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Sample records for calculations deduced gamow-teller

  1. Gamow-teller strengths in proton-rich exotic nuclei deduced in the combined analysis of mirror transitions.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Adachi, T; von Brentano, P; Berg, G P A; Fransen, C; De Frenne, D; Fujita, H; Fujita, K; Hatanaka, K; Jacobs, E; Nakanishi, K; Negret, A; Pietralla, N; Popescu, L; Rubio, B; Sakemi, Y; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Yosoi, M; Zell, K O

    2005-11-18

    Isospin symmetry is expected for the T(z)=+/-1-->0 isobaric analogous transitions in isobars with mass number A, where T(z) is the z component of isospin T. Assuming this symmetry, strengths of analogous Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions within A = 50 isobars were determined from a high energy-resolution study at 0 degrees in combination with the decay Q value and lifetime from the beta decay. This method can be applied to other pf-shell nuclei and can be used to study GT strengths of astrophysical interest.

  2. Gamow-Teller Strengths in Proton-Rich Exotic Nuclei Deduced in the Combined Analysis of Mirror Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Brentano, P. von; Fransen, C.; Pietralla, N.; Zell, K.O.; Berg, G.P.A.; Frenne, D. de; Jacobs, E.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.

    2005-11-18

    Isospin symmetry is expected for the T{sub z}={+-}1{yields}0 isobaric analogous transitions in isobars with mass number A, where T{sub z} is the z component of isospin T. Assuming this symmetry, strengths of analogous Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions within A=50 isobars were determined from a high energy-resolution T{sub z}=+1{yields}0, {sup 50}Cr({sup 3}He,t){sup 50}Mn study at 0 deg. in combination with the decay Q value and lifetime from the T{sub z}=-1{yields}0, {sup 50}Fe{yields}{sup 50}Mn {beta} decay. This method can be applied to other pf-shell nuclei and can be used to study GT strengths of astrophysical interest.

  3. Missing and Quenched Gamow-Teller Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurier, E.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A. P.

    1995-02-01

    Gamow-Teller strength functions in the resonance region are calculated in the full \\(pf\\)8 space. The observed profile is very sensitive to the level density and may become so diluted as to be confused with background. A model independent proof is given that standard quenching originates in nuclear correlations, and that some 30% of the total strength must be due to states outside the \\(pf\\)8 space. By combining this argument with the results of shell model calculations, comparison with the 48Ca\\(p,n\\)48Sc experimental data strongly suggest that most of the strength that is currently thought to be missing is actually observed.

  4. Shell-model calculations of isovector electromagnetic transitions and Gamow-Teller beta decays in the N~=28 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Atsushi; Horie, Hisashi

    1988-08-01

    Isovector E2 and M1 transitions from isobaric analog states of the N=29 isotones to low-lying states in the N=28 isotones are discussed by making use of the shell model. The fn-17/2j and the fn7/2+fn-17/2j configurations are assumed for the N=29 and N=28 isotones, respectively, where j denotes one of the p3/2, p1/2, and f5/2 orbits. First, the model space is restricted to j=p3/2 only, and it is extended to include all the p3/2, p1/2, and f5/2 orbits, in order to study stepwise the role of the various wave function components. For the isovector E2 transitions, it is confirmed that the major components of the wave functions play a decisive role for the allowed transitions in the single-particle shell model and the use of the good isospin wave functions is indispensable for the forbidden ones. For the isovector M1 transitions, it is shown that the spin-nonflip f7/2-->f7/2 transition, which is introduced by the neutron-excited components in the wave functions of the N=28 isotones, plays a very significant role: It gives rise to the important cancellation which is responsible for the strong suppression of the M1 transition strength in comparison with the simple shell-model prediction, and it becomes the leading term in the l- and j-forbidden M1 transitions. Similar discussion holds for the Gamow-Teller beta decays between the levels of the N=28 and N=29 nuclei.

  5. Reexamining Gamow-Teller decays near 78Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshudifat, M. F.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Gross, C. J.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C.; Borzov, I. N.; Brewer, N. T.; Cartegni, L.; Fijałkowska, A.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.; Ilyushkin, S. V.; Jost, C.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Królas, W.; Liu, S. H.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Padgett, S. W.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Ramayya, A. V.; Stracener, D. W.; Surman, R.; Winger, J. A.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-04-01

    Decays of neutron-rich nuclei Zn,8382 and Ga,8382 produced in proton-induced fission of 238U were studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility using on-line mass separation and β -γ spectroscopy techniques. New γ -ray transitions were identified and level schemes, which include states at high excitation energies in the range between 3-7 MeV were constructed. These high-energy levels were identified to be populated through allowed Gamow-Teller β transitions, and their structure was interpreted with new shell-model calculations. A β -delayed neutron branching ratio of 69 ±7 % was deduced for 82Zn and revised β -decay half-life values of 82Zn [155(17)(20) ms] and 83Zn [122(28) ms] were determined.

  6. Low-lying Gamow-Teller transitions in spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak, N.; Uenlue, S.; Selam, C.

    2012-01-15

    The Pyatov Method has been used to study the low-lying Gamow-Teller transitions in the mass region of 98 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To A Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 130. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the total Hamiltonian have been solved within the framework of proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The low-lying {beta} decay log(ft) values have been calculated for the nuclei under consideration.

  7. β+ Gamow-Teller transition strengths from 46Ti and stellar electron-capture rates.

    PubMed

    Noji, S; Zegers, R G T; Austin, Sam M; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Cole, A L; Doster, H J; Gade, A; Guess, C J; Gupta, S; Hitt, G W; Langer, C; Lipschutz, S; Lunderberg, E; Meharchand, R; Meisel, Z; Perdikakis, G; Pereira, J; Recchia, F; Schatz, H; Scott, M; Stroberg, S R; Sullivan, C; Valdez, L; Walz, C; Weisshaar, D; Williams, S J; Wimmer, K

    2014-06-27

    The Gamow-Teller strength in the β(+) direction to (46)Sc was extracted via the (46)Ti(t,(3)He + γ) reaction at 115  MeV/u. The γ-ray coincidences served to precisely measure the very weak Gamow-Teller transition to a final state at 991 keV. Although this transition is weak, it is crucial for accurately estimating electron-capture rates in astrophysical scenarios with relatively low stellar densities and temperatures, such as presupernova stellar evolution. Shell-model calculations with different effective interactions in the pf shell-model space do not reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strengths, which is likely due to sd-shell admixtures. Calculations in the quasiparticle random phase approximation that are often used in astrophysical simulations also fail to reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution, leading to strongly overestimated electron-capture rates. Because reliable theoretical predictions of Gamow-Teller strengths are important for providing astrophysical electron-capture reaction rates for a broad set of nuclei in the lower pf shell, we conclude that further theoretical improvements are required to match astrophysical needs.

  8. Gamow-Teller strength in 54Fe and 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurier, E.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A. P.

    1995-10-01

    Through a sequence of large scale 0ħω shell model calculations, Gamow-Teller strengths (S+ and S-) in 54Fe and 56Fe are obtained. They reproduce the experimental values by quenching the στ operator through the standard factor of 0.77. Comparisons are made with recent shell model Monte Carlo calculations. Results are shown to depend critically on the interaction. It is argued that the experimental data contain enough strength in the region above the resonance to make them consistent with the 3(N-Z) sum rule.

  9. Benchmarking nuclear models for Gamow-Teller response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, E.; Brown, B. A.; Fang, D.-L.; Marketin, T.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2014-03-01

    A comparative study of the nuclear Gamow-Teller response (GTR) within conceptually different state-of-the-art approaches is presented. Three nuclear microscopic models are considered: (i) the recently developed charge-exchange relativistic time blocking approximation (RTBA) based on the covariant density functional theory, (ii) the shell model (SM) with an extended “jj77” model space and (iii) the non-relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) with a Brueckner G-matrix effective interaction. We study the physics cases where two or all three of these models can be applied. The Gamow-Teller response functions are calculated for 208Pb, 132Sn and 78Ni within both RTBA and QRPA. The strengths obtained for 208Pb are compared to data that enable a firm model benchmarking. For the nucleus 132Sn, also SM calculations are performed within the model space truncated at the level of a particle-hole (ph) coupled to vibration configurations. This allows a consistent comparison to the RTBA where ph⊗phonon coupling is responsible for the spreading width and considerable quenching of the GTR. Differences between the models and perspectives of their future developments are discussed.

  10. Superallowed Gamow-Teller decay of the doubly magic nucleus 100Sn.

    PubMed

    Hinke, C B; Böhmer, M; Boutachkov, P; Faestermann, T; Geissel, H; Gerl, J; Gernhäuser, R; Górska, M; Gottardo, A; Grawe, H; Grębosz, J L; Krücken, R; Kurz, N; Liu, Z; Maier, L; Nowacki, F; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Sieja, K; Steiger, K; Straub, K; Weick, H; Wollersheim, H-J; Woods, P J; Al-Dahan, N; Alkhomashi, N; Ataç, A; Blazhev, A; Braun, N F; Čeliković, I T; Davinson, T; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Doornenbal, P C; de France, G; Farrelly, G F; Farinon, F; Goel, N; Habermann, T C; Hoischen, R; Janik, R; Karny, M; Kaşkaş, A; Kojouharov, I M; Kröll, Th; Litvinov, Y; Myalski, S; Nebel, F; Nishimura, S; Nociforo, C; Nyberg, J; Parikh, A R; Procházka, A; Regan, P H; Rigollet, C; Schaffner, H; Scheidenberger, C; Schwertel, S; Söderström, P-A; Steer, S J; Stolz, A; Strmeň, P

    2012-06-20

    The shell structure of atomic nuclei is associated with 'magic numbers' and originates in the nearly independent motion of neutrons and protons in a mean potential generated by all nucleons. During β(+)-decay, a proton transforms into a neutron in a previously not fully occupied orbital, emitting a positron-neutrino pair with either parallel or antiparallel spins, in a Gamow-Teller or Fermi transition, respectively. The transition probability, or strength, of a Gamow-Teller transition depends sensitively on the underlying shell structure and is usually distributed among many states in the neighbouring nucleus. Here we report measurements of the half-life and decay energy for the decay of (100)Sn, the heaviest doubly magic nucleus with equal numbers of protons and neutrons. In the β-decay of (100)Sn, a large fraction of the strength is observable because of the large decay energy. We determine the largest Gamow-Teller strength so far measured in allowed nuclear β-decay, establishing the 'superallowed' nature of this Gamow-Teller transition. The large strength and the low-energy states in the daughter nucleus, (100)In, are well reproduced by modern, large-scale shell model calculations.

  11. Gamow-Teller transition strengths from 56Ni.

    PubMed

    Sasano, M; Perdikakis, G; Zegers, R G T; Austin, Sam M; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Caesar, C; Cole, A L; Deaven, J M; Ferrante, N; Guess, C J; Hitt, G W; Meharchand, R; Montes, F; Palardy, J; Prinke, A; Riley, L A; Sakai, H; Scott, M; Stolz, A; Valdez, L; Yako, K

    2011-11-11

    A new technique to measure (p,n) charge-exchange reactions in inverse kinematics at intermediate energies on unstable isotopes was successfully developed and used to study the (56)Ni(p,n) reaction at 110 MeV/u. Gamow-Teller transition strengths from (56)Ni leading to (56)Cu were obtained and compared with shell-model predictions in the pf shell using the KB3G and GXPF1A interactions. The calculations with the GXPF1A interaction reproduce the experimental strength distribution much better than the calculations that employed the KB3G interaction, indicating deficiencies in the spin-orbit and proton-neutron residual potentials for the latter. The results are important for improving the description of electron-capture rates on nuclei in the iron region, which are important for modeling the late evolution of core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae.

  12. Gamow-Teller response and its spreading mechanism in doubly magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y. F.; Colò, G.; Vigezzi, E.

    2014-11-01

    The scope of the paper is to apply a state-of-the-art beyond mean-field model to the description of the Gamow-Teller response in atomic nuclei. This topic recently attracted considerable renewed interest, due, in particular, to the possibility of performing experiments in unstable nuclei. We study the cases of 48Ca,78Ni,132Sn, and 208Pb. Our model is based on a fully self-consistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock plus random phase approximation. The same Skyrme interaction is used to calculate the coupling between particles and vibrations, which leads to the mixing of the Gamow-Teller resonance with a set of doorway states and to its fragmentation. We compare our results with available experimental data. The microscopic coupling mechanism is also discussed in some detail.

  13. Gamow-Teller strength in the beta decay of mirror nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkanen, J.; ńystö, J.; Koponen, V.; Taskinen, P.; Eskola, K.; Messelt, S.; Ogawa, K.

    1987-12-01

    Distribution of the Gamow-Teller strength has been studied both experimentally and theoretically in the f7/2 shell mirror nuclides over a wide energy range. Experimental studies were performed using light ion induced reactions and the He-jet transport method or the ion-guide on-line isotope separation, IGISOL. Several transitions were observed to excited states in the decays of 43Ti and 51Fe and some in the decays of 47Cr, 49Mn, 43Co and 55Ni. Theoretical calculations were made by a shell model code using fn7/2+(P3/2, f5/2, P1/2)1 shell space. The β-feeding has been predicted for all transitions up to about 4 MeV excitation in each daughter nucleus. The quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength has been studied by comparing the experimental strength with the calculation. The formation of the giant Gamow-Teller resonance has been studied theoretically as a function of the mass number.

  14. Probing Configuration Mixing in Be-12 with Gamow-Teller Transition Strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. A.; Howard, M. E.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Weisshaar, D.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel technique for studying the quenching of shell gaps in exotic isotopes. The method is based on extracting Gamow-Teller ({Delta}L = 0, {Delta}S = 1) transition strengths [B(GT)] to low-lying states from charge-exchange reactions at intermediate beam energies. These Gamow-Teller strengths are very sensitive to configuration mixing between cross-shell orbitals, and this technique thus provides an important complement to other tools currently used to study cross-shell mixing. This work focuses on the N = 8 shell gap. We populated the ground and 2.24 MeV 0{sup +} states in {sup 12}Be using the {sup 12}B(1{sup +}) ({sup 7}Li, {sup 7}Be) reaction at 80 MeV/u in inverse kinematics. Using the ground-state B(GT) value from {beta}-decay measurements (0.184 {+-} 0.007) as a calibration, the B(GT) for the transition to the second 0{sup +} state was determined to be 0.214 {+-} 0.051. Comparing the extracted Gamow-Teller strengths with shell-model calculations, it was determined that the wave functions of the first and second 0{sup +} states in {sup 12}Be are composed of 25 {+-} 5% and 60 {+-} 5% (0s){sup 4}(0p){sup 8} configurations, respectively.

  15. Probing configuration mixing in 12Be with Gamow-Teller transition strengths.

    PubMed

    Meharchand, R; Zegers, R G T; Brown, B A; Austin, Sam M; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Deaven, J; Gade, A; Grinyer, G F; Guess, C J; Howard, M E; Iwasaki, H; McDaniel, S; Meierbachtol, K; Perdikakis, G; Pereira, J; Prinke, A M; Ratkiewicz, A; Signoracci, A; Stroberg, S; Valdez, L; Voss, P; Walsh, K A; Weisshaar, D; Winkler, R

    2012-03-23

    We present a novel technique for studying the quenching of shell gaps in exotic isotopes. The method is based on extracting Gamow-Teller (ΔL=0, ΔS=1) transition strengths [B(GT)] to low-lying states from charge-exchange reactions at intermediate beam energies. These Gamow-Teller strengths are very sensitive to configuration mixing between cross-shell orbitals, and this technique thus provides an important complement to other tools currently used to study cross-shell mixing. This work focuses on the N=8 shell gap. We populated the ground and 2.24 MeV 0+ states in 12Be using the 12B(1+) (7Li, 7Be) reaction at 80  MeV/u in inverse kinematics. Using the ground-state B(GT) value from β-decay measurements (0.184±0.007) as a calibration, the B(GT) for the transition to the second 0+ state was determined to be 0.214±0.051. Comparing the extracted Gamow-Teller strengths with shell-model calculations, it was determined that the wave functions of the first and second 0+ states in 12Be are composed of 25±5% and 60±5% (0s)4(0p)8 configurations, respectively.

  16. Magnetic Dipole and Gamow-Teller Modes in Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions: Impact on Supernova Dynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Byelikov, A.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Fujita, H.; Heger, A.; Kolbe, E.; Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2006-03-13

    Some aspects of the importance of neutrino-induced reactions on nuclei within supernova physics are discussed. It is argued that important constraints on the experimentally unknown cross sections can be obtained from experimental studies of the nuclear response in selected cases. Examples are neutral-current induced reactions on fp-shell nuclei extracted from high-resolution inelastic electron scattering data providing the M1 strength distributions and the production of the exotic heavy, odd-odd nuclei 138La and 180Ta through charged-current reactions dominated by Gamow-Teller transitions. The Gamow-Teller strength can deduced from the (3He,t) charge-exchange reaction at zero degree.

  17. Gamow-Teller strength distributions for {beta}{beta}-decaying nuclei within continuum quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Urin, M. H.; Rodin, Vadim; Faessler, Amand

    2011-04-15

    An isospin-self-consistent pn-continuum-QRPA approach is formulated and applied to describe the Gamow-Teller strength distributions for {beta}{beta}-decaying open-shell nuclei. Calculation results obtained for the pairs of nuclei {sup 76}Ge-Se, {sup 100}Mo-Ru, {sup 116}Cd-Sn, and {sup 130}Te-Xe are compared with available experimental data.

  18. Sum rule study for double Gamow-Teller states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, H.; Uesaka, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the sum rules of double Gamow-Teller (DGT) excitations through double spin-isospin operator (σt-) 2. In general, 2+ states in the grand-daughter nuclei have dominant transition strength in DGT excitations and 0+ states are weak, except in T =1 mother nuclei in which 0+ strength is competitive with 2+ strength. The isospin selection of DGT is also discussed among five possible isospin states in grand-daughter nuclei. A possibility to extract the unit cross section for the DGT transition strength is pointed out in the (σt-) 2 excitation of double isobaric analog state (DIAS) in T =1 nuclei.

  19. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of ^{78}Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies.

    PubMed

    Madurga, M; Paulauskas, S V; Grzywacz, R; Miller, D; Bardayan, D W; Batchelder, J C; Brewer, N T; Cizewski, J A; Fijałkowska, A; Gross, C J; Howard, M E; Ilyushkin, S V; Manning, B; Matoš, M; Mendez, A J; Miernik, K; Padgett, S W; Peters, W A; Rasco, B C; Ratkiewicz, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Stracener, D W; Wang, E H; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Zganjar, E F

    2016-08-26

    The β-delayed neutron emission of ^{83,84}Ga isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to ^{78}Ni core-excited states in ^{83,84}Ge favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton fpg_{9/2} and neutron extended fpg_{9/2}+d_{5/2} valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β-decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β-decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β-delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  20. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of 78Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R.; Miller, D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Fijałkowska, A.; Gross, C. J.; Howard, M. E.; Ilyushkin, S. V.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Padgett, S. W.; Peters, W. A.; Rasco, B. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Stracener, D. W.; Wang, E. H.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    The β -delayed neutron emission of Ga,8483 isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to 78Ni core-excited states in Ge,8483 favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton f p g9 /2 and neutron extended f p g9 /2+d5 /2 valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β -decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β -decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β -delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  1. Ground state Gamow-Teller strength in sup 64 Ni(n,p) sup 64 Co

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, A.; Haight, R.C.; King, N.S.P.; Lisowski, P.W.; Sorenson, D.S.; Ullmann, J.L. ); Aslanoglou, X.; Finlay, R.W.; Park, B.K.; Rapaport, J. ); Brady, F.P.; Romero, J.L. ); Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W. )

    1991-01-01

    An important process occurring in presupernova stars is e{sup {minus}} capture on free protons and nuclei. As e{sup {minus}} capture and the charge exchange reaction (n,p) between same initial and final states are both T{sub 0} {yields} T{sub 0} + 1 transitions involving the same nuclear matrix element, the (n,p) reaction can be used to provide the input required to calculate e{sup {minus}} capture rates. Specifically, the e{sup {minus}} capture rate {lambda}{sup if} for a nucleus going from an initial state i to a final state f is proportional to the Gamow-Teller strength B{sup if}. Once B{sup if} for a particular transition is known, the corresponding e{sup {minus}} capture rate {lambda}{sup if} for that transition can be calculated. The unit cross section {cflx {sigma}}{sub GT}(E,A) relates B{sup if} to the zero degree differential cross section extrapolated to q = 0 for (n,p) or (p,n) reactions: {sigma}(q = 0) = {cflx {sigma}}(E,A)B{sup if}. As {cflx {sigma}}(E,A) has been seen to have a smooth A dependence, measurements of zero degree (n,p) cross sections for (fp) shell nuclei can be used to obtain B{sup if}, and thus {lambda}{sup if}, once a value for {cflx {sigma}}(E,A) in this mass region is known. The data presented here allow a value for {cflx {sigma}}{sub GT} in the (fp) shell to be calculated from the Gamow-Teller strength for the {beta}{sup {minus}} decay {sup 64}Co {yields} {sup 64}Ni + e{sup {minus}} + {bar {nu}}{sub e}. Since {sup 64}Co {beta}{sup {minus}} decay and the reaction {sup 64}Ni(n,p) {sup 64}Co have opposite initial and final states, detailed balance can be used to relate the Gamow-Teller strengths for the two processes: B{sup np} = 0.6228{sub {minus}.0369}{sup +.0328}. It is this value of B{sup np} together with the differential cross section measurements presented here for the reaction {sup 64}Ni(n,p) {sup 64}Co that allow {cflx {sigma}} to be calculated and thus a calibration point in the (fp) shell is established.

  2. Shell model description of Gamow-Teller strengths in pf-shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vikas; Srivastava, P. C.

    2016-06-01

    A systematic shell model description of the experimental Gamow-Teller transition strength distributions in 42Ti , 46Cr , 50Fe and 54Ni is presented. These transitions have been recently measured via β -decay of these T_z=-1 nuclei, produced in fragmentation reactions at GSI and also with (3He, t) charge-exchange (CE) reactions corresponding to T_z=+1 to T_z=0 carried out at RCNP-Osaka. The calculations are performed in the pf model space, using the GXPF1a and KB3G effective interactions. Qualitative agreement is obtained for the individual transitions, while the calculated summed transition strengths closely reproduce the observed ones.

  3. Projected shell model for Gamow-Teller transitions in heavy, deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-Jun; Sun, Yang; Gao, Zao-Chun; Kiran Ghorui, Surja

    2016-02-01

    Calculations of Gamow-Teller (GT) transition rates for heavy, deformed nuclei, which are useful input for nuclear astrophysics studies, are usually done with the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We propose a shell-model method by applying the Projected Shell Model (PSM) based on deformed bases. With this method, it is possible to perform a state-by-state calculation for nuclear matrix elements for β-decay and electron-capture in heavy nuclei. Taking β- decay from 168Dy to 168Ho as an example, we show that the known experimental B(GT) from the ground state of the mother nucleus to the low-lying states of the daughter nucleus could be well described. Moreover, strong transitions to high-lying states are predicted to occur, which may considerably enhance the total decay rates once these nuclei are exposed to hot stellar environments.

  4. Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} decay of deformed nuclei near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Frisk, F.; Hamamoto, I.; Zhang, X.Z. |

    1995-11-01

    Using a quasiparticle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) based on deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with Skyrme interactions, the distribution of the Gamow-Teller (GT) {beta}{sup +} decay strength is estimated for the HF local minima of even-even deformed nuclei near the proton drip line in the region of 28{lt}{ital Z}{lt}66. The distribution often depends sensitively on the nuclear shape (namely, oblate or prolate). In the region of {ital Z}{lt}50 the possibility of observing {beta}-delayed proton emission depends sensitively on the excess of {ital Z} over {ital Z}={ital N}. In the region of {ital Z}{gt}50 almost the entire estimated GT strength is found to lie below the ground states of the even-even mother nuclei, and the observation of the total GT strength by {beta}-delayed charged-particle(s) emission will be of essential importance.

  5. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-20

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from {sup 90}Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the {beta}{sub -} and the {beta}{sub +} channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L= 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  6. Impact of New Gamow-Teller Strengths on Explosive Type Ia Supernova Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kanji; Famiano, Michael A.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Toshio; Hidaka, Jun; Honma, Michio; Iwamoto, Koichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2016-12-01

    Recent experimental results have confirmed a possible reduction in the Gamow-Teller (GT+) strengths of pf-shell nuclei. These proton-rich nuclei are of relevance in the deflagration and explosive burning phases of SNe Ia. While prior GT strengths result in nucleosynthesis predictions with a lower-than-expected electron fraction, a reduction in the GT+ strength can result in a slightly increased electron fraction compared to previous shell model predictions, though the enhancement is not as large as previous enhancements in going from rates computed by Fuller, Fowler, and Newman based on an independent particle model. A shell model parametrization has been developed that more closely matches experimental GT strengths. The resultant electron-capture rates are used in nucleosynthesis calculations for carbon deflagration and explosion phases of SNe Ia, and the final mass fractions are compared to those obtained using more commonly used rates.

  7. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, T.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-01

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from 90Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the β- and the β+ channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L = 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  8. Gamow-Teller Transitions Starting from T{sub z} = +3/2 Nucleus {sup 47}Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Ganioglu, E.; Susoy, G.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Zenihiro, J.; Algora, A.; Estevez, E.; Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Csatlos, M.; Gulyas, J.

    2011-10-28

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are mediated by the {sigma}{tau} operator. Owing to its simplicity and also its spin-isospin nature, GT transitions play key roles in the studies of nuclear structure as well as astro-nuclear processes. In violent neutrino-induced reactions at the core-collapse stage of type II supernovae, Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions starting from stable as well as unstable pf-shell nuclei play important roles. We study GT transitions starting from {sup 47}Ti in a high-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0 deg. and at an intermediate incident energy of 140 MeV/nucleon at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka. Individual GT transitions up to high excitations were observed. Assuming the isospin symmetry for the strengths of T{sub z} = {+-}3/2{yields}{+-}1/2 analogous GT transitions, we can deduce the detailed strength distribution starting from mirror unstable nucleus {sup 47}Mn.

  9. Measurement of Gamow-Teller transitions from 56Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Masaki

    2011-10-01

    Electron-capture (EC) and β-decay play important roles in type-II and type-Ia supernovae. They occur through the Gamow-Teller (GT) and Fermi transitions in nuclei, which are extensively studied to reliably estimate the weak-interactions rates. Experimentally, a powerful probe to study GT transitions has been provided by the charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies such as the (p,n), (3He,t) rections. They can selectively excite the GT transitions in a wide excitation energy region. Until recently, such studies have been restricted to stable nuclei because of difficulties in inverse-kinematics measurements with rare isotope beams. In this talk, we present the first study with a rare isotope using the 56Ni(p,n)56Cu reaction at 110 MeV/u in inverse kinematics with a newly developed Low-Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) in combination with the S800 spectrometer. 56Ni is produced in large abundances during the pre-explosion phase of core-collapse supernovae and considered to be as one of the most important contributors to the change in the electron-to-baryon ratio in core-collapse supernovae. In addition, to study the GT transition in 56Ni serves as a stringent test of the effects of the N = Z = 28 core not being inert on GT transitions for a large number of nearby nuclei in the Fe region. This work is supported by the US NSF (PHY-0822648 (JINA) and PHY-0606007).

  10. Direct proton decay from the Gamow-Teller resonance in {sup 208}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Akimune, H.; Daito, I.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Greenfield, M.B.; Harakeh, M.N.; Inomata, T.; Jaenecke, J.; Katori, K.; Nakayama, S.; Sakai, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yosoi, M. ||||||||

    1995-08-01

    Spin-isospin excitations in {sup 208}Bi have been investigated using the {sup 208}Pb ({sup 3}He,{ital t}){sup 208}Bi reaction at near {theta}{approx}0{degree} at {ital E}({sup 3}He)=450 MeV. The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR), the isobaric analog state (IAS), and the spin-flip dipole ({Delta}{ital L}=1) resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been studied by observing their direct proton decays to the low-lying neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb. Decay protons were measured at backward angles in coincidence with tritons detected at and near 0{degree}. The total branching ratio for proton decay from the GTR is determined to be only 4.9{plus_minus}1.3%. The total branching ratio for proton decay from the SDR amounts to 14.1{plus_minus}4.2%. The deduced total widths as well as the total and partial proton escape widths of the GRR and IAS are found to be in reasonable agreement with recent theoretical estimates obtained in the framework of the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

  11. Gamow-Teller Strength in the A=14 Multiplet: A Challenge to the Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Negret, A; Adachi, T; Barrett, B R; Baumer, C; den Berg, A v; Berg, G; von Brentano, P; Frekers, D; De Frenne, D; Fujita, H; Fujita, K; Fujita, Y; Grewe, E; Haefner, P; Harakeh, M; Hatanaka, K; Heyde, K; Hunyadi, M; Jacobs, E; Kalmykov, Y; Korff, A; Nakanishi, K; Navratil, P; von Neumann-Cosel, P; Popescu, L; Rakers, S; Richter, A; Ryezayeva, N; Sakemi, Y; Schevchenko, A; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Uchida, M; Vary, J; Wortche, H; Yosoi, M; Zamick, L

    2006-08-07

    A new experimental approach to the famous problem of the anomalously slow Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in the {beta} decay of the A = 14 multiplet is presented. The GT strength distributions to excited states in {sup 14}C and {sup 14}O was studied in high-resolution (d,{sup 2}He) and ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions on {sup 14}N. No-core shell-model (NCSM) calculations capable of reproducing the suppression of the {beta} decays predict a selective excitation of J{sup {pi}} = 2{sup +} states. The experimental confirmation represents a validation of the assumptions about the underlying structure of the {sup 14}N ground state wave function. However, the fragmentation of the GT strength over three 2{sup +} final states remains a fundamental issue not explained by the present NCSM using a 6 {h_bar}{omega} model space, suggesting possibly the need to include cluster structure in these light nuclei in a consistent way.

  12. Gamow-Teller strength in the exotic odd-odd nuclei 138La and 180Ta and its relevance for neutrino nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Byelikov, A; Adachi, T; Fujita, H; Fujita, K; Fujita, Y; Hatanaka, K; Heger, A; Kalmykov, Y; Kawase, K; Langanke, K; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Nakanishi, K; von Neumann-Cosel, P; Neveling, R; Richter, A; Sakamoto, N; Sakemi, Y; Shevchenko, A; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Smit, F D; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Woosley, S E; Yosoi, M

    2007-02-23

    The Gamow-Teller strength distributions below the particle threshold in 138La and 180Ta, deduced from high-resolution measurements of the (3He,t) reaction at 0 degrees, allow us to evaluate the role of charged-current reactions for the production of these extremely rare nuclides in neutrino-nucleosynthesis models. The analysis suggests that essentially all 138La in the Universe can be made that way. Neutrino nucleosynthesis also contributes significantly to the abundance of 180Ta but the magnitude depends on the unknown branching ratio for population of the long-lived isomer.

  13. Gamow-Teller Strength in the Exotic Odd-Odd Nuclei {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and Its Relevance for Neutrino Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Byelikov, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Heger, A.

    2007-02-23

    The Gamow-Teller strength distributions below the particle threshold in {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta, deduced from high-resolution measurements of the ({sup 3}He,t) reaction at 0 deg., allow us to evaluate the role of charged-current reactions for the production of these extremely rare nuclides in neutrino-nucleosynthesis models. The analysis suggests that essentially all {sup 138}La in the Universe can be made that way. Neutrino nucleosynthesis also contributes significantly to the abundance of {sup 180}Ta but the magnitude depends on the unknown branching ratio for population of the long-lived isomer.

  14. Comparison of the pn quasiparticle RPA and shell model for Gamow-Teller beta and double-beta decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Brown, B. Alex

    1993-06-01

    We examine the validity of the pn quasiparticle RPA (pnQRPA) as a model for calculating β+ and 2νββ Gamow-Teller decays by making a comparison of the pnQRPA with a large-basis shell-model calculation within the 0f1p shell. We employ A=46 nuclei (those with six valence nucleons) for this comparison. Our comparison includes the decay matrix elements summed over final states, the strength distributions, and, for the first time, the coherent transition matrix elements (CTME). The pnQRPA overestimates the total β+ and 2νββ matrix elements. There are large differences in the shape of the spectra as well as in the CTME between the pnQRPA and shell-model results. Empirical improvements for the pnQRPA are discussed.

  15. Comparison of the [ital pn] quasiparticle RPA and shell model for Gamow-Teller beta and double-beta decays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Brown, B.A. )

    1993-06-01

    We examine the validity of the [ital pn] quasiparticle RPA ([ital pn]QRPA) as a model for calculating [beta][sup +] and 2[nu][beta][beta] Gamow-Teller decays by making a comparison of the [ital pn]QRPA with a large-basis shell-model calculation within the 0[ital f]1[ital p] shell. We employ [ital A]=46 nuclei (those with six valence nucleons) for this comparison. Our comparison includes the decay matrix elements summed over final states, the strength distributions, and, for the first time, the coherent transition matrix elements (CTME). The [ital pn]QRPA overestimates the total [beta][sup +] and 2[nu][beta][beta] matrix elements. There are large differences in the shape of the spectra as well as in the CTME between the [ital pn]QRPA and shell-model results. Empirical improvements for the [ital pn]QRPA are discussed.

  16. Gamow-Teller transitions to {sup 64}Cu measured with the {sup 64}Zn(t,{sup 3}He) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hitt, G. W.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Guess, C. J.; Austin, Sam M.; Galaviz, D.; Shimbara, Y.; Tur, C.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Horoi, M.; Howard, M. E.; Smith, E. E.; Rae, W. D. M.

    2009-07-15

    The {sup 64}Zn(t,{sup 3}He) reaction has been studied by using a secondary triton beam of 115 MeV/nucleon to extract the Gamow-Teller transition-strength distribution to {sup 64}Cu. The results were compared with shell-model calculations with the pf-shell effective interactions KB3G and GXPF1A and with existing data from the {sup 64}Zn(d,{sup 2}He) reaction. Whereas the experimental results exhibited good consistency, neither of the theoretical predictions managed to reproduce the data. The implications for electron-capture rates during late stellar evolution were investigated. The rates based on the theoretical strength distributions are lower by factors of 3.5-5 compared to the rates based on experimental strength distributions.

  17. Observations of the Gamow-Teller resonance in the rare-earth nuclei above 146Gd populated in β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nácher, E.; Rubio, B.; Algora, A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Taín, J. L.; Gadea, A.; Agramunt, J.; Gierlik, M.; Karny, M.; Janas, Z.; Roeckl, E.; Blazhev, A.; Collatz, R.; Döring, J.; Hellström, M.; Hu, Z.; Kirchner, R.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Shibata, M.; Rykaczewski, K.; Batist, L.; Moroz, F.; Wittmann, V.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    The rare-earth region of the nuclear table around the quasi-doubly magic nucleus 146Gd is one of the very few places in which the Gamow-Teller (GT) resonance can be populated in β decay. The appropriate technique to study such a phenomenon is total absorption spectroscopy, thanks to which one can measure the B (GT) distribution in β -decay experiments even when it is very fragmented and lies at high excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. Results on the GT resonance measured in the β decay of the odd-Z , N =83 nuclei 148Tb 150Ho, and 152Tm are presented in this work and compared with shell-model calculations. The tail of the resonance is clearly observed up to the limit imposed by the Q value. This observation is important in the context of the understanding of the "quenching" of the GT strength.

  18. Gamow-Teller strength and lepton captures rates on 66‑71Ni in stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    Charge-changing transitions play a significant role in stellar weak-decay processes. The fate of the massive stars is decided by these weak-decay rates including lepton (positron and electron) captures rates, which play a consequential role in the dynamics of core collapse. As per previous simulation results, weak interaction rates on nickel (Ni) isotopes have significant influence on the stellar core vis-à-vis controlling the lepton content of stellar matter throughout the silicon shell burning phases of high mass stars up to the presupernova stages. In this paper, we perform a microscopic calculation of Gamow-Teller (GT) charge-changing transitions, in the β-decay and electron capture (EC) directions, for neutron-rich Ni isotopes (66‑71Ni). We further compute the associated weak-decay rates for these selected Ni isotopes in stellar environment. The computations are accomplished by employing the deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) model. A recent study showed that the deformed pn-QRPA theory is well suited for the estimation of GT transitions. The astral weak-decay rates are determined over densities in the range of 10-1011g/cm3 and temperatures in the range of 0.01 × 109-30 × 109K. The calculated lepton capture rates are compared with the previous calculation of Pruet and Fuller (PF). The overall comparison demonstrates that, at low stellar densities and high temperatures, our EC rates are bigger by as much as two orders of magnitude. Our results show that, at higher temperatures, the lepton capture rates are the dominant mode for the stellar weak rates and the corresponding lepton emission rates may be neglected.

  19. Estimation of a 2p2h effect on Gamow-Teller transitions within the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two-particle two-hole (2p2h) effect on the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition for neutron-rich nuclei is studied by the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation (STDA) with the Skyrme interaction. Unstable 24O and 34Si and stable 48Ca nuclei are chosen to study the quenching and fragmentation of the GT strengths. Correlation of the 2p2h configurations causes about 20 % quenching and downward shift of GT giant resonances (GTGRs). The residual interaction changing relative angular momentum that appeared in the tensor force part gives a meaningful effect to the GT strength distributions. In this work, 17 - 26 % of the total GT strengths are brought to high-energy region above GTGRs. In particular, the tensor force brings strengths to high energy more than 50 MeV. STDA calculation within a small model space for 2p2h configuration is also performed and experimental data of 48Ca is reproduced reasonably.

  20. Observation of low- and high-energy Gamow-Teller phonon excitations in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Fujita, H; Adachi, T; Bai, C L; Algora, A; Berg, G P A; von Brentano, P; Colò, G; Csatlós, M; Deaven, J M; Estevez-Aguado, E; Fransen, C; De Frenne, D; Fujita, K; Ganioğlu, E; Guess, C J; Gulyás, J; Hatanaka, K; Hirota, K; Honma, M; Ishikawa, D; Jacobs, E; Krasznahorkay, A; Matsubara, H; Matsuyanagi, K; Meharchand, R; Molina, F; Muto, K; Nakanishi, K; Negret, A; Okamura, H; Ong, H J; Otsuka, T; Pietralla, N; Perdikakis, G; Popescu, L; Rubio, B; Sagawa, H; Sarriguren, P; Scholl, C; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Susoy, G; Suzuki, T; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Thies, J H; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M; Zegers, R G T; Zell, K O; Zenihiro, J

    2014-03-21

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in atomic nuclei are sensitive to both nuclear shell structure and effective residual interactions. The nuclear GT excitations were studied for the mass number A = 42, 46, 50, and 54 "f-shell" nuclei in ((3)He, t) charge-exchange reactions. In the (42)Ca → (42)Sc reaction, most of the GT strength is concentrated in the lowest excited state at 0.6 MeV, suggesting the existence of a low-energy GT phonon excitation. As A increases, a high-energy GT phonon excitation develops in the 6-11 MeV region. In the (54)Fe → (54)Co reaction, the high-energy GT phonon excitation mainly carries the GT strength. The existence of these two GT phonon excitations are attributed to the 2 fermionic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  1. Gamow-Teller Transitions in Stable and Unstable pf-shell Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Rubio, B.; Gelletly, W.

    2008-11-11

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions starting from stable as well as unstable pf-shell nuclei are of interest not only in nuclear physics, but also in astrophysics, e.g. in violent neutrino-induced reactions at the core-collapse stage of type II supernovae. In the {beta}-decay study of these pf-shell nuclei, half-lives can be measured rather accurately. On the other hand, in high-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0 deg., individual GT transitions up to high excitations can be studied. Assuming the isospin symmetry for the strengths of T{sub z} = {+-}1{yields}0 analogous GT transitions, we present a unique 'merged analysis' for the determination of absolute B(GT) values. This method can be applied not only to T = 1 systems, but also to higher T systems.

  2. Deformation signature from the Gamow-Teller decay of N=Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Miehe, Ch.; Dessagne, Ph.; Huck, A.; Knipper, A.; Marguier, G.; Longour, C.; Rauch, V.; Giovinazzo, J.; Borge, M. J. G.; Piqueras, I.; Tengblad, O.; Jokinen, A.; Ramdhane, M.

    1998-12-21

    The {sup 76}Sr (N=Z=38) and the {sup 72}Kr (N=Z=36) {beta}{sup +} EC decay have been studied at the CERN/ISOLDE PSB facility where their beta-gamma and delayed particle decay modes have been investigated. The established decay schemes yield new information on the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength spread over the J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +} states in the daughter nuclei. The delayed proton emission of an N=Z nucleus is observed for the first time in the case of {sup 76}Sr. The experimental GT strength intensities and distributions are discussed in the light of the theoretical estimates for oblate and prolate deformations.

  3. Neutron-Proton Pairing Effects on the Gamow-Teller Transitions in 24,26Mg by Using the Deformed QRPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Eunja; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    We investigated the effects of the neutron-proton (np) pairing correlations on the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition of 24,26Mg by taking into account the deformation. Our calculations is performed within the deformed quasi-particle random phase approximation (DQRPA) which explicitly includes the deformation at the BCS and RPA stage. In this work, we include the np pairing as well as the nn and pp paring correlations to the DQRPA. Our new formalism is applied to the GT transition of the well known deformed Mg isotopes. The np pairing effect is found to affect the GT distribution of 24Mg and 26Mg. Correlations between the deformation and the np pairing are also discussed with the comparison to the experimental GT transition data by triton and 3He beams.

  4. Gamow-Teller strength distribution in proton-rich nucleus 57Zn and its implications in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Rahman, Muneeb-Ur

    2011-04-01

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions play a preeminent role in the collapse of stellar core in the stages leading to a Type-II supernova. The microscopically calculated GT strength distributions from ground and excited states are used for the calculation of weak decay rates for the core-collapse supernova dynamics and for probing the concomitant nucleosynthesis problem. The B(GT) strength for 57Zn is calculated in the domain of proton-neutron Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. No experimental insertions were made (as usually made in other pn-QRPA calculations of B(GT) strength function) to check the performance of the model for proton-rich nuclei. The calculated B(GT) strength distribution is in good agreement with measurements and shows differences with the earlier reported shell model calculation. The pn-QRPA model reproduced the measured low-lying strength for 57Zn better in comparison to the KB3G interaction used in the large-scale shell model calculation. The stellar weak rates are sensitive to the location and structure of these low-lying states in daughter 57Cu. The structure of 57Cu plays a sumptuous role in the nucleosynthesis of proton-rich nuclei. The primary mechanism for producing such nuclei is the rp-process and is believed to be important in the dynamics of the collapsing supermassive stars. Small changes in the binding and excitation energies can lead to significant modifications of the predictions for the synthesis of proton rich isotopes. The β +-decay and electron capture (EC) rates on 57Zn are compared to the seminal work of Fuller, Fowler and Newman (FFN). The pn-QRPA calculated β +-decay rates are generally in good agreement with the FFN calculation. However at high stellar temperatures the calculated β +-decay rates are almost half of FFN rates. On the other hand, for rp-process conditions, the calculated electron capture ( β +-decay) rates are bigger than FFN rates by more than a factor 2 (1.5) and may have interesting

  5. Gamow-Teller Transitions Starting from T{sub z} = +3/2 Nucleus {sup 45}Sc

    SciTech Connect

    Susoy, G.; Ganioglu, E.; Oktem, Y.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Zenihiro, J.; Algora, A.; Estevez, E.; Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Csatlos, M.

    2011-10-28

    Owing to its simplicity and also its nature of spin-isospin ({sigma}{tau}) excitation, Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions play key roles in the studies of nuclear structure as well as astro-nuclear processes. We studied GT transitions starting from {sup 45}Sc in a high-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0 deg. and at an intermediate incoming energy of 140 MeV/nucleon. Individual GT transitions were observed up to high excitation energy of 10 MeV and a concentration of GT strength, a resonance-like structure, was observed at 6.5 MeV.

  6. Fine Structure of the Gamow-Teller Resonance in {sup 90}Nb and Level Density of 1{sup +} States

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Wambach, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Berg, G.P.A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, H.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-01-13

    The fine structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance in a medium-heavy nucleus is observed for the first time in a high-resolution {sup 90}Zr({sup 3}He,t){sup 90}Nb experiment at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Using a novel wavelet analysis technique, it is possible to extract characteristic energy scales and to quantify their relative importance for the generation of the fine structure. This method combined with the selectivity of the reaction permits an extraction of the level density of 1{sup +} states in {sup 90}Nb.

  7. High Resolution Charge Exchange Reaction and Analogous {beta}-decay for the Study of Gamow-Teller Transition Strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Rubio, B.

    2007-06-13

    Isospin symmetry is expected for the Tz = {+-}1 {yields} 0 isobaric analogous transitions in isobars with mass number A, where Tz is the z component of isospin T. Assuming this symmetry, strengths of analogous Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions within A = 50 isobars were determined from a high energy-resolution Tz = + 1 {yields} 0, 50Cr(3He,t)50Mn study at 0 deg. in combination with the decay Q-value and lifetime from the Tz = -1 {yields} 0, 50Fe{yields}50Mn {beta} decay. This method can be applied to other pf-shell nuclei and can be used to study GT strengths of astrophysical interest.

  8. Gamow-Teller transitions from Mg24 and their impact on the electron capture rates in the O+Ne+Mg cores of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Rahman, Muneeb-Ur

    2007-03-01

    Electron captures on nuclei play an important role in the collapse of stellar core in the stages leading to a type-II supernova. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g., 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br) were able to rekindle the interest in 8 10 M⊙ which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. We used the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory to calculate the B(GT) strength for Mg24 →Na24 and its associated electron capture rates for incorporation in simulation calculations. The calculated rates, in this article, have differences with the earlier reported shell model and Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (hereafter FN2) rates. We compared Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distribution functions and found fairly good agreement with experiment and shell model. However, the GT centroid and the total GT strength, which are useful in the calculation of electron capture rates in the core of massive presupernova stars, lead to the enhancement of our rate up to a factor of 4 compared to the shell model rates at high temperatures and densities.

  9. Effects of deformation and neutron-proton pairing on the Gamow-Teller transitions for Mg,2624 in a deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Eunja; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2016-11-01

    We investigate effects of neutron-proton (n p ) pairing correlations on the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition of Mg,2624 by explicitly taking into account deformation effects. Our calculation is performed by a deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation (DQRPA) which includes the deformation at the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer and RPA stage. In this paper, we include the n p pairing as well as neutron-neutron (n n ) and proton-proton (p p ) paring correlations to the DQRPA. Our new formalism is applied to the GT transition of well-known deformed Mg isotopes. The n p pairing effect is found to affect more or less the GT distribution of 24Mg and 26Mg. But the deformation effect turns out to be much larger than the n p paring effect because the Fermi surfaces smear more widely by the deformation rather than the n p pairing correlations. Correlations between the deformation and the n p pairing effects and their ambiguities are also discussed with the comparison to experimental GT strength data by triton and 3He beams.

  10. Hindered Gamow-Teller decay to the odd-odd N=Z (62)Ga: absence of proton-neutron T=0 condensate in A=62.

    PubMed

    Grodner, E; Gadea, A; Sarriguren, P; Lenzi, S M; Grebosz, J; Valiente-Dobón, J J; Algora, A; Górska, M; Regan, P H; Rudolph, D; de Angelis, G; Agramunt, J; Alkhomashi, N; Amon Susam, L; Bazzacco, D; Benlliure, J; Benzoni, G; Boutachkov, P; Bracco, A; Caceres, L; Cakirli, R B; Crespi, F C L; Domingo-Pardo, C; Doncel, M; Dombrádi, Zs; Doornenbal, P; Farnea, E; Ganioğlu, E; Gelletly, W; Gerl, J; Gottardo, A; Hüyük, T; Kurz, N; Leoni, S; Mengoni, D; Molina, F; Morales, A I; Orlandi, R; Oktem, Y; Page, R D; Perez, D; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Poves, A; Quintana, B; Rinta-Antila, S; Rubio, B; Nara Singh, B S; Steer, A N; Verma, S; Wadsworth, R; Wieland, O; Wollersheim, H J

    2014-08-29

    Search for a new kind of superfluidity built on collective proton-neutron pairs with aligned spin is performed studying the Gamow-Teller decay of the T=1, J(π)=0+ ground state of (62)Ge into excited states of the odd-odd N=Z nucleus (62)Ga. The experiment is performed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Shwerionenforshung with the (62)Ge ions selected by the fragment separator and implanted in a stack of Si-strip detectors, surrounded by the RISING Ge array. A half-life of T1/2=82.9(14)  ms is measured for the (62)Ge ground state. Six excited states of (62)Ga, populated below 2.5 MeV through Gamow-Teller transitions, are identified. Individual Gamow-Teller transition strengths agree well with theoretical predictions of the interacting shell model and the quasiparticle random phase approximation. The absence of any sizable low-lying Gamow-Teller strength in the reported beta-decay experiment supports the hypothesis of a negligible role of coherent T=0 proton-neutron correlations in (62)Ga.

  11. Comparative study of Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the odd-odd nucleus V50 and its impact on electron capture rates in astrophysical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Sajjad, Muhammad

    2007-11-01

    Gamow-Teller (GT) strength transitions are an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In addition to nuclear structure, GT transitions in nuclei directly affect the early phases of Type Ia and Type-II supernovae core collapse since the electron capture rates are partly determined by these GT transitions. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. Recent nucleosynthesis calculations show that odd-odd and odd-A nuclei cause the largest contribution in the rate of change of lepton-to-baryon ratio. In the present manuscript, we have calculated the GT strength distributions and electron capture rates for odd-odd nucleus V50 by using the pn-QRPA theory. At present V50 is the first experimentally available odd-odd nucleus in fp-shell nuclei. We also compare our GT strength distribution with the recently measured results of a V50(d, He2)Ti50 experiment, with the earlier work of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (referred to as FFN) and subsequently with the large-scale shell model calculations. One curious finding of the paper is that the Brink's hypothesis, usually employed in large-scale shell model calculations, is not a good approximation to use at least in the case of V50. SNe Ia model calculations performed using FFN rates result in overproduction of Ti50, and were brought to a much acceptable value by employing shell model results. It might be interesting to study how the composition of the ejecta using presently reported QRPA rates compare with the observed abundances.

