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Sample records for calculations deduced gamow-teller

  1. Reexamining Gamow-Teller decays near 78Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshudifat, M. F.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Gross, C. J.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C.; Borzov, I. N.; Brewer, N. T.; Cartegni, L.; Fijałkowska, A.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.; Ilyushkin, S. V.; Jost, C.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Królas, W.; Liu, S. H.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Padgett, S. W.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Ramayya, A. V.; Stracener, D. W.; Surman, R.; Winger, J. A.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-04-01

    Decays of neutron-rich nuclei Zn,8382 and Ga,8382 produced in proton-induced fission of 238U were studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility using on-line mass separation and β -γ spectroscopy techniques. New γ -ray transitions were identified and level schemes, which include states at high excitation energies in the range between 3-7 MeV were constructed. These high-energy levels were identified to be populated through allowed Gamow-Teller β transitions, and their structure was interpreted with new shell-model calculations. A β -delayed neutron branching ratio of 69 ±7 % was deduced for 82Zn and revised β -decay half-life values of 82Zn [155(17)(20) ms] and 83Zn [122(28) ms] were determined.

  2. Gamow-Teller strength distributions for neutron-rich nitrogen, oxygen and fluorine isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Gamow-Teller transition properties for neutron-rich nitrogen, oxygen and fluorine isotopes are studied in integrated energy. The structures of these nuclei are described by means of nuclear shell model with the WBT interaction in the p-sd shell space. Calculations of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution reproduce the experimental data reasonably in the low-energy region. For the dripline nucleus 24O, a super Gamow-Teller transition to a single state at excitation energy of 14.72 MeV in 24F is predicted. β-decay half-lives for these nuclei are calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  3. β+ Gamow-Teller Transition Strengths from Ti46 and Stellar Electron-Capture Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noji, S.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Austin, Sam M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Cole, A. L.; Doster, H. J.; Gade, A.; Guess, C. J.; Gupta, S.; Hitt, G. W.; Langer, C.; Lipschutz, S.; Lunderberg, E.; Meharchand, R.; Meisel, Z.; Perdikakis, G.; Pereira, J.; Recchia, F.; Schatz, H.; Scott, M.; Stroberg, S. R.; Sullivan, C.; Valdez, L.; Walz, C.; Weisshaar, D.; Williams, S. J.; Wimmer, K.

    2014-06-01

    The Gamow-Teller strength in the β+ direction to Sc46 was extracted via the Ti46(t ,He3+γ) reaction at 115 MeV /u. The γ-ray coincidences served to precisely measure the very weak Gamow-Teller transition to a final state at 991 keV. Although this transition is weak, it is crucial for accurately estimating electron-capture rates in astrophysical scenarios with relatively low stellar densities and temperatures, such as presupernova stellar evolution. Shell-model calculations with different effective interactions in the pf shell-model space do not reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strengths, which is likely due to sd-shell admixtures. Calculations in the quasiparticle random phase approximation that are often used in astrophysical simulations also fail to reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution, leading to strongly overestimated electron-capture rates. Because reliable theoretical predictions of Gamow-Teller strengths are important for providing astrophysical electron-capture reaction rates for a broad set of nuclei in the lower pf shell, we conclude that further theoretical improvements are required to match astrophysical needs.

  4. β+ Gamow-Teller transition strengths from 46Ti and stellar electron-capture rates.

    PubMed

    Noji, S; Zegers, R G T; Austin, Sam M; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Cole, A L; Doster, H J; Gade, A; Guess, C J; Gupta, S; Hitt, G W; Langer, C; Lipschutz, S; Lunderberg, E; Meharchand, R; Meisel, Z; Perdikakis, G; Pereira, J; Recchia, F; Schatz, H; Scott, M; Stroberg, S R; Sullivan, C; Valdez, L; Walz, C; Weisshaar, D; Williams, S J; Wimmer, K

    2014-06-27

    The Gamow-Teller strength in the β(+) direction to (46)Sc was extracted via the (46)Ti(t,(3)He + γ) reaction at 115  MeV/u. The γ-ray coincidences served to precisely measure the very weak Gamow-Teller transition to a final state at 991 keV. Although this transition is weak, it is crucial for accurately estimating electron-capture rates in astrophysical scenarios with relatively low stellar densities and temperatures, such as presupernova stellar evolution. Shell-model calculations with different effective interactions in the pf shell-model space do not reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strengths, which is likely due to sd-shell admixtures. Calculations in the quasiparticle random phase approximation that are often used in astrophysical simulations also fail to reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution, leading to strongly overestimated electron-capture rates. Because reliable theoretical predictions of Gamow-Teller strengths are important for providing astrophysical electron-capture reaction rates for a broad set of nuclei in the lower pf shell, we conclude that further theoretical improvements are required to match astrophysical needs. PMID:25014806

  5. β+ Gamow-Teller transition strengths from 46Ti and stellar electron-capture rates.

    PubMed

    Noji, S; Zegers, R G T; Austin, Sam M; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Cole, A L; Doster, H J; Gade, A; Guess, C J; Gupta, S; Hitt, G W; Langer, C; Lipschutz, S; Lunderberg, E; Meharchand, R; Meisel, Z; Perdikakis, G; Pereira, J; Recchia, F; Schatz, H; Scott, M; Stroberg, S R; Sullivan, C; Valdez, L; Walz, C; Weisshaar, D; Williams, S J; Wimmer, K

    2014-06-27

    The Gamow-Teller strength in the β(+) direction to (46)Sc was extracted via the (46)Ti(t,(3)He + γ) reaction at 115  MeV/u. The γ-ray coincidences served to precisely measure the very weak Gamow-Teller transition to a final state at 991 keV. Although this transition is weak, it is crucial for accurately estimating electron-capture rates in astrophysical scenarios with relatively low stellar densities and temperatures, such as presupernova stellar evolution. Shell-model calculations with different effective interactions in the pf shell-model space do not reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strengths, which is likely due to sd-shell admixtures. Calculations in the quasiparticle random phase approximation that are often used in astrophysical simulations also fail to reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution, leading to strongly overestimated electron-capture rates. Because reliable theoretical predictions of Gamow-Teller strengths are important for providing astrophysical electron-capture reaction rates for a broad set of nuclei in the lower pf shell, we conclude that further theoretical improvements are required to match astrophysical needs.

  6. Gamow-Teller 1{sup +} states in {sup 208}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Babacan, T.; Salamov, D. I.; Kuecuekbursa, A.

    2005-03-01

    The properties of the Gamow-Teller (GT) 1{sup +} states in {sup 208}Bi have been investigated by using the Pyatov-Salamov method. The GT resonance (GTR) energy, the contribution of the GTR {beta} transition strength to the Ikeda sum rule, and the differential cross sections for the {sup 208}Pb(p,n){sup 208}Bi and {sup 208}Pb({sup 3}He,t){sup 208}Bi charge exchange reactions at different energies have been calculated. Our results show good agreement with experimental values.

  7. Configuration splitting of the Gamow-Teller resonance in antimony isotopes: Is this a real or a virtual effect?

    SciTech Connect

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Rodin, V. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2013-04-15

    The Gamow-Teller strength functions for a number of antimony isotopes were calculated within a semimicroscopic approach based on the continuum version of the charge-exchange quasiparticle random-phase approximation and on phenomenologically taking into account the fragmentation effect. The structural effect of splitting of the main maximum of the Gamow-Teller resonance in these isotopes was confirmed. Experimental data on the excitation of this resonance in a direct and a resonance reaction for the {sup 118}Sn parent nucleus were analyzed with allowance for this effect.

  8. Semimicroscopic description of basic modes of relaxation of the Gamow-Teller resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Safonov, I. V. Urin, M. H.

    2012-12-15

    Semimicroscopic approach based on the continuum version of the random-phase approximation and on a phenomenological method for taking into account the fragmentation effect is used to describe quantitatively basic relaxation parameters of the Gamow-Teller resonance in magic and nearmagic nuclei. For the {sup 208}Bi nucleus, the results obtained by calculating the resonance parameters in question are compared with respective experimental data.

  9. Magnetic Dipole and Gamow-Teller Modes in Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions: Impact on Supernova Dynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Byelikov, A.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Fujita, H.; Heger, A.; Kolbe, E.; Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2006-03-13

    Some aspects of the importance of neutrino-induced reactions on nuclei within supernova physics are discussed. It is argued that important constraints on the experimentally unknown cross sections can be obtained from experimental studies of the nuclear response in selected cases. Examples are neutral-current induced reactions on fp-shell nuclei extracted from high-resolution inelastic electron scattering data providing the M1 strength distributions and the production of the exotic heavy, odd-odd nuclei 138La and 180Ta through charged-current reactions dominated by Gamow-Teller transitions. The Gamow-Teller strength can deduced from the (3He,t) charge-exchange reaction at zero degree.

  10. Gamow-Teller Transitions Starting from Tz = +3/2 Nucleus 47Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganioǧlu, E.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Algora, A.; Csatlos, M.; Deaven, J.; Estevez, E.; Guess, C.; Gulyás, J.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Matsubara, H.; Meharchand, R.; Molina, F.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Perdikakis, G.; Rubio, B.; Scholl, C.; Susoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thies, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Zenihiro, J.

    2011-10-01

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are mediated by the στ operator. Owing to its simplicity and also its spin-isospin nature, GT transitions play key roles in the studies of nuclear structure as well as astro-nuclear processes. In violent neutrino-induced reactions at the core-collapse stage of type II supernovae, Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions starting from stable as well as unstable pf-shell nuclei play important roles. We study GT transitions starting from 47Ti in a high-resolution (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0° and at an intermediate incident energy of 140 MeV/nucleon at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka. Individual GT transitions up to high excitations were observed. Assuming the isospin symmetry for the strengths of Tz = ±3/2→±1/2 analogous GT transitions, we can deduce the detailed strength distribution starting from mirror unstable nucleus 47Mn.

  11. Gamow-Teller strength distributions and neutrino energy loss rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Shehzadi, Ramoona; Fayaz, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Gamow-Teller transitions in isotopes of chromium play a consequential role in the presupernova evolution of massive stars. β-decay and electron capture rates on chromium isotopes significantly affect the time rate of change of lepton fraction (dot{Ye}). Fine-tuning of this parameter is one of the key for simulating a successful supernova explosion. The (anti)neutrinos produced as a result of electron capture and β-decay are transparent to stellar matter during presupernova phases. They carry away energy and this result in cooling the stellar core. In this paper we present the calculations of Gamow-Teller strength distributions and (anti)neutrino energy loss rates due to weak interactions on chromium isotopes of astrophysical importance. We compare our results with measured data and previous calculations wherever available.

  12. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of ^{78}Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies.

    PubMed

    Madurga, M; Paulauskas, S V; Grzywacz, R; Miller, D; Bardayan, D W; Batchelder, J C; Brewer, N T; Cizewski, J A; Fijałkowska, A; Gross, C J; Howard, M E; Ilyushkin, S V; Manning, B; Matoš, M; Mendez, A J; Miernik, K; Padgett, S W; Peters, W A; Rasco, B C; Ratkiewicz, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Stracener, D W; Wang, E H; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Zganjar, E F

    2016-08-26

    The β-delayed neutron emission of ^{83,84}Ga isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to ^{78}Ni core-excited states in ^{83,84}Ge favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton fpg_{9/2} and neutron extended fpg_{9/2}+d_{5/2} valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β-decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β-decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β-delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. PMID:27610848

  13. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of 78Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R.; Miller, D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Fijałkowska, A.; Gross, C. J.; Howard, M. E.; Ilyushkin, S. V.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Padgett, S. W.; Peters, W. A.; Rasco, B. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Stracener, D. W.; Wang, E. H.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    The β -delayed neutron emission of Ga,8483 isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to 78Ni core-excited states in Ge,8483 favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton f p g9 /2 and neutron extended f p g9 /2+d5 /2 valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β -decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β -decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β -delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  14. Gamow-Teller and dipole strength in the 208Pb(n,p) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raywood, K. J.; Long, S. A.; Spicer, B. M.

    1997-02-01

    Earlier data on the 208Pb(n,p) 208Ti reaction at 198 MeV has been analysed using the multipole decomposition technique, and the contributions to the spectra from L = 0 and 1 transitions determined. The L = 0 cross section has been found to be smaller than values given by the calculations of MacFarlane [3] for Gamow-Teller transitions, using three different forms for the population of single particle states about the Fermi energy. Comparison is made with GT-strength values obtained from a more recent mean field calculation of these populations, and with an older nuclear structure calculation of properties of the lead nuclei. The L = 1 strength distribution is also reported.

  15. Projected shell model for Gamow-Teller transitions in heavy, deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-Jun; Sun, Yang; Gao, Zao-Chun; Kiran Ghorui, Surja

    2016-02-01

    Calculations of Gamow-Teller (GT) transition rates for heavy, deformed nuclei, which are useful input for nuclear astrophysics studies, are usually done with the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We propose a shell-model method by applying the Projected Shell Model (PSM) based on deformed bases. With this method, it is possible to perform a state-by-state calculation for nuclear matrix elements for β-decay and electron-capture in heavy nuclei. Taking β- decay from 168Dy to 168Ho as an example, we show that the known experimental B(GT) from the ground state of the mother nucleus to the low-lying states of the daughter nucleus could be well described. Moreover, strong transitions to high-lying states are predicted to occur, which may considerably enhance the total decay rates once these nuclei are exposed to hot stellar environments.

  16. Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} decay of deformed nuclei near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Frisk, F.; Hamamoto, I.; Zhang, X.Z. |

    1995-11-01

    Using a quasiparticle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) based on deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with Skyrme interactions, the distribution of the Gamow-Teller (GT) {beta}{sup +} decay strength is estimated for the HF local minima of even-even deformed nuclei near the proton drip line in the region of 28{lt}{ital Z}{lt}66. The distribution often depends sensitively on the nuclear shape (namely, oblate or prolate). In the region of {ital Z}{lt}50 the possibility of observing {beta}-delayed proton emission depends sensitively on the excess of {ital Z} over {ital Z}={ital N}. In the region of {ital Z}{gt}50 almost the entire estimated GT strength is found to lie below the ground states of the even-even mother nuclei, and the observation of the total GT strength by {beta}-delayed charged-particle(s) emission will be of essential importance.

  17. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-20

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from {sup 90}Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the {beta}{sub -} and the {beta}{sub +} channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L= 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  18. Chiral two-body currents in nuclei: Gamow-Teller transitions and neutrinoless double-beta decay.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, J; Gazit, D; Schwenk, A

    2011-08-01

    We show that chiral effective field theory (EFT) two-body currents provide important contributions to the quenching of low-momentum-transfer Gamow-Teller transitions, and use chiral EFT to predict the momentum-transfer dependence that is probed in neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay. We then calculate for the first time the 0νββ decay operator based on chiral EFT currents and study the nuclear matrix elements at successive orders. The contributions from chiral two-body currents are significant and should be included in all calculations. PMID:21902315

  19. Gamow-Teller strength distributions and stellar weak-interaction rates for ^{76}Ge and ^{82}Se using the deformed pn-QRPA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Ishfaq, Mavra

    2016-07-01

    We calculate Gamow-Teller strength distributions for β β-decay nuclei ^{76}Ge and ^{82}Se using the deformed pn-QRPA model. We use a deformed Nilsson basis and consider pairing correlations within the deformed BCS theory. Ground state correlations and two-particle and two-hole mixing states were included in our pn-QRPA model. Our calculated strength distributions were compared with experimental data and previous calculation. The total Gamow-Teller strength and centroid placement calculated in our model compares well with the measured value. We calculate β-decay and positron capture rates on ^{76}Ge and ^{82}Se in supernovae environments and compare them to those obtained from experimental data and previous calculation. Our study shows that positron capture rates command the total weak rates at high stellar temperatures. We also calculate energy rates of β-delayed neutrons and their emission probabilities.

  20. Direct proton decay from the Gamow-Teller resonance in {sup 208}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Akimune, H.; Daito, I.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Greenfield, M.B.; Harakeh, M.N.; Inomata, T.; Jaenecke, J.; Katori, K.; Nakayama, S.; Sakai, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yosoi, M. ||||||||

    1995-08-01

    Spin-isospin excitations in {sup 208}Bi have been investigated using the {sup 208}Pb ({sup 3}He,{ital t}){sup 208}Bi reaction at near {theta}{approx}0{degree} at {ital E}({sup 3}He)=450 MeV. The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR), the isobaric analog state (IAS), and the spin-flip dipole ({Delta}{ital L}=1) resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been studied by observing their direct proton decays to the low-lying neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb. Decay protons were measured at backward angles in coincidence with tritons detected at and near 0{degree}. The total branching ratio for proton decay from the GTR is determined to be only 4.9{plus_minus}1.3%. The total branching ratio for proton decay from the SDR amounts to 14.1{plus_minus}4.2%. The deduced total widths as well as the total and partial proton escape widths of the GRR and IAS are found to be in reasonable agreement with recent theoretical estimates obtained in the framework of the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

  1. Gamow-Teller strengths in {sup 24}Na using the {sup 24}Mg(t,{sup 3}He) reaction at 115A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M. E.; Smith, E. E.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Brown, B. A.; Gade, A.; Hitt, G. W.; Austin, Sam M.; Cole, A. L.; Galaviz, D.; Bazin, D.; Famiano, M.; Matos, M.; Shimbara, Y.; Davids, B.; Fujita, Y.; Reitzner, S. D.; Schradin, L. J.; Samanta, C.; Simenel, C.

    2008-10-15

    Gamow-Teller transitions from {sup 24}Mg to {sup 24}Na were studied via the (t,{sup 3}He) reaction at 115A MeV using a secondary triton beam produced via fast fragmentation of 150A MeV {sup 16}O ions. Compared to previous (t,{sup 3}He) experiments at this energy that employed a primary {alpha} beam, the secondary beam intensity is improved by about a factor of five. Despite the large emittance of the secondary beam, an excitation-energy resolution of {approx}200 keV is achieved. A good correspondence is found between the extracted Gamow-Teller strength distribution and those available from other charge-exchange probes. Theoretical calculations using the newly developed USDA and USDB sd-shell model interactions reproduce the data well.

  2. Nuclear shape dependence of Gamow-Teller distributions in neutron-deficient Pb isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarriguren, P.; Moreno, O.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2005-11-01

    We study Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the neutron-deficient even isotopes {sup 184-194}Pb in a search for signatures of deformation. The microscopic formalism used is based on a deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) approach, which involves a self-consistent quasiparticle deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock (HF) basis and residual spin-isospin forces in both the particle-hole and particle-particle channels. By analyzing the sensitivity of the Gamow-Teller strength distributions to the various ingredients in the formalism, we conclude that the {beta} decay of these isotopes could be a useful tool to look for fingerprints of nuclear deformation.

  3. Gamow-Teller Strength in the A=14 Multiplet: A Challenge to the Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Negret, A; Adachi, T; Barrett, B R; Baumer, C; den Berg, A v; Berg, G; von Brentano, P; Frekers, D; De Frenne, D; Fujita, H; Fujita, K; Fujita, Y; Grewe, E; Haefner, P; Harakeh, M; Hatanaka, K; Heyde, K; Hunyadi, M; Jacobs, E; Kalmykov, Y; Korff, A; Nakanishi, K; Navratil, P; von Neumann-Cosel, P; Popescu, L; Rakers, S; Richter, A; Ryezayeva, N; Sakemi, Y; Schevchenko, A; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Uchida, M; Vary, J; Wortche, H; Yosoi, M; Zamick, L

    2006-08-07

    A new experimental approach to the famous problem of the anomalously slow Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in the {beta} decay of the A = 14 multiplet is presented. The GT strength distributions to excited states in {sup 14}C and {sup 14}O was studied in high-resolution (d,{sup 2}He) and ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions on {sup 14}N. No-core shell-model (NCSM) calculations capable of reproducing the suppression of the {beta} decays predict a selective excitation of J{sup {pi}} = 2{sup +} states. The experimental confirmation represents a validation of the assumptions about the underlying structure of the {sup 14}N ground state wave function. However, the fragmentation of the GT strength over three 2{sup +} final states remains a fundamental issue not explained by the present NCSM using a 6 {h_bar}{omega} model space, suggesting possibly the need to include cluster structure in these light nuclei in a consistent way.

  4. Gamow-Teller Strength in the Exotic Odd-Odd Nuclei {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and Its Relevance for Neutrino Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Byelikov, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Heger, A.

    2007-02-23

    The Gamow-Teller strength distributions below the particle threshold in {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta, deduced from high-resolution measurements of the ({sup 3}He,t) reaction at 0 deg., allow us to evaluate the role of charged-current reactions for the production of these extremely rare nuclides in neutrino-nucleosynthesis models. The analysis suggests that essentially all {sup 138}La in the Universe can be made that way. Neutrino nucleosynthesis also contributes significantly to the abundance of {sup 180}Ta but the magnitude depends on the unknown branching ratio for population of the long-lived isomer.

  5. Gamow-Teller transitions to {sup 64}Cu measured with the {sup 64}Zn(t,{sup 3}He) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hitt, G. W.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Guess, C. J.; Austin, Sam M.; Galaviz, D.; Shimbara, Y.; Tur, C.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Horoi, M.; Howard, M. E.; Smith, E. E.; Rae, W. D. M.

    2009-07-15

    The {sup 64}Zn(t,{sup 3}He) reaction has been studied by using a secondary triton beam of 115 MeV/nucleon to extract the Gamow-Teller transition-strength distribution to {sup 64}Cu. The results were compared with shell-model calculations with the pf-shell effective interactions KB3G and GXPF1A and with existing data from the {sup 64}Zn(d,{sup 2}He) reaction. Whereas the experimental results exhibited good consistency, neither of the theoretical predictions managed to reproduce the data. The implications for electron-capture rates during late stellar evolution were investigated. The rates based on the theoretical strength distributions are lower by factors of 3.5-5 compared to the rates based on experimental strength distributions.

  6. Observations of the Gamow-Teller resonance in the rare-earth nuclei above 146Gd populated in β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nácher, E.; Rubio, B.; Algora, A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Taín, J. L.; Gadea, A.; Agramunt, J.; Gierlik, M.; Karny, M.; Janas, Z.; Roeckl, E.; Blazhev, A.; Collatz, R.; Döring, J.; Hellström, M.; Hu, Z.; Kirchner, R.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Shibata, M.; Rykaczewski, K.; Batist, L.; Moroz, F.; Wittmann, V.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    The rare-earth region of the nuclear table around the quasi-doubly magic nucleus 146Gd is one of the very few places in which the Gamow-Teller (GT) resonance can be populated in β decay. The appropriate technique to study such a phenomenon is total absorption spectroscopy, thanks to which one can measure the B (GT) distribution in β -decay experiments even when it is very fragmented and lies at high excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. Results on the GT resonance measured in the β decay of the odd-Z , N =83 nuclei 148Tb 150Ho, and 152Tm are presented in this work and compared with shell-model calculations. The tail of the resonance is clearly observed up to the limit imposed by the Q value. This observation is important in the context of the understanding of the "quenching" of the GT strength.

  7. Gamow-Teller transitions to 45Ca via the 45Sc(t ,3He+γ ) reaction at 115 MeV/u and its application to stellar electron-capture rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noji, S.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Austin, Sam M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Cole, A. L.; Doster, H. J.; Gade, A.; Guess, C. J.; Gupta, S.; Hitt, G. W.; Langer, C.; Lipschutz, S.; Lunderberg, E.; Meharchand, R.; Meisel, Z.; Perdikakis, G.; Pereira, J.; Recchia, F.; Schatz, H.; Scott, M.; Stroberg, S. R.; Sullivan, C.; Valdez, L.; Walz, C.; Weisshaar, D.; Williams, S. J.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-08-01

    Background: Stellar electron-capture reactions on medium-heavy nuclei are important for many astrophysical phenomena, including core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovæ and neutron stars. Estimates of electron-capture rates rely on accurate estimates of Gamow-Teller strength distributions, which can be extracted from charge-exchange reactions at intermediate beam energies. Measured Gamow-Teller transition strength distributions for stable pf-shell nuclei are reasonably well reproduced by theoretical calculations in the shell model, except for lower mass nuclei where admixtures from the sd shell can become important. Purpose: This paper presents a β+ charge-exchange experiment on 45Sc , one of the lightest pf-shell nuclei. The focus was on Gamow-Teller transitions to final states at low excitation energies, which are particularly important for accurate estimations of electron-capture rates at relatively low stellar densities. The experimental results are compared with various theoretical models. Method: The double-differential cross section for the 45Sc(t ,3He+γ ) reaction was measured using the NSCL Coupled-Cyclotron Facility at 115 MeV /u . Gamow-Teller contributions to the excitation-energy spectra were extracted by means of a multipole-decomposition analysis. γ rays emitted due to the deexcitation of 45Ca were measured using GRETINA to allow for the extraction of Gamow-Teller strengths from very weak transitions at low excitation energies. Results: Gamow-Teller transition strengths to 45Ca were extracted up to an excitation energy of 20 MeV, and that to the first excited state in 45Ca at 174 keV was extracted from the γ -ray measurement, which, even though weak, is important for the astrophysical applications and dominates under certain stellar conditions. Shell-model calculations performed in the pf shell-model space with the GXPF1A, KB3G, and FPD6 interactions did not reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution, and a calculation using

  8. Gamow-Teller Transitions Starting from Tz = +3/2 Nucleus 45Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susoy, G.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Algora, A.; Csatlos, M.; Deaven, J.; Estevez, E.; Ganioǧlu, E.; Guess, C.; Gulyás, J.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Matsubara, H.; Meharchand, R.; Molina, F.; Okamura, H.; Oktem, Y.; Ong, H. J.; Perdikakis, G.; Rubio, B.; Scholl, C.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thies, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Zenihiro, J.

    2011-10-01

    Owing to its simplicity and also its nature of spin-isospin (στ) excitation, Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions play key roles in the studies of nuclear structure as well as astro-nuclear processes. We studied GT transitions starting from 45Sc in a high-resolution (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0° and at an intermediate incoming energy of 140 MeV/nucleon. Individual GT transitions were observed up to high excitation energy of 10 MeV and a concentration of GT strength, a resonance-like structure, was observed at 6.5 MeV.

  9. Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden decays near the r-process paths at N=50, 82, and 126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, I. N.

    2003-02-01

    The β-decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei relevant to the r-process nucleosynthesis are mostly beyond experimental reach. Their predictions demand a self-consistent extrapolation of various nuclear properties away from the experimentally known regions. The allowed transitions approximation commonly used in large-scale microscopic calculations also needs to be revised in different mass regions. The density functional+continuum QRPA approximation to self-consistent calculations of the ground state properties, Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden β-decay transitions of nuclei far from stability is developed. Systematic calculations are performed of the allowed and first-forbidden β-decay rates for the r-process relevant nuclides near the closed neutron shells at N=50,82,126. The importance of first-forbidden decays near Z⩾50, N≈82 and near N=126 is shown. The total β-decay half-lives in the region “east” of the 208Pb are estimated. A comparison with recent experimental data, global calculations, and self-consistent microscopic predictions is presented.

  10. Gamow-Teller unit cross sections for (t,{sup 3}He) and ({sup 3}He,t) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Perdikakis, G.; Austin, Sam M.; Galaviz, D.; Tur, C.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Deaven, J. M.; Guess, C. J.; Hitt, G. W.; Meharchand, R.; Bazin, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Caesar, C.; Herlitzius, C.; Gade, A.; Howard, M. E.; Smith, E. E.; Noji, S.; Sakai, H.; Shimbara, Y.

    2011-05-15

    The proportionality between differential cross sections at vanishing linear momentum transfer and Gamow-Teller transition strength, expressed in terms of the unit cross section ({sigma}{sub GT}), was studied as a function of target mass number for (t,{sup 3}He) and ({sup 3}He,t) reactions at 115A MeV and 140A MeV, respectively. Existing ({sup 3}He,t) and (t,{sup 3}He) data on targets with mass number 12{<=}A{<=}120 were complemented with new and reevaluated (t,{sup 3}He) data on proton, deuteron, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 12}C targets. It was found that in spite of the small difference in beam energies between the two probes, the unit cross sections have a nearly identical and simple dependence on target mass number A, for A{>=}12: {sigma}{sub GT}=109/A{sup 0.65}. The factorization of the unit cross sections in terms of a kinematical factor, a distortion factor, and the strength of the effective spin-isospin transfer nucleus-nucleus interaction was investigated. Simple phenomenological functions depending on mass number A were extracted for the latter two. By comparison with plane and distorted-wave Born approximation calculations, it was found that the use of a short-range approximation for knock-on exchange contributions to the transition amplitude results in overestimated cross sections for reactions involving the composite ({sup 3}He,t) and (t,{sup 3}He) probes.

  11. Deformation signature from the Gamow-Teller decay of N=Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Miehe, Ch.; Dessagne, Ph.; Huck, A.; Knipper, A.; Marguier, G.; Longour, C.; Rauch, V.; Giovinazzo, J.; Borge, M. J. G.; Piqueras, I.; Tengblad, O.; Jokinen, A.; Ramdhane, M.

    1998-12-21

    The {sup 76}Sr (N=Z=38) and the {sup 72}Kr (N=Z=36) {beta}{sup +} EC decay have been studied at the CERN/ISOLDE PSB facility where their beta-gamma and delayed particle decay modes have been investigated. The established decay schemes yield new information on the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength spread over the J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +} states in the daughter nuclei. The delayed proton emission of an N=Z nucleus is observed for the first time in the case of {sup 76}Sr. The experimental GT strength intensities and distributions are discussed in the light of the theoretical estimates for oblate and prolate deformations.

  12. Gamow-Teller Transitions in Stable and Unstable pf-shell Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Rubio, B.; Gelletly, W.

    2008-11-11

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions starting from stable as well as unstable pf-shell nuclei are of interest not only in nuclear physics, but also in astrophysics, e.g. in violent neutrino-induced reactions at the core-collapse stage of type II supernovae. In the {beta}-decay study of these pf-shell nuclei, half-lives can be measured rather accurately. On the other hand, in high-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0 deg., individual GT transitions up to high excitations can be studied. Assuming the isospin symmetry for the strengths of T{sub z} = {+-}1{yields}0 analogous GT transitions, we present a unique 'merged analysis' for the determination of absolute B(GT) values. This method can be applied not only to T = 1 systems, but also to higher T systems.

  13. Study of Gamow-Teller transitions with J = 0 and Jmax pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ricardo; Zamick, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Allowed Gamow-Teller transitions are sensitive to the interactions which are used. In this single j shell study, we consider the 2 extremes J = 0 pairing and Jmax pairing as well as ``half.'' Also, for comparison, a realistic interaction, MBZE. For 43Sc decay J = 0 pairing yields a maximum B(GT) for I = 7/2 to 7/2 but is zero for 7/2 to 9/2 and 7/2 to 5/2. This is tied to a selection rule that one cannot simultaneously change reduced isospin and seniority. For 46Ti I = 1 to I = 0 there is not monotonic behavior as one goes from Jmax to J = 0 pairing, explained by the fact that that there is an isospin crossover of J = 1 T = 2 as one goes to the J=0 pairing limit. Comparison with experiment is made. RG has received support via the Research Undergraduate Experience program (REU) from the U.S. National Science Foundation through grant PHY-1263280, and thanks the REU Physics program at Rutgers University for their support.

  14. Gamow-Teller Transitions Starting from T{sub z} = +3/2 Nucleus {sup 45}Sc

    SciTech Connect

    Susoy, G.; Ganioglu, E.; Oktem, Y.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Zenihiro, J.; Algora, A.; Estevez, E.; Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Csatlos, M.

    2011-10-28

    Owing to its simplicity and also its nature of spin-isospin ({sigma}{tau}) excitation, Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions play key roles in the studies of nuclear structure as well as astro-nuclear processes. We studied GT transitions starting from {sup 45}Sc in a high-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0 deg. and at an intermediate incoming energy of 140 MeV/nucleon. Individual GT transitions were observed up to high excitation energy of 10 MeV and a concentration of GT strength, a resonance-like structure, was observed at 6.5 MeV.

  15. Fine Structure of the Gamow-Teller Resonance in {sup 90}Nb and Level Density of 1{sup +} States

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Wambach, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Berg, G.P.A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, H.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-01-13

    The fine structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance in a medium-heavy nucleus is observed for the first time in a high-resolution {sup 90}Zr({sup 3}He,t){sup 90}Nb experiment at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Using a novel wavelet analysis technique, it is possible to extract characteristic energy scales and to quantify their relative importance for the generation of the fine structure. This method combined with the selectivity of the reaction permits an extraction of the level density of 1{sup +} states in {sup 90}Nb.

  16. High-resolution study of Gamow-Teller transitions from the Tz=1 nucleus 46Ti to the Tz=0 nucleus 46V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Brentano, P. Von; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Berg, G. P.; Fransen, C.; Frenne, D. De; Fujita, H.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Honma, M.; Jacobs, E.; Kamiya, J.; Kawase, K.; Mizusaki, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Negret, A.; Otsuka, T.; Pietralla, N.; Popescu, L.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Uchida, M.; Wakasa, T.; Yosoi, M.; Zell, K. O.

    2006-02-01

    The Gamow-Teller (GT) transition strengths in fp-shell nuclei are important parameters in presupernova models. A high-energy-resolution (3He,t) experiment was performed on the Tz=1 nucleus 46Ti at 0° and at an intermediate incident energy of 140 MeV/nucleon for the study of precise GT transition strengths to the final Tz=0 nucleus 46V. With an energy resolution of 33 keV, individual GT transitions were observed and GT strengths were derived for them up to the excitation energy of 4.5 MeV. The GT strengths were compared with shell-model calculations using various effective interactions. In this low-lying region, most GT states have isospin T=0. A few GT states with isospin T=1 were identified from the existence of the corresponding (analog) M1 states in 46Ti. By comparing the GT strength with the corresponding (analogous) M1 transition strength studied in 46Ti(e,e') or (γ,γ') measurements, a large constructive interference of orbital and spin terms was suggested for one of these M1 transitions.

  17. Ground and excited states Gamow-Teller strength distributions of iron isotopes and associated capture rates for core-collapse simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports on the microscopic calculation of ground and excited states Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distributions, both in the electron capture and electron decay direction, for 54,55,56Fe. The associated electron and positron capture rates for these isotopes of iron are also calculated in stellar matter. These calculations were recently introduced and this paper is a follow-up which discusses in detail the GT strength distributions and stellar capture rates of key iron isotopes. The calculations are performed within the framework of the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of GT strength functions and stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of the results. For the first time experimental deformation of nuclei are taken into account. In the core of massive stars isotopes of iron, 54,55,56Fe, are considered to be key players in decreasing the electron-to-baryon ratio ( Y e ) mainly via electron capture on these nuclide. The structure of the presupernova star is altered both by the changes in Y e and the entropy of the core material. Results are encouraging and are compared against measurements (where possible) and other calculations. The calculated electron capture rates are in overall good agreement with the shell model results. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, from oxygen shell burning stages till around end of convective core silicon burning, the calculated electron capture rates on 54Fe are around three times bigger than the corresponding shell model rates. The calculated positron capture rates, however, are suppressed by two to five orders of magnitude.

  18. Comparative study of Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the odd-odd nucleus {sup 50}V and its impact on electron capture rates in astrophysical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Sajjad, Muhammad

    2007-11-15

    Gamow-Teller (GT) strength transitions are an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In addition to nuclear structure, GT transitions in nuclei directly affect the early phases of Type Ia and Type-II supernovae core collapse since the electron capture rates are partly determined by these GT transitions. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. Recent nucleosynthesis calculations show that odd-odd and odd-A nuclei cause the largest contribution in the rate of change of lepton-to-baryon ratio. In the present manuscript, we have calculated the GT strength distributions and electron capture rates for odd-odd nucleus {sup 50}V by using the pn-QRPA theory. At present {sup 50}V is the first experimentally available odd-odd nucleus in fp-shell nuclei. We also compare our GT strength distribution with the recently measured results of a {sup 50}V(d, {sup 2}He){sup 50}Ti experiment, with the earlier work of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (referred to as FFN) and subsequently with the large-scale shell model calculations. One curious finding of the paper is that the Brink's hypothesis, usually employed in large-scale shell model calculations, is not a good approximation to use at least in the case of {sup 50}V. SNe Ia model calculations performed using FFN rates result in overproduction of {sup 50}Ti, and were brought to a much acceptable value by employing shell model results. It might be interesting to study how the composition of the ejecta using presently reported QRPA rates compare with the observed abundances.

  19. Comparative study of Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the odd-odd nucleus V50 and its impact on electron capture rates in astrophysical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Sajjad, Muhammad

    2007-11-01

    Gamow-Teller (GT) strength transitions are an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In addition to nuclear structure, GT transitions in nuclei directly affect the early phases of Type Ia and Type-II supernovae core collapse since the electron capture rates are partly determined by these GT transitions. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. Recent nucleosynthesis calculations show that odd-odd and odd-A nuclei cause the largest contribution in the rate of change of lepton-to-baryon ratio. In the present manuscript, we have calculated the GT strength distributions and electron capture rates for odd-odd nucleus V50 by using the pn-QRPA theory. At present V50 is the first experimentally available odd-odd nucleus in fp-shell nuclei. We also compare our GT strength distribution with the recently measured results of a V50(d, He2