long-lived cosmogenic nuclides on hillsope interfluves for the Western Cordillera and those derived from preliminary data (21Ne) on catchment wide erosion rates of the Lluta-drainage system yield similar orders of magnitudes. Additionally, catchment wide erosion rates remain largely constant throughout the entire catchment. The analyses of multiple terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides and the use of various "erosion-island" diagrams allowed the identification of system states and of possible complex exposure histories. Complex exposure was identified for non-bedrock samples, such as boulders or amalgamated clast samples. Cosmogenic

  4. Cross-Spectral Comparison of Dust and Cosmogenic Nuclide Records from Greenland Ice Cores Demonstrate Synchronicity at Millennial Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbas, A.; Cuzzone, J. K.; Mix, A. C.; Clark, P. U.

    2013-12-01

    Greenland ice core records of dust and cosmogenic nuclides, converted to flux, share a striking resemblance on millennial timescales. However, to date, the significance of the relationship between these two parameters has received little attention. Here, we compare records of 10Be, 36Cl, and dust spanning ~18ky to ~33ky from the GRIP and GISP2 ice cores using cross-spectral analysis. Our findings demonstrate a statistically robust relationship between the cosmogenic nuclide flux and the dust flux, revealing a common mode of in-phase variability with a period of ~1600 years and coincident with the Northern Hemisphere Dansgaard-Oeschger events. Millennial-scale variability in cosmogenic nuclides from Greenland ice cores is commonly attributed to solar variability while variations in Greenland dust concentrations are associated with changes in atmospheric circulation, but why these two processes would co-vary remains unclear. We suggest that circulation could also act as a previously unrecognized control on cosmogenic nuclide fluxes, whereby variable mixing between the troposphere and stratosphere could explain the portion of the observed millennial-scale variability which cannot be explained by solar variability alone. Our proposed mechanism invokes changes in atmospheric mixing due to upper level (troposphere-stratosphere boundary) wind shear, which climate models predict may change during climate changes as a result of baroclinic variability. GCM simulations suggest that changes in baroclinicity between the LGM and present day lead to changes in the upper level jet velocities (500mb), which in turn, affect the vertical wind shear at upper levels (200-300mb). Because dust deposition scales closely with changes in wind velocity and chemical constituent exchange from the stratosphere to the troposphere is largely a function of jet proximal clear air turbulence provoked by instabilities in vertical shear, the Greenland dust and cosmogenic records may be particularly

  5. Analysis of burnup and isotopic compositions of BWR 9 x 9 UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Ando, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    2012-07-01

    In order to extend isotopic composition data focusing on fission product nuclides, measurements are progressing using facilities of JAEA for five samples taken from high burnup BWR 9 x 9 UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies. Neutronics analysis with an infinite assembly model was applied to the preliminary measurement data using a continuous-energy Monte Carlo burnup calculation code MVP-BURN with nuclear libraries based on JENDL-3.3 and JENDL-4.0. The burnups of the samples were determined to be 28.0, 39.3, 56.6, 68.1, and 64.0 GWd/t by the Nd-148 method. They were compared with those calculated using node-average irradiation histories of power and in-channel void fractions which were taken from the plant data. The comparison results showed that the deviations of the calculated burnups from the measurements were -4 to 3%. It was confirmed that adopting the nuclear data library based on JENDL-4.0 reduced the deviations of the calculated isotopic compositions from the measurements for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 144}Nd, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 146}Nd, {sup 148}Nd, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 154}Gd, and {sup 157}Gd. On the other hand, the effect of the revision in the nuclear. data library on the neutronics analysis was not significant for major U and Pu isotopes. (authors)

  6. Calculation of absorbed doses to water pools in severe accident sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.

    1991-12-01

    A methodology is presented for calculating the radiation dose to a water pool from the decay of uniformly distributed nuclides in that pool. Motivated by the need to accurately model radiolysis reactions of iodine, direct application is made to fission product sources dissolved or suspended in containment sumps or pools during a severe nuclear reactor accident. Two methods of calculating gamma absorption are discussed - one based on point-kernal integration and the other based on Monte Carlo techniques. Using least-squares minimization, the computed results are used to obtain a correlation that relates absorbed dose to source energy and surface-to-volume ratio of the pool. This correlation is applied to most relevant fission product nuclides and used to actually calculate transient sump dose rate in a pressurized-water reactor (PWR) severe accident sequence.

  7. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides from Mo-99 Acidic Liquid Waste - 13027

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Hsien-Ming; Pen, Ben-Li

    2013-07-01

    About 200 liters highly radioactive acidic liquid waste originating from Mo-99 production was stored at INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research). A study regarding the treatment of the radioactive acidic liquid waste was conducted to solve storage-related issues and allow discharge of the waste while avoiding environmental pollution. Before discharging the liquid waste, the acidity, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and Hg ions in high concentrations, and radionuclides must comply with environmental regulations. Therefore, the treatment plan was to neutralize the acidic liquid waste, remove key radionuclides to reduce the dose rate, and then remove the nitrate and mercury ions. Bench tests revealed that NaOH is the preferred solution to neutralize the high acidic waste solution and the pH of solution must be adjusted to 9∼11 prior to the removal of nuclides. Significant precipitation was produced when the pH of solution reached 9. NaNO{sub 3} was the major content in the precipitate and part of NaNO{sub 3} was too fine to be completely collected by filter paper with a pore size of approximately 3 μm. The residual fine particles remaining in solution therefore blocked the adsorption column during operation. Two kinds of adsorbents were employed for Cs-137 and a third for Sr-90 removal to minimize cost. For personnel radiation protection, significant lead shielding was required at a number of points in the process. The final process design and treatment facilities successfully treated the waste solutions and allowed for environmentally compliant discharge. (authors)

  8. On a solar origin for the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Dietrich, W. F.; Ling, A. G.

    2014-01-20

    We explore requirements for a solar particle event (SPE) and flare capable of producing the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D., and review solar circumstances at that time. A solar source for 775 would require a >1 GV spectrum ∼45 times stronger than that of the intense high-energy SPE of 1956 February 23. This implies a >30 MeV proton fluence (F {sub 30}) of ∼8 × 10{sup 10} proton cm{sup –2}, ∼10 times larger than that of the strongest 3 month interval of SPE activity in the modern era. This inferred F {sub 30} value for the 775 SPE is inconsistent with the occurrence probability distribution for >30 MeV solar proton events. The best guess value for the soft X-ray classification (total energy) of an associated flare is ∼X230 (∼9 × 10{sup 33} erg). For comparison, the flares on 2003 November 4 and 1859 September 1 had observed/inferred values of ∼X35 (∼10{sup 33} erg) and ∼X45 (∼2 × 10{sup 33} erg), respectively. The estimated size of the source active region for a ∼10{sup 34} erg flare is ∼2.5 times that of the largest region yet recorded. The 775 event occurred during a period of relatively low solar activity, with a peak smoothed amplitude about half that of the second half of the 20th century. The ∼1945-1995 interval, the most active of the last ∼2000 yr, failed to witness a SPE comparable to that required for the proposed solar event in 775. These considerations challenge a recent suggestion that the 775 event is likely of solar origin.

  9. On a Solar Origin for the Cosmogenic Nuclide Event of 775 A.D.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Dietrich, W. F.; Ling, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    We explore requirements for a solar particle event (SPE) and flare capable of producing the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D., and review solar circumstances at that time. A solar source for 775 would require a greater than 1 GV spectrum approximately 45 times stronger than that of the intense high-energy SPE of 1956 February 23. This implies a greater than 30 MeV proton fluence (F(sub 30)) of approximately 8 × 10(exp 10) proton cm(exp -2), approximately 10 times larger than that of the strongest 3 month interval of SPE activity in the modern era. This inferred F(sub 30) value for the 775 SPE is inconsistent with the occurrence probability distribution for greater than 30 MeV solar proton events. The best guess value for the soft X-ray classification (total energy) of an associated flare is approximately X230 (approximately 9 × 10(exp 33) erg). For comparison, the flares on 2003 November 4 and 1859 September 1 had observed/inferred values of approximately X35 (approximately 10(exp 33) erg) and approximately X45 (approximately 2 × 10(exp 33) erg), respectively. The estimated size of the source active region for a approximately 10(exp 34) erg flare is approximately 2.5 times that of the largest region yet recorded. The 775 event occurred during a period of relatively low solar activity, with a peak smoothed amplitude about half that of the second half of the 20th century. The approximately 1945-1995 interval, the most active of the last approximately 2000 yr, failed to witness a SPE comparable to that required for the proposed solar event in 775. These considerations challenge a recent suggestion that the 775 event is likely of solar origin.

  10. Extensive MIS 3 glaciation in southernmost Patagonia revealed by cosmogenic nuclide dating of outwash sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Hein, Andrew S.; Rodés, Ángel

    2015-11-01

    The timing and extent of former glacial advances can demonstrate leads and lags during periods of climatic change and their forcing, but this requires robust glacial chronologies. In parts of southernmost Patagonia, dating pre-global Last Glacial Maximum (gLGM) ice limits has proven difficult due to post-deposition processes affecting the build-up of cosmogenic nuclides in moraine boulders. Here we provide ages for the Río Cullen and San Sebastián glacial limits of the former Bahía Inútil-San Sebastián (BI-SSb) ice lobe on Tierra del Fuego (53-54°S), previously hypothesised to represent advances during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 12 and 10, respectively. Our approach uses cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure dating, but targets glacial outwash associated with these limits and uses depth-profiles and surface cobble samples, thereby accounting for surface deflation and inheritance. The data reveal that the limits formed more recently than previously thought, giving ages of 45.6 ka (139.9/-14.3) for the Río Cullen, and 30.1 ka (+45.6/-23.1) for the San Sebastián limits. These dates indicate extensive glaciation in southern Patagonia during MIS 3, prior to the well-constrained, but much less extensive MIS 2 (gLGM) limit. This suggests the pattern of ice advances in the region was different to northern Patagonia, with the terrestrial limits relating to the last glacial cycle, rather than progressively less extensive glaciations over hundreds of thousands of years. However, the dates are consistent with MIS 3 glaciation elsewhere in the southern mid-latitudes, and the combination of cooler summers and warmer winters with increased precipitation, may have caused extensive glaciation prior to the gLGM.

  11. Rotational Spectrum, Conformational Composition, and Quantum Chemical Calculations of Cyanomethyl Formate (HC(O)OCH2C≡N), a Compound of Potential Astrochemical Interest.

    PubMed

    Samdal, Svein; Møllendal, Harald; Carles, Sophie

    2015-08-27

    The rotational spectrum of cyanomethyl formate (HC(O)OCH2C≡N) has been recorded in the 12–123 GHz spectral range. The spectra of two conformers were assigned. The rotamer denoted I has a symmetry plane and two out-of plane hydrogen atoms belonging to the cyanomethyl (CH2CN) moiety. In the conformer called II, the cyanomethyl group is rotated 80.3° out of this plane. Conformer I has an energy that is 1.4(6) kJ/mol lower than the energy of II according to relative intensity measurements. A large number of rotational transitions have been assigned for the ground and vibrationally excited states of the two conformers and accurate spectroscopic constants have been obtained. These constants should predict frequencies of transitions outside the investigated spectral range with a very high degree of precision. It is suggested that cyanomethyl formate is a potential interstellar compound. This suggestion is based on the fact that its congener methyl formate (HC(O)OCH3) exists across a large variety of interstellar environments and the fact that cyanides are very prevalent in the Universe. The experimental work has been augmented by high-level quantum chemical calculations. The CCSD/cc-pVQZ calculations are found to predict structures of the two forms that are very close to the Born–Oppenheimer equilibrium structures. MP2/cc-pVTZ predictions of several vibration–rotation interaction constants were generally found to be rather inaccurate. A gas-phase reaction between methyl formate and the cyanomethyl radical CH2CN to produce a hydrogen atom and cyanomethyl formate was mimicked using MP2/cc-pVTZ calculations. It was found that this reaction is not favored thermodynamically. It is also conjectured that the possible formation of cyanomethyl formate might be catalyzed and take place on interstellar particles. PMID:26207519

  12. Explicitly correlated benchmark calculations on C8H8 isomer energy separations: how accurate are DFT, double-hybrid, and composite ab initio procedures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karton, Amir; Martin, Jan M. L.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate isomerization energies are obtained for a set of 45 C8H8 isomers by means of the high-level, ab initio W1-F12 thermochemical protocol. The 45 isomers involve a range of hydrocarbon functional groups, including (linear and cyclic) polyacetylene, polyyne, and cumulene moieties, as well as aromatic, anti-aromatic, and highly-strained rings. Performance of a variety of DFT functionals for the isomerization energies is evaluated. This proves to be a challenging test: only six of the 56 tested functionals attain root mean square deviations (RMSDs) below 3 kcal mol-1 (the performance of MP2), namely: 2.9 (B972-D), 2.8 (PW6B95), 2.7 (B3PW91-D), 2.2 (PWPB95-D3), 2.1 (ωB97X-D), and 1.2 (DSD-PBEP86) kcal mol-1. Isomers involving highly-strained fused rings or long cumulenic chains provide a 'torture test' for most functionals. Finally, we evaluate the performance of composite procedures (e.g. G4, G4(MP2), CBS-QB3, and CBS-APNO), as well as that of standard ab initio procedures (e.g. MP2, SCS-MP2, MP4, CCSD, and SCS-CCSD). Both connected triples and post-MP4 singles and doubles are important for accurate results. SCS-MP2 actually outperforms MP4(SDQ) for this problem, while SCS-MP3 yields similar performance as CCSD and slightly bests MP4. All the tested empirical composite procedures show excellent performance with RMSDs below 1 kcal mol-1.

  13. Rotational Spectrum, Conformational Composition, Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding, and Quantum Chemical Calculations of Mercaptoacetonitrile (HSCH2C≡N), a Compound of Potential Astrochemical Interest.

    PubMed

    Møllendal, Harald; Samdal, Svein; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-31

    The microwave spectra of mercaptoacetonitrile (HSCH2C≡N) and one deuterated species (DSCH2C≡N) were investigated in the 7.5-124 GHz spectral interval. The spectra of two conformers denoted SC and AP were assigned. The H-S-C-C chain of atoms is synclinal in SC and anti-periplanar in AP. The ground state of SC is split into two substates separated by a comparatively small energy difference resulting in closely spaced transitions with equal intensities. Several transitions of the parent species of SC deviate from Watson's Hamiltonian. Only slight improvements were obtained using a Hamiltonian that takes coupling between the two substates into account. Deviations from Watson's Hamiltonian were also observed for the parent species of AP. However, the spectrum of the deuterated species, which was investigated only for the SC conformer, fits satisfactorily to Watson's Hamiltonian. Relative intensity measurements found SC to be lower in energy than AP by 3.8(3) kJ/mol. The strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bond between the thiol and cyano groups was estimated to be ∼2.1 kJ/mol. The microwave work was augmented by quantum chemical calculations at CCSD and MP2 levels using basis sets of minimum triple-ζ quality. Mercaptoacetonitrile has astrochemical interest, and the spectra presented herein should be useful for a potential identification of this compound in the interstellar medium. Three different ways of generating mercaptoacetonitrile from compounds already found in the interstellar medium were explored by quantum chemical calculations. PMID:26974178

  14. Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions and Applications II. Users Manual and Program Description. 2; Users Manual and Program Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    This users manual is the second part of a two-part report describing the NASA Lewis CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications) program. The program obtains chemical equilibrium compositions of complex mixtures with applications to several types of problems. The topics presented in this manual are: (1) details for preparing input data sets; (2) a description of output tables for various types of problems; (3) the overall modular organization of the program with information on how to make modifications; (4) a description of the function of each subroutine; (5) error messages and their significance; and (6) a number of examples that illustrate various types of problems handled by CEA and that cover many of the options available in both input and output. Seven appendixes give information on the thermodynamic and thermal transport data used in CEA; some information on common variables used in or generated by the equilibrium module; and output tables for 14 example problems. The CEA program was written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77. CEA should work on any system with sufficient storage. There are about 6300 lines in the source code, which uses about 225 kilobytes of memory. The compiled program takes about 975 kilobytes.

  15. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solum, John G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Lockner, David A.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ˜1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon.

  17. The Gas-Filled-Magnet at PRIME Lab: Increased Sensitivity of Cosmogenic Nuclide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Granger, D. E.; Woodruff, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), radionuclides produced either by cosmic-ray interactions or by nucleogenic means can be measured. Typical isotopic abundance ratios range from 1 x 10-10 to 1 x 10-15. The routinely measured radionuclides are 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, and 129I. Be-10, 26Al, and 36Cl have isobaric interferences that cannot be eliminated mass through mass analysis, but dE/dx techniques suppresses these isobars enough to allow successful measurements. There are compromises, the isobar for 26Al, 26Mg, precludes successful measurement of 26Al if AlO- is injected into the accelerator. Mg- doesn't form a stable negative ion so a 26Al measurement requires injection of 26Al-. But the Al- ion is formed inefficiently; secondary ion currents using Al- are ~ 10 times less than an AlO- secondary ion beam. Precision scales with count rate so precise measurement of the 26Al/Al for all but higher ratio samples is difficult. It has long been recognized that a gas-filled-magnet (GFM) could potentially improve the measurement of those radionuclides with intractable isobar interferences. A GFM works on the principle that each element of an isobar pair, e.g. 26Mg and 26Al, has a different average charge state as it traverses a gas (3-4 Torr of N2) contained within the vacuum jacket of a magnet. The magnet steers each species with its own momentum-to-charge ratio on its own distinct radius of curvature. The magnet can be tuned to allow the isotope of interest into a dE/dx detector; most of the isobar doesn't make it into the detector. Using the PRIME Lab GFM we are now able to routinely run 26Al with a precision that is comparable to that obtained with 10Be. We are also using the GFM for routine measurements of 10Be and 36Cl. Although the improvement for these nuclides is not as pronounced as it is for 26Al, the GFM has improved the detection sensitivity for both. Our 10Be background is now ~ 5 x 10-16 and for 36Cl we can now run the source more

  18. Flux of transuranium nuclides and chlorinated hydrocarbons in the northwestern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, S. W.; Ballestra, S.; Villeneuve, J.-P.

    1990-09-01

    The transuranium nuclides, plutonium and americium, and selected chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds have been measured in sediment trap samples, bottom sediments and waters. These measurements have been used to quantify vertical fluxes and elucidate particulate biogeochemical cycles, of these man-made contaminants in the northwestern Mediterranean. Sediment trap experiments in the Gulf of Lions (Lacaze-Duthiers Canyon) have shown that transuranic fluxes are considerably higher in the Gulf of Lions, than those which have been reported for the northeast Pacific; principally this is due to the relatively high mass fluxes in this region of the Mediterranean. Water, surface sediment and sediment trap data indicate that 241Am is being transported downward (via particle settling) more rapidly than 239+240Pu. From direct flux measurement, residence times for 239+240Pu and 241Am in the upper 300 m were computed to be 2.5 and 0.14 years, respectively. Comparison of 239+240Pu concentrations in the water column, in 1986, with similar measurements made 5-11 years earlier suggests that fallout input to the Mediterranean has decreased by nearly a factor of 2 during the period 1975-1986. Fluxes of PCB, HCB, γ-HCH and DDT residues varied by as much as an order of magnitude, or more, both temporally and with depth. The average fluxes of most of the compounds in the Lacaze-Duthiers Canyon, during 1985-1986, were quite similar to those measured off the coast of Monaco several years earlier. Generally, the increased chlorinated hydrocarbon fluxes observed with depth were a direct result of the much higher mass fluxes which occurred at depth. Demonstrated differences in PCB concentrations in the settling particles, deposited surface sediments and overlying sediment floc indicate that simple bottom sediment resuspension is not a major contributor to the enhanced PCB flux noted at depth. The PCB concentration in sedimenting particulate material collected from deeper waters, is similar to

  19. Major- and minor-metal composition of three distinct solid material fractions associated with Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids (northeast Pacific), and calculation of dilution fluid samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.K.; Seeley, J.L.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1988-01-01

    Three distinct types of solid material are associated with each sample of the hydrothermal fluid that was collected from the vents of the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The solid materials appear to be representative of deposits on ocean floors near mid-ocean ridges, and interpretation of the chemistry of the hydrothermal solutions requires understanding of them. Sr isotopic evidence indicates that at least two and probably all three of these solid materials were removed from the solution with which they are associated, by precipitation or adsorption. This occurred after the "pure" hydrothermal fluid was diluted and thoroughly mixed with ambient seawater. The three types of solid materials, are, respectively, a coarse Zn- and Fe-rich material with small amounts of Na and Ca; a finer material also rich in Zn and Fe, but with alkali and alkaline-earth metals; and a scum composed of Ba or Zn, with either considerable Fe or Si, and Sr. Mineral identification is uncertain because of uncertain anion composition. Only in the cases of Ba and Zn were metal masses greater in solid materials than in the associated fluids. For all other metals measured, masses in fluids dwarf those in solids. The fluids themselves contain greater concentrations of all metals measured, except Mg, than seawater. We discuss in detail the relative merits of two methods of determining the mixing proportions of "pure" hydrothermal solution and seawater in the fluids, one based on Sr isotopes, and another previously used method based on Mg concentrations. Comparison of solute concentrations in the several samples shows that degree of dilution of "pure" hydrothermal solutions by seawater, and amounts of original solutes that were removed from it as solid materials, are not related. There is no clear evidence that appreciable amounts of solid materials were not conserved (lost) either during or prior to sample collection. ?? 1988.

  20. Investigation of Nuclide Importance to Functional Requirements Related to Transport and Long-Term Storage of LWR Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The radionuclide characteristics of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel play key roles in the design and licensing activities for radioactive waste transportation systems, interim storage facilities, and the final repository site. Several areas of analysis require detailed information concerning the time-dependent behavior of radioactive nuclides including (1) neutron/gamma-ray sources for shielding studies, (2) fissile/absorber concentrations for criticality safety determinations, (3) residual decay heat predictions for thermal considerations, and (4) curie and/or radiological toxicity levels for materials assumed to be released into the ground/environment after long periods of time. The crucial nature of the radionuclide predictions over both short and long periods of time has resulted in an increased emphasis on thorough validation for radionuclide generation/depletion codes. Current radionuclide generation/depletion codes have the capability to follow the evolution of some 1600 isotopes during both irradiation and decay time periods. Of these, typically only 10 to 20 nuclides dominate contributions to each analysis area. Thus a quantitative ranking of nuclides over various time periods is desired for each of the analysis areas of shielding, criticality, heat transfer, and environmental dose (radiological toxicity). These rankings should allow for validation and data improvement efforts to be focused only on the most important nuclides. This study investigates the relative importances of the various actinide, fission-product, and light-element isotopes associated with LWR spent fuel with respect to five analysis areas: criticality safety (absorption fractions), shielding (dose rate fractions), curies (fractional curies levels), decay heat (fraction of total watts), and radiological toxicity (fraction of potential committed effective dose equivalent). These rankings are presented for up to six different burnup/enrichment scenarios and at decay times from 2 to

  1. Beta decay of nuclides 56Fe, 62Ni, 64Ni and 68Ni in the crust of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Kang, Xiao-Ping; Hao, Liang-Huan; Feng, Hao; Liu, Dong-Mei; Li, Chang-Wei; Zeng, Xiang-Ming

    2016-11-01

    By introducing the Dirac δ-function and Pauli exclusion principle in the presence of superstrong magnetic fields (SMFs), we investigate the influence of SMFs on beta decay and the change rates of electron fraction (CREF) of nuclides 56Fe, 62Ni, 64Ni and 68Ni in magnetars, which are powered by magnetic field energy. We find that the magnetic fields have a great influence on the beta decay rates, and the beta decay rates can decrease by more than six orders of magnitude in the presence of SMFs. The CREF also decreases by more than seven orders of magnitude in the presence of SMFs.

  2. [Bibliographic consideration of proper management of radioactive waste on short-lived period nuclides that are used in nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayakawa, Toshio

    2009-05-20

    A rational clearance system for medical radioactive waste has not yet been established in Japan. As Europe and USA's ways, the establishment of DIS that medical radioactive waste what are kept in storage room for more than decided period each nuclide except from regulation of radiation's control. The purpose of this report is to clarify the problems with the establishment of DIS in Japan through a literature review of the experience in Europe and the USA and previous research that has been reported in Japan. To establish the DIS system, the radiation control system in nuclear medicine should be rebuilt and put into effect.

  3. [Bibliographic consideration of proper management of radioactive waste on short-lived period nuclides that are used in nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayakawa, Toshio

    2009-05-20

    A rational clearance system for medical radioactive waste has not yet been established in Japan. As Europe and USA's ways, the establishment of DIS that medical radioactive waste what are kept in storage room for more than decided period each nuclide except from regulation of radiation's control. The purpose of this report is to clarify the problems with the establishment of DIS in Japan through a literature review of the experience in Europe and the USA and previous research that has been reported in Japan. To establish the DIS system, the radiation control system in nuclear medicine should be rebuilt and put into effect. PMID:19498253

  4. WBGT Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Charles H.

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulate the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.

  5. WBGT Calculator

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  6. Natural Paleoseismometers: Cosmogenic Nuclide Dating of Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBRs) - Integral Constraints on Maximum Ground Accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perg, L. A.; Ludwig, L. G.; Kendrick, K.; Brune, J.; Purvance, M.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Akciz, S.

    2007-12-01

    Precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) act as natural seismometers constraining maximum ground acceleration over the surface exposure history of the PBR. These key paleoseismic indicators have the potential to validate ground motions on the timescale necessary to test earthquake rupture forecasts and Seismic Hazard Assessment estimates, and are an active topic of research to validate CyberShake results and constrain National Seismic Hazard Maps. This research focuses on examining the post-exhumation history of PBRs using in-situ terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs). TCNs provide a record of near-surface exposure history. The measured concentrations are a function of the residence time in the upper ~20 m of the subsurface (inherited concentration), the timing and rate of exhumation, and post-exhumation surface spalling and chemical erosion. Our goal in the project is to provide reasonable constraints on the post-exhumation history, specifically the age of the PBRs and evolution of precariousness: we should be able to constrain whether the rocks were of similar precariousness 2.5 ka, 5 ka, and 10 ka ago. These specific targets will provide important constraints on time since exceedance for the CyberShake models. We developed our sampling strategy to address subsurface inheritance, exhumation rate and timing, and post- exhumation spalling and chemical erosion. PBRs were selected to meet a variety of considerations. These rocks constrain ground motions from large earthquakes on the San Jacinto and Elsinore faults, in Southern California. Inherited concentrations lead to an age estimate that is too old; we are investigating inherited concentrations though sampling a rock quarry near Perris CA, with shielded samples at greater than 15 m depth. We also have partially shielded samples from the interior of rocks toppled to measure their stability, and through vandalism. To determine exhumation age and rate, our sampling strategy is to collect 5-6 samples per PBR: 1 on top, 3

  7. Terrestrial Cosmogenic-Nuclide Dating of Alluvial Fans in Death Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Slate, Janet L.; Phillips, Fred M.

    2008-01-01

    We have used terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN) to establish the age of some of the most extensive Quaternary alluvial fans in Death Valley, California. These intermediate-age alluvial fans are most extensive on the western side of the valley, where tectonic deformation is considerably less pronounced than on the eastern side of the valley. These fans are characterized by a relatively smooth, densely packed desert pavement formed by well-varnished (blackened) clasts. These surfaces have been mapped as the Q2 gravel by previous workers and as unit Qai (intermediate age) by us. However, the intermediate-age gravels probably contain multiple subunits, as evidenced by slight differences in morphologic expression, soil formation, and inset geomorphic relations. The TCN technique used herein sums the cosmogenic 36Cl in approximately 2.5-meter-deep profiles through soil and host alluvium, thus avoiding some of the problems associated with the more typical surface-exposure dating of boulders or smaller clasts. Our TCN 36Cl dating of 12 depth profiles indicates that these intermediate-age (Qai) alluvial fans range from about 100 to 40 kilo-annum (ka), with a mean age of about 70 ka. An alternative interpretation is that alluvial unit Qai was deposited in two discrete episodes from 90 to 80 ka and from 60 to 50 ka, before and after MIS (marine oxygen-isotope stage) 4 (respectively). Without an intermediate-age unit, such as MIS 4 lake deposits, we can neither disprove nor prove that Qai was deposited in two discrete intervals or over a longer range of time. Thus, in Death Valley, alluvial unit Qai largely brackets MIS 4, which is not associated with a deep phase of Lake Manly. These Qai fans extend to elevations of about -46 meters (150 feet below sea level) and have not been transgressed by Lake Manly, suggesting that MIS 4 or MIS 2 lakes were rather shallow in Death Valley, perhaps because they lacked inflow from surface runoff of the Sierra Nevada drainages through

  8. Determination of k0-factors of short-lived nuclides and application of k0-NAA to selected trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, R.; Holzbecher, J.; Chatt, A.

    2012-07-01

    As part of the standardization program of k0-based NAA (k0-NAA) methods at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (DUSR) facility, the k0-factors of 15 analytically important short-lived nuclides (half-life <65 s) were determined with respect to gold (197Au). The elemental standards used were prepared mostly from their primary standard solutions. The samples were irradiated in both inner and outer pneumatic sites of the DUSR facility and counted using an HPGe-detector coupled to an ORTEC's digital gamma-ray spectrometer. The k0-factors determined using both inner and outer irradiation sites were found to be within ±5% with respect to either recommended or literature values in most cases. The Z-score values at 95% confidence level were found to be in the range of ±0.03-1.6. The k0-NAA method was applied to three different NIST standard reference materials (SRMs) and concentrations of six elements, namely Ag, F, Hf, Rb, Sc, and Se were determined using their short-lived nuclides. The concentrations of these elements were also determined by relative NAA method for comparison purposes.

  9. SOURCES: a code for calculating (alpha,n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W B; Perry, R T; Charlton, W S; Parish, T A; Shores, E F

    2005-01-01

    SOURCES is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from (alpha,n) reactions, spontaneous fission and delayed neutron emission owing to the decay of radionuclides in homogeneous media, interface problems and three-region interface problems. The code is also capable of calculating the neutron production rates due to (alpha,n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of alpha particles incident on a slab of target material. The (alpha,n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the centre-of-mass system with a library of 107 nuclide decay alpha-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated (alpha,n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional alpha particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. Spontaneous fission sources and spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching and Watt spectrum parameters for 44 actinides. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code outputs the magnitude and spectra of the resultant neutron sources. It also provides an analysis of the contributions to that source by each nuclide in the problem. PMID:16381695

  10. HALF-LIVES OF LONG-LIVED ALPHA DECAY, BETA DECAY, ELECTRON CAPTURE DECAY, BETA BETA-DECAY, PROTON DECAY AND SPONTANEOUS FISSION DECAY NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, H.E.

    2003-08-08

    In his review of radionuclides for dating purposes, Roth noted that there were a large number of nuclides, normally considered ''stable'' but which are radioactive with a very long half-life. Roth suggested that I review the data on the half-life values of these long-lived nuclides for the 2001 Atomic Weights Commission meeting in Brisbane. I provided a report, BNL-NCS-68377, to fulfill Roth's request. Peiser has now made a similar suggestion that I review these data for our next Commission meeting in Ottawa for their possible inclusion in our Tables. These half-life values for long-lived nuclides include those due to various decay modes, {alpha}-decay, {beta}-decay, electron capture decay, {beta}{beta}-decay, proton decay and spontaneous fission decay. This data review (post Brisbane) provides an update to the recommendation of the 2001 review.

  11. Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS

    SciTech Connect

    Perkasa, Y. S.; Waris, A. Kurniadi, R. Su'ud, Z.

    2014-09-30

    Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS have been conducted. In this work, fission cross section resulted from MCNP6 prediction will be compared with result from TALYS calculation. MCNP6 with its event generator CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 have been validated and verified for several intermediate and heavy nuclides fission reaction data and also has a good agreement with experimental data for fission reaction that induced by photons, pions, and nucleons at energy from several ten of MeV to about 1 TeV. The calculation that induced within TALYS will be focused mainly to several hundred MeV for actinide and sub-actinide nuclides and will be compared with MCNP6 code and several experimental data from other evaluator.

  12. Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in Neogene rivers of the Great Plains reveal the evolution of fluvial storage and recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Hugh; Stuart, Fin; McCann, Louise; Tao, Zui

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of the duration of near surface residence of sediment grains from the stratigraphic record has the potential to quantitatively reconstruct processes such as stratal condensation, sediment recycling and the exposure histories of unconformities. Geomorphological measurements of dates and rates of surfaces and erosion respectively has enabled significant advances in understanding, however, the radiogenic half life of typical cosmogenic nuclides such as 10Be and 26Al means they are not suitable for the stratigraphic record. Instead, we have applied the stable cosmogenic nuclide of 21Ne to quartz-rich sediment to quantify the routing history of the river systems that have drained the southern Rockies of Wyoming and Colorado during Neogene times. The Neogene sediments of Nebraska record fluvial systems of the Great Plains that flow from the Rockies towards the east and into the Mississippi catchment. This succession is <300 m thick, and records successive episodes of fluvial incision and aggradation associated with regional tilting from 6 to 4 Ma and periods of climate change. As part of an evaluation of the application of 21Ne to the stratigraphic record, we sampled quartzite pebbles from an Upper Miocene, Pliocene and modern river channel of the North Platte approximately 400 km from their mountainous source. The quartzite is derived from a single exposure of the Medicine Bow quartzites in Wyoming, therefore all three intervals recorded the same travel distance from source. Additionally, we know the erosion rate of the Medicine Bow quartzites from detrital 10Be analyses, and we also sampled shielded bedrock samples from the quartzite to evaluate for any non-cosmogenic 21Ne. This means that the concentrations of 21Ne in detrital pebbles >400 km from their source could be corrected for both inherited non-cosmogenic and erosion induced accumulation at source. Therefore, any additional amounts of 21Ne must record storage and exposure during transport down

  13. In-situ measurements of U-series nuclides by electron microprobe on zircons and monazites from Gandak river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosia, C.; Deloule, E.; France-Lanord, C.; Chabaux, F.

    2015-12-01

    Determination of sediment transfer time during transport in the alluvial plains is a critical issue to correctly understand the relationship between climate, tectonics and Earth surface evolution. The residence time of river sediments may be constrained by analyzing the U series nuclides fractionations (e.g. [1] and [2]), which are created during water rock interactions by the ejection of the daughter nuclides of the grain (α-recoil) and the preferential mobilization of nuclides in decay damaged crystal structure. However, recent studies on sediments from the Gandak river, one of the main Ganga tributary, highlighted the difficulties to obtain reproducible data on bulk sediments, due to the nuggets distribution of U-Th enriched minor minerals in the samples (Bosia et al., unpublished data). We therefore decided to analyze the U and Th isotopic systematic at a grain-scale for Himalayan sediments from the Gandak river. This has been tested by performing in situ depth profiles of 238U-234U-230Th and 232Th on zircons and monazites (50-250 μm) by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) at the CRPG, Nancy, France. The first results point the occurrence of 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria in the outermost parts of both monazite and zircon minerals with a return to the equilibrium state in the core of the grains. The relative U and Th enrichment is however slightly different depending on considered minerals, suggesting possible adsorption processes of 230-Th. Coupled to a simple model of U and Th mobility during water-mineral interactions, these data should help to constrain the origin of 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria in these minerals. Moreover, the results of the study should be relevant to discuss the potential of this approach to constrain the residence time of zircons and monazites in the Gandak alluvial plain. [1] Chabaux et al., 2012, C. R. Geoscience, 344 (11-12): 688-703; [2] Granet et al., 2007, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 261 (3-4): 389-406.

  14. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Youngsuk; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Jessee, Matthew A.; Mertyurek, Ugur

    2015-08-14

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has greatly improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the use of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This paper extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Finally, numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system.

  15. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, Youngsuk; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Jessee, Matthew A.; Mertyurek, Ugur

    2015-08-14

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has greatly improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the usemore » of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This paper extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Finally, numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system.« less

  16. Chlorine-36 in fossil rat urine: an archive of cosmogenic nuclide deposition during the past 40,000 years.

    PubMed

    Plummer, M A; Phillips, F M; Fabryka-Martin, J; Turin, H J; Wigand, P E; Sharma, P

    1997-07-25

    Knowledge of the production history of cosmogenic nuclides, which is needed for geological and archaeological dating, has been uncertain. Measurements of chlorine-36/chlorine (36Cl/Cl) ratios in fossil packrat middens from Nevada that are radiocarbon-dated between about 38 thousand years ago (ka) and the present showed that 36Cl/Cl ratios were higher by a factor of about 2 before approximately 11 ka. This raises the possibility that cosmogenic production rates just before the close of the Pleistocene were up to 50% higher than is suggested by carbon-14 calibration data. The discrepancy could be explained by addition of low-carbon-14 carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during that period, which would have depressed atmospheric radiocarbon activity. Alternatively, climatic effects on 36Cl deposition may have enhanced the 36Cl/Cl ratios.

  17. Chlorine-36 in fossil rat urine: An archive of cosmogenic nuclide deposition during the past 40,000 years

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, M.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1997-07-25

    Knowledge of the production history of cosmogenic nuclides, which is needed for geological and archaeological dating, has been uncertain. Measurements of chlorine-36/chlorine ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) ratios in fossil packrat middens from Nevada that are radiocarbon-dated between about 38 thousand years ago (ka) and the present showed that {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios were higher by a factor of about 2 before {approx} 11 ka. This raises the possibility that cosmogenic production rates just before the close of the Pleistocene were up to 50% higher than is suggested by carbon-14 calibration data. The discrepancy could be explained by addition of low-carbon-14 carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during that period, which would have depressed atmospheric radiocarbon activity. Alternatively, climatic effects on {sup 36}Cl deposition may have enhanced the {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios. 49 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Low temperature solid-state NMR experiments of half-integer quadrupolar nuclides: caveats and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Andrew S; Heck, Robert W; Sears, Jesse A; Ellis, Paul D

    2004-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclides has received a lot of interest recently with the advent of new methodologies and higher magnetic fields. We present here the extension of our previous low temperature method to an 18.8T system. This new probe entailed a total redesign including a cross coil and variable capacitors that are operational at cryogenic temperatures. The limitations to sensitivity are also discussed; including a new diode network, the utilization of a cryogenic band pass filter, and the consequences of the RF profiles of the coil. Further, details of the spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei in a protein are discussed, such as the observation of the outer transitions and how to distinguish them from the desired +/-1/2 transition.

  19. Evolution of the Galaxy and the Birth of the Solar System: The Short-Lived Nuclides Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahijpal, S.

    2014-06-01

    An attempt is made, probably for the first time, to understand the origin of the solar system in context with the evolution of the galaxy as a natural consequence of the birth of several generations of stellar clusters. The galaxy is numerically simulated to deduce the inventories of the short-lived nuclides, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 53Mn and 60Fe, from the stellar nucleosynthetic contributions of the various stellar clusters using an N-body simulation with updated prescriptions of the astrophysical processes. The galaxy is evolved by considering the discreteness associated with the stellar clusters and individual stars. We estimate the steady state abundance of the radionuclides around 4.56 billion years ago at the time of formation of the solar system. Further, we also estimate the present 26Al/27Al and 60Fe/56Fe of the interstellar medium that match within a factor of two with the observed estimates. In contrary to the conventional Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE) model, the present adopted numerical approach provides a natural framework to understand the astrophysical environment related with the origin of the solar system. We deduce the nature of the two stellar clusters; the one that formed and evolved prior to the solar system formation, and the other within which the solar system that was probably formed. The former could have contributed to the short-lived nuclides 129I and 53Mn, whereas, the supernova associated with the most massive star in the latter contributed 26Al and 60Fe to the solar system. The analysis was performed with the revised solar metallicity of 0.014.

  20. Detailed deposition density maps constructed by large-scale soil sampling for gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kimiaki; Tanihata, Isao; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Saito, Takashi; Shimoura, Susumu; Otsuka, Takaharu; Onda, Yuichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Saegusa, Jun; Seki, Akiyuki; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Shibata, Tokushi

    2015-01-01

    Soil deposition density maps of gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident were constructed on the basis of results from large-scale soil sampling. In total 10,915 soil samples were collected at 2168 locations. Gamma rays emitted from the samples were measured by Ge detectors and analyzed using a reliable unified method. The determined radioactivity was corrected to that of June 14, 2011 by considering the intrinsic decay constant of each nuclide. Finally the deposition maps were created for (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (131)I, (129m)Te and (110m)Ag. The radioactivity ratio of (134)Cs-(137)Cs was almost constant at 0.91 regardless of the locations of soil sampling. The radioactivity ratios of (131)I and (129m)Te-(137)Cs were relatively high in the regions south of the Fukushima NPP site. Effective doses for 50 y after the accident were evaluated for external and inhalation exposures due to the observed radioactive nuclides. The radiation doses from radioactive cesium were found to be much higher than those from the other radioactive nuclides. PMID:24703526

  1. Detailed deposition density maps constructed by large-scale soil sampling for gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kimiaki; Tanihata, Isao; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Saito, Takashi; Shimoura, Susumu; Otsuka, Takaharu; Onda, Yuichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Saegusa, Jun; Seki, Akiyuki; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Shibata, Tokushi

    2015-01-01

    Soil deposition density maps of gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident were constructed on the basis of results from large-scale soil sampling. In total 10,915 soil samples were collected at 2168 locations. Gamma rays emitted from the samples were measured by Ge detectors and analyzed using a reliable unified method. The determined radioactivity was corrected to that of June 14, 2011 by considering the intrinsic decay constant of each nuclide. Finally the deposition maps were created for (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (131)I, (129m)Te and (110m)Ag. The radioactivity ratio of (134)Cs-(137)Cs was almost constant at 0.91 regardless of the locations of soil sampling. The radioactivity ratios of (131)I and (129m)Te-(137)Cs were relatively high in the regions south of the Fukushima NPP site. Effective doses for 50 y after the accident were evaluated for external and inhalation exposures due to the observed radioactive nuclides. The radiation doses from radioactive cesium were found to be much higher than those from the other radioactive nuclides.

  2. Neutron activation analysis of nuclides from stellar and man-induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, L. L.

    Neutron activation and gamma counting were used to determine the relative abundances of six stable tellurium isotopes in the acid-etched residues of the Allende meteorite. The results were correlated with the isotopic compositions of xenon and the elemental abundances of helium and neon in similarly prepared residues. Nucleosynthesis appears to be the only viable explanation or the anomalous isotopic and elemental compositions observed in these residues. Results suggest that the solar system condensed from an isotopically and chemically zoned nebula that was produced by the explosion of a supernova, concentric with the present Sun. A combination of neutron activation and mass spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of fissiogenic iodine 129 and stable iodine 127 in rain, milk and the thyroids of man, cow and deer from Missouri. Rain and deer thyroids show the highest average values of the iodine 129/iodine 127 ratio. Milk and the thyroids of cattle and humans show successively lower values of the iodine 129/iodine 127 ratio due to dietary additives of mineral iodine and to biological averaging.

  3. Hydrologic Nuclide Transport Models in Cyder, A Geologic Disposal Software Library - 13328

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, Kathryn D.

    2013-07-01

    Component level and system level abstraction of detailed computational geologic repository models have resulted in four rapid computational models of hydrologic radionuclide transport at varying levels of detail. Those models are described, as is their implementation in Cyder, a software library of interchangeable radionuclide transport models appropriate for representing natural and engineered barrier components of generic geology repository concepts. A proof of principle demonstration was also conducted in which these models were used to represent the natural and engineered barrier components of a repository concept in a reducing, homogenous, generic geology. This base case demonstrates integration of the Cyder open source library with the Cyclus computational fuel cycle systems analysis platform to facilitate calculation of repository performance metrics with respect to fuel cycle choices. (authors)

  4. Neutron core excitations in the N=126 nuclide {sup 210}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Lane, G. J.; Davidson, P. M.; Kibedi, T.; Nieminen, P.; Maier, K. H.; Watanabe, H.; Byrne, A. P.; Wilson, A. N.

    2008-03-15

    Excited states above the 16{sup +} isomer in {sup 210}Po have been identified using time-correlated {gamma}-ray spectroscopy techniques and the {sup 204}Hg({sup 13}C,3n{alpha}){sup 210}Po reaction. States up to {approx}27({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) have been identified, including an isomer at 8074 keV with a mean life of 13(2) ns. Among the new states, a candidate for the 17{sup +} state obtained from maximal coupling of the {pi}[h{sub 9/2}i{sub 13/2}]{sub 11{sup -}} valence proton configuration and the {nu}[p{sub 1/2}{sup -1}i{sub 11/2}]{sub 6{sup -}} neutron core excitation has been identified. This and other results are compared with semiempirical shell-model calculations that predict that single core excitations from the i{sub 13/2} neutron orbital and double core excitations out of the p{sub 1/2} and f{sub 5/2} orbitals, populating the g{sub 9/2},i{sub 11/2}, and j{sub 15/2} orbitals above the N=126 shell, will compete in energy. Good agreement is obtained for the lower states but there are systematic discrepancies at high spins including the absence of states that are calculated to lie low in the spectrum, implying uncertainties for configurations associated either with the i{sub 13/2} neutron hole or double core excitations.

  5. PRODUCTION OF ALL THE r-PROCESS NUCLIDES IN THE DYNAMICAL EJECTA OF NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, Shinya; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Shibata, Masaru; Nishimura, Nobuya; Kyutoku, Koutarou

    2014-07-10

    Recent studies suggest that binary neutron star (NS-NS) mergers robustly produce heavy r-process nuclei above the atomic mass number A ∼ 130 because their ejecta consist of almost pure neutrons (electron fraction of Y {sub e} < 0.1). However, the production of a small amount of the lighter r-process nuclei (A ≈ 90-120) conflicts with the spectroscopic results of r-process-enhanced Galactic halo stars. We present, for the first time, the result of nucleosynthesis calculations based on the fully general relativistic simulation of a NS-NS merger with approximate neutrino transport. It is found that the bulk of the dynamical ejecta are appreciably shock-heated and neutrino processed, resulting in a wide range of Y {sub e} (≈0.09-0.45). The mass-averaged abundance distribution of calculated nucleosynthesis yields is in reasonable agreement with the full-mass range (A ≈ 90-240) of the solar r-process curve. This implies, if our model is representative of such events, that the dynamical ejecta of NS-NS mergers could be the origin of the Galactic r-process nuclei. Our result also shows that radioactive heating after ∼1 day from the merging, which gives rise to r-process-powered transient emission, is dominated by the β-decays of several species close to stability with precisely measured half-lives. This implies that the total radioactive heating rate for such an event can be well constrained within about a factor of two if the ejected material has a solar-like r-process pattern.

  6. Data and software tools for gamma radiation spectral threat detection and nuclide identification algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnoy, David; Fisher, Brian; Phifer, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    spectral data at 1 s time intervals, which represents data collected by a mobile system operating in a dynamic radiation background environment; and one that represents static measurements with a foreground spectrum (background plus source) and a background spectrum. These data include controlled variations in both Source Related Factors (nuclide, nuclide combinations, activities, distances, collection times, shielding configurations, and background spectra) and Detector Related Factors (currently only gain shifts, but resolution changes and non-linear energy calibration errors will be added soon). The software tools will allow the developer to evaluate the performance impact of each of these factors. Although this first implementation is somewhat limited in scope, considering only NaI-based detection systems and two application domains, it is hoped that (with community feedback) a wider range of detector types and applications will be included in the future. This article describes the methods used for dataset creation, the software validation/performance measurement tools, the performance metrics used, and examples of baseline performance.

  7. Decays of New Nuclides and Isomers Beyond the Proton Drip Line--The Influence of Neutron Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Cooper, R. J.; Grahn, T.; Judson, D. S.; Sapple, P. J.; Thomson, J.; Simpson, J.; Labiche, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Al-Khalili, J. S.; Cannon, A. J.; Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.

    2008-11-11

    The energy of the vh{sub 9/2} orbital in nuclei above N = 82 drops rapidly in energy relative to the vf{sub 7/2} orbital as the occupancy of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} orbital increases. These two neutron orbitals become nearly degenerate as the proton drip line is approached. In this work, we have discovered the new nuclides {sup 161}Os and {sup 157}W, and studied the decays of the proton emitter {sup 160}Re in detail. The {sup 161}Os and {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced in reactions of 290, 300 and 310 MeV {sup 58}Ni ions with an isotopically enriched {sup 106}Cd target, separated in-flight using the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. The {sup 161}Os{alpha} a decays populated the new nuclide {sup 157}W, which decayed by {beta}-particle emission. The {beta} decay fed the known {alpha}-decaying 1/2{sup +} and 11/2{sup -} states in {sup 157}Ta, which is consistent with a vf{sub 7/2} ground state in {sup 157}W. The measured {alpha}-decay energy and half-life for {sup 161}Os correspond to a reduced {alpha}-decay width that is compatible with s-wave {alpha}-particle emission, implying that its ground state is also a vf{sub 7/2} state. Over 7000 {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced and the {gamma} decays of a new isomeric state feeding the {pi}d{sub 3/2} level in {sup 160}Re were discovered, but no evidence for the proton or a decay of the expected {pi}h{sub 11/2} state could be found. The isomer decays offer a natural explanation for this non-observation and provides a striking example of the influence of the near degeneracy of the vh{sub 9/2} and vf{sub 7/2} orbitals on the properties of nuclei in this region.

  8. Glacial Erosion Rates from Bayesian Inversion of Cosmogenic Nuclide Concentrations in a Bedrock Core, Streaked Mtn., ME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploskey, Z. T.; Stone, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial erosion is an important source of sediment and could be an important coupling to glacier and ice sheet models that track sediment. However, glacial erosion is difficult to quantify, and models of glacial erosion can benefit from independent erosion rate estimates. Here we present the results of a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion of a cosmogenic nuclide (CN) geomorphic model for glacial erosion rates on a bedrock landform formerly eroded beneath the Laurentide ice sheet. The CN 10Be was measured in quartz to 8 m depth in a bedrock core from the summit of Streaked Mountain, ME. The accumulation of 10Be was modeled over multiple glacial cycles of alternating exposure and glacial erosion. This model was invertedfor glacial erosion rates and burial history using MCMC algorithms implemented in PyMC (Patil et al., 2010). This Bayesian approach allows us to incorporate prior constraints on ice cover history, including oxygen isotope records and radiometric dates, which is otherwise difficult to differentiate from erosion in rapidly eroding areas. We compare these results to depth profile and surface CN measurements elsewhere in Maine (Ploskey and Stone, 2013).The forward model of CN production used in the inversion is part of Cosmogenic (github.com/cosmolab/cosmogenic), an open-source Python-based software library we developed for modeling the growth and decay of in-situ CN inventories in rock during geomorphic evolution. It includes calibrated production rates for 10Be and 26Al in quartz and 36Cl in K-feldspar by both neutrons and muons, with more isotopic production pathways and material targets to be added in the future. Production rates are scaled to the site altitude and latitude using modular scaling schemes. Cosmogenic includes a variety of functions representing common geomorphic histories, and can be used to model any arbitrary exposure, erosion and burial history that can be defined as Python function.ReferencesPatil, A., D. Huard and C

  9. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides by Multi-Functional Microcapsules Enclosing Inorganic Ion-Exchangers and Organic Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, H.; Akiba, K.; Onodera, Y.

    2002-02-26

    The microcapsules enclosing two kinds of functional materials, inorganic ion-exchangers and organic extractants, were prepared by taking advantage of the high immobilization ability of alginate gel polymer. The fine powders of inorganic ion-exchanger and oil drops of extractant were kneaded with sodium alginate (NaALG) solution and the kneaded sol readily gelled in a salt solution of CaCl2, BaCl2 or HCl to form spherical gel particles. The uptake properties of various nuclides, 137Cs, 85Sr, 60Co, 88Y, 152Eu and 241Am, for thirty-four specimens of microcapsules in the presence of 10-1-10-4 M HNO3 were evaluated by the batch method. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Cs+ above 103 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules enclosing CuFC or AMP. The Kd of Sr2+ around 102 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules containing clinoptilolite, antimonic acid, zeolite A, zeolite X or titanic acid. The microcapsules enclosing DEHPA exhibited relatively large Kd values of trivalent metal ions above 103 cm3/g; for example, the Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for a favorable microcapsule (CuFC/clinoptilolite/DEHPA/CaALG) were 1.1x104, 7.5x10, 1.1x10, 1.0x104, 1.4x104, 3.4x103 cm3/g, respectively. The uptake rates of Cs+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for this microcapsule were rather fast; the uptake percentage above 90% was obtained after 19 h-shaking and the uptake equilibrium was attained within 1 d. The AMP/CaALG exhibited high uptake ability for Cs+ even after irradiation of 188 kGy, and DEHPA/CaALG microcapsule had similar Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ ions before and after irradiation. The microcapsules with various shapes such as spherical, columnar, fibrous and filmy forms were easily prepared by changing the way of dipping kneaded sol into gelling salt solution. The microcapsules enclosing inorganic ion-exchangers and extractants have a potential possibility for the simultaneous removal of various radioactive nuclides from waste solutions.

  10. Uranium, thorium and lead nuclides in a Delaware salt marsh sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Thomas M.; Lord, Charles J.; Somayajulu, B. L. K.

    1981-09-01

    Natural isotopes of uranium (234, 238), thorium (232, 230) and lead (210) have been assayed in sediments from a lower Delaware salt marsh. Uranium is concentrated in the top sections of the core and decreases with depth (3 to 1 d min -1 g -1). A significant proportion of this uranium has been authigenically extracted from seawater as demonstrated by an excess ratio of 234U: 238U (1·03-1·14). Thorium (232) is rather constant (2·4-4·7 parts 10 -6 for all but one sample), while the concentration of 230Th is deficient with respect to its uranium parent. In contrast to the deep sea, the fixation of authigenic reduced uranium dominates over the scavenging of 230Th in these tidal sediments. Excess 210Pb shows an exponential decay over the length of the core, and when corrected for a correspondingly significant exponential decrease in organic carbon and salt yields a sedimentation rate of 0·47 cm year -1. Although this rate approximates the local apparent rate of sea-level rise, a lower limit for the rate of salt marsh accumulation, the actual rate is higher suggesting net filling and acccretion of salt marshes. The total integrated flux of 210Pb to this and other salt marsh surfaces in the eastern U.S. is calculated to more often exceed the reported local atmospheric flux. It appears that salt marshes may scavenge 210Pb, as other trace metals, from flooding waters.

  11. Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of the oldest glacial successions in the Himalayan orogen: Ladakh Range, northern India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Caffee, M.W.; Bovard, K.R.; Finkel, R.C.; Sharma, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of moraine boulders and alluvial fan sediments define the timing of five glacial advances over at least the last five glacial cycles in the Ladakh Range of the Transhimalaya. The glacial stages that have been identified are: the Indus Valley glacial stage, dated at older than 430 ka; the Leh glacial stage occurring in the penultimate glacial cycle or older; the Karglacial stage, occurring during the early part of the last glacial cycle; the Bazgo glacial stage, at its maximum during the middle of the last glacial cycle; and the early Holocene Khalling glacial stage. The exposure ages of the Indus Valley moraines are the oldest observed to date throughout the Himalayan orogen. We observe a pattern of progressively more restricted glaciation during the last five glacial cycles, likely indicating a progressive reduction in the moisture supply necessary to sustain glaciation. A possible explanation is that uplift of Himalayan ranges to the south and/or of the Karakoram Mountains to the west of the region may have effectively blocked moisture supply by the south Asian summer monsoon and mid-latitude westerlies, respectively. Alternatively, this pattern of glaciation may reflect a trend of progressively less extensive glaciation in mountain regions that has been observed globally throughout the Pleistocene. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  12. Cosmogenic nuclide enhancement via deposition from long-period comets as a test of the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Andrew C.; Melott, Adrian L.

    2013-09-01

    We explore the idea that detectable excursions in 26Al may arise from direct deposition by any bolide, and excursions in 14C and 10Be abundances in the atmosphere may result from long-period comet impacts. This is very different from the usual processes of production by cosmic rays within Earth's atmosphere. Long-period comets experience greatly increased cosmic ray flux beyond the protection of the sun's magnetic field. We report the computed amount of 14C, 10Be, and 26Al present on long-period comets as a function of comet mass. We find that the amount of nuclide mass on large long-period comets entering the Earth's atmosphere may be sufficient for creating anomalies in the records of 14C and 10Be from past impacts. In particular, the estimated mass of the proposed Younger Dryas comet is consistent with its having deposited sufficient isotopes to account for recorded 14C and 10Be increases at that time. The 26Al/10Be ratio is much larger in extraterrestrial objects than in the atmosphere, and so, we note that measuring this ratio in ice cores is a suitable definitive test for the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis, even if the hypothetical bolide is not a long-period comet and/or did not contribute to the 14C and 10Be increases.

  13. Incorporating 3-D parent nuclide zonation for apatite 4He/3He thermochronometry: An example from the Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Matthew; McKeon, Ryan E.; Shuster, David L.

    2014-11-01

    ability to constrain km-scale exhumation with apatite 4He/3He thermochronometry is well established and the technique has been applied to a range of tectonic and geomorphic problems. However, multiple sources of uncertainty in specific crystal characteristics limit the applicability of the method, especially when geologic problems require identifying small perturbations in a cooling path. Here we present new 4He/3He thermochronometric data from the Appalachian Mountains, which indicate significant parent nuclide zonation in an apatite crystal. Using LA-ICPMS measurements of U and Th in the same crystal, we design a 3-D model of the crystal to explore the effects of intracrystal variability in radiation damage accumulation. We describe a numerical approach to solve the 3-D production-diffusion equation. Using our numerical model and a previously determined time temperature path for this part of the Appalachians, we find excellent agreement between predicted and observed 4He/3He spectra. Our results confirm this time-temperature path and highlight that for complex U and Th zonation patterns, 3-D numerical models are required to infer an accurate time-temperature history. In addition, our results provide independent and novel evidence for a radiation damage control on diffusivity. The ability to exploit intracrystal differences in 4He diffusivity [i.e., temperature sensitivity) greatly increases the potential to infer complex thermal histories.

  14. Validation of corrections for errors in collimation during measurement of gastric emptying of nuclide-labeled meals.

    PubMed

    VanDeventer, G; Thomson, J; Graham, L S; Thomasson, D; Meyer, J H

    1983-03-01

    The study was undertaken to validate phantom-derived corrections for errors in collimation due to septal penetration or scatter, which vary with the size of the gastric region of interest (ROI). Six volunteers received 495 ml of 20% glucose labeled with both In-113m DTPA and Tc-99m DTPA. Gastric emptying of each nuclide was monitored by gamma camera as well as by periodic removal and reinstillation of the meal through a gastric tube. Serial aspirates from the gastric tube confirmed parallel emptying of In-113m and Tc-99m, but analyses of gamma-camera data yielded parallel emptying only when adequate corrections were made for errors in collimation. Analyses of ratios of gastric counts from anterior to posterior, as well as analyses of peak-to-scatter ratios, revealed only small, insignificant anteroposterior movement of the tracers within the stomach during emptying. Accordingly, there was no significant improvement in the camera data when corrections were made for attenuation with intragastric depth. PMID:6338170

  15. Nuclear-decay studies of neutron-rich rare-earth nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Chasteler, R.M. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-04-26

    Neutron-rich rare-earth nuclei were produced in multinucleon transfer reactions of {sup 170}Er and {sup 176}Yb projectiles on {sup nat}W targets at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC and their radioactive decays properties studied at the on-line mass separation facility OASIS. Two unknown isotopes, {sup 169}Dy (t {sub 1/2} {equals} 39 {plus minus} 8 s) and {sup 174}Er(t{sub 1/2} {equals} 3.3 {plus minus} 0.2 m) were discovered and their decay characteristics determined. The decay schemes for two previously identified isotopes, {sup 168}Dy (t{sub 1/2} {equals} 8.8 {plus minus} 0.3 m) and {sup 171}Ho (t{sub 1/2} {equals} 55 {plus minus} 3 s), were characterized. Evidence for a new isomer of 3.0 m {sup 168}Ho{sup g}, {sup 168}Ho{sup m} (t{sub 1/2} {equals} 132 {plus minus} 4 s) which decays by isomeric transition (IT) is presented. Beta particle endpoint energies were determined for the decay of {sup 168}Ho{sup g}, {sup 169}Dy, {sup 171}Ho, and {sup 174}Er, the resulting Q{beta}-values are: 2.93 {plus minus} 0.03, 3.2 {plus minus} 0.3, 3.2 {plus minus} 0.6, and 1.8 {plus minus} 0.2 MeV, respectively. These values were compared with values calculated using recent atomic mass formulae. Comparisons of various target/ion source geometries used in the OASIS mass separator facility for these multinucleon transfer reactions were performed. 73 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Calculation of the radionuclides in PWR spent fuel samples for SFR experiment planning.

    SciTech Connect

    Naegeli, Robert Earl

    2004-06-01

    This report documents the calculation of radionuclide content in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel samples planned for use in the Spent Fuel Ratio (SPR) Experiments at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL) to aid in experiment planning. The calculation methods using the ORIGEN2 and ORIGEN-ARP computer codes and the input modeling of the planned PWR spent fuel from the H. B. Robinson and the Surry nuclear power plants are discussed. The safety hazards for the calculated nuclide inventories in the spent fuel samples are characterized by the potential airborne dose and by the portion of the nuclear facility hazard category 2 and 3 thresholds that the experiment samples would present. In addition, the gamma ray photon energy source for the nuclide inventories is tabulated to facilitate subsequent calculation of the direct and shielded dose rates expected from the samples. The relative hazards of the high burnup 72 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU) spent fuel from H. B. Robinson and the medium burnup 36 GWd/MTU spent fuel from Surry are compared against a parametric calculation of various fuel burnups to assess the potential for higher hazard PWR fuel samples.

  17. New Decay Data Sub-library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactors Antineutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, Alejandro; McCutchan, Elizabeth; Johnson, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 decay data sub-library contains up-to-date decay properties for all known nuclides and can be used in a wide variety of applications such as decay heat, delayed nu-bar and astrophysics. We have recently completed an upgrade to the ENDF/B-VII.1 decay data sub-library in order to better calculate antineutrino spectra from fission of actinide nuclides. This sub-library has been used to identify the main contributors to the antineutrino spectra as well as to derive a systematic behavior of the energy integrated spectra similar to that of the beta-delayed neutron multiplicities. The main improvements have been the use of the TAGS data from Algora et al and Greenwood et al, as well as some of the single beta spectrum data from Rudstam et al to obtain beta minus level feedings. Additionally, we have calculated the antineutrino spectra for neutron energies higher than thermal, needed for highly-enriched uranium cores, such as the HFIR in ORNL that will be used in the PROSPECT experiment. These calculations are relevant since the high precision beta spectra which are used in many antineutrino calculations were measured at thermal energies. The impact of the fission yield data on these calculations will be discussed. This work was sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  18. Sensitivity of MCNP5 calculations for a spherical numerical benchmark problem to the angular scattering distributions for deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kozier, K. S.

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines the sensitivity of MCNP5 k{sub eff} results to various deuterium data files for a simple benchmark problem consisting of an 8.4-cm radius sphere of uranium surrounded by an annulus of deuterium at the nuclide number density corresponding to heavy water. This study was performed to help clarify why {Delta}k{sub eff} values of about 10 mk are obtained when different ENDF/B deuterium data files are used in simulations of critical experiments involving solutions of high-enrichment uranyl fluoride in heavy water, while simulations of low-leakage, heterogeneous critical lattices of natural-uranium fuel rods in heavy water show differences of <1 mk. The benchmark calculations were performed as a function of deuterium reflector thickness for several uranium compositions using deuterium ACE files derived from ENDF/B-VII.b1 (release beta 1), ENDF/B-VI.4 and JENDL-3.3, which differ primarily in the energy/angle distributions for elastic scattering <3.2 MeV. Calculations were also performed using modified ACE files having equiprobable cosine bin values in the centre-of-mass reference frame in a progressive manner with increasing energy. It was found that the {Delta}k{sub eff} values increased with deuterium reflector thickness and uranium enrichment. The studies using modified ACE files indicate that most of the reactivity differences arise at energies <1 MeV; hence, this energy range should be given priority if new scattering distribution measurements are undertaken. (authors)

  19. Chemical and isotopic compositions in acid residues from various meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kano, N.; Yamakoshi, K.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nogami, K.

    1993-01-01

    We are planning to carry out systematic isotopic investigations of Ru, Mg, etc., in primordial samples. The investigations will be pursued in the context of a study of the pre-history of the solar system. It is hoped that the study will yield direct evidence for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and detection of extinct radioactive nuclides. In this paper, we present the results of chemical compositions of acid residues obtained from three types of meteorites: Canyon Diablo (IA), Allende (CV3), and Nuevo Mercuro (H5); and the preliminary results of Ru isotopic compositions.

  20. Mass measurements on stable nuclides in the rare-earth region with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelaer, J.; Audi, G.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Dworschak, M.; Herfurth, F.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Droese, C.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Smorra, C.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Nagy, Sz.; Neidherr, D.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Wang, M.

    2011-07-15

    The masses of 15 stable nuclides in the rare-earth region have been measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. This is the first series of absolute mass measurements linking these nuclides to the atomic-mass standard {sup 12}C. Previously, nuclear reaction studies almost exclusively determined the literature values of these masses in the Atomic-Mass Evaluation. The TRIGA-TRAP results show deviations on the order of 3-4 standard deviations from the latest published values of the Atomic-Mass Evaluation 2003 for some cases. However, the binding-energy differences that are important for nuclear structure studies have been confirmed and improved. The new masses are discussed in the context of valence proton-neutron interactions using double differences of binding energies, {delta}V{sub pn}(Z,N).

  1. Mass measurements on stable nuclides in the rare-earth region with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaer, J.; Audi, G.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Droese, C.; Dworschak, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Nagy, Sz.; Neidherr, D.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Smorra, C.; Wang, M.

    2011-07-01

    The masses of 15 stable nuclides in the rare-earth region have been measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. This is the first series of absolute mass measurements linking these nuclides to the atomic-mass standard C12. Previously, nuclear reaction studies almost exclusively determined the literature values of these masses in the Atomic-Mass Evaluation. The TRIGA-TRAP results show deviations on the order of 3-4 standard deviations from the latest published values of the Atomic-Mass Evaluation 2003 for some cases. However, the binding-energy differences that are important for nuclear structure studies have been confirmed and improved. The new masses are discussed in the context of valence proton-neutron interactions using double differences of binding energies, δVpn(Z,N).

  2. Rapid sequential determination of Pu, 90Sr and 241Am nuclides in environmental samples using an anion exchange and Sr-Spec resins.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Ahn, H J; Park, J H; Park, Y J; Song, K

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a quantitative and rapid method of sequential separation of Pu, (90)Sr and (241)Am nuclides in environmental soil samples with an anion exchange resin and Sr Spec resin. After the sample solution was passed through an anion exchange column connected to a Sr Spec column, Pu isotopes were purified from the anion exchange column. Strontium-90 was separated from other interfering elements by the Sr Spec column. Americium-241 was purified from lanthanides by the anion exchange resin after oxalate co-precipitation. Measurement of Pu and Am isotopes was carried out using an α-spectrometer. Strontium-90 was measured by a low-level liquid scintillation counter. The radiochemical procedure of Pu, (90)Sr and (241)Am nuclides investigated in this study validated by application to IAEA reference materials and environmental soil samples.

  3. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  4. Exciton Model Code System for Calculating Preequilibrium and Direct Double Differential Cross Sections.

    2007-07-09

    Version 02 PRECO-2006 is a two-component exciton model code for the calculation of double differential cross sections of light particle nuclear reactions. PRECO calculates the emission of light particles (A = 1 to 4) from nuclear reactions induced by light particles on a wide variety of target nuclei. Their distribution in both energy and angle is calculated. Since it currently only considers the emission of up to two particles in any given reaction, it ismore » most useful for incident energies of 14 to 30 MeV when used as a stand-alone code. However, the preequilibrium calculations are valid up to at least around 100 MeV, and these can be used as input for more complete evaporation calculations, such as are performed in a Hauser-Feshbach model code. Finally, the production cross sections for specific product nuclides can be obtained« less

  5. Contribution of Paleomagnetic and Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Records to Solve the Question of Orbital Constraint on the Geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouveny, N.; Ménabréaz, L.; Bourles, D. L.; Demory, F.; Guillou, V.; Arnold, M.; Magorb Team

    2013-05-01

    The contribution of axial precession to the geodynamo energy budget recently rebounded with the demonstrations through theoretical and experimental studies that its amount of energy had been underestimated, while on the contrary the energy required to disturb the geodynamo was overestimated (e.g. Vanyo, 2004, Roberts et Wu, 2005, Tilgner 2005). Paleomagnetic tests of such an hypothesis remain yet highly controversial because relative paleointensity reconstructions are suspected of paleoenvironmental biases. Many available indicators [i) depositional remanent magnetization of sediment (paleodirections and paleointensity), ii) magnetization of the deep sea floor basalts, iii) geochemical records of cosmogenic nuclides production rates] however converge to produce a robust series of geomagnetic dipole lows related to paleomagnetic excursions of the last Ma. These series evidence periodicities in the 30 kyr-120 kyr range and present phase relationships with obliquity variations and δ18O records. Yet, such paleomagnetic time series are presently not precise and complete enough to firmly validate such fundamental but still hypothetic relationship. To further contribute solving this issue, the MAG-ORB project, funded for a 4 years period by the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche, aims at reconstructing the time series of the geomagnetic dipole lows over the last 2 Ma using paleomagnetism coupled with cosmogenic nuclide 10Be and lithogenic 9Be isotopes measurements on sedimentary cores from mid and low latitudes, i.e. where the geomagnetic modulation of the cosmic ray penetration is the most efficient. New results (Ménabréaz et al., 2011; 2012; Ménabréaz, 2012) confirm and complete former results (Carcaillet et al., 2003; 2004) to demonstrate that over the last 1.2 Ma the excursions and reversals, and their respective relative paleointensity lows, are accompanied by significant enhancements of the cosmogenic 10Be production rate, pointing out a global collapse of

  6. Insights on the post-seismic geomorphological response to the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake from detrital cosmogenic nuclides data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Godard, Vincent; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Scherler, Dirk; Xu, Chong; Xu, Quiang; Xie, Kejia; Bellier, Olivier; Ansberque, Claire; de Sigoyer, Julia; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    In high-relief mountain ranges bounded by reverse faults, large-magnitude earthquakes can contribute to topographic growth by co- and inter-seismic surface uplift of the hanging wall; meanwhile, earthquakes can also lower relief by causing erosion through extensive landslides. Quantifying evacuation process of co-seismic landslides material is central to our understanding of mass redistribution at the earth surface and the evolution of active mountain ranges. The 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake in the Longmen Shan range of eastern Tibet provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate such direct impact. Cosmogenic nuclides concentrations in river sands are diluted by the input of low-concentration landslide debris materials after the earthquake (West et al., 2014), and we document the evolution 10Be concentrations in quartz for several years after the Wenchuan earthquake to trace the routing processes of co-seismic landslides. Over the 2008-2013 period we collected river sand samples at 19 locations annually along the rivers that flow through the rupture zone. When compared with published pre-earthquake data, our results show that the 10Be concentration in river sand declined dramatically after the earthquake at all sampling sites. Meanwhile, multi-year time series of 10Be concentration at single sites present roughly constant level of dilution with moderate fluctuations. Our analyses indicate that the 10Be dilution amplitude is closely controlled by local catchment slope and landslide density, rather than by the location of landslides with respect to sampling sites. The perturbation we observed for 10Be concentrations in the 0.25~1 mm size fraction appears to be sustained over the timescale of our survey with no clear relaxation, which is consistent with independent results from suspended sediment analysis (Wang et al., 2015).

  7. New Insights on Long Term Geomagnetic Moment Variation from Cosmogenic Nuclide and Paleointensity Signatures along Ocean Sediment Cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.; Valet, J. P.; Bassinot, F. C.; Ménabréaz, L.; Simon, Q.; Demory, F.; Valery, G.; Vidal, L.; Beaufort, L.; de Garidel-Thoron, T.

    2015-12-01

    Some numerical and experimental simulations suggest that precession might supply enough power to influence planetary dynamos. The demonstration of a causal relationship between the Earth's orbital motion and variations of the geomagnetic field intensity, would open interesting perspective for modelling the past and future geomagnetic field behaviour and its eventual relationships to past and future orbitally constrained, climatic changes. Although pristine geomagnetic signals can be extracted by filtering and stacking multiple normalized intensity records, the reconstruction of high resolution geomagnetic field variations still raises questions. Namely, significant variance at orbital frequencies in relative paleointensity (RPI) records are generally considered as clues of residual contamination by paleoclimatically induced variations of magnetic carriers size ranges or mineralogy. Such questions can be adressed using other indicators of the geomagnetic dipole moment variation, such as the cosmogenic production modulated by the magnetospheric shielding. During the MAGORB project (ANR-09-BLAN-053-001) cosmogenic nuclide geochemistry, d18O, and paleomagnetic records were constructed along thick clayey-carbonate sequences deposited in the equatorial pacific and indian oceans over the last million of years. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio and RPI variations generally exhibit similar ranges of oscillations. However significant offsets appear between some RPI lows and their corresponding 10Be/9Be peaks, suggesting delayed lock-in of the remanent magnetization. After transfer on time scales the new geomagnetic moment series can be compared with the PISO-1500 and SINT-2000 stacks, and with the 10Be ice core record of EPICA Dome C. These new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio records provide new opportunities to: 1) assess the validity of high resolution RPI records, 2) evaluate address the question of the presence of orbital periods in the paleo-field geomagnetic spectrum, and 3) to

  8. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  9. Comparison of k0-NAA measurement results with calculated uncertainties for reference samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smodiš, B.; Bučar, T.

    2010-10-01

    Standard samples of well-defined geometry containing accurately known amounts of Co, Fe, Gd, Mo, Nd, Sb, Se, W, Zn and Zr were prepared and assayed using k0-based neutron activation analysis ( k0-NAA). Measurement results for six independent determinations of each standard spiked sample were evaluated and compared to calculated uncertainties using the computer program ERON, which computes uncertainty propagation factors from the relevant formulae and calculates the overall uncertainty following the internationally recommended approach. The calculated relative expanded uncertainties U ( k=2), which ranged from 6 to 11% for particular nuclides/gamma-lines agreed well with the measurements results thus proving the correctness of the applied approach. One of the important measures to further reduce uncertainties in the k0-NAA measurements is to review and re-determine more accurately specific nuclear constants involved in the relevant calculations.

  10. Calculations in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Photiadis, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The author analyzes two problems which extend the predictive ability of Quantum Chromodynamics. He studies composite operators in lattice gauge theory that reduce to operators of the form anti psi gamma DDDD ... psi in the continuum limit; such operators arise in perturbative analyses of quantum chromodynamics. Using these results and the data of a numerical simulation one could normalize exclusive processes and predict moments of deep inelastic scattering structure functions. To initiate the program the author constructs and renormalizes lattice operators to the one-loop level. He is encouraged that the hadronic matrix elements of the simpler operators are within reach of numerical simulations. The author also calculates a corrected photon spectrum in the endpoint region, z ..-->.. 1, for direct photon decay of the upsilon by summing the leading logarithms of (1-z) to all orders in perturbation theory. This effect causes the cross section to level out at approx. = = .8, removing the sharp peak in the tree level prediction, but does not cause the cross section to turn over.

  11. Calculations in Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Photiadis, Douglas Marc

    I analyze two problems which extend the predictive ability of Quantum Chromodynamics. I study composite operators in lattice gauge theory that reduce to operators of the form (')(psi) (GAMMA) DDDD . . . (psi) in the continuum limit; such operators arise in perturbative analyses of quantum chromodynamics. Using our results and the data of a numerical simulation one could normalize exclusive processes and predict moments of deep inelastic scattering structure functions. To initiate the program we construct and renormalize lattice operators to the one-loop level. We are encouraged that the hadronic matrix elements of the simpler operators are within reach of numerical simulations. I also calculate a corrected photon spectrum in the endpoint region, z (--->) 1, for direct photon decay of the upsilon by summing the leading logarithms of (1 -z) to all orders in perturbation theory. This effect causes the cross section to level out at (DBLTURN)z = .8, removing the sharp peak in the tree level prediction, but does not cause the cross section to turn over.

  12. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  13. Denudation rates derived from spatially-averaged cosmogenic nuclide analysis in Nelson catchments, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdis, A.; Norton, K. P.; Ditchburn, B.; Zondervan, A.

    2013-12-01

    New Zealand's tectonically and climatically dynamic environment generates erosion rates that outstrip global averages by up to ten times in some locations. In order to assess recent changes in erosion rate, and also to predict future erosion dynamics, it is important to quantify long-term, background erosion. Current research on erosion in New Zealand predominantly covers short-term (100 yrs) erosion dynamics and Myr dynamics from thermochronological proxy data. Without medium-term denudation data for New Zealand, it is uncertain which variables (climate, anthropogenic disturbance of the landscape, tectonic uplift, lithological, or geomorphic characteristics) exert the dominant control on denudation in New Zealand. Spatially-averaged cosmogenic nuclide analysis can effectively offer this information by providing averaged rates of denudation on millennial timescales without the biases and limitations of short-term erosion methods. Basin-averaged denudation rates were obtained in the Nelson region, New Zealand, from analysis of concentrations of meteoric 10Be in clay and in-situ produced 10Be in quartz. The measured denudation rates integrate over ~8000 yrs (meteoric) and ~3000 yrs (in-situ). Not only do the 10Be records produce erosion rates that are remarkably consistent with each other, but they are also independent of topographic metrics. Denudation rates range from ~116 - 306 t km-2 yr-1, with the exception of one basin which is eroding at 789 t km-2 yr-1(derived from meteoric 10Be) and 644 t km-2 yr-1(derived from in-situ 10Be). The homogeneity of rates and absence of a significant correlation with geomorphic or lithological characteristics suggest another factor is exerting the dominant control on landscape denudation in the Nelson region. Storm variability is a likely driver of erosion in this setting. The background rates are higher than current short term rates (~50 - 200 t km-2 yr-1) due to the significant erosion caused by high magnitude, low frequency

  14. Cosmogenic nuclide and uranium-series dating of old, high shorelines in the western Great Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurth, G.; Phillips, F.M.; Reheis, M.C.; Redwine, J.L.; Paces, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Closed-basin pluvial lakes are sensitive recorders of effective moisture, and they provide a terrestrial signal of climate change that can be compared to marine and ice records of glacial-interglacial cycles. Although the most recent deep-lake cycle in the western Great Basin (at ca. 16 ka) has been studied intensively, comparatively little is known about the longer-term Quaternary lacustrine history of the region. Lacustrine features higher than those of the most recent highstand have been discovered in many locations throughout the western Great Basin. Qualitative geomorphic and soil studies of shoreline sequences above the latest Pleistocene level suggest that their ages increase as a function of increasing altitude. The results of cosmogenic nuclide dating using chlorine-36 depth profiles from three sites in Nevada (Walker Lake, Columbus Salt Marsh, and Newark Valley), combined with uranium-series and radiocarbon ages, corroborate the geomorphic and soil evidence. The 36Cl results are consistent with available 14C ages and together indicate that the most recent highstands of all three lakes occurred ca. 20-15 ka, late in marine isotope stage (MIS) 2, as shown by previous ages. The 36Cl ages indicate that older lakes in all three basins reached highstands between 100 and 50 ka, and most likely during MIS 4. Shorelines of this age are at about the same or higher altitudes as the younger, MIS 2 shorelines in those basins. The 36Cl results combined with uranium-series ages and one tephra correlation obtained on shorelines higher in altitude than those of MIS 4 and 2 lakes suggest that there were also major lake highstands in the western Great Basin at ca. 100-200 ka, likely corresponding with MIS 6, and during at least two older periods. From these results, we conclude that the preserved shorelines show an apparent decrease in maximum levels with time, suggesting long-term drying of the region since the early middle Pleistocene. ?? 2011 Geological Society of

  15. Surface exposure dating of the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine system, western Swiss Alps, using the cosmogenic nuclide 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Meredith A.; Kubik, Peter W.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Schlüchter, Christian

    2004-07-01

    Egesen moraines throughout the Alps mark a glacial advance that has been correlated with the Younger Dryas cold period. Using the surface exposure dating method, in particular the measurement of the cosmogenic nuclide 10Be in rock surfaces, we attained four ages for boulders on a prominent Egesen moraine of Great Aletsch Glacier, in the western Swiss Alps. The 10Be dates range from 10 460+/-1100 to 9040+/-1020 yr ago. Three 10Be dates between 9630+/-810 and 9040+/-1020 yr ago are based upon samples from the surfaces of granite boulders. Two 10Be dates, 10 460+/-1100 and 9910+/-970 yr ago, are based upon a sample from a quartz vein at the surface of a schist boulder. In consideration of the numerous factors that can influence apparently young 10Be dates and the scatter within the data, we interpret the weighted mean of four boulder ages, 9640+/-430 yr (including the weighted mean of two 10Be dates of the quartz vein), as a minimum age of deposition of the moraine.All 10Be dates from the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine are consistent with radiocarbon dates of nearby bog-bottom organic sediments, which provide minimum ages of deglaciation from the moraine. The 10Be dates from boulders on the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine also are similar to 10Be dates from Egesen moraines of Vadret Lagrev Glacier on Julier Pass, in the eastern Swiss Alps. Both the morphology of the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine and the comparison with 10Be dates from the inner Vadret Lagrev Egesen moraine support the hypothesis that the climatic cooling that occurred during the Younger Dryas cold episode influenced the glacial advance that deposited the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine. Because of the large size and slow response time of Great Aletsch Glacier, we suggest that the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine was formed during the last glacial advance of the multiphased Egesen cold period, the Kromer stage, during the Preboreal chron. Copyright

  16. Radioactive nuclides in the incinerator ashes of municipal solid wastes before and after the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Iwahana, Yuki; Ohbuchi, Atsushi; Koike, Yuya; Kitano, Masaru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive nuclides in the incinerator ashes of municipal solid wastes were determined by γ-ray spectrometry before and after the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant (March 11, 2011). Incinerator ash samples were collected in northern Kyushu, Japan, which is located approximately 1200 km west-southwest (WSW) of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, from April 2006 to March 2007 and from March 2011 to October 2011. (40)K, (137)Cs, (208)Tl, (212)Pb, (214)Pb, (212)Bi, (214)Bi, and (228)Ac were identified in the ashes before the accident (~February 2011) and (134)Cs was identified along with these eight nuclides in the ashes after the accident (March 2011~). A sequential extraction procedure based on a modified Tessier method with added water extraction was used for 1st fly ash sampled in August 2011 because the highest activity concentrations of (134)Cs and (137)Cs were observed for this sample. The speciation of radioactive nuclides in the fly ash was achieved by γ-ray spectrometry and powder X-ray diffractometry for the extraction residues. Little variation was observed in the distribution of the chemical forms of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in 1st fly ash of municipal solid waste; one half of (134)Cs existed as water soluble salts and the other half as carbonate compounds, whereas 75% of (137)Cs existed as water soluble salts with the remainder as carbonates(10%) and sulfides (15%). These results show that 88% of the total radioactive Cs existed in water soluble and ion extractive forms and might be at risk for elution and diffusion with rain and wind.

  17. The Birth of the Solar System in a Molecular Cloud: Evidence from the Isotopic Pattern of Short-lived Nuclides in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, S. B.

    2005-12-01

    A good positive correlation between the initial solar abundances of short-lived (now extinct) nuclides (when normalized to their nucleosynthetic production ratios) and their mean lifetimes on a logarithmic plot has been well known for some time. Here I show that: (i) the slope for short-lived nuclides in the average interstellar medium in such a diagram is always 1. (ii) for molecular clouds, the slope is expected to be 2 or slightly less than 2 for a model where the molecular clouds are at a steady state and slowly exchange matter with the remaining interstellar medium. The existing data suggest a residence time of ˜ 6 x107 yrs for the matter present in molecular clouds. (iii) the intercept depends on (1) the residence time of matter in molecular clouds, (2) the mass fraction of the interstellar medium that is in molecular clouds, (3) the age of the galaxy and (4) the ratio of the time-average nucleosynthtic production rate and the production rate at the time of solar system formation. (iv) the abundances of 53Mn, 182Hf, 244Pu and 146Sm in the early solar system are likely formed by the same type of supernova sources (SNII?) over the history of our galaxy, while 129I (and possibly 107Pd) were produced in a different type of supernova sources (SNIa?) with the production rate skewed toward the early history of our galaxy. The abundances of these nuclides most likely characterize the average ISM values modified during their residence in the molecular cloud complex where the solar system formed. The abundances of 26Al, 41 Ca and 60Fe are too high to be of galactic production; these must be a contamination from young stellar sources that formed within the proto-Solar molecular cloud. These young sources could not have contributed significant quantities of 53Mn, 182Hf, 244Pu and 146Sm or 129I and thus were dissimilar to typical supernova sources.

  18. Interlaminar fracture of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture mechanics has been found to be a useful tool for understanding composite delamination. Analyses for calculating strain energy release rates associated with delamination growth have been developed. These analyses successfully characterized delamination onset and growth for particular sources of delamination. Low velocity impact has been found to be the most severe source of composite delamination. A variety of test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness are being developed to identify new composite materials with enhanced delamination resistance.

  19. First results using a new technology for measuring masses of very short-lived nuclides with very high accuracy: The MISTRAL program at ISOLDE

    SciTech Connect

    Monsanglant, C.; Audi, G.; Conreur, G.; Cousin, R.; Doubre, H.; Jacotin, M.; Henry, S.; Kepinski, J.-F.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Toader, C.; Bollen, G.; Lebee, G.; Scheidenberger, C.; Borcea, C.; Duma, M.; Kluge, H.-J.; Le Scornet, G.

    1999-11-16

    MISTRAL is an experimental program to measure masses of very short-lived nuclides (T{sub 1/2} down to a few ms), with a very high accuracy (a few 10{sup -7}). There were three data taking periods with radioactive beams and 22 masses of isotopes of Ne, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, and Ti were measured. The systematic errors are now under control at the level of 8x10{sup -7}, allowing to come close to the expected accuracy. Even for the very weakly produced {sup 30}Na (1 ion at the detector per proton burst), the final accuracy is 7x10{sup -7}.

  20. Regolith formation rate from U-series nuclides: Implications from the study of a spheroidal weathering profile in the Rio Icacos watershed (Puerto Rico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F.; Blaes, E.; Stille, P.; di Chiara Roupert, R.; Pelt, E.; Dosseto, A.; Ma, L.; Buss, H. L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    A 2 m-thick spheroidal weathering profile, developed on a quartz diorite in the Rio Icacos watershed (Luquillo Mountains, eastern Puerto Rico), was analyzed for major and trace element concentrations, Sr and Nd isotopic ratios and U-series nuclides (238U-234U-230Th-226Ra). In this profile a 40 cm thick soil horizon is overlying a 150 cm thick saprolite which is separated from the basal corestone by a ˜40 cm thick rindlet zone. The Sr and Nd isotopic variations along the whole profile imply that, in addition to geochemical fractionations associated to water-rock interactions, the geochemical budget of the profile is influenced by a significant accretion of atmospheric dusts. The mineralogical and geochemical variations along the profile also confirm that the weathering front does not progress continuously from the top to the base of the profile. The upper part of the profile is probably associated with a different weathering system (lateral weathering of upper corestones) than the lower part, which consists of the basal corestone, the associated rindlet system and the saprolite in contact with these rindlets. Consequently, the determination of weathering rates from 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra disequilibrium in a series of samples collected along a vertical depth profile can only be attempted for samples collected in the lower part of the profile, i.e. the rindlet zone and the lower saprolite. Similar propagation rates were derived for the rindlet system and the saprolite by using classical models involving loss and gain processes for all nuclides to interpret the variation of U-series nuclides in the rindlet-saprolite subsystem. The consistency of these weathering rates with average weathering and erosion rates derived via other methods for the whole watershed provides a new and independent argument that, in the Rio Icacos watershed, the weathering system has reached a geomorphologic steady-state. Our study also indicates that even in environments with differential

  1. Autistic Savant Calendar Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, Paul J.

    This study identified 10 savants with developmental disabilities and an exceptional ability to calculate calendar dates. These "calendar calculators" were asked to demonstrate their abilities, and their strategies were analyzed. The study found that the ability to calculate dates into the past or future varied widely among these calculators. Three…

  2. An automated Monte-Carlo based method for the calculation of cascade summing factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. J.; Britton, R.; Davies, A. V.; McLarty, J. L.; Goodwin, M.

    2016-10-01

    A versatile method has been developed to calculate cascade summing factors for use in quantitative gamma-spectrometry analysis procedures. The proposed method is based solely on Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) nuclear data, an X-ray energy library, and accurate efficiency characterisations for single detector counting geometries. The algorithm, which accounts for γ-γ, γ-X, γ-511 and γ-e- coincidences, can be applied to any design of gamma spectrometer and can be expanded to incorporate any number of nuclides. Efficiency characterisations can be derived from measured or mathematically modelled functions, and can accommodate both point and volumetric source types. The calculated results are shown to be consistent with an industry standard gamma-spectrometry software package. Additional benefits including calculation of cascade summing factors for all gamma and X-ray emissions, not just the major emission lines, are also highlighted.

  3. Identification of parameters of models of nonlinear deformation of isotropic and composite materials on the basis of calculations and experiments aimed at analyzing the dynamic behavior of cylindrical metal-plastic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimov, N. A.; Novosel'tseva, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    A method for identification of material parameters of the constitutive relations of elastoplastic and viscoelastic deformation of isotropic and composite materials is developed. The method is based on minimizing the functional of the residue of results of numerical and experimental analysis of unsteady deformation of structural elements made of examined materials. The method is tested, and prospects of its application for determining material parameters of viscoelastic and elastoplastic models of nonlinear deformation of cylindrical metal-plastic shells under explosive loading are demonstrated.

  4. Comparative radiation resistance calculation for graded- and constant-composition n Al/x/Ga/1-x/As-p Al/z/Ga/1-z/As solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchby, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The performance and radiation resistance of a new double-graded-band-gap solar cell are theoretically determined. The performance of this device is similar to that of the single-graded-band-gap cell. The power-conversion efficiencies of both graded-band-gap structures are shown to be less sensitive to minority-carrier lifetime degradation than a similar constant-composition heteroface cell.

  5. Effects of slag composition and process variables on decontamination of metallic wastes by melt refining

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Melt refining has been suggested as an alternative for decontamination and volume reduction of low-level-contaminated metallic wastes. Knowledge of metallurgical and thermochemical aspects of the process is essential for effective treatment of various metals. Variables such as slag type and composition, melting technique, and refractory materials need to be identified for each metal or alloy. Samples of contaminated metals were melted with fluxes by resistance furnace or induction heating. The resulting ingots as well as the slags were analyzed for their nuclide contents, and the corresponding partition ratios were calculated. Compatibility of slags and refractories was also investigated, and proper refractory materials were identified. Resistance furnace melting appeared to be a better melting technique for nonferrous scrap, while induction melting was more suitable for ferrous metals. In general uranium contents of the metals, except for aluminum, could be reduced to as low as 0.01 to 0.1 ppM by melt refining. Aluminum could be decontaminated to about 1 to 2 ppM U when certain fluoride slags were used. The extent of decontamination was not very sensitive to slag type and composition. However, borosilicate and basic oxidizing slags were more effective on ferrous metals and Cu; NaNO/sub 3/-NaCl-NaOH type fluxes were desirable for Zn, Pb, and Sn; and fluoride type slags were effective for decontamination of Al. Recrystallized alumina proved to be the most compatible refractory for melt refining both ferrous and nonferrous metals, while graphite was suitable for nonferrous metal processing. In conclusion, melt refining is an effective technique for volume reduction ad decontamination of contaminated metal scrap when proper slags, melting technique, and refractories are used.

  6. Calculating drug doses.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Numeracy and calculation are key skills for nurses. As nurses are directly accountable for ensuring medicines are prescribed, dispensed and administered safely, they must be able to understand and calculate drug doses. PMID:27615351

  7. Calculator-Active Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.; Harris, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This journal contains brief descriptions of calculator-active materials that were found using Resource Finder, the searchable online catalog of curriculum resources from the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC). It features both the calculators themselves and the activity books that are used with them. Among the calculators included are those…

  8. Flexible Mental Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, John

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that strategy choice is a misleading characterization of efficient mental calculation and that teaching mental calculation methods as a whole is not conducive to flexibility. Proposes an alternative in which calculation is thought of as an interaction between noticing and knowledge. Presents an associated teaching approach to promote…

  9. Cosmogenic Nuclides 10Be-21Ne Burial Dating of Middle Miocene Sedimentary Formation of the Hongliu Valley in Southern Ningxia Basin: A Case of Isotopic Geochronology Study for the Cenozoic Sedimentary Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Huiping; Wang, Weitao; Pang, Jianzhang; Zheng, Dewen

    2016-04-01

    Chronology studies for the Cenozoic sedimentary strata based on the magnetostratigraphy cannot afford the unique chronological sequences in the absence of absolute ages from biostratigraphy or volcanic ash chronology. In situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides provide a powerful tool for the sediment dating based on the time-dependent concentration ratio of two nuclides, which are produced in the same mineral but with different half-lives. Thereinto,10Be-26Al is the most widely used nuclide pairs, of which the available dating range spans the Plio-Pleistocene. But the coupling of 10Be with the stable nuclide 21Ne would significantly improve the burial dating range up to the middle Miocene, which is promising in revolutionizing the chronology study for the Late Cenozoic terrestrial sedimentary sequences. We have applied 10Be-21Ne pair for dating the middle Miocene sediments of the Hongliu Valley in southern Ningxia basin. Two major features of the sediments are involved in our study: (1) sediments originated from the steady erosion of the source area, and (2) the burial depth of our sample after deposition is time dependent due to the gradual accumulation of sediments into basin. The post-burial nuclide production is estimated to be less than 3%, including the contribution by muon interactions, of the total nuclide concentrations measured in our sample. Our 10Be-21Ne analysis demonstrates the age of the burial sample is 12.4(+0.6/-0.4) Ma, and the erosion rate at the source area is 0.26±0.01 cm ka-1. The sample's burial age is consistent with the age constraint set by the Hongliugou Formation (16.7-5.4 Ma) which we collected the sample in. Vertebrate fossils of Platybelodon tongxinensis with an age between 12 and 15 Ma exhumated along with our sample further verifies the reliability of our dating results for the middle Miocene sediments.This study has shown the improved age range of cosmogenic-nuclide burial dating method by incorporating the stable nuclide 21Ne, and has

  10. SOURCES 4A: A Code for Calculating (alpha,n), Spontaneous Fission, and Delayed Neutron Sources and Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Madland, D.G.; Arthur, E.D.; Estes, G.P.; Stewart, J.E.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.; Parish, T.A.; Brown, T.H.; England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.; Charlton, W.S.

    1999-09-01

    SOURCES 4A is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to the decay of radionuclides. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., a mixture of {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 43 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 89 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code outputs the magnitude and spectra of the resultant neutron source. It also provides an analysis of the contributions to that source by each nuclide in the problem.

  11. SOURCES 4C : a code for calculating ([alpha],n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W. B.; Perry, R. T.; Shores, E. F.; Charlton, W. S.; Parish, Theodore A.; Estes, G. P.; Brown, T. H.; Arthur, Edward D. ,; Bozoian, Michael; England, T. R.; Madland, D. G.; Stewart, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    SOURCES 4C is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to radionuclide decay. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., an intimate mixture of a-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 44 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 107 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code provides the magnitude and spectra, if desired, of the resultant neutron source in addition to an analysis of the'contributions by each nuclide in the problem. LASTCALL, a graphical user interface, is included in the code package.

  12. Influence of halide composition on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of mixed CH3NH3Pb (I1-xBrx) 3 perovskites calculated using the virtual crystal approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, Un-Gi; Yu, Chol-Jun; Ri, Jin-Song; Kim, Nam-Hyok; Ri, Guk-Chol

    2016-09-01

    Extensive studies have demonstrated the promising capability of the organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 in solar cells with a high power conversion efficiency exceeding 20%. However, the intrinsic as well as extrinsic instabilities of this material remain the major challenge to the commercialization of perovskite-based solar cells. Mixing halides is expected to resolve this problem. Here, we investigate the effect of chemical substitution in the position of the halogen atom on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of mixed halide perovskites CH3NH3Pb (I1-xBrx) 3 with a pseudocubic phase using the virtual crystal approximation method within density functional theory. With an increase of Br content x from 0.0 to 1.0, the lattice constant decreases in proportion to x with the function of a (x )=6.420 -0.333 x (Å), while the band gap and the exciton binding energy increase with the quadratic function of Eg(x ) =1.542 +0.374 x +0.185 x2 (eV) and the linear function of Eb(x ) =0.045 +0.057 x (eV), respectively. The photoabsorption coefficients are also calculated, showing a blueshift of the absorption onsets for higher Br contents. We calculate the phase decomposition energy of these materials and analyze the electronic charge density difference to estimate the material stability. Based on the calculated results, we suggest that the best match between efficiency and stability can be achieved at x ≈0.2 in CH3NH3Pb (I1-xBrx) 3 perovskites.

  13. PACKAGE (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics and Generator Efficiency): a computer program for the calculation of partial chemical equilibrium/partial chemical rate controlled composition of multiphased mixtures under one dimensional steady flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.H.; Haimes, R.

    1980-02-01

    The NASA CEC Code was the starting point for PACKAGE, whose function is to evaluate the composition of a multiphase combustion product mixture under the following chemical conditions: (1) total equilibrium with pure condensed species; (2) total equilibrium with ideal liquid solution; (3) partial equilibrium/partial finite rate chemistry; and (4) fully finite rate chemistry. The last three conditions were developed to treat the evolution of complex mixtures such as coal combustion products. The thermodynamic variable pairs considered are either pressure (P) and enthalpy, P and entropy, at P and temperature. Minimization of Gibbs free energy is used. This report gives detailed discussions of formulation and input/output information used in the code. Sample problems are given. The code development, description, and current programming constraints are discussed. (DLC)

  14. Prediction of Combustion Gas Deposit Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.; Zeleznik, F. J.; Gordon, S.

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrated procedure used to predict accurately chemical compositions of complicated deposit mixtures. NASA Lewis Research Center's Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions (CEC) used in conjunction with Computer Program for Calculation of Ideal Gas Thermodynamic Data (PAC) and resulting Thermodynamic Data Base (THDATA) to predict deposit compositions from metal or mineral-seeded combustion processes.

  15. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  16. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  17. Residual Nuclide Production from Iron, Lead, and Uranium by Neutron-Induced Reactions up to 180 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.; Glasser, W.; Herpers, U.; Schuhmacher, H.; Brede, H.J.; Dangendorf, V.; Nolte, R.; Malmborg, P.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Smirnov, A.N.; Rishkov, I.; Kollar, D.; Meulders, J.P.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.

    2005-05-24

    Within the HINDAS project, activation experiments with quasi mono-energetic neutrons were performed at UCL and TSL. Cross sections for the production of residual radionuclides were derived from the measured activities by unfolding, based on the neutron spectra inside the target stacks and starting from 'guess' excitation functions. Exemplary results are presented and are compared with theoretical calculations using the TALYS code.

  18. First Results Using a New Technology for Measuring Masses of Very Short-Lived Nuclides with Very High Accuracy: the MISTRAL Program at ISOLDE

    SciTech Connect

    C. Monsanglant; C. Toader; G. Audi; G. Bollen; C. Borcea; G. Conreur; R. Cousin; H. Doubre; M. Duma; M. Jacotin; S. Henry; J.-F. Kepinski; H.-J. Kluge; G. Lebee; G. Le Scornet; D. Lunney; M. de Saint Simon; C. Scheidenberger; C. Thibault

    1999-12-31

    MISTRAL is an experimental program to measure masses of very short-lived nuclides (T{sub 1/2} down to a few ms), with a very high accuracy (a few 10{sup -7}). There were three data taking periods with radioactive beams and 22 masses of isotopes of Ne, Na{clubsuit}, Mg, Al{clubsuit}, K, Ca, and Ti were measured. The systematic errors are now under control at the level of 8x10{sup -7}, allowing to come close to the expected accuracy. Even for the very weakly produced {sup 30}Na (1 ion at the detector per proton burst), the final accuracy is 7x10{sup -7}.

  19. The deep accumulation of 10Be at Utsira, southwestern Norway: Implications for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating in peripheral ice sheet landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briner, Jason P.; Goehring, Brent M.; Mangerud, Jan; Svendsen, John Inge

    2016-09-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is a widely used method for constraining past ice sheet histories. We scrutinize a recently published data set of cosmogenic 10Be data from erratic boulders in Norway used to constrain the deglaciation of the western Scandinavian Ice Sheet to 20 ka. Our model of the 10Be inventory in glacial surfaces leads us to conclude that the chronology may be afflicted by the deep subsurface accumulation of 10Be during long-lasting ice-free periods that resulted in 10Be ages >10% too old. We suggest that the majority of the dated erratic boulders contain a uniform level of inherited muon-produced 10Be and were derived from bedrock depths >2.5 m and most likely ~4 m. The implication of our finding is that for landscapes that experience long ice-free periods between brief maximum glacial phases, glacial erosion of >5 m is required to remove detectable traces of inherited 10Be.

  20. Observation of the 3n evaporation channel in the complete hot-fusion reaction 26Mg + 248Cm leading to the new superheavy nuclide 271Hs.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, J; Brüchle, W; Chelnokov, M; Düllmann, Ch E; Dvorakova, Z; Eberhardt, K; Jäger, E; Krücken, R; Kuznetsov, A; Nagame, Y; Nebel, F; Nishio, K; Perego, R; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Schausten, B; Schimpf, E; Schuber, R; Semchenkov, A; Thörle, P; Türler, A; Wegrzecki, M; Wierczinski, B; Yakushev, A; Yeremin, A

    2008-04-01

    The analysis of a large body of heavy ion fusion reaction data with medium-heavy projectiles (6 < or = Z < or = 18) and actinide targets suggests a disappearance of the 3n exit channel with increasing atomic number of the projectile. Here, we report a measurement of the excitation function of the reaction (248)Cm ((26)Mg,xn)(274-x)Hs and the observation of the new nuclide (271)Hs produced in the 3n evaporation channel at a beam energy well below the Bass fusion barrier with a cross section comparable to the maxima of the 4n and 5n channels. This indicates the possible discovery of new neutron-rich transactinide nuclei using relatively light heavy ion beams of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes and actinide targets. PMID:18517941

  1. Calculation of Macrosegregation in an Ingot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Maples, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes both two-dimensional theoretical model of macrosegregation (separating into regions of discrete composition) in solidification of binary alloy in chilled rectangular mold and interactive computer program embodying model. Model evolved from previous ones limited to calculating effects of interdendritic fluid flow on final macrosegregation for given input temperature field under assumption of no fluid in bulk melt.

  2. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides (26 Al, 36 Cl, 3 He, and 21 Ne)

    PubMed Central

    Cvetković, V.; Niedermann, S.; Pejović, V.; Amthauer, G.; Boev, B.; Bosch, F.; Aničin, I.; Henning, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb‐As‐Tl‐Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long‐term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive (26Al and 36Cl) and stable (3He and 21Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying 26Al, 36Cl, and 21Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ∼165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L‐8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L‐4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo‐depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250–290 and 750–790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo‐depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo‐depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of 205Pb derived from pp‐neutrino and fast cosmic‐ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment. PMID:27587984

  3. Impact of nuclear data on sodium-cooled fast reactor calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aures, Alexander; Bostelmann, Friederike; Zwermann, Winfried; Velkov, Kiril

    2016-03-01

    Neutron transport and depletion calculations are performed in combination with various nuclear data libraries in order to assess the impact of nuclear data on safety-relevant parameters of sodium-cooled fast reactors. These calculations are supplemented by systematic uncertainty analyses with respect to nuclear data. Analysed quantities are the multiplication factor and nuclide densities as a function of burn-up and the Doppler and Na-void reactivity coefficients at begin of cycle. While ENDF/B-VII.0 / -VII.1 yield rather consistent results, larger discrepancies are observed between the JEFF libraries. While the newest evaluation, JEFF-3.2, agrees with the ENDF/B-VII libraries, the JEFF-3.1.2 library yields significant larger multiplication factors.

  4. Calculators and Polynomial Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, J. F.

    The intent of this paper is to suggest and illustrate how electronic hand-held calculators, especially non-programmable ones with limited data-storage capacity, can be used to advantage by students in one particular aspect of work with polynomial functions. The basic mathematical background upon which calculator application is built is summarized.…

  5. TI-73 Calculator Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips-Bey, Carol K.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes TI-73 calculator activities appropriate for middle school students. It was found that the use of the calculator allowed for higher-level thinking and a richer exploration of mathematical ideas by students. [Included with this article are "Dice Roll Worksheet" and "Transforming Tree Worksheet".] (Contains 9 figures.)

  6. Relativistic shell model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnstahl, R. J.

    1986-06-01

    Shell model calculations are discussed in the context of a relativistic model of nuclear structure based on renormalizable quantum field theories of mesons and baryons (quantum hadrodynamics). The relativistic Hartree approximation to the full field theory, with parameters determined from bulk properties of nuclear matter, predicts a shell structure in finite nuclei. Particle-hole excitations in finite nuclei are described in an RPA calculation based on this QHD ground state. The particle-hole interaction is prescribed by the Hartree ground state, with no additional parameters. Meson retardation is neglected in deriving the RPA equations, but it is found to have negligible effects on low-lying states. The full Dirac matrix structure is maintained throughout the calculation; no nonrelativistic reductions are made. Despite sensitive cancellations in the ground state calculation, reasonable excitation spectra are obtained for light nuclei. The effects of including charged mesons, problems with heavy nuclei, and prospects for improved and extended calculations are discussed.

  7. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    the melting temperature is a design criterion. We present in detail two examples of refractory materials. First, we demonstrate how key material properties that provide guidance in the design of refractory materials can be accurately determined via ab initio thermodynamic calculations in conjunction with experimental techniques based on synchrotron X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis under laser-heated aerodynamic levitation. The properties considered include melting point, heat of fusion, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficients, thermal stability, and sublattice disordering, as illustrated in a motivating example of lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7). The close agreement with experiment in the known but structurally complex compound La2Zr 2O7 provides good indication that the computation methods described can be used within a computational screening framework to identify novel refractory materials. Second, we report an extensive investigation into the melting temperatures of the Hf-C and Hf-Ta-C systems using ab initio calculations. With melting points above 4000 K, hafnium carbide (HfC) and tantalum carbide (TaC) are among the most refractory binary compounds known to date. Their mixture, with a general formula TaxHf 1-xCy, is known to have a melting point of 4215 K at the composition Ta4HfC 5, which has long been considered as the highest melting temperature for any solid. Very few measurements of melting point in tantalum and hafnium carbides have been documented, because of the obvious experimental difficulties at extreme temperatures. The investigation lets us identify three major chemical factors that contribute to the high melting temperatures. Based on these three factors, we propose and explore a new class of materials, which, according to our ab initio calculations, may possess even higher melting temperatures than Ta-Hf-C. This example also demonstrates the feasibility of materials screening and discovery via ab initio calculations for the

  8. Mass prediction of proton-rich nuclides with the Coulomb displacement energies in the relativistic point-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, BaoHua; Zhao, PengWei; Meng, Jie

    2011-02-01

    The masses, one- and two-proton separation energies of proton-rich nuclei with Z = 20-55, are computed using the measured masses of mirror neutron-rich nuclei and the Coulomb displacement energies calculated from the relativistic point-coupling model. The implications for the proton drip lines, candidates for two-proton emitters, as well as the impact on the astrophysical rp-process are discussed.

  9. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74 <=Z <= 94 and 90 <=N <= 150

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Möller, Peter; Randrup, Jørgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ≈ 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near ¹³²Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ≈ 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near ¹³²Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al.more » [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ¹⁸⁰Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ¹⁸⁰Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ≤ Z ≤ 85 and 100 ≤ N ≤ 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the main

  10. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74 <=Z <= 94 and 90 <=N <= 150

    SciTech Connect

    Möller, Peter; Randrup, Jørgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ≈ 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near ¹³²Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ≈ 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near ¹³²Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ¹⁸⁰Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ¹⁸⁰Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ≤ Z ≤ 85 and 100 ≤ N ≤ 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the

  11. Dose Calculation Spreadsheet

    1997-06-10

    VENTSAR XL is an EXCEL Spreadsheet that can be used to calculate downwind doses as a result of a hypothetical atmospheric release. Both building effects and plume rise may be considered. VENTSAR XL will run using any version of Microsoft EXCEL version 4.0 or later. Macros (the programming language of EXCEL) was used to automate the calculations. The user enters a minimal amount of input and the code calculates the resulting concentrations and doses atmore » various downwind distances as specified by the user.« less

  12. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  13. The CIPW Normative Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Charles

    1979-01-01

    The author has rewritten rules for CIPW norm calculation and has written FORTRAN IV programs to assist the student in this procedure. Includes a set of problems utilizing the CIPW norm to illustrate principles of chemical petrology. (MA)

  14. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and hard alcohol calories you are consuming. Simply ... calories) Average Drinks Per Week Monthly Subtotal Calories Beer Regular 12 149 Regular Beer Light 12 110 ...

  15. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTY CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer models have been developed to estimate a wide range of physical-chemical properties from molecular structure. The SPARC modeling system approaches calculations as site specific reactions (pKa, hydrolysis, hydration) and `whole molecule' properties (vapor pressure, boilin...

  16. More Experiments and Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddons, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two experiments that illustrate basic ideas but would be difficult to carry out. Also presents activities and experiments on rainbow cups, electrical charges, electrophorus calculation, pulse electrometer, a skidding car, and on the Oersted effect. (JN)

  17. Nuclear reactions in type IA supernovae: Effects of progenitor composition and detonation asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamulak, David A.

    deflagration just after ignition near the center of the white dwarf, where the laminar speed of the flame dominates over the buoyant rise, and in regions of lower density ~10^7 g cm -3 where a transition to distributed burning is conjectured to occur. The increase in flame speed will decrease the density of any transition to distributed burning. Finally, we look at how a surface detonation affects the composition of nuclides across the supernovae remnant. Several scenarios have been proposed as to how this delayed detonation may actually occur but careful nucleosynthesis calculations to determine the isotopic abundances produced by these scenarios have not been done. The surface detonation produces a clear compositional gradient in elemental Ni in layers of the white dwarf that do not burn to nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE). A number of nuclides show a gradient but when combined into elemental abundances Ni shows the largest change over the face of the star. The Ni abundance varies by as much as an order of magnitude across the star. Tins may be a way to observationally test detonation models.

  18. Alpha Induced Reaction Cross Section Calculations of Tantalum Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Ugur, F. A.; Gokce, A. A.

    2013-04-01

    The fusion energy is attractive as an energy source because the fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and so fusion will not contribute to environmental problems, such as particulate pollution and excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. The fusion reaction does not produce radioactive nuclides and it is not self-sustaining, as is a fission reaction when a critical mass of fissionable material is assembled. Since the fusion reaction is easily and quickly quenched the primary sources of heat to drive such an accident are heat from radioactive decay and heat from chemical reactions. Both the magnitude and time dependence of the generation of heat from radioactive decay can be controlled by proper selection and design of materials. Tantalum is one of the candidate materials for the first wall of fusion reactors and for component parts of irradiation chambers. Accurate experimental cross-section data of alpha induced reactions on Tantalum are also of great importance for thermonuclear reaction rate determinations since the models used in the study of stellar nucleosynthesis are strongly dependent on these rates (Santos et al. in J Phys G 26:301, 2000). In this study, neutron-production cross sections for target nuclei 181Ta have been investigated up to 100 MeV alpha energy. The excitation functions for (α, xn) reactions (x = 1, 2, 3) have been calculated by pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism. And also neutron emission spectra for 181Ta (α, xn) reactions at 26.8 and 45.2 MeV have been calculated. The mean free path multiplier parameters has been investigated. The pre-equilibrium results have been calculated by using the hybrid model, the geometry dependent hybrid (GDH) model. Calculation results have been also compared with the available measurements in literature.

  19. Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The current methods of quantum chemical calculations will be reviewed. The accent will be on the accuracy that can be achieved with these methods. The basis set requirements and computer resources for the various methods will be discussed. The utility of the methods will be illustrated with some examples, which include the calculation of accurate bond energies for SiF$_n$ and SiF$_n^+$ and the modeling of chemical data storage.

  20. Source and replica calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, P.P.

    1994-02-01

    The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem.

  1. Systematics and limit calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Wade; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    This note discusses the estimation of systematic uncertainties and their incorporation into upper limit calculations. Two different approaches to reducing systematics and their degrading impact on upper limits are introduced. An improved {chi}{sup 2} function is defined which is useful in comparing Poisson distributed data with models marginalized by systematic uncertainties. Also, a technique using profile likelihoods is introduced which provides a means of constraining the degrading impact of systematic uncertainties on limit calculations.

  2. Utilization of short- and medium-lived nuclides for the trace-element characterization of food samples

    SciTech Connect

    Chatt, A.; McDowell, L.S.; Pegg, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Food has long been known to play a key role not only in the health status of human beings but also in their social lives. Relationships between food and physical as well as spiritual well-beings have been cited in ancient Chinese, Greek, and Indian literatures. Modern medicine, curative as well as preventive, values the nutritional aspects of food. In this regard, there exists an increasing interest in estimating the average daily intake of biologically important elements through food. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is particularly well suited for the simultaneous determinations of major, minor, and trace elements in both individual food items and composite diets. In the present study, emphasis is placed on the development of reliable and rapid INAA methods for measuring concentrations of ten elements of nutritional interest in food samples.

  3. ON-LINE CALCULATOR: FORWARD CALCULATION JOHNSON ETTINGER MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  4. The calculation of thermophysical properties of nickel plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Apfelbaum, E. M.

    2015-09-15

    The thermophysical properties of Nickel plasma have been calculated for the temperatures 10–60 kK and densities less than 1 g/cm{sup 3}. These properties are the pressure, internal energy, heat capacity, and the electronic transport coefficients (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and thermal power). The thermodynamic values have been calculated by means of the chemical model, which also allows one to obtain the ionic composition of considered plasma. The composition has been used to calculate the electronic transport coefficients within the relaxation time approximation. The results of the present investigation have been compared with the calculations of other researchers and available data of measurements.

  5. Fast focus field calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, Marcel; Geissbuehler, Matthias; Märki, Iwan; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Lasser, Theo

    2008-02-01

    We present a method for fast calculation of the electromagnetic field near the focus of an objective with a high numerical aperture (NA). Instead of direct integration, the vectorial Debye diffraction integral is evaluated with the fast Fourier transform for calculating the electromagnetic field in the entire focal region. We generalize this concept with the chirp z transform for obtaining a flexible sampling grid and an additional gain in computation speed. Under the conditions for the validity of the Debye integral representation, our method yields the amplitude, phase and polarization of the focus field for an arbitrary paraxial input field in the aperture of the objective. Our fast calculation method is particularly useful for engineering the point-spread function or for fast image deconvolution. We present several case studies by calculating the focus fields of high NA oil immersion objectives for various amplitude, polarization and phase distributions of the input field. In addition, the calculation of an extended polychromatic focus field generated by a Bessel beam is presented. This extended focus field is of particular interest for Fourier domain optical coherence tomography because it preserves a lateral resolution of a few micrometers over an axial distance in the millimeter range.

  6. Post-irradiation analysis of an ISOLDE lead-bismuth target: Stable and long-lived noble gas nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Grimberg, A.; David, J.-C.; Schumann, D.; Neuhausen, J.; Zanini, L.; Noah, E.

    2016-07-01

    We measured the isotopic concentrations of long-lived and stable He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe isotopes in a sample from a lead-bismuth eutectic target irradiated with 1.0 and 1.4 GeV protons. Our data indicate for most noble gases nearly complete release with retention fractions in the range of percent or less. Higher retention fractions result from the decay of long-lived radioactive progenitors from groups 1, 2, or 7 of the periodic table. From the data we can calculate a retention fraction for 3H of 2-3%. For alkaline metals we find retention fractions of about 10%, 30%, and 50% for Na, Rb, and Cs, respectively. For the alkaline earth metal Ba we found complete retention. Finally, the measured Kr and Xe concentrations indicate that there was some release of the halogens Br and I during and/or after the irradiation.

  7. Consideration of geomorphological uncertainties with terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND): combining Schmidt-hammer and 10Be dating, Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    As the importance of glaciers as key indicators of global change has increased during recent years, investigating Holocene glaciers chronologies has gained higher attention accordingly. One reason is the need for a better understanding of the climate - glacier relationship. Comparative studies play a major role in this field of research owing to the natural diversity of glacier behaviour. Detailed Holocene glacier chronologies are, furthermore, necessary to verify and eventually adjust glacier models indispensable for many attempts to predict future glacier changes. The Southern Alps of New Zealand are one of the few key study areas on the Southern Hemisphere where, in general, evidence is still sparse compared to its Northern counterpart. Improvement and reassessment of the Late Holocene glacier chronology in this region is, therefore, an important goal of current research. Recently, terrestrial (in situ) cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating has been increasingly applied to Holocene moraines in New Zealand and elsewhere. In the context of numerical ("absolute") dating techniques, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND) seems to have been established as an alternative to the previously dominating radiocarbon (14C) dating of organic material (plant remains, organic-rich soil layers etc.) buried beneath or within moraines. Precision and time resolution achieved by the newest laboratory standards and procedures (Schaefer et al. 2009) is truly a milestone and will promote future attempts of TCND in any comparable context. Maybe, TCND has the potential to at least partially replace radiocarbon (14C) dating in its dominating role for the "absolute" dating of Holocene glacial deposits. By contrast, field sampling for TCND often lacks appropriate consideration of geomorphological uncertainties. Whereas much effort is made with the high precision results achieved in the laboratory, the choice of boulders sampled on Holocene moraines is often purely made

  8. Calculations for waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Measurements are the first step in the characterization of waste forms. The results are used to determine the types and amounts of radioactive material present. From this data, several characteristics are calculated which are used to satisfy site, Department of Energy (DOE), and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) requirements. How well these calculations are made becomes important to the waste characterization program. Several sources are available to obtain the required values needed to calculate these characteristics. To ensure consistency among all sites within the DOE complex, a standardized program for all necessary data needs to be established. The effects of several of the inconsistencies are presented along with a recommended list of criteria to be used.

  9. Hydrogen moderator performance calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Picton, D. J.; Beynon, T. D.; Broome, T. A.

    1997-09-01

    A comparison was made between MCNP calculations and experimental measurements of the neutron spectrum from the liquid hydrogen moderator on ISIS. The calculations were performed for varying ortho/para concentrations, and demonstrated a best fit for 100% para-hydrogen. The agreement between the measured and calculated results was good below 2Å (i.e. for energies above 20 meV) but significant deviations were seen for longer wavelengths. A second study used the MCNP code for a detailed comparison of the time distributions and neutron spectra from poisoned liquid hydrogen and liquid methane moderators. The results indicate that the replacement of a liquid methane moderator with liquid hydrogen, in order to eliminate radiation damage effects, is an option which can be seriously considered. (auth)

  10. Analysis of U-series Nuclides and in situ Be in a Weathering Profile from the Strengbach Catchment (Vosges Massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerer, J.; Chabaux, F.; van der Woerd, J.; Negrel, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies underline the potential of U series nuclides to quantify the regolith production rate in weathering profiles (e.g.Chabaux et al, 2013; Ma et al., 2012). However, the quantification of regolith production rate in temperate climates encountered some limitations when analyzing only superficial samples in the first meter of soil (Rihs et al, 2011). Here, we propose to combine the analysis of U-Th-Ra disequilibrium with the cosmogenic in situ Be in a weathering profile extending from the top soil to the granitic fractured bedrock at 2 m of depth to better estimate both production and denudation rate of regolith. The weathering profile is located on the top of the watershed and was sampled with a high spatial resolution (15 samples). Whole-rock data show trends of variation for major and trace element concentrations and for U-Th-Ra disequilibria, which are different in the upper part of the regolith (0-80 cm) and in the deeper part of the fractured saprolith and/or bedrock (100cm-200cm). U-series isotopes in the surface of the profile are difficult to interpret in terms of weathering rate, while the disequilibria in the deeper weathered bedrock show a smooth trend of variation. The modeling of the U-Th-Ra data in this deeper part of the profile, performed with a nuclide gain and loss model, leads to a regolith production rate of 35 ± 10 T/km²/year. In addition, a numerical optimization for nonlinear inverse problem has been performed to estimate the exposure age and the mean denudation rate at the summit from the Be data. The results show that the exposure age of the profile is about 20 000 years and the mean denudation rate is 37 ± 15 T/km²/year. The consistency between the regolith production rate and the soil denudation rate suggests therefore that in such a temperate context, the long-term mass balance of soil developed on granitic bedrock would be close to a steady-state.

  11. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  12. Confidence Calculation with AMV+

    SciTech Connect

    Fossum, A.F.

    1999-02-19

    The iterative advanced mean value algorithm (AMV+), introduced nearly ten years ago, is now widely used as a cost-effective probabilistic structural analysis tool when the use of sampling methods is cost prohibitive (Wu et al., 1990). The need to establish confidence bounds on calculated probabilities arises because of the presence of uncertainties in measured means and variances of input random variables. In this paper an algorithm is proposed that makes use of the AMV+ procedure and analytically derived probability sensitivities to determine confidence bounds on calculated probabilities.

  13. Three recent TDHF calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, M.S.

    1981-05-01

    Three applications of TDHF are discussed. First, vibrational spectra of a post grazing collision /sup 40/Ca nucleus is examined and found to contain many high energy components, qualitatively consistent with recent Orsay experiments. Second, the fusion cross section in energy and angular momentum are calculated for /sup 16/O + /sup 24/Mg to exhibit the parameters of the low l window for this system. A sensitivity of the fusion cross section to the effective two body potential is discussed. Last, a preliminary analysis of /sup 86/Kr + /sup 139/La at E/sub lab/ = 505 MeV calculated in the frozen approximation is displayed, compared to experiment and discussed.

  14. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  15. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  16. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the perselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  17. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1990-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the permselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  18. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the permselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  19. Calculation of enviromental indices

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This portion of the Energy Vision 2020 draft report discusses the development of environmental indices. These indices were developed to be a quantitative measure of characterizing how TVA power system operations and alternative energy strategies might affect the environment. All indices were calculated relative to the reference strategy, and for the environmental review, the reference strategy was `no action`.

  20. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  1. Curvature calculations with GEOCALC

    SciTech Connect

    Moussiaux, A.; Tombal, P.

    1987-04-01

    A new method for calculating the curvature tensor has been recently proposed by D. Hestenes. This method is a particular application of geometric calculus, which has been implemented in an algebraic programming language on the form of a package called GEOCALC. They show how to apply this package to the Schwarzchild case and they discuss the different results.

  2. Calculation of magnetostriction constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatebayashi, T.; Ohtsuka, S.; Ukai, T.; Mori, N.

    1986-02-01

    The magnetostriction constants h1 and h2 for Ni and Fe metals and the anisotropy constants K1 and K2 for Fe metal are calculated on the basis of the approximate d bands obtained by Deegan's prescription, by using Gilat-Raubenheimer's method. The obtained results are compared with the experimental ones.

  3. A Computer Calculated Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Francis J.

    The Gunning Fog Index of readability indicates both the average length of words and the difficult words (three or more syllables) in written material. This document describes a business communication course at Wayne State University in which students calculate the Gunning Fog Index of two of their writing assignments with the aid of the…

  4. A Specific Calculating Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mike; O'Connor, Neil; Hermelin, Beate

    1998-01-01

    Studied the calculating ability used by a low IQ savant to identify prime numbers in two experiments comparing him to control subjects, one involving reaction time and the other involving inspection time. Concludes that this individual uses a complex computational algorithm to identify primes and discusses the apparent contradiction of his low IQ.…

  5. Calendrical Calculation and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Neil; Cowan, Richard; Samella, Katerina

    2000-01-01

    Studied the ability to name the days of the week for dates in the past and future (calendrical calculation) of 10 calendrical savants with Wechlser Adult Intelligence Scale scores from 50 to 97. Results suggest that although low intelligence does not prevent the development of this skill, the talent depends on general intelligence. (SLD)

  6. Solar Guide and Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazria, Edward; Winitsky, David

    This guide provides users with a basic understanding of where and how the sun works in relation to a building and site and provides a simplified method of calculating sun angles and the available heat energy from the sun on vertical and horizontal surfaces. (Author/IRT)

  7. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  8. Production of the entire range of r-process nuclides by black hole accretion disk outflows from neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-Ru; Fernández, Rodrigo; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-08-01

    We consider r-process nucleosynthesis in outflows from black hole accretion disks formed in double neutron star and neutron star - black hole mergers. These outflows, powered by angular momentum transport processes and nuclear recombination, represent an important - and in some cases dominant - contribution to the total mass ejected by the merger. Here we calculate the nucleosynthesis yields from disk outflows using thermodynamic trajectories from hydrodynamic simulations, coupled to a nuclear reaction network. We find that outflows produce a robust abundance pattern around the second r-process peak (mass number A ˜ 130), independent of model parameters, with significant production of A < 130 nuclei. This implies that dynamical ejecta with high electron fraction may not be required to explain the observed abundances of r-process elements in metal poor stars. Disk outflows reach the third peak (A ˜ 195) in most of our simulations, although the amounts produced depend sensitively on the disk viscosity, initial mass or entropy of the torus, and nuclear physics inputs. Some of our models produce an abundance spike at A = 132 that is absent in the Solar System r-process distribution. The spike arises from convection in the disk and depends on the treatment of nuclear heating in the simulations. We conclude that disk outflows provide an important - and perhaps dominant - contribution to the r-process yields of compact binary mergers, and hence must be included when assessing the contribution of these systems to the inventory of r-process elements in the Galaxy.

  9. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  10. The behavior of the uranium decay chain nuclides and thorium during the flank eruptions of Kilauea (Hawaii) between 1983 and 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Reinitz, I.M.; Turekian, K.K. )

    1991-12-01

    The concentrations of members of the {sup 238}U decay chain and {sup 232}Th have been determined for the lavas that erupted on the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii (Puu Oo) between January 1983 and January 1985. There was a decrease during the first 180 days in the abundances of all nuclides, following the behavior of the incompatible elements. ({sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U) varies with ({sup 232}Th/{sup 238}U) yielding a batch process age for the source magma of 127,800 {plus minus} 28,500 (2{omega}) y, similar to East Pacific Rise basalts. No ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium was evident at Puu Oo although Haleakala and Loihi show significant excesses of ({sup 226}Ra) over ({sup 230}Th). The initial ({sup 210}Pb) excess relative to ({sup 226}Ra) implies strong incompatibility of {sup 210}Pb probably with the help of chloride complexing, and the deficiency in later episodes indicates volatilization from the melt mediated by the formation of volatile chloride compounds.

  11. Programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae and ashing analysis: A decrement solution for nuclide and heavy metal disposal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Luo, Lang; Xiang, Sha; Zhang, Gege

    2016-08-15

    One of the waste disposal principles is decrement. The programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae regarding bioremoval and ashing process for decrement were studied in present research. The results indicated that S. cerevisiae cells showed valid biosorption for strontium ions with greater than 90% bioremoval efficiency for high concentration strontium ions under batch culture conditions. The S. cerevisiae cells bioaccumulated approximately 10% of strontium ions in the cytoplasm besides adsorbing 90% strontium ions on cell wall. The programmed gradient descent biosorption presented good performance with a nearly 100% bioremoval ratio for low concentration strontium ions after 3 cycles. The ashing process resulted in a huge volume and weight reduction ratio as well as enrichment for strontium in the ash. XRD results showed that SrSO4 existed in ash. Simulated experiments proved that sulfate could adjust the precipitation of strontium ions. Finally, we proposed a technological flow process that combined the programmed gradient descent biosorption and ashing, which could yield great decrement and allow the supernatant to meet discharge standard. This technological flow process may be beneficial for nuclides and heavy metal disposal treatment in many fields.

  12. 12. 3-min /sup 256/Cf and 43-min /sup 258/Md and systematics of the spontaneous fission propertiesof heavy nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Weber, J.; Daniels, W.R.; Hulet, E.K.; Lougheed, R.W.; Landrum, J.H.; Wild, J.F.; Dupzyk, R.J.

    1980-03-01

    The new isotope 12.3-min /sup 256/Cf was produced via the /sup 254/Cf(t,p) reaction, and a new 43-min isomer of /sup 258/Md was produced via the /sup 255/Es(..cap alpha..,n) reaction. The fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions from the spontaneous fission of /sup 256/Cf were found to be very similar to those from the spontaneous fission of lighter Cf isotopes. The mass division is primarily asymmetric, and the average total kinetic energy is 189.8 +- 0.9 MeV. The 43-min /sup 258/Md presumably decays by electron capture and provides an opportunity to study the mass and kinetic energy distributions from the spontaneous fission of the 380-..mu..s /sup 258/Fm daughter. The observed narrow, symmetric mass distribution and the most probable total kinetic energy of 238 +- 3 MeV are similar to those reported for the spontaneous fission of /sup 259/Fm but show a sharp increase in symmetric mass division and total kinetic energy compared to /sup 257/Fm and the lighter Fm isotopes. No such abrupt change in properties was observed for /sup 256/Cf, which, like /sup 258/Fm, has 158 neutrons. The marked difference between the spontaneous fission properties of the heavier Fm isotopes and those of other spontaneously fissioning nuclides is compared to some theoretical predictions.

  13. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the TRIGA MARK-II reactor in Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. W.; Böck, H.; Unfried, E.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1986-02-01

    In order to improve the source characterization of the reactor, especially for recent irradiation experiments in the central irradiation thimble, neutron activation experiments were made on 16 nuclides and the neutron flux spectrum was adjusted using the computer code STAY'SL. The results for the total, thermal and fast neutron flux density at a reactor power of 250 kW are as follows: 2.1 × 10 17, 6.1 × 10 16 ( E < 0.55 eV), 7.6 × 10 16 ( E > 0.1 MeV) and 4.0 × 10 16 ( E > 1 MeV) m -2 s -1. respectively. Calculated damage energy cross sections and gas production rates are presented for selected elements.

  14. Point Kernel Calculation for Complex and Time-Dependent Gamma-Ray Source Spectra.

    1990-04-01

    Version 00 PRESTO is written especially for simple shielding design studies. The chosen approximation is due to calculations of shielding for piping and spherical/cylindrical containers. Surface sources built up by radioactive deposits can be estimated. PRESTO I treats cylinder sources with shields at the side, such as pipelines or containers in radioactive facilities. PRESTO II is the analogous code for spherical sources. The programs consider volume sources or a combination of volume and surface sources.more » To describe the source spectrum, one begins with the nuclides contained in the source mixture or (with the aid of PRESTO IA) from energy group sets. The internal data set contains 5 common shield construction materials.« less

  15. The LAW Library -- A multigroup cross-section library for use in radioactive waste analysis calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, N.M.; Arwood, J.W.; Wright, R.Q.; Parks, C.V.

    1994-08-01

    The 238-group LAW Library is a new multigroup neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-V data, with five sets of data taken from ENDF/B-VI ({sup 14}N{sub 7}, {sup 15}N{sub 7}, {sup 16}O{sub 8}, {sup 154Eu}{sub 63}, and {sup 155}Eu{sub 63}). These five nuclides are included because the new evaluations are thought to be superior to those in Version 5. The LAW Library contains data for over 300 materials and will be distributed by the Radiation Shielding Information Center, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was generated for use in neutronics calculations required in radioactive waste analyses, although it has equal utility in any study requiring multigroup neutron cross sections.

  16. Cosmogenic nuclides in the solar gas-rich H3-6 chondrite breccia Frontier Mountain 90174

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.

    2009-03-01

    We re-evaluated the cosmic-ray exposure history of the H3-6 chondrite shower Frontier Mountain (FRO) 90174, which previously was reported to have a simple exposure history, an irradiation time of about 7 Ma, and a pre-atmospheric radius of 80-100 cm (Welten et al. 2001). Here we measured the concentrations and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar in 8 aliquots of 6 additional fragments of this shower, and 10Be and 26Al in the stone fractions of seven fragments. The radionuclide concentrations in the stone fractions, combined with those in the metal fractions, confirm that all samples are fragments of the FRO 90174 shower. Four of the fragments contain solarwind- implanted noble gases with a solar 20Ne/22Ne ratio of ˜12.0, indicating that FRO 90174 is a regolith breccia. The concentrations of solar gases and cosmogenic 21Ne in the samples analyzed by us and by Welten et al. (2001) overlap with those of the FRO H-chondrites from the 1984 season, suggesting that many of these samples are also part of the large FRO 90174 chondrite shower. The cosmogenic 21Ne concentrations in FRO 90174 show no simple correlation with 10Be and 26Al activities. We found 21Ne excesses between 0.3-1.1 × 10-8 cm3 STP/g in 6 of the 17 samples. Since excess 21Ne and trapped solar gases are not homogeneously distributed, i.e., we found in one fragment aliquots with and without excess 21Ne and solar 20Ne, we conclude that excess 21Ne is due to GCR irradiation of the regolith before compaction of the FRO 90174 object. Therefore, the chondrite shower FRO 90174 did not simply experience an exposure history, but some material was already irradiated at the surface of an asteroid leading to excess 21Ne. This excess 21Ne is correlated to implanted solar gases, clearly indicating that both processes occurred on the regolith.

  17. CONVEYOR FOUNDATIONS CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Romanos

    1995-03-10

    The purpose of these calculations is to design foundations for all conveyor supports for the surface conveyors that transport the muck resulting from the TBM operation, from the belt storage to the muck stockpile. These conveyors consist of: (1) Conveyor W-TO3, from the belt storage, at the starter tunnel, to the transfer tower. (2) Conveyor W-SO1, from the transfer tower to the material stacker, at the muck stockpile.

  18. Strength calculations on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, A

    1925-01-01

    Every strength calculation, including those on airplanes, must be preceded by a determination of the forces to be taken into account. In the following discussion, it will be assumed that the magnitudes of these forces are known and that it is only a question of how, on the basis of these known forces, to meet the prescribed conditions on the one hand and the practical requirements on the other.

  19. Nuclear Material Variance Calculation

    1995-01-01

    MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculations) is a custom spreadsheet that significantly reduces the effort required to make the variance and covariance calculations needed to determine the detection sensitivity of a materials accounting system and loss of special nuclear material (SNM). The user is required to enter information into one of four data tables depending on the type of term in the materials balance (MB) equation. The four data tables correspond to input transfers, output transfers,more » and two types of inventory terms, one for nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements and one for measurements made by chemical analysis. Each data entry must contain an identification number and a short description, as well as values for the SNM concentration, the bulk mass (or solution volume), the measurement error standard deviations, and the number of measurements during an accounting period. The user must also specify the type of error model (additive or multiplicative) associated with each measurement, and possible correlations between transfer terms. Predefined spreadsheet macros are used to perform the variance and covariance calculations for each term based on the corresponding set of entries. MAVARIC has been used for sensitivity studies of chemical separation facilities, fuel processing and fabrication facilities, and gas centrifuge and laser isotope enrichment facilities.« less

  20. Electrocatalyst compositions

    DOEpatents

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Chan, Benny C.; Reddington, Erik; Sapienza, Anthony; Chen, Guoying; Smotkin, Eugene; Gurau, Bogdan; Viswanathan, Rameshkrishnan; Liu, Renxuan

    2001-09-04

    Compositions for use as catalysts in electrochemical reactions are described. The compositions are alloys prepared from two or more elemental metals selected from platinum, molybdenum, osmium, ruthenium, rhodium, and iridium. Also described are electrode compositions including such alloys and electrochemical reaction devices including such catalysts.

  1. Cross Sections Needed for the Interpretation of Long-Lived and Short-Lived Cosmogenic Nuclide Production in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Beverding, A.; Kim, K. J.; Englert, P. A. J.; Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Cloudt, S.; Castaneda, C.; Vincent, J.; Caffee, M. W.; Osazuwa, C. O.; Reedy, R. C.

    1995-09-01

    Radionuclides produced by cosmic rays in extraterrestrial materials archive information that can be used to determine cosmic-ray fluxes and to study the history of the irradiated object. Long-lived radionuclides give information about the last ~5 Myr; short-lived radionuclides give information about recent events. To calculate the solar cosmic ray (SCR) flux from measured depth profiles for cosmogenic radionuclides produced in lunar rocks, accurate and precise cross section values for the production of these radionuclides from all relevant elements are needed. About 98% of SCR and ~87% of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) falling on extraterrestrial materials are protons. Cross section measurements were made using three proton accelerators to cover the energy range ~20 - 500 MeV. Thin target techniques used in the irradiations minimized the number of protons scattered out of the stack and the neutron production within the stack. After irradiation, the short-lived radionuclides e.g. 22Na, 7Be, 24Na, 54Mn, and 56Co were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. 14C, 10Be, and 26Al were determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Our main objective is to measure the production cross sections of long-lived radionuclides. We have reported new cross section values for making 10Be from O and 14C from O, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, and Ni [1,2]. Using these new results, better estimates for the solar proton flux over several time periods in the past were determined [3]. However, no single value for the SCR flux could explain the measured data from different time periods. Further cross section measurements are being made to verify that the values used in these estimates were accurate. Irradiations designed to give good cross section measurements for long-lived radionuclides also give good cross section measurements for short-lived radionuclides. Results will be presented for proton production cross sections of 22Na from Mg, Al and Si, and 54Mn and 56Co from Fe and Ni; some values at low

  2. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  3. Calculation of Electron Trajectories

    1982-06-01

    EGUN, the SLAC Electron Trajectory Program, computes trajectories of charged particles in electrostatic and magnetostatic focusing systems including the effects of space charge and self-magnetic fields. Starting options include Child''s Law conditions on cathodes of various shapes, user-specified initial conditions for each ray, and a combination of Child''s Law conditions and user specifications. Either rectangular or cylindrically symmetric geometry may be used. Magnetic fields may be specified using arbitrary configuration of coils, or the outputmore » of a magnet program, such as Poisson, or by an externally calculated array of the axial fields.« less

  4. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the

  5. Buoyant plume calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures.

  6. Unraveling the Quaternary river incision in the Moselle valley (Rhenish Massif, Germany): new insights from cosmogenic nuclide dating (10Be/26Al) of the Main Terrace complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; Harmand, Dominique; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Brückner, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Throughout the whole river network of the Rhenish Massif, the terrace complex of the so-called Main Terrace forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley (plateau valley) and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this Main Terrace complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature in the terrace flight; it is often used as a reference level to identify the start of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). The latter probably reflects the major tectonic pulse that affected the whole Massif and was related to an acceleration of the uplift rates (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). The Main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley and are characterized by a constant absolute elevation of their base along a 150 km-long reach. Despite that various hypotheses have been proposed to explain this horizontality (updoming, faulting...), all studies assumed an age of ca. 800 ka for the YMT, mainly based on the questionable extrapolation of palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. Therefore, a reliable chronological framework is still required to unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the Moselle valley. In this study, we apply cosmogenic nuclide dating (10Be/26Al) to fluvial sediments pertaining to the Main Terrace complex or to the upper Middle Terraces. Several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct sampling strategies: (i) depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-)surface is well preserved and did not experience much postdepositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and (ii) the isochron technique where the sediment thickness exceeds 3 m. Cosmogenic nuclide ages recently obtained for three rivers in the Meuse catchment in the western Rhenish Massif demonstrated that the Main Terraces were younger than expected and their abandonment was diachronic along the

  7. Gamma-ray characterization of uranium-series nuclides and its application to the study of the Pena Blanca natural analogue site, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Virgina

    Two natural analogue sites located in the Pena Blanca Uranium District, Chihuahua, Mexico were characterized for radionuclide mobility. Analogue I is used to assess the long-term behavior of uranium-series nuclides in a host rock and geochemical environment that is similar to the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analogue II represents a former dump site to assess short-term radionuclide mobility. Gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis was used to measure radioactivity of the U-series nuclides. Samples analyzed from Analogue I consist of: (1) fracture-infillings associated with different alteration assemblages collected within and outside the breccia pipe from various levels of the deposit and (2) fracture-infillings collected along an east-west trending fracture which intersects the breccia pipe and extends into the host rock. Alteration mineralogy, established via X-ray diffraction analysis, consists of pure kaolinite, a mixture of Fe-oxyhydroxide (goethite, hematite) With inclusions of jarosite and alunite, and carbonates. Results from activity ratios of 230Th/238U versus 226Ra/230Th indicate that majority of the Fe-oxyhydroxides from the breccia zone show a slight disequilibrium with respect to Ra enrichment and U depletion. This observation is modeled as requiring a multiple-event history of U mobility. An amorphous Fe sample distal to the breccia zone shows similar behavior but to a greater extent. This extreme behavior is ascribed to initially low U content and greater late-stage U removal. Two Fe-oxyhydroxide samples from Within the breccia pipe also display multiple-event stages but exhibit both Ra and U leaching. This behavior is shared by Fe-oxyhydroxide samples collected inside and peripheral to the breccia zone from the east-west trending fracture. Finally, three samples, two Fe phase samples outside the breccia zone and a kaolinite inside the breccia zone, show Ra and U enrichment. Also, a distal Fe-oxyhydroxide sample from the

  8. Accumulation of fallout radio nuclides such as cesium derived from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident in reservoirs in Fukushima prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, K.; Onda, Y.; Fukushima, T.

    2012-12-01

    A degree and condition of contamination of 137Cs and the other fallout radio nuclides (FRN) in reservoir can show large impacts on the irrigation and domestic/industrial water utilization. To clear the accumulation properties of FRN in the reservoirs, this study investigated the concentration, inventory and depth profile. Sediment was collected from four irrigation ponds and two sites in dam lake (Lake Horai) sited around Abukuma river system in summer 2011 (Jul.-Aug.), spring 2012 (Apr.) and summer 2012 (Aug.). Sediment collected by core sampler (diameter = 100 mm) was sliced into 20 mm thickness. Suspended solid (SS) in the water of Abukuma River was collected by SS sampler from Jul. 2011 to May 2012 with interval of two weeks. Samples were dried by oven (105°C, 24 hours) and grained. The radio activities were measured by gamma-ray detector (EGC 25-195-R, Canberra Eurisys, Meriden, U.S.A) equipped with a multichannel analyzer (DSA 1000, Canberra, Meriden, U.S.A). The concentration of 137Cs in Lake Horai showed non-uniform depth distribution, suggesting a large agitation of sediment and vertical migration of 137Cs. The concentrations of 137Cs in the sediment cores ranged from 47 to 63 kBq/kg in summer, 2011, and from 1 to 23 kBq/kg in spring, 2012. The concentration of 137Cs in SS in river water also decreased with time. The inventory drastically decreased with time, indicating that most of 137Cs in the sediment was flushed out from dam lake. In contrast to Lake Horai, most of 137Cs in the sediment of ponds were accumulated in surface layer, and the concentration decreased with increase in the depth. The concentration of 137Cs increased with time, resulted in the increase in inventory with time. We will be discussed about the seasonal trend in the FRN in the reservoirs.

  9. Double-nuclide study of the myocardium using 201Tl and 123I-labeled fatty acids in non-ischemic myocardial diseases.

    PubMed

    Knapp, W H; Vyska, K; Machulla, H J; Notohamiprodjo, G; Schmidt, U; Knust, E J; Gleichmann, U

    1988-06-01

    Metabolic impairment and perfusion abnormalities are known to occur in hypertensive heart disease (HHD) and in cardiomyopathies. Free fatty acid (FFA) extraction is severely inhibited in a number of pathobiochemical reactions. This parameter was assessed using the radiolabeled FFA analogue 123I-(p-iodo-phenyl-)-pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) and 201Tl as perfusion marker, both of them injected at maximal physical workload. The regional extraction fraction of IPPA (IPPA-EF) was estimated by relating the regional IPPA and 201Tl uptake to each other. In HHD (normal coronary arteries) with posterior wall thickness less than or equal to 12 mm IPPA-EF was 77 +/- 18% (SD) in septum and 92 +/- 17% in the posterolateral wall (N = 13), with thickness of greater than 12 mm 60 +/- 23% in septum and 61 +/- 20% in the posterolateral wall (N = 8) when compared with IPPA-EF in normal subjects (= 100%, N = 9). In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) IPPA-EF averaged 51 +/- 20% in septum and 87 +/- 10% in the posterolateral wall (N = 11). In these patient groups no systematic regional changes in 201TI uptake were observed. In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) both IPPA-EF and 201Tl uptake showed distinct regional variations and a great interindividual variability with a mean IPPA-EF reduction of 12% (N = 9). Thus, IPPA uptake in primarily non-ischemic myocardial disease may already be compromised when 201Tl uptake is unchanged. The double-nuclide method for IPPA-EF determination allows to eliminate the influence of flow in FFA imaging and enhances the potential of scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of HHD versus coronary artery disease. PMID:3405780

  10. Micromechanical modeling of laminated composites with interfaces and woven composites using the boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.K.; Hopkins, D.A.

    1993-10-01

    The boundary element method is utilized to analyze the effects of fiber/matrix interfaces on the micromechanical behavior of laminated composites as well as the elastic behavior of woven composites. Effective composite properties are computed for laminated SiC/RBSN and SiC/Ti-15-3 composites, as well as a woven SiC/SiC composite. The properties calculated using the computerized tool BEST-CMS match the experimental results well.

  11. Micromechanical modeling of laminated composites with interfaces and woven composites using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1993-01-01

    The boundary element method is utilized to analyze the effects of fiber/matrix interfaces on the micromechanical behavior of laminated composites as well as the elastic behavior of woven composites. Effective composite properties are computed for laminated SiC/RBSN and SiC/Ti-15-3 composites, as well as a woven SiC/SiC composite. The properties calculated using the computerized tool BEST-CMS match the experimental results well.

  12. Smile esthetics: calculated beauty?

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Guillaume; Truong Tan Trung, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Esthetic demand from patients continues to increase. Consequently, the treatments we offer are moving towards more discreet or invisible techniques using lingual brackets in order to achieve harmonious, balanced results in line with our treatment goals. As orthodontists, we act upon relationships between teeth and bone. And the equilibrium they create impacts the entire face via the smile. A balanced smile is essential to an esthetic outcome and is governed by rules, which guide both the practitioner and patient. A smile can be described in terms of mathematical ratios and proportions but beauty cannot be calculated. For the smile to sit harmoniously within the face, we need to take into account facial proportions and the possibility of their being modified by our orthopedic appliances or by surgery.

  13. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance,more » roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.« less

  14. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  15. Energetic composites

    DOEpatents

    Danen, Wayne C.; Martin, Joe A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application.

  16. Energetic composites

    DOEpatents

    Danen, W.C.; Martin, J.A.

    1993-11-30

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application. 3 figures.

  17. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  18. Component Publications and Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Naijun; Kang, Eun Young; Liu, Zhiming

    One of the major issues in component-based design is how to use a component correctly in different applications according to the given interface specification, called the publication, of the component. In this paper we formulate this as the problem of component publication composition and refinement. We define the notion of publications of components that describes how a component can be used by a third party in building their own components or in writing their applications without access to the design or the code of the component. It is desirable that different users of the components can be given different publications according to their need. The first contribution of this paper is to provide a procedure, which calculates a weakest contract of the required interface of a component from the contract of its provided interface and its code. The other contribution, that is more significant from a component-based designer's point of view, is to define composition on publications so that the publication of a composite component can be calculated from those of its subcomponents. For this we define a set of primitive composition operators over components, including renaming, hiding, internalizing, plugging and feedback. This theory is presented based on the sematic model of rCOS, a refinement calculus of component and object systems.

  19. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  20. MBPT calculations with ABINIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giantomassi, Matteo; Huhs, Georg; Waroquiers, David; Gonze, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) defines a rigorous framework for the description of excited-state properties based on the Green's function formalism. Within MBPT, one can calculate charged excitations using e.g. Hedin's GW approximation for the electron self-energy. In the same framework, neutral excitations are also well described through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). In this talk, we report on the recent developments concerning the parallelization of the MBPT algorithms available in the ABINIT code (www.abinit.org). In particular, we discuss how to improve the parallel efficiency thanks to a hybrid version that employs MPI for the coarse-grained parallelization and OpenMP (a de facto standard for parallel programming on shared memory architectures) for the fine-grained parallelization of the most CPU-intensive parts. Benchmark results obtained with the new implementation are discussed. Finally, we present results for the GW corrections of amorphous SiO2 in the presence of defects and the BSE absorption spectrum. This work has been supported by the Prace project (PaRtnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, http://www.prace-ri.eu).

  1. Summary of Vulcan Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J.D.

    2000-03-23

    This is a summary of the results of my calculations compared to Elisabeth Wolfrum's data on the Vulcan imprint experiments. The material strength makes essentially no difference to the growth of perturbations seeded by the laser imprint. For the low-intensity case (30 J laser energy, beam intensity of 0.5 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) the thin (2 microns) Al foil melts quickly from the front (driven) surface and decompresses quickly from the back surface, so there is actually only a fraction of the foil that is solid and compressed, and then for only a short time. And this solid fraction is not accelerating much during this short time. In particular, the shock (which is at about 250 kbar when it is about half way through the foil) travels entirely through the foil in about 0.25 ns. At 0.3 ns the ablation front is 0.6 {micro}m in from the original position of the front surface, the next 0.6 {micro}m is melted, so only the back 0.8 {micro}m is solid and compressed. This solid portion, though, is not moving much; the place where the imprinted perturbations are growing is back at the ablation front, where the perturbations are clearly growing fluid-like. By 0.5 ns the entire foil is melted and decompressing from both ends. Thus, the actual foil distortion looks little different with and without strength.

  2. Relative Hazard Calculation Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    DL Strenge; MK White; RD Stenner; WB Andrews

    1999-09-07

    The methodology presented in this document was developed to provide a means of calculating the RH ratios to use in developing useful graphic illustrations. The RH equation, as presented in this methodology, is primarily a collection of key factors relevant to understanding the hazards and risks associated with projected risk management activities. The RH equation has the potential for much broader application than generating risk profiles. For example, it can be used to compare one risk management activity with another, instead of just comparing it to a fixed baseline as was done for the risk profiles. If the appropriate source term data are available, it could be used in its non-ratio form to estimate absolute values of the associated hazards. These estimated values of hazard could then be examined to help understand which risk management activities are addressing the higher hazard conditions at a site. Graphics could be generated from these absolute hazard values to compare high-hazard conditions. If the RH equation is used in this manner, care must be taken to specifically define and qualify the estimated absolute hazard values (e.g., identify which factors were considered and which ones tended to drive the hazard estimation).

  3. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  4. Solubility of hot fuel particles from Chernobyl--influencing parameters for individual radiation dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Garger, Evgenii K; Meisenberg, Oliver; Odintsov, Oleksiy; Shynkarenko, Viktor; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear fuel particles of Chernobyl origin are carriers of increased radioactivity (hot particles) and are still present in the atmosphere of the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Workers in the zone may inhale these particles, which makes assessment necessary. The residence time in the lungs and the transfer in the blood of the inhaled radionuclides are crucial for inhalation dose assessment. Therefore, the dissolution of several kinds of nuclear fuel particles from air filters sampled in the Chernobyl exclusion zone was studied. For this purpose filter fragments with hot particles were submersed in simulated lung fluids (SLFs). The activities of the radionuclides (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am were measured in the SLF and in the residuum of the fragments by radiometric methods after chemical treatment. Soluble fractions as well as dissolution rates of the nuclides were determined. The influence of the genesis of the hot particles, represented by the (137)Cs/(239+240)Pu ratio, on the availability of (137)Cs was demonstrated, whereas the dissolution of (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am proved to be independent of genesis. No difference in the dissolution of (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu was observed for the two applied types of SLF. Increased solubility was found for smaller hot particles. A two-component exponential model was used to describe the dissolution of the nuclides as a function of time. The results were applied for determining individual inhalation dose coefficients for the workers at the Chernobyl construction site. Greater dose coefficients for the respiratory tract and smaller coefficients for the other organs were calculated (compared to ICRP default values). The effective doses were in general lower for the considered radionuclides, for (241)Am even by one order of magnitude.

  5. Nuclide-migration field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erdal, B.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Johnstone, J.K.; Erickson, K.L.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.; Hines, J.J.

    1981-03-01

    When considering groundwater flow and radionuclide retention in the complex flow systems that can occur in geologic formations, one has a serious problem in determining if laboratory studies are being performed under conditions appropriate to natural systems. This document is the project plan for a program designed to begin to address these problems. The project is being carried out jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Argonne National Laboratory. The work has three principal objectives: (1) to develop the experimental, instrumental, and safety techniques necessary to conduct controlled, small-scale radionuclide migration field experiments, including those involving actinides; (2) to use these techniques to define radionuclide migration through rock by performing generic, at-depth experiments under closely monitored conditions; and (3) to determine whether available lithologic, geochemical, and hydrologic properties together with existing or developing transport models are sufficient and appropriate to describe real field conditions.

  6. Primordial compositions of refractory inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, L.; Simon, S. B.; Rai, V. K.; Thiemens, M. H.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Williams, R. W.; Galy, A.; Ding, T.; Fedkin, A. V.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.

    2008-06-01

    Bulk chemical and O-, Mg- and Si-isotopic compositions were measured for each of 17 Types A and B refractory inclusions from CV3 chondrites. After bulk chemical compositions were corrected for non-representative sampling in the laboratory, the Mg- and Si-isotopic compositions of each inclusion were used to calculate its original chemical composition assuming that the heavy-isotope enrichments of these elements are due to Rayleigh fractionation that accompanied their evaporation from CMAS liquids. The resulting pre-evaporation chemical compositions are consistent with those predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic calculations for high-temperature nebular condensates, but only if different inclusions condensed from nebular regions that ranged in total pressure from 10-6 to 10-1 bar, regardless of whether they formed in a system of solar composition or in one enriched in dust of ordinary chondrite composition relative to gas by a factor of 10 compared to solar composition. This is similar to the range of total pressures predicted by dynamic models of the solar nebula for regions whose temperatures are in the range of silicate condensation temperatures. Alternatively, if departure from equilibrium condensation and/or non-representative sampling of condensates in the nebula occurred, the inferred range of total pressure could be smaller. Simple kinetic modeling of evaporation successfully reproduces observed chemical compositions of most inclusions from their inferred pre-evaporation compositions, suggesting that closed-system isotopic exchange processes did not have a significant effect on their isotopic compositions. Comparison of pre-evaporation compositions with observed ones indicates that 80% of the enrichment in refractory CaO + Al2O3 relative to more volatile MgO + SiO2 is due to initial condensation and 20% due to subsequent evaporation for both Types A and B inclusions.

  7. Electrode compositions

    DOEpatents

    Block, Jacob; Fan, Xiyun

    1998-01-01

    An electrode composition for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5-4.5 volts.

  8. Electrode compositions

    DOEpatents

    Block, J.; Fan, X.

    1998-10-27

    An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

  9. Body Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    Body composition refers to the types and amounts of tissues which make up the body. The most acceptable method for assessing body composition is underwater weighing. A subcutaneous skinfold provides a quantitative measurement of fat below the skin. The skinfold technique permits a valid estimate of the body's total fat content. (JN)

  10. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the physical processes of impact cratering on planetary surfaces and atmospheres as well as collisions of finite-size self-gravitating objects is vitally important to planetary science. The observation has often been made that craters are the most ubiquitous landform on the solid planets and the satellites. The density of craters is used to date surfaces on planets and satellites. For large ringed basin craters (e.g. Chicxulub), the issue of identification of exactly what 'diameter' transient crater is associated with this structure is exemplified by the arguments of Sharpton et al. (1993) versus those of Hildebrand et al. (1995). The size of a transient crater, such as the K/T extinction crater at Yucatan, Mexico, which is thought to be the source of SO,-induced sulfuric acid aerosol that globally acidified surface waters as the result of massive vaporization of CASO, in the target rock, is addressed by our present project. The impact process excavates samples of planetary interiors. The degree to which this occurs (e.g. how deeply does excavation occur for a given crater diameter) has been of interest, both with regard to exposing mantle rocks in crater floors, as well as launching samples into space which become part of the terrestrial meteorite collection (e.g. lunar meteorites, SNC's from Mars). Only in the case of the Earth can we test calculations in the laboratory and field. Previous calculations predict, independent of diameter, that the depth of excavation, normalized by crater diameter, is d(sub ex)/D = 0.085 (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1993). For Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) fragments impacting Jupiter, predicted excavation depths of different gas-rich layers in the atmosphere, were much larger. The trajectory and fate of highly shocked material from a large impact on the Earth, such as the K/T bolide is of interest. Melosh et al. (1990) proposed that the condensed material from the impact upon reentering the Earth's atmosphere induced. radiative

  11. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  12. Toward determining the uncertainties associated with the seismic histories retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide fault scarp dating: model reappraisal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla

    2016-04-01

    How the past seismic activity of faults has varied over the last 20 ky is a crucial information for seismic hazard assessment and for the understanding of fault-interaction processes. Chlorine 36 in situ produced cosmogenic nuclide is increasingly used to retrieve past earthquakes histories on seismically exhumed limestone normal fault-scarps. Schlagenhauf et al. in 2010 developed a modeling code with a forward approach enabling the test of scenarii generated with a priori constraints (number of events, age and slip of events and pre-exposure time). The main shortcomings of this forward approach were the limited number of testable scenarii and the difficulty to derive the associated uncertainties. We present here a reappraisal methodology with an inverse approach using an optimization algorithm. This modelling approach enables 1-exploring the parameter space (age and slip of events), 2-finding the best scenario without a priori constraints and 3-precisely quantifying the associated uncertainties by determining the range of plausible models. Through a series of synthetic tests, we observed that the algorithm revealed a great capacity to constrain event slips and ages in a short computational time (several hours) with an accuracy that can reach 0.1 ky and 0.5 m for the age and slip of exhumation event, respectively. We also explore the influence of the pre-exposure history (amount of 36Cl accumulated when the sampled fault-plane was still buried under the colluvial wedge) and show that it has an important impact on the generated scenarii. This new modeling also allows now to accurately determining this parameter. Finally, the results show that any given [36Cl] profile results in a unique exhumation solution. We then apply this new model to the Magnola fault (Italy) dataset (Schlgenhauf et al. 2011). In agreement the previously published results, our model also results in 3 intense periods of seismic activity. However, the contribution of the pre-exposure history is

  13. Weathering and denudation rates determined by the combined analysis of Uranium series nuclides and in situ Beryllium in a weathering profile (Vosges massif, Strengbach catchment, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerer, Julien; Chabaux, François; Van der Woerd, Jerome; Pelt, Eric; Kali, Elise; Pierret, Marie Claire; Viville, Daniel; Wyns, Robert; Negrel, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The determination of soil sustainability is a major issue for societies. It is crucial to estimate the soil formation and denudation rates to evaluate the landscapes stability and their response to natural or anthropological forcings. In this work, we propose to combine the analysis of Uranium-Thorium-Radium isotopes with the cosmogenic in situ Beryllium in a weathering profile located in the Strengbach catchment to estimate both production rate of regolith and denudation rate of soil and to establish a soil mass balance at millennial timescales. The weathering profile is located on the summit of the watershed and extending from the top soil to the granitic fractured bedrock at 2 m depth. Whole rock data shows different trends of variation of major and trace element concentrations and also of U-Th-Ra disequilibria in the upper part of the regolith (0-80 cm) and the deeper part of the fractured saprolith and/or bedrock (100cm-200cm). Modeling of the U-Th-Ra data in this deeper part of the profile, using a particle swarm optimization model dedicated to isotopic ratios leads to a regolith production rate at the summit of the watershed of 35 ± 9 T/km²/year. In addition, a numerical optimization for nonlinear inverse problem has been performed to estimate the regolith residence time and the mean denudation rate at the summit from the Beryllium data. The results show that the regolith residence time is about 14 000 years and the mean denudation rate is 32 ± 8 T/km²/year. The consistency between the regolith production rate and the soil denudation rate suggests therefore that in such a temperate context, the long-term mass balance of soil developed on granitic bedrock would be close to a steady state. The data also highlights that the determination of a weathering production rate from analysis of Uranium series nuclides in whole rock samples cannot be easily obtained by analyzing only surficial soil samples, and requires the analysis of the deeper fractured saprolith

  14. Using short-lived nuclides of the U- and Th-series to probe the kinetics of colloid migration in forested soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihs, Sophie; Prunier, Jonathan; Thien, Bruno; Lemarchand, Damien; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Chabaux, François

    2011-12-01

    The recent chemical dynamics of a podzolic forest soil section (from the Strengbach watershed, France) was investigated using U- and Th-series nuclides. Analyses of ( 238U), ( 230Th), ( 226Ra), ( 232Th), ( 228Ra) and ( 228Th) activities in the soil particles, the seepage waters, and the mature leaves of the beech trees growing on this soil were performed by TIMS or gamma spectrometry. The simultaneous analysis of the different soil ( sl) compartments allows to demonstrate that a preferential Th leaching over Ra must be assumed to explain the ( 226Ra/ 230Th), ( 228Ra/ 232Th) and ( 228Th/ 228Ra) disequilibria recorded in the soil particles. The overall Ra- and Th- transfer schemes are entirely consistent with the prevailing acido-complexolysis weathering mechanism in podzols. Using a continuous open-system leaching model, the ( 226Ra/ 230Th) and ( 228Ra/ 232Th) disequilibria measured in the different soil layers enable dating of the contemporary processes occurring in this soil. In this way, we have determined that a preferential Th-leaching from the shallow Ah horizon, due to a strong complexation with organic colloids, began fairly recently (18 years ago at most). The continual increase in pH recorded in precipitations over the last 20 years is assumed to be the cause of this enhanced organic complexation. A lower soil horizon (50-60 cm) is also affected by preferential Th leaching, though lasting over several centuries at least, with a much smaller leaching rate. The migration of Th isotopes through this soil section might hence be used as a tracer for the organic colloids migration and the induced radioactive disequilibria demonstrate to be useful for assessing the colloidal migration kinetics in a forested soil. Ra and Th isotopic ratios also appear to be valuable tracers of some mineral-water-plant interactions occurring in soil. The ( 228Ra/ 226Ra) ratio enables discrimination of the Ra flux originating from leaf degradation from that originating from mineral

  15. Toward precise QEC values for the superallowed 0+→0+ β decays of T=2 nuclides: The masses of Na20, Al24, P28, and Cl32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrede, C.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Faestermann, T.; Hertenberger, R.; Parikh, A.; Wirth, H.-F.; Bishop, S.; Chen, A. A.; Eppinger, K.; García, A.; Krücken, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Rugel, G.; Setoodehnia, K.

    2010-05-01

    High-precision measurements of superallowed 0+→0+ β decays of T=2 nuclides such as Mg20, Si24, S28, and Ar32 can contribute to searches for physics beyond the standard model of particle physics if the QEC values are accurate to a few keV or better. As a step toward providing precise QEC values for these decays, the ground-state masses of the respective daughter nuclei Na20, Al24, P28, and Cl32 have been determined by measuring the (He3,t) reactions leading to them with the Ar36(He3,t)K36 reaction as a calibration. A quadrupole-dipole-dipole-dipole (Q3D) magnetic spectrograph was used together with thin ion-implanted carbon-foil targets of Ne20, Mg24, Si28, S32, and Ar36. The masses of Na20 and Cl32 are found to be in good agreement with the values from the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME03) [G. Audi, A. H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/j.nuclphysa.2003.11.003 729, 337 (2003)], and the precision has been improved by a factor of 6 in both cases. The masses of Al24 and P28 are found to be higher than the values from AME03 by 9.5 keV (3.2σ) and 11.5 keV (3.6σ), respectively, and the precision has been improved by a factor of 2.5 in both cases. The new Cl32 mass is used together with the excitation energy of its lowest T=2 level and the mass of Ar32 to derive an improved superallowed QEC value of 6087.3(22) keV for this case. The effects on quantities related to standard-model tests including the β-ν correlation coefficient a and the isospin-symmetry-breaking correction δC are examined for the A=32 case.

  16. Cosmogenic Nuclide Dating of Glacial Advances in the Himalaya of Western Garhwal and Southern Himachal Pradesh, India (78°E, 31°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, D.; Bodo, B.; Strecker, M. R.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Rood, D.

    2008-12-01

    Recent glacial chronologies from the Himalaya suggest that glaciers are sensitive to changes in the strength of the Indian Summer Monsoon, which is sourced by moisture from the Bay of Bengal. However, a large fraction of the annual snowfall in the orogen may be supplied by the northern hemisphere westerlies (Western Disturbances) during winter. In particular, areas in northern India west of 78° longitude receive less than 60% of their annual precipitation during summer. Our study area lies within the transition zone from a summer to a winter precipitation maximum in northern India in the greater Sutlej River area. The sampling sites for cosmogenic nuclide dating of terminal moraine systems span the northwest-southeast oriented orographic rainfall barrier and exhibit a strong gradient in summer monsoon rainfall. We have collected samples for surface exposure dating of large erratic boulders from well-preserved moraines in three different valleys that are located within a distance of 100-150 km to each other. The main focus of our study lies on a detailed glacial chronology for the strongly monsoon-influenced upper Tons valley in western Garhwal, where at least three glacial stages can be distinguished. Preliminary results indicate that all three moraine systems are of Holocene age. The lowermost moraines occur at an elevation of approx. 2.5 km and at a distance of 18-20 km from the present-day glacier terminus. Holocene moraines at such low elevations have rarely been reported from the Himalaya and we suspect this to be a result of the high proportion of winter snowfall in this part of the mountain range. The much drier Pin and Thangi valleys are located in southern Himachal Pradesh, about 150 km to the north and 100km to the northwest, respectively. The oldest identifiable moraines in the Thangi valley occur at a shorter distance from the present-day glacier terminus, as compared to the Tons and Pin valley. Nevertheless, preliminary early Holocene ages for these

  17. [Contrast study on natural radioactive nuclides contents of rice between Xiangshan uranium deposit area, Jiangxi and non-uranium depsoit area].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping-Hui; Ye, Chang-Sheng; Xie, Shu-Rong; Rui, Yu-Kui

    2009-07-01

    The contents of natural radioactive nuclides such as uranium and thorium in paddies were analyzed and compared by means of ICP-MS. Totally 14 paddy samples were distinguished into two groups and collected from two rice planting area. One group (12 paddy samples) was collected from the Xiangshan uranium deposit area, Jiangxi province; while the other group (2 samples) collected from non-uranium deposit suburban area of Fuzhou city, Jiangxi, as comparison samples. The distance between the two sampling areas is about 80 kilometers. Before analysis, those paddy samples were continuously carbonized by two hours first, then continuously incinerated for 8 hours at the temperature of 600 degrees centigrade. The results show that the uranium contents in the paddy ash of samples gotten from Xiangshan uranium deposit area range from 0.053 to 1.482 microg x g(-1). The uranium contents of two comparison paddy samples ash are 0.059 and 0.061 microg x g(-1), respectiovely. The average uranium content of paddy ash of uranium deposit area is 0.323 microg x g(-1). Compared with the comparison samples, the uranium contents of paddy ash of uranium deposit area are considerably high, 5.30 times that of non-uranium deposit area. The thorium contents in paddy ash of the uranium deposit area, however, are relatively low and less than that of samples collected from non-uranium deposit area, which range from 0.029 to 0.311 microg x g(-1); The average level is 0.104 microg x g(-1), only about 50% of that of paddy ash sampled from non-urnaium deposit area. Moreover, there is significant linearity correlation between uranium and thorium contents of paddy sampled from Xiangshan uranium deposit area. The positive effects show that the thorium contents of paddy increase as uranium contents of paddy in uranium deposit area increase. The causes for the remarkable difference in uranium contents in paddy between urianium deposit area and non-uranium deposit area are not clear yet. The research on

  18. Behaviour of nuclides and U-series disequilibrium in clayey sediments: application to the Late Jurassic record from the eastern Paris basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, J.; Négrel, Ph.; Innocent, C.; Brulhet, J.

    2003-04-01

    We present a record of U-series disequilibrium covering the Callovo-Oxfordian-Thitonian times of the Late Jurassic carbonated platform from the eastern part of the Paris basin. The Callovo-Oxfordian clayey layer is the potential host rock for reconnaissance work carried out by Andra (e.g., Agence Nationale de Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs) in eastern France, the objective of which is the designing and building of an underground research laboratory to study the aptitude of the clay-marl Callovo-Oxfordian layer for the storage of radioactive wastes. We analyse U and Th trace elements on both the labile fraction (extracted by cold HCl) and the total bulk sediments. The Th contents are extremely low in the Oxfordian shelf reef carbonates (<10 ppb) with respect to the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian clayey marls and the Callovian-Oxfordian argilites (up to 10 ppm). In contrast, the uranium contents are much more homogenous (1 ppm ±0.8) along the section. With respect to bulk concentrations, the nuclide contents in the labile component are particularly low in the Callovian-Oxfordian argilites. This behaviour suggests that given the extremely low permeability of the rock, any groundwater circulation of solutes could only have taken place by diffusion - a very slow mechanism that favours water-rock interactions. For U-series analyses (measured by alpha-spectrometry), a total of 43 bulk-rock samples were preferentially microdrilled from the fine-grained lithologies, although the heterogeneity of carbonate facies within sections necessitated occasional sampling of coarser grained lithologies. Within the carbonate-rich part (Oxfordian to Tithonian) of the section, the 234U/238U ratios slightly fluctuate from secular equilibrium and are interpreted as preferential 234U-solution processes related to groundwater circulation. Preferential removal of 234U in this zone is also indicated by some 230Th/234U activity ratios higher than unity. In contrast, most of the samples from the

  19. Slip rate variability over the Holocene period in the middle Aterno fault system (Italy), retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide dating of exhumed fault-plane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla; Pucci, Stefano; Villani, Fabio; Bourles, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim; Aumaitre, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Numerous numerical modeling studies have described and quantified non-stochastic spatio-temporal variations of earthquake occurrences within fault-networks, such as temporal clustered earthquakes or fault synchronization. However, very few long-enough paleoseismological and geological records are available to test those models against well-constrained dataset and thus account for such variability in the fault behavior. The prerequisites for improving our understanding of fault-rupture processes and thus our capacity to better assess seismic hazard are to acquire paleoseismological records that enable to derive both long-term slip-rate and short-term variability, on a large population of faults and/or within a fault system. These conditions met in Central Apennines, an extensional province where substantial paleoseismological dataset accurately described the Holocene seismic history of a dense network of normal faults. In this study we use 36Cl in situ cosmogenic nuclide to retrieve the seismic history of 3 faults belonging to the Middle Aterno fault system, from north to south: the Bazzano fault, the Roccapreturo fault and the Sulmona fault, a portion of which ruptured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake in Italy. We use a new modeling approach to determine the age and slip of past seismic events from the 36Cl concentration profiles. This model is based on an inverse approach and uses an optimization algorithm enabling all the parameter space (number of events, age and slip of events, pre-exposure) to be explored without a priori constraints (see Tesson et al. in session TS4.2/NH4.16/SM3.8). Using this new approach, we precisely determine the slip events occurrences over the Holocene period of those three faults. The results indicate that the three studied faults have ruptured between 4.5 and 5.5 ka, while the southernmost part of the system has also ruptured between at 1.5-3 ka (Sulmona fault and southern segment of Roccapreturo). Those results are in agreement

  20. Authigenic 10Be/9Be Ratio Signatures of the Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Linked to Geomagnetic Dipole Moment Variation During and Since the Brunhes/Matuyama Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Q.; Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.; Ménabréaz, L.; Valet, J. P.; Valery, G.; Choy, S.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rate of cosmogenic nuclides is linked to the geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) by a non-linear inverse relationship. Large amplitude GDM variations associated with reversals and excursions can potentially be reconstructed using time variation of the cosmogenic beryllium-10 (10Be) production recorded in ocean sediments. Downcore profiles of authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) in oceanic cores provide independent and additional records of the evolution of the geomagnetic intensity and complete previous information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI). Here are presented new authigenic 10Be/9Be results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and from the top of core MD05-2930 collected in the West Equatorial Pacific Ocean. Completing data of Ménabréaz et al. (2012, 2014), these results provide the first continuous 10Be production rate sedimentary record covering the last 800 ka. Along these cores, authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio peaks are recorded - within methodological errors - at the stratigraphic level of RPI lows. High-resolution chronologies (δ18O-derived) lead to interpret these peaks as successive global 10Be overproduction events triggered by geomagnetic dipole lows present in the PISO-1500 and Sint-2000 stacks. The largest amplitude 10Be production enhancement is synchronous to the very large decrease of the dipole field associated with the last polarity reversal (772 ka). It is consistent in shape and duration with the peak recorded in core MD90-0961 from the Maldive area (Indian Ocean) (Valet et al. 2014). Two significant 10Be production enhancements are coeval with the Laschamp (41 ka) and Icelandic basin (190 ka) excursions, while 10Be production peaks of lower amplitude correlate to other recognized excursions such as the Blake (120 ka), Pringle-Falls (215 ka), Portuguese Margin (290 ka), Big Lost (540 ka) among others. This study provides new data on the amplitude and timing of dipole field variations

  1. 47 CFR 65.305 - Calculation of the weighted average cost of capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of the weighted average cost of... Carriers § 65.305 Calculation of the weighted average cost of capital. (a) The composite weighted average... Commission determines to the contrary in a prescription proceeding, the composite weighted average cost...

  2. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Haight, Robert Cameron; Jandel, Marian; Mosby, Shea Morgan; O'Donnell, John M.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Krticka, Milan

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  3. EPA's National Stormwater Calculator (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster will demonstrate how EPA's National Stormwater Calculator works. The National Stormwater Calculator (SWC) estimates the amount of stormwater runoff generated from a site under different development and control scenarios over a long period of historical rainfall. The a...

  4. Calculates Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel.

    1989-11-10

    Version 00 THRUSH computes the thermal neutron scattering kernel by the phonon expansion method for both coherent and incoherent scattering processes. The calculation of the coherent part is suitable only for calculating the scattering kernel for heavy water.

  5. Primordial Compositions of Refractory Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L; Simon, S B; Rai, V K; Thiemens, M H; Hutcheon, I D; Williams, R W; Galy, A; Ding, T; Fedkin, A V; Clayton, R N; Mayeda, T K

    2008-02-20

    Bulk chemical and oxygen, magnesium and silicon isotopic compositions were measured for each of 17 Types A and B refractory inclusions from CV3 chondrites. After bulk chemical compositions were corrected for non-representative sampling in the laboratory, the Mg and Si isotopic compositions of each inclusion were used to calculate its original chemical composition assuming that the heavy-isotope enrichments of these elements are due to Rayleigh fractionation that accompanied their evaporation from CMAS liquids. The resulting pre-evaporation chemical compositions are consistent with those predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic calculations for high-temperature nebular condensates but only if different inclusions condensed from nebular regions that ranged in total pressure from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -1} bar, regardless of whether they formed in a system of solar composition or in one enriched in OC dust relative to gas by a factor of ten relative to solar composition. This is similar to the range of total pressures predicted by dynamic models of the solar nebula for regions whose temperatures are in the range of silicate condensation temperatures. Alternatively, if departure from equilibrium condensation and/or non-representative sampling of condensates in the nebula occurred, the inferred range of total pressure could be smaller. Simple kinetic modeling of evaporation successfully reproduces observed chemical compositions of most inclusions from their inferred pre-evaporation compositions, suggesting that closed-system isotopic exchange processes did not have a significant effect on their isotopic compositions. Comparison of pre-evaporation compositions with observed ones indicates that 80% of the enrichment in refractory CaO + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to more volatile MgO + SiO{sub 2} is due to initial condensation and 20% due to subsequent evaporation for both Type A and Type B inclusions.

  6. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žagar, Tomaž; Božič, Matjaž; Ravnik, Matjaž

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (γ emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. 133Ba, 41Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  7. Equilibrium cycle pin by pin transport depletion calculations with DeCART

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Downar, T.; Taiwo, T.

    2012-07-01

    As the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program has matured it has become more important to utilize more advanced simulation methods. The work reported here was performed as part of the AFCI fellowship program to develop and demonstrate the capability of performing high fidelity equilibrium cycle calculations. As part of the work here, a new multi-cycle analysis capability was implemented in the DeCART code which included modifying the depletion modules to perform nuclide decay calculations, implementing an assembly shuffling pattern description, and modifying iteration schemes. During the work, stability issues were uncovered with respect to converging simultaneously the neutron flux, isotopics, and fluid density and temperature distributions in 3-D. Relaxation factors were implemented which considerably improved the stability of the convergence. To demonstrate the capability two core designs were utilized, a reference UOX core and a CORAIL core. Full core equilibrium cycle calculations were performed on both cores and the discharge isotopics were compared. From this comparison it was noted that the improved modeling capability was not drastically different in its prediction of the discharge isotopics when compared to 2-D single assembly or 2-D core models. For fissile isotopes such as U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 the relative differences were 1.91%, 1.88%, and 0.59%), respectively. While this difference may not seem large it translates to mass differences on the order of tens of grams per assembly, which may be significant for the purposes of accounting of special nuclear material. (authors)

  8. Design and minimum reflux calculations for multicomponent reactive distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, D.; Doherty, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    A new set of transformed composition variables is introduced to simplify the design equations for single-feed, multicomponent reactive distillation columns. Based on these equations, a general method of calculating minimum reflux ratios for reactive distillation columns is presented. The new composition variables are also used to derive simple relationships between the dependent design variables, which are not evident when the design equations are written in terms of mole fractions.

  9. Direct synthesis of [DOTA-DPhe1]-octreotide and [DOTA-DPhe1,Tyr3]-octreotide (SMT487): two conjugates for systemic delivery of radiotherapeutical nuclides to somatostatin receptor positive tumors in man.

    PubMed

    Albert, R; Smith-Jones, P; Stolz, B; Simeon, C; Knecht, H; Bruns, C; Pless, J

    1998-05-19

    Direct attachment of unprotected DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N',N",N"',N"-tetraacetic acid) to partially suitably protected octreotide or [Tyr3]-octreotide leads after deprotection to [DOTA-DPhe1]-octreotide (III) and [DOTA-DPhe1,Tyr3]-octreotide (IV). These DOTA-containing somatostatin analogs, when labeled with a radiotherapeutic nuclide, are useful as antitumor agents. The partially protected peptides are accessible via solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) followed by selective cleavage under mild acidic conditions from the resin. PMID:9871736

  10. Calculation of water activation for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollaire, Joachim; Brugger, Markus; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Roesler, Stefan; Vojtyla, Pavol

    2006-06-01

    The management of activated water in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a key concern for radiation protection. For this reason, the induced radioactivity of the different water circuits is calculated using the Monte-Carlo (MC) code FLUKA. The results lead to the definition of procedures to be taken into account during the repair and maintenance of the machine, as well as to measures being necessary for a release of water into the environment. In order to assess the validity of the applied methods, a benchmark experiment was carried out at the CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field (CERF) facility, where a hadron beam (120 GeV) is impinging on a copper target. Four samples of water, as used at the LHC, and different in their chemical compositions, were irradiated near the copper target. In addition to the tritium activity measured with a liquid scintillation counter, the samples were also analyzed using gamma spectroscopy in order to determine the activity of the gamma emitting isotopes such as Be7 and Na24. While for the latter an excellent agreement between simulation and measurement was found, for the calculation of tritium a correction factor is derived to be applied for future LHC calculations in which the activity is calculated by direct scoring of produced nuclei. A simplified geometry representing the LHC Arc sections is then used to evaluate the different calculation methods with FLUKA. By comparing these methods and by taking into account the benchmark results, a strategy for the environmental calculations can be defined.

  11. Advanced Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarantos, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    This is an excerpt from a course for advanced students, designed to teach proficiency in English composition by providing activities specifically geared to the elimination of native language interference. (LG)

  12. Fuel composition

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, S.L.

    1983-09-20

    A composition useful, inter alia, as a fuel, is based on ethyl alcohol denatured with methylisobutyl alcohol and kerosene, which is mixed with xylenes and isopropyl alcohol. The xylenes and isopropyl alcohol act with the denaturizing agents to raise the flash point above that of ethyl alcohol alone and also to mask the odor and color the flame, thus making the composition safer for use as a charcoal lighter or as a fuel for e.g. patio lamps.

  13. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung W.

    1995-01-01

    A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  14. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  15. Martian Radiation Environment: Model Calculations and Recent Measurements with "MARIE"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saganti, P. B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; zeitlin, C. J.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Galactic Cosmic Ray spectra in Mars orbit were generated with the recently expanded HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations. These model calculations are compared with the first eighteen months of measured data from the MARIE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft that is currently in Martian orbit. The dose rates observed by the MARIE instrument are within 10% of the model calculated predictions. Model calculations are compared with the MARIE measurements of dose, dose-equivalent values, along with the available particle flux distribution. Model calculated particle flux includes GCR elemental composition of atomic number, Z = 1-28 and mass number, A = 1-58. Particle flux calculations specific for the current MARIE mapping period are reviewed and presented.

  16. Airplane stability calculations with a card programmable pocket calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Programs are presented for calculating airplane stability characteristics with a card programmable pocket calculator. These calculations include eigenvalues of the characteristic equations of lateral and longitudinal motion as well as stability parameters such as the time to damp to one-half amplitude or the damping ratio. The effects of wind shear are included. Background information and the equations programmed are given. The programs are written for the International System of Units, the dimensional form of the stability derivatives, and stability axes. In addition to programs for stability calculations, an unusual and short program is included for the Euler transformation of coordinates used in airplane motions. The programs have been written for a Hewlett Packard HP-67 calculator. However, the use of this calculator does not constitute an endorsement of the product by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Tawfik, Abdel Nasser

    2013-03-15

    The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

  18. Source apportionment using reconstructed mass calculations.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Naila; Waheed, Shahida

    2014-01-01

    A long-term study was undertaken to investigate the air quality of the Islamabad/Rawalpindi area. In this regard fine and coarse particulate matter were collected from 4 sites in the Islamabad/Rawalpindi region from 1998 to 2010 using Gent samplers and polycarbonate filters and analyzed for their elemental composition using the techniques of Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Proton Induced X-ray Emission/Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIXE/PIGE) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Spectroscopy. The elemental data along with the gravimetric measurements and black carbon (BC) results obtained by reflectance measurement were used to approximate or reconstruct the particulate mass (RCM) by estimation of pseudo sources such as soil, smoke, sea salt, sulfate and black carbon or soot. This simple analysis shows that if the analytical technique used does not measure important major elements then the data will not be representative of the sample composition and cannot be further utilized for source apportionment studies or to perform transboundary analysis. In this regard PIXE/PIGE and XRF techniques that can provide elemental compositional data for most of the major environmentally important elements appear to be more useful as compared to NAA. Therefore %RCM calculations for such datasets can be used as a quality assurance (QA) measure to treat data prior to application of chemometrical tools such as factor analysis (FA) or cluster analysis (CA). PMID:24345244

  19. Addressing solar modulation and long-term uncertainties in scaling secondary cosmic rays for in situ cosmogenic nuclide applications [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Bieber, John W.; Clem, John M.; Duldig, Marc L.; Evenson, Paul; Humble, John E.; Pyle, Roger

    2005-10-01

    Solar modulation affects the secondary cosmic rays responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide (CN) production the most at the high geomagnetic latitudes to which CN production rates are traditionally referenced. While this has long been recognized (e.g., D. Lal, B. Peters, Cosmic ray produced radioactivity on the Earth, in: K. Sitte (Ed.), Handbuch Der Physik XLVI/2, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1967, pp. 551-612 and D. Lal, Theoretically expected variations in the terrestrial cosmic ray production rates of isotopes, in: G.C. Castagnoli (Ed.), Proceedings of the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics 95, Italian Physical Society, Varenna 1988, pp. 216-233), these variations can lead to potentially significant scaling model uncertainties that have not been addressed in detail. These uncertainties include the long-term (millennial-scale) average solar modulation level to which secondary cosmic rays should be referenced, and short-term fluctuations in cosmic ray intensity measurements used to derive published secondary cosmic ray scaling models. We have developed new scaling models for spallogenic nucleons, slow-muon capture and fast-muon interactions that specifically address these uncertainties. Our spallogenic nucleon scaling model, which includes data from portions of 5 solar cycles, explicitly incorporates a measure of solar modulation ( S), and our fast- and slow-muon scaling models (based on more limited data) account for solar modulation effects through increased uncertainties. These models improve on previously published models by better sampling the observed variability in measured cosmic ray intensities as a function of geomagnetic latitude, altitude, and solar activity. Furthermore, placing the spallogenic nucleon data in a consistent time-space framework allows for a more realistic assessment of uncertainties in our model than in earlier ones. We demonstrate here that our models reasonably account for the effects of solar modulation on measured

  20. Equilibrium calculations of firework mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Tanaka, Katsumi; Iida, Mitsuaki; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    1994-12-31

    Thermochemical equilibrium calculations have been used to calculate detonation conditions for typical firework components including three report charges, two display charges, and black powder which is used as a fuse or launch charge. Calculations were performed with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculations with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. The detonation calculations presented in this paper are thought to be the first report on the theoretical study of firework detonation. Measured velocities for two report charges are available and compare favorably to predicted detonation velocities. However, the measured velocities may not be true detonation velocities. Fast deflagration rather than an ideal detonation occurs when reactants contain significant amounts of slow reacting constituents such as aluminum or titanium. Despite such uncertainties in reacting pyrotechnics, the detonation calculations do show the complex nature of condensed phase formation at elevated pressures and give an upper bound for measured velocities.

  1. Global nuclear-structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1990-04-20

    The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to {epsilon}{sub 2} and {epsilon}{sub 4} used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and {Beta}-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential.

  2. Handheld calculator program simplifies calculation of data for gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Karger, W.

    1982-01-11

    For natural gases having several components, Elliott Co.'s handheld calculator program can characterize the gas mixture with a printout that provides its molecular weight, molar specific heat at constant pressure, pseudocritical pressure and temperature, ratio of specific heats, and adiabatic compression exponent. The program also provides for further calculations that yield specific gravity, specific heat/lb, and compressibility.

  3. Implementation of a Thermodynamic Solver within a Computer Program for Calculating Fission-Product Release Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Duncan Henry

    During some postulated accidents at nuclear power stations, fuel cooling may be impaired. In such cases, the fuel heats up and the subsequent increased fission-gas release from the fuel to the gap may result in fuel sheath failure. After fuel sheath failure, the barrier between the coolant and the fuel pellets is lost or impaired, gases and vapours from the fuel-to-sheath gap and other open voids in the fuel pellets can be vented. Gases and steam from the coolant can enter the broken fuel sheath and interact with the fuel pellet surfaces and the fission-product inclusion on the fuel surface (including material at the surface of the fuel matrix). The chemistry of this interaction is an important mechanism to model in order to assess fission-product releases from fuel. Starting in 1995, the computer program SOURCE 2.0 was developed by the Canadian nuclear industry to model fission-product release from fuel during such accidents. SOURCE 2.0 has employed an early thermochemical model of irradiated uranium dioxide fuel developed at the Royal Military College of Canada. To overcome the limitations of computers of that time, the implementation of the RMC model employed lookup tables to pre-calculated equilibrium conditions. In the intervening years, the RMC model has been improved, the power of computers has increased significantly, and thermodynamic subroutine libraries have become available. This thesis is the result of extensive work based on these three factors. A prototype computer program (referred to as SC11) has been developed that uses a thermodynamic subroutine library to calculate thermodynamic equilibria using Gibbs energy minimization. The Gibbs energy minimization requires the system temperature (T) and pressure (P), and the inventory of chemical elements (n) in the system. In order to calculate the inventory of chemical elements in the fuel, the list of nuclides and nuclear isomers modelled in SC11 had to be expanded from the list used by SOURCE 2.0. A

  4. Photoimageable composition

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul; Krafick, Karen L.; Simison, Kelby Liv

    2005-02-22

    The use of photoacid generators including an alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salt and/or bis(t-butylphenyl)iodonium salt in a photoimageable composition helps improve resolution. Suitable photoimageable compositions includes: (a) a multifuctional polymeric epoxy resin that is dissolved in an organic solvent wherein the epoxy resin comprises oligomers of bisphenol A that is quantitatively protected by glycidyl ether and wherein the oligomers have an average functionality that ranges from about 3 to 12; and a photoacid generator comprising an alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salt and/or bis(t-butylphenyl)iodonium salt. Preferred alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salts include 4-octyloxyphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and 4-methoxyphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate. The photoimageable composition is particularly suited for producing high aspect ratio microstructures.

  5. Composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  6. Composite piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A composite piston structure is disclosed which provides a simple and reliable means for joining a carbon-carbon or ceramic piston cap with a metallic piston body. Attachment is achieved by means of a special geometry which compensates for differences in thermal expansion without complicated mechanical fastening devices. The shape employs a flange created by opposed frustoconical shapes with coincident vertices intersecting on the radial centerline of the piston in order to retain the piston cap. The use of carbon-carbon for the piston cap material allows a close fit between the piston and a cylinder wall, eliminating the need for piston rings. The elimination of extra mechanical parts of previous composite pistons provides a lightweight composite piston capable of extended high temperature operation.

  7. Photoimageable composition

    DOEpatents

    Simison, Kelby Liv; Dentinger, Paul

    2003-11-11

    The use of selected buffering amines in a photoimageable composition prevents process bias which with conventional photoresists causes designed features to be distorted, especially in corners and high resolution features. It is believed that the amines react with the catalysts, e.g., photoacids, generated to create an inert salt. The presence of the amines also increases resolution. Suitable photoimageable compositions includes: (a) a multifunctional polymeric epoxy resin that is dissolved in an organic solvent wherein the epoxy resin comprises oligomers of bisphenol A that is quantitatively protected by glycidyl ether and wherein the oligomers have an average functionality that ranges from about 3 to 12; (b) a photoactive compound; and (c) an amine that is selected from the group consisting of triisobutylamine, 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (also known as PROTON SPONGET.TM.), 2,2'-diazabicyclo[2.2.2] octane and mixtures thereof. The photoimageable composition is particularly suited for producing high aspect ratio metal microstructures.

  8. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  9. Thermal Response Of Composite Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel B.; Smith, Marnell; Kolodziej, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Engineering model gives useful predictions. Pair of reports presents theoretical and experimental analyses of thermal responses of multiple-component, lightweight, porous, ceramic insulators. Particular materials examined destined for use in Space Shuttle thermal protection system, test methods and heat-transfer theory useful to chemical, metallurgical, and ceramic engineers needing to calculate transient thermal responses of refractory composites.

  10. Composite resins.

    PubMed

    Leinfelder, K F

    1985-04-01

    The interest in posterior composite resins has grown rapidly during the last several years. Much of the interest has been initiated by a demand for esthetic dentistry. Some has developed as a result of a concern by some for mercury sensitivity. Despite their growing popularity, a number of major problems persist. Some of these deal with the restorative material, whereas others relate to the clinical techniques associated with their use. Before the clinician considers the use of composite resins in posterior teeth, he or she should be familiar with conditions that strongly influence clinical behavior.

  11. Composite Riflescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Bushnell Division of Bausch & Lomb's Armor-Sight riflescope combines the company's world-renowned optics with a graphite composite (Graphlon VI) developed for space applications. The riflescope is 10 percent lighter than aluminum scopes, and, because its thermal expansion coefficient is near zero, optical distortion from heat and cold extremes is eliminated. It is fogproof and waterproof; advanced multicoated optics provide maximum light transmission to brighten target ranges. Bushnell was assisted by NIAC/USC in searching for technical information on graphic composites and in overcoming difficulties with bonding and porosity.

  12. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  13. Chemical composition of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The composition of Mars has been calculated from the cosmochemical model of Ganapathy and Anders (1974) which assumes that planets and chondrites underwent the same 4 fractionation processes in the solar nebula. Because elements of similar volatility stay together in these processes, only 4 index elements (U, Fe, K and Tl or Ar36) are needed to calculate the abundances of all 83 elements in the planet. The values chosen are U = 28 ppb, K = 62 ppm (based on K U = 2200 from orbital ??-spectrometry and on thermal history calculations by Tokso??z and Hsui (1978) Fe = 26.72% (from geophysical data), and Tl = 0.14 ppb (from the Ar36 and Ar40 abundances measured by Viking). The mantle of Mars is an iron-rich [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.77] garnet wehrlite (?? = 3.52-3.54 g/cm3), similar to McGetchin and Smyth's (1978) estimate but containing more Ca and Al. It is nearly identical to the bulk Moon composition of Morgan et al. (1978b). The core makes up 0.19 of the planet and contains 3.5% S-much less than estimated by other models. Volatiles have nearly Moon-like abundances, being depleted relative to the Earth by factors of 0.36 (K-group, Tcond = 600-1300 K) or 0.029 (Tl group, Tcond < 600 K). The water abundance corresponds to a 9 m layer, but could be higher by as much as a factor of 11. Comparison of model compositions for 5 differentiated planets (Earth, Venus, Mars, Moon, and eucrite parent body) suggests that volatile depletion correlates mainly with size rather than with radial distance from the Sun. However, the relatively high volatile content of shergottites and some chondrites shows that the correlation is not simple; other factors must also be involved. ?? 1979.

  14. Calculation of sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Romero-Serrano, Antonio

    1993-10-01

    The Reddy-Blander model for the sulfide capacities of slags has been modified for the case of acid slags and to include A12O3 and TiO2 as components. The model has been extended to calculate a priori sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags, from a knowledge of the thermodynamic activities of the component oxides, with no adjustable parameters. Agreement with measurements is obtained within experimental uncertainty for binary, ternary, and quinary slags involving the components SiO2-Al2O3-TiO2-CaO-MgO-FeO-MnO over wide ranges of composition. The oxide activities used in the computations are calculated from a database of model parameters obtained by optimizing thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data for oxide systems. Sulfur has now been included in this database. A computing system with automatic access to this and other databases has been developed to permit the calculation of the sulfur content of slags in multicomponent slag/metal/gas/solid equilibria.

  15. Shuffler bias corrections using calculated count rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, Phillip M.; Hurd, J. R.; Hsue, F.

    2001-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has two identical shufflers that have been calibrated with a dozen U{sub 3}O{sub 8} certified standards from 10 g {sup 235}U to 3600 g {sup 235}U. The shufflers are used to assay a wide variety of material types for their {sup 235}U contents. When the items differ greatly in chemical composition or shape from the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} standards a bias is introduced because the calibration is not appropriate. Recently a new tool has been created to calculate shuffler count rates accurately, and this has been applied to generate bias correction factors. The tool has also been used to verify the masses and count rates of some uncertified U{sub 3}O{sub 8} standards up to 8.0 kg of {sup 235}U which were used to provisionally extend the calibration beyond the 3.6 kg of {sup 235}U mass when a special need arose. Metallic uranium has significantly different neutronic properties from the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} standards and measured count rates from metals are biased low when the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} calibration is applied. The application of the calculational tool to generate bias corrrections for assorted metals will be described. The accuracy of the calculational tool was verified using highly enriched metal disk standards that could be stacked to form cylinders or put into spread arrays.

  16. A FORTRAN Computer Program for Q Sort Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, William R.

    1978-01-01

    The Q Sort method is a rank order procedure. A FORTRAN program is described which calculates a total value for any group of cases for the items in the Q Sort, and rank orders the items according to this composite value. (Author/JKS)

  17. Calculator. Owning a Small Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Seven activities are presented in this student workbook designed for an exploration of small business ownership and the use of the calculator in this career. Included are simulated situations in which students must use a calculator to compute property taxes; estimate payroll taxes and franchise taxes; compute pricing, approximate salaries,…

  18. Design Calculations for Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldin, B.

    1983-01-01

    Nine simplified analytic models based on average properties accurately predict heat rates for silicon/germanium thermoelectric generators. Solutions from simplified models were compared with those obtained using sophisticated numerical analysis. Maximum errors in calculated heat rate range from about 4 percent to about 0.2 percent. Models also used to calculate power delivered to load and thermodynamic efficiency.

  19. Deconstructing Calculation Methods: Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this series of four articles is to look critically, and in some detail, at the primary strategy approach to written calculation, as set out on pages 5 to 16 of the "Guidance paper" "Calculation." The underlying principle of that approach is that children should use mental methods whenever they are appropriate, whereas for calculations…

  20. relline: Relativistic line profiles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauser, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    relline calculates relativistic line profiles; it is compatible with the common X-ray data analysis software XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) and ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The two basic forms are an additive line model (RELLINE) and a convolution model to calculate relativistic smearing (RELCONV).