  12. Observation of the β-delayed γ-proton decay of (56)Zn and its impact on the Gamow-Teller strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Orrigo, S E A; Rubio, B; Fujita, Y; Blank, B; Gelletly, W; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ascher, P; Bilgier, B; Cáceres, L; Cakirli, R B; Fujita, H; Ganioğlu, E; Gerbaux, M; Giovinazzo, J; Grévy, S; Kamalou, O; Kozer, H C; Kucuk, L; Kurtukian-Nieto, T; Molina, F; Popescu, L; Rogers, A M; Susoy, G; Stodel, C; Suzuki, T; Tamii, A; Thomas, J C

    2014-06-06

    We report the observation of a very exotic decay mode at the proton drip line, the β-delayed γ-proton decay, clearly seen in the β decay of the T_{z}=-2 nucleus ^{56}Zn. Three γ-proton sequences have been observed after the β decay. Here this decay mode, already observed in the sd shell, is seen for the first time in the fp shell. Both γ and proton decays have been taken into account in the estimation of the Fermi and Gamow-Teller strengths. Evidence for fragmentation of the Fermi strength due to strong isospin mixing is found.

  13. Study of Gamow-Teller transitions from 132Sn via the (p,n) reaction at 220 MeV/u in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, M.; Yasuda, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Baba, H.; Chao, W.; Dozono, M.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jhang, G.; Kamaeda, D.; Kubo, T.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Milman, E.; Motobayashi, T.; Otsu, H.; Panin, V.; Powell, W.; Sakai, H.; Sako, M.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Stuhl, L.; Suzuki, H.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Takeda, H.; Uesaka, T.; Yoneda, K.; Zenihiro, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Sumikama, T.; Tako, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.; Togano, Y.; Shikata, M.; Tsubota, J.; Yako, K.; Shimoura, K.; Ota, S.; Kawase, S.; Kubota, Y.; Takaki, M.; Michimasa, S.; Kisamori, K.; Lee, C. S.; Tokieda, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Koyama, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Wakasa, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Kaneko, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Mucher, D.; Reichert, S.; Bazin, D.; Lee, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    The charge-exchange (p,n) reaction at 220 MeV has been measured to extract the strength distribution of Gamow-Teller transitions from the doubly magic unstable nucleus 132Sn. A recently developed experimental technique of measuring the (p,n) reaction in inverse kinematics has been applied to the study of unstable nuclei in the mass region around A˜100 for the first time. We have combined the low-energy neutron detector WINDS and the SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory (RIBF). The particle identification plot for the reaction residues obtained by the spectrometer provides the clear separation of the CE reaction channel from other background events, enabling us to identify kinematic curves corresponding the (p, n) reaction. Further analysis to reconstruct the excitation energy spectrum is ongoing.

  14. Specificity of /sup 71/Ga(p,n)/sup 71/Ge at 35 MeV for Gamow-Teller strength

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A.J.; Weneser, J.; Brown, B.A.; Rapaport, J.

    1985-01-01

    The motivation for considering the /sup 71/Ga(p,n)/sup 71/Ge reaction is to help determine the properties of /sup 71/Ga as a detector of solar neutrinos. The proposed solar neutrino experiment, /sup 71/Ga(nu,e/sup -/)/sup 71/Ge, has a threshold of only .236 MeV, and is thus sensitive to neutrinos produced in the basic burning process in the sun p + p ..-->.. /sup 2/H + e/sup +/ + nu, which has a .420 MeV endpoint. The excitation of the (5/2)/sup -/ state at .175 MeV in /sup 71/Ge could be important, however. Were the Gamow-Teller (G-T) transition to the 175 keV state equal in strength to the ground state transition there would be approx. 25% added to the detector signal, the greater part of this coming from the /sup 7/Be neutrinos; the desired sensitivity to the p-p neutrinos would then be less.

  15. Gamow-Teller strengths in A=34 isobars: Comparison of the mirror transitions T{sub z}=+1{yields}0 and T{sub z}=-1{yields}0

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Botha, N. T.

    2007-05-15

    With a high energy-resolution of {delta}E=21 keV in the {sup 34}S({sup 3}He,t){sup 34}Cl measurement at 0 degree sign and at 140 MeV/nucleon, strengths of Fermi and Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions between T{sub z}=+1 and T{sub z}=0 states were studied, where T{sub z} is the z component of isospin T. The corresponding isospin-symmetric transitions connecting T{sub z}=-1 and T{sub z}=0 states can be studied in the {sup 34}Ar {beta}{sup +} decay. The strengths of corresponding GT transitions were compared up to the excitation energy (E{sub x}) of 3.1 MeV. A good agreement was observed for the two strong transitions to states around E{sub x}=3 MeV, while a disagreement of 40% was observed for a weaker transition to a low-lying state.

  16. High-resolution study of {sup 56}Fe{yields}{sup 56}Mn Gamow-Teller transition by the combined analysis of {sup 56}Fe({sup 3}He, t){sup 56}Co and 56Fe(P, p'){sup 56}Fe reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashimaa, M.; Shimbara, Y.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Matsubara, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Sakemic, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Botha, N. T.; Neveling, R.; Ganioglu, E.; Susoy, G.

    2010-08-12

    The Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in the {beta}{sup +}(electron capture) direction from the ground state of {sup 56}Fe to the excited states of {sup 56}Mn play an important role in the core collapse of presupernova. Assuming that isospin analogous transitions in isobars have corresponding strengths, we deduced these GT strengths by combining the results of the {sup 56}Fe(p, p'){sup 56}Fe experiment performed at 200 MeV and 0 deg. and the {sup 56}Fe({sup 3}He, t){sup 56}Co experiment in the {beta}{beta} direction at 140 MeV/u and 0 deg. The ground state of {sup 56}Fe has the isospin value of T = 2, while the GT states in {sup 56}Mn have T = 3. In order to identify the analogous T = 2{yields}3, GT transitions in the {sup 56}Fe(p, p'){sup 56}Fe and the {sup 56}Fe({sup 3}He, t){sup 56}Co measurements, we used the fact that the isospin Clebsch-Gordan (CG) coefficients for these T = 2{yields}3 transitions are different in these measurements. Then the GT transition strengths B(GT) in the {beta}{sup +} direction can be deduced from the B(GT) values of the corresponding transitions well determined in the {sup 56}Fe({sup 3}He, t){sup 56}Co measurement assuming the isospin symmetry and correcting the difference of CG coefficients.

  17. Bivariate distributions in statistical spectroscopy studies: IV. Interacting particle Gamow-Teller strength densities and β-decay rates of fp-shell nuclei for presupernova stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, V. K. B.; Majumdar, D.

    1995-12-01

    A method to calculate temperature dependent β-decay rates is developed by writing the expression for the rates explicitly in terms of bivariate GT strength densities ( I {/O H } ( GT)) for a given hamiltonian H=h+V and state densities of the parent nucleus besides having the usual phase space factors. The theory developed in the preceding paper (III) for constructing NIP strength densities is applied for generating I {/O h } ( GT) and then I {/O H } ( GT) is constructed using the bivariate convolution form I {/O H } ( GT)=Σ S I {/O(GT) h,S }⊗ρ{/O(GT) V, S }; BIV-G . The spreading bivariate Gaussian ρ{/O(GT) V}; BIV-G, for fp-shell nuclei, is constructed by assuming that the marginal centroids are zero, the marginal variances are same as the corresponding state density variances and fixing the bivariate correlation coefficientbar ζ using experimental β-decay half lifes. With the deduced values ofbar ζ bar ζ ˜ 0.67, β-S-decay rates for61,62Fe and62 64Co isotopes are calculated at presupernova matter densities ρ=107 109 gm/cc, temperatures T=(3 5)×109 ∘K and electron fractions Ye=0.43 0.5. The convolution form for I {O(GT)/ H } led to a simple expression for calculating GT non-energy weighted sum rule strength and it describes (within 10%) the shell model results of fp-shell nuclei.

  18. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Moller, Peter; Wilson, William B

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than in previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra agree reasonably well with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors.

  19. Shell-model calculations of beta-decay rates for s- and r-process nucleosyntheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Mathews, G. J.; Bloom, S. D.

    1985-10-01

    Examples of large-basis shell-model calculations of Gamow-Teller (BETA)-decay properties of specific interest in the astrophysical s- and r- processes are presented. Numerical results are given for: (1) the GT-matrix elements for the excited state decays of the unstable s-process nucleus Tc-99; and (2) the GT-strength function for the neutron-rich nucleus Cd-130, which lies on the r-process path. The results are discussed in conjunction with the astrophysics problems.

  20. Weak Interaction Rates of sd-SHELL Nuclei in Stellar Environments Calculated in the Proton-Neutron Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, J.-U.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.

    1999-03-01

    Allowed weak interaction rates for sd-shell nuclei in stellar environment are calculated using a generalized form of proton-neutron quasi-particle RPA model with separable Gamow-Teller forces. The calculated capture and decay rates take into consideration the latest experimental energy levels and ft-value compilations. Weak rates calculated are tabulated at the same points of density and temperature as those of Oda et al. [Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 56, 231 (1994)]. The results are also compared with earlier works. Particle emission processes from excited states, previously ignored, are taken into account and are found to significantly affect some β decay rates.

  1. The {sup 150}Nd({sup 3}He,t) and {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) reactions with applications to {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, C. J.; Brown, B. A.; Deaven, J. M.; Hitt, G. W.; Meharchand, R.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Zenihiro, J.; Akimune, H.; Algora, A.

    2011-06-15

    The {sup 150}Nd({sup 3}He,t) reaction at 140 MeV/u and {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) reaction at 115 MeV/u were measured, populating excited states in {sup 150}Pm. The transitions studied populate intermediate states of importance for the (neutrinoless) {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 150}Nd to {sup 150}Sm. Monopole and dipole contributions to the measured excitation-energy spectra were extracted by using multipole decomposition analyses. The experimental results were compared with theoretical calculations obtained within the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation, which is one of the main methods employed for estimating the half-life of the neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 150}Nd. The present results thus provide useful information on the neutrino responses for evaluating the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and 2{nu}{beta}{beta} matrix elements. The 2{nu}{beta}{beta} matrix element calculated from the Gamow-Teller transitions through the lowest 1{sup +} state in the intermediate nucleus is maximally about half that deduced from the half-life measured in 2{nu}{beta}{beta} direct counting experiments, and at least several transitions through 1{sup +} intermediate states in {sup 150}Pm are required to explain the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} half-life. Because Gamow-Teller transitions in the {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) experiment are strongly Pauli blocked, the extraction of Gamow-Teller strengths was complicated by the excitation of the 2({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}, {Delta}L=0, {Delta}S=1 isovector spin-flip giant monopole resonance (IVSGMR). However, the near absence of Gamow-Teller transition strength made it possible to cleanly identify this resonance, and the strength observed is consistent with the full exhaustion of the non-energy-weighted sum rule for the IVSGMR.

  2. Deducing the molecular properties of zwitterionic, protonated, deprotonated, and double-deprotonated forms of L-cysteine from vibrational spectroscopy (IR, Raman, VCD) and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Moreno, María Mar; Avilés-Moreno, Juan Ramón; Márquez-García, A A; López-González, Juan Jesús

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of L-cysteine (C3H7NO2S, (2R)-2-amino-3-sulfanylpropanoic acid) in water at different pH values was analyzed both experimentally and theoretically. The behavior was studied at pH values of 5.21 (at this pH, L-cysteine is a zwitterionic species), 1.00 (protonated species), 8.84 (monodeprotonated species), and 13.00 (dideprotonated species). We carried out a vibrational study using nonchiroptical (IR-Raman) and chiroptical (VCD) techniques complemented by quantum chemical calculations. We adopted a dual strategy, as follows. (i) The hybrid density functionals B3LYP and M062X and the ab initio MP2 method were employed, with the same 6-311++G (d,p) basis set, in order to characterize the relative energies and structures of an extensive set of conformers of L-cysteine. The presence of water was included by utilizing the IEF-PCM implicit solvation model. (ii) The vibrational analysis was made using a chirality-sensitive using a chirality-sensitive technique (VCD) and chirality-insensitive techniques (IR, including MIR and FIR, and Raman), especially in aqueous solution. The results obtained theoretically and experimentally were compared in order to deduce the most stable structures at each pH. Moreover, for the first time, the monodeprotonated anion of L-cysteine was detected in aqueous solution by means of IR, Raman and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). Finally, analysis of the low-frequency region using the IR and Raman techniques was shown to be a very important way to understanding the conformational preference of the zwitterionic species.

  3. Measurement of the Gamow-Teller Branching Ratio in the β-Decay of 21Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achouri, N. L.; Angélique, J.-C.; Ban, G.; Bastin, B.; Blank, B.; Dean, S.; Dendooven, P. G.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grévy, S.; Jungmann, K.; Laurent, B.; Liénard, E.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Orr, N. A.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Sohani, M.; Traykov, E.; Wilschut, H.

    2009-01-01

    The β-decay branching ratio of the GT transition in 21Na to the first excited state in 21Ne has been measured. The value obtained of 4.93(20)% is in agreement with the most recent measurement and with the value adopted so far. This confirms that the branching ratio is not the source of discrepancy in a previous measurement of β-v correlation coefficient which exhibited a 3σ difference with respect to the Standard Model prediction.

  4. New calculations of gross β-decay properties for astrophysical applications: Speeding-up the classical r process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Peter; Pfeiffer, Bernd; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig

    2003-05-01

    Recent compilations of experimental gross β-decay properties, i.e., half-lives (T1/2) and neutron-emission probabilities (Pn), are compared to improved global macroscopic-microscopic model predictions. The model combines calculations within the quasiparticle (QP) random-phase approximation for the Gamow-Teller (GT) part with an empirical spreading of the QP strength and the gross theory for the first-forbidden part of β- decay. Nuclear masses are either taken from the 1995 data compilation of Audi et al., when available, otherwise from the finite-range droplet model. Especially for spherical and neutron-(sub-)magic isotopes a considerable improvement compared to our earlier predictions for pure GT decay (ADNDT, 1997) is observed. T1/2 and Pn values up to the neutron drip line have been used in r-process calculations within the classical “waiting-point” approximation. With the new nuclear-physics input, a considerable speeding-up of the r-matter flow is observed, in particular at those r-abundance peaks which are related to magic neutron-shell closures.

  5. Measurement of the ground-state asymmetry parameter for the decay of sup 29 P

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    The ground state asymmetry parameter, A{sub gs}, was measured for the decay of polarized {sup 29}P. From A{sub gs} and the published value for ft{sub 1/2}, the decay's Fermi and Gamow-Teller strengths were deduced. Polarized {sup 29}P was produced by bombarding {sup 28}Si with 3.0 MeV vector polarized deuterons. A free standing wafer of pure natural abundance silicon crystal served as both target and host for the {sup 29}P. The target was heated to 140{degree}C and placed in a 1.0mT magnetic field to lengthen the polarization relaxation time. Positrons emitted in the decay were recorded by two detector telescopes placed at 0{degree}C and 180{degree} relative to the sample's polarization axis. A NaI detector, placed at 90{degree} was used to record gammas in coincidence with positrons, making it possible to simultaneously measure the asymmetries for both the ground state and excited state branches. The ground state asymmetry parameter, A{sub gs}, was deduced from these two asymmetries. The vector coupling constant, calculated form the measured Fermi strength, agrees with the predictions of CVC and with the accepted value for the Cabibbo angle. The measured Gamow-Teller strength agrees with recent calculations by Brown and Wildenthal, and disagree with earlier results of Azuelos and Kitching.

  6. Reinvestigation of the beta-decay of 110Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. C.; Dendooven, P.; Hankonen, S.; Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lhersonneau, G.; Nieminen, A.; Peräjärvi, K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Äystö, J.

    2004-01-01

    The beta-decay of the neutron-rich nucleus 110Mo, separated by the IGISOL on-line mass separator from other fission products, has been investigated by using beta-gamma and gamma-gamma coincidence techniques. The decay scheme of 110Mo has been revised, including 3 new excited states and 7 new γ transitions in 110Tc. The β -feedings were measured and log {ft} values and B(GT) values were deduced based on a Q_{β}-value from systematics. Three excited 1 + states in 110Tc fed by spin-flip allowed-unhindered beta transitions were identified. The deduced beta-decay strengths are compared with the Gamow-Teller strength distribution obtained from a macroscopic-microscopic calculation. The role of the asymptotic quantum numbers in the context of the allowed beta-decay is discussed.

  7. β decay of 129Cd and excited states in 129In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taprogge, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Grawe, H.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Xu, Z. Y.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gey, G.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jung, H. S.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Li, Z.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Vajta, Zs.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.; Benzoni, G.; Bönig, S.; Chae, K. Y.; Coraggio, L.; Covello, A.; Daugas, J.-M.; Drouet, F.; Gadea, A.; Gargano, A.; Ilieva, S.; Kondev, F. G.; Kröll, T.; Lane, G. J.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Mücher, D.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Wendt, A.

    2015-05-01

    The β decay of 129Cd, produced in the relativistic fission of a 238U beam, was experimentally studied at the RIBF facility at the RIKEN Nishina Center. From the γ radiation emitted after the β decays, a level scheme of 129In was established comprising 31 excited states and 69 γ -ray transitions. The experimentally determined level energies are compared to state-of-the-art shell-model calculations. The half-lives of the two β -decaying states in 129Cd were deduced and the β feeding to excited states in 129In were analyzed. It is found that, as in most cases in the Z <50 , N ≤82 region, both decays are dominated by the ν 0 g7 /2→π 0 g9 /2 Gamow-Teller transition, although the contribution of first-forbidden transitions cannot be neglected.

  8. General Constraints on Cross Sections Deduced from Surrogate Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W

    2003-08-14

    Cross sections that cannot be measured in the laboratory, e.g. because the target lifetime is too short, can be inferred indirectly from a different reaction forming the same compound system, but with a more accessible beam/target combination (the ''surrogate-reaction'' technique). The reactions share the same compound system and a common decay mechanism, but they involve different formation processes. Therefore, an implicit constraint is imposed on the inferred cross section deduced from the measured surrogate-reaction data, through the common decay mechanism. In this paper, the mathematical consequences of this implicit constraint are investigated. General formulas are derived from upper and lower bounds on the inferred cross section, estimated from surrogate data in a procedure which does not require any modeling of the common decay process. As an example, the formulas developed here are applied to the case of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section, deduced from {sup 234}U(t,pf) surrogate data. The calculated bounds are not very tight in this particular case. However, by introducing a few qualitative assumptions about the physics of the fission process, meaningful bounds on the deduced cross section are obtained. Upper and lower limits for the cross-section ratio of the (n,f) reaction on the {sup 235}U isomer at E{sub x} = 77 eV relative to the (n,f) reaction on the ground state are also calculated. The generalization of this technique to other surrogate reactions is discussed.

  9. Full 0ħω shell model calculation of the binding energies of the 1f7/2 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurier, E.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Nowacki, F.; Poves, A.; Retamosa, J.; Zuker, A. P.

    1999-04-01

    Binding energies and other global properties of nuclei in the middle of the pf shell, such as M1, E2, and Gamow-Teller sum rules, have been obtained using a new shell model code (NATHAN) written in quasispin formalism and using a j-j-coupled basis. An extensive comparison is made with the recently available shell model Monte Carlo results using the effective interaction KB3. The binding energies for nearly all the 1f7/2 nuclei are compared with the measured (and extrapolated) results.

  10. New analysis of 14O β decay: Branching ratios and conserved vector current consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towner, I. S.; Hardy, J. C.

    2005-11-01

    The ground-state Gamow-Teller transition in the decay of 14O is strongly hindered and the electron spectrum shape deviates markedly from the allowed shape. A reanalysis of the only available data on this spectrum changes the branching ratio assigned to this transition by seven standard deviations: Our new result is (0.54±0.02)%. The Kurie plot data from two earlier publications are also examined, and a revision to their published branching ratios is recommended. The required nuclear matrix elements are calculated with the shell model, and, for the first time, consistency is obtained between the M1 matrix element deduced from the analog γ transition in 14N and that deduced from the slope in the shape-correction function in the β transition, a requirement of the conserved-vector current hypothesis. This consistency is obtained, however, only if renormalized rather than free-nucleon operators are used in the shell-model calculations. In the mirror decay of 14C, a similar situation occurs. Consistency among the 14C lifetime, the slope of the shape-correction function, and the M1 matrix element from γ decay can be achieved only with renormalized operators in the shell-model calculation.

  11. Nuclear properties for astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Kratz, K.L.

    1994-09-23

    We tabulate the ground-state odd-proton and odd-neutron spins, proton and neutron pairing gaps, binding energies, neuton separation energies, quantities related to {beta}-delayed one, two and three neutron emission probabilities, {beta}-decay Q values and half-lives with respect to Gamow-Teller decay, proton separation energies, and {alpha}-decay Q values and half-lives. The starting point of the calculations is a calculation of nuclear ground-states and (information based on the finite-range droplet model and the folded-Yukawa single-particle model published in a previous issue of ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES. The {beta}-delayed neutron-emission probabilities and Gamow-Teller {beta}-decay rates are obtained from a QRPA model that uses single-particle levels and wave-functions at the calculated nuclear ground-state shape as the starting point.

  12. Neutrinoless double beta nuclear matrix elements around mass 80 in the nuclear shell-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, N.; Higashiyama, K.; Taguchi, D.; Teruya, E.

    2015-05-01

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. For theoretical nuclear physics it is particularly important to estimate three types of matrix elements, namely Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) matrix elements. In this paper, we carry out shell-model calculations and also pair-truncated shell-model calculations to check the model dependence in the case of mass A=82 nuclei.

  13. Effective gA in the pf shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Poves, A.; Caurier, E.; Zuker, A. P.

    1996-06-01

    We have calculated the Gamow-Teller matrix elements of 64 decays of nuclei in the mass range A=41-50. In all the cases the valence space of the full pf shell is used. Agreement with the experimental results demands the introduction of an average quenching factor q=0.744+/-0.015 slightly smaller but statistically compatible with the sd-shell value, thus indicating that the present number is close to the limit for large A.

  14. Beta-decay properties of 25 Si and 26 P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J.-C.; Achouri, L.; Äystö, J.; Béraud, R.; Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Dendooven, P.; Ensallem, A.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guillet, N.; Honkanen, J.; Jokinen, A.; Laird, A.; Lewitowicz, M.; Longour, C.; Oliveira Santos, F.; Peräjärvi, K.; Stanoiu, M.

    2004-09-01

    The β-decay properties of the neutron-deficient nuclei 25Si and 26P have been investigated at the GANIL/LISE3 facility by means of charged-particle and γ-ray spectroscopy. The decay schemes obtained and the Gamow-Teller strength distributions are compared to shell-model calculations based on the USD interaction. B(GT) values derived from the absolute measurement of the β-decay branching ratios give rise to a quenching factor of the Gamow-Teller strength of 0.6. A precise half-life of 43.7 (6) ms was determined for 26P, the β-(2)p decay mode of which is described.

  15. Deducing spectroscopic factors from wave-function asymptotics

    SciTech Connect

    Capel, P.; Danielewicz, P.; Nunes, F. M.

    2010-11-15

    In a coupled-channel model, we explore the effects of coupling between configurations on the radial behavior of the wave function and, in particular, on the spectroscopic factor (SF) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). We evaluate the extraction of a SF from the ratio of the ANC of the coupled-channel model to that of a single-particle approximation of the wave function. We perform this study within a core+n collective model, which includes two states of the core that connect by a rotational coupling. To get additional insights, we also use a simplified model that takes a {delta} function for the coupling potential. Calculations are performed for {sup 11}Be. Fair agreement is obtained between the SF inferred from the single-particle approximation and the one obtained within the coupled-channel models. Significant discrepancies are observed only for large coupling strength and/or large admixture, that is, a small SF. This suggests that reliable SFs can be deduced from the wave-function asymptotics when the structure is dominated by one configuration, that is, for a large SF.

  16. Finite pure integer programming algorithms employing only hyperspherically deduced cuts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Three algorithms are developed that may be based exclusively on hyperspherically deduced cuts. The algorithms only apply, therefore, to problems structured so that these cuts are valid. The algorithms are shown to be finite.

  17. Isospin and Spin-Isospin Modes in Charge-Exchange Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harakeh, M.N.; Akimune, H.; van den Berg, A.M.; Brandenburg, S.; Fujiwara, M.; Laurent, H.; Willis, A.; Zegers, R.G.T.

    1999-12-31

    The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been investigated in the {sup 208}Pb({sup 3}He,tp){sup 207}Pb reaction at E{sup 3}He=450 MeV and very forward scattering angles. The partial and total branching ratios and the escape widths for GTR and SDR decay to the residual neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb were deduced. These are found to be in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates. The ({sup 3}He,tp) reaction on Pb at E({sup 3}He)=177 MeV was also studied in order to locate isovector monopole strength corresponding to 2{Dirac_h}{omega} transitions. Monopole strength at excitation energies above 25 MeV was discovered and compared to calculated strength due to the isovector giant monopole resonance and the spin-flip isovector monopole resonance. Calculations in a normal-mode framework show that all isovector monopole strength can be accounted for if the branching ratio for decay by proton emission is 20%.

  18. Isospin and spin-isospin modes in charge-exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harakeh, M. N.; Berg, A. M. van den; Brandenburg, S.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Akimune, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Laurent, H.; Willis, A.

    1999-11-16

    The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been investigated in the {sup 208}Pb({sup 3}He,tp){sup 207}Pb reaction at E({sup 3}He)=450 MeV and very forward scattering angles. The partial and total branching ratios and the escape widths for GTR and SDR decay to the residual neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb were deduced. These are found to be in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates. The ({sup 3}He,tp) reaction on Pb at E({sup 3}He)=177 MeV was also studied in order to locate isovector monopole strength corresponding to 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} transitions. Monopole strength at excitation energies above 25 MeV was discovered and compared to calculated strength due to the isovector giant monopole resonance and the spin-flip isovector monopole resonance. Calculations in a normal-mode framework show that all isovector monopole strength can be accounted for if the branching ratio for decay by proton emission is 20%.

  19. β -decay rate of 59Fe in shell burning environment and its influence on the production of 60Fe in a massive star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. A.; Lam, Y. H.; Qi, C.; Tang, X. D.; Zhang, N. T.

    2016-12-01

    We deduced the stellar β -decay rate of 59Fe at typical carbon-shell burning temperature by taking the experimental Gamow-Teller transition strengths of the 59Fe excited states. The result is also compared with those derived from large-scale shell model calculations. The new rate is up to a factor of 2.5 lower than the theoretical rate of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (FFN) and up to a factor of 5 higher than decay rate of Langanke and Martínez-Pinedo (LMP) in the temperature region 0.5 ≤T ≤2 GK. We estimated the impact of the newly determined rate on the synthesis of cosmic γ emitter 60Fe in C-shell burning and explosive C/Ne burning using a one-zone model calculation. Our results show that 59Fe stellar β decay plays an important role in 60Fe nucleosynthesis, even though the uncertainty of the decay rate is rather large due to the error of B (GT) strengths.

  20. Deducing Reaction Mechanism: A Guide for Students, Researchers, and Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Simon J.; Pitman, Catherine L.; Miller, Alexander J. M.

    2016-01-01

    An introductory guide to deducing the mechanism of chemical reactions is presented. Following a typical workflow for probing reaction mechanism, the guide introduces a wide range of kinetic and mechanistic tools. In addition to serving as a broad introduction to mechanistic analysis for students and researchers, the guide has also been used by…

  1. Kinematics of ICMEs Deduced From Remote Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Low-frequency radio emissions, generated at the driven shock wave at the fundamental and harmonic of the plasma frequency, can directly reveal the kinematics of ICMEs as they propagate through the inner heliosphere. The reason is that the frequency of the radio emissions varies in a predictable way as a function of heliocentric distance. Hence, the observed frequency drift of these radio emissions is essentially a plot of the height above the Sun as a function of time. The derivative of the observed frequency-time curve at each point then gives the instantaneous speed of the propagating interplanetary shock. We have used these remote radio observations to determine the speed profiles for some 40 fast CMEs observed during solar cycle 23. The speed profiles for these fast ICMEs were found to imply an initial rapid deceleration at a constant rate, followed by a constant propagation speed to 1 AU (Reiner et al. ApJ 663, 1369, 2007), consistent with some earlier Doppler scintillation measurements (Woo et al., JGR 90, 154, 1985). Because of the large number of CME events for which this analysis was carried out, we were further able to study the correlations of the deceleration parameters of the ICME speed profiles. For most of those remote radio observations, there were no corresponding white-light observations beyond the 32 Rs (0.15 AU) limit of the LASCO coronagraph. After 2003, the all-sky camera SMEI permitted the first direct comparison between the remote radio and the white-light observations in interplanetary space (Reiner et al. JGR 110, A09S14, 2005). The STEREO spacecraft, launched in October of 2006, provide a new and unique opportunity to make direct comparisons between the radio and white-light observations of the ICME kinematics. The STEREO observations also allow the locations of the radio sources along the shock front to be directly deduced from two or three spacecraft triangulation measurement from STEREO and Wind (Reiner et al. Solar Physics 10.1007/s

  2. Advance of the perihelion of Mercury deduced from QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    I deduce the new gravitational formula from the variance in mass of QFT and GR (H05-0029-08, E15-0039 -08, E14-0032-08, D31-0054-10) in the partial differential: f (QFT) = f (GR) = delta∂ (m v)/delta∂ t = f _{P} + f _{C} , f _{P} = m delta∂ v / delta∂ t = - ( G m M /r (2) ) r / r, f _{C} = v delta∂ m / delta∂ t = - ( G m M / r (2) ) v / c (1), f (QFT) is the quasi-Casimir pressure of net virtual neutrinos nuν _{0} flux (after counteract contrary direction nuν _{0}). f (GR) is equivalent to Einstein’s equation, Eq. (1) is a new version of GR and can be solved exactly. Its core content is that the gravity produced by particles collide cannot linear addition, i.e., the nonlinearity of Einstein equation had been replaced by the nonlinearity caused by the variable mass in Eq.(1). Einstein equation can be inferred from Eq.(1) thereby from QFT, but QFT cannot be inferred from Eq.(1) or GR. f (QFT) is essential but f (GR) is phenomenological. Eq.(1) is obtained just by to absorb the essence of corpuscule collided gravitation origin ism proposed by Fatio in 1690 and 1920 Majorana’s experiment concept about gravitational shield effect again fuse with QFT. In my paper ‘QFT’S advance of the perihelion of Mercury, China Science &Technology Overview 125 88-90 (2011)’ QFT gravitational potential U = - G M /r is just the distribution density of net nuν _{0} flux, from SR we again get that: f (QFT) = f _{P} + f _{C}, f _{P} = - m ( delta∂ U / delta∂ r) r / r, f _{C} = - m ( delta∂U / delta∂ r) v / c (2), f _{ P} correspond the change rate of three-dimensional momentum p, f _{C} correspond the change rate of fourth dimensional momentum i m c which show directly as a dissipative force of mass change. According to Eq.(2) the circular motion is instability and elliptic motion is in the auto-stability state. In the fluctuation vacuum a particle with mass M neighbor another particle with mass m, the renormalization mass M and m will be less than that when

  3. Full pf shell model study of A=48 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurier, E.; Zuker, A. P.; Poves, A.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    1994-07-01

    Exact diagonalizations with a minimally modified realistic force lead to detailed agreement with measured level schemes and electromagnetic transitions in 48Ca, 48Sc, 48Ti, 48V, 48Cr, and 48Mn. Gamow-Teller strength functions are systematically calculated and reproduce the data to within the standard quenching factor. Their fine structure indicates that fragmentation makes much strength unobservable. As a by-product, the calculations suggest a microscopic description of the onset of rotational motion. The spectroscopic quality of the results provides strong arguments in favor of the general validity of monopole corrected realistic forces, which is discussed.

  4. Neutrinoless Double Beta Nuclear Matrix Elements Around Mass 80 in the Nuclear Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji; Taguchi, Daisuke; Teruya, Eri

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. In its theoretical nuclear side it is particularly important to estimate three types of nuclear matrix elements, namely, Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) types matrix elements. The shell model calculations and also the pair-truncated shell model calculations are carried out to check the model dependence on nuclear matrix elements. In this work the neutrinoless double-beta decay for mass A = 82 nuclei is studied. It is found that the matrix elements are quite sensitive to the ground state wavefunctions.

  5. Beta-decay rates: towards a self-consistent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Borzov, I. N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    1998-02-15

    An approximation to a self-consistent model of the ground state properties and spin-isospin excitations of neutron-rich nuclides is outlined. The structure of the Gamow-Teller strength functions in stable nuclei and short-lived nuclides undergoing high-energy {beta}-decay is discussed. The results of large-scale calculations of the {beta}-decay rates for spherical and slightly deformed nuclides of relevance to the r-process are analysed and compared with the results of existing global calculations.

  6. A major protein precursor of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) byssus: deduced sequence and significance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K E; Waite, J H

    1998-04-01

    The zebra mussel is a nonindigenous invader of North American lakes and rivers and one of the few freshwater bivalve molluscs having a byssus--a sclerotized organ used by the mussel for opportunistic attachment to hard surfaces. We have sequenced a foot-specific cDNA whose composite protein sequence was deduced from a series of overlapping but occasionally nonidentical cDNA fragments. The overall deduced sequence matches tryptic peptides from a major byssal precursor protein--Dreissena polymorpha foot protein 1 (Dpfp1). The calculated mass of Dpfp1 is 49 kDa; but this is known to be extensively hydroxylated and O-glycosylated during maturation. Purified native Dpfp1 analyzed using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry with time-of-flight indicates that the protein occurs as at least two size variants with masses of 48.6 and 54.5 kDa. In all probability, the sequence variants reported in this study are related to the larger mass variant. Dpfp1 has a block copolymer-like structure defined by two consensus motifs that are sharply segregated into domains. The N-terminal side of Dpfp1 has 22 tandem repeats of a heptapeptide consensus (P-[V/E]-Y-P-[T/S/delta]-[K/Q]-X); the C-terminal side has 16 repeats of a tridecapeptide motif (K-P-G-P-Y-D-Y-D-G-P-Y-D-K). Both consensus repeats are unique, with some limited homology to other proteins functioning in tension: marine mussel adhesives, plant extensins, titin, and trematode eggshell precursors.

  7. Empirical singular vectors of baroclinic flows deduced from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, Uwe; Hoff, Michael; Seelig, Torsten; Egbers, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Instability is related to exponentially growing eigenmodes. Interestingly, when finite time intervals are considered, growth rates of certain initial perturbations can exceed the growth rates of the most unstable modes. Moreover, even when all modes are damped, such particular initial perturbations can grow dramatically during finite time intervals. The perturbations with the largest growth rates are called singular vectors or optimal perturbations. They not only play an important role in atmospheric ensemble predictions, but also for the theory of instability and turbulence. Starting point for the singular vector analysis is a linear dynamical system with a known system matrix. In atmospheric ensemble prediction, linearization is generally done around a nonlinear solution and then the system matrix is time-dependent. In contrast, in turbulence research linearization is done around a mean state. In that case the system matrix is time-independent. We consider the mathematically simpler latter case here. We decompose surface temperature data of a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment into principal oscillation patterns, that are the empirically estimated linear eigenmodes of the system. Using these modes we can estimate the modes of maximal growth, which are thus the empirically estimated singular vectors. In contrast to the traditional approach we deduce these modes from the data alone without using a linear model operator and thus without actually knowing the system matrix (Penland and Sardeshmukh, 1995). In our study we will address the following questions: What is the appropriate filter technique to remove noise from the data prior to the empirical singular vector analysis? Is there an objective mean to distinguish between noise and signal? How accurate are the empirical singular vectors? To answer the last question we compare the data based results with findings from a numerical model for which the system matrix is known. We want to test the idea

  8. The solar neutrino capture cross section for 81Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.

    1981-09-01

    The solar neutrino capture rate for the reaction 81Br + νe --> 81Kr + e- is calculated for the standard solar and weak interaction models. The results show that the capture cross section is dominated by the lowest Gamow-Teller transition to the metastable 1/2- (0.190 MeV) state in 81Kr. As the inverse electron capture rate for this transition has been measured recently, one can then argue that the cross section is well determined experimentally. Thus uncertainties in nuclear physics should not be an obstacle to the recently proposed 81Br radiochemical measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino flux. Present address.

  9. Intermediate Nuclear Structure for 2v 2{beta} Decay of {sup 48}Ca Studied by (p, n) and (n, p) Reactions at 300 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, H.; Yako, K.

    2009-08-26

    Angular distributions of the double differential cross sections for the {sup 48}Ca(p,n) and the {sup 48}Ti(n,p) reactions were measured at 300 MeV. A multipole decomposition technique was applied to the spectra to extract the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition strengths. In the (n, p) spectrum beyond 8 MeV excitation energy extra B(GT{sup +}) strengths which are not predicted by the shell model calculation. This extra B(GT{sup +}) strengths significantly contribute to the nuclear matrix element of the 2v2{beta}-decay.

  10. ({sup 3}He,t) reaction on the double {beta} decay nucleus {sup 48}Ca and the importance of nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Grewe, E.-W.; Frekers, D.; Rakers, S.; Baeumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Thies, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Botha, N. T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Neveling, R.

    2007-11-15

    High-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) measurements on the double {beta}-decay ({beta}{beta}) nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been performed at RCNP (Osaka, Japan) to determine Gamow-Teller (GT{sup -}) transitions to the nucleus {sup 48}Sc, which represents the intermediate nucleus in the second-order perturbative description of the {beta}{beta} decay. At a bombarding energy of E{sub {sup 3}He}=420 MeV an excitation energy resolution of 40 keV was achieved. The measurements were performed at two angle positions of the Grand Raiden Spectrometer (GRS): 0 deg. and 2.5 deg. The results of both settings were combined to achieve angular distributions, by which the character of single transitions could be determined. To characterize the different multipoles, theoretical angular distributions for states with J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +},2{sup +},2{sup -}, and 3{sup +} were calculated using the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) Code DW81. The GT{sup -} strength was extracted up to E{sub x}=7 MeV and combined with corresponding GT{sup +} strength deduced from the {sup 48}Ti(d,{sup 2}He){sup 48}Sc data to calculate the low-energy part of the {beta}{beta}-decay matrix element for the {sup 48}Ca 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay. We show that after applying trivial momentum corrections to the ({sup 3}He,t) spectrum, the two reaction probes (p,n) and ({sup 3}He,t) reveal a spectral response to an impressively high degree of similarity in the region of low momentum transfer.

  11. Study of Weak Interactions with Beta-Alpha Angular Correlations and the Positive Beta Decay of NITROGEN-18 and OXYGEN-14.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Ana Maria

    1982-03-01

    (pi)-exchange NN interaction F(,(pi)). The resulting value, independent of the nuclear model, is F(,(pi)) = (0.4 (+OR -) 1.1) x 10('-6). In the second experiment the Gamow-Teller (beta) decay from the ('14)O O('+) ground state to the 3.948 MeV 1('+) level in ('14)N has been studied by observing (gamma) rays from the de-excitation of the 3.948 and 2.313 MeV levels in ('14)N. We measured a branching ratio of (5.28 (+OR-) 0.23) x 10('-4) relative to the superallowed Fermi decay to the 2.313 MeV level, and deduce ft = 1446 (+OR -) 63 sec. The corresponding Gamow-Teller transition strength is B(GT) = 2.73 (+OR-) 0.12. This value is about 40% lower than predicted by several widely used shell model calculations, and may suggest appreciable quenching by mesonic currents.

  12. Thin cirrus clouds - Seasonal distribution over oceans deduced from Nimbus-4 IRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Fraser, R. S.; Dalu, G.; Wu, Man-Li C.; Curran, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Spectral differences in the extinction of the 10.8- and 12.6-micron bands of the IR window region, due to optically thin clouds, were found in the measurements made by both an airborne broadband IR radiometer and the IR interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) aboard the Nimbus-4 satellite; the extinction at 12.6 microns was significantly larger than that at 10.8 microns; both water and ice particles in the clouds can account for such spectral difference in extinction. Multiple scattering radiative transfer calculations of IRIS data revealed this spectral feature about 100 to 20 km away from the high-altitude cold clouds; it is assumed that this feature is related to the spreading of cirrus clouds. Based on this assumption, mean seasonal maps of the distribution of thin cirrus clouds over the oceans were deduced from the IRIS data. The maps show that such clouds are often present over the convectively active areas, such as ITCZ, SPCZ, and the Bay of Bengal during the summer monsoon.

  13. On the strength of the hydrogen-carbon interaction as deduced from physisorption.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T X; Bae, J-S; Wang, Y; Bhatia, S K

    2009-04-21

    We deduce a new value for the potential well depth for the C-H2 interaction on the basis of experimental validations of isotherms of H2 and D2 predicted using independently characterized microstructural parameters. We use two carbons, one an activated carbon fiber whose structure has been recently characterized by us (Nguyen, T. X.; cohaut, N.; Bae, J.-S.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2008, 24, 7912) using hybrid reverse Monte Carlo simulation (HRMC) and the other the commercial Takeda 3A carbon molecular sieve whose pore size distribution is determined here from the 273 K CO2 adsorption isotherm. The conventional grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation technique incorporating a semiclassical Feynman and Hibbs (FH) potential approximation (FHGCMC) as well as path integral Monte Carlo calculations is employed to determine theoretical adsorption isotherms. It is found that curvature enhances the well depth for the LJ C-H2 interaction by a factor of 1.134 over that for a flat graphite surface, consistent with our recent study (Nguyen, T. X.; cohaut, N.; Bae, J.-S.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2008, 24, 7912). A value of the C-C well depth of 37.26 K, used for estimating the C-H2 well depth in conjunction with the Berthelot rules, with the Steele C-C well depth used for interaction with heavier gases (Ar, CO2 and CH4), leads to excellent agreement with experimental isotherms in all cases.

  14. Using Bayesian Evidence to Deduce the Dust-Attenuation Law at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Brett W.; Papovich, Casey J.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Closson Ferguson, Henry; Long, James; CANDELS

    2016-01-01

    Although the nature of dust attenuation affects nearly all aspects of galaxy evolution, very little is known about the form of the dust-attenuation law in the distant Universe. Dust enshrouds and obscures UV star formation, convoluting our understanding of galaxy evolution at high redshift. Recent literature has recognized how the inferred physical properties of distant galaxies can be influenced by the non-universality of their attenuation curve shape. In this talk, I will present a Bayesian method to quantitatively constrain the dust-attenuation curve in high-redshift star-forming galaxies. This method is tested on galaxies at z~2 where we have CANDELS UV-to-optical photometry and Spitzer/Herschel IR luminosities. We find that the dust law implied from using only UV/optical data to calculate the full posterior probability densities supports the observed IR luminosities as predicted by that dust law. This method shows promise to deduce the shape of the attenuation curve at higher redshifts (z>4), as supported by our experiments using mock data from a semi-analytic model with qualities like those of the CANDELS GOODS fields.

  15. New evidence for the antiquity of man in North America deduced from aspartic acid racemization.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Schroeder, R A; Carter, G F

    1974-05-17

    Ages of several Californzia Paleo-Indlian skeletons have been deduced from the extent of aspartic acid racemization. These dates suggest that man was present in North America at least 50,000 years before the present.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of neutron-deficient light nuclei: decay properties of 21Mg, 25Si and 26P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J.-C.; Achouri, L.; ńystö, J.; Béraud, R.; Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Dendooven, P.; Ensallem, A.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guillet, N.; Honkanen, J.; Jokinen, A.; Laird, A.; Lewitowicz, M.; Longour, C.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Stanoiu, M.

    2003-09-01

    Neutron-deficient nuclei with Tz equals to -3/2 and -2 have been produced at the GANIL/LISE3 facility in fragmentation reactions of a 95 MeV/u 36Ar primary beam in a 12C target. For the first time, β-delayed proton and β-γ emission has been simultaneously observed in the decay of 21Mg, 25Si and 26P. The decay scheme of the latter is proposed and the Gamow-Teller strength distribution in its β decay is compared to shell-model calculations based on the USD interaction. The B(GT) values derived from the absolute measurement of the β-branching ratios are in agreement with the quenching factor of about 60% obtained for allowed Gamow-Teller transitions in this mass region. A precise half-life of 43.7 (6) ms was determined for 26P, the β-2p emission of which was studied. The expected contribution of spectroscopic studies of neutron-rich nuclei is discussed with respect to the mirror asymmetry phenomenon occuring in analogous β decays.

  17. CONSISTENT USE OF THE KALMAN FILTER IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS (CTMS) FOR DEDUCING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past research has shown that emissions can be deduced using observed concentrations of a chemical, a Chemical Transport Model (CTM), and the Kalman filter in an inverse modeling application. An expression was derived for the relationship between the "observable" (i.e., the con...

  18. A blind trial evaluation of a crime scene methodology for deducing impact velocity and droplet size from circular bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Hulse-Smith, Lee; Illes, Mike

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, mechanical engineering models were utilized to deduce impact velocity and droplet volume of circular bloodstains by measuring stain diameter and counting spines radiating from their outer edge. A blind trial study was subsequently undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of this technique, using an applied, crime scene methodology. Calculations from bloodstains produced on paper, drywall, and wood were used to derive surface-specific equations to predict 39 unknown mock crime scene bloodstains created over a range of impact velocities (2.2-5.7 m/sec) and droplet volumes (12-45 microL). Strong correlations were found between expected and observed results, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.83 and 0.99. The 95% confidence limit associated with predictions of impact velocity and droplet volume was calculated for paper (0.28 m/sec, 1.7 microL), drywall (0.37 m/sec, 1.7 microL), and wood (0.65 m/sec, 5.2 microL).

  19. Confidence envelop of the global MSL time series deduced from TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2 altimeter missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeais, JeanFrancois; Ablain, Michael; Zawadzki, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    With the satellite altimetry missions, the global mean sea level (GMSL) has been calculated on a continual basis since January 1993. 'Verification' phases, during which the satellites follow each other in close succession (TOPEX/Poseidon--Jason-1, then Jason-1--Jason-2), help to link up these different missions by precisely determining any bias between them. The global mean sea level (MSL) deduced from these 3 altimetric missions provides a global rate of 3.2 mm from 1993 to 2013 applying the post glacial rebound (MSL AVISO website http://www.jason.oceanobs.com/msl). Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative program, the users requirements have been collected and for the users of the Sea Level ECV, it is crucial to know as much as possible the errors impacting the MSL calculation in order to analyze the MSL variations and in fine to interpret correctly the geophysical mechanisms underlying these variations. The characterization of these errors was performed over the whole altimetric period separating several time scales as the long-term evolution (mean sea level trend), but also the inter-annual and periodic signals. However, it will also be very useful to provide the confidence envelop (or error envelop) of the global MSL time series in order to know the exact error level at each time step. In this paper, we propose to describe in details the approach developed to compute this confidence envelop. We will also present the results obtained and how to interpret them.

  20. The DEDUCE Guided Query Tool: Providing Simplified Access to Clinical Data for Research and Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Monica M.; Winfield, Stephanie; Evans, Steve; Slopek, Steve; Shang, Howard; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    In many healthcare organizations, comparative effectiveness research and quality improvement (QI) investigations are hampered by a lack of access to data created as a byproduct of patient care. Data collection often hinges upon either manual chart review or ad hoc requests to technical experts who support legacy clinical systems. In order to facilitate this needed capacity for data exploration at our institution (Duke University Health System), we have designed and deployed a robust Web application for cohort identification and data extraction—the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE). DEDUCE is envisioned as a simple, web-based environment that allows investigators access to administrative, financial, and clinical information generated during patient care. By using business intelligence tools to create a view into Duke Medicine's enterprise data warehouse, DEDUCE provides a guided query functionality using a wizard-like interface that lets users filter through millions of clinical records, explore aggregate reports, and, export extracts. Researchers and QI specialists can obtain detailed patient- and observation-level extracts without needing to understand structured query language or the underlying database model. Developers designing such tools must devote sufficient training and develop application safeguards to ensure that patient-centered clinical researchers understand when observation-level extracts should be used. This may mitigate the risk of data being misunderstood and consequently used in an improper fashion. PMID:21130181

  1. The DEDUCE Guided Query tool: providing simplified access to clinical data for research and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Monica M; Winfield, Stephanie; Evans, Steve; Slopek, Steve; Shang, Howard; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    In many healthcare organizations, comparative effectiveness research and quality improvement (QI) investigations are hampered by a lack of access to data created as a byproduct of patient care. Data collection often hinges upon either manual chart review or ad hoc requests to technical experts who support legacy clinical systems. In order to facilitate this needed capacity for data exploration at our institution (Duke University Health System), we have designed and deployed a robust Web application for cohort identification and data extraction--the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE). DEDUCE is envisioned as a simple, web-based environment that allows investigators access to administrative, financial, and clinical information generated during patient care. By using business intelligence tools to create a view into Duke Medicine's enterprise data warehouse, DEDUCE provides a Guided Query functionality using a wizard-like interface that lets users filter through millions of clinical records, explore aggregate reports, and, export extracts. Researchers and QI specialists can obtain detailed patient- and observation-level extracts without needing to understand structured query language or the underlying database model. Developers designing such tools must devote sufficient training and develop application safeguards to ensure that patient-centered clinical researchers understand when observation-level extracts should be used. This may mitigate the risk of data being misunderstood and consequently used in an improper fashion.

  2. Bolus calculators.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    Matching meal insulin to carbohydrate intake, blood glucose, and activity level is recommended in type 1 diabetes management. Calculating an appropriate insulin bolus size several times per day is, however, challenging and resource demanding. Accordingly, there is a need for bolus calculators to support patients in insulin treatment decisions. Currently, bolus calculators are available integrated in insulin pumps, as stand-alone devices and in the form of software applications that can be downloaded to, for example, smartphones. Functionality and complexity of bolus calculators vary greatly, and the few handfuls of published bolus calculator studies are heterogeneous with regard to study design, intervention, duration, and outcome measures. Furthermore, many factors unrelated to the specific device affect outcomes from bolus calculator use and therefore bolus calculator study comparisons should be conducted cautiously. Despite these reservations, there seems to be increasing evidence that bolus calculators may improve glycemic control and treatment satisfaction in patients who use the devices actively and as intended.

  3. Estimation of uncertainty in isotherms deduced from Hugoniots resulting from shockwave generated defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of how defect concentrations produced in a shock experiment affect the isothermal equation of state is considered. From the few experimental results available that bear directly on this question, it appears the effect could be substantial, i.e., the pressure in material free of defects may be 10-25% lower at a given volume than the isothermal pressure deduced from Hugoniot data on the assumption that defects are negligible in the shocked material. This correction caused by the presence of defects is called the defect pressure.

  4. Deducing nanopore structure and growth mechanisms in porogen-templated silsesquioxane thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hua-Gen; Vallery, Richard S.; Liu, Ming; Frieze, William E.; Gidley, David W.; Yim, Jin-Heong; Jeong, Hyun-Dam; Kim, Jongmin

    2005-10-01

    Adjusting the functional group of a porogen is found to have a tremendous effect on the pore structre of porous low dielectric constant films with silsesquioxane as the matrix precursor. The pore size and interconnection length measured by positronium annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be used to deduce the pore shape and its evolution with porosity from templates of isolated porogen molecules through film percolation. Inert, self-linkable, and amphiphilic porogens are demonstrated to randomly aggregate three-dimensionally, linearly polymerize, and form micelles, respectively.

  5. What are the causes for the spread of GLE parameters deduced from NM data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bütikofer, R.; Flückiger, E.

    2015-08-01

    Investigations have shown that the analysis results of ground level enhancements (GLEs) based on neutron monitor (NM) data for a selected event can differ considerably depending the procedure used. This may have significant consequences e.g. for the assessment of radiation doses at flight altitudes. The reasons for the spread of the GLE parameters deduced from NM data can be manifold and are at present unclear. They include differences in specific properties of the various analysis procedures (e.g. NM response functions, different ways in taking into account the dynamics of the Earth's magnetospheric field), different characterisations of the solar particle flux near Earth as well as the specific selection of NM stations used for the analysis. In the present paper we quantitatively investigate this problem for a time interval during the maximum phase of the GLE on 13 December 2006. We present and discuss the changes in the resulting GLE parameters when using different NM response functions, different model representations of the Earth's magnetospheric field as well as different assumptions for the solar particle spectrum and pitch angle distribution near Earth. The results of the study are expected to yield a basis for the reduction in the spread of the GLE parameters deduced from NM data.

  6. Near-Surface Flow Fields Deduced Using Correlation Tracking and Time-Distance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeRosa, Marc; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Toomre, Juri

    1999-01-01

    Near-photospheric flow fields on the Sun are deduced using two independent methods applied to the same time series of velocity images observed by SOI-MDI on SOHO. Differences in travel times between f modes entering and leaving each pixel measured using time-distance helioseismology are used to determine sites of supergranular outflows. Alternatively, correlation tracking analysis of mesogranular scales of motion applied to the same time series is used to deduce the near-surface flow field. These two approaches provide the means to assess the patterns and evolution of horizontal flows on supergranular scales even near disk center, which is not feasible with direct line-of-sight Doppler measurements. We find that the locations of the supergranular outflows seen in flow fields generated from correlation tracking coincide well with the locations of the outflows determined from the time-distance analysis, with a mean correlation coefficient after smoothing of bar-r(sub s) = 0.840. Near-surface velocity field measurements can used to study the evolution of the supergranular network, as merging and splitting events are observed to occur in these images. The data consist of one 2048-minute time series of high-resolution (0.6" pixels) line-of-sight velocity images taken by MDI on 1997 January 16-18 at a cadence of one minute.

  7. Deducing the Kinetics of Protein Synthesis In Vivo from the Transition Rates Measured In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rudorf, Sophia; Thommen, Michael; Rodnina, Marina V.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The molecular machinery of life relies on complex multistep processes that involve numerous individual transitions, such as molecular association and dissociation steps, chemical reactions, and mechanical movements. The corresponding transition rates can be typically measured in vitro but not in vivo. Here, we develop a general method to deduce the in-vivo rates from their in-vitro values. The method has two basic components. First, we introduce the kinetic distance, a new concept by which we can quantitatively compare the kinetics of a multistep process in different environments. The kinetic distance depends logarithmically on the transition rates and can be interpreted in terms of the underlying free energy barriers. Second, we minimize the kinetic distance between the in-vitro and the in-vivo process, imposing the constraint that the deduced rates reproduce a known global property such as the overall in-vivo speed. In order to demonstrate the predictive power of our method, we apply it to protein synthesis by ribosomes, a key process of gene expression. We describe the latter process by a codon-specific Markov model with three reaction pathways, corresponding to the initial binding of cognate, near-cognate, and non-cognate tRNA, for which we determine all individual transition rates in vitro. We then predict the in-vivo rates by the constrained minimization procedure and validate these rates by three independent sets of in-vivo data, obtained for codon-dependent translation speeds, codon-specific translation dynamics, and missense error frequencies. In all cases, we find good agreement between theory and experiment without adjusting any fit parameter. The deduced in-vivo rates lead to smaller error frequencies than the known in-vitro rates, primarily by an improved initial selection of tRNA. The method introduced here is relatively simple from a computational point of view and can be applied to any biomolecular process, for which we have detailed information

  8. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave

    PubMed Central

    Arman, Samuel D.; Prideaux, Gavin J.

    2016-01-01

    The marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, was the largest-ever marsupial carnivore, and is one of the most iconic extinct Australian vertebrates. With a highly-specialised dentition, powerful forelimbs and a robust build, its overall morphology is not approached by any other mammal. However, despite >150 years of attention, fundamental aspects of its biology remain unresolved. Here we analyse an assemblage of claw marks preserved on surfaces in a cave and deduce that they were generated by marsupial lions. The distribution and skewed size range of claw marks within the cave elucidate two key aspects of marsupial lion biology: they were excellent climbers and reared young in caves. Scrutiny of >10,000 co-located Pleistocene bones reveals few if any marsupial lion tooth marks, which dovetails with the morphology-based interpretation of the species as a flesh specialist. PMID:26876952

  9. An asymmetric color image encryption method by using deduced gyrator transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lili; Yuan, Caojin; Qiang, Junjie; Feng, Shaotong; Nie, Shouping

    2017-02-01

    An encryption algorithm is proposed by using the properties of deduced gyrator transform (GT). After being transformed by the GT algorithm and multiplied by a phase distribution p*, the spectrum modulus of the input image is considered to be the encrypted image by further performing Fourier transformation. To resist the attack from iterative phase retrieval, the red, green and blue components of the input image is modulated by a random phase mask and then combined using convolution. The encryption result is real-valued, which is convenient for display, transmission and storage. In the decryption process, the three original color components can be recovered with decryption keys which are different from the encryption keys. An optoelectronic hybrid system for the encryption process is also presented. Computer simulations are presented to demonstrate its performance, and the security of the proposed system is analyzed as well.

  10. Martian low-altitude magnetic topology deduced from MAVEN/SWEA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui; Mitchell, David; Liemohn, Michael; Fang, Xiaohua; Ma, Yingjuan; Luhmann, Janet; Brain, David; Steckiewicz, Morgane; Mazelle, Christian; Connerney, Jack; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission for the first time make regular particle and field measurements down to ~150 km altitude. The Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) instrument provides 3-D measurements of the electron energy and angular distributions. This study presents the pitch angle-resolved shape parameters that can separate photoelectrons from solar wind electrons, therefore used to deduce the Martian magnetic topology. The three-dimensional view of the magnetic topology is manifested for the first time. The northern hemisphere is found to be dominated by the crustal closed field lines, instead of draped interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF), on the dayside and more day-night connections through cross-terminator closed field lines than in the south. This study can also single out open field lines attached to the dayside ionosphere, which provide possible passage for ion outflow. Magnetic topology governs energetic electrons' movement, thus necessary to understand nightside ionosphere, and aurora.

  11. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of a new subtilisin from an alkaliphilic Bacillus isolate.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Katsuhisa; Magallones, Marietta V; Takimura, Yasushi; Hatada, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kawai, Shuji; Ito, Susumu

    2003-10-01

    The gene for a new subtilisin from the alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. KSM-LD1 was cloned and sequenced. The open reading frame of the gene encoded a 97 amino-acid prepro-peptide plus a 307 amino-acid mature enzyme that contained a possible catalytic triad of residues, Asp32, His66, and Ser224. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature enzyme (LD1) showed approximately 65% identity to those of subtilisins SprC and SprD from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. LG12. The amino acid sequence identities of LD1 to those of previously reported true subtilisins and high-alkaline proteases were below 60%. LD1 was characteristically stable during incubation with surfactants and chemical oxidants. Interestingly, an oxidizable Met residue is located next to the catalytic Ser224 of the enzyme as in the cases of the oxidation-susceptible subtilisins reported to date.

  12. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave.

    PubMed

    Arman, Samuel D; Prideaux, Gavin J

    2016-02-15

    The marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, was the largest-ever marsupial carnivore, and is one of the most iconic extinct Australian vertebrates. With a highly-specialised dentition, powerful forelimbs and a robust build, its overall morphology is not approached by any other mammal. However, despite >150 years of attention, fundamental aspects of its biology remain unresolved. Here we analyse an assemblage of claw marks preserved on surfaces in a cave and deduce that they were generated by marsupial lions. The distribution and skewed size range of claw marks within the cave elucidate two key aspects of marsupial lion biology: they were excellent climbers and reared young in caves. Scrutiny of >10,000 co-located Pleistocene bones reveals few if any marsupial lion tooth marks, which dovetails with the morphology-based interpretation of the species as a flesh specialist.

  13. Temperature structure of active regions deduced from helium-like sulphur lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hara, Hirohisa; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Hiei, Eijiro; Bentley, Robert D.; Lang, James; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.; Pike, C. David; Fludra, Andrzej; Bromage, Barbara J. I.

    1995-01-01

    Solar active-region temperatures have been determined from the full-Sun spectra of helium-like sulfur (S XV) observed by the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer on Board the Yohkoh satellite. The average temperature deduced from S XV is demonstrated to vary with the solar activity level: A temperature of 2.5 x 10(exp 6) K is derived from the spectra taken during low solar activity, similar to the general corona, while 4 x 10(exp 6) K is obtained during a higher activity phase. For the latter, the high- temperature tail of the differential emission measure of active regions is found most likely due to the superposition of numerous flare-like events (micro/nano-flares).

  14. Wind speeds in two tornadic storms and a tornado, deduced from Doppler Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Zrnic, D.; Istok, M.

    1980-12-01

    Doppler spectra of a tornado were collected with a radar having a large unambiguous velocity range, +- 91 m s/sup -1/. Thus for the first time a presentation of nonaliased spectra was possible, showing direct measurement of radial velocities. By fitting the tornado model spectrum to data, the radius of maximum winds and tornado center location are deduced. Tornado spectral signature is defined as a double peak, symmetric with respect to the mean wind spectrum. Histograms of maximum measured wind speeds (from spectrum skirts) for two tornadic storms are obtained, and the histograms of velocity difference (between the left and right spectrum skirt) suggest that smaller scale turbulence (<500 m) is principally responsible for spectrum broadness.

  15. Characteristics of middle and upper tropospheric clouds as deduced from rawinsonde data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, D. D. O.; Cox, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The static environment of middle and upper tropospheric clouds is characterized. Computed relative humidity with respect to ice is used to diagnose the presence of cloud layer. The deduced seasonal mean cloud cover estimates based on this technique are shown to be reasonable. The cases are stratified by season and pressure thickness, and the dry static stability, vertical wind speed shear, and Richardson number are computed for three layers for each case. Mean values for each parameter are presented for each stratification and layer. The relative frequency of occurrence of various structures is presented for each stratification. The observed values of each parameter and the observed structure of each parameter are quite variable. Structures corresponding to any of a number of different conceptual models may be found. Moist adiabatic conditions are not commonly observed and the stratification based on thickness yields substantially different results for each group.

  16. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arman, Samuel D.; Prideaux, Gavin J.

    2016-02-01

    The marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, was the largest-ever marsupial carnivore, and is one of the most iconic extinct Australian vertebrates. With a highly-specialised dentition, powerful forelimbs and a robust build, its overall morphology is not approached by any other mammal. However, despite >150 years of attention, fundamental aspects of its biology remain unresolved. Here we analyse an assemblage of claw marks preserved on surfaces in a cave and deduce that they were generated by marsupial lions. The distribution and skewed size range of claw marks within the cave elucidate two key aspects of marsupial lion biology: they were excellent climbers and reared young in caves. Scrutiny of >10,000 co-located Pleistocene bones reveals few if any marsupial lion tooth marks, which dovetails with the morphology-based interpretation of the species as a flesh specialist.

  17. Full pf shell study of A=47 and A=49 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Zuker, A. P.; Poves, A.; Caurier, E.

    1997-01-01

    Complete diagonalizations in the pf major shell lead to very good agreement with the experimental data (level schemes, transitions rates, and static moments) for the A=47 and A=49 isotopes of Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn. Gamow-Teller and M1 strength functions are calculated. The necessary monopole modifications to the realistic interactions are shown to be critically tested by the spectroscopic factors for one particle transfer from 48Ca, reproduced in detail by the calculations. The collective behavior of 47Ti, and of the mirror pairs 47V-47Cr and 49Cr-49Mn is found to follow at low spins the particle plus rotor model. It is then analyzed in terms of the approximate quasi-SU(3) symmetry, for which some new results are given.

  18. Charge-exchange QRPA with the Gogny Force for Axially-symmetric Deformed Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, M.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.

    2014-06-15

    In recent years fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations using finite range Gogny force have been performed to study electromagnetic excitations of several axially-symmetric deformed nuclei up to the {sup 238}U. Here we present the extension of this approach to the charge-exchange nuclear excitations (pnQRPA). In particular we focus on the Isobaric Analog and Gamow-Teller resonances. A comparison of the predicted GT strength distribution with existing experimental data is presented. The role of nuclear deformation is shown. Special attention is paid to β-decay half-lives calculations for which experimental data exist and for specific isotone chains of relevance for the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  19. β -decay properties of neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, P.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, β -decay properties of even-even neutron-rich isotopes in the rare-earth mass region are studied within a microscopic theoretical approach based on a proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The underlying mean field is constructed self-consistently from a deformed Hartree-Fock calculation with Skyrme interactions and pairing correlations to which particle-hole and particle-particle residual interactions are added. Nuclei in this mass region participate in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process and are directly involved in the generation of the rare-earth peak in the isotopic abundance pattern centered at A ≃160 . The energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength as well as the β -decay half-lives and the β -delayed neutron-emission probabilities are discussed and compared with the available experimental information and with calculations based on different approaches.

  20. Firewood calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Curtis, A.B.; Darwin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    Rotating cardboard discs are used to read off total tree or topwood firewood volume (tons or cords) that can be expected from trees of d.b.h. 6 to 24 inches and tree height 10 to 90 feet. One side of the calculator is used for broadleaved species with deliquescent crowns and the other side for braodleaves with excurrent crowns.

  1. Atmospheric emissions and trends of nitrous oxide deduced from 10 years of ALE-GAGE data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, R.; Cunnold, D.; Alyea, F.; Rasmussen, R.; Simmonds, P.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) obtained during the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment (ALE) and the Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (GAGE) for a period from 1978 to 1988 are presented and interpreted. It is observed that the average concentration in the Northern Hemisphere is 0.75 +/- 0.16 ppbv higher than in the Southern Hemisphere and that the global average linear trend in N2O lies in the range from 0.25 to 0.31 percent/year. The measured trends and latitudinal distributions are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that stratospheric photodissociation is the major atmospheric sink for N2O, while the cause of the N2O trend is suggested to be a combination of a growing tropical source and a growing Northern mid-latitude source. A 10-year average global N2O emission rate of (20.5 +/- 2.4) x 10 to the 12th g N2O/year is deduced from the ALE/GAGE data.

  2. Relations between aliphatics and silicate components in 12 stratospheric particles deduced from vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Merouane, S.; Djouadi, Z.; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, L.

    2014-01-10

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are among the most pristine extraterrestrial samples available in the laboratory for analyses with moderate to high spatial- and spectral-resolution spectroscopic techniques. Their composition can provide precious information on the early stages of the solar nebula as well as on the processes on the surfaces of different small bodies in the solar system from which IDPs originate. In this work, we have analyzed six anhydrous IDPs and six stratospheric particles possibly of cosmic origin through infrared (IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy to study and investigate their silicate and organic components. We find that the length/ramification of the aliphatic organics given by the CH{sub 2}/CH{sub 3} ratios in the IDPs is closely linked to the silicate family (pyroxene or olivine) present in the samples. Both IR and Raman data suggest that this relation is not correlated with either aqueous (as evidenced by the absence of aqueous related minerals) or thermal processes (as deduced from Raman measurements). Therefore, this observation might be related to the initial path of formation of the organics on the silicate surfaces, thus tracing a possible catalytic role that silicates would play in the formation and/or ramification of organic matter in the primitive nebula.

  3. Function of longitudinal vs circular muscle fibers in esophageal peristalsis, deduced with mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Brasseur, James G; Nicosia, Mark A; Pal, Anupam; Miller, Larry S

    2007-01-01

    We summarize from previous works the functions of circular vs. longitudinal muscle in esophageal peristaltic bolus transport using a mix of experimental data, the conservation laws of mechanics and mathematical modeling. Whereas circular muscle tone generates radial closure pressure to create a local peristaltic closure wave, longitudinal muscle tone has two functions, one physiological with mechanical implications, and one purely mechanical. Each of these functions independently reduces the tension of individual circular muscle fibers to maintain closure as a consequence of shortening of longitudinal muscle locally coordinated with increasing circular muscle tone. The physiological function is deduced by combining basic laws of mechanics with concurrent measurements of intraluminal pressure from manometry, and changes in cross sectional muscle area from endoluminal ultrasound from which local longitudinal shortening (LLS) can be accurately obtained. The purely mechanical function of LLS was discovered from mathematical modeling of peristaltic esophageal transport with the axial wall motion generated by LLS. Physiologically, LLS concentrates circular muscle fibers where closure pressure is highest. However, the mechanical function of LLS is to reduce the level of pressure required to maintain closure. The combined physiological and mechanical consequences of LLS are to reduce circular muscle fiber tension and power by as much as 1/10 what would be required for peristalsis without the longitudinal muscle layer, a tremendous benefit that may explain the existence of longitudinal muscle fiber in the gut. We also review what is understood of the role of longitudinal muscle in esophageal emptying, reflux and pathology. PMID:17457963

  4. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Line Mixing Deduced from Impulsive Solar Flare Particles.

    PubMed

    Mazur; Mason; Dwyer; Giacalone; Jokipii; Stone

    2000-03-20

    We have studied fine-scale temporal variations in the arrival profiles of approximately 20 keV nucleon-1 to approximately 2 MeV nucleon-1 ions from impulsive solar flares using instrumentation on board the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft at 1 AU between 1997 November and 1999 July. The particle events often had short-timescale ( approximately 3 hr) variations in their intensity that occurred simultaneously across all energies and were generally not in coincidence with any local magnetic field or plasma signature. These features appear to be caused by the convection of magnetic flux tubes past the observer that are alternately filled and devoid of flare ions even though they had a common flare source at the Sun. Thus, we have used the particles to study the mixing of the interplanetary magnetic field that is due to random walk. We deduce an average timescale of 3.2 hr for these features, which corresponds to a length of approximately 0.03 AU.

  5. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F S; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Fallon, P; Clark, R M; Deleplanque, M A; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S; Ai, H; Beausang, C; Cridder, B

    2005-12-29

    The authors have deduced the cross section for {sup 237}U(n,f) over an equivalent neutron energy range from 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions: {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}{prime}f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}{prime}f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). Scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} and 131{sup o}.

  6. Bovine cone photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase structure deduced from a cDNA clone.

    PubMed Central

    Li, T S; Volpp, K; Applebury, M L

    1990-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding the alpha' subunit of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) from bovine cone photoreceptors was selected by probing a retinal library with a DNA fragment encoding the catalytic core of the rod cGMP PDE alpha subunit. Identity of the clone was confirmed by comparing its deduced sequence with cone PDE peptide sequences determined by Charbonneau et al. [Charbonneau, H., Prusti, R. K., LeTrong, H., Sonnenburg, W. K., Mullaney, P. J., Walsh, K. A. & Beavo, J. A. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, pp. 288-292]. The cone PDE alpha' and the rod PDE alpha and beta subunits are encoded by distinct genes. cGMP PDE subunits share a common ancestry with cAMP PDEs and cyclic nucleotide-binding proteins. Sequence comparisons predict the presence of a catalytic core and possible secondary sites for noncatalytic cGMP binding. The presence of a C-terminal CAAX (Cys-aliphatic-aliphatic-Xaa) motif suggests the cone enzyme may be posttranslationally modified by proteolysis, methylation, and isoprenylation. Images PMID:2153291

  7. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  8. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L W; Fallon, P; Clark, R; Delaplanque, M; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S

    2005-08-16

    The authors have deduced the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross-section over an equivalent neutron energy range of 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}'f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}'f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). The energies of the scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} to 131{sup o}.

  9. The Seismic risk perception in Italy deduced by a statistical sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Pessina, Vera; Peruzza, Laura; Cerbara, Loredana; Crescimbene, Cristiana

    2015-04-01

    In 2014 EGU Assembly we presented the results of a web a survey on the perception of seismic risk in Italy. The data were derived from over 8,500 questionnaires coming from all Italian regions. Our questionnaire was built by using the semantic differential method (Osgood et al. 1957) with a seven points Likert scale. The questionnaire is inspired the main theoretical approaches of risk perception (psychometric paradigm, cultural theory, etc.) .The results were promising and seem to clearly indicate an underestimation of seismic risk by the italian population. Based on these promising results, the DPC has funded our research for the second year. In 2015 EGU Assembly we present the results of a new survey deduced by an italian statistical sample. The importance of statistical significance at national scale was also suggested by ISTAT (Italian Statistic Institute), considering the study as of national interest, accepted the "project on the perception of seismic risk" as a pilot study inside the National Statistical System (SISTAN), encouraging our RU to proceed in this direction. The survey was conducted by a company specialised in population surveys using the CATI method (computer assisted telephone interview). Preliminary results will be discussed. The statistical support was provided by the research partner CNR-IRPPS. This research is funded by Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC).

  10. Neutron-$$\\gamma$$ competition for β-delayed neutron emission

    DOE PAGES

    Mumpower, Matthew Ryan; Kawano, Toshihiko; Moller, Peter

    2016-12-19

    Here we present a coupled quasiparticle random phase approximation and Hauser-Feshbach (QRPA+HF) model for calculating delayed particle emission. This approach uses microscopic nuclear structure information, which starts with Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the daughter nucleus and then follows the statistical decay until the initial available excitation energy is exhausted. Explicitly included at each particle emission stage is γ-ray competition. We explore this model in the context of neutron emission of neutron-rich nuclei and find that neutron-γ competition can lead to both increases and decreases in neutron emission probabilities, depending on the system considered. Finally, a second consequence of this formalismmore » is a prediction of more neutrons on average being emitted after β decay for nuclei near the neutron drip line compared to models that do not consider the statistical decay.« less

  11. Neutron-$\\gamma$ competition for β-delayed neutron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, Matthew Ryan; Kawano, Toshihiko; Moller, Peter

    2016-12-19

    Here we present a coupled quasiparticle random phase approximation and Hauser-Feshbach (QRPA+HF) model for calculating delayed particle emission. This approach uses microscopic nuclear structure information, which starts with Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the daughter nucleus and then follows the statistical decay until the initial available excitation energy is exhausted. Explicitly included at each particle emission stage is γ-ray competition. We explore this model in the context of neutron emission of neutron-rich nuclei and find that neutron-γ competition can lead to both increases and decreases in neutron emission probabilities, depending on the system considered. Finally, a second consequence of this formalism is a prediction of more neutrons on average being emitted after β decay for nuclei near the neutron drip line compared to models that do not consider the statistical decay.

  12. Effects of Inelastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering on Supernova Dynamics and Radiated Neutrino Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Mueller, B.; Janka, H.-Th.; Marek, A.; Hix, W. R.; Juodagalvis, A.; Sampaio, J. M.

    2008-01-11

    Based on the shell model for Gamow-Teller and the random phase approximation for forbidden transitions, we calculate cross sections for inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (INNS) under supernova (SN) conditions, assuming a matter composition given by nuclear statistical equilibrium. The cross sections are incorporated into state-of-the-art stellar core-collapse simulations with detailed energy-dependent neutrino transport. While no significant effect on the SN dynamics is observed, INNS increases the neutrino opacities noticeably and strongly reduces the high-energy tail of the neutrino spectrum emitted in the neutrino burst at shock breakout. Relatedly the expected event rates for the observation of such neutrinos by earthbound detectors are reduced by up to about 60%.

  13. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and {3}He.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Kievsky, A; Rosati, S; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2012-02-03

    The muon-capture reactions {2}H(μ{-},ν{μ})nn and {3}He(μ{-},ν{μ}){3}H are studied with nuclear potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived in chiral effective field theory. The low-energy constants (LECs) c{D} and c{E}, present in the three-nucleon potential and (c{D}) axial-vector current, are constrained to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. The muon-capture rates on deuteron and {3}He are predicted to be 399±3  sec{-1} and 1494±21  sec{-1}, respectively. The spread accounts for the cutoff sensitivity, as well as uncertainties in the LECs and electroweak radiative corrections. By comparing the calculated and precisely measured rates on {3}He, a value for the induced pseudoscalar form factor is obtained in good agreement with the chiral perturbation theory prediction.

  14. High Precision Determination of the β Decay QEC Value of 11C and Implications on the Tests of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyuz, K.; Bollen, G.; Brodeur, M.; Bryce, R. A.; Cooper, K.; Eibach, M.; Izzo, C.; Kwan, E.; Manukyan, K.; Morrissey, D. J.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Redshaw, M.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Valverde, A. A.; Villari, A. C. C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the determination of the QEC value of the mirror transition of 11C by measuring the atomic masses of 11C and 11B using Penning trap mass spectrometry. More than an order of magnitude improvement in precision is achieved as compared to the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation (Ame2012) [Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012)]. This leads to a factor of 3 improvement in the calculated F t value. Using the new value, QEC=1981.690 (61 ) keV , the uncertainty on F t is no longer dominated by the uncertainty on the QEC value. Based on this measurement, we provide an updated estimate of the Gamow-Teller to Fermi mixing ratio and standard model values of the correlation coefficients.

  15. How low-energy weak reactions can constrain three-nucleon forces and the neutron-neutron scattering length.

    PubMed

    Gårdestig, A; Phillips, D R

    2006-06-16

    We show that chiral symmetry and gauge invariance enforce relations between the short-distance physics that occurs in a number of electroweak and pionic reactions on light nuclei. Within chiral perturbation theory, this is manifested via the appearance of the same axial isovector two-body contact term in pi(-)d --> nngamma, p-wave pion production in NN collisions, tritium beta decay, pp fusion, nud scattering, and the hep reaction. Using a Gamow-Teller matrix element obtained from calculations of pp fusion as input, we compute the neutron spectrum obtained in pi(-)d --> nngamma. With the short-distance physics in this process controlled from pp --> de(=)nu(e), the theoretical uncertainty in the nn scattering length extracted from pi(-)d --> nngamma is reduced by a factor larger than 3, to approximately < or = 0.05 fm.

  16. Effects of inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering on supernova dynamics and radiated neutrino spectra.

    PubMed

    Langanke, K; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Müller, B; Janka, H-Th; Marek, A; Hix, W R; Juodagalvis, A; Sampaio, J M

    2008-01-11

    Based on the shell model for Gamow-Teller and the random phase approximation for forbidden transitions, we calculate cross sections for inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (INNS) under supernova (SN) conditions, assuming a matter composition given by nuclear statistical equilibrium. The cross sections are incorporated into state-of-the-art stellar core-collapse simulations with detailed energy-dependent neutrino transport. While no significant effect on the SN dynamics is observed, INNS increases the neutrino opacities noticeably and strongly reduces the high-energy tail of the neutrino spectrum emitted in the neutrino burst at shock breakout. Relatedly the expected event rates for the observation of such neutrinos by earthbound detectors are reduced by up to about 60%.

  17. β-decay properties of neutron-deficient Pt, Hg, and Pb isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarriguren, P.; Boillos, J. M.; Moreno, O.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2015-10-15

    Neutron-deficient isotopes in the lead region are well established examples of the shape coexistence phenomenon in nuclei. In this work, bulk and decay properties, including deformation energy curves, charge mean square radii, Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distributions, and β-decay half-lives, are studied in neutron-deficient Pt, Hg, and Pb isotopes. The nuclear structure involved is described microscopically from deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations with residual interactions in both particle-hole and particle-particle channels, performed on top of a self-consistent deformed quasiparticle Skyrme Hartree-Fock basis. The sensitivity to deformation of the GT strength distributions in those isotopes is proposed as an additional complementary signature of the nuclear shape. The β-decay half-lives resulting from the GT strength distributions are compared to experiment to demonstrate the ability of the method.

  18. Unified description of the double {beta} decay to the first quadrupole phonon state in spherical and deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Raduta, C. M.; Raduta, A. A.

    2007-10-15

    The Gamow-Teller transition operator is written as a polynomial in the dipole proton-neutron and quadrupole charge-conserving quasiparticle random-phase approximation boson operators, using the prescription of the boson expansion technique. Then, the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} process ending on the first 2{sup +} state in the daughter nucleus is allowed through one-, two-, and three-boson states describing the odd-odd intermediate nucleus. The approach uses a single particle basis that is obtained by projecting out the good angular momentum from an orthogonal set of deformed functions. The basis for mother and daughter nuclei may have different deformations. The GT transition amplitude as well as the half-lives were calculated for 18 transitions. Results are compared with the available data as well as with the predictions obtained with other methods.

  19. Structure of La Primavera caldera, Jalisco, Mexico, deduced from gravity anomalies and drilling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, I.; Mena, M.

    1991-07-01

    Previous studies of La Primavera caldera have mostly been based on surface geology and topography. Since 1980, many wells, exploring for geothermal energy, have reached depths of about 2 to 3 km at the center of the caldera. The results of the drillings, together with those of the gravity surveys, provide information about the subsurface structure of the caldera, and shed light on its formation. The drilling results and gravity anomalies at La Primavera caldera and San Marcos, located at about 40 km distance from the caldera, suggest that regional gravity anomalies can be interpreted in terms of depths of the granitic basements: the basement beneath La Primavera caldera is about 3 km deep and consists of roughly the same horizon as that beneath San Marcos. The drilling results within the caldera reveal that the depth of the caldera fills ranges from 0.3 to 1 km at the drilling sites. The andesite basement, about 1 km deep, remains approximately horizontal, and the granitic basement has a depth of about 3 km. The surface topographies, such as the postcaldera domes, scarcely disturb the subsurface strata. The local gravity anomalies show two lows within the caldera reflecting the configuration of caldera bottom, two funnel-shaped depressions, one of which corresponds to a vent of the Tala tuff deduced from geological observations. The mass deficiency within the caldera estimated from the gravity anomaly, satisfies the general relationship that the mass deficiency is proportional to the caldera diameter cubed. This means that caldera structure is three-dimensional: the larger the diameter, the deeper the funnel-shape. At present this argument may be limited to funnel-shaped calderas.

  20. Deducing growth mechanisms for minerals from the shapes of crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of natural and synthetic samples are observed to have several distinct and different shapes. We have simulated these CSDs using three simple equations: the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), a mass balance equation, and equations for Ostwald ripening. The following crystal growth mechanisms are simulated using these equations and their modifications: (1) continuous nucleation and growth in an open system, during which crystals nucleate at either a constant, decaying, or accelerating nucleation rate, and then grow according to the LPE; (2) surface-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with an essentially unlimited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (3) supply-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with a specified, limited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (4) supply- or surface-controlled Ostwald ripening in a closed system, during which the relative rate of crystal dissolution and growth is controlled by differences in specific surface area and by diffusion rate; and (5) supply-controlled random ripening in a closed system, during which the rate of crystal dissolution and growth is random with respect to specific surface area. Each of these mechanisms affects the shapes of CSDs. For example, mechanism (1) above with a constant nucleation rate yields asymptotically-shaped CSDs for which the variance of the natural logarithms of the crystal sizes (??2) increases exponentially with the mean of the natural logarithms of the sizes (??). Mechanism (2) yields lognormally-shaped CSDs, for which ??2 increases linearly with ??, whereas mechanisms (3) and (5) do not change the shapes of CSDs, with ??2 remaining constant with increasing ??. During supply-controlled Ostwald ripening (4), initial lognormally-shaped CSDs become more symmetric, with ??2 decreasing with increasing ??. Thus, crystal growth mechanisms often can be deduced by noting trends in ?? versus ??2 of CSDs for

  1. Martian low-altitude magnetic topology deduced from MAVEN/SWEA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui; Mitchell, David; Liemohn, Michael; Fang, Xiaohua; Ma, Yingjuan; Luhmann, Janet; Brain, David; Steckiewicz, Morgane; Mazelle, Christian; Connerney, Jack; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-02-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission has obtained comprehensive particle and magnetic field measurements. The Solar Wind Electron Analyzer provides electron energy-pitch angle distributions along the spacecraft trajectory that can be used to infer magnetic topology. This study presents pitch angle-resolved electron energy shape parameters that can distinguish photoelectrons from solar wind electrons, which we use to deduce the Martian magnetic topology and connectivity to the dayside ionosphere. Magnetic topology in the Mars environment is mapped in three dimensions for the first time. At low altitudes (<400 km) in sunlight, the northern hemisphere is found to be dominated by closed field lines (both ends intersecting the collisional atmosphere), with more day-night connections through cross-terminator closed field lines than in the south. Although draped field lines with 100 km amplitude vertical fluctuations that intersect the electron exobase ( 160-220 km) in two locations could appear to be closed at the spacecraft, a more likely explanation is provided by crustal magnetic fields, which naturally have the required geometry. Around 30% of the time, we observe open field lines from 200 to 400 km, which implies three distinct topological layers over the northern hemisphere: closed field lines below 200 km, open field lines with foot points at lower latitudes that pass over the northern hemisphere from 200 to 400 km, and draped interplanetary magnetic field above 400 km. This study also identifies open field lines with one end attached to the dayside ionosphere and the other end connected with the solar wind, providing a path for ion outflow.

  2. Characteristics of tropical thin cirrus clouds deduced from joint CloudSat and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haladay, Taryn; Stephens, Graeme

    2009-04-01

    The joint detection characteristics of both the CloudSat radar and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) lidar are used to study tropical thin cirrus observed between 20°N and 20°S. The thin ice cloud category (TIC-1) of cirrus consists of those clouds detected by the lidar but not the radar whereas the TIC-2 cirrus category consists of clouds detected by both sensors. Tropical TIC-1 cirrus clouds between 20°N and 20°S are high, are optically thin, and have an approximate cloud cover in the defined region of 30%. Almost a third of this occurrence is in the form of single layers of cloudiness without any clouds below. These TIC-1 clouds also exhibit a marked seasonal variation, especially away from the equator, consistent with the shifts in annual cycle of convection with latitude. Lidar-based estimates of optical depth, uncorrected for multiple scattering, suggest that the TIC-1 optical depths range between 0.02 and 0.3. The ice water path of TIC-1 clouds is also estimated to be between 0.5 and 4 g m-2. The radiative properties of the TIC-1 clouds are also deduced from CloudSat flux data products at the top, at the bottom, and within the atmosphere. The influence of these clouds on the instantaneous reflected solar fluxes is determined to be less than 2 W m-2. The effects of TIC-1 clouds on the instantaneous outgoing longwave fluxes are estimated to be ˜20 W m-2, and the impact of these TIC-1 clouds on the tropics-wide average of the infrared heating is ˜4 W m-2.

  3. A novel computational framework for deducing muscle synergies from experimental joint moments

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Anantharaman; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior experimental studies have hypothesized the existence of a “muscle synergy” based control scheme for producing limb movements and locomotion in vertebrates. Such synergies have been suggested to consist of fixed muscle grouping schemes with the co-activation of all muscles in a synergy resulting in limb movement. Quantitative representations of these groupings (termed muscle weightings) and their control signals (termed synergy controls) have traditionally been derived by the factorization of experimentally measured EMG. This study presents a novel approach for deducing these weightings and controls from inverse dynamic joint moments that are computed from an alternative set of experimental measurements—movement kinematics and kinetics. This technique was applied to joint moments for healthy human walking at 0.7 and 1.7 m/s, and two sets of “simulated” synergies were computed based on two different criteria (1) synergies were required to minimize errors between experimental and simulated joint moments in a musculoskeletal model (pure-synergy solution) (2) along with minimizing joint moment errors, synergies also minimized muscle activation levels (optimal-synergy solution). On comparing the two solutions, it was observed that the introduction of optimality requirements (optimal-synergy) to a control strategy solely aimed at reproducing the joint moments (pure-synergy) did not necessitate major changes in the muscle grouping within synergies or the temporal profiles of synergy control signals. Synergies from both the simulated solutions exhibited many similarities to EMG derived synergies from a previously published study, thus implying that the analysis of the two different types of experimental data reveals similar, underlying synergy structures. PMID:25520645

  4. Deducing Electronic Unit Internal Response During a Vibration Test Using a Lumped Parameter Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    During random vibration testing of electronic boxes there is often a desire to know the dynamic response of certain internal printed wiring boards (PWBs) for the purpose of monitoring the response of sensitive hardware or for post-test forensic analysis in support of anomaly investigation. Due to restrictions on internally mounted accelerometers for most flight hardware there is usually no means to empirically observe the internal dynamics of the unit, so one must resort to crude and highly uncertain approximations. One common practice is to apply Miles Equation, which does not account for the coupled response of the board in the chassis, resulting in significant over- or under-prediction. This paper explores the application of simple multiple-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter modeling to predict the coupled random vibration response of the PWBs in their fundamental modes of vibration. A simple tool using this approach could be used during or following a random vibration test to interpret vibration test data from a single external chassis measurement to deduce internal board dynamics by means of a rapid correlation analysis. Such a tool might also be useful in early design stages as a supplemental analysis to a more detailed finite element analysis to quickly prototype and analyze the dynamics of various design iterations. After developing the theoretical basis, a lumped parameter modeling approach is applied to an electronic unit for which both external and internal test vibration response measurements are available for direct comparison. Reasonable correlation of the results demonstrates the potential viability of such an approach. Further development of the preliminary approach presented in this paper will involve correlation with detailed finite element models and additional relevant test data.

  5. Deducing logical relationships between spatially registered cortical parcellations under conditions of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bezgin, Gleb; Wanke, Egon; Krumnack, Antje; Kötter, Rolf

    2008-10-01

    We propose a new technique, called Spatial Objective Relational Transformation (SORT), as an automated approach for derivation of logical relationships between cortical areas in different brain maps registered in the same Euclidean space. Recently, there have been large amounts of voxel-based three-dimensional structural and functional imaging data that provide us with coordinate-based information about the location of differently defined areas in the brain, whereas coordinate-independent, parcellation-based mapping is still commonly used in the majority of animal tracing and mapping studies. Because of the impact of voxel-based imaging methods and the need to attribute their features to coordinate-independent brain entities, this mapping becomes increasingly important. Our motivation here is not to make vague statements where more precise spatial statements would be better, but to find criteria for the identity (or other logical relationships) between areas that were delineated by different methods, in different individuals, or mapped to three-dimensional space using different deformation algorithms. The relevance of this problem becomes immediately obvious as one superimposes and compares different datasets in multimodal databases (e.g. CARET, http://brainmap.wustl.edu/caret), where voxel-based data are registered to surface nodes exploited by the procedure presented here. We describe the SORT algorithm and its implementation in the Java 2 programming language (http://java.sun.com/, which we make available for download. We give an example of practical use of our approach, and validate the SORT approach against a database of the coordinate-independent statements and inferences that have been deduced using alternative techniques.

  6. The complete set of spin observables for the (13)C(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(13)N and (15)N(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(15)O reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qun Qun

    1998-12-01

    The 13C(p,n)13N and 15N(p,n)15O reactions have been a puzzle for more than ten years. The ground state transitions are Jπ=1/2- to Jπ=1/2-. These are 'mixed' transitions because they can involve quantum number changes either (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=0,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=0), or (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=1,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=1); these quantum number changes are refered to as 'Fermi' and 'Gamow-Teller' respectively. Because the quantum number changes are the same as for Fermi and Gamow-Teller beta decay. From the systematics of (p,n) and (n,p) reactions on pure Fermi transitions (e.g. 0 + to 0+) and pure Gamow-Teller transitions (e.g. 0+ to 1+), calibrations have been established of cross section per unit B(F) or unit B(GT), where 'B' refers to doubly reduced matrix elements extracted from beta decay. However, cross sections for the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s.) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) reactions are substantially larger than one would then predict from the known B(F)s and B(GT)s for these transitions. To explore this anomaly, spin observables were used to extract separately the Fermi and Gamow-Teller cross sections for these reactions. To acquire the complete sets of polarization- transfer observables, a new neutron polarimeter was designed, built, commissioned and calibrated. This polarimeter, call the '2π polarimeter' because of its complete azimuthal coverage for scattered neutrons, has very good position and timing resolution (354 ps). The complete sets of spin-transfer coefficients Dij for 13C(p,n)13N (at 0o , 5.5o , and 11o ) and 15N(p,n)15O (at 0o ) at 135 MeV were measured. Following the formalism of Ichimura and Kawahigashi, we extracted the spin-longitudinal, and spin-transverse and spin-independent responses D0,/ Dq,/ Dn and Dp from the measured Dijs. The F and GT fractions of the (p,n) cross sections are then extracted as f F=D0 and fGT=Dn+Dp+Dq=1- d0. Values of Dk for both the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) were extracted. From these responses, we

  7. New constraints on the rupture process of the 1999 August 17 Izmit earthquake deduced from estimates of stress glut rate moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clévédé, E.; Bouin, M.-P.; Bukchin, B.; Mostinskiy, A.; Patau, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper illustrates the use of integral estimates given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 for constraining the rupture scenario of a large earthquake in the particular case of the 1999 Izmit mainshock. We determine the integral estimates of the geometry, source duration and rupture propagation given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 by inverting long-period surface wave (LPSW) amplitude spectra. Kinematic and static models of the Izmit earthquake published in the literature are quite different from one another. In order to extract the characteristic features of this event, we calculate the same integral estimates directly from those models and compare them with those deduced from our inversion. While the equivalent rupture zone and the eastward directivity are consistent among all models, the LPSW solution displays a strong unilateral character of the rupture associated with a short rupture duration that is not compatible with the solutions deduced from the published models. With the aim of understand this discrepancy, we use simple equivalent kinematic models to reproduce the integral estimates of the considered rupture processes (including ours) by adjusting a few free parameters controlling the western and eastern parts of the rupture. We show that the joint analysis of the LPSW solution and source tomographies allows us to elucidate the scattering of source processes published for this earthquake and to discriminate between the models. Our results strongly suggest that (1) there was significant moment released on the eastern segment of the activated fault system during the Izmit earthquake; (2) the apparent rupture velocity decreases on this segment.

  8. DEDUCE Clinical Text: An Ontology-based Module to Support Self-Service Clinical Notes Exploration and Cohort Development.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Horvath, Monica M; Brinson, Stephanie; Evans, Steve; Shang, Howard C; Ferranti, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Large amounts of information, as well as opportunities for informing research, education, and operations, are contained within clinical text such as radiology reports and pathology reports. However, this content is less accessible and harder to leverage than structured, discrete data. We report on an extension to the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), a self-service query tool developed to provide clinicians and researchers with access to data within the Duke Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW). The DEDUCE Clinical Text module supports ontology-based text searching, enhanced filtering capabilities based on document attributes, and integration of clinical text with structured data and cohort development. The module is implemented with open-source tools extensible to other institutions, including a Java-based search engine (Apache Solr) with complementary full-text indexing library (Lucene) employed with a negation engine (NegEx) modified by clinical users to include to local domain-specific negation phrases.

  9. Proton Spectroscopic Factors Deduced from Helium-3 Global Phenomenological and Microscopic Optical Model Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenny, Lee; Pang, Dan-Yang; Han, Yin-Lu; B. Tsang, M.

    2014-09-01

    Global phenomenological GDP08 and microscopic helium-3 optical model potentials have been recently derived. We evaluate these two potential sets by comparing the elastic scattering data of 25 MeV 3He on 16O, 18O, 19F, 23Na, 24Mg, 25Mg, 26Mg, 27Al, 28Si, 30Si, 31P, 32S, 34S, 35Cl, 37Cl, and 39K isotopes. Using the deuteron angular distributions calculated with the distorted wave Born approximation model, we extract the ground-state proton spectroscopic factors from (3He, d) reactions on the same set of nuclei. The extracted proton spectroscopic factors are compared with the large-basis shell-model calculations.

  10. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Weekly Total 0 Calories Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and ... Calories College Alcohol Policies Interactive Body Calculators Alcohol Calorie Calculator Alcohol Cost Calculator Alcohol BAC Calculator Alcohol ...

  11. CMB and the elementary particles structure deduced from QFT of non-dot model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    In my paper ‘Planck Constant Deduced from Metrical Results of Doppler Effect of Moving Particle —Uncertainty Principle Caused by Collision of a Particle with CMB Photons and Virtual Photons (H05-0036-10)’ the absolute velocity is decided by CMB which as a mark of the vacuum. CMB come from the thermal radiation of stars via gravitational redshift about 10 (13) year (E14- 0032-08). In my paper ‘Quanta turn-advance ism, China Science && Technology Overview 131 192-210 (2011)’, QFT four-dimensional uncertainty principle and momentum-energy conservation law had been generalized as a five-dimensional equations: de Broglie wavelength as a position vector \\underline{q}= (i c t, r, s), momentum \\underline{P} = (i E / c, P, U c), \\underline{q} = i h / \\underline{P}, \\underline{q} \\underline{q} = 0, \\underline{P} \\underline{P} = 0, Sigma∑ \\underline{P} = \\underline{P} (0) . The five-dimensional time-space-spin had been quantized as a non-dot model basic cell, the lowest energy state vertical polarized left spin 1/2 neutrino and right spin 1/2 antineutrino are just the left, right advance unit quanta _{0}nuυ, nuυ _{0} and left, right back unit quanta (0) nuυ, nuυ (0) , it again compose into spin 1 unit advance photons _{0}nuυnuυ _{0} and back (0) nuυnuυ (0) , spin 0 unit rest mass nuυ _{0}nuυ (0) and anti-mass _{0}nuυ (0) nuυ, spin 0 unit positive charge _{0}nuυnuυ (0) and negative charge nuυ _{0} (0) nuυ. It accord to the high energy physics experimental results of the transformation among the photons, masses quanta and charges quanta. The physical vacuum is the even collocation of non-combinational nuυ _{0} or _{0}nuυ. QFT is no longer with divergence difficulty by the non-dot model. It is mathematically easy that from five-dimensional equations deduce out the Dirac, Klein-Gordan, Maxwell equations and Lorentz force formula, but appear some new results. The interactions between _{0}nuυ, nuυ _{0}, (0) nuυ, nuυ (0) , i.e., force f

  12. Global significance of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high-resolution seismic observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuchs, K.; Tittgemeyer, M.; Ryberg, T.; Wenzel, F.; Mooney, W.

    2002-01-01

    We infer the fine structure of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) at the top of the lithospheric mantle from high-resolution seismic observations of Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) on superlong-range profiles in Russia. Densely recorded seismograms permit recognition of previously unknown features of teleseismic propagation of the well known Pn and Sn phases, such as a band of incoherent, scattered, high-frequency seismic energy, developing consistently from station to station, apparent velocities of sub-Moho material, and high-frequency energy to distances of more than 3000 km with a coda band, incoherent at 10 km spacing and yet consistently observed to the end of the profiles. Estimates of the other key elements of the SMBL were obtained by finite difference calculations of wave propagation in elastic 2D models from a systematic grid search through parameter space. The SMBL consists of randomly distributed, mild velocity fluctuations of 2% or schlieren of high aspect ratios (???40) with long horizontal extent (???20 km) and therefore as thin as 0.5 km only; SMBL thickness is 60-100 km. It is suggested that the SMBL is of global significance as the physical base of the platewide observed high-frequency phases Pn and Sn. It is shown that wave propagation in the SMBL waveguide is insensitive to the background velocity distribution on which its schlieren are superimposed. This explains why the Pn and Sn phases traverse geological provinces of various age, heat flow, crustal thickness, and tectonic regimes. Their propagation appears to be independent of age. temperature, pressure, and stress. Dynamic stretching of mantle material during subduction or flow, possibly combined with chemical differentiation have to be considered as scale-forming processes in the upper mantle. However, it is difficult to distinguish with the present sets of Pn/Sn array data whether (and also where) the boundary layer is a frozen-in feature of paleo-processes or whether it is a response to

  13. Deducing the magma chamber processes of middle Eocene volcanics, Sivas and Tokat regions; NE Turkey: Insights from clinopyroxene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmengil, Gönenç; Karacık, Zekiye; Genç, Ş. Can; Prelevic, Dejan

    2016-04-01

    Middle Eocene Tokat and Sivas volcanic successions occur within the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone. Different models are suggested for the development of the middle Eocene volcanism such as post-collisional, delamination and slab-breakoff models as well as the arc magmatism. In both areas, volcanic units cover all the basement units with a regional disconformity and comprise lavas spanning a compositional range from mainly basalt-basaltic andesite to a lesser amount trachyte. Here, we report mineral chemistry of different basaltic lavas through transect from northern continent (Tokat region, Pontides) to southern continent (Sivas region, Kırşehir block) to deduce the characteristics of the magma chamber processes which are active during the middle Eocene. Basaltic lavas include olivine bearing basalts (Ol-basalt: ± olivine + clinopyroxene + plagioclase); amphibole bearing basaltic andesite (Amp-basaltic andesite: amphibole + clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± biotite) and pyroxene bearing basaltic andesite (Px-basaltic andesite: clinopyroxene + plagioclase). Microlitic, glomeroporphyric and pilotaxitic texture are common. Clinopyroxene phenocrystals (macro ≥ 750 μm and micro ≤300 μm) are common in all three lava series which are investigated by transecting core to rim compositional profiles. They are generally augite and diopside; euhedral to subhedral in shape with oscillatory, normal and reverse zoning patterns. Also, all clinopyroxene phenocrystals are marked by moderately high Mg# (for Ol-basalt: 67-91; avg. 80; Amp-basaltic andesite: 76-83, avg: 80; Px -basaltic andesite 68-95, avg: 81). In Ol-basalt, clinopyroxene phenocrystals show normal zonation (high Mg# cores and low Mg# rims). In Amp-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxenes are generally homogenous in composition with minor variation of Mg# towards the rims. On the contrary, in Px-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxene macro phenocrystals show reverse zonation with the core with low Mg# and the rims with

  14. Large-scale shell model calculations for odd-odd nuclei and comparison to experimental studies of fission product nuclei in the /sup 132/Sn region

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, S.M.; Henry, E.A.; Meyer, R.A.

    1985-01-08

    Experimental spectroscopy data of fission products have been obtained using highly automated and rapid chemical separations followed by automated spectroscopy studies of isolated fission products. These data have established the presence of only a single level with spin-parity of 1/sup +/ below 1500 keV of excitation in Z = 51 /sup 132/Sb/sub 81/. This is in contrast to the results of our studies of /sup 130/Sb and /sup 134/I. For /sup 134/I, the N = 81 isotone with Z = 53, we can characterize three 1/sup +/ levels below 1200 keV. For /sup 130/Sb/sub 79/ that has a neutron pair less than /sup 132/Sb, we can identify two 1/sup +/ levels below 1100 keV. We can account for the additional levels using the LLNL shell-model code which is based on the Lanczos tridiagonalization algorithm using an uncoupled m-scheme basis and vector manipulations. The 1g/sub 7/2/, 2d/sub 5/2/, 2d/sub 3/2/, 1h/sub 11/2/, and 3s/sub 1/2/ orbitals are available to the valence protons and the 2d/sub 5/2/, 2d/sub 3/2/, 1h/sub 11/2/, and 3s/sub 1/2/ orbitals are available to the valence neutron holes. Analysis of the wavefunctions show the dominant role of three nucleon cluster configurations in producing the increased number of states at low energy. The absence of nucleon cluster configurations in the parent nucleus /sup 130/Sn is used to explain the reduction of approximately a factor of 20 in the Gamow-Teller beta strength to the low lying 1/sup +/ levels of /sup 130/Sb. 27 references.

  15. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them less favourable for studying the field generated by dynamo action in the core. We remove external field predictions, including a new way of characterizing the magnetospheric ring current, from the data and then calculate revised monthly means using robust methods. The geomagnetic secular variation (SV) is calculated as the first annual differences of these monthly means, which also removes the static crustal field. SV time-series based on revised monthly means are much less scattered than those calculated from ordinary monthly means, and their variances and correlations between components are smaller. On the annual to decadal timescale, the SV is generated primarily by advection in the fluid outer core. We demonstrate the utility of the revised monthly means by calculating models of the core surface advective flow between 1997 and 2013 directly from the SV data. One set of models assumes flow that is constant over three months; such models exhibit large and rapid temporal variations. For models of this type, less complex flows achieve the same fit to the SV derived from revised monthly means than those from ordinary monthly means. However, those obtained from ordinary monthly means are able to follow excursions in SV that are likely to be external field contamination rather than core signals. Having established that we can find models that fit the data adequately, we then assess how much temporal variability is required. Previous studies have suggested that the flow is consistent with torsional oscillations (TO), solid body-like oscillations of fluid on concentric cylinders with axes aligned along the Earth's rotation axis. TO have been proposed to explain decadal

  16. Fishing for biodiversity: Novel methanopterin-linked C1 transfergenes deduced from the Sargasso Sea metagenome

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Nercessian, Olivier; Lapidus, Alla; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2004-07-01

    The recently generated database of microbial genes from anoligotrophic environment populated by a calculated 1,800 of major phylotypes (the Sargasso Sea metagenome) presents a great source for expanding local databases of genes indicative of a specific function. In this paper we analyze the Sargasso Sea metagenome in terms of the presence of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer genes that are signature for methylotrophy. We conclude that more than 10 phylotypes possessing genes of interest are present in this environment, and a few of these are relatively abundant species. The sequences representative of the major phylotypes do not appear to belong to any known microbial group capable of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer. Instead, they separate from all known sequences on phylogenetic trees, pointing towards their affiliation with a novel microbial phylum. These data imply a broader distribution of methanopterin-linked functions in the microbial world than previously known.

  17. Variations of anthropogenic CO2 in urban area deduced by radiocarbon concentration in modern tree rings.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z; Nakamura, Toshio; Pazdur, Anna

    2008-10-01

    Radiocarbon concentration in the atmosphere is significantly lower in areas where man-made emissions of carbon dioxide occur. This phenomenon is known as Suess effect, and is caused by the contamination of clean air with non-radioactive carbon from fossil fuel combustion. The effect is more strongly observed in industrial and densely populated urban areas. Measurements of carbon isotope concentrations in a study area can be compared to those from areas of clear air in order to estimate the amount of carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel combustion by using a simple mathematical model. This can be calculated using the simple mathematical model. The result of the mathematical model followed in this study suggests that the use of annual rings of trees to obtain the secular variations of 14C concentration of atmospheric CO2 can be useful and efficient for environmental monitoring and modeling of the carbon distribution in local scale.

  18. Deducing conformational variability of intrinsically disordered proteins from infrared spectroscopy with Bayesian statistics

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Anurag; Anunciado, Divina; Tian, Jianhui; Vu, Dung M.; Gnanakaran, S.

    2013-01-01

    As it remains practically impossible to generate ergodic ensembles for large intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, it becomes critical to compare spectroscopic characteristics of the theoretically generated ensembles to corresponding measurements. We develop a Bayesian framework to infer the ensemble properties of an IDP using a combination of conformations generated by MD simulations and its measured infrared spectrum. We performed 100 different MD simulations totaling more than 10 µs to characterize the conformational ensemble of αsynuclein, a prototypical IDP, in water. These conformations are clustered based on solvent accessibility and helical content. We compute the amide-I band for these clusters and predict the thermodynamic weights of each cluster given the measured amide-I band. Bayesian analysis produces a reproducible and non-redundant set of thermodynamic weights for each cluster, which can then be used to calculate the ensemble properties. In a rigorous validation, these weights reproduce measured chemical shifts. PMID:24187427

  19. Fishing for biodiversity: novel methanopterin-linked C transfer genes deduced from the Sargasso Sea metagenome.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Nercessian, Olivier; Lapidus, Alla; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2005-12-01

    The recently generated database of microbial genes from an oligotrophic environment populated by a calculated 1800 major phylotypes (the Sargasso Sea metagenome-SSM) presents a great source for expanding local databases of genes indicative of a specific function. In this article we analyse the SSM for the presence of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer genes that are signature for methylotrophy. We conclude that more than 10 phylotypes possessing genes of interest are present in this environment. The sequences representative of these major phylotypes do not appear to belong to any known microbial group capable of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer. Instead, these sequences separate from all known sequences on phylogenetic trees, pointing toward their affiliation with novel microbial phyla. These data imply a broader distribution of methanopterin-linked functions in the microbial world than has been previously known.

  20. Predictable 'meta-mechanisms' emerge from feedbacks between transpiration and plant growth and cannot be simply deduced from short-term mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, François; Parent, Boris

    2016-08-29

    Growth under water deficit is controlled by short-term mechanisms but, because of numerous feedbacks, the combination of these mechanisms over time often results in outputs that cannot be deduced from the simple inspection of individual mechanisms. It can be analysed with dynamic models in which causal relationships between variables are considered at each time-step, allowing calculation of outputs that are routed back to inputs for the next time-step and that can change the system itself. We first review physiological mechanisms involved in seven feedbacks of transpiration on plant growth, involving changes in tissue hydraulic conductance, stomatal conductance, plant architecture and underlying factors such as hormones or aquaporins. The combination of these mechanisms over time can result in non-straightforward conclusions as shown by examples of simulation outputs: 'over production of abscisic acid (ABA) can cause a lower concentration of ABA in the xylem sap ', 'decreasing root hydraulic conductance when evaporative demand is maximum can improve plant performance' and 'rapid root growth can decrease yield'. Systems of equations simulating feedbacks over numerous time-steps result in logical and reproducible emergent properties that can be viewed as 'meta-mechanisms' at plant level, which have similar roles as mechanisms at cell level.

  1. Deducing the electron-beam diameter in a laser-plasma accelerator using x-ray betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Landgraf, Björn; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Jäckel, Oliver; Peth, Christian; Thiele, Tobias; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Willi, Oswald; Kaluza, Malte C; Spielmann, Christian

    2012-02-17

    We investigate the properties of a laser-plasma electron accelerator as a bright source of keV x-ray radiation. During the interaction, the electrons undergo betatron oscillations and from the carefully measured x-ray spectrum the oscillation amplitude of the electrons can be deduced which decreases with increasing electron energies. From the oscillation amplitude and the independently measured x-ray source size of (1.8±0.3) μm we are able to estimate the electron bunch diameter to be (1.6±0.3) μm.

  2. The age of the Veritas asteroid family deduced by chaotic chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Andrea; Farinella, Paolo

    1994-07-01

    ASTEROID families are groups of objects produced in disruptive collisions of a parent body. Although family members are widely dispersed in real space, they cluster in the parameter space defined by their so-called proper elements, and can thus be distinguished from the background asteroid population1-3. For most asteroids, these parameters are very close to being invariants of motion and families are still apparent billions of years after their formation4'5. But these parameters undergo chaotic diffusion, and in some cases the rate of diffusion might be large enough that a family member exits from the region of proper-element space occupied by the family after a characteristic time which is shorter than the lifetime of the Solar System. In this case, the characteristic time should provide an approximate upper bound to the age of the family. Here we use this 'chaotic chronology' method to estimate the lifetime of the unusually compact Veritas family. Calculations of the evolu-tion of the proper elements of the family show that two members (including the largest, 490 Veritas) wander outside the borders of the family on a timescale of about 50 Myr, indicating that the family has an age of less than this.

  3. Tracer transport in the stratosphere deduced from satellite data and a two-dimensional model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    The effective transport velocity (e.g., the meridional circulation that can produce the observed seasonal variations in the tracer fields) is estimated from both observed tracer distributions and model simulations in the stratosphere. The equatorial double peak structure is emphasized among other features of tracer mixing ratio fields to validate the transport velocity. Three years of zonally averaged N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} data from the SAMS instrument on Nimbus 7 are utilized to investigate the annual and semiannual cycles in long-lived tracer mixing ratios. The annual and semiannual variations are shown to be approximately antisymmetric and symmetric about the equator, respectively. Using the first three components of the cycles to estimate the time tendency, the tracer continuity equation is solved diagnostically to obtain the effective transport velocity. A two dimensional isentropic coordinate model is constructed for further study. The meridional velocities and horizontal diffusion coefficients are calculated from the net radiative heating and the x-momentum equation respectively. The tracer continuity equation is integrated in time for N{sub 2}O by using the diabatic circulation and diffusion coefficients. To intensify the equinoctial subsidence, the climatological zonal mean wind and corresponding temperature fields are modified by using a stronger semiannual oscillation in the equatorial region. Thus, the new vertical velocity fields produced change in the resulting tracer patterns.

  4. Ozone trends deduced from combined Nimbus 7 SBUV and NOAA 11 SBUV/2 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, S. M.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Flynn, L. E.; Planet, W.; Miller, A. J.; Chandra, S.

    1995-01-01

    The long-term time series of global ozone from the Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet instrument (SBUV) (Nov. 1978-June 1990) are extended through June 1994 by using measurements from the NOAA-11 SBUV/2. The data sets are merged based upon comparisons during the 18-month overlap period in which both instruments were operational. During this period, the average offset between the two time series is less than 2% in total ozone, and less than 6% in Umkehr layers 1-10. A linear-regression trend model is applied to the extended time series to calculate updated trends as a function of latitude and altitude. Trends through June 1994 are 1.5-2% per decade less negative than through June 1990 in the tropical middle stratosphere (35-40 km) and in the upper stratosphere (45-50 km) at mid-latitudes. In the lower stratosphere, the trends are nearly 1.5% per decade more negative in the southern hemisphere tropical regions to 25 deg S, but remain relatively unchanged elsewhere. The seasonal structure of the total ozone trends is similar to past trend study results, but the magnitude of the seasonal trend can vary by 2% per decade depending on the length of the time series. Both Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) (through April 1993) and SBUV total ozone time series show small negative trends in the equatorial region, though they are not statistically at the 2-sigma level.

  5. The verification of lightning location accuracy in Finland deduced from lightning strikes to trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, Antti; Mäkelä, Jakke; Haapalainen, Jussi; Porjo, Niko

    2016-05-01

    We present a new method to determine the ground truth and accuracy of lightning location systems (LLS), using natural lightning strikes to trees. Observations of strikes to trees are being collected with a Web-based survey tool at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Since the Finnish thunderstorms tend to have on average a low flash rate, it is often possible to identify from the LLS data unambiguously the stroke that caused damage to a given tree. The coordinates of the tree are then the ground truth for that stroke. The technique has clear advantages over other methods used to determine the ground truth. Instrumented towers and rocket launches measure upward-propagating lightning. Video and audio records, even with triangulation, are rarely capable of high accuracy. We present data for 36 quality-controlled tree strikes in the years 2007-2008. We show that the average inaccuracy of the lightning location network for that period was 600 m. In addition, we show that the 50% confidence ellipse calculated by the lightning location network and used operationally for describing the location accuracy is physically meaningful: half of all the strikes were located within the uncertainty ellipse of the nearest recorded stroke. Using tree strike data thus allows not only the accuracy of the LLS to be estimated but also the reliability of the uncertainty ellipse. To our knowledge, this method has not been attempted before for natural lightning.

  6. Evolution of the Storm Magnetic Field Disturbance on Earth's Surface and the Associated Ring Current as Deduced from Multiple Ground Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Zeng, Gang; Li, Xinlin; Rong, Zhaojin

    2014-05-01

    Based on the continuous magnetic field measurements of the multiple ground observatories, the structure of the geomagnetic field disturbance and its temporal variations have been investigated, so as to deduce the evolution of the storm ring current. Assuming the geomagnetic field disturbance around Earth is linear in space, the gradient of the corrected H component is obtained from the multiple ground observations. It is found that, the maximum difference of the corrected H component around the Earth surface, as calculated by the gradient of the corrected H component multiplied by the Earth diameter, well represents the asymmetric index Asy-H, but is actually more sensitive to the substorm activities than the Asy-H index. The anti-direction of the gradient of the corrected H component may be regarded as pointing to the position of the maximum partial ring current. It is shown that, for the ordinary storms (Dst>-200nT) (which may be caused by CIRs, long lasting fast solar wind flows, or prolonged south IMF, etc), the maximum partial ring current is located around the duskside during the main phase and the earlier stage of the recovery phase. At the later stage of the recovery phase, the position of the maximum partial ring current keeps rotating eastward, indicating the energetic electrons may play a significant role and the main ring current carriers may be the electrons at this stage. For the severe storms (Dst<-200nT), the position of the maximum partial ring current is not so regular, and there is the evidence that the injected electrons may contribute significantly to the ring current during the main phase of supper storms. Based on physical considerations, this investigation also provides new definitions to the symmetric index Sym-H and asymmetric index Asy-H. It is made possible that, the symmetric index Sym-H and asymmetric index Asy-H may be deduced from the measurements of the geomagnetic observatories located at local but not global area on Earth.

  7. Topoclimatic features as deduced from remote sensing and their impacts on ecological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensky, Itamar; Dayan, Uri

    2010-05-01

    Several recent studies have shown that global models are not capable to predict accurately the evolution of climate changes and variability on the regional scale. Misinterpretation of the anticipated climate change impacts on plants and animals are caused by failure of models to capture topoclimatic conditions. In order to capture the climate spatial variability induced by topography it is necessary to conduct topoclimatological studies. The steady growth in remote sensing and its capacities to monitor spatial patterns in climate driven by topography seems to be an indispensable tool to fill the spatial gap existing in topoclimatic studies. We analyzed time series of Land Surface Temperature (LST) from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's TERRA satellite using temporal Fourier analysis for the Eastern Mediterranean (EM). RGB display of the mean, amplitude and phase of the first harmonic (annual) were used to decipher topoclimatic features, e.g. cold patches of few kilometers differing much from their vicinity, driven by local topography. These time series were also used to calculate recent decadal trends on a fine spatial resolution of 1 km. The decadal trend over the EM is of about 0.3oC with very large local variability (-1.5 to 1.5oC). The day LST trends values are larger than those obtained for the night time, implying tendency towards a more continental climate (desertification). The thermal heterogeneity resulting from topographic diversity has strong impacts on ecological systems (e.g. biodiversity) and on agriculture (e.g. pest management, crop production). Examples of such impacts will be shown for present and predicted climate for 20 years over the EM.

  8. Crustal structure of the Hecataeus Rise (eastern Mediterranean) deduced by marine gravity and marine magnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In the year 2010 extensive geophysical researches were carried out in the area of Hecataeus Rise using the German research vessel Maria S. Merian. Beside the bathymetry, refraction and reflection seismic data, marine gravity and marine magnetic data were acquired during this cruise. The result of the research along one Wide-Angle reflection/refraction seismic line of this cruise is published 2015 by K. Welford et al.. Based on interpretation of reflection seismic and bathymetry data across the Hecataeus Rise, S. Reiche published 2015 the crustal structure and bathymetric features along some seismic profiles of this cruise. The focus of this work is to use the available sediments and crustal structures inferred by seismic information together with real marine gravity and marine magnetic data in order to produce gravity and magnetic 2-D models along all seismic profiles. While Welford et al. used the altimetry gravity data and magnetic data from EMAG3 database for their modelling, the real gravity and magnetic data measured exactly along the seismic profiles will be used in this work. The advantage of the real marine gravity and real marine magnetic data used for the modelling is that they have higher accuracy in the values as well as in the positions. Furthermore, Welford et al. calculated the gravity and Magnetic models along some seismic profiles, while in this work the result of gravity and magnetic modelling along all seismic profiles of this cruise will be presented. The marine gravity and marine magnetic data along all seismic profiles were recorded continuously. The accuracy of marine gravity data is about ± 1 mGal, while the accuracy of Marine magnetic data is in the range of ± 3 nT. The results of 2-D gravity and magnetic modelling will be presented and discussed in this work.

  9. Adult Opisthorchis felineus major protein fractions deduced from transcripts: comparison with liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Pomaznoy, Mikhail; Tatkov, Sergey; Katokhin, Alexey; Afonnikov, Dmitry; Babenko, Vladimir; Furman, Dagmara; Brusentsov, Ilya; Belavin, Pavel; Najakshin, Alexandr; Guselnikov, Sergey; Vasiliev, Gennady; Sivkov, Anton; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Skryabin, Konstantin; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav

    2013-10-01

    The epidemiologically important liver flukes Opisthorchis felineus, Opisthorchis viverrini, and Clonorchis sinensis are of interest to health professionals, epidemiologists, pharmacologists, and molecular biologists. Recently the transcriptomes of the latter two species were intensively investigated. However our knowledge on molecular biology of O. felineus is scarce. We report the first results of the O. felineus transcriptome analysis. We isolated and annotated a total of 2560 expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from adult O. felineus (deposited within the database of expressed sequence tags (dbEST), under accession numbers GenBank: JK624271-JK626790, JK006511-JK006547, JK649790-JK649792). Clustering and analysis resulted in the detection of 267 contigs. Of the protein sequences deduced from these, 82% had homologs in the NCBI (nr) protein database and 63% contained conserved domains, allowing the functions to be interpreted using the Gene Ontology terms. Comprehensive analysis of Opisthorchiidae- and Trematoda-specific substitutions within amino acid sequences deduced for the proteins myoglobin, vitelline precursor protein, cathepsin F, and 28kDa glutathione transferase was carried out. The gene set of the 32 ribosomal proteins for the three Opisthorchiidae species with the addition of available Schistosoma and Fasciola orthologs was created and is provided in the supplementary. The orthologous gene set created was used for inferring phylogeny within the Trematoda with special attention to interrelations within the Opisthorchiidae. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a closer relationship between C. sinensis and O. viverrini and some divergence of O. felineus from either O. viverrini or C. sinensis.

  10. Atomic oxygen on the Venus nightside: Global distribution deduced from airglow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, L.; Gérard, J.-C.; Montmessin, F.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.; Bertaux, J.-L.

    2012-02-01

    The Visible and Infra-Red Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument on board the Venus Express spacecraft has measured the O 2(a 1Δ) nightglow distribution at 1.27 μm in the Venus mesosphere for more than two years. Nadir observations have been used to create a statistical map of the emission on Venus nightside. It appears that the statistical 1.6 MR maximum of the emission is located around the antisolar point. Limb observations provide information on the altitude and on the shape of the emission layer. We combine nadir observations essentially covering the southern hemisphere, corrected for the thermal emission of the lower atmosphere, with limb profiles of the northern hemisphere to generate a global map of the Venus nightside emission at 1.27 μm. Given all the O 2(a 1Δ) intensity profiles, O 2(a 1Δ) and O density profiles have been calculated and three-dimensional maps of metastable molecular and atomic oxygen densities have been generated. This global O density nightside distribution improves that available from the VTS3 model, which was based on measurements made above 145 km. The O 2(a 1Δ) hemispheric average density is 2.1 × 10 9 cm -3, with a maximum value of 6.5 × 10 9 cm -3 at 99.2 km. The O density profiles have been derived from the nightglow data using CO 2 profiles from the empirical VTS3 model or from SPICAV stellar occultations. The O hemispheric average density is 1.9 × 10 11 cm -3 in both cases, with a mean altitude of the peak located at 106.1 km and 103.4 km, respectively. These results tend to confirm the modeled values of 2.8 × 10 11 cm -3 at 104 km and 2.0 × 10 11 cm -3 at 110 km obtained by Brecht et al. [Brecht, A., Bougher, S.W., Gérard, J.-C., Parkinson, C.D., Rafkin, S., Foster, B., 2011a. J. Geophys. Res., in press] and Krasnopolsky [Krasnopolsky, V.A., 2010. Icarus 207, 17-27], respectively. Comparing the oxygen density map derived from the O 2(a 1Δ) nightglow observations, it appears that the morphology is very

  11. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results.

  12. Accretion timescale and impact history of Mars deduced from the isotopic systematics of martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Lars E.; Brennecka, Gregory A.; Symes, Steven J. K.

    2016-02-01

    High precision Sm-Nd isotopic analyses have been completed on a suite of 11 martian basaltic meteorites in order to better constrain the age of silicate differentiation on Mars associated with the formation of their mantle sources. These data are used to evaluate the merits and disadvantages of various mathematical approaches that have been employed in previous work on this topic. Ages determined from the Sm-Nd isotopic systematics of individual samples are strongly dependent on the assumed Nd isotopic composition of the bulk planet. This assumption is problematic given differences observed between the Nd isotopic composition of Earth and chondritic meteorites and the fact that these materials are both commonly used to represent bulk planetary Nd isotopic compositions. Ages determined from the slope of 146Sm-142Nd whole rock isochrons are not dependent on the assumed 142Nd/144Nd ratio of the planet, but require the sample suite to be derived from complementary, contemporaneously-formed reservoirs. In this work, we present a mathematical expression that defines the age of formation of the source regions of such a suite of samples that is based solely on the slope of a 143Nd-142Nd whole rock isochron and is also independent of any a priori assumptions regarding the bulk isotopic composition of the planet. This expression is also applicable to mineral isochrons and has been used to successfully calculate 143Nd-142Nd model crystallization ages of early refractory solids as well as lunar samples. This permits ages to be obtained using only Nd isotopic measurements without the need for 147Sm/144Nd isotope dilution determinations. When used in conjunction with high-precision Nd isotopic measurements completed on martian meteorites this expression yields an age of formation of the martian basaltic meteorite source regions of 4504 ± 6 Ma. Because the Sm-Nd model ages for the formation of martian source regions are commonly interpreted to record the age at which large scale

  13. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  14. Intra-plasmaspheric wave power density deduced from long-term DEMETER measurements of terrestrial VLF transmitter wave amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauben, D.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U.

    2012-12-01

    We deduce the 3d intra-plasmaspheric distribution of VLF wave power between conjugate regions of strong VLF wave amplitudes as measured by DEMETER for high-power terrestrial VLF transmitters during its ~6-yr lifetime. We employ a mixed WKB/full-wave technique to solve for the primary and secondary electromagnetic and electrostatic waves which are transmitted and reflected from strong cold-plasma density gradients and posited irregularities, in order to match the respective end-point measured amplitude distributions. Energy arriving in the conjugate region and also escaping to other regions of the magnetosphere is note. The resulting 3d distribution allows improved estimates for the long-term average particle scattering induced by terrestrial VLF transmitters.

  15. WBN-1 Cycle 10 TPBAR Tritium Release, Deduced From Analysis of RCS Data TTP-1-3046-00, Rev 0

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Niehus, Mark T.; Love, Edward F.

    2012-02-19

    This document contains the calculation of the TPBAR tritium release from the Mark 9.2 design TPBARs irradiated in WBN cycle 10. The calculation utilizes the generalized cycle analysis methodology given in TTP-1-3045 Rev. 0.

  16. On the calculation of flow about objects traveling at high supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, A J

    1952-01-01

    A procedure for calculating three-dimensional steady and nonsteady supersonic flows with the method of characteristics is developed and discussed. An approximate method is deduced from the characteristics method and shown to be of practical value at high supersonic speeds.

  17. An Exact Formula for Calculating Inverse Radial Lens Distortions

    PubMed Central

    Drap, Pierre; Lefèvre, Julien

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a new approach to calculating the inverse of radial distortions. The method presented here provides a model of reverse radial distortion, currently modeled by a polynomial expression, that proposes another polynomial expression where the new coefficients are a function of the original ones. After describing the state of the art, the proposed method is developed. It is based on a formal calculus involving a power series used to deduce a recursive formula for the new coefficients. We present several implementations of this method and describe the experiments conducted to assess the validity of the new approach. Such an approach, non-iterative, using another polynomial expression, able to be deduced from the first one, can actually be interesting in terms of performance, reuse of existing software, or bridging between different existing software tools that do not consider distortion from the same point of view. PMID:27258288

  18. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  19. Morphology of high-latitude plasma density perturbations as deduced from the total electron content measurements onboard the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Lühr, Hermann; Kervalishvili, Guram; Rauberg, Jan; Stolle, Claudia; Kwak, Young-Sil; Lee, Woo Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the climatology of high-latitude total electron content (TEC) variations as observed by the dual-frequency Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers onboard the Swarm satellite constellation. The distribution of TEC perturbations as a function of geographic/magnetic coordinates and seasons reasonably agrees with that of the Challenging Minisatellite Payload observations published earlier. Categorizing the high-latitude TEC perturbations according to line-of-sight directions between Swarm and GNSS satellites, we can deduce their morphology with respect to the geomagnetic field lines. In the Northern Hemisphere, the perturbation shapes are mostly aligned with the L shell surface, and this anisotropy is strongest in the nightside auroral (substorm) and subauroral regions and weakest in the central polar cap. The results are consistent with the well-known two-cell plasma convection pattern of the high-latitude ionosphere, which is approximately aligned with L shells at auroral regions and crossing different L shells for a significant part of the polar cap. In the Southern Hemisphere, the perturbation structures exhibit noticeable misalignment to the local L shells. Here the direction toward the Sun has an additional influence on the plasma structure, which we attribute to photoionization effects. The larger offset between geographic and geomagnetic poles in the south than in the north is responsible for the hemispheric difference.

  20. Evolutionary relationships of a plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organism and Acholeplasma laidlawii deduced from two ribosomal protein gene sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, P O; Sears, B B

    1992-01-01

    The families within the class Mollicutes are distinguished by their morphologies, nutritional requirements, and abilities to metabolize certain compounds. Biosystematic classification of the plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) has been difficult because these organisms have not been cultured in vitro, and hence their nutritional requirements have not been determined nor have physiological characterizations been possible. To investigate the evolutionary relationship of the MLOs to other members of the class Mollicutes, a segment of a ribosomal protein operon was cloned and sequenced from an aster yellows-type MLO which is pathogenic for members of the genus Oenothera and from Acholeplasma laidlawii. The deduced amino acid sequence data from the rpl22 and rps3 genes indicate that the MLOs are more closely related to A. laidlawii than to animal mycoplasmas, confirming previous results from 16S rRNA sequence comparisons. This conclusion is also supported by the finding that the UGA codon is not read as a tryptophan codon in the MLO and A. laidlawii, in contrast to its usage in Mycoplasma capricolum. PMID:1556079

  1. New prospects for deducing the evolutionary history of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes: Aromatic biosynthesis as a case-in-point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Suhail; Jensen, Roy A.

    1988-03-01

    Metabolic pathways of prokaryotes are more biochemically diverse than is generally recognized. Distinctive biochemical features are shared by phylogenetic clusters. The hierarchical levels of characterstate clustering depends upon evolutionary events which fortuitously became fixed in the genome of a common ancestor. Prokaryotes can now be ordered on a phylogenetic tree. This allows the evolutionary steps that underlie the construction and regulation of appropriately complex biochemical pathways to be traced in an evolutionary progression of prokaryote types that house these pathways. Essentially the approach is to deduce ancestral character states at ever deeper phylogenetic levels, utilizing logical principles of maximum parsimony. The current perspective on the evolution of the biochemical pathway for biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids is developed as a case-in-point model for analyses that should be feasible with many major metabolic systems. Phenylalanine biosynthesis probably arose prior to the addition of branches leading to tyrosine and tryptophan. An evolutionary scenario is developed that begins with non-enzymatic reactions which may have operated in primitive systems, followed by the evolution of an enzymatic system that pre-dated the divergence of major lineages of modern eubacteria (Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative purple bacteria, and cyanobacteria).

  2. Deducing solid liquid interfacial energy from superheating or supercooling: application to H2O at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian; Strachan, Alejandro; Swift, Damian C.

    2005-04-01

    We present a general method to determine the solid-liquid interfacial energy (γsl) from the maximum supercooling (or superheating), and apply it to the water-ice system. For solid-liquid phase transitions, the nucleation-theory-based systematics of maximum superheating and supercooling relate a dimensionless nucleation barrier to the superheating (supercooling) and heating (cooling) rates. Given superheating (or supercooling) values from either experiments or simulations, γsl can then be deduced from the dimensionless nucleation barrier, equilibrium melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion. We demonstrate the accuracy of this approach using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Lennard-Jones system: our predictions of γsl at various pressures are in excellent agreement with independent, direct MD simulations. With this approach, we predict γsl for the water-ice (Ih and III) system using experimental supercooling values in the pressure range of 0-0.3 GPa. The predicted value (28 ± 0.8 mJ m-2) agrees with measurements on H2O-Ih at ambient pressure.

  3. Metabolic potential of the organic-solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E deduced from its annotated genome

    PubMed Central

    Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Daniels, Craig; Gómez, Manuel J; Molina-Henares, María A; Matilla, Miguel A; Roca, Amalia; Fernández, Matilde; Duque, Estrella; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2013-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E is an organic solvent tolerant strain capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report the DOT-T1E genomic sequence (6 394 153 bp) and its metabolic atlas based on the classification of enzyme activities. The genome encodes for at least 1751 enzymatic reactions that account for the known pattern of C, N, P and S utilization by this strain. Based on the potential of this strain to thrive in the presence of organic solvents and the subclasses of enzymes encoded in the genome, its metabolic map can be drawn and a number of potential biotransformation reactions can be deduced. This information may prove useful for adapting desired reactions to create value-added products. This bioengineering potential may be realized via direct transformation of substrates, or may require genetic engineering to block an existing pathway, or to re-organize operons and genes, as well as possibly requiring the recruitment of enzymes from other sources to achieve the desired transformation. Funding Information Work in our laboratory was supported by Fondo Social Europeo and Fondos FEDER from the European Union, through several projects (BIO2010-17227, Consolider-Ingenio CSD2007-00005, Excelencia 2007 CVI-3010, Excelencia 2011 CVI-7391 and EXPLORA BIO2011-12776-E). PMID:23815283

  4. Deducing the 236Pu(n,f) and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections via the surrogate ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. O.; Beausang, C. W.; Ross, T. J.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; McCleskey, M.; Cooper, N.; Escher, J. E.; Gell, K. B.; Good, E.; Humby, P.; Saastimoinen, A.; Tarlow, T. D.

    2013-10-01

    The short half-lives associated with certain minor actinide nuclei that are relevant to stockpile stewardship pursuits and the development of next-generation nuclear reactors make direct neutron measurements very challenging. In certain cases, a stable beam and target ``surrogate reaction'' can be used in lieu of the neutron-induced reaction, and the (n,f) cross section can then be deduced indirectly. Agreement between surrogate and direct measurements for (n,f) cross sections in actinide nuclei is usually within 10%. The present work reports on the measurement of the 236Pu(n,f) and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections via 239Pu(p,tf) and 239Pu(p,df) surrogate reactions, respectively. The experiment was performed at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Facility using a 28.5 MeV proton beam to bombard 239Pu and 235U targets. Outgoing light ions were detected in coincidence with fission fragments using the STAR-LiTe detector array. Results of the analysis will be presented. This work was supported by DoE Grant Numbers: DE-FG52-09NA29454 and DE-FG02-05ER41379 (Richmond), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-FG52-09NA29467 (TAMU).

  5. Programmable calculator stress analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gulick, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced programmable alphanumeric calculators are well suited for closed-form calculation of pressure-vessel stresses. They offer adequate computing power, portability, special programming features, and simple interactive execution procedures. Representative programs that demonstrate calculator capabilities are presented. Problems treated are stress and strength calculations in thick-walled pressure vessels and the computation of stresses near head/pressure-vessel junctures.

  6. Light regulation of cGMP metabolism in toad rod outer segments (ROS) deduced from intact photoreceptor and cellfree kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Dawis, S.M.; Graeff, R.M.; Heyman, R.A.; Walseth, T.F.; Butz, E.A.

    1987-05-01

    The rate of cGMP hydrolysis by phosphodiesterase (PDE) in intact ROS, monitored in dark-adapted isolated toad retina by the rate of /sup 18/O appearance in guanine nucleotide ..cap alpha..-phosphoryls, is 1/360th of that observed in disrupted ROS at a substrate concentration equivalent to the total (cGMP) in ROS. Low to moderate photic stimuli increase this cGMP hydrolytic rate up to 10-fold in intact ROS with little or no change in total (cGMP). G-protein activation determined in intact ROS by the fraction of GDP labeled with /sup 18/O corresponds with light-related increases in cGMP flux. In contrast, relatively high intensities and extended illumination cause attenuation of maximal cGMP hydrolysis with proportionate reductions in total (cGMP). From these observations combined with the effects of activated G-protein on kinetics and cGMP binding of ROS PDE the following model for light-regulation of cGMP metabolism was deduced: cGMP flux in intact ROS is severely restricted in the dark state because approximately 99% of the cGMP is bound to high affinity sites on the non-stimulated form of PDE. This constraint is relieved when activated G-protein converts the cGMP-binding form of PDE to a high K/sub m/ catalytic form. cGMP is then redistributed to a dynamic pool where it is available to PDE catalytic sites and lower affinity allosteric sites. The (cGMP) in the dynamic pool is maintained or further increased or decreased by modulating the activity of an apparently light-sensitive guanylyl cyclase.

  7. Implications of Late Pliocene-Pleistocene Humidity Fluctuations in the Qaidam Paleolake (NE Tibetan Plateau) Deduced from Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herb, C.; Appel, E.; Koutsodendris, A.; Zhang, W.; Pross, J.; Fang, X.

    2014-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin (NE Tibetan Plateau) contains a near-continuous, up to 12 km thick sequence of Cenozoic strata that offers a unique opportunity for studying long-term climate change. We investigate the 940-m-long drill core SG-1 from the western Qaidam Basin, which is characterized by a long-term transition from a semi-deep freshwater lake to nearly complete exsiccation of the water body, detected by several studies including geochemical and lithological observations. Based on magnetostratigraphy and optically stimulated luminescence dating, and refined by orbital tuning, the SG-1 core spans the interval from 2.69 to 0.1 Ma. Moisture availability in the western Qaidam Basin deduced from the pollen ratio Artemisia/Chenopodiaceae (A/C), suggests desert to steppe vegetation along core SG-1 as a long-term feature. Magnetic susceptibility (χ) is well suited for the high-resolution investigation of paleohumidity. The meaning of χ as a paleohydrology proxy is shown by comparing χ to other magnetic proxies for checking its relation to magnetic grain sizes and magnetic mineralogy as well as to pollen results. χ variations are analyzed to obtain regional information on the factors leading to the drying process of the Qaidam paleolake as well as potential driving factors for humidity fluctuations (e.g., insolation). An important topic that needs further investigation is the influence of monsoon in the Qaidam Basin. While the southern part of the Tibetan Plateau is directly affected by monsoon precipitation through the topographic barrier, its influence in the past is questionable in the hyper-arid Qaidam Basin. We check a potential coupling to the monsoon system in the western Qaidam Basin by comparing our χ record to reconstructions of the Asian monsoon system from other archives as well as searching evidence from orbital cyclicities found in the χ time series.

  8. Deducing Hybrid Performance from Parental Metabolic Profiles of Young Primary Roots of Maize by Using a Multivariate Diallel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Feher, Kristen; Lisec, Jan; Römisch-Margl, Lilla; Selbig, Joachim; Gierl, Alfons; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nikoloski, Zoran; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2014-01-01

    Heterosis, the greater vigor of hybrids compared to their parents, has been exploited in maize breeding for more than 100 years to produce ever better performing elite hybrids of increased yield. Despite extensive research, the underlying mechanisms shaping the extent of heterosis are not well understood, rendering the process of selecting an optimal set of parental lines tedious. This study is based on a dataset consisting of 112 metabolite levels in young roots of four parental maize inbred lines and their corresponding twelve hybrids, along with the roots' biomass as a heterotic trait. Because the parental biomass is a poor predictor for hybrid biomass, we established a model framework to deduce the biomass of the hybrid from metabolite profiles of its parental lines. In the proposed framework, the hybrid metabolite levels are expressed relative to the parental levels by incorporating the standard concept of additivity/dominance, which we name the Combined Relative Level (CRL). Our modeling strategy includes a feature selection step on the parental levels which are demonstrated to be predictive of CRL across many hybrid metabolites. We demonstrate that these selected parental metabolites are further predictive of hybrid biomass. Our approach directly employs the diallel structure in a multivariate fashion, whereby we attempt to not only predict macroscopic phenotype (biomass), but also molecular phenotype (metabolite profiles). Therefore, our study provides the first steps for further investigations of the genetic determinants to metabolism and, ultimately, growth. Finally, our success on the small-scale experiments implies a valid strategy for large-scale experiments, where parental metabolite profiles may be used together with profiles of selected hybrids as a training set to predict biomass of all possible hybrids. PMID:24409329

  9. Sequence and tissue distribution of a second protein of hepatic gap junctions, Cx26, as deduced from its cDNA

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    While a number of different gap junction proteins have now been identified, hepatic gap junctions are unique in being the first demonstrated case where two homologous, but distinct, proteins (28,000 and 21,000 Mr) are found within a single gap junctional plaque (Nicholson, B. J., R. Dermietzel, D. Teplow, O. Traub, K. Willecke, and J.-P. Revel. 1987. Nature [Lond.]. 329:732-734). The cDNA for the major 28,000-Mr component has been cloned (Paul, D. L. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:123-134) (Kumar, N. M., and N. B. Gilula. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:767-776) and, based on its deduced formula weight of 32,007, has been designated connexin 32 (or Cx32 as used here). We now report the selection and characterization of clones for the second 21,000-Mr protein using an oligonucleotide derived from the amino-terminal protein sequence. Together the cDNAs represent 2.4 kb of the single 2.5- kb message detected in Northern blots. An open reading frame of 678 bp coding for a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 26,453 D was identified. Overall sequence homology with Cx32 and Cx43 (64 and 51% amino acid identities, respectively) and a similar predicted tertiary structure confirm that this protein forms part of the connexin family and is consequently referred to as Cx26. Consistent with observations on Cx43 (Beyer, E. C., D. L. Paul, and D. A. Goodenough. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105:2621-2629) the most marked divergence between Cx26 and other members of the family lies in the sequence of the cytoplasmic domains. The Cx26 gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome in rat and, based on Southern blots, appears to contain at least one intron outside the open reading frame. Northern blots indicate that Cx32 and Cx26 are typically coexpressed, messages for both having been identified in liver, kidney, intestine, lung, spleen, stomach, testes, and brain, but not heart and adult skeletal muscle. This raises the interesting prospect of having differential modes of regulating

  10. Evaluation des programmes de techniques d'education en services de garde (Evaluation of Programs of Educational Methods in Child Care Services. 2410-0521.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigneau, Paul, Comp.

    In March 1994, Quebec's Commission on the Evaluation of Collegiate Teaching initiated an evaluation of "Techniques d'education en services de garde" (TESG) programs, or educational methods in child care services. This report presents results from the evaluation in three parts. The first section describes the following four stages of the…

  11. Personal Finance Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argo, Mark

    1982-01-01

    Contains explanations and examples of mathematical calculations for a secondary level course on personal finance. How to calculate total monetary cost of an item, monthly payments, different types of interest, annual percentage rates, and unit pricing is explained. (RM)

  12. Calculators, Computers, and Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Jon L.; Kirschner, Vicky

    Suggestions for using four-function calculators, programmable calculators, and microcomputers are considered in this collection of 36 articles. The first section contains articles considering general implications for mathematics curricula implied by the freedom calculators offer students from routine computation, enabling them to focus on results…

  13. How Do Calculators Calculate Trigonometric Functions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Jeremy M.; Edwards, Bruce H.

    How does your calculator quickly produce values of trigonometric functions? You might be surprised to learn that it does not use series or polynomial approximations, but rather the so-called CORDIC method. This paper will focus on the geometry of the CORDIC method, as originally developed by Volder in 1959. This algorithm is a wonderful…

  14. 600 yr High-Resolution Climate Reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability deduced from a Puerto Rican Speleothem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, A.; Vieten, R.

    2015-12-01

    A multi-proxy speleothem study tracks the regional hydrological variability in Puerto Rico and highlights its close relation to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Our proxy record extends instrumental observations 600 years into the past, and reveals the range of natural hydrologic variability for the region. A detailed interpretation and understanding of the speleothem climate record is achieved by the combination of multi-proxy measurements, thin section petrography, XRD analysis and cave monitoring results. The speleothem was collected in Cueva Larga, a one mile-long cave system that has been monitored since 2012. MC-ICPMS 230Th/U-dating reveals that the speleothem grew constantly over the last 600 years. Trace element ratios (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) as well as stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ13C) elucidate significant changes in atmospheric precipitation at the site. Monthly cave monitoring results demonstrate that the epikarst system responds to multi-annual changes in seepage water recharge. The drip water isotope and trace element composition lack short term or seasonal variability. This hydrological system creates favorable conditions to deduce decadal climate variability from Cueva Larga's climate record. The speleothem time series mimics the most-recently published AMO reconstruction over the last 200 years with a time lag of 10-20 years. The time lag seems to results from slow atmospheric signal transmission through the epikarst but the effect of dating uncertainties cannot be ruled out. Warm SSTs in the North Atlantic are related to drier conditions in Puerto Rico. During times of decreased rainfall a relative increase in prior calcite precipitation seems to be the main process causing increased Mg/Ca trace element ratios. High trace element ratios correlate to higher δ13C values. The increase in both proxies indicates a shift towards time periods of decreased rainfall. Over the past 600 years there are two intervals of increased Mg/Ca and δ13C values

  15. 600 yr High-Resolution Climate Reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation deduced from a Puerto Rican Speleothem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieten, Rolf; Winter, Amos; Scholz, Denis; Black, David; Spoetl, Christoph; Winterhalder, Sophie; Koltai, Gabriella; Schroeder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Terzer, Stefan; Zanchettin, Davide; Mangini, Augusto

    2016-04-01

    A multi-proxy speleothem study tracks the regional hydrological variability in Puerto Rico and highlights its close relation to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) describing low-frequency sea-surface temperature (SST) variability in the North Atlantic ocean. Our proxy record extends instrumental observations 600 years into the past, and reveals the range of natural hydrologic variability for the region. A detailed interpretation and understanding of the speleothem climate record is achieved by the combination of multi-proxy measurements, thin section petrography, XRD analysis and cave monitoring results. The speleothem was collected in Cueva Larga, a one mile-long cave system that has been monitored since 2012. MC-ICPMS 230Th/U-dating reveals that the speleothem grew constantly over the last 600 years. Trace element ratios (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) as well as stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ13C) elucidate significant changes in atmospheric precipitation at the site. Monthly cave monitoring results demonstrate that the epikarst system responds to multi-annual changes in seepage water recharge. The drip water isotope and trace element composition lack short term or seasonal variability. This hydrological system creates favorable conditions to deduce decadal climate variability from Cueva Larga's climate record. The speleothem time series mimics the most recent AMO reconstruction over the last 200 years (Svendsen et al., 2014) with a time lag of 10-20 years. The lag seems to results from slow atmospheric signal transmission through the epikarst but the effect of dating uncertainties cannot be ruled out. Warm SSTs in the North Atlantic are related to drier conditions in Puerto Rico. During times of decreased rainfall a relative increase in prior calcite precipitation seems to be the main process causing increased Mg/Ca trace element ratios. High trace element ratios correlate to higher δ13C values. The increase in both proxies indicates a shift towards time

  16. SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaumann, Uwe; Duprat, Josette; Pujol, Claude; Labeyrie, Laurent D.

    1996-02-01

    leave the system.) (Paper 95PA01743,SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surfacetemperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments, UwePflaumann, Josette Duprat, Claude Pujol, and Laurent D. Labeyrie).Diskette may be ordered from American Geophysical Union, 2000Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009; Payment mustaccompany order.

  17. Current Deformation in Central Afar and Triple Junction Kinematics Deduced from GPS and InSAR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cécile, Doubre; Aline, Déprez; Frédéric, Masson; Anne, Socquet; Elias, Lewi; Raphael, Grandin; Alexandre, Nercessian; Patrice, Ulrich; Jean-Bernard, De Chabalier; Ibrahim, Saad; Ahmadine, Abayazid; Gilles, Peltzer; Arthur, Delorme; Eric, Calais; Tim, Wright

    2016-11-01

    Kinematics of divergent boundaries and Rift-Rift-Rift junctions are classically studied using long-term geodetic observations. Since significant magma-related displacements are expected, short-term deformation provides important constraints on the crustal mechanisms involved both in active rifting and in transfer of extensional deformation between spreading axes. Using InSAR and GPS data, we analyze the surface deformation in the whole Central Afar region in detail, focusing on both the extensional deformation across the Quaternary magmato-tectonic rift segments, and on the zones of deformation transfer between active segments and spreading axes. The largest deformation occurs across the two recently activated Asal-Ghoubbet (AG) and MH-D magmato-tectonic segments with very high strain rates, whereas the other Quaternary active segments do not concentrate any large strain, suggesting that these rifts are either sealed during inter-dyking periods or not mature enough to remain a plate boundary. Outside of these segments, the GPS horizontal velocity field shows a regular gradient following a clockwise rotation of the displacements from the Southeast to the East of Afar, with respect to Nubia. Very few shallow creeping structures can be identified as well in the InSAR data. However, using these data together with the strain rate tensor and the rotations rates deduced from GPS baselines, the present-day strain field over Central Afar is consistent with the main tectonic structures, and therefore with the long-term deformation. We investigate the current kinematics of the triple junction included in our GPS data set by building simple block models. The deformation in Central Afar can be described by adding a central micro-block evolving separately from the three surrounding plates. In this model, the northern block boundary corresponds to a deep EW-trending trans-tensional dislocation, locked from the surface to 10-13 km and joining at depth the active spreading axes of

  18. Current deformation in Central Afar and triple junction kinematics deduced from GPS and InSAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubre, Cécile; Déprez, Aline; Masson, Frédéric; Socquet, Anne; Lewi, Elias; Grandin, Raphaël; Nercessian, Alexandre; Ulrich, Patrice; De Chabalier, Jean-Bernard; Saad, Ibrahim; Abayazid, Ahmadine; Peltzer, Gilles; Delorme, Arthur; Calais, Eric; Wright, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Kinematics of divergent boundaries and Rift-Rift-Rift junctions are classically studied using long-term geodetic observations. Since significant magma-related displacements are expected, short-term deformation provides important constraints on the crustal mechanisms involved both in active rifting and in transfer of extensional deformation between spreading axes. Using InSAR and GPS data, we analyse the surface deformation in the whole Central Afar region in detail, focusing on both the extensional deformation across the Quaternary magmato-tectonic rift segments, and on the zones of deformation transfer between active segments and spreading axes. The largest deformation occurs across the two recently activated Asal-Ghoubbet (AG) and Manda Hararo-Dabbahu (MH-D) magmato-tectonic segments with very high strain rates, whereas the other Quaternary active segments do not concentrate any large strain, suggesting that these rifts are either sealed during interdyking periods or not mature enough to remain a plate boundary. Outside of these segments, the GPS horizontal velocity field shows a regular gradient following a clockwise rotation of the displacements from the Southeast to the East of Afar, with respect to Nubia. Very few shallow creeping structures can be identified as well in the InSAR data. However, using these data together with the strain rate tensor and the rotations rates deduced from GPS baselines, the present-day strain field over Central Afar is consistent with the main tectonic structures, and therefore with the long-term deformation. We investigate the current kinematics of the triple junction included in our GPS data set by building simple block models. The deformation in Central Afar can be described by adding a central microblock evolving separately from the three surrounding plates. In this model, the northern block boundary corresponds to a deep EW-trending trans-tensional dislocation, locked from the surface to 10-13 km and joining at depth the

  19. Tables of Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section for Various Pu, U, and Th Isotopes, Deduced from Measured Fission Probabilites

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Britt, H C

    2003-03-31

    Cross sections for neutron-induced fission of {sup 231,233}Th, {sup 234,235,236,237,239}U, and {sup 240,241,243}Pu are presented in tabular form for incident neutron energies of 0.1 {le} E{sub n}(MeV) {le} 2.5. The cross sections were obtained by converting measured fission probabilities from (t,pf) reactions on mass-A targets to (n,f) cross sections on mass-A + 1 neutron targets, by using modeling to compensate for the differences in the reaction mechanisms. Data from Britt et al. were used for the {sup 234}U(t,pf) reaction, from Cramer et al. for the {sup 230,232}Th(t,pf), {sup 236,238}U(t,pf), and {sup 240,242}Pu(t,pf) reactions, and from Britt et al. for the {sup 233,235}U(t,pf) and {sup 239}Pu(t,pf) reactions. The fission probabilities P{sub (t,pf)}(E{sub x}), measured as a function of excitation energy E{sub x} of the compound system formed by the (t,p) reaction, are listed in the tables with the corresponding deduced cross sections as a function of incident neutron energy E{sub n}, {sigma}{sub (n,f)}(E{sub n}). The excitation energy and incident neutron energy are related by E{sub x} = E{sub n} + B{sub n}, where B{sub n}, where B{sub n} is the neutron binding energy. Comparison with ENDF/B-VI evaluations of the well-measured {sup 234,235,236}U(n,f) and {sup 240,241}Pu(n,f) cross sections confirms the accuracy of the present results within a 10% standard deviation above E{sub n} = 1 MeV. Below E{sub n} = 1 MeV, localized deviations of at most {+-} 20% are observed.

  20. Importance of parametrizing constraints in quantum-mechanical variational calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Kwong T.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    In variational calculations of quantum mechanics, constraints are sometimes imposed explicitly on the wave function. These constraints, which are deduced by physical arguments, are often not uniquely defined. In this work, the advantage of parametrizing constraints and letting the variational principle determine the best possible constraint for the problem is pointed out. Examples are carried out to show the surprising effectiveness of the variational method if constraints are parameterized. It is also shown that misleading results may be obtained if a constraint is not parameterized.

  1. Beta Decay of the Proton-Rich Nuclei 102Sn and 104Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Karny, M.; Batist, L.; Banu, A.; Becker, F.; Blazhev, A.; Brown, B. A.; Bruchle, W.; Doring, J.; Faestermann, T.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Janas, Z.; Jungclaus, A.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kirchner, R.; La Commara, M.; Mandal, S.; Mazzocchi, C.; Miernik, K.; Mukha, I.; Muralithar, S.; Plettner, C.; Plochocki, A.; Roeckl, E.; Romoli, M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schadel, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Zylicz, J.

    2006-01-01

    The {beta} decays of {sup 102}Sn and {sup 104}Sn were studied by using high-resolution germanium detectors as well as a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). For {sup 104}Sn, with three new {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays identified, the total Gamow-Teller strength (BGT) value of 2.7(3) was obtained. For {sup 102}Sn, the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data were collected for the first time, allowing us to considerably extend the decay scheme. This scheme was used to unfold the TAS data and to deduce a BGT value of 4.2(8) for this decay. This result is compared to shell model predictions, yielding a hindrance factor of 3.6(7) in agreement with those obtained previously for {sup 98}Cd and {sup 100}In. Together with the latter two, {sup 102}Sn completes the triplet of Z {le} 50, N {ge} 50 nuclei with two proton holes, one proton hole and one neutron particle, and two neutron particles with respect to the doubly magic {sup 100}Sn core.

  2. Explosion Calculations of SN1087

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Explosion calculations of SNT1987A generate pictures of Rayleigh-Taylor fingers of radioactive Ni-56 which are boosted to velocities of several thousand km/s. From the KAO observations of the mid-IR iron lines, a picture of the iron in the ejecta emerges which is consistent with the "frothy iron fingers" having expanded to fill about 50% of the metal-rich volume of the ejecta. The ratio of the nickel line intensities yields a high ionization fraction of greater than or equal to 0.9 in the volume associated with the iron-group elements at day 415, before dust condenses in the ejecta. From the KAO observations of the dust's thermal emission, it is deduced that when the grains condense their infrared radiation is trapped, their apparent opacity is gray, and they have a surface area filling factor of about 50%. The dust emission from SN1987A is featureless: no 9.7 micrometer silicate feature, nor PAH features, nor dust emission features of any kind are seen at any time. The total dust opacity increases with time even though the surface area filling factor and the dust/gas ratio remain constant. This suggests that the dust forms along coherent structures which can maintain their radial line-of-sight opacities, i.e., along fat fingers. The coincidence of the filling factor of the dust and the filling factor of the iron strongly suggests that the dust condenses within the iron, and therefore the dust is iron-rich. It only takes approximately 4 x 10(exp -4) solar mass of dust for the ejecta to be optically thick out to approximately 100 micrometers; a lower limit of 4 x 10(exp -4) solar mass of condensed grains exists in the metal-rich volume, but much more dust could be present. The episode of dust formation started at about 530 days and proceeded rapidly, so that by 600 days 45% of the bolometric luminosity was being emitted in the IR; by 775 days, 86% of the bolometric luminosity was being reradiated by the dust. Measurements of the bolometric luminosity of SN1987A from

  3. Nuclear structure and weak rates of heavy waiting point nuclei under rp-process conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Böyükata, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    The structure and the weak interaction mediated rates of the heavy waiting point (WP) nuclei 80Zr, 84Mo, 88Ru, 92Pd and 96Cd along N = Z line were studied within the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1) and the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA). The energy levels of the N = Z WP nuclei were calculated by fitting the essential parameters of IBM-1 Hamiltonian and their geometric shapes were predicted by plotting potential energy surfaces (PESs). Half-lives, continuum electron capture rates, positron decay rates, electron capture cross sections of WP nuclei, energy rates of β-delayed protons and their emission probabilities were later calculated using the pn-QRPA. The calculated Gamow-Teller strength distributions were compared with previous calculation. We present positron decay and continuum electron capture rates on these WP nuclei under rp-process conditions using the same model. For the rp-process conditions, the calculated total weak rates are twice the Skyrme HF+BCS+QRPA rates for 80Zr. For remaining nuclei the two calculations compare well. The electron capture rates are significant and compete well with the corresponding positron decay rates under rp-process conditions. The finding of the present study supports that electron capture rates form an integral part of the weak rates under rp-process conditions and has an important role for the nuclear model calculations.

  4. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  5. Evapotranspiration Calculator Desktop Tool

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Evapotranspiration Calculator estimates evapotranspiration time series data for hydrological and water quality models for the Hydrologic Simulation Program - Fortran (HSPF) and the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM).

  6. Calculating Toxic Corridors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    nomograms, and a programmable calculator . Appendices present worksheets, example problems, procedures for determining meteorological inputs, a procedure for determining evaporative source strength, and other items.

  7. On calculating the potential vorticity flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-03-15

    We discuss and compare different approaches to calculating the dynamics of anisotropic flow structure formation in quasi two-dimensional turbulence based on potential vorticity (PV) transport in real space. The general structure of the PV flux in the relaxation processes is deduced non-perturbatively. The transport coefficients of the PV flux are then systematically calculated using perturbation theory. We develop two non-perturbative relaxation models: the first is a mean field theory for the dynamics of minimum enstrophy relaxation based on the requirement that the mean flux of PV dissipates total potential enstrophy but conserves total fluid kinetic energy. The results show that the structure of PV flux has the form of a sum of a positive definite hyper-viscous and a negative or positive viscous flux of PV. Turbulence spreading is shown to be related to PV mixing via the link of turbulence energy flux to PV flux. In the relaxed state, the ratio of the PV gradient to zonal flow velocity is homogenized. This homogenized quantity sets a constraint on the amplitudes of PV and zonal flow in the relaxed state. The second relaxation model is derived from symmetry principles alone. The form of PV flux contains a nonlinear convective term in addition to viscous and hyper-viscous terms. For both cases, the transport coefficients are calculated using perturbation theory. For a broad turbulence spectrum, a modulational calculation of the PV flux gives both a negative viscosity and a positive hyper-viscosity. For a narrow turbulence spectrum, the result of a parametric instability analysis shows that PV transport is also convective. In both relaxation and perturbative analyses, it is shown that turbulent PV transport is sensitive to flow structure, and the transport coefficients are nonlinear functions of flow shear.

  8. Origin of platinum-group mineral assemblages in a mantle tectonite at Unst deduced from mineral chemistry and osmium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badanina, Inna Yu.; Lord, Richard A.; Malitch, Kreshimir N.; Meisel, Thomas C.

    2013-04-01

    assemblage is likely to reflect processes such as in-situ serpentinisation, alteration during emplacement or regional greenschist metamorphism. Whole-rock platinum-group element (PGE) concentrations give negatively sloped chondrite-normalized PGE patterns, typical of podiform chromitite, where refractory PGE (Os, Ir and Ru) prevail over less refractory PGE (Rh, Pt and Pd). The osmium isotope results identify similarly 'unradiogenic' 187Os/188Os values for 'primary' and 'secondary' PGM assemblages (with mean 187Os/188Os values of 0.12419 and 0.12464, respectively), being within uncertainty of the chromitite composition (0.1240±0.0006). This implies that the whole-rock Os isotope budget is largely controlled by laurite-dominant assemblages, supporting the conclusion that the 'secondary' PGM assemblage inherited the subchondritic osmium isotope signature of the 'primary' PGM. No evidence for other source contributions during later thermal events has been observed. The Os-isotope data provide further support for an Enstatite Chondrite Reservoir model for the convective upper mantle as defined by Walker et al. (2002) and are consistent with origin of the complex as a Caledonian ophiolite formed in a supra-subduction zone. This study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 12-05-01166-a to IYuB) and the Uralian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences (project No 12-P-5-1020). References: Andrews, D.R.A., Brenan, J.M. (2002) Phase-equilibrium constraints on the magmatic origin of laurite and Os-Ir alloy. Can. Mineral. 40, 1705-1716. Walker, R.J., Prichard, H.M., Ishiwatari, A., Pimentel, M. (2002) The osmium isotopic composition of convecting upper mantle deduced from ophiolite chromites. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66, 329-345.

  9. Local fluctuations of ozone from 16 km to 45 km deduced from in situ vertical ozone profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, G.; Robert, C.

    1994-01-01

    A vertical ozone profile obtained by an in situ ozone sonde from 16 km to 45 km, has allowed to observe local ozone concentration variations. These variations can be observed, thanks to a fast measurement system based on a UV absorption KrF excimer laser beam in a multipass cell. Ozone standard deviation versus altitude calculated from the mean is derived. Ozone variations or fluctuations are correlated with the different dynamic zones of the stratosphere.

  10. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: The Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE)

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Monica M.; Rusincovitch, Shelley A.; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C.; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Methods Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of “smart dimensions”, and dynamically-generated user interfaces. Results DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort “join” functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Conclusions Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source

  11. The characteristics of lower crust and upper mantle in the Cima volcanic field deduced from xenolith studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardon, K. P.; Anthony, E.

    2015-12-01

    A lithospheric model based on mineral chemistry, textures, and temperatures is used to interpret the seismic structure of the upper mantle and lower crust observed under the Cima Volcanic Field, CA. Seismic velocities calculated from xenolith compositions are used in conjunction with petrologic information to interpret geophysical models of the area. The lower crust is composed of mafic compositions and contains a high percentage of quenched partial melt. The combination of quenched partial melt and mafic composition explains the relatively low seismic velocities observed in seismic models. The mafic composition is consistent with a rift environment. Melt compositions, some with > 60 wt% SiO2 are found in all types of Cima xenoliths, although pyroxenites and gabbros contain the largest amount. Pyroxenite from the uppermost mantle transitions into gabbroic compositions and plagioclase rich lithologies in the crust. Temperatures calculated for peridotite xenoliths range from ~ 950 to 1030˚ C. Plagioclase bearing samples have the lowest temperatures and are interpreted as residing in the immediate sub-Moho mantle. Plagioclase bearing lherzolite structurally overlies spinel bearing peridotite. Strain accumulation is most prevalent in plagioclase bearing peridotite and virtually absent from pyroxenites and gabbros. Seismic velocities calculated for peridotite xenoliths are faster than pyroxenite and gabbroic samples. Despite the chemical heterogeneity and complex history of the Moho transitional are most mantle is composed dominantly by peridotite. Very little lithosphere, rhelologically speaking, remains under the volcanic field. We interpret lithospheric dismemberment to be caused by hot mantle working northward from the Gulf of California.

  12. [Understanding dosage calculations].

    PubMed

    Benlahouès, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The calculation of dosages in paediatrics is the concern of the whole medical and paramedical team. This activity must generate a minimum of risks in order to prevent care-related adverse events. In this context, the calculation of dosages is a practice which must be understood by everyone.

  13. Electron beam dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, K R; Mills, M D; Almond, P R

    1981-05-01

    Electron beam dose distributions in the presence of inhomogeneous tissue are calculated by an algorithm that sums the dose distribution of individual pencil beams. The off-axis dependence of the pencil beam dose distribution is described by the Fermi-Eyges theory of thick-target multiple Coulomb scattering. Measured square-field depth-dose data serve as input for the calculations. Air gap corrections are incorporated and use data from'in-air' measurements in the penumbra of the beam. The effective depth, used to evaluate depth-dose, and the sigma of the off-axis Gaussian spread against depth are calculated by recursion relations from a CT data matrix for the material underlying individual pencil beams. The correlation of CT number with relative linear stopping power and relative linear scattering power for various tissues is shown. The results of calculations are verified by comparison with measurements in a 17 MeV electron beam from the Therac 20 linear accelerator. Calculated isodose lines agree nominally to within 2 mm of measurements in a water phantom. Similar agreement is observed in cork slabs simulating lung. Calculations beneath a bone substitute illustrate a weakness in the calculation. Finally a case of carcinoma in the maxillary antrum is studied. The theory suggests an alternative method for the calculation of depth-dose of rectangular fields.

  14. Experimental study of radiative pion capture on /sup 13/C, /sup 20/Ne, /sup 90/Zr, /sup 19/F and /sup 12/C

    SciTech Connect

    Martoff, C.J.

    1980-11-01

    Photon spectra for 50 < E/sub ..gamma../ < 135 MeV have been measured from the radiative capture of stopped negative pions by the nuclides /sup 13/C, /sup 19/F, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 90/Zr. The e/sup +/e/sup -/ pair spectrometer system used has resolution 850 keV fwhm and photon detection efficiency 5 x 10/sup -6/. The total radiative capture branching ratios measured are /sup 13/C (1.66 +- 0.25)%, /sup 19/F (2.40 +- 0.48)%, /sup 20/Ne (1.60 +- 0.24)%, and /sup 90/Zr (2.1 +- 0.5)%. The partial radiative capture branching ratios to four bound states and two resonances in /sup 20/F, and two bound states and three resonances in /sup 13/B have also been measured. The branching ratio for /sup 13/C(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 13/B g.s. is (6.1 +- 1.2) x 10/sup -4/. Comparison of this result with the beta decay rate of /sup 13/B shows that (84 +- 16)% of the pion capture amplitude is accounted for by the Gamow-Teller matrix element. Further analysis suggests that much of the remaining strength is E2. The measured branching ratios to resonant states in /sup 13/C(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 13/B are shown to be in agreement with detailed shell model calculations. The total single-particle strength in these transitions is shown to be approximately half as large as that of the T = 3/2 part of the E1 photoresonance (the Giant Dipole Resonance) in /sup 13/C. The branching ratio for /sup 20/Ne(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 20/F (T = 1, J/sup ..pi../ = 1/sup +/, E/sub x/ = 1.06 MeV) is 0.91 +- 0.52).10/sup -4/. Comparison with the electroexcitation of the analog giant M1 state in /sup 20/Ne (11.24 MeV) shows that the M1 transition amplitude is less than (46 +- 14)% Gamow-Teller. This result is in agreement with detailed shell model calculations of the M1 transition. The photon spectrum for radiative pion capture from flight (reaction /sup 12/C(..pi../sup +/ T = 44 MeV, ..gamma.. at 90/sup 0/)) has been measured. 13 figures, 12 tables.

  15. Spin-isospin transitions in chromium isotopes within the quasiparticle random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, Sadiye; Nabi, Jameel-Un; Babacan, Tahsin; Maras, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Beta decay and electron capture on isotopes of chromium are advocated to play a key role in the stellar evolution process. In this paper we endeavor to study charge-changing transitions for 24 isotopes of chromium (42-65Cr). These include neutron-rich and neutron-deficient isotopes of chromium. Three different models from the QRPA genre, namely the pn-QRPA, the Pyatov method (PM) and the Schematic model (SM), were selected to calculate and study the Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in chromium isotopes. The SM was employed separately in the particle-particle (pp) and pp + particle-hole (ph) channels. To study the effect of deformation, the SM was first used assuming the nuclei to be spherical and later to be deformed. The PM was used both in pp and pp + ph channels but only for the case of spherical nuclei. The pn-QRPA calculation was done by considering both pp and ph forces and taking deformation of nucleus into consideration. A recent study proved this version of pn-QRPA to be the best for calculation of GT strength distributions amongst the QRPA models. The pn-QRPA model calculated GT distributions had low-lying centroids and small widths as compared to other QRPA models. Our calculation results were also compared with other theoretical models and measurements wherever available. Our results are in decent agreement with previous measurements and shell model calculations.

  16. Sample size calculations.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marlies; Dekker, Friedo W; Zoccali, Carmine; Jager, Kitty J

    2011-01-01

    The sample size is the number of patients or other experimental units that need to be included in a study to answer the research question. Pre-study calculation of the sample size is important; if a sample size is too small, one will not be able to detect an effect, while a sample that is too large may be a waste of time and money. Methods to calculate the sample size are explained in statistical textbooks, but because there are many different formulas available, it can be difficult for investigators to decide which method to use. Moreover, these calculations are prone to errors, because small changes in the selected parameters can lead to large differences in the sample size. This paper explains the basic principles of sample size calculations and demonstrates how to perform such a calculation for a simple study design.

  17. Rotational Dependence of Intramolecular Dynamics in Acetylene at Low Vibrational Excitation as Deduced from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, David S.; Miller, Anthony; Amyay, B.; Fayt, A.; Herman, M.

    2010-06-01

    The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), X1Σg+ with up to 8,600 wn of vibrational energy. This comparison is based on the extensive knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision. Simulated intensity borrowing features in high resolution absorption spectra and predicted survival probabilities for intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) are first investigated for the ν4+ν5 and ν3 bright states, for J = 2, 30 and 100. The dependence of the results on the rotational quantum number and on the choice of vibrational bright state reflects the interplay of three kinds of off-diagonal resonances: anharmonic, rotational l-type, and Coriolis. The dynamical quantities used to characterize the calculated time-dependent dynamics are the dilution factor φd, the IVR lifetime τIVR, and the recurrence time τrec. For the two bright states ν3+2ν4 and 7ν4, the collisionless dynamics for thermally averaged rotational distributions at T = 27, 270 and 500 K were calculated from the available spectroscopic data. For the 7ν4 bright state, an apparent irreversible decay of is found. In all cases, the model Hamiltonian allows a detailed calculation of the energy flow among all of the coupled zeroth-order vibration-rotation states. B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thiévin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys., 131, 114301 (2009).

  18. Correlation between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the field-aligned current regions deduced from DE 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, M.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Slavin, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite-observed high correlations between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the high-latitude field-aligned current regions are investigated by examining the dependence of the relationship between Delta-B and E on spatial scale, using the electric and magnetic field data obtained by DE 2 in the polar regions. The results are compared with the Pedersen conductivity inferred from the international reference ionosphere model and the Alfven wave velocity calculated from the in situ ion density and magnetic field measurements.

  19. Dose Calculation Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, Ali

    1997-06-10

    VENTSAR XL is an EXCEL Spreadsheet that can be used to calculate downwind doses as a result of a hypothetical atmospheric release. Both building effects and plume rise may be considered. VENTSAR XL will run using any version of Microsoft EXCEL version 4.0 or later. Macros (the programming language of EXCEL) was used to automate the calculations. The user enters a minimal amount of input and the code calculates the resulting concentrations and doses at various downwind distances as specified by the user.

  20. Deduced primary structure of rat hepatocyte growth factor and expression of the mRNA in rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, K; Hagiya, M; Nishizawa, T; Seki, T; Shimonishi, M; Shimizu, S; Nakamura, T

    1990-01-01

    The primary structure of rat hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was elucidated by determining the base sequence of the complementary DNA (cDNA) of HGF. The cDNA for rat HGF was isolated by screening a liver cDNA library with oligonucleotides based on the partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the beta subunit of purified rat HGF. HGF is encoded in an mRNA of about 6 kilobases. Both alpha and beta subunits of HGF are specified in a single open reading frame for a 728-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 82,904. The N-terminal part of HGF has a signal sequence and a prosequence with 30 and 25 amino acid residues, respectively. The mature heterodimer structure is derived proteolytically from this single pre-pro precursor polypeptide. The calculated molecular weights of the alpha and beta subunits are 50,664 and 25,883, respectively, and each subunit has two potential N-linked glycosylation sites. The amino acid sequence of HGF is 38% identical with that of plasminogen. The alpha subunit of HGF contains four "kringle" structures, and the beta subunit has 37% amino acid identity with the serine protease domain of plasmin. Northern blot analysis revealed that HGF mRNA was expressed in rat various tissues, including the liver, kidney, lung, and brain. Images PMID:2139229

  1. Interval arithmetic in calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairbekova, Gaziza; Mazakov, Talgat; Djomartova, Sholpan; Nugmanova, Salima

    2016-10-01

    Interval arithmetic is the mathematical structure, which for real intervals defines operations analogous to ordinary arithmetic ones. This field of mathematics is also called interval analysis or interval calculations. The given math model is convenient for investigating various applied objects: the quantities, the approximate values of which are known; the quantities obtained during calculations, the values of which are not exact because of rounding errors; random quantities. As a whole, the idea of interval calculations is the use of intervals as basic data objects. In this paper, we considered the definition of interval mathematics, investigated its properties, proved a theorem, and showed the efficiency of the new interval arithmetic. Besides, we briefly reviewed the works devoted to interval analysis and observed basic tendencies of development of integral analysis and interval calculations.

  2. National Stormwater Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s National Stormwater Calculator (SWC) is a desktop application that estimates the annual amount of rainwater and frequency of runoff from a specific site anywhere in the United States (including Puerto Rico).

  3. More Experiments and Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddons, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two experiments that illustrate basic ideas but would be difficult to carry out. Also presents activities and experiments on rainbow cups, electrical charges, electrophorus calculation, pulse electrometer, a skidding car, and on the Oersted effect. (JN)

  4. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTY CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer models have been developed to estimate a wide range of physical-chemical properties from molecular structure. The SPARC modeling system approaches calculations as site specific reactions (pKa, hydrolysis, hydration) and `whole molecule' properties (vapor pressure, boilin...

  5. Programmable calculator stress analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gulick, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper assesses the suitability of advanced programmable alphanumeric calculators for closed form calculation of pressure vessel stresses and offers, as their advantages, adequate computing power, portability, special programming features, and simple interactive execution procedures. Representative programs which demonstrate their capacities are presented. Problems dealing with stress and strength calculations in thick-walled pressure vessels and with the computation of stresses near head/pressure vessel junctures are treated. Assessed favorably in this paper as useful contributors to computeraided design of pressure vessels, programmable alphanumeric calculators have areas of implementation in checking finite element results, aiding in the development of an intuitive understanding of stresses and their parameter dependencies, and evaluating rapidly a variety of preliminary designs.

  6. Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The current methods of quantum chemical calculations will be reviewed. The accent will be on the accuracy that can be achieved with these methods. The basis set requirements and computer resources for the various methods will be discussed. The utility of the methods will be illustrated with some examples, which include the calculation of accurate bond energies for SiF$_n$ and SiF$_n^+$ and the modeling of chemical data storage.

  7. Source and replica calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, P.P.

    1994-02-01

    The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem.

  8. Multiconfiguration self-consistent-field calculation of the dipole moment function of CO/X 1 sigma +/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, F. P., II; Krauss, M.

    1974-01-01

    Using the optimized valence configurations (OVC) multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) method, the dipole moment function for the ground state of CO in the vicinity of the equilibrium internuclear distance has been calculated. The OVC MCSCF calculation results are compared with existing Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction treatments of this molecule at single points and also the dipole moment function deduced from experimental infrared intensities. A general prescription for constructing OVC wavefunctions for diatomic molecules is also presented.

  9. Diffraction calculation of occultation light curves in the presence of an isothermal atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. G.; Gierasch, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    From diffraction theory, light curves are calculated for stellar occultations by a planetary body with an isothermal atmosphere. The character of the resulting curves is determined by the scale height H, the Fresnel zone size l, the surface atmospheric refractivity, and the planetary radius. An exact general solution and two approximations are presented which are valid when H is much greater than l. The importance is assessed of accounting for diffraction effects of the limb when deducing atmospheric parameters from occultation light curves

  10. The role of angular-momentum removal in photonuclear reactions as deduced from the isomeric ratios for ? and ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, D.; Ernst, J.

    1998-03-01

    A model interpretation of isomeric ratios for 0954-3899/24/3/010/img7 and 0954-3899/24/3/010/img8 produced in the reactions 0954-3899/24/3/010/img9, 0954-3899/24/3/010/img10, 0954-3899/24/3/010/img11, 0954-3899/24/3/010/img12, 0954-3899/24/3/010/img13 and 0954-3899/24/3/010/img14 is presented. The experimental isomeric ratios were obtained using bremsstrahlung radiation with end-point energies of 18 and 43 MeV. The calculations were performed by means of the well known code STAPRE and the new code COMPLET. Angular-momentum removal in pre-equilibrium emission was found to be much more important for the observed isomeric ratios than subsequent compound-nucleus evaporation.

  11. ON-LINE CALCULATOR: FORWARD CALCULATION JOHNSON ETTINGER MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  12. Competition between α and β decays for heavy deformed neutron-deficient Pa, U, Np, and Pu isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2017-01-01

    The competition between α and β decays is investigated for neutron-deficient Pa, U, Np, and Pu isotopes. β+/electron-capture (EC) decay rates are calculated within the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic nucleon-nucleon (N N ) interactions. Contributions from allowed Gamow-Teller and Fermi transitions as well as first-forbidden transitions are considered. α -decay calculations are performed within the generalized density-dependent cluster model. Effects of differences between neutron and proton distributions and nuclear deformation are taken into account. In the calculations, Reid-93 N N interactions are used for β+/EC decays, while Michigan three-range Yukawa effective interactions, based on the G -matrix elements of Reid N N potentials, are used for α decay. The calculated β -decay half-lives show good agreement with the experimental data over a range of magnitude from 102 to 105 s. The resulting total half-lives including α and β contributions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, together with the α /β -decay branching ratios.

  13. The beta-decay properties in the vicinity of 78Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, Ivan

    2011-10-01

    The beta-decay properties of neutron-rich Cu to Ga nuclei in the vicinity of the doubly magic 78Ni have been calculated within the density-functional approach plus continuum QRPA (DF+CQRPA). The framework allows for a fully microscopic description of the Gamow-Teller (GT) and first forbidden (FF) transitions between dsgh and fpp shells. The new theoretical predictions are compared with our previous ones, with the standard FRDM calculations and recent experimental data. Of particular importance are new high quality gamma ray spectroscopy data obtained for Zn to Ga isotopes with N > 50 at Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). In 78Ni region, the half-lives calculated with blocking of the odd-proton on the 1pf5/2-orbital agrees with the data better than the ones with no blocking as well as the ones from standard FRDM calculations used for the r-process modeling. The high-energy first forbidden transitions in the nuclei with N > 50 populating low lying excited levels in the daughter nuclei produce a strong impact on the total half- lives and especially on the delayed neutron emission. The effect of reduction of the Pn-values compared to the pure GT- approximation in N > 50 isotopes will be discussed. This work was supported by JIHIR (ORNL, Oak Ridge).

  14. {beta}-decay in neutron-deficient Hg, Pb, and Po isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, O.; Sarriguren, P.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Guerra, E. Moya de

    2006-05-15

    The effect of nuclear deformation on the energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength is studied in neutron-deficient Hg, Pb, and Po even isotopes. The theoretical framework is based on a self-consistent deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations between like nucleons in BCS approximation and residual spin-isospin interactions treated in the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. After a systematic study of the Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the low-excitation-energy region, relevant for {beta}{sup +} decay, we have identified the best candidates to look for deformation signatures in their {beta}{sup +}-decay patterns. {beta}{sup +} half-lives and total Gamow-Teller strengths B(GT{sup {+-}}) are analyzed as well.

  15. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  16. Concentrations of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in the free upper troposphere and lower stratosphere deduced from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results on the volume mixing ratio profiles of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, deduced from the spectroscopic analysis of IR solar absorption spectra obtained in the occultation mode with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during its mission aboard Spacelab 3. A comparison of the ATMOS measurements for both northern and southern latitudes with previous field investigations at low midlatitudes shows a relatively good agreement. Southern Hemisphere volume mixing ratio profiles for both molecules were obtained for the first time, as were the profiles for the Northern Hemisphere covering the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere simultaneously.

  17. A comprehensive model of postseismic deformation of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake deduced from GPS observations in northern Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Endra; Sagiya, Takeshi; Ito, Takeo; Kimata, Fumiaki; Tabei, Takao; Ohta, Yusaku; Meilano, Irwan; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Agustan; Nurdin, Irwandi; Sugiyanto, Didik

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the postseismic deformation of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (SAE) using 5 years of Global Positioning System (GPS) data located in northern Sumatra. Continuous GPS data from northern Sumatra suggest that the relaxation time in the vertical displacement is longer than horizontal displacements. This implies that there are multiple physical mechanisms that control the postseismic deformation, which refer to afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. In this study, we introduce an analysis strategy of postseismic deformation to simultaneously calculate multiple mechanisms of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. The afterslip inversion results indicate that the distribution of the afterslip and the coseismic slip are compensatory of each other. Also, afterslip has a limited contribution to vertical deformation in northern Sumatra. In our rheology model, we use a gravitational Maxwell viscoelastic response and the result indicates that the elastic layer thickness is 65 ± 5 km and the Maxwell viscosity is 8.0 ± 1.0 × 1018 Pa s. We find that afterslip plus Maxwell viscoelastic relaxation are appropriate to explain the deformation in northern Sumatra. We also find that our rheology model reproduces the long-term features of the GPS time series in Thailand. Applying our rheology model to the data in Andaman Islands our afterslip estimation is located at the down-dip part of the plate boundary. Finally, we showed that our rheology model is applicable to the GPS datasets of postseismic deformation of the 2004 SAE located in northern Sumatra, Thailand, and Andaman-Nicobar, respectively.

  18. Primary structure of bovine pituitary secretory protein I (chromogranin A) deduced from the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T.G.; Cohn, D.V.; Gorr, S.U.; Ornstein, D.L.; Kashdan, M.A.; Levine, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    Secretory protein I (SP-I), also referred to as chromogranin A, is an acidic glycoprotein that has been found in every tissue of endocrine and neuroendocrine origin examined but never in exocrine or epithelial cells. Its co-storage and co-secretion with peptide hormones and neurotransmitters suggest that it has an important endocrine or secretory function. The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a bovine pituitary lambdagt11 expression library using an antiserum to parathyroid SP-I. The largest clone (SP4B) hybridized to a transcript of 2.1 kilobases in RNA from parathyroid, pituitary, and adrenal medulla. Immunoblots of bacterial lysates derived from SP4B lysognes demonstrated specific antibody binding to an SP4B/..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein (160 kDa) with a cDNA-derived component of 46 kDa. Radioimmunoassay of the bacterial lystates with SP-I antiserum yielded parallel displacement curves of /sup 125/I-labeled SP-I by the SP4B lysate and authentic SP-I. SP4B contains a cDNA of 1614 nucleotides that encodes a 449-amino acid protein (calculated mass, 50 kDa). The nucleotide sequences of the pituitary SP-I cDNA and adrenal medullary SP-I cDNAs are nearly identical. Analysis of genomic DNA suggests that pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid SP-I are products of the same gene.

  19. Sources and flow patterns of deep-ocean waters as deduced from potential temperature, salinity, and initial phosphate concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Takahashi, Taro; Takahashi, Timothy

    1985-01-01

    Through the deconvolution of ocean chemical data it has been shown that the ratio of O2 utilization to phosphate production in the sea is 175±6 (rather than 138, as proposed by Redfield et al. (1963)). We find no evidence that this ratio changes significantly with location or depth in the sea. We have used this new ratio to calculate the initial phosphate concentrations for the waters sampled during the GEOSECS and TTO programs. The important application of these new results is in constraining the origin and flow patterns of deep waters in the ocean. We believe that a strong case can be made that Antarctic salinity maximum water (i.e., the common water of Montgomery (1958)) is produced by the mixing of waters entering the Antarctic from mid-depths in the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic with Weddell Sea bottom water (southern component). Antarctic common water consists of about 45% Weddell Sea bottom water, 30% intermediate waters from the Pacific and Indian oceans, and 25% deep water originating from the northern Atlantic.

  20. Pulling Marbles from a Bag: Deducing the Regional Impact History of the SPA Basin from Impact Melt Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Coker, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin is an important target for absolute age-dating. Vertical and lateral impact mixing ensures that regolith within SPA will contain rock fragments from SPA itself, local impact craters, and faraway giant basins. About 20% of the regolith at any given site is foreign [1, 2], but much of this material will be cold ejecta, not impact melt. We calculated the fraction of contributed impact melt using scaling laws to estimate the amount and provenance of impact melt, demonstrating that SPA melt is the dominant impact melt rock (>70%) likely to be present. We also constructed a statistical model to illustrate how many randomly-selected impact-melt fragments would need to be dated, and with what accuracy, to confidently reproduce the impact history of a site. A detailed impact history becomes recognizable after a few hundred to a thousand randomly-selected marbles, however, it will be useful to have more information (e.g. compositional, mineralogical, remote sensing) to group fragments. These exercises show that SPA melt has a high probability of being present in a scoop sample and that dating of a few hundred to a thousand impact-melt fragments will yield the impact history of the SPA basin.

  1. Spin Resonance Strength Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, E. D.

    2009-08-01

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  2. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  3. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  4. Theoretical uncertainties in the nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay: The transition operator

    SciTech Connect

    Menéndez, Javier

    2013-12-30

    We explore the theoretical uncertainties related to the transition operator of neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay. The transition operator used in standard calculations is a product of one-body currents, that can be obtained phenomenologically as in Tomoda [1] or Šimkovic et al. [2]. However, corrections to the operator are hard to obtain in the phenomenological approach. Instead, we calculate the 0νββ decay operator in the framework of chiral effective theory (EFT), which gives a systematic order-by-order expansion of the transition currents. At leading orders in chiral EFT we reproduce the standard one-body currents of Refs. [1] and [2]. Corrections appear as two-body (2b) currents predicted by chiral EFT. We compute the effects of the leading 2b currents to the nuclear matrix elements of 0νββ decay for several transition candidates. The 2b current contributions are related to the quenching of Gamow-Teller transitions found in nuclear structure calculations.

  5. Charge-exchange resonances and restoration of Wigner's supersymmetry in heavy and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Tikhonov, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    Various facets of the question of whether Wigner's supersymmetry [ SU(4) symmetry] may be restored in heavy and superheavy nuclei are analyzed on the basis of a comparison of the results of calculations with experimental data. The energy difference between the giant Gamow-Teller resonance and the analog resonance (the difference of E G and E A) according to calculations based on the theory of finite Fermi systems is presented for the case of 33 nuclei for which experimental data are available. The calculated difference Δ E G-A of E G and E A tends to zero in heavier nuclei, showing evidence of the restoration of Wigner's SU(4) symmetry. Also, the isotopic dependence of the Coulomb energy difference between neighboring isobaric nuclei is analyzed within the SU(4) approach for more than 400 nuclei in the mass-number range of A = 5-244. The restoration of Wigner's SU(4) symmetry in heavy nuclei is confirmed. It is shown that the restoration of SU(4) symmetry is compatible with the possible existence of the stability island in the region of superheavy nuclei.

  6. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  7. Solar Guide and Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazria, Edward; Winitsky, David

    This guide provides users with a basic understanding of where and how the sun works in relation to a building and site and provides a simplified method of calculating sun angles and the available heat energy from the sun on vertical and horizontal surfaces. (Author/IRT)

  8. A Computer Calculated Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Francis J.

    The Gunning Fog Index of readability indicates both the average length of words and the difficult words (three or more syllables) in written material. This document describes a business communication course at Wayne State University in which students calculate the Gunning Fog Index of two of their writing assignments with the aid of the…

  9. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Owens, T. M.; Mielke, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Calculated principal-and off-principal plane patterns are presented for the following aircraft: de Havilland DHC-7, Rockwell Sabreliner 75A, Piper PA-31T Cheyenne, Lockheed Jet Star II, Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain, Beechcraft Duke B60, Rockwell Commander 700, Cessna Citation 3, Piper PA-31P Pressurized Navajo, Lear Jet, and Twin Otter DHC-6.

  10. Calculation of enviromental indices

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This portion of the Energy Vision 2020 draft report discusses the development of environmental indices. These indices were developed to be a quantitative measure of characterizing how TVA power system operations and alternative energy strategies might affect the environment. All indices were calculated relative to the reference strategy, and for the environmental review, the reference strategy was `no action`.

  11. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  12. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  13. A Hypothesis: Life Initiated from Two Genes, as Deduced from the RNA World Hypothesis and the Characteristics of Life-Like Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    RNA played a central role in the emergence of the first life-like system on primitive Earth since RNA molecules contain both genetic information and catalytic activity. However, there are several drawbacks regarding the RNA world hypothesis. Here, I briefly discuss the feasibility of the RNA world hypothesis to deduce the RNA functions that are essential for forming a life-like system. At the same time, I have conducted a conceptual analysis of the characteristics of biosystems as a useful approach to deduce a realistic life-like system in relation to the definition of life. For instance, an RNA-based life-like system should possess enough stability to resist environmental perturbations, by developing a cell-like compartment, for instance. Here, a conceptual viewpoint is summarized to provide a realistic life-like system that is compatible with the primitive Earth environment and the capabilities of RNA molecules. According to the empirical and conceptual analysis, I propose the hypothesis that the first life-like system could have initiated from only two genes. PMID:27490571

  14. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach)

    PubMed Central

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event—the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids—as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches. PMID:26821048

  15. A Hypothesis: Life Initiated from Two Genes, as Deduced from the RNA World Hypothesis and the Characteristics of Life-Like Systems.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2016-08-02

    RNA played a central role in the emergence of the first life-like system on primitive Earth since RNA molecules contain both genetic information and catalytic activity. However, there are several drawbacks regarding the RNA world hypothesis. Here, I briefly discuss the feasibility of the RNA world hypothesis to deduce the RNA functions that are essential for forming a life-like system. At the same time, I have conducted a conceptual analysis of the characteristics of biosystems as a useful approach to deduce a realistic life-like system in relation to the definition of life. For instance, an RNA-based life-like system should possess enough stability to resist environmental perturbations, by developing a cell-like compartment, for instance. Here, a conceptual viewpoint is summarized to provide a realistic life-like system that is compatible with the primitive Earth environment and the capabilities of RNA molecules. According to the empirical and conceptual analysis, I propose the hypothesis that the first life-like system could have initiated from only two genes.

  16. Calculation of recoil implantation profiles using known range statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C. D.; Avila, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed to calculate the depth distribution of recoil atoms that result from ion implantation onto a substrate covered with a thin surface layer. The calculation includes first order recoils considering projected range straggles, and lateral straggles of recoils but neglecting lateral straggles of projectiles. Projectile range distributions at intermediate energies in the surface layer are deduced from look-up tables of known range statistics. A great saving of computing time and human effort is thus attained in comparison with existing procedures. The method is used to calculate recoil profiles of oxygen from implantation of arsenic through SiO2 and of nitrogen from implantation of phosphorus through Si3N4 films on silicon. The calculated recoil profiles are in good agreement with results obtained by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation and they also compare very well with available experimental results in the literature. The deviation between calculated and experimental results is discussed in relation to lateral straggles. From this discussion, a range of surface layer thickness for which the method applies is recommended.

  17. Calculation of effective dose.

    PubMed

    McCollough, C H; Schueler, B A

    2000-05-01

    The concept of "effective dose" was introduced in 1975 to provide a mechanism for assessing the radiation detriment from partial body irradiations in terms of data derived from whole body irradiations. The effective dose is the mean absorbed dose from a uniform whole-body irradiation that results in the same total radiation detriment as from the nonuniform, partial-body irradiation in question. The effective dose is calculated as the weighted average of the mean absorbed dose to the various body organs and tissues, where the weighting factor is the radiation detriment for a given organ (from a whole-body irradiation) as a fraction of the total radiation detriment. In this review, effective dose equivalent and effective dose, as established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 1977 and 1990, respectively, are defined and various methods of calculating these quantities are presented for radionuclides, radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography and mammography. In order to calculate either quantity, it is first necessary to estimate the radiation dose to individual organs. One common method of determining organ doses is through Monte Carlo simulations of photon interactions within a simplified mathematical model of the human body. Several groups have performed these calculations and published their results in the form of data tables of organ dose per unit activity or exposure. These data tables are specified according to particular examination parameters, such as radiopharmaceutical, x-ray projection, x-ray beam energy spectra or patient size. Sources of these organ dose conversion coefficients are presented and differences between them are examined. The estimates of effective dose equivalent or effective dose calculated using these data, although not intended to describe the dose to an individual, can be used as a relative measure of stochastic radiation detriment. The calculated values, in units of sievert (or rem), indicate the amount of

  18. First Results From GRIFFIN: Half-Lives of Neutron Rich 128-130Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, Ryan; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Half-lives of N = 82 nuclei below doubly-magic 132Sn are key input parameters for any astrophysical r-process scenario and play an important role in the formation and shape of the second r-process abundance peak. Shell-model calculations for neutron-rich nuclei near the N = 82 neutron shell closure that are not yet experimentally accessible have been performed by adjusting the quenching of the Gamow-Teller (GT) operator to reproduce the 130Cd half-life. The calculated half-lives of other nuclei in the region are known to be systematically too long. Recently, a shorter half-life for 130Cd was measured by the EURICA collaboration that resolves this discrepancy by scaling the GT quenching by a constant factor for all of the nuclei in the region. Distinguishing between these discrepant half-life measurements for 130Cd is thus of critical importance. We have measured the half-lives of 128-130Cd using the high-efficiency GRIFFIN γ-ray spectrometer at TRIUMF, which improves the precision of the 128,129Cd half-lives, and confirms the shorter half-life of 130Cd recently reported by the EURICA collaboration. Details of the GRIFFIN experiments will be presented and the implications of the resulting half-lives discussed.

  19. Astrophysical implication of low E(21+) in neutron-rich Sn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, M. Saha

    2009-10-01

    The observation and prediction of unusually depressed first excited 21+ states in even-A neutron-rich isotopes of semi-magic Sn above 132Sn provide motivations for reviewing the problems related to the nuclear astrophysics in general. In the present work, the β-decay rates of the exotic even Sn isotopes (134,136Sn) above the 132Sn core have been calculated as a function of temperature (T). In order to get the necessary ft values, B(GT) values corresponding to allowed Gamow Teller (GT-) β-decay have been theoretically calculated using shell model. The total decay rate shows decrease with increasing temperature as the ground state population is depleted and population of excited states with slower decay rates increases. The abundance at each Z value is inversely proportional to the decay constant of the waiting point nucleus for that particular Z. So the increase in half-life of isotopes of Sn, like 136Sn, might have substantial impact on the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  20. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    This Institute annual report for the period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 covers a period which has seen the initial runs of three new spectrometers which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP), the Mass Achromat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. These devices are now available to pursue the studies of Gamow Teller states, reactions of astrophysical interest, and giant resonance studies for which they were constructed, as well as for other experiments. A beam analysis system which will deliver high resolution beams to the MDM spectrometer is currently under construction. With the completion of these spectrometer projects, the facility emphasis is now focused on the development of the full capabilities of the K500 cyclotron and on the research program. During the report period, the ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons, the latter as a probe of the QCD phase transition. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. In atomic physics, new measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported.

  1. β decay of Si,4038 (Tz=+5 ,+6 ) to low-lying core excited states in odd-odd P,4038 isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Vandana; Lubna, R. S.; Abromeit, B.; Crawford, H. L.; Liddick, S. N.; Utsuno, Y.; Bender, P. C.; Crider, B. P.; Dungan, R.; Fallon, P.; Kravvaris, K.; Larson, N.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Otsuka, T.; Prokop, C. J.; Richard, A. L.; Shimizu, N.; Tabor, S. L.; Volya, A.; Yoshida, S.

    2017-02-01

    Low-lying excited states in P,4038 have been identified in the β decay of Tz=+5 ,+6 , Si,4038. Based on the allowed nature of the Gamow-Teller (GT) decay observed, these states are assigned spin and parity of 1+ and are core-excited 1p1h intruder states with a parity opposite to the ground state. The occurrence of intruder states at low energies highlights the importance of pairing and quadrupole correlation energies in lowering the intruder states despite the N =20 shell gap. Configuration interaction shell model calculations with the state-of-art SDPF-MU effective interaction were performed to understand the structure of these 1p1h states in the even-A phosphorus isotopes. States in 40P with N =25 were found to have very complex configurations involving all the f p orbitals leading to deformed states as seen in neutron-rich nuclei with N ≈28 . The calculated GT matrix elements for the β decay highlight the dominance of the decay of the core neutrons rather than the valence neutrons.

  2. Modification of magicity toward the dripline and its impact on electron-capture rates for stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2016-02-01

    The importance of microphysical inputs from laboratory nuclear experiments and theoretical nuclear structure calculations in the understanding of core-collapse dynamics and the subsequent supernova explosion is largely recognized in the recent literature. In this work, we analyze the impact of the masses of very neutron-rich nuclei on the matter composition during collapse and the corresponding electron-capture rate. To this end, we introduce an empirical modification of the popular Duflo-Zuker mass model to account for possible shell quenching far from stability. We study the effect of this quenching on the average electron-capture rate. We show that the pre-eminence of the closed shells with N =50 and N =82 in the collapse dynamics is considerably decreased if the shell gaps are reduced in the region of 78Ni and beyond. As a consequence, local modifications of the overall electron-capture rate of up to 30% can be expected, depending on the strength of magicity quenching. This finding has potentially important consequences on the entropy generation, the neutrino emissivity, and the mass of the core at bounce. Our work underlines the importance of new experimental measurements in this region of the nuclear chart, the most crucial information being the nuclear mass and the Gamow-Teller strength. Reliable microscopic calculations of the associated elementary rate, in a wide range of temperatures and electron densities, optimized on these new empirical information, will be additionally needed to get quantitative predictions of the collapse dynamics.

  3. Radioprotection calculations for MEGAPIE.

    PubMed

    Zanini, L

    2005-01-01

    The MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) liquid lead-bismuth spallation neutron source will commence operation in 2006 at the SINQ facility of the Paul Scherrer Institut. Such an innovative system presents radioprotection concerns peculiar to a liquid spallation target. Several radioprotection issues have been addressed and studied by means of the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. The dose rates in the room above the target, where personnel access may be needed at times, from the activated lead-bismuth and from the volatile species produced were calculated. Results indicate that the dose rate level is of the order of 40 mSv h(-1) 2 h after shutdown, but it can be reduced below the mSv h(-1) level with slight modifications to the shielding. Neutron spectra and dose rates from neutron transport, of interest for possible damage to radiation sensitive components, have also been calculated.

  4. CONVEYOR FOUNDATIONS CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Romanos

    1995-03-10

    The purpose of these calculations is to design foundations for all conveyor supports for the surface conveyors that transport the muck resulting from the TBM operation, from the belt storage to the muck stockpile. These conveyors consist of: (1) Conveyor W-TO3, from the belt storage, at the starter tunnel, to the transfer tower. (2) Conveyor W-SO1, from the transfer tower to the material stacker, at the muck stockpile.

  5. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Tina, K. G.; Bhadra, R.; Srinivasan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic–aromatic interactions, aromatic–sulphur interactions and cation–π interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar–apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside. PMID:17584791

  6. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator.

    PubMed

    Tina, K G; Bhadra, R; Srinivasan, N

    2007-07-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic-aromatic interactions, aromatic-sulphur interactions and cation-pi interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar-apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside.

  7. New reaction rates for improved primordial D /H calculation and the cosmic evolution of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coc, Alain; Petitjean, Patrick; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Descouvemont, Pierre; Iliadis, Christian; Longland, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historically strong evidences for the big bang model. Standard BBN is now a parameter-free theory, since the baryonic density of the Universe has been deduced with an unprecedented precision from observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. There is a good agreement between the primordial abundances of 4He, D, 3He, and 7Li deduced from observations and from primordial nucleosynthesis calculations. However, the 7Li calculated abundance is significantly higher than the one deduced from spectroscopic observations and remains an open problem. In addition, recent deuterium observations have drastically reduced the uncertainty on D /H , to reach a value of 1.6%. It needs to be matched by BBN predictions whose precision is now limited by thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties. This is especially important as many attempts to reconcile Li observations with models lead to an increased D prediction. Here, we reevaluate the d (p ,γ )3He, d (d ,n ) 3H3, and d (d ,p ) 3H reaction rates that govern deuterium destruction, incorporating new experimental data and carefully accounting for systematic uncertainties. Contrary to previous evaluations, we use theoretical ab initio models for the energy dependence of the S factors. As a result, these rates increase at BBN temperatures, leading to a reduced value of D /H =(2.45 ±0.10 )×10-5 (2 σ ), in agreement with observations.

  8. A unified two-dimensional approach to the calculation of three-dimensional hypersonic flows, with application to bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, A J , Jr; Savin, Raymond C

    1955-01-01

    A procedure for calculating three-dimensional steady and nonsteady supersonic flows with the method of characteristics is developed and discussed. An approximate method is deduced from the characteristics method and shown to be of practical value at high supersonic speeds.

  9. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  10. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  11. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the

  12. OECD Maximum Residue Limit Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With the goal of harmonizing the calculation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) across the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD has developed an MRL Calculator. View the calculator.

  13. Configuration space Faddeev calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, G.L.; Klink, W.H.; Polyzou, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    The detailed study of few-body systems provides one of the most effective means for studying nuclear physics at subnucleon distance scales. For few-body systems the model equations can be solved numerically with errors less than the experimental uncertainties. We have used such systems to investigate the size of relativistic effects, the role of meson-exchange currents, and the importance of quark degrees of freedom in the nucleus. Complete calculations for momentum-dependent potentials have been performed, and the properties of the three-body bound state for these potentials have been studied. Few-body calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron and pion have been carried out using a front-form formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics. The decomposition of the operators transforming convariantly under the Poincare group into kinematical and dynamical parts has been studies. New ways for constructing interactions between particles, as well as interactions which lead to the production of particles, have been constructed in the context of a relativistic quantum mechanics. To compute scattering amplitudes in a nonperturbative way, classes of operators have been generated out of which the phase operator may be constructed. Finally, we have worked out procedures for computing Clebsch-Gordan and Racah coefficients on a computer, as well as giving procedures for dealing with the multiplicity problem.

  14. Calculating Speed of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  15. Buoyant plume calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures.

  16. Mechanism of pH-dependent decomposition of monoalkylamine diazeniumdiolates to form HNO and NO, deduced from the model compound methylamine diazeniumdiolate, density functional theory, and CBS-QB3 calculations.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Andrew S; Suhrada, Christopher P; Miranda, Katrina M; Wink, David A; Fukuto, Jon M; Houk, K N

    2006-03-20

    Isopropylamine diazeniumdiolate, IPA/NO, the product of the reaction of isopropylamine and nitric oxide, NO, decomposes in a pH-dependent manner to afford nitroxyl, HNO, in the pH range of 13 to above 5, and NO below pH 7. Theoretical studies using B3LYP/6-311+G(d) density functional theory, the polarizable continuum and conductor-like polarizable continuum solvation models, and the high-accuracy CBS-QB3 method on the simplified model compound methylamine diazeniumdiolate predict a mechanism involving HNO production via decomposition of the unstable tautomer MeNN+(O-)NHO-. The production of NO at lower pH is predicted to result from fragmentation of the amide/NO adduct upon protonation of the amine nitrogen.

  17. Precision experiments to test the Standard Model at the University of Notre Dame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodeur, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Model of Physics as a description of matter in the universe contains many unexplained features. One way to search for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) is accomplished by testing the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Such a unitarity test requires a precise and accurate determination of the Vud matrix element, which is currently achieved via the precise determination of the comparative half-life of superallowed beta decays. While Vud is currently determined mostly from an ensemble of precise experimental quantities of superallowed pure Fermi transitions, there is currently a growing interest in obtaining Vud from superallowed mixed transitions to test the accuracy of Vud and the calculation of the isospin symmetry breaking theoretical correction. In the past year our group has performed several half-life measurements of mirror decay transitions using radioactive ion beams produced by the TwinSol facility of the Nuclear Science Laboratory of Notre Dame. In the future we also plan on building an ion trapping system to measure the Fermi to Gamow-Teller mixing ratio in many mirror decays for the first time. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation and the University of Notre Dame.

  18. Shell Model Description of the C14 Dating β Decay with Brown-Rho-Scaled NN Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Brown, G. E.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Holt, J. D.; Machleidt, R.

    2008-02-01

    We present shell model calculations for the beta decay of C14 to the N14 ground state, treating the states of the A=14 multiplet as two 0p holes in an O16 core. We employ low-momentum nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions derived from the realistic Bonn-B potential and find that the Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix element is too large to describe the known lifetime. By using a modified version of this potential that incorporates the effects of Brown-Rho scaling medium modifications, we find that the GT matrix element vanishes for a nuclear density around 85% that of nuclear matter. We find that the splitting between the (Jπ,T)=(1+,0) and (Jπ,T)=(0+,1) states in N14 is improved using the medium-modified Bonn-B potential and that the transition strengths from excited states of C14 to the N14 ground state are compatible with recent experiments.

  19. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and $^3$He

    SciTech Connect

    Laura E. Marcucci, A. Kievsky, S. Rosati, R. Schiavilla, M. Viviani

    2012-01-01

    The muon-capture reactions {sup 2}H({mu}{sup -}, {nu}{sub {mu}})nn and {sup 3}He({mu}{sup -},{nu}{sub {mu}}){sup 3}H are studied with nuclear strong-interaction potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived in chiral effective field theory. The low-energy constants (LEC's) c{sub D} and c{sub E}, present in the three-nucleon potential and (c{sub D}) axial-vector current, are constrained to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. The vector weak current is related to the isovector component of the electromagnetic current via the conserved-vector-current constraint, and the two LEC's entering the contact terms in the latter are constrained to reproduce the A=3 magnetic moments. The muon capture rates on deuteron and {sup 3}He are predicted to be 399 {+-} 3 sec{sup -1} and 1494 {+-} 21 sec{sup -1}, respectively, where the spread accounts for the cutoff sensitivity as well as uncertainties in the LEC's and electroweak radiative corrections. By comparing the calculated and precisely measured rates on {sup 3}He, a value for the induced pseudoscalar form factor is obtained in good agreement with the chiral perturbation theory prediction.

  20. Unified analysis of spin isospin responses of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, T.; Ichimura, M.; Sakai, H.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the Gamow-Teller (GT) response functions at a momentum transfer of q=0fm-1 and the pionic response functions for quasielastic scattering (QES) at q≈1.7fm-1 using the continuum random phase approximation with the π+ρ+g' model interaction. The Landau-Migdal (LM) parameters, g'NN and g'NΔ, are estimated by comparing the calculations with recent experimental data. The peak of the GT resonance and the pionic response functions below the QES peak constrain g'NN, whereas the quenching of the GT total strength and the enhanced pionic strength around the QES peak provide information about g'NΔ. We obtained g'NN=0.6±0.1 and g'NΔ=0.35±0.16 at q=0fm-1 and g'NN=0.7±0.1 and g'NΔ=0.3±0.1 at q≈1.7fm-1. These results indicate that the q dependence of the LM parameters is weak.

  1. Spin isospin responses in nuclei and their unified understanding with Landau Migdal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, Tomotsugu; RCNP E57, the; E59; E131; E149 Collaborations

    2005-01-01

    Both the Gamow-Teller (GT) and the pionic response functions are investigated in the same framework of the continuum random phase approximation with the π ρ + g' model interaction. The Landau-Migdal (LM) parameters, g'NN and g'NΔ, are estimated by comparing these calculations with recent experimental data. The peak of the GT resonance and the pionic response functions below the quasielastic scattering (QES) peak constrain g'NN, whereas the quenching of the GT total strength and the enhanced pionic strength around the QES peak provide information about g'NΔ. We obtain a common set of the LM parameters, g'NN = 0.6-0.7 and g'NΔ = 0.2-0.4, which reproduce the peak and quenching of the GT strengths as well as the enhancement of the pionic modes. The g'NΔ value is significantly smaller than g'NN, which means that the universality ansatz, g'NN = g'NΔ, should not be valid.

  2. Tritium β decay in chiral effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Schiavilla, R.; Viviani, M.

    2016-08-18

    We evaluate the Fermi and Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix elements in tritium $\\beta$-decay by including in the charge-changing weak current the corrections up to one loop recently derived in nuclear chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$ EFT). The trinucleon wave functions are obtained from hyperspherical-harmonics solutions of the Schroedinger equation with two- and three-nucleon potentials corresponding to either $\\chi$ EFT (the N3LO/N2LO combination) or meson-exchange phenomenology (the AV18/UIX combination). We find that contributions due to loop corrections in the axial current are, in relative terms, as large as (and in some cases, dominate) those from one-pion exchange, which nominally occur at lower order in the power counting. Furthermore, we also provide values for the low-energy constants multiplying the contact axial current and three-nucleon potential, required to reproduce the experimental GT matrix element and trinucleon binding energies in the N3LO/N2LO and AV18/UIX calculations.

  3. Tritium β decay in chiral effective field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; ...

    2016-08-18

    We evaluate the Fermi and Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix elements in tritiummore » $$\\beta$$-decay by including in the charge-changing weak current the corrections up to one loop recently derived in nuclear chiral effective field theory ($$\\chi$$ EFT). The trinucleon wave functions are obtained from hyperspherical-harmonics solutions of the Schroedinger equation with two- and three-nucleon potentials corresponding to either $$\\chi$$ EFT (the N3LO/N2LO combination) or meson-exchange phenomenology (the AV18/UIX combination). We find that contributions due to loop corrections in the axial current are, in relative terms, as large as (and in some cases, dominate) those from one-pion exchange, which nominally occur at lower order in the power counting. Furthermore, we also provide values for the low-energy constants multiplying the contact axial current and three-nucleon potential, required to reproduce the experimental GT matrix element and trinucleon binding energies in the N3LO/N2LO and AV18/UIX calculations.« less

  4. Low-spin structure of 51,35,86Br and 50,36,86Kr nuclei: The role of the g7 /2 neutron orbital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, W.; Sieja, K.; Materna, T.; Czerwiński, M.; Rząca-Urban, T.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Mutti, P.; Köster, U.; Soldner, T.; de France, G.; Simpson, G. S.; Ur, C. A.; Bernards, C.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Regis, J.-M.; Thomas, T.; Warr, N.

    2016-10-01

    Low-spin excited levels in 51,35,86Br and 50,36,86Kr, populated following β- decay and the neutron-induced fission of 235U, were measured using the Lohengrin fission-fragment separator and the EXILL array of Ge detectors at the PF1B cold-neutron facility of the Institute Laue-Langevin Grenoble. Improved populations of excited levels in 86Br remove inconsistencies existing in the literature on this nucleus. Directional-linear-polarization correlations, analyzed using newly developed formulas, as well as precise angular correlations allowed the unique 1- and 2- spin and parity assignments to the ground state of 86Br and the 4016.3-keV level in 86Kr, respectively. Based on these results we propose that the Gamow-Teller β- decays of 86Se and 86Br involve the ν g7 /2→π g9 /2 transition in addition to the ν p3 /2→π p3 /2 transition proposed earlier. In 86Kr we have identified 11+, 23+, and 31+ levels, analogous to the mixed-symmetry states in 94Mo, which in 86Kr are from proton excitations, only. Large-scale, shell-model calculations with refined interactions reproduce well excitations in 86Br and 86Kr and support our interpretations.

  5. Tritium β decay in chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Schiavilla, R.; Viviani, M.

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the Fermi and Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix elements in tritium β decay by including in the charge-changing weak current the corrections up to one loop recently derived in nuclear chiral effective field theory (χ EFT ). The trinucleon wave functions are obtained from hyperspherical-harmonics solutions of the Schrödinger equation with two- and three-nucleon potentials corresponding to either χ EFT (the N3LO/N2LO combination) or meson-exchange phenomenology (the AV18/UIX combination). We find that contributions due to loop corrections in the axial current are, in relative terms, as large as (and in some cases, dominate) those from one-pion exchange, which nominally occur at lower order in the power counting. We also provide values for the low-energy constants multiplying the contact axial current and three-nucleon potential, required to reproduce the experimental GT matrix element and trinucleon binding energies in the N3LO/N2LO and AV18/UIX calculations.

  6. Decay spectroscopy of N < Z nuclei around 100Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joochun (Jason); Eurica Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Many interesting topics in both nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics converge on the doubly-magic nucleus 100Sn and nuclei in its vicinity. Among them are the boundaries of proton dripline, the effect of pn interaction in self-conjugate nuclei, and the decay properties required for rp -process calculations in nucleosynthesis models. Despite many studies, experimental knowledge of these nuclides has remained scarce due to low production cross sections and a lack of intense beams. However, record quantities of exotic N = Z isotopes around 100Sn were produced at RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory, via fragmentation of a 124Xe beam on a thin 9Be target. Based on the obtained data, 89Rh and 93Ag have been confirmed to be proton unbound. Half-lives of isotopes near the proton dripline will be presented with improved precision compared to literature values. In addition, strategies to determine Qβ for ft values, and consequently the Fermi/Gamow-Teller transition strengths of these isotope decays will be discussed. Work supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  7. Studies on the double-{beta} decay nucleus {sup 64}Zn using the (d,{sup 2}He) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Grewe, E.-W.; Baeumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Frekers, D.; Hollstein, S.; Rakers, S.; Thies, J. H.; Harakeh, M. N.; Berg, A. M. van den; Woertche, H. J.; Johansson, H.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Petermann, I.; Sieja, K.; Simon, H.; Langanke, K.; Nowacki, F.; Popescu, L.; Savran, D.; Zilges, A.

    2008-06-15

    The (d,{sup 2}He) charge-exchange reaction on the double-{beta} decay ({beta}{beta}) nucleus {sup 64}Zn has been studied at an incident energy of 183 MeV. The two protons in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state (indicated as {sup 2}He) were both momentum analyzed and detected simultaneously by the BBS magnetic spectrometer and its position-sensitive detector. {sup 2}He spectra with a resolution of about 115 keV (FWHM) have been obtained allowing identification of many levels in the residual nucleus {sup 64}Cu with high precision. {sup 64}Zn is one of the rare cases undergoing a {beta}{beta} decay in {beta}{sup +} direction. In the experiment presented here, Gamow-Teller (GT{sup +}) transition strengths have been extracted. Together with the GT{sup -} transition strengths from {sup 64}Ni({sup 3}He,t) data to the same intermediate nucleus {sup 64}Cu, the nuclear matrix elements of the {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 64}Zn have been evaluated. Finally, the GT{sup {+-}} distributions are compared with shell-model calculations and a critical assessment is given of the various residual interactions presently employed for the pf shell.

  8. Nuclear response theory for spin-isospin excitations in a relativistic quasiparticle-phonon coupling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Caroline; Litvinova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    A new theoretical approach to spin-isospin excitations in open-shell nuclei is presented. The developed method is based on the relativistic meson-exchange nuclear Lagrangian of Quantum Hadrodynamics and extends the response theory for superfluid nuclear systems beyond relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation in the proton-neutron channel (pn-RQRPA). The coupling between quasiparticle degrees of freedom and collective vibrations (phonons) introduces a time-dependent effective interaction, in addition to the exchange of pion and ρ -meson taken into account without retardation. The time-dependent contributions are treated in the resonant time-blocking approximation, in analogy to the previously developed relativistic quasiparticle time-blocking approximation (RQTBA) in the neutral (non-isospin-flip) channel. The new method is called proton-neutron RQTBA (pn-RQTBA) and is applied to the Gamow-Teller resonance in a chain of neutron-rich nickel isotopes 68-78Ni . A strong fragmentation of the resonance along with quenching of the strength, as compared to pn-RQRPA, is obtained. Based on the calculated strength distribution, beta-decay half-lives of the considered isotopes are computed and compared to pn-RQRPA half-lives and to experimental data. It is shown that a considerable improvement of the half-life description is obtained in pn-RQTBA because of the spreading effects, which bring the lifetimes to a very good quantitative agreement with data.

  9. Report to the DOE Nuclear Data Committee, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Lanier, R.G.

    1985-02-01

    Progress is reported on the following measurements: the leakage multiplication from hollow beryllium spheres; /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/Li neutron-induced tritium production cross sections at 15 MeV; fast neutron fission yields; /sup 238/U(t,X) cross sections; neutron capture cross sections for /sup 86/ /sup 87/Sr at stellar temperatures; influence of realistic single particle spacings on precompound decay spectra; spontaneous fissions from a source of /sup 260/Md; and excitation functions from proton and deutron bombardment of natural Ti. Progress on the following calculations are reported: using modeled discrete levels; modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei; test of a phenomenological model of odd-odd deformed nuclei (an ARC study of /sup 176/Lu); absolute dipole gamma-ray strength functions for /sup 176/Lu; Gamow-Teller matrix elements for the /sup 11/B(p,n)/sup 11/C reaction at Ep = 26 MeV; K-distribution for neutron fission of /sup 232/Th; shell model study of the /sup 71/Ga(nu, anti e)/sup 71/Ge neutrino detector; and extension of microscopic models for neutron and proton scattering to inelastic scattering and charge-exchange reactions. Also, the status of the re-evaluation of the /sup 9/Be(n, 2n) reaction is given. (WHK)

  10. Complete nucleotide sequence and deduced polypeptide sequence of a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain gene from Acanthamoeba: evidence of a hinge in the rodlike tail

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have completely sequenced a gene encoding the heavy chain of myosin II, a nonmuscle myosin from the soil ameba Acanthamoeba castellanii. The gene spans 6 kb, is split by three small introns, and encodes a 1,509-residue heavy chain polypeptide. The positions of the three introns are largely conserved relative to characterized vertebrate and invertebrate muscle myosin genes. The deduced myosin II globular head amino acid sequence shows a high degree of similarity with the globular head sequences of the rat embryonic skeletal muscle and nematode unc 54 muscle myosins. By contrast, there is no unique way to align the deduced myosin II rod amino acid sequence with the rod sequence of these muscle myosins. Nevertheless, the periodicities of hydrophobic and charged residues in the myosin II rod sequence, which dictate the coiled-coil structure of the rod and its associations within the myosin filament, are very similar to those of the muscle myosins. We conclude that this ameba nonmuscle myosin shares with the muscle myosins of vertebrates and invertebrates an ancestral heavy chain gene. The low level of direct sequence similarity between the rod sequences of myosin II and muscle myosins probably reflects a general tolerance for residue changes in the rod domain (as long as the periodicities of hydrophobic and charged residues are largely maintained), the relative evolutionary "ages" of these myosins, and specific differences between the filament properties of myosin II and muscle myosins. Finally, sequence analysis and electron microscopy reveal the presence within the myosin II rodlike tail of a well-defined hinge region where sharp bending can occur. We speculate that this hinge may play a key role in mediating the effect of heavy chain phosphorylation on enzymatic activity. PMID:3040773

  11. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme.

  12. Genetic makeup of the Corynebacterium glutamicum LexA regulon deduced from comparative transcriptomics and in vitro DNA band shift assays.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, Nina; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Czaja, Lisa F; Brinkrolf, Karina; Brune, Iris; Hüser, Andrea T; Hansmeier, Nicole; Pühler, Alfred; Borovok, Ilya; Tauch, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    The lexA gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was deleted to create the mutant strain C. glutamicum NJ2114, which has an elongated cell morphology and an increased doubling time. To characterize the SOS regulon in C. glutamicum, the transcriptomes of NJ2114 and a DNA-damage-induced wild-type strain were compared with that of a wild-type control using DNA microarray hybridization. The expression data were combined with bioinformatic pattern searches for LexA binding sites, leading to the detection of 46 potential SOS boxes located upstream of differentially expressed transcription units. Binding of a hexahistidyl-tagged LexA protein to 40 double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the potential SOS boxes was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. It turned out that LexA binds not only to SOS boxes in the promoter-operator region of upregulated genes, but also to SOS boxes detected upstream of downregulated genes. These results demonstrated that LexA controls directly the expression of at least 48 SOS genes organized in 36 transcription units. The deduced genes encode a variety of physiological functions, many of them involved in DNA repair and survival after DNA damage, but nearly half of them have hitherto unknown functions. Alignment of the LexA binding sites allowed the corynebacterial SOS box consensus sequence TcGAA(a/c)AnnTGTtCGA to be deduced. Furthermore, the common intergenic region of lexA and the differentially expressed divS-nrdR operon, encoding a cell division suppressor and a regulator of deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, was characterized in detail. Promoter mapping revealed differences in divS-nrdR expression during SOS response and normal growth conditions. One of the four LexA binding sites detected in the intergenic region is involved in regulating divS-nrdR transcription, whereas the other sites are apparently used for negative autoregulation of lexA expression.

  13. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme. PMID:8550452

  14. Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchet, F.; Lis, D.; Caudano, Y.; Mani, A. A.; Peremans, A.; Champagne, B.; Guthmuller, J.

    2012-03-01

    The knowledge of the first hyperpolarizability tensor elements of molecular groups is crucial for a quantitative interpretation of the sum frequency generation (SFG) activity of thin organic films at interfaces. Here, the SFG response of the terminal methyl group of a dodecanethiol (DDT) monolayer has been interpreted on the basis of calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level of approximation. In particular, DFT calculations have been carried out on three classes of models for the aliphatic chains. The first class of models consists of aliphatic chains, containing from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, in which only one methyl group can freely vibrate, while the rest of the chain is frozen by a strong overweight of its C and H atoms. This enables us to localize the probed vibrational modes on the methyl group. In the second class, only one methyl group is frozen, while the entire remaining chain is allowed to vibrate. This enables us to analyse the influence of the aliphatic chain on the methyl stretching vibrations. Finally, the dodecanethiol (DDT) molecule is considered, for which the effects of two dielectrics, i.e. n-hexane and n-dodecane, are investigated. Moreover, DDT calculations are also carried out by using different exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in order to assess the DFT approximations. Using the DFT IR vectors and Raman tensors, the SFG spectrum of DDT has been simulated and the orientation of the methyl group has then been deduced and compared with that obtained using an analytical approach based on a bond additivity model. This analysis shows that when using DFT molecular properties, the predicted orientation of the terminal methyl group tends to converge as a function of the alkyl chain length and that the effects of the chain as well as of the dielectric environment are small. Instead, a more significant difference is observed when comparing the DFT-based results with those obtained from the analytical approach, thus indicating

  15. Calculating Trajectories And Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alderson, Daniel J.; Brady, Franklyn H.; Breckheimer, Peter J.; Campbell, James K.; Christensen, Carl S.; Collier, James B.; Ekelund, John E.; Ellis, Jordan; Goltz, Gene L.; Hintz, Gerarld R.; Legerton, Victor N.; Mccreary, Faith A.; Mitchell, Robert T.; Mottinger, Neil A.; Moultrie, Benjamin A.; Moyer, Theodore D.; Rinker, Sheryl L.; Ryne, Mark S.; Stavert, L. Robert; Sunseri, Richard F.

    1989-01-01

    Double-Precision Trajectory Analysis Program, DPTRAJ, and Orbit Determination Program, ODP, developed and improved over years to provide highly reliable and accurate navigation capability for deep-space missions like Voyager. Each collection of programs working together to provide desired computational results. DPTRAJ, ODP, and supporting utility programs capable of handling massive amounts of data and performing various numerical calculations required for solving navigation problems associated with planetary fly-by and lander missions. Used extensively in support of NASA's Voyager project. DPTRAJ-ODP available in two machine versions. UNIVAC version, NPO-15586, written in FORTRAN V, SFTRAN, and ASSEMBLER. VAX/VMS version, NPO-17201, written in FORTRAN V, SFTRAN, PL/1 and ASSEMBLER.

  16. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    SciTech Connect

    New, Joshua R; Garrett, Aaron; Erdem, Ender; Huang, Yu

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance, roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  18. Impact cratering calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Okeefe, J. D.; Smither, C.; Takata, T.

    1991-01-01

    In the course of carrying out finite difference calculations, it was discovered that for large craters, a previously unrecognized type of crater (diameter) growth occurred which was called lip wave propagation. This type of growth is illustrated for an impact of a 1000 km (2a) silicate bolide at 12 km/sec (U) onto a silicate half-space at earth gravity (1 g). The von Misses crustal strength is 2.4 kbar. The motion at the crater lip associated with this wave type phenomena is up, outward, and then down, similar to the particle motion of a surface wave. It is shown that the crater diameter has grown d/a of approximately 25 to d/a of approximately 4 via lip propagation from Ut/a = 5.56 to 17.0 during the time when rebound occurs. A new code is being used to study partitioning of energy and momentum and cratering efficiency with self gravity for finite-sized objects rather than the previously discussed planetary half-space problems. These are important and fundamental subjects which can be addressed with smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) codes. The SPH method was used to model various problems in astrophysics and planetary physics. The initial work demonstrates that the energy budget for normal and oblique impacts are distinctly different than earlier calculations for silicate projectile impact on a silicate half space. Motivated by the first striking radar images of Venus obtained by Magellan, the effect of the atmosphere on impact cratering was studied. In order the further quantify the processes of meteor break-up and trajectory scattering upon break-up, the reentry physics of meteors striking Venus' atmosphere versus that of the Earth were studied.

  19. Curriculum Issues for Graphics Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissane, Barry

    2000-01-01

    Identifies and describes some of the mathematics curriculum issues associated with graphing calculators such as equity, role of calculators, content and sequencing, textbook design, learning to use a calculator, worksheets, student decision-making, calculator dependence, assessment, electronic algorithms, multiplying choices, calculator…

  20. Cosmological calculations on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, D.; Bellis, M.; Allen, M. T.; Yepremyan, H.; Kratochvil, J. M.

    2013-02-01

    Cosmological measurements require the calculation of nontrivial quantities over large datasets. The next generation of survey telescopes will yield measurements of billions of galaxies. The scale of these datasets, and the nature of the calculations involved, make cosmological calculations ideal models for implementation on graphics processing units (GPUs). We consider two cosmological calculations, the two-point angular correlation function and the aperture mass statistic, and aim to improve the calculation time by constructing code for calculating them on the GPU. Using CUDA, we implement the two algorithms on the GPU and compare the calculation speeds to comparable code run on the CPU. We obtain a code speed-up of between 10 and 180× faster, compared to performing the same calculation on the CPU. The code has been made publicly available. GPUs are a useful tool for cosmological calculations, even for datasets the size of current surveys, allowing calculations to be made one or two orders of magnitude faster.

  1. EXAFS spectroscopy and MNDO/AM1/PM3 calculations: a structural study of a model system for Friedel—Crafts alkylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, Teja Sebastian; Bertagnolli, Helmut

    1993-12-01

    The results of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic investigations and supporting theoretical MNDO/AM1/PM1 calculations for a model system of Friedel—Crafts alkylation (benzene, nitrobenzene, AlX 3 where X = Cl or Br, CH 3CH 2Br) are presented. Detailed structural models for the system are deduced with the help of the EXAFS-determined distances. The conclusions drawn from the EXAFS data are confirmed by the results of the theoretical calculations.

  2. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings.

  3. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  4. Relative Hazard Calculation Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    DL Strenge; MK White; RD Stenner; WB Andrews

    1999-09-07

    The methodology presented in this document was developed to provide a means of calculating the RH ratios to use in developing useful graphic illustrations. The RH equation, as presented in this methodology, is primarily a collection of key factors relevant to understanding the hazards and risks associated with projected risk management activities. The RH equation has the potential for much broader application than generating risk profiles. For example, it can be used to compare one risk management activity with another, instead of just comparing it to a fixed baseline as was done for the risk profiles. If the appropriate source term data are available, it could be used in its non-ratio form to estimate absolute values of the associated hazards. These estimated values of hazard could then be examined to help understand which risk management activities are addressing the higher hazard conditions at a site. Graphics could be generated from these absolute hazard values to compare high-hazard conditions. If the RH equation is used in this manner, care must be taken to specifically define and qualify the estimated absolute hazard values (e.g., identify which factors were considered and which ones tended to drive the hazard estimation).

  5. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  6. Summary of Vulcan Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J.D.

    2000-03-23

    This is a summary of the results of my calculations compared to Elisabeth Wolfrum's data on the Vulcan imprint experiments. The material strength makes essentially no difference to the growth of perturbations seeded by the laser imprint. For the low-intensity case (30 J laser energy, beam intensity of 0.5 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) the thin (2 microns) Al foil melts quickly from the front (driven) surface and decompresses quickly from the back surface, so there is actually only a fraction of the foil that is solid and compressed, and then for only a short time. And this solid fraction is not accelerating much during this short time. In particular, the shock (which is at about 250 kbar when it is about half way through the foil) travels entirely through the foil in about 0.25 ns. At 0.3 ns the ablation front is 0.6 {micro}m in from the original position of the front surface, the next 0.6 {micro}m is melted, so only the back 0.8 {micro}m is solid and compressed. This solid portion, though, is not moving much; the place where the imprinted perturbations are growing is back at the ablation front, where the perturbations are clearly growing fluid-like. By 0.5 ns the entire foil is melted and decompressing from both ends. Thus, the actual foil distortion looks little different with and without strength.

  7. The rating reliability calculator

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, David J

    2004-01-01

    Background Rating scales form an important means of gathering evaluation data. Since important decisions are often based on these evaluations, determining the reliability of rating data can be critical. Most commonly used methods of estimating reliability require a complete set of ratings i.e. every subject being rated must be rated by each judge. Over fifty years ago Ebel described an algorithm for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data. While his article has been widely cited over the years, software based on the algorithm is not readily available. This paper describes an easy-to-use Web-based utility for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data using Ebel's algorithm. Methods The program is available public use on our server and the source code is freely available under GNU General Public License. The utility is written in PHP, a common open source imbedded scripting language. The rating data can be entered in a convenient format on the user's personal computer that the program will upload to the server for calculating the reliability and other statistics describing the ratings. Results When the program is run it displays the reliability, number of subject rated, harmonic mean number of judges rating each subject, the mean and standard deviation of the averaged ratings per subject. The program also displays the mean, standard deviation and number of ratings for each subject rated. Additionally the program will estimate the reliability of an average of a number of ratings for each subject via the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula. Conclusion This simple web-based program provides a convenient means of estimating the reliability of rating data without the need to conduct special studies in order to provide complete rating data. I would welcome other researchers revising and enhancing the program. PMID:15117416

  8. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  9. New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2015-03-04

    This report presents calculations for the new arsenic cross section. Cross sections for 73,74,75 As above the resonance range were calculated with a newly developed Hauser-Feshbach code, CoH3.

  10. EPA's National Stormwater Calculator (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster will demonstrate how EPA's National Stormwater Calculator works. The National Stormwater Calculator (SWC) estimates the amount of stormwater runoff generated from a site under different development and control scenarios over a long period of historical rainfall. The a...

  11. A Program for Gear Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisbee, Kolak K.; Hawkins, Harry M.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a microcomputer program (designed for Apple II but it can be modified) used to calculate various dimensions relative to a spur gear. Basic terms are identified and a program listing for gear calculations is included. (CT)

  12. The calculation of comet ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatum, J.

    1982-06-01

    A brief description of how a basic comet ephemeris can be calculated from the orbital elements is given. A simple Keplerian orbit is assumed for the calculations, omitting such details as light-travel time, perturbation by the planets, and non-gravitational effects. The calculated ephemeris will usually be adequate to find the comet in a telescope, and only a good programmable calculator is required. To avoid cumbersome mathematics, the necessary formulas are given without derivation.

  13. Imputation approach for deducing a complete mitogenome sequence from low-depth-coverage next-generation sequencing data: application to ancient remains from the Moon Pyramid, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Fuzuki; Kumagai, Masahiko; Kurosaki, Kunihiko; Hayashi, Michiko; Sugiyama, Saburo; Ueda, Shintaroh; Wang, Li

    2017-02-16

    It is considered that more than 15 depths of coverage are necessary for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data to obtain reliable complete nucleotide sequences of the mitogenome. However, it is difficult to satisfy this requirement for all nucleotide positions because of problems obtaining a uniform depth of coverage for poorly preserved materials. Thus, we propose an imputation approach that allows a complete mitogenome sequence to be deduced from low-depth-coverage NGS data. We used different types of mitogenome data files as panels for imputation: a worldwide panel comprising all the major haplogroups, a worldwide panel comprising sequences belonging to the estimated haplogroup alone, a panel comprising sequences from the population most closely related to an individual under investigation, and a panel comprising sequences belonging to the estimated haplogroup from the population most closely related to an individual under investigation. The number of missing nucleotides was drastically reduced in all the panels, but the contents obtained by imputation were quite different among the panels. The efficiency of the imputation method differed according to the panels used. The missing nucleotides were most credibly imputed using sequences of the estimated haplogroup from the population most closely related to the individual under investigation as a panel.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 16 February 2017; doi:10.1038/jhg.2017.14.

  14. Experimental and data analysis techniques for deducing collision-induced forces from photographic histories of engine rotor fragment impact/interaction with a containment ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeghiayan, R. P.; Leech, J. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis method termed TEJ-JET is described whereby measured transient elastic and inelastic deformations of an engine-rotor fragment-impacted structural ring are analyzed to deduce the transient external forces experienced by that ring as a result of fragment impact and interaction with the ring. Although the theoretical feasibility of the TEJ-JET concept was established, its practical feasibility when utilizing experimental measurements of limited precision and accuracy remains to be established. The experimental equipment and the techniques (high-speed motion photography) employed to measure the transient deformations of fragment-impacted rings are described. Sources of error and data uncertainties are identified. Techniques employed to reduce data reading uncertainties and to correct the data for optical-distortion effects are discussed. These procedures, including spatial smoothing of the deformed ring shape by Fourier series and timewise smoothing by Gram polynomials, are applied illustratively to recent measurements involving the impact of a single T58 turbine rotor blade against an aluminum containment ring. Plausible predictions of the fragment-ring impact/interaction forces are obtained by one branch of this TEJ-JET method; however, a second branch of this method, which provides an independent estimate of these forces, remains to be evaluated.

  15. Structure of LEP100, a glycoprotein that shuttles between lysosomes and the plasma membrane, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the encoding cDNA

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    LEP100, a membrane glycoprotein that has the unique property of shuttling from lysosomes to endosomes to plasma membrane and back, was purified from chicken brain. Its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence was determined, and an oligonucleotide encoding part of this sequence was used to clone the encoding cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 414 residues of which the NH2-terminal 18 constitute a signal peptide. The sequence includes 17 sites for N-glycosylation in the NH2-terminal 75% of the polypeptide chain followed by a region lacking N-linked oligosaccharides, a single possible membrane-spanning segment, and a cytoplasmic domain of 11 residues, including three potential phosphorylation sites. Eight cysteine residues are spaced in a regular pattern through the lumenal (extracellular) domain, while a 32-residue sequence rich in proline, serine, and threonine occurs at its midpoint. Expression of the cDNA in mouse L cells resulted in targeting of LEP100 primarily to the mouse lysosomes. PMID:3339090

  16. Metabolic Switches and Adaptations Deduced from the Proteomes of Streptomyces coelicolor Wild Type and phoP Mutant Grown in Batch Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Louise; Hodgson, David A.; Wentzel, Alexander; Nieselt, Kay; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Moore, Jonathan; Morrissey, Edward R.; Legaie, Roxane; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Martín, Juan F.; Burroughs, Nigel J.; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Smith, Margaret C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Streptomyces are soil-dwelling oligotrophs and important producers of secondary metabolites. Previously, we showed that global messenger RNA expression was subject to a series of metabolic and regulatory switches during the lifetime of a fermentor batch culture of Streptomyces coelicolor M145. Here we analyze the proteome from eight time points from the same fermentor culture and, because phosphate availability is an important regulator of secondary metabolite production, compare this to the proteome of a similar time course from an S. coelicolor mutant, INB201 (ΔphoP), defective in the control of phosphate utilization. The proteomes provide a detailed view of enzymes involved in central carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Trends in protein expression over the time courses were deduced from a protein abundance index, which also revealed the importance of stress pathway proteins in both cultures. As expected, the ΔphoP mutant was deficient in expression of PhoP-dependent genes, and several putatively compensatory metabolic and regulatory pathways for phosphate scavenging were detected. Notably there is a succession of switches that coordinately induce the production of enzymes for five different secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways over the course of the batch cultures. PMID:22147733

  17. Deduced sequences of the membrane fusion and attachment proteins of canine distemper viruses isolated from dogs and wild animals in Korea.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chae-Wun; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Nak-Hyung; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Choi, In-Soo

    2013-08-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes highly contagious respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological diseases in wild and domestic animal species. Despite a broad vaccination campaign, the disease is still a serious problem worldwide. In this study, six field CDV strains were isolated from three dogs, two raccoon dogs, and one badger in Korea. The full sequence of the genes encoding fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) proteins were compared with those of other CDVs including field and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis for the F and H genes indicated that the two CDV strains isolated from dogs were most closely related to Chinese strains in the Asia-1 genotype. Another four strains were closely related to Japanese strains in the Asia-2 genotype. The six currently isolated strains shared 90.2-92.1% and 88.2-91.8% identities with eight commercial vaccine strains in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the F protein, respectively. They also showed 90.1-91.4% and 87.8-90.7% identities with the same vaccine strains in their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the H protein, respectively. Different N-linked glycosylation sites were identified in the F and H genes of the six isolates from the prototype vaccine strain Onderstepoort. Collectively, these results demonstrate that at least two different CDV genotypes currently exist in Korea. The considerable genetic differences between the vaccine strains and wild-type isolates would be a major factor of the incomplete protection of dogs from CDV infections.

  18. Hemispheric asymmetry in transition from equatorial plasma bubble to blob as deduced from 630.0 nm airglow observations at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Martinis, Carlos R.; Lühr, Hermann; Pfaff, Robert F.; Kwak, Young-Sil

    2016-01-01

    Transitions from depletions to enhancements of 630.0 nm nighttime airglow have been observed at Arecibo. Numerical simulations by Krall et al. (2009) predicted that they should occur only in one hemisphere, which has not yet been confirmed observationally. In this study we investigate the hemispheric conjugacy of the depletion-to-enhancement transition using multiple instruments. We focus on one event observed in the American longitude sector on 22 December 2014: 630.0 nm airglow depletions evolved into enhancements in the Northern Hemisphere while the evolution did not occur in the conjugate location in the Southern Hemisphere. Concurrent plasma density measured by low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites and 777.4 nm airglow images support that the depletions and enhancements of 630.0 nm nighttime airglow reflect plasma density decreases and increases (blobs), respectively. Characteristics of the airglow depletions, in the context of the LEO satellite data, further suggest that the plasma density depletion deduced from the airglow data represents equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) rather than medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances from midlatitudes. Hence, the event in this study can be interpreted as EPB-to-blob transition.

  19. Intermolecular associations in an equimolar formamide-water solution based on neutron scattering and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoulahi, Hafedh; Ghalla, Houcine; Nasr, Salah; Darpentigny, Jacques; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-10-07

    In the present work, we have investigated the intermolecular associations of formamide with water in an equimolar formamide-water solution (FA-Water) by means of neutron scattering in combination with density functional theory calculations. The neutron scattering data were analyzed to deduce the structure factor SM(q) and the intermolecular pair correlation function gL(r). By considering different hydrogen bonded FA-Water associations, it has been shown that some of them describe well the local order in the solution. Natural bond orbital and atoms in molecules analyses have been performed to give more insight into the properties of hydrogen bonds involved in the more probable models.

  20. Magnetic entropy calculation for a second-order ferromagnetic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Fan, Jiyu; Zhang, Yuheng

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new calculation method of magnetic entropy in an arbitrary second-order ferromagnetic phase transition system. Based on the Arrott-Noakes relation (H/M)1/γ = (T-TC)/TC+(M/M1)1/β, the Gibbs energy can be rewritten as a new form where the critical exponents are naturally included. Correspondingly, the magnetic entropy (SM) is presented as: SM = -[(1)/(1/γ +1)(∂ A')/(∂ T)M1/γ +1+(1)/(1/β +1/γ +1)(∂ B')/(∂ T)M1/β +1/γ +1]H1-1/γ . Thus, the magnetic entropy change (ΔSM) can be deduced as Δ SM∣ {T = TC} ˜ H1+β/-1{β +γ } which is consistent exactly with the previous report [V. Franco et al., Appl. Phys. Lett.89 (2006) 222512]. In addition, the conventional calculation method of magnetic entropy can be treated as a particular form of this calculation method. Furthermore, the obtained magnetic entropy change from experimental measurement are consistent with the theoretical value deduced from the present method.

  1. Airplane stability calculations with a card programmable pocket calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Programs are presented for calculating airplane stability characteristics with a card programmable pocket calculator. These calculations include eigenvalues of the characteristic equations of lateral and longitudinal motion as well as stability parameters such as the time to damp to one-half amplitude or the damping ratio. The effects of wind shear are included. Background information and the equations programmed are given. The programs are written for the International System of Units, the dimensional form of the stability derivatives, and stability axes. In addition to programs for stability calculations, an unusual and short program is included for the Euler transformation of coordinates used in airplane motions. The programs have been written for a Hewlett Packard HP-67 calculator. However, the use of this calculator does not constitute an endorsement of the product by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of a subtilisin-like serine protease from a deep-sea bacterium, Alkalimonas collagenimarina AC40(T).

    PubMed

    Kurata, Atsushi; Uchimura, Kohsuke; Shimamura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tohru; Horikoshi, Koki

    2007-11-01

    The acpI gene encoding an alkaline protease (AcpI) from a deep-sea bacterium, Alkalimonas collagenimarina AC40(T), was shotgun-cloned and sequenced. It had a 1,617-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 538 amino acids. Based on analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence, AcpI is a subtilisin-like serine protease belonging to subtilase family A. It consists of a prepropeptide, a catalytic domain, and a prepeptidase C-terminal domain like other serine proteases from the genera Pseudomonas, Shewanella, Alteromonas, and Xanthomonas. Heterologous expression of the acpI gene in Escherichia coli cells yielded a 28-kDa recombinant AcpI (rAcpI), suggesting that both the prepropeptide and prepeptidase C-terminal domains were cleaved off to give the mature form. Analysis of N-terminal and C-terminal amino acid sequences of purified rAcpI showed that the mature enzyme would be composed of 273 amino acids. The optimal pH and temperature for the caseinolytic activity of the purified rAcpI were 9.0-9.5 and 45 degrees C in 100 mM glycine-NaOH buffer. Calcium ions slightly enhanced the enzyme activity and stability. The enzyme favorably hydrolyzed gelatin, collagen, and casein. AcpI from A. collagenimarina AC40(T) was also purified from culture broth, and its molecular mass was around 28 kDa, indicating that the cleavage manner of the enzyme is similar to that in E. coli cells.

  3. How to deduce and teach the logical and unambiguous answer, namely L = ∑C, to “What is Life?” using the principles of communication?

    PubMed Central

    De Loof, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Is it possible to understand the very nature of ‘Life’ and ‘Death’ based on contemporary biology? The usual spontaneous reaction is: “No way. Life is far too complicated. It involves both material- and an immaterial dimensions, and this combination exceeds the capacities of the human brain.” In this paper, a fully contrarian stand is taken. Indeed it will be shown that without invoking any unknown principle(s) unambiguous definitions can be logically deduced. The key? First ask the right questions. Next, thoroughly imbue contemporary biology with the principles of communication, including both its ‘hardware’ and its ‘software’ aspects. An integrative yet simple principle emerges saying that: 1. All living matter is invariably organized as sender-receiver compartments that incessantly handle and transfer information (= communicate); 2. The ‘communicating compartment’ is better suited to serve as universal unit of structure, function and evolution than ‘the (prokaryotic) cell’, the smallest such unit; 3. ‘Living matter’ versus ‘non-living’ are false opposites while ‘still alive’ and ‘just not alive anymore’ are true opposites; 4. ‘Death’ ensues when a given sender-receiver compartment irreversibly loses its ability to handle information at its highest level of compartmental organization; 5. The verb ‘Life’ (L) denotes nothing else than the total sum (∑) of all acts of communication (C) executed by a sender-receiver at all its levels of compartmental organization: L = ∑C; 6. Any act of communication is a problem-solving act; 6. Any Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES) should have the definition of Life at its core. PMID:27064373

  4. Global nuclear-structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1990-04-20

    The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to {epsilon}{sub 2} and {epsilon}{sub 4} used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and {Beta}-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential.

  5. Intensity calculations of HCN molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Kausar

    2006-10-01

    Accurate spectroscopic data of HCN are required for many astronomical calculations and modeling. HCN molecules are present in the atmosphere of carbon stars and in galactic centers. Ro-vibrational energy levels and intensity calculations were carried out using the full coupled cluster model and radau coordinates. Accurate ab initio calculated potential energy surface^1 and dipole moment surface^2 were used for computation. The computed values were compared with Hitran^99.^

  6. Programmable Calculators for Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayrik, John J.

    1978-01-01

    Instructions are given for using and programing programable calculators. Several problems and examples are given that include topics such as temperature conversion, estimation, and number operations. (MP)

  7. Calculating a Stepwise Ridge Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Although methods for using ordinary least squares regression computer programs to calculate a ridge regression are available, the calculation of a stepwise ridge regression requires a special purpose algorithm and computer program. The correct stepwise ridge regression procedure is given, and a parallel FORTRAN computer program is described.…

  8. Teaching Decimal Math with Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenner, Martin

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the use of hand-held calculators on the teaching of decimal arithmetic in seventh and eighth grade pre-science units. In particular, the effects of calculators on pencil and paper computational skills and on conceptual understanding were studied. The study consisted of a pre-unit…

  9. CELSS scenario analysis: Breakeven calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    A model of the relative mass requirements of food production components in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) based on regenerative concepts is described. Included are a discussion of model scope, structure, and example calculations. Computer programs for cultivar and breakeven calculations are also included.

  10. relline: Relativistic line profiles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauser, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    relline calculates relativistic line profiles; it is compatible with the common X-ray data analysis software XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) and ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The two basic forms are an additive line model (RELLINE) and a convolution model to calculate relativistic smearing (RELCONV).

  11. Calculator. Owning a Small Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Seven activities are presented in this student workbook designed for an exploration of small business ownership and the use of the calculator in this career. Included are simulated situations in which students must use a calculator to compute property taxes; estimate payroll taxes and franchise taxes; compute pricing, approximate salaries,…

  12. Automatic calculation in quarkonium physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Bin; Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2014-06-01

    In this report, an automatic calculating package based on REDUCE and RLISP, FDC, is introduced, especially its one-loop calculation part and its special treatment for quarkonium physics. With FDC, many works have been completed, most of them are very important in solve/clarify current puzzles in quarkonium physics.

  13. Shortcut program eases gas calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, W.G.

    1982-12-01

    This paper shows how the HP-41C programmable calculator is used to obtain viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity and net heating values for gas mixtures. It presents diagram of program logic for physical properties, program listings, a table with program summaries, a table with storage locations, and an example calculation.

  14. Scattering calculations and confining interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1993-01-01

    Most of the research work performed under this grant were concerned with strong interaction processes ranging from kaon-nucleon interaction to proton-nucleus scattering calculations. Research performed under this grant can be categorized into three groups: (1) parametrization of fundamental interactions, (2) development of formal theory, and (3) calculations based upon the first two. Parametrizations of certain fundamental interactions, such as kaon-nucleon interaction, for example, were necessary because kaon-nucleon scattering amplitude was needed to perform kaon-nucleus scattering calculations. It was possible to calculate kaon-nucleon amplitudes from the first principle, but it was unnecessary for the purpose of the project. Similar work was also done for example for anti-protons and anti-nuclei. Formal developments to some extent were also pursued so that consistent calculations can be done.

  15. Stress Calculations for Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, Timur; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Atomic stresses were calculated for carbon nanotubes under strain conditions. Graphitic tubules with radii ranging from approximately 2 to 11 Angstroms and two different tubule structures with varying atomic orientations were included in the calculations. Elongations and contractions were applied in the axial direction and atomic stress values were calculated for infinitely long tubules. The calculations were carried out using Brenner's function which was developed for carbon species. Results indicate that the stress is tensile in the radial direction while it is compressive in the tangential direction. Variations in stress values in the direction of the cylindrical aids were investigated as a function of applied strain. Furthermore, using the stress-strain curve (calculated based on atomic considerations), the values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for nanotubules were also estimated.

  16. Unique first-forbidden β-decay transitions in odd-odd and even-even heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Çakmak, Necla; Majid, Muhammad; Selam, Cevad

    2017-01-01

    The allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are the most common weak nuclear processes of spin-isospin (στ) type. These transitions play a key role in numerous processes in the domain of nuclear physics. Equally important is their contribution in astrophysics, particularly in nuclear synthesis and supernova-explosions. In situations where allowed GT transitions are not favored, first-forbidden transitions become significant, specifically in medium heavy and heavy nuclei. For neutron-rich nuclei, first-forbidden transitions are favored mainly due to the phase-space amplification for these transitions. In this work we calculate the allowed GT as well as unique first-forbidden (U1F) | ΔJ | = 2 transitions strength in odd-odd and even-even nuclei in mass range 70 ≤ A ≤ 214. Two different pn-QRPA models were used with a schematic separable interaction to calculate GT and U1F transitions. The inclusion of U1F strength improved the overall comparison of calculated terrestrial β-decay half-lives in both models. The ft values and reduced transition probabilities for the 2- ⟷0+ transitions were also calculated. We compared our calculations with the previously reported correlated RPA calculation and experimental results. Our calculations are in better agreement with measured data. For stellar applications we further calculated the allowed GT and U1F weak rates. These include β±-decay rates and electron/positron capture rates of heavy nuclei in stellar matter. Our study shows that positron and electron capture rates command the total weak rates of these heavy nuclei at high stellar temperatures.

  17. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  18. Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, M.; Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2004-10-01

    As part of designing a village electric power system, the present and future electric loads must be defined, including both seasonal and daily usage patterns. However, in many cases, detailed electric load information is not readily available. NREL developed the Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator to help estimate the electricity requirements in a village given basic information about the types of facilities located within the community. The purpose of this report is to explain how the load calculator was developed and to provide instructions on its use so that organizations can then use this model to calculate expected electrical energy usage.

  19. Multi-calculation rate simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Akhter, M.

    1977-01-01

    It is common in real time simulations of large aerospace systems to separate the high and low frequency subsystems within the simulation and perform the integrations of the subsystems at different calculation rates. This is done to strike a balance between accuracy of calculation and capacity of the digital computer. Questions arising as to the accuracy of this structure compared to single calculation rates were studied using a linear aircraft model. Also investigated were interactions arising to cause errors worse than those expected. Problems are specifically identified and guidelines are given for selection of sample rates for multiple rate simulations.

  20. Geometric field-line calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Mead, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for calculating three components of vector field from spherical harmonic using either geocentric or geodetic coordinates as input and output is described. Three subroutines of computer program are explained. Program is written in FORTRAN for IBM 360 computer.

  1. Nursing students' mathematic calculation skills.

    PubMed

    Rainboth, Lynde; DeMasi, Chris

    2006-12-01

    This mixed method study used a pre-test/post-test design to evaluate the efficacy of a teaching strategy in improving beginning nursing student learning outcomes. During a 4-week student teaching period, a convenience sample of 54 sophomore level nursing students were required to complete calculation assignments, taught one calculation method, and mandated to attend medication calculation classes. These students completed pre- and post-math tests and a major medication mathematic exam. Scores from the intervention student group were compared to those achieved by the previous sophomore class. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement from pre- to post-test and the students who received the intervention had statistically significantly higher scores on the major medication calculation exam than did the students in the control group. The evaluation completed by the intervention group showed that the students were satisfied with the method and outcome.

  2. Landfill Gas Energy Benefits Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the LFG Energy Benefits Calculator to estimate direct, avoided, and total greenhouse gas reductions, as well as environmental and energy benefits, for a landfill gas energy project.

  3. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  4. Transfer Area Mechanical Handling Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    B. Dianda

    2004-06-23

    This calculation is intended to support the License Application (LA) submittal of December 2004, in accordance with the directive given by DOE correspondence received on the 27th of January 2004 entitled: ''Authorization for Bechtel SAX Company L.L. C. to Include a Bare Fuel Handling Facility and Increased Aging Capacity in the License Application, Contract Number DE-AC28-01R W12101'' (Arthur, W.J., I11 2004). This correspondence was appended by further Correspondence received on the 19th of February 2004 entitled: ''Technical Direction to Bechtel SAIC Company L.L. C. for Surface Facility Improvements, Contract Number DE-AC28-OIRW12101; TDL No. 04-024'' (BSC 2004a). These documents give the authorization for a Fuel Handling Facility to be included in the baseline. The purpose of this calculation is to establish preliminary bounding equipment envelopes and weights for the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) transfer areas equipment. This calculation provides preliminary information only to support development of facility layouts and preliminary load calculations. The limitations of this preliminary calculation lie within the assumptions of section 5 , as this calculation is part of an evolutionary design process. It is intended that this calculation is superseded as the design advances to reflect information necessary to support License Application. The design choices outlined within this calculation represent a demonstration of feasibility and may or may not be included in the completed design. This calculation provides preliminary weight, dimensional envelope, and equipment position in building for the purposes of defining interface variables. This calculation identifies and sizes major equipment and assemblies that dictate overall equipment dimensions and facility interfaces. Sizing of components is based on the selection of commercially available products, where applicable. This is not a specific recommendation for the future use of these components or their related

  5. Interactive Software For Astrodynamical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaifer, Ronald S.; Skinner, David L.; Roberts, Phillip H.

    1995-01-01

    QUICK computer program provides user with facilities of sophisticated desk calculator performing scalar, vector, and matrix arithmetic; propagate conic-section orbits; determines planetary and satellite coordinates; and performs other related astrodynamic calculations within FORTRAN-like software environment. QUICK is interpreter, and no need to use compiler or linker to run QUICK code. Outputs plotted in variety of formats on variety of terminals. Written in RATFOR.

  6. Impact delivery of organic matter on the acapulcoite-lodranite parent-body deduced from C, N isotopes and nanostructures of carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, E.; Aléon, J.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Lodran. Carbon phases in Lodran would have been formed by the secondary carbonization of hydrocarbon fluids released during the primary carbonization of IOM. In the framework of this model, the C isotopic compositions can be reproduced using Rayleigh distillation at each carbonization step and the N isotopic compositions can be understood as resulting from the variable loss and preservation of 15N-rich nitriles (δ15N ∼ +800‰) and 15N-poor pyrroles (δ15N = -140‰) during carbonization. The combined interpretation of the temperatures deduced from this model, petrographic cooling rates, and thermochronological indicators suggest that the CI-CM IOM could have been introduced in the parent-body by an impact, about 10 Myr after solar system formation.

  7. Calculated diffusion coefficients and the growth rate of olivine in a basalt magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Concentration gradients in glass adjacent to skeletal olivines in a basalt have been examined by electron probe. The glass is depleted in Mg, Fe, and Cr and enriched in Si, Al, Na, and Ca relative to that far from olivine. Ionic diffusion coefficients for the glass compositions are calculated from temperature, ionic radius and melt viscosity, using the Stokes-Einstein relation. At 1170 C, the diffusion coefficient of Mg(2+) ions in the basalt is 4.5 billionths sq cm per sec. Comparison with measured diffusion coefficients in a mugearite suggests this value may be 16 times too small. The concentration gradient data and the diffusion coefficients are used to calculate instantaneous olivine growth rates. Growth necessarily preceded emplacement such that the composition of the crystals plus the enclosing glass need not be that of a melt. The computed olivine growth rates are compatible with the rate of crystallization deduced for the Skaegaard intrusion.

  8. The primary composition beyond 10 to the 5th power GeV as deduced from high energy hadrons and muons in air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    1985-01-01

    Data obtained from a large set of air shower simulation calculations with use of highly refined hadronic interaction and shower simulation model are presented, in an attempt to solve the problem of primary chemical composition beyond 100,000 GeV total energy. It is rated that high energy hadrons in air showers offer a rather unique primary mass signature and show that the interpretation of high energy muon data is much more ambiguous. Predictions are compared with experimental data.

  9. Time Dependent Nuclear Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David

    2005-04-01

    A new time dependent method for calculating scattering matrix elements of two and three body nuclear collisions below 50 Mev is being developed. The procedure closely follows the channel packet method (CPM) used to compute scattering matrix elements for non-adiabatic molecular reactions.ootnotetextT.A.Niday and D.E.Weeks, Chem. Phys. Letters 308 (1999) 106 Currently, one degree of freedom calculations using a simple square well have been completed and a two body scattering calculation using the Yukawa potential is anticipated. To perform nuclear scattering calculations with the CPM that will incorporate the nucleon-nucleon tensor force, we plan to position initial reactant and product channel packets in the asymptotic limit on single coupled potential energy surfaces labeled by the spin, isospin, and total angular momentum of the reactant nucleons. The wave packets will propagated numerically using the split operator method augmented by a coordinate dependant unitary transformation used to diagonalize the potential. Scattering matrix elements will be determined by the Fourier transform of the correlation function between the evolving reactant and product wave packets. A brief outline of the Argonne v18 nucleon-nucleon potentialootnotetextR.B.Wiringa, V.G.J.Stoks, and R.Schiavilla, Physical Review C 51(1995) 38 and the proposed wave packet calculations will be presented.

  10. Calculation and Interpretation of XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravel, B.; Rehr, J. J.

    1997-03-01

    A real space multiple-scattering (MS) approach for ab initio calculations and for the interpretation of x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is presented. The method is based on full-MS calculations of the electron density matrix ρ(E). Our approach uses the exact Rehr-Albers [Phys. Rev. B, 41, 8139, (1990)] separable representation of the free propagator G together with atomic scattering t-matrices from uc(FEFF7) [Phys. Rev. B52, 2995 (1995)]. This method yields a parallel treatment both of XANES and local electronic structure, including local densities of states (LDOS) and charge transfer. With this method XANES for large clusters can be calculated efficiently. A scattering theoretic interpretation is presented using the separation of both XANES and LDOS into central site and scattering parts, i.e., μ(E)=μ_c(E)[1+\\chi(E)] and ρ(E)=ρ_c(E)[1+\\chi(E)], where \\chi(E) is the XAFS function and both μc and ρc are smooth backgrounds. Charge transfer is interpreted in terms of the scattering part \\chi, and hence is related to features in XANES. Calculations for several materials are presented and compared with LMTO band-structure calculations and with experiment.

  11. Collisional broadening of CO2 IR lines. II. Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenmann, L.; Hartmann, J. M.; Perrin, M. Y.; Taine, J.

    1988-03-01

    The ability of available theoretical models in describing broadening mechanisms is tested for the CO2-O2, CO2-CO2, and CO2-N2 systems. It is shown that the Anderson-Tsao-Curnutte theory is inaccurate since short-range forces can contribute significantly to broadening. We use the approach of Robert and Bonamy, but the usual expansion of the atom-atom potential to the fourth order around the intermolecular distance appears insufficient at short distances for these particular systems. We propose a better representation of the radial dependence of the atom-atom potential, while keeping the previous analytical expression of the cross section. Satisfactory results are obtained for both the rotational quantum number dependence of room-temperature CO2-O2, CO2-CO2, and CO2-N2 half-widths and the evolution of CO2-N2 broadening with temperature. It is shown that the isotropic part of the potential involved in the trajectory calculation must be coherently deduced from the atom-atom interaction potential.

  12. Insertion device calculations with mathematica

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.; Lidia, S.

    1995-02-01

    The design of accelerator insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators has usually been aided by numerical modeling on digital computers, using code in high level languages like Fortran. In the present era, there are higher level programming environments like IDL{reg_sign}, MatLab{reg_sign}, and Mathematica{reg_sign} in which these calculations may be performed by writing much less code, and in which standard mathematical techniques are very easily used. The authors present a suite of standard insertion device modeling routines in Mathematica to illustrate the new techniques. These routines include a simple way to generate magnetic fields using blocks of CSEM materials, trajectory solutions from the Lorentz force equations for given magnetic fields, Bessel function calculations of radiation for wigglers and undulators and general radiation calculations for undulators.

  13. Canister Transfer Facility Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. Monroe-Rammsy

    2000-10-13

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the criticality risk in the surface facility for design basis events (DBE) involving Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) standardized canisters (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System [CRWMS] Management and Operating Contractor [M&O] 2000a). Since some of the canisters will be stored in the surface facility before they are loaded in the waste package (WP), this calculation supports the demonstration of concept viability related to the Surface Facility environment. The scope of this calculation is limited to the consideration of three DOE SNF fuels, specifically Enrico Fermi SNF, Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA) SNF, and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF.

  14. SIMULATE-4 pin power calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadir, T.; Lindahl, S. Oe

    2006-07-01

    A new pin power reconstruction module has been implemented in Studsvik Scandpower's next generation nodal code, SIMULATE-4. Heterogeneous pin powers are calculated by modulating multi-group pin powers from the sub-mesh solver of SIMULATE-4 with pin form factors from single-assembly CASMO-5 lattice calculations. The multi-group pin power model captures instantaneous spectral effects, and actinide tracking on the assembly sub-mesh describes exposure-induced pin power variations. Model details and verification tests against high order multi-assembly transport methods are presented. The accuracy of the new methods is also demonstrated by comparing SIMULATE-4 calculations with measured critical experiment pin powers. (authors)

  15. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  16. Quantum Mechanics and physical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayan, H. S.

    2014-03-01

    We suggest to realize the computer simulation and calculation by the algebraic structure built on the basis of the logic inherent to processes in physical systems (called physical computing). We suggest a principle for the construction of quantum algorithms of neuroinformatics of quantum neural networks. The role of academician Sahakyan is emphasized in the development of quantum physics in Armenia.

  17. Automated calculation and simulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Thorsten

    2003-04-01

    I briefly summarize the parallel sessions on Automated Calculation and Simulation Systems for high-energy particle physics phenomenology at ACAT 2002 (Moscow State University, June 2002) and present a short overview over the current status of the field and try to identify the important trends.

  18. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  19. Algorithm Calculates Cumulative Poisson Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowerman, Paul N.; Nolty, Robert C.; Scheuer, Ernest M.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithm calculates accurate values of cumulative Poisson distribution under conditions where other algorithms fail because numbers are so small (underflow) or so large (overflow) that computer cannot process them. Factors inserted temporarily to prevent underflow and overflow. Implemented in CUMPOIS computer program described in "Cumulative Poisson Distribution Program" (NPO-17714).

  20. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG INACTIVATION CALCULATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix O of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) Guidance Manual introduces the CeffT10 (i.e., reaction zone outlet C value and T10 time) method for calculating ozone CT value and Giardia and virus log inactivation. The LT2ESWTR Pre-proposal Draft Regulatory Language for St...

  1. Recursive Calculation of Crop Evaptranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1948 three papers were published that introduced methods to calculate evaporation of water from land and water surfaces. The first paper was by Charles Thornthwaite (geographer and climatologist) that devised a climate classification system and introduced the concept of potential evapotranspirati...

  2. Exact Multiple Scattering XANES Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravel, B.; Rehr, J. J.

    1996-03-01

    Ab initio calculations of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), are made by inverting the full multiple-scattering (MS) matrix G=(1-G_0t)-1G_0. Our approach uses the fast, quickly convergent Rehr-Albers(J.J. Rehr and R.C. Albers, Phys. Rev. B, 41), 8139, (1990) separable representation of the free electron propagator G0 together with atomic scattering t-matrices from the FEFF6 code,(S. I. Zabinsky, et al., Phys. Rev. B52), 2995 (1995). which are calculated within the muffin-tin approximation with overlapped atom potentials. With this technique XANES spectra and its polarization dependence can be calculated in reasonable cpu time on large clusters. Good agreement with the XANES spectra of several sample compounds is obtained. This strategy is also used to determine the local densities of states ρ(E, r ) from the full MS matrix. From ρ(E, r ) we calculate the Fermi energies and estimate charge transfer for our sample clusters. The prospect of quantitative analysis of XANES spectra and its preedge features is discussed.

  3. Preliminary modulus calculations for cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Young's modulus is a measure of the inherent stiffness of an elastic material. In the case of cellulose, it quantifies the ability of the material to undergo changes in length as tension or compression forces are applied. The modulus can be calculated by performing tensile tests on cotton fiber...

  4. CAI on a Programmable Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlaphoff, Carl W.

    1975-01-01

    This article describes a procedure for presenting routine practice problems on a programable calculator with attached teletype. The program uses a random number generator to write problems, gives feedback and assigns grades according to the procedures outlined (and flow-charted) by the author. (SD)

  5. ITER Port Interspace Pressure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Van Hove, Walter A

    2016-01-01

    The ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) is equipped with 54 access ports. Each of these ports has an opening in the bioshield that communicates with a dedicated port cell. During Tokamak operation, the bioshield opening must be closed with a concrete plug to shield the radiation coming from the plasma. This port plug separates the port cell into a Port Interspace (between VV closure lid and Port Plug) on the inner side and the Port Cell on the outer side. This paper presents calculations of pressures and temperatures in the ITER (Ref. 1) Port Interspace after a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a pipe of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) with high temperature water. It is assumed that this DEGB occurs during the worst possible conditions, which are during water baking operation, with water at a temperature of 523 K (250 C) and at a pressure of 4.4 MPa. These conditions are more severe than during normal Tokamak operation, with the water at 398 K (125 C) and 2 MPa. Two computer codes are employed in these calculations: RELAP5-3D Version 4.2.1 (Ref. 2) to calculate the blowdown releases from the pipe break, and MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 (Ref. 3) to calculate the pressures and temperatures in the Port Interspace. A sensitivity study has been performed to optimize some flow areas.

  6. Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This "Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator" helps school systems quantify all current spending aimed at improving teaching effectiveness. Part I provides worksheets to analyze total investment. Part II provides a system for evaluating investments based on purpose, target group, and delivery. In this Spending Calculator…

  7. Prenatal radiation exposure: dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Scharwächter, C; Röser, A; Schwartz, C A; Haage, P

    2015-05-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero x-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties. • Radiation exposure of the unborn child can result in both deterministic as well as stochastic damage und hitherto should be avoided or reduced to a minimum

  8. A few ways of calculating the similarity parameter kappa* for real gases. [increase Reynolds number in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz-Meyer, W.

    1977-01-01

    In connection with the question on the applicability of test results obtained from cryogenic wind tunnels to the large-scale model the similarity parameter is referred to. A simple method is given for calculating the similarity parameter. From the numerical values obtained it can be deduced that nitrogen behaves practically like an ideal gas when it is close to the saturation point and in a pressure range up to 4 bar. The influence of this parameter on the pressure distribution of a supercritical profile confirms this finding.

  9. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging

  10. Neutrino mean free paths in cold symmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, S.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    2004-09-01

    The neutrino mean free paths (NMFP) for scattering and absorption in cold symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) are calculated using two-body effective interactions and one-body effective weak operators obtained from realistic models of nuclear forces using correlated basis theory. The infinite system is modeled in a box with periodic boundary conditions and the one particle-hole (p-h) response functions are calculated using the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). For the densities {rho}=(1/2), 1 (3/2){rho}{sub 0}, where {rho}{sub 0} is the equilibrium density of SNM, the strength of the response is shifted to higher energy transfers when compared to a noninteracting Fermi gas (FG). This and the weakness of effective operators compared to the bare operators, significantly reduces the cross sections, enhancing the NMFP by factors of {approx}2.5-3.5 at the densities considered. The NMFP at the equilibrium density {rho}{sub 0} are also calculated using the TDA and random phase approximation (RPA) using zero range Skyrme-like effective interactions with parameters chosen to reproduce the equation of state and spin-isospin susceptibilities of matter. Their results indicate that RPA corrections to correlated TDA may further increase the NMFP by {approx}25% to 3-4 times those in a noninteracting FG. Finally, the sums and the energy weighted sums of the Fermi and Gamow-Teller responses obtained from the correlated ground state are compared with those of the 1 p-h response functions to extract the sum and mean energies of multi p-h contributions to the weak response. The relatively large mean energy of the multi p-h excitations suggests that they may not contribute significantly to low energy NMFP.

  11. The distribution of cosmic rays in the galaxy and their dynamics as deduced from recent gamma-ray observations. [X-ray intensity variations with galactocentric distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puget, J. L.; Stecker, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recent data from SAS-2 on the galactic gamma ray line flux as a function of longitude reveal a broad maximum in the gamma ray intensity in the region absolute value of l approximately smaller than 30 deg. These data imply that the low energy galactic cosmic ray flux varies with galactocentric distance and is about an order of magnitude higher than the local value in a toroidal region between 4 and 5 kpc from the galactic center. This enhancement can be plausibly accounted for by first order Fermi acceleration, compression and trapping of cosmic rays consistent with present ideas of galactic dynamics and galactic structure theory. Calculations indicate that cosmic rays in the 4 to 5 kpc region are trapped and accelerated over a mean time of the order of a few million years or about 2 to 4 times the assumed trapping time in the solar region of the galaxy.

  12. First-principles calculations of carbon clathrates: Comparison to silicon and germanium clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connétable, Damien

    2010-08-01

    We employ state-of-the-art first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory and density-functional perturbation theory to investigate relevant physical properties and phase diagram of the free guest type-I (X-46) and type-II (X-34) carbon clathrates. Their properties and those of silicon and germanium diamonds, and clathrates have been computed and compared within the same approach. We briefly present and discuss their structural, cohesive, and electronic properties. In particular, we present different results about electronic properties of carbon clathrates. From the symmetry analysis of electronic states around the band gap, we deduce their optical properties, and we forecast the effects of hypothetical-doped elements on their electronic band gap. We then report first-principles calculations of vibrational, thermodynamical, and elastic properties. Whereas vibrational properties of Si and Ge systems can be linked through their atomic weight ratio, we show that the vibrational properties of carbon structures differ strongly. Raman and infrared spectra of all clathrates are also calculated and compared. The effects of pressure and temperature on thermodynamical properties (heat capacity, entropy, thermal expansion, etc.) within static and quasiharmonic approximations are investigated. It is shown that thermodynamical properties of carbon clathrates and diamond present a similar evolution up to high pressures (100 GPa) and over a large range of temperatures ([0, 1500] K). Then we deduce the equilibrium phase diagram (P,T) of C-2/C-34/C-46. We conclude the paper with a presentation of elastic properties computed from acoustic slopes.

  13. Calculation of longshore sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'yev, I. O.

    2014-03-01

    Calculation approaches to longshore transport of sandy sediments are discussed. The estimation of the total sediment transport rate is shown to be possibly based on the so-called CERC formula, where the proportionality factor K should be calculated from relationships of Bayram et al. [8] or Leont'yev [4]. In both cases, the results are very close to each other if the author's determination of the wave breaking depth is used. Under the condition of contrasting variations in the sediment grain size over the coastal profile or in the case of fragmentary sand distribution on the surface of the bed, the local approach implying process-based modeling is more effective. A model is suggested to compute the local longshore sediment transport rates.

  14. Geothermometer calculations for geothermal assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    Geothermal exploration programs have relied on the calculation of geothermometers from hot spring chemistry as an early estimation of geothermal reservoir temperatures. Calibration of the geothermometers has evolved from experimental determinations of mineral solubility as a function of temperature to calibration from analyses of water chemistry from known depths and temperatures in thermal wells. Most of the geothermometers were calibrated from analyses of sodium-chloride type waters, and the application of some geothermometers should be restricted to waters of the chemical types that were used in their calibration. Chemical analyses must be determined to be reliable before they are used to calculate geothermometers. The USGS Geothermal Resource Assessment will rely on the silica geothermometer developed by Giggenbach that approximates the transition between chalcedony at 20??C and quartz at 200??C. Above 200??C, the assessment will rely on the quartz geothermometer. In addition, the assessment will also rely on the potassium-magnesium geothermometer.

  15. Calculation of Ceramic Phase Diagrams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-30

    Parameters were derived covering the liquid, spinel , periclase, corundum alpha and beta. DD IJAN73 1413 EDITIOW OF I NOV4SS IS OSSOLETE (/Ai/Ec-;/ 5 - -rZ7 77...Lattice Stability, Solution and Compound Phase Parameters were derived covering the liquid, spinel , periclase, corundum alpha and beta quartz, crystobalite...and compound phase parameters for the liquid, spinel , corundum and periclase phases can be employed to calculate phase equilibria activity, vapor

  16. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  17. The mass balance record and surge behavior of Drangajökull Ice Cap (Iceland) from 1946 to 2011 deduced from aerial photographs and LiDAR DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Cobo Belart, Joaquín; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Pálsson, Finnur

    2014-05-01

    High resolution and accuracy (e.g. based on LiDAR survey) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of glaciers and their close vicinity have significantly improved the methods for calculation of geodetic mass balance and study of changes in glacier dynamics. However additional data is needed to extend such studies back in time. Here we present a geodetically derived mass balance record for Drangajökull ice cap (NW-Iceland) since 1946 to present. The mass balance is calculated from a series of DEMs derived by photogrammetric processing of aerial photographs (years: 1946, 1975, 1985, 1994) and a LiDAR DEM (2011). All Ground Control Points (GCPs) used to constrain the orientation of the aerial photographs, used in the photogrammetric processing, are picked from the LiDAR derived DEM, thus eliminating the time consuming and expensive in situ survey of GCPs. The LiDAR DEM also helps to assess the accuracy of the photogrammetrically derived DEMs, by analyzing the residuals in elevation in ice-free areas. For the DEMs of 1975, 1985 and 1994 the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the residuals is less than 2 m, whereas the accuracy of the DEM of 1946 is worse, with RMSE of 5.5 m, caused by the deteriorated images. The geodetic mass balance yields a negative specific mass balance of ~-0.5 m w.e.a-¹ for the period 1946-1975, followed by periods of positive mass balance: ~0.2 m w.e.a-¹ for the period 1975-1985 and ~0.3 m w.e.a-¹ for the period 1985-1994. Negative specific mass balance of ~-0.6 m w.e.a-¹ is derived for the period 1994-2011. High mass redistribution is observed during 1985-1994 and 1994-2011 on the three main outlets of the ice cap, related to surges. The derived orthophotographs allow tracking of stable features at individual locations on the northern part of Drangajökull, indicating an average velocity of 5-10 m a-¹ for the period 1946-1985 and speeding up in the last two periods due to a surge.

  18. Aerial photographic surveys analyzed to deduce oil spill movement during the decay and breakup of fast ice, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, I.M.; Baird, D.A.

    1982-09-01

    During the summers of 1979 and 1980 aerial photographs of the land fast ice north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, were taken. These photographs, covering two-week periods, highlight the decay and break-up of the land fast ice sheet. During the period of photography, wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, and tidal height measurements were recorded continuously. Several larger ice floes were 'tagged' with colored plywood markers during 1979. Both these marked flows and other distinctively shaped floes were tracked on the photographic surveys to determine the effect the wind had on their movement. Within the barrier islands, average ice floe velocities as a percentage of wind speed exceeded the 3.5% figure 'normally' found in the literature. North of these islands average ice floe velocities as a percentage of wind speed were less than the 3.5% value. In addition to the flow drift calculations the photographs provide information on melt pool formation and a comparison of the decay and breakup processes between the 1979 and 1980 seasons. The decay and breakup process appears to be triggered by strong wind events in early July.

  19. Astrophysical Impact of the Updated 9Be(p,α)6Li and 10B(p,α)7Be Reaction Rates As Deduced By THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    The complete understanding of the stellar abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron represents one of the most interesting open problems in astrophysics. These elements are largely used to probe stellar structure and mixing phenomena in different astrophysical scenarios, such as pre-main-sequence or main-sequence stars. Their different fragility against (p,α) burning reactions allows one to investigate different depths of the stellar interior. Such fusion mechanisms are triggered at temperatures between T ≈ (2-5) × {10}6 K, thus defining a corresponding Gamow energy between ≈ 3-10 keV, where S(E)-factor measurements need to be performed to get reliable reaction rate evaluations. The Trojan Horse Method is a well defined procedure to measure cross sections at Gamow energies overcoming the uncertainties due to low-energy S(E)-factor extrapolation as well as electron screening effects. Taking advantage of the {\\mathtt{THM}} measure of the 9Be(p,α)6Li and 10B(p,α)7Be cross sections, the corresponding reaction rates have been calculated and compared with the evaluations by the NACRE collaboration, widely used in the literature. The impact on surface abundances of the updated 9Be and 10B (p,α) burning rates is discussed for pre-MS stars.

  20. Ground deformation effects from the M6 earthquakes (2014-2015) on Cephalonia-Ithaca Islands (Western Greece) deduced by GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwed, Małgorzata; Pińskwar, Iwona; Kundzewicz, Zbigniew W.; Graczyk, Dariusz; Mezghani, Abdelkader

    2017-03-01

    The implications of the earthquakes that took place in the central Ionian Islands in 2014 (Cephalonia, M w6.1, M w5.9) and 2015 (Lefkas, M w6.4) are described based on repeat measurements of the local GPS networks in Cephalonia and Ithaca, and the available continuous GPS stations in the broader area. The Lefkas earthquake occurred on a branch of the Cephalonia Transform Fault, affecting Cephalonia with SE displacements gradually decreasing from north ( 100 mm) to south ( 10 mm). This earthquake revealed a near N-S dislocation boundary separating Paliki Peninsula in western Cephalonia from the rest of the island, as well as another NW-SE trending fault that separates kinematically the northern and southern parts of Paliki. Strain field calculations during the interseismic period (2014-2015) indicate compression between Ithaca and Cephalonia, while extension appears during the following co-seismic period (2015-2016) including the 2015 Lefkas earthquake. Additional tectonically active zones with differential kinematic characteristics were also identified locally.

  1. DeNovoID: a web-based tool for identifying peptides from sequence and mass tags deduced from de novo peptide sequencing by mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halligan, Brian D; Ruotti, Victor; Twigger, Simon N; Greene, Andrew S

    2005-07-01

    One of the core activities of high-throughput proteomics is the identification of peptides from mass spectra. Some peptides can be identified using spectral matching programs like Sequest or Mascot, but many spectra do not produce high quality database matches. De novo peptide sequencing is an approach to determine partial peptide sequences for some of the unidentified spectra. A drawback of de novo peptide sequencing is that it produces a series of ordered and disordered sequence tags and mass tags rather than a complete, non-degenerate peptide amino acid sequence. This incomplete data is difficult to use in conventional search programs such as BLAST or FASTA. DeNovoID is a program that has been specifically designed to use degenerate amino acid sequence and mass data derived from MS experiments to search a peptide database. Since the algorithm employed depends on the amino acid composition of the peptide and not its sequence, DeNovoID does not have to consider all possible sequences, but rather a smaller number of compositions consistent with a spectrum. DeNovoID also uses a geometric indexing scheme that reduces the number of calculations required to determine the best peptide match in the database. DeNovoID is available at http://proteomics.mcw.edu/denovoid.

  2. Calculation of gas turbine characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaev, B. I.; Murashko, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    The reasons and regularities of vapor flow and turbine parameter variation depending on the total pressure drop rate π* and rotor rotation frequency n are studied, as exemplified by a two-stage compressor turbine of a power-generating gas turbine installation. The turbine characteristic is calculated in a wide range of mode parameters using the method in which analytical dependences provide high accuracy for the calculated flow output angle and different types of gas dynamic losses are determined with account of the influence of blade row geometry, blade surface roughness, angles, compressibility, Reynolds number, and flow turbulence. The method provides satisfactory agreement of results of calculation and turbine testing. In the design mode, the operation conditions for the blade rows are favorable, the flow output velocities are close to the optimal ones, the angles of incidence are small, and the flow "choking" modes (with respect to consumption) in the rows are absent. High performance and a nearly axial flow behind the turbine are obtained. Reduction of the rotor rotation frequency and variation of the pressure drop change the flow parameters, the parameters of the stages and the turbine, as well as the form of the characteristic. In particular, for decreased n, nonmonotonic variation of the second stage reactivity with increasing π* is observed. It is demonstrated that the turbine characteristic is mainly determined by the influence of the angles of incidence and the velocity at the output of the rows on the losses and the flow output angle. The account of the growing flow output angle due to the positive angle of incidence for decreased rotation frequencies results in a considerable change of the characteristic: poorer performance, redistribution of the pressure drop at the stages, and change of reactivities, growth of the turbine capacity, and change of the angle and flow velocity behind the turbine.

  3. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  4. Band calculation of lonsdaleite Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pin-Shiang; Fan, Sheng-Ting; Lan, Huang-Siang; Liu, Chee Wee

    2017-01-01

    The band structure of Ge in the lonsdaleite phase is calculated using first principles. Lonsdaleite Ge has a direct band gap at the Γ point. For the conduction band, the Γ valley is anisotropic with the low transverse effective mass on the hexagonal plane and the large longitudinal effective mass along the c axis. For the valence band, both heavy-hole and light-hole effective masses are anisotropic at the Γ point. The in-plane electron effective mass also becomes anisotropic under uniaxial tensile strain. The strain response of the heavy-hole mass is opposite to the light hole.

  5. Development of Evaporative Emissions Calculations for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes methodology for developing evaporative emissions calculations for MOVES2009 Model. To describe development of inputs and calculations used in the MOVES2009 model to calculate on-highway emissions inventories.

  6. Magma Degassing and Evolution Processes of the 2000 Eruption of Miyakejima Volcano, Japan, Deduced From of Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusion Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, G.; Morishita, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical analyses of melt inclusions in Mg-poor (Mg#68-73) and Mg-rich (Mg#76-84)"@olivines from a bomb and lapilli from the 18 August 2000 eruption of Miyakejima volcano, Japan, were carried out in order to investigate degassing and evolution process "Íf the magma. Analyses of major elements, S and Cl of the melt inclusions were made by EPMA, and H2O and CO2 by FTIR and SIMS (Miyagi et al., 1995; Hauri et al., 2002). Major element composition of Mg-poor olivine-hosted melt inclusions (Mg-poor Ol MIs) is similar to that of groundmass in the bomb, indicating the melt entrapment just before the eruption. The Mg-poor Ol MIs have volatile contents of 0.7-2.5 wt.% H2O, 0.005-0.02 wt.% CO2, 0.05-0.17 wt. % S, and 0.06-0.1 wt. % Cl, that are roughly similar to those of plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions (Saito et al., 2005). Gas saturation pressure of the magma is calculated to be 20-100 MPa on the basis of the H2O and CO2 contents of Mg-poor Ol MIs, corresponds to the depth of 1-4 km. On the other hand, the Mg-rich olivine-hosted melt inclusions (Mg-rich Ol MIs) have SiO2 and K2O-poor but Al2O3-rich composition than the whole rock composition of the bomb and lapilli. They have volatile contents of 1.9-3.5 wt.% H2O, 0.003-0.025 wt.% CO2, 0.06-0.21 wt.% S, and 0.04-0.07 wt.% Cl, that are a little higher H2O and S and lower Cl contents than those of Mg-rich Ol MIs. Gas saturation pressure of the magma is calculated to be 50-150 MPa on the basis of the H2O and CO2 contents of Mg-rich Ol MIs. Ratios of H2O and S contents of both the Mg-poor and Mg-rich Ol MIs are similar to that of volcanic gas emitted from the summit after the 2000 eruption, while their ratios of CO2 and H2O contents are lower than that of volcanic gas. Existence of the Al2O3-rich less-evolved melt with high H2O content is consistent with the petrological and experimental studies that low-MgO high-alumina basalt is derived from primary magma with high H2O content (Uto, 1986; Sisson and Grove, 1993). The

  7. Rapid coastal subsidence in the central Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (Bangladesh) since the 17th century deduced from submerged salt-producing kilns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanebuth, T. J.; Kudrass, H.; Linstädter, J.; Islam, B.; Zander, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The densely populated low lying Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta is highly vulnerable to the global sea-level rise. In order to estimate the subsidence of the delta over historical time scales, we examined submerged salt-producing kiln sites in the coastal Sundarbans. These kilns were built just above the previous winterly spring high-tide level, but are currently located ~155 × 15 cm below the corresponding modern level. According to optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, the kilns were ultimately fired ~300 years ago (1705 × 35 AD) and salt production was terminated abruptly by a catastrophic event (major cyclone), which affected the kiln sites at different levels and locations. Two particular buried mangrove root horizons 80 cm below this kiln level also indicate catastrophic scenarios (probably subsidence events related to a regional earthquake). AMS-14C ages measured on the charcoal layers at the kiln's bases and on these associated mangrove stump horizons support the OSL dates. Based on the respective elevations of these kiln and mangrove palaeo-horizons and on the ages, the 300-year-average rate of sinking of the outer delta is 5.2 × 1.2 mm/a, which includes 0.8 mm/a of eustatic sea-level rise over this historical period. Expecting further acceleration of the eustatic sea-level rise of up to 7 mm/a, we calculate a rise in relative sea level of up to 8.9 × 3.3 mm/a for the next few decased, which will dramatically aggravate the already present problematic situation. Only a prudently-managed control of sediment accretion will keep southern Bangladesh above the sea level. (Hanebuth et al., Geology, Sept 2013, doi: 10.1130/G34646.1.)

  8. Marked longevity of human lung parenchymal elastic fibers deduced from prevalence of D-aspartate and nuclear weapons-related radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.D.; Endicott, S.K.; Province, M.A.; Pierce, J.A.; Campbell, E.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Normal structure and function of the lung parenchyma depend upon elastic fibers. Amorphous elastin is biochemically stable in vitro, and may provide a metabolically stable structural framework for the lung parenchyma. To test the metabolic stability of elastin in the normal human lung parenchyma, we have (a) estimated the time elapsed since the synthesis of the protein through measurement of aspartic acid racemization and (b) modeled the elastin turnover through measurement of the prevalence of nuclear weapons-related {sup 14}C. Elastin purified by a new technique from normal lung parenchyma was hydrolyzed; then the prevalences of D-aspartate and {sup 14}C were measured by gas chromatography and accelerator-mass spectrometry, respectively. D-aspartate increased linearly with age; Kasp (1.76 x 10{sup {minus} 3} yr{sup {minus} 1}) was similar to that previously found for extraordinarily stable human tissues, indicating that the age of lung parenchymal elastin corresponded with the age of the subject. Radiocarbon prevalence data also were consistent with extraordinary metabolic stability of elastin; the calculated mean carbon residence time in elastin was 74 yr (95% confidence limits, 40-174 yr). These results indicate that airspace enlargement characteristic of 'aging lung' is not associated with appreciable new synthesis of lung parenchymal elastin. The present study provides the first tissue-specific evaluation of turnover of an extracellular matrix component in humans and underscores the potential importance of elastin for maintenance of normal lung structure. Most importantly, the present work provides a foundation for strategies to directly evaluate extracellular matrix injury and repair in diseases of lung (especially pulmonary emphysema), vascular tissue, and skin.

  9. Using a Hand-Held Electronic Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Roger

    1975-01-01

    The arithmetic needed for complex calculation using an electronic calculator is explained and exemplified. Problems involving square roots, number theory, Fibonacci numbers, and electrical resistances are solved. (SD)

  10. First principles calculations of structural, electronic and optical properties of InN compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graine, R.; Chemam, R.; Gasmi, F. Z.; Nouri, R.; Meradji, H.; Khenata, R.

    2015-11-01

    We carried out ab initio calculations of structural, electronic and optical properties of Indium nitride (InN) compound in both zinc blende and wurtzite phases, using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW), within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). For the exchange and correlation potential, local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) were used. Moreover, the alternative form of GGA proposed by Engel and Vosko (EV-GGA) and modified Becke-Johnson schemes (mBJ) were also applied for band structure calculations. Ground state properties such as lattice parameter, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are calculated. Results obtained for band structure of these compounds have been compared with experimental results as well as other first principle computations. Our results show good agreement with the available data. The calculated band structure shows a direct band gap Γ → Γ. In the optical properties section, several optical quantities are investigated; in particular we have deduced the interband transitions from the imaginary part of the dielectric function.

  11. Calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields for low-Z elements

    SciTech Connect

    Nekkab, M.; Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, N. Küp; Aylikçi, V.

    2015-03-30

    The analytical methods based on X-ray fluorescence are advantageous for practical applications in a variety of fields including atomic physics, X-ray fluorescence surface chemical analysis and medical research and so the accurate fluorescence yields (ω{sub K}) are required for these applications. In this contribution we report a new parameters for calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields (ω{sub K}) of elements in the range of 11≤Z≤30. The experimental data are interpolated by using the famous analytical function (ω{sub k}/(1−ω{sub k})){sup 1/q} (were q=3, 3.5 and 4) vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields. A comparison is made between the results of the procedures followed here and those theoretical and other semi-empirical fluorescence yield values. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  12. Role of pyroclast recycling on style of small basaltic explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy, deduced from real-time collected ash samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, T.; Kawaguchi, R.; Nishimura, T.; Aoyama, H.; Yamada, T.; Fujita, E.

    2015-12-01

    Understandings of controlling mechanism on the style of volcanic explosion is one of the most important subject not only for volcanology but also for hazard mitigation. Vesiculation, outgassing and crystallization of magma, and interaction with external water have been considered as essential factors for the controlling mechanism (e.g., Houghton and Gonnerman, 2005). In contrast, recent studies suggested that vigorous recyclings of pyroclast into the vent occur at basaltic volcanoes with repeating small explosions (D'Oriano et al., 2014). The recycling of pyroclast that fills the shallow conduit can affect explosion dynamics such as shape and ejection speed of jet cloud (e.g., Ohba et al., 2002). This study examined component, texture and chemical composition of ash samples collected during normal activity at Stromboli to discuss a controlling mechanism of small explosion styles in basaltic volcano. During studied term (14:26-18:29, May 21th, 2014), ash-rich explosion occurred in NE crater, and ash-poor explosion occurred in the central and SW craters. We performed real-time collection of falling ash every 4-18 minutes. The real-time collection permits direct comparison of the ash samples with explosion activity. We classify the ash particles into Juvenile (glassy particles having similar composition with HP magma), Recycled (similar texture with reheated basaltic ash; D'Oriano et al., 2013), Altered, and Crystal particles. Bulk component of recycled particle calculated from componentry variations with grain size and grain size distribution shows that the volume fraction of recycled particles increases with ash falling rate at sampling site. The ash falling rate at sampling site increased after the occurrence of ash rich explosions at NE crater. Our ash observation indicates that burial of eruptive vent by recycled pyroclasts relates with occurrence of ash rich explosion at NE crater. Therefore, we suggest that combination of the amount of gas supplied from a

  13. Global ionospheric current patterns associated with the development of the R1 and R2 FACs deduced by the GEMSIS-POT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamizo, A.; Hiraki, Y.; Hori, T.; Seki, K.; Ieda, A.; Tsuji, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Kikuchi, T.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the GEMSIS project (Geospace Environment Modeling System for Integrated Studies), we have developed a two-dimensional ionospheric global potential solver. There has been considerable research on the mid-and low-latitude ionospheric system driven by neutral wind [e.g., Richmond, 1973]. However, there are few researches on the relationship between the high-latitude system and middle and low latitude system, which is important for the integrated studies of the magnetosphere-inner magnetosphere system coupled through the ionosphere. Our model basically follows a methodology provided by Tsunomura [1999]; it solves the Ohm's law under the thin-shell approximated 2-D ionosphere, with FACs in the polar region and height-integrated ionospheric conductivities. The most important extension from previous studies is that our model covers both hemispheres without a boundary at the equator. The values of Pedersen and Hall conductivities are calculated as exactly as possible with the MSIS-2000, IRI-2007, and IGRF-2005 reference models. In addition, we consider the effect of auroral particle precipitation on conductivities with reference to the empirical models [e.g., Hardy et al., 1987]. Although the FACs and ionospheric conductivity are intrinsically related to each other, we set them a priori at present because there is still no theory describing the development of the FACs-conductivity coupled system self-consistently. By using the solver, we investigate (1) the relationship between the conductivity and electric field in the middle and low latitude ionosphere and (2) how the current density ratio and latitudinal/longitudinal distribution of R1-FAC and R2-FAC affect the electric field distribution and current pattern in the middle and low latitude ionosphere. Here, FACs are distributed with reference to the empirical model by Hori et al. [in preparation] and the location of the conductivity enhancement associated with auroral activities given by empirical models is

  14. Formation of highly oxidized multifunctional compounds: autoxidation of peroxy radicals formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes - deduced from structure-product relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, T. F.; Springer, M.; Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Pullinen, I.; Kurtén, T.; Rissanen, M.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.

    2015-06-01

    It has been postulated that secondary organic particulate matter plays a pivotal role in the early growth of newly formed particles in forest areas. The recently detected class of extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOC) provides the missing organic vapors and possibly contributes a significant fraction to atmospheric SOA (secondary organic aerosol). The sequential rearrangement of peroxy radicals and subsequent O2 addition results in ELVOC which are highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM). Key for efficiency of such HOM in early particle growth is that their formation is induced by one attack of the oxidant (here O3), followed by an autoxidation process involving molecular oxygen. Similar mechanisms were recently observed and predicted by quantum mechanical calculations e.g., for isoprene. To assess the atmospheric importance and therewith the potential generality, it is crucial to understand the formation pathway of HOM. To elucidate the formation path of HOM as well as necessary and sufficient structural prerequisites of their formation we studied homologous series of cycloalkenes in comparison to two monoterpenes. We were able to directly observe highly oxidized multifunctional peroxy radicals with 8 or 10 O atoms by an Atmospheric Pressure interface High Resolution Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (APi-TOF-MS) equipped with a NO3--chemical ionization (CI) source. In the case of O3 acting as an oxidant, the starting peroxy radical is formed on the so-called vinylhydroperoxide path. HOM peroxy radicals and their termination reactions with other peroxy radicals, including dimerization, allowed for analyzing the observed mass spectra and narrowing down the likely formation path. As consequence, we propose that HOM are multifunctional percarboxylic acids, with carbonyl, hydroperoxy, or hydroxy groups arising from the termination steps. We figured that aldehyde groups facilitate the initial rearrangement steps. In simple molecules like cycloalkenes

  15. Formation of highly oxidized multifunctional compounds: autoxidation of peroxy radicals formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes - deduced from structure-product relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, T. F.; Springer, M.; Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Pullinen, I.; Kurtén, T.; Rissanen, M.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been postulated that secondary organic particulate matter plays a pivotal role in the early growth of newly formed particles in forest areas. The recently detected class of extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOC) provides the missing organic vapours and possibly contributes a~significant fraction to atmospheric SOA. ELVOC are highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM), formed by sequential rearrangement of peroxy radicals and subsequent O2 addition. Key for efficiency in early particle growth is that formation of HOM is induced by one attack of the oxidant (here O3) and followed by an autoxidation process involving molecular oxygen. Similar mechanisms were recently observed and predicted by quantum mechanical calculations e.g. for isoprene. To assess the atmospheric importance and therewith the potential generality, it is crucial to understand the formation pathway of HOM. To elucidate the formation path of HOM as well as necessary and sufficient structural prerequisites of their formation we studied homologues series of cycloalkenes in comparison to two monoterpenes. We were able to directly observe highly oxidized multifunctional peroxy radicals with 8 or 10 O-atoms by an Atmospheric Pressure interface High Resolution Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer equipped with a NO3--Chemical Ionization (CI) source. In case of O3 acting as oxidant the starting peroxy radical is formed on the so called vinylhydroperoxide path. HOM peroxy radicals and their termination reactions with other peroxy radicals, including dimerization, allowed for analysing the observed mass spectra and narrow down the likely formation path. As consequence we propose that HOM are multifunctional percarboxylic acids; with carbonyl-, hydroperoxy-, or hydroxy-groups arising from the termination steps. We figured that aldehyde groups facilitate the initial rearrangement steps. In simple molecules like cyloalkenes autoxidation was limited to both terminal C-atoms and two further C

  16. FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Jimmy; Schofield, Sam; Shashkov, Mikhail J.

    2012-06-25

    We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

  17. Tensor formalism in anharmonic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nero, N.

    1984-11-01

    A new method is presented to compute cartesian tensors in the expansion of curvilinear internal coordinates. Second- and higher-order coefficients are related to the metrics of the space of displacements. Components of the metric tensor are taken from existing tables of inverse kinetic energy matrix elements or, when rotations are involved, derived from general invariance conditions of scalars within a molecule. This leads to a tensor formalism particularly convenient in dealing with curvilinear coordinates in anharmonic calculations of vibrational frequencies. Formulae are given for elements of the potential energy matrix, related to quadratic and cubic force constants in terms of Christoffel symbols. The latter quantities are also used in the expansion of redundancy relations, with explicit coefficients given up to the third order.

  18. Electron Affinity Calculations for Thioethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulton, Deley L.; Boothe, Michael; Ball, David W.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1997-01-01

    Previous work indicated that polyphenyl thioethers possessed chemical properties, related to their electron affinities, which could allow them to function as vapor phase lubricants (VPL). Indeed, preliminary tribological tests revealed that the thioethers could function as vapor phase lubricants but not over a wide temperature and hertzian pressure range. Increasing the electron affinity of the thioethers may improve their VPL properties over this range. Adding a substituent group to the thioether will alter its electron affinity in many cases. Molecular orbital calculations were undertaken to determine the effect of five different substituent groups on the electron affinity of polyphenyl thioethers. It was found that the NO2, F, and I groups increased the thioethers electron affinity by the greatest amount. Future work will involve the addition of these groups to the thioethers followed by tribological testing to assess their VPL properties.

  19. Uncertainties in Transfer Impedance Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, H.; Verpoorte, J.

    2016-05-01

    The shielding effectiveness of metal braids of cables is governed by the geometry and the materials of the braid. The shielding effectiveness can be characterised by the transfer impedance of the metal braid. Analytical models for the transfer impedance contain in general two components, one representing diffusion of electromagnetic energy through the metal braid, and a second part representing leakage of magnetic fields through the braid. Possible sources of uncertainties in the modelling are inaccurate input data (for instance, the exact size of the braid diameter or wire diameter are not known) and imperfections in the computational model. The aim of the present paper is to estimate effects of variations of input data on the calculated transfer impedance.

  20. Dyscalculia and the Calculating Brain.

    PubMed

    Rapin, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Dyscalculia, like dyslexia, affects some 5% of school-age children but has received much less investigative attention. In two thirds of affected children, dyscalculia is associated with another developmental disorder like dyslexia, attention-deficit disorder, anxiety disorder, visual and spatial disorder, or cultural deprivation. Infants, primates, some birds, and other animals are born with the innate ability, called subitizing, to tell at a glance whether small sets of scattered dots or other items differ by one or more item. This nonverbal approximate number system extends mostly to single digit sets as visual discrimination drops logarithmically to "many" with increasing numerosity (size effect) and crowding (distance effect). Preschoolers need several years and specific teaching to learn verbal names and visual symbols for numbers and school agers to understand their cardinality and ordinality and the invariance of their sequence (arithmetic number line) that enables calculation. This arithmetic linear line differs drastically from the nonlinear approximate number system mental number line that parallels the individual number-tuned neurons in the intraparietal sulcus in monkeys and overlying scalp distribution of discrete functional magnetic resonance imaging activations by number tasks in man. Calculation is a complex skill that activates both visual and spatial and visual and verbal networks. It is less strongly left lateralized than language, with approximate number system activation somewhat more right sided and exact number and arithmetic activation more left sided. Maturation and increasing number skill decrease associated widespread non-numerical brain activations that persist in some individuals with dyscalculia, which has no single, universal neurological cause or underlying mechanism in all affected individuals.

  1. Accuracy of Monte Carlo Criticality Calculations During BR2 Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, Edgar; Ponsard, Bernard

    2005-08-15

    The Belgian Material Test Reactor BR2 is a strongly heterogeneous high-flux engineering test reactor at SCK-CEN (Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire) in Mol with a thermal power of 60 to 100 MW. It deploys highly enriched uranium, water-cooled concentric plate fuel elements, positioned inside a beryllium reflector with a complex hyperboloid arrangement of test holes. The objective of this paper is to validate the MCNP and ORIGEN-S three-dimensional (3-D) model for reactivity predictions of the entire BR2 core during reactor operation. We employ the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C to evaluate the effective multiplication factor k{sub eff} and 3-D space-dependent specific power distribution. The one-dimensional code ORIGEN-S is used to calculate the isotopic fuel depletion versus burnup and to prepare a database with depleted fuel compositions. The approach taken is to evaluate the 3-D power distribution at each time step and along with the database to evaluate the 3-D isotopic fuel depletion at the next step and to deduce the corresponding shim rod positions of the reactor operation. The capabilities of both codes are fully exploited without constraints on the number of involved isotope depletion chains or an increase of the computational time. The reactor has a complex operation, with important shutdowns between cycles, and its reactivity is strongly influenced by poisons, mainly {sup 3}He and {sup 6}Li from the beryllium reflector, and the burnable absorbers {sup 149}Sm and {sup 10}B in the fresh UAl{sub x} fuel. The computational predictions for the shim rod positions at various restarts are within 0.5 $ ({beta}{sub eff} = 0.0072)

  2. The shell model as a unified view of nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Nowacki, F.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A.P.

    2005-04-01

    The last decade has witnessed both quantitative and qualitative progress in shell-model studies, which have resulted in remarkable gains in our understanding of the structure of the nucleus. Indeed, it is now possible to diagonalize matrices in determinantal spaces of dimensionality up to 10{sup 9} using the Lanczos tridiagonal construction, whose formal and numerical aspects are analyzed in this review. In addition, many new approximation methods have been developed in order to overcome the dimensionality limitations. New effective nucleon-nucleon interactions have been constructed that contain both two- and three-body contributions. The former are derived from realistic potentials (i.e., potentials consistent with two-nucleon data). The latter incorporate the pure monopole terms necessary to correct the bad saturation and shell-formation properties of the realistic two-body forces. This combination appears to solve a number of hitherto puzzling problems. The present review concentrates on those results which illustrate the global features of the approach: the universality of the effective interaction and the capacity of the shell model to describe simultaneously all the manifestations of the nuclear dynamics, either single-particle or collective in nature. The review also treats in some detail the problems associated with rotational motion, the origin of quenching of the Gamow-Teller transitions, double-{beta} decays, the effect of isospin nonconserving nuclear forces, and the specificities of neutron-rich nuclei. Many other calculations--which appear to have 'merely' spectroscopic interest--are touched upon briefly, although the authors are fully aware that much of the credibility of the shell model rests on them.

  3. Geodetic mass balance record with rigorous uncertainty estimates deduced from aerial photographs and lidar data - Case study from Drangajökull ice cap, NW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnússon, E.; Muñoz-Cobo Belart, J.; Pálsson, F.; Ágústsson, H.; Crochet, P.

    2016-01-01

    changes caused by uncertainties of the SGSim bias correction, the seasonal bias correction and the interpolation of glacier surface where data are lacking. The record shows a glacier-wide mass balance rate of Ḃ = -0.26 ± 0.04 m w.e. a-1 for the entire study period (1946-2011). We observe significant decadal variability including periods of mass gain, peaking in 1985-1994 with Ḃ = 0.27 ± 0.11 m w.e. a-1. There is a striking difference when Ḃ is calculated separately for the western and eastern halves of Drangajökull, with a reduction of eastern part on average ˜ 3 times faster than the western part. Our study emphasizes the need for applying rigorous geostatistical methods for obtaining uncertainty estimates of geodetic mass balance, the importance of seasonal corrections of DEMs from glaciers with high mass turnover and the risk of extrapolating mass balance record from one glacier to another even over short distances.

  4. Volcanic Signatures in Estimates of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Distribution Width, Surface Area, and Volume Deduced from Global Satellite-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, J. J.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    Volcanic signatures in the stratospheric aerosol layer are revealed by two independent techniques which retrieve aerosol information from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. Both techniques combine the 4-wavelength Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II extinction measurements (0.385 <= lambda <= 1.02 microns) with the 7.96 micron and 12.82 micron extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument. The algorithms use the SAGE II/CLAES composite extinction spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub R). The first technique is a multi-wavelength Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm which retrieves values and uncertainties of R(sub eff) by comparing ratios of extinctions from SAGE II and CLAES (e.g., E(sub lambda)/E(sub 1.02) to pre-computed extinction ratios which are based on a range of unimodal lognormal size distributions. The pre-computed ratios are presented as a function of R(sub eff) for a given sigma(sub g); thus the comparisons establish the range of R(sub eff) consistent with the measured spectra for that sigma(sub g). The fact that no solutions are found for certain sigma(sub g) values provides information on the acceptable range of sigma(sub g), which is found to evolve in response to volcanic injections and removal periods. Analogous comparisons using absolute extinction spectra and error bars establish the range of S and V. The second technique is a Parameter Search Technique (PST) which estimates R(sub eff) and sigma(sub g) within a month-latitude-altitude bin by minimizing the chi-squared values obtained by comparing the SAGE II/CLAES extinction spectra and error bars with spectra calculated by varying the lognormal fitting parameters: R(sub eff), sigma(sub g), and the total number of particles N(sub 0). For both techniques, possible biases in

  5. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  9. 46 CFR 50.20-25 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculations. 50.20-25 Section 50.20-25 Shipping COAST... and Approval § 50.20-25 Calculations. (a) Calculations shall be forwarded with plans submitted for... taken to identify sources of equations, factors and other information upon which the calculations...

  10. 40 CFR 89.207 - Credit calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Credit calculation. 89.207 Section 89... Trading Provisions § 89.207 Credit calculation. (a) Requirements for calculating NO X credits from Tier 1... be used in the credit generation calculation described in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. If...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940 Section 1065.940 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... Emission calculations. Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  12. Factors affecting calculation of L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotola, Mark P.

    2001-08-01

    A detectable extraterrestrial civilization can be modeled as a series of successive regimes over time each of which is detectable for a certain proportion of its lifecycle. This methodology can be utilized to produce an estimate for L. Potential components of L include quantity of fossil fuel reserves, solar energy potential, quantity of regimes over time, lifecycle patterns of regimes, proportion of lifecycle regime is actually detectable, and downtime between regimes. Relationships between these components provide a means of calculating the lifetime of communicative species in a detectable state, L. An example of how these factors interact is provided, utilizing values that are reasonable given known astronomical data for components such as solar energy potential while existing knowledge about the terrestrial case is used as a baseline for other components including fossil fuel reserves, quantity of regimes over time, and lifecycle patterns of regimes, proportion of lifecycle regime is actually detectable, and gaps of time between regimes due to recovery from catastrophic war or resource exhaustion. A range of values is calculated for L when parameters are established for each component so as to determine the lowest and highest values of L. roadmap for SETI research at the SETI Institute for the next few decades. Three different approaches were identified. 1) Continue the radio search: build an affordable array incorporating consumer market technologies, expand the search frequency, and increase the target list to 100,000 stars. This array will also serve as a technology demonstration and enable the international radio astronomy community to realize an array that is a hundred times larger and capable (among other things) of searching a million stars. 2) Begin searches for very fast optical pulses from a million stars. 3) As Moore's Law delivers increased computational capacity, build an omni-directional sky survey array capable of detecting strong, transient

  13. Broadening of the R(0) and P(2) Lines in the 13CO Fundamental by Helium Atoms from 300 K down to 12 K: Measurements and Comparison with Close-Coupling Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibault, F.; Mantz, A. W.; Claveau, C.; Valentin, A.; Hurtmans, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of He-broadening parameters for the R(0) and O(2) lines in the fundamental band of 13CO at different temperatures between 12K and room temperature. The broadening parameters are determined, taking into account confinement narrowing, by simultaneous least-squares fitting of spectra recorded using a frequency stabilized diode laser spectrometer. The pressure broadening cross sections are deduced and compared to close-coupling calculations and earlier results obtained for rotational transitions of 12 CO.

  14. Calculations of Nuclear Astrophysics and Californium Fission Neutron Spectrum Averaged Cross Section Uncertainties Using ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-fidelity Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear astrophysics and californium fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections and their uncertainties for ENDF materials have been calculated. Absolute values were deduced with Maxwellian and Mannhart spectra, while uncertainties are based on ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-Fidelity covariances. These quantities are compared with available data, independent benchmarks, EXFOR library, and analyzed for a wide range of cases. Recommendations for neutron cross section covariances are given and implications are discussed.

  15. Calculations of Nuclear Astrophysics and Californium Fission Neutron Spectrum Averaged Cross Section Uncertainties Using ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-fidelity Covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritychenko, B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics and californium fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections and their uncertainties for ENDF materials have been calculated. Absolute values were deduced with Maxwellian and Mannhart spectra, while uncertainties are based on ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-Fidelity covariances. These quantities are compared with available data, independent benchmarks, EXFOR library, and analyzed for a wide range of cases. Recommendations for neutron cross section covariances are given and implications are discussed.

  16. Calculating system reliability with SRFYDO

    SciTech Connect

    Morzinski, Jerome; Anderson - Cook, Christine M; Klamann, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    SRFYDO is a process for estimating reliability of complex systems. Using information from all applicable sources, including full-system (flight) data, component test data, and expert (engineering) judgment, SRFYDO produces reliability estimates and predictions. It is appropriate for series systems with possibly several versions of the system which share some common components. It models reliability as a function of age and up to 2 other lifecycle (usage) covariates. Initial output from its Exploratory Data Analysis mode consists of plots and numerical summaries so that the user can check data entry and model assumptions, and help determine a final form for the system model. The System Reliability mode runs a complete reliability calculation using Bayesian methodology. This mode produces results that estimate reliability at the component, sub-system, and system level. The results include estimates of uncertainty, and can predict reliability at some not-too-distant time in the future. This paper presents an overview of the underlying statistical model for the analysis, discusses model assumptions, and demonstrates usage of SRFYDO.

  17. Selfconsistent calculations for hyperdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Molique, H.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.; Luo, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Properties of the hyperdeformed nuclei in the A {approximately} 170 mass range are re-examined using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with the SOP parametrization. A comparison with the previous predictions that were based on a non-selfconsistent approach is made. The existence of the {open_quotes}hyper-deformed shell closures{close_quotes} at the proton and neutron numbers Z=70 and N=100 and their very weak dependence on the rotational frequency is suggested; the corresponding single-particle energy gaps are predicted to play a role similar to that of the Z=66 and N=86 gaps in the super-deformed nuclei of the A {approximately} 150 mass range. Selfconsistent calculations suggest also that the A {approximately} 170 hyperdeformed structures have neglegible mass asymmetry in their shapes. Very importantly for the experimental studies, both the fission barriers and the {open_quotes}inner{close_quotes} barriers (that separate the hyperdeformed structures from those with smaller deformations) are predicted to be relatively high, up to the factor of {approximately}2 higher than the corresponding ones in the {sup 152}Dy superdeformed nucleus used as a reference.

  18. Moment calculations by digital filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrikis, Z. L.; Hatamian, M.

    1984-02-01

    A simple recursive algorithm is presented for computing moments of two-dimensional integer arrays. It uses only additions, and can be implemented for high speed and real time computation at video rates. The Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), Very Large-Scale Integrated (VLSI) implementation of the algorithm in a single chip that can calculate the 16 moments on a 512 x 512 array of 8-bit integers in real time (at video rate) is described. Such a chip can have potential applications in image processing, graphics, and robotics. The basic building block of the system is a single-pole digital filter that is implemented by recursive addition. The complexities involved in designing the chip, as well as its area, are significantly reduced by taking advantage of the fact that the column samples of the data array can be processed at a much slower rate than the row samples. An estimate of the chip area obtained from the layout design of the individual cells is given.

  19. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  20. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-07-01

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  1. McEliece PKC Calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, Repka

    2015-01-01

    The original McEliece PKC proposal is interesting thanks to its resistance against all known attacks, even using quantum cryptanalysis, in an IND-CCA2 secure conversion. Here we present a generic implementation of the original McEliece PKC proposal, which provides test vectors (for all important intermediate results), and also in which a measurement tool for side-channel analysis is employed. To our best knowledge, this is the first such an implementation. This Calculator is valuable in implementation optimization, in further McEliece/Niederreiter like PKCs properties investigations, and also in teaching. Thanks to that, one can, for example, examine side-channel vulnerability of a certain implementation, or one can find out and test particular parameters of the cryptosystem in order to make them appropriate for an efficient hardware implementation. This implementation is available [1] in executable binary format, and as a static C++ library, as well as in form of source codes, for Linux and Windows operating systems.

  2. Nightside plasmapause positions observed by DE-1 as a function of geomagnetic indices - Comparison with whistler observations and model calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decreau, P. M. E.; Lemaire, J.; Chappell, C. R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The paper analyzes 28 plasmapause crossings made by the DE1 satellite in the night local time sector (from January to March 1982). Different signatures obtained by the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer instrument have been used for this analysis. The observed plasmapause positions (Lpp) have been organized as a function of geomagnetic indices. They are compared with the empirical relationship deduced by Carpenter and Parks (1973) from whistler observations. Moreover, the dependence of Lpp versus Kp has been inferred from model calculations using Kp dependent electric and magnetic fields derived from McIlwain's (1974) E3H electric field model and M2 magnetic field model respectively. Stationary models as well as time dependent ones, have been used to determine the positions of the plasmapause. The results of the model calculations are compared to the observations.

  3. On a Riesz basis of exponentials related to the eigenvalues of an analytic operator and application to a non-selfadjoint problem deduced from a perturbation method for sound radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellouz, Hanen; Feki, Ines; Jeribi, Aref

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper, we prove that the family of exponentials associated to the eigenvalues of the perturbed operator T(ɛ) ≔ T0 + ɛT1 + ɛ2T2 + … + ɛkTk + … forms a Riesz basis in L2(0, T), T > 0, where \\varepsilon in {C}, T0 is a closed densely defined linear operator on a separable Hilbert space H with domain D(T_0) having isolated eigenvalues with multiplicity one, while T1, T2, … are linear operators on H having the same domain Dsupset D(T_0) and satisfying a specific growing inequality. After that, we generalize this result using a H-Lipschitz function. As application, we consider a non-selfadjoint problem deduced from a perturbation method for sound radiation.

  4. On a Riesz basis of exponentials related to the eigenvalues of an analytic operator and application to a non-selfadjoint problem deduced from a perturbation method for sound radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ellouz, Hanen; Feki, Ines; Jeribi, Aref

    2013-11-15

    In the present paper, we prove that the family of exponentials associated to the eigenvalues of the perturbed operator T(ε) ≔ T{sub 0} + εT{sub 1} + ε{sup 2}T{sub 2} + … + ε{sup k}T{sub k} + … forms a Riesz basis in L{sup 2}(0, T), T > 0, where ε∈C, T{sub 0} is a closed densely defined linear operator on a separable Hilbert space H with domain D(T{sub 0}) having isolated eigenvalues with multiplicity one, while T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, … are linear operators on H having the same domain D⊃D(T{sub 0}) and satisfying a specific growing inequality. After that, we generalize this result using a H-Lipschitz function. As application, we consider a non-selfadjoint problem deduced from a perturbation method for sound radiation.

  5. CHP Energy and Emissions Savings Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Download the CHP Emissions Calculator, a tool that calculates the difference between the anticipated carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions from a CHP system to those of a separate heat and power system.

  6. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  7. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  8. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  9. 46 CFR 170.170 - Calculations required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Weather Criteria § 170.170 Calculations required. (a) Each vessel must... weather deck or abnormal sheer. (c) When doing the calculations required by paragraph (a) of this...

  10. SW New Mexico BHT geothermal gradient calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shari Kelley

    2015-07-24

    This file contains a compilation of BHT data from oil wells in southwestern New Mexico. Surface temperature is calculated using the collar elevation. An estimate of geothermal gradient is calculated using the estimated surface temperature and the uncorrected BHT data.

  11. The Case for Programmable Calculators in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Norman J.

    1981-01-01

    Programmable calculators are useful tools in the classroom that are often overlooked. This report gives examples of problems and activities that can be brought within the scope of such calculators. (MP)

  12. Pressure Vessel Calculations for VVER-440 Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordósy, G.; Hegyi, Gy.; Keresztúri, A.; Maráczy, Cs.; Temesvári, E.; Vértes, P.; Zsolnay, É.

    2003-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were performed for a selected cycle of the Paks NPP Unit II to test a computational model. In the model the source term was calculated by the core design code KARATE and the neutron transport calculations were performed by the MCNP. Different forms of the source specification were examined. The calculated results were compared with measurements and in most cases fairly good agreement was found.

  13. Calculator Logic Systems and Mathematical Understandings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Enid R.

    This monograph is aimed at helping the reader understand the built-in logic of various calculator operating systems. It is an outgrowth of workshop contacts with in-service and pre-service teachers of mathematics and is in response to their request for a book on the subject of calculator logic systems and calculator algorithms. The mathematical…

  14. LUST ON-LINE CALCULATOR INTRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a suite of on-line calculators to assist in performing site assessment and modeling calculations for leaking underground storage tank sites (http://www.epa.gov/athens/onsite). The calculators are divided into four types: parameter estimation, models, scientific...

  15. A general formalism for phase space calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Deutchman, Philip A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1988-01-01

    General formulas for calculating the interactions of galactic cosmic rays with target nuclei are presented. Methods for calculating the appropriate normalization volume elements and phase space factors are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining correct phase space factors for 2-, and 3-body final states. Calculations for both Lorentz-invariant and noninvariant phase space are presented.

  16. Decimals, Denominators, Demons, Calculators, and Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Len; Swan, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The authors provide activities for overcoming some fraction misconceptions using calculators specially designed for learners in primary years. The writers advocate use of the calculator as a way to engage children in thinking about mathematics. By engaging with a calculator as part of mathematics learning, children are learning about and using the…

  17. 47 CFR 1.1623 - Probability calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Probability calculation. 1.1623 Section 1.1623 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Random Selection Procedures for Mass Media Services General Procedures § 1.1623 Probability calculation. (a) All calculations shall be computed to no less than...

  18. Electric Calculators; Business Education: 7718.06.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Jane

    The course was developed to instruct students in the use of mechanical and/or electronic printing calculators, electronic display calculators, and rotary calculators to solve special business problems with occupational proficiency. Included in the document are a list of performance objectives, a course content outline, suggested learning…

  19. Mathematical Creative Activity and the Graphic Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Janina

    2011-01-01

    Teaching mathematics using graphic calculators has been an issue of didactic discussions for years. Finding ways in which graphic calculators can enrich the development process of creative activity in mathematically gifted students between the ages of 16-17 is the focus of this article. Research was conducted using graphic calculators with…

  20. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Browman, M.J.; Weiland, T.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Three-dimensional RF structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. K.; Browman, M. J.; Weiland, T.

    1989-04-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described.

  2. Workbook, Basic Mathematics and Wastewater Processing Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Albany.

    This workbook serves as a self-learning guide to basic mathematics and treatment plant calculations and also as a reference and source book for the mathematics of sewage treatment and processing. In addition to basic mathematics, the workbook discusses processing and process control, laboratory calculations and efficiency calculations necessary in…

  3. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  4. 7 CFR 1416.104 - Payment calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment calculation. 1416.104 Section 1416.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... PROGRAMS Livestock Compensation Program § 1416.104 Payment calculation. (a) LCP payments are calculated...

  5. 7 CFR 1416.603 - Payment calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment calculations. 1416.603 Section 1416.603 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... PROGRAMS Nursery Disaster Program § 1416.603 Payment calculations. (a) Payments are calculated...

  6. 10 CFR 766.102 - Calculation methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calculation methodology. 766.102 Section 766.102 Energy... ASSESSMENT OF DOMESTIC UTILITIES Procedures for Special Assessment § 766.102 Calculation methodology. (a) Calculation of Domestic Utilities' Annual Assessment Ratio to the Fund. Domestic utilities shall be...

  7. 46 CFR 174.360 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculations. 174.360 Section 174.360 Shipping COAST... SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Dry Cargo Ships § 174.360 Calculations. Each ship to... II-1, part B-1. Compliance with the applicable requirements must be demonstrated by calculations...

  8. 7 CFR 760.1106 - Payment calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment calculation. 760.1106 Section 760.1106 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... Payment calculation. (a) Preliminary, unadjusted LCP payments are calculated for a producer by...

  9. 46 CFR 172.130 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculations. 172.130 Section 172.130 Shipping COAST... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.130 Calculations. (a) Except as provided in § 153.7 of this chapter, each tankship must be shown by design calculations to meet the survival conditions in § 172.150 in...

  10. The Programmable Calculator in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarz, Theodore J.

    The uses of programable calculators in the mathematics classroom are presented. A discussion of the "microelectronics revolution" that has brought programable calculators into our society is also included. Pointed out is that the logical or mental processes used to program the programable calculator are identical to those used to program…

  11. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  12. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  13. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  14. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  15. Deducing dust emission mechanisms from field measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations are needed to both develop and test theories on dust emission for use in global modeling systems. The mechanism of dust emission (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) and the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under ...

  16. Deducing a mechanism of all musculoskeletal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Verrall, Geoffrey; Dolman, Bronwyn

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The mechanism of musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries is not well understood. This research applies principles of elastic motion to the anatomy and movement patterns of MSK structures. From this an insight into the application and timing of forces on MSK structures can be established and the mechanism/s of injury derived. Methods (Current Knowledge) All MSK structures demonstrate varying degrees of elasticity. Movement occurs primarily as a consequence of Muscle Tendon Unit (MTU) shortening. The application of an applied external force results in MSK structure lengthening. Results The MTU acts as a non-idealised Hookean Spring. The resting length of MSK structures is the minimum distance between attachment points. The anatomical constraints results in MSK structures having adequate compressive strength during shortening. Thus MSK injuries only occur during lengthening of the MSK structure. From this with knowledge of MSK movement cycles, we can derive the mechanism of injury. Conclusions MSK injuries result from an inability to counter applied forces whilst lengthening. Muscles, tendons and ligaments can only injure during their lengthening contraction phase. Insertional tendons and bone near attachment points injure during the MTU shortening phase. Injuries to other MSK structures can occur independent of the lengthening and shortening phases such as direct contact injuries. PMID:27900289

  17. Deducing behaviors from primitive movement attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Danzhou; Hughes, Charles E.

    2005-03-01

    The research reported here anticipates the future of smart buildings by developing algorithms that categorize the movements of individuals based on such characteristics as motion vectors, velocity vectors, head orientation vectors and predetermined positions. The intended applications include detecting intrusions, helping lost visitors, and changing the artwork on virtual posters to reflect an individual's presumed interests. The vectors we capture represent trajectories in a multi-dimensional space. To make sense out of these, we first segment a trajectory into sub-trajectories, typically based on time. To describe each sub-trajectory, we use primitive patterns of body movement and additional information, e.g., average speed during this interval, head movement and place or object nearby. That is, for each sub-trajectory, we use a tuple of the following form: (interval_ID, body_movement, avg_speed, head_movement, places_passed). Since trajectories may have many outliers introduced by sensor failures or uneven human movement, we have developed a neural network-based pattern extraction subsystem that can handle intervals with noisy data. The choice of these attributes and our current classification of behaviors do not imply that these are the only or best ways to categorize behaviors. However, we do not see that as the focus of the research reported here. Rather, our goal is to show that the use of primitive attributes (low level), neural networks to identify categories of recognizable simple behaviors (middle level) and a regular expression-based means of describing intent (high level) is sufficient to provide a means to convert observable low-level attributes into the recognition of potential intents.

  18. Investigation of the Local Ge Concentration in Si/SiGe Multi-QW Structures by CBED Analysis and FEM Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, E.; Mussler, G.; Müller, E.; Grützmacher, D.

    The local Ge concentration in Si/SiGe multiquantum well structures was investigated by CBED analysis. Series of bright field CBED patterns were taken across the quantum wells using the [340]-zone axis in STEM mode. The HOLZ lines in these patterns were fitted with the JEMS program [1] in order to deduce the local lattice parameters. With finite-element calculations taking the plastic relaxation of the thin TEM foil into account the Ge concentrations corresponding to these sets of lattice parameters were determined.

  19. Calculation of the magnetic gradient tensor from total magnetic anomaly field based on regularized method in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gang; Zhang, Yingtang; Mi, Songlin; Fan, Hongbo; Li, Zhining

    2016-11-01

    To obtain accurate magnetic gradient tensor data, a fast and robust calculation method based on regularized method in frequency domain was proposed. Using the potential field theory, the transform formula in frequency domain was deduced in order to calculate the magnetic gradient tensor from the pre-existing total magnetic anomaly data. By analyzing the filter characteristics of the Vertical vector transform operator (VVTO) and Gradient tensor transform operator (GTTO), we proved that the conventional transform process was unstable which would zoom in the high-frequency part of the data in which measuring noise locate. Due to the existing unstable problem that led to a low signal-to-noise (SNR) for the calculated result, we introduced regularized method in this paper. By selecting the optimum regularization parameters of different transform phases using the C-norm approach, the high frequency noise was restrained and the SNR was improved effectively. Numerical analysis demonstrates that most value and characteristics of the calculated data by the proposed method compare favorably with reference magnetic gradient tensor data. In addition, calculated magnetic gradient tensor components form real aeromagnetic survey provided better resolution of the magnetic sources and original profile.

  20. Parallel calculations between the TC 4. 7 simplified energy calculation procedure and seven comprehensive hourly simulation energy calculation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuda, T

    1980-10-31

    The TC 4.7 simplified energy calculation method is a bin method used by the REAP procedure of the Carrier Corporation, except for the load estimating calculations. The simplified procedure was compared with hourly simulation procedures for an office building in Washington, DC. The comparison studied the extent as well as the reasons for agreement and discrepancies due to these two different types of annual energy analysis (bin method and hourly simulation methods). Results of the parallel calculations are discussed and the major reasons of discrepancies between the hourly simulation technique and the simplified TC 4.7 method are identified. Data resulting from the calculation methods are tabulated. (MCW)

  1. Estimation of air concentrations and profiles for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from calculated vegetation-air partition coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeller, L.O.; Rappe, C.; Jones, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Air concentrations of vapor and particulate phase polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) are predicted by use of calculated plant-air partition coefficients. The plant-air interaction is reduced to an octanol-air distribution at equilibrium. Partition coefficients are deduced from the fugacity approach and calculated from congener group average data of solubility, vapor pressure and octanol-water partition coefficient. Calculated partition coefficients were used for prediction of the PCDD/F levels and congener profile in air from archived herbage collected pre- and post-1940. Before 1940 the air had a fly ash or combustion derived PCDD/F composition. After 1940 Hp and OCDD/F are superimposed on the combustion pattern, reflection of their release from the extensive use of polychlorinated compounds, notably penta chlorophenol, but also related compounds.

  2. The β-γ decay of 21Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achouri, N. L.; Angélique, J. C.; Ban, G.; Bastin, B.; Blank, B.; Dean, S.; Dendooven, P.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grévy, S.; Jungmann, K.; Laurent, B.; Liénard, E.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Orr, N. A.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Sohani, M.; Traykov, E.; Wilschut, H.

    2010-04-01

    A new and independent determination of the Gamow-Teller branching ratio in the β-decay of 21Na is reported. The value 5.13 ± 0.43% obtained is in agreement with the currently adopted value and the most recent measurement. In contrast to previous experiments, the present method was based on the counting of the parent 21Na ions and the resulting 351 keV γ-rays without coincident β-particle detection.

  3. Study of Short-Lived Unstable Nuclei by Means of Laser Optical Pumping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-04

    Supervisor A ccepted by .......................................................... George F. Koster Chairman, Departmental Committee on Graduate Students...The work described in this thesis is the culmination of a program begun in 1975 at the George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory to incorporate laser...the rest frame of the parent. The value 3 of a is equal either to +1 or -1/3 , depending on whether the transition is Fermi transition or Gamow -Teller

  4. Nuclear magnetic moments and related sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Arima, Akito

    2011-05-06

    We first review the history and our present understanding of nuclear magnetic moments and Gamow-Teller transitions, with emphasis on the roles of configuration mixing and meson exchange currents. Then we discuss the renormalization of the orbital g-factor in nuclei, and its relation to the E1 sum rule for photoabsorption and the M1 sum rule for the scissors mode of deformed nuclei.

  5. Long-term changes in UT/LS ozone between the late 1970s and the 1990s deduced from the GASP and MOZAIC aircraft programs and from ozonesondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnadt Poberaj, C.; Staehelin, J.; Brunner, D.; Thouret, V.; de Backer, H.; Stübi, R.

    2009-01-01

    We present ozone measurements of the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) performed from four commercial and one research aircraft in the late 1970s to compare them with respective measurements of the ongoing MOZAIC project. Climatologies of UT/LS ozone were built using the aircraft data sets (1975-1979 and 1994-2001), and long-term changes between the 1970s and 1990s were derived by comparison. The data were binned relative to the dynamical tropopause to separate between UT and LS air masses. LS data were analysed using equivalent latitudes. In the UT, pronounced increases are found over the Middle East and South Asia in the spring and summer seasons. Increases are also found over Japan, Europe, and the eastern parts of the Unites States depending on season. LS ozone over northern mid- and high latitudes was found to be lower in the 1990s compared to the 1970s in all seasons of the year. In addition, a comparison with long-term changes deduced from ozonesondes is presented. An altitude offset was applied to the sonde data to account for the slow response time of the ozone sensors. The early 1970s European Brewer-Mast (BM) sonde data agree with GASP within the range of uncertainty (UT) or measured slightly less ozone (LS). In contrast, the 1990s BM sensors show consistently and significantly higher UT/LS ozone values than MOZAIC. This unequal behaviour of aircraft/sonde comparisons in the 1970s and 1990s leads to differences in the estimated long-term changes over Europe: while the comparison between GASP and MOZAIC indicates ozone changes of -5% to 10% over Europe, the sondes suggest a much larger increase of 10%-35% depending on station and season, although statistical significance is not conclusive due to data sample limitations. In contrast to the BM sondes, the Electrochemical Cell (ECC) sonde at Wallops Island, USA, measured higher UT ozone than both GASP and MOZAIC. Hence, long-term changes from GASP/MOZAIC agree within the range of uncertainty with

  6. Long-term changes in UT/LS ozone between the late 1970s and the 1990s deduced from the GASP and MOZAIC aircraft programs and from ozonesondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnadt Poberaj, C.; Staehelin, J.; Brunner, D.; Thouret, V.; de Backer, H.; Stübi, R.

    2009-07-01

    We present ozone measurements of the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) performed from four commercial and one research aircraft in the late 1970s to compare them with respective measurements of the ongoing MOZAIC project. Multi-annual averages of UT/LS ozone were built using the aircraft data sets (1975-1979 and 1994-2001), and long-term changes between the 1970s and 1990s were derived by comparison. The data were binned relative to the dynamical tropopause to separate between UT and LS air masses. LS data were analysed using equivalent latitudes. In the UT, pronounced increases of 20-40% are found over the Middle East and South Asia in the spring and summer seasons. Increases are also found over Japan, Europe, and the eastern parts of the United States depending on season. LS ozone over northern mid- and high latitudes was found to be lower in the 1990s compared to the 1970s in all seasons of the year. In addition, a comparison with long-term changes deduced from ozonesondes is presented. The early 1970s European Brewer-Mast (BM) sonde data agree with GASP within the range of uncertainty (UT) or measured slightly less ozone (LS). In contrast, the 1990s BM sensors show consistently and significantly higher UT/LS ozone values than MOZAIC. This unequal behaviour of aircraft/sonde comparisons in the 1970s and 1990s leads to differences in the estimated long-term changes over Europe: while the comparison between GASP and MOZAIC indicates ozone changes of -5% to 10% over Europe, the sondes suggest a much larger increase of 10%-35% depending on station and season, although statistical significance is not conclusive due to data sample limitations. In contrast to the BM sondes, the Electrochemical Cell (ECC) sonde at Wallops Island, USA, measured higher UT ozone than both GASP and MOZAIC. Hence, long-term changes from GASP/MOZAIC agree within the range of uncertainty with the changes deduced from Wallops Island.

  7. Microscopic Calculations of 240Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2007-09-11

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations have been performed with the Gogny finite-range effective interaction for {sup 240}Pu out to scission, using a new code developed at LLNL. A first set of calculations was performed with constrained quadrupole moment along the path of most probable fission, assuming axial symmetry but allowing for the spontaneous breaking of reflection symmetry of the nucleus. At a quadrupole moment of 345 b, the nucleus was found to spontaneously scission into two fragments. A second set of calculations, with all nuclear moments up to hexadecapole constrained, was performed to approach the scission configuration in a controlled manner. Calculated energies, moments, and representative plots of the total nuclear density are shown. The present calculations serve as a proof-of-principle, a blueprint, and starting-point solutions for a planned series of more comprehensive calculations to map out a large set of scission configurations, and the associated fission-fragment properties.

  8. Benchmarking criticality safety calculations with subcritical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    Calculation of the neutron multiplication factor at delayed criticality may be necessary for benchmarking calculations but it may not be sufficient. The use of subcritical experiments to benchmark criticality safety calculations could result in substantial savings in fuel material costs for experiments. In some cases subcritical configurations could be used to benchmark calculations where sufficient fuel to achieve delayed criticality is not available. By performing a variety of measurements with subcritical configurations, much detailed information can be obtained which can be compared directly with calculations. This paper discusses several measurements that can be performed with subcritical assemblies and presents examples that include comparisons between calculation and experiment where possible. Where not, examples from critical experiments have been used but the measurement methods could also be used for subcritical experiments.

  9. Microscopic Sub-Barrier Fusion Calculations for the Neutron Star Crust

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E,; Horowitz, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Fusion of very neutron-rich nuclei may be important to determine the composition and heating of the crust of accreting neutron stars. Fusion cross sections are calculated using time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory coupled with density-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations to deduce an effective potential. Systems studied include 16O+16O, 16O+24O, 24O+24O, 12C+16O, and 12C+24O. We find remarkable agreement with experimental cross sections for the fusion of stable nuclei. Our simulations use the SLy4 Skyrme force that has been previously fit to the properties of stable nuclei, and no parameters have been fit to fusion data. We compare our results to the simple S o Paulo static barrier penetration model. For the asymmetric systems 12C+24O or 16O+24O we predict an order of magnitude larger cross section than those predicted by the S o Paulo model. This is likely due to the transfer of neutrons from the very neutron rich nucleus to the stable nucleus and dynamical rearrangements of the nuclear densities during the collision process. These effects are not included in potential models. This enhancement of fusion cross sections, for very neutron rich nuclei, can be tested in the laboratory with radioactive beams.

  10. Calculations of the time taken for excitons to form in GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. H.; Huang, Q.; Zhou, J. M.

    1997-11-01

    The time taken for excitons to form has been calculated by solving the Boltzmann equation for an 80 Å GaAs quantum well. Our results show that longitudinal acoustic phonon emission is the most important relaxation mechanism for exciton formation from free-electron - hole pairs at low lattice temperatures. The time taken for excitons to form is found to depend on the excitation conditions: the excitation density, the electron - hole plasma temperature and the lattice temperature, and is approximately proportional to 0953-8984/9/46/016/img1 (where 0953-8984/9/46/016/img2 is the electron - hole plasma temperature and 0953-8984/9/46/016/img3 is the exciton binding energy) at a fixed lattice temperature. For the excitation conditions used by Kumar et al (Kumar R, Vengurlekar A S, Prabhu S S, Shah J and Pfeiffer L N 1996 Phys. Rev. B 54 4891), the calculated time is 108 ps, which is of the same order of magnitude as the experimentally deduced one of 50 ps. We find that the approximation in which the wave-vector component 0953-8984/9/46/016/img4 of the LA phonon is taken as zero can lead to underestimation of the rate of exciton formation. A longer time of 150 ps for the exciton formation can be obtained using this approximation.

  11. Test of 600 and 750 MeV NN matrix on elastic scattering Glauber model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, I.

    1980-09-01

    The 600 and 750 MeV proton nucleus elastic scattering cross section and polarization calculations have been performed in the framework of the Glauber model to test the pp and pn scattering amplitudes deduced from a phase shift analysis by Bystricky, Lechanoine and Lehar. It is well known that up to now we do not possess a non-phenomenological NN scattering matrix at intermediate energies. However proton-nucleus scattering analyses are used to extract information about short range correlations1), Δ resonance2) or pion condensation presences)... etc. Most scattering calculations made at these energies have been done with phenomenological NN amplitudes having a gaussian q-dependence 10050_2005_Article_BF01438168_TeX2GIFE1.gif A(q) = {kσ }/{4π }(α + i) e^{ - β ^2 q^2 /2} and 10050_2005_Article_BF01438168_TeX2GIFE2.gif C(q) = {kσ }/{4π }iq(α + i) D_e - β ^2 q^2 /2 K and σ being respectively the projectile momentum and the total pN total cross section. The parameters α, β and D are badly known and are adjusted by fitting some specific reactions as p+4He elastic scattering4). Even when these amplitudes provide good fits to the data, our understanding of the dynamics of the scattering remains obscure.

  12. Empirical formula for calculating the output factors of electron beams from a Therac 20 linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.

    1988-05-01

    A polynomial formula, deduced from the data published by Mills et al. (Med. Phys. 12, 473 (1985)), in predicting the relative electron beam output factors, is presented in this report. This formula contains four parameters. By choosing four measured output factors, from four field sizes normalized at the field size of (10,10), the values of these parameters can be determined. A comparison of the factors predicted with this formula and the values measured by Mills et al. shows that the differences between the field sizes of (4,4) to (30,30) are 0.5% or less in 31 out of 35 field sizes. All the 35 field sizes are within 1% for an electron beam of 20 MeV. With 6-MeV electron beams, the differences are 0.5% or less in 26 out of 35 field sizes, and 1% or less in 31 out of 35 field sizes. Those having differences greater than 1% have either a small field size (5 cm) or a large field size (20 cm). Considering that this formula requires only four accurately measured relative output factors, one can predict the factors of any field within an acceptable accuracy. The calculation is easy with a scientific hand calculator. This formula provides major improvement over the other methods which require many mesurements to be taken in order to interpolate with acceptable accuracy.

  13. Comment on ``Laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations of O2 A-band electric quadrupole transitions''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, T. K.; Mishra, A. P.

    2011-11-01

    D. A. Long [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.042513 80, 042513 (2009)] recently reported accurate measurements on the ultraweak electric quadrupole (E2) transitions in the O2 A band. They also presented elegant theoretical calculation of the line intensities based on Hund's case (b) formulation. However, their theoretical elucidation fails to relate to a highly relevant previous work by Balasubramanian and Narayanan [Acta Phys. Hung 74, 341 (1994)] in which closed-form expressions for the E2 branch line strengths for the eight possible rotational branches of the b1Σg+-X3Σg- transition, in intermediate coupling, are derived. The complete equivalence of the two methods is proven through direct calculation. A second point of concern is that the magnetic dipole (M1) transition moment M1 = 0.0687 μB deduced by Long from the previously measured transition intensities is ˜2.7 times the ab initio value of 0.0255 μB computed by Minaev [Chem. Phys.CMPHC20301-010410.1016/0301-0104(96)00126-7 208, 299 (1996)]. Since the latter reproduces closely the measured Einstein's spontaneous emission coefficient of the A band, this large discrepancy is intriguing.

  14. Calculation of the Moments of Polygons.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    2.1) VowUK-1N0+IDIO TUUNTKPlNO.YKNO C Calculate AREA YKXK-YKPIND*IKNO-YKNO*XKP1NO AIKA-hEEA4YKXX C Calculate ACEIT ACENT (1)- ACEIT ( 1) VSUNI4TKIK... ACEIT (2) -ACENT(2) .VSUNYKXK C Calculate SECHON 3ECNON (1) -SCNON( 1) TKXK*(XX~PIdO*VSUNXKKO**2) SECNO(2) -SEn N(2) .yrf* (XKP114*YKP1MO.XKO*YXO+VB1hi

  15. Simplified Methodology for Calculating Building Heating Loads.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    an inexpensive, accurate, and reliable simplified methodology , termed the "Modified Bin Method ", for 2 calculating building heating loads. In doing so...I AD-AI01 725 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGMT-PATTERSON AFB OH F/6 13/1 SIMPLIFIED METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING BUILDING HEATING LOADS.(U) NOV 80 S 0...University The Graduate School ," Department of Architectural Engineering 4, Simplified Methodology for Calculating Building Heating Loads, -A /. ’.- A

  16. Numerical Strip-Yield Calculation of CTOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beek, Joachim; Forman, Royce

    2007-01-01

    Many existing methods to calculate CTOD can be costly and complicated, or apply only to particular configurations. A new numerical method for calculating CTOD was investigated. NASGRO's Boundary Element module NASBEM was adapted to calculate displacements at any point on the crack. Demonstrated for a number of crack configurations: a) finite and infinite domains; b) center and edge cracks; and c) complex cases with several cracks and holes. Great accuracy at minimal computational cost.

  17. Numerical calculation of the Fresnel transform.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Damien P

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of calculating Fresnel diffraction integrals using a finite number of uniformly spaced samples. General and simple sampling rules of thumb are derived that allow the user to calculate the distribution for any propagation distance. It is shown how these rules can be extended to fast-Fourier-transform-based algorithms to increase calculation efficiency. A comparison with other theoretical approaches is made.

  18. Program calculates two-phase pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, W.W.

    1980-11-24

    Analysts have developed a program for determining the two-phase pressure drop in piping. Written for the TI-59 programmable calculator used with a PC-100C printer, the program incorporates several unique features: it calculates single-phase as well as two-phase pressure drops, has a 10-20 s execution time, permits the operating data to be changed easily, and includes an option for calculating the estimated surface tension of paraffinic hydrocarbon liquids.

  19. Computer program for calculation of oxygen uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, B. L.; Castle, G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A description and operational precedures are presented for a computer program, written in Super Basic, that calculates oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, and related ventilation parameters. Program features include: (1) the option of entering slope and intercept values of calibration curves for the O2 and CO2 and analyzers; (2) calculation of expired water vapor pressure; and (3) the option of entering inspured O2 and CO2 concentrations. The program is easily adaptable for programmable laboratory calculators.

  20. The Band Structure of Polymers: Its Calculation and Interpretation. Part 2. Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, B. J.; O'Leary, Brian

    1988-01-01

    Details ab initio crystal orbital calculations using all-trans-polyethylene as a model. Describes calculations based on various forms of translational symmetry. Compares these calculations with ab initio molecular orbital calculations discussed in a preceding article. Discusses three major approximations made in the crystal case. (CW)

  1. Carbon cycle modeling calculations for the IPCC

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Jain, A.K.

    1993-08-12

    We carried out essentially all the carbon cycle modeling calculations that were required by the IPCC Working Group 1. Specifically, IPCC required two types of calculations, namely, ``inverse calculations`` (input was CO{sub 2} concentrations and the output was CO{sub 2} emissions), and the ``forward calculations`` (input was CO{sub 2} emissions and output was CO{sub 2} concentrations). In particular, we have derived carbon dioxide concentrations and/or emissions for several scenarios using our coupled climate-carbon cycle modelling system.

  2. MATNORM: Calculating NORM using composition matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruseth, Kamal L.

    2009-09-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of an entirely new set of formulas to calculate the CIPW norm. MATNORM does not involve any sophisticated programming skill and has been developed using Microsoft Excel spreadsheet formulas. These formulas are easy to understand and a mere knowledge of the if-then-else construct in MS-Excel is sufficient to implement the whole calculation scheme outlined below. The sequence of calculation used here differs from that of the standard CIPW norm calculation, but the results are very similar. The use of MS-Excel macro programming and other high-level programming languages has been deliberately avoided for simplicity.

  3. National Stormwater Calculator: Low Impact Development ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Stormwater Calculator (NSC) makes it easy to estimate runoff reduction when planning a new development or redevelopment site with low impact development (LID) stormwater controls. The Calculator is currently deployed as a Windows desktop application. The Calculator is organized as a wizard style application that walks the user through the steps necessary to perform runoff calculations on a single urban sub-catchment of 10 acres or less in size. Using an interactive map, the user can select the sub-catchment location and the Calculator automatically acquires hydrologic data for the site.A new LID cost estimation module has been developed for the Calculator. This project involved programming cost curves into the existing Calculator desktop application. The integration of cost components of LID controls into the Calculator increases functionality and will promote greater use of the Calculator as a stormwater management and evaluation tool. The addition of the cost estimation module allows planners and managers to evaluate LID controls based on comparison of project cost estimates and predicted LID control performance. Cost estimation is accomplished based on user-identified size (or auto-sizing based on achieving volume control or treatment of a defined design storm), configuration of the LID control infrastructure, and other key project and site-specific variables, including whether the project is being applied as part of new development or redevelopm

  4. Methodology for embedded transport core calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Boyan D.

    The progress in the Nuclear Engineering field leads to developing new generations of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) with complex rector core designs, such as cores loaded partially with mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, high burn-up loadings, and cores with advanced designs of fuel assemblies and control rods. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the diffusion theory that has been used for several decades for calculations of the current Pressurized Water Rector (PWR) cores. To address the difficulties the diffusion approximation encounters new core calculation methodologies need to be developed by improving accuracy, while preserving efficiency of the current reactor core calculations. In this thesis, an advanced core calculation methodology is introduced, based on embedded transport calculations. Two different approaches are investigated. The first approach is based on embedded finite element (FEM), simplified P3 approximation (SP3), fuel assembly (FA) homogenization calculation within the framework of the diffusion core calculation with NEM code (Nodal Expansion Method). The second approach involves embedded FA lattice physics eigenvalue calculation based on collision probability method (CPM) again within the framework of the NEM diffusion core calculation. The second approach is superior to the first because most of the uncertainties introduced by the off-line cross-section generation are eliminated.

  5. Binary cluster model calculations for 20Ne and 44Ti nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyuncu, F.; Soylu, A.; Bayrak, O.

    2017-03-01

    The elastic scattering data of α+16O and α+40Ca systems at Elab = 32.2-146 MeV and Elab = 24.1-49.5 MeV energies have been analyzed with double-folding (DF) potential in optical model formalism in order to investigate the cluster structures of 20Ne and 44Ti nuclei. The deduced DF potentials between α and 16O as well as α and 40Ca have been used for obtaining the excitation energies and α-decay widths of 20Ne and 44Ti in Gamow code, but the reasonable results could not be obtained. Thus, the real parts of DF potentials which are in the best agreement with experimental data have been fitted with the squared-Woods-Saxon (WS2) potential parameters to calculate the α-decay widths of 20Ne and 44Ti with Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approach. The nuclear potential sets obtained in WKB calculations are also used for Gamow code calculations. We take into account the deformation and orientation of 40Ca nucleus to examine their influence on both the excitation energies and decay widths of 44Ti. Besides, by using the binary cluster model the rotational band energies and electromagnetic transition probabilities (BE2)s according to angles are also reproduced for both nuclei. The obtained results showed that the binary cluster model is very useful to understand the observables of 20Ne and 44Ti nuclei. Although only spherical calculations are made for 20Ne (α + 16O), the deformation in 40Ca would be important for the understanding of 44Ti (α + 40Ca) cluster structure. The mechanism presented here would also be applied to understand the cluster structures in heavy nuclei.

  6. Neutron-proton correlations in an exactly solvable model

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Pittel, S.; Stoitsov, M.; Vogel, P.; Dukelsky, J.

    1997-04-01

    We examine isovector and isoscalar neutron-proton correlations in an exactly solvable model based on the algebra SO(8). We look particularly closely at Gamow-Teller strength and double {beta} decay, both to isolate the effects of the two kinds of pairing and to test two approximation schemes: the renormalized neutron-proton quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) and generalized BCS theory. When isoscalar pairing correlations become strong enough a phase transition occurs and the dependence of the Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} strength on isospin changes in a dramatic and unfamiliar way, actually increasing as neutrons are added to an N=Z core. Renormalization eliminates the well-known instabilities that plague the QRPA as the phase transition is approached, but only by unnaturally suppressing the isoscalar correlations. Generalized BCS theory, on the other hand, reproduces the Gamow-Teller strength more accurately in the isoscalar phase than in the usual isovector phase, even though its predictions for energies are equally good everywhere. It also mixes T=0 and T=1 pairing, but only on the isoscalar side of the phase transition. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Calculating "g" from Acoustic Doppler Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Sebastian; Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, the Doppler effect for sound is introduced in high school and college physics courses. Students calculate the perceived frequency for several scenarios relating a stationary or moving observer and a stationary or moving sound source. These calculations assume a constant velocity of the observer and/or source. Although seldom…

  8. 40 CFR 89.207 - Credit calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... negative) are to be calculated according to one of the following equations and rounded, in accordance with..., in grams per kilowatt-hour. FEL = the NOX family emission limit for the engine family in grams per... credits and PM emission credits (positive or negative) are to be calculated according to one of...

  9. 40 CFR 89.207 - Credit calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... negative) are to be calculated according to one of the following equations and rounded, in accordance with..., in grams per kilowatt-hour. FEL = the NOX family emission limit for the engine family in grams per... credits and PM emission credits (positive or negative) are to be calculated according to one of...

  10. 40 CFR 89.207 - Credit calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... negative) are to be calculated according to one of the following equations and rounded, in accordance with..., in grams per kilowatt-hour. FEL = the NOX family emission limit for the engine family in grams per... credits and PM emission credits (positive or negative) are to be calculated according to one of...

  11. 40 CFR 89.207 - Credit calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... negative) are to be calculated according to one of the following equations and rounded, in accordance with..., in grams per kilowatt-hour. FEL = the NOX family emission limit for the engine family in grams per... credits and PM emission credits (positive or negative) are to be calculated according to one of...

  12. 47 CFR 1.1623 - Probability calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Probability calculation. 1.1623 Section 1.1623 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Random Selection Procedures for Mass Media Services General Procedures § 1.1623 Probability calculation. (a)...

  13. Calculation of the Poisson cumulative distribution function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowerman, Paul N.; Nolty, Robert G.; Scheuer, Ernest M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for calculating the Poisson cdf (cumulative distribution function) is presented. The method avoids computer underflow and overflow during the process. The computer program uses this technique to calculate the Poisson cdf for arbitrary inputs. An algorithm that determines the Poisson parameter required to yield a specified value of the cdf is presented.

  14. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  19. PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

  20. Applications of Programmable Calculators in Chemistry Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, David

    1977-01-01

    Described is the use of calculators in two experiments. In the first, students determine the relative atomic mass of magnesium. In the second, students use a calculator to determine a constant for gaseous concentrations of two reactants and the product at equilibrium. (AJ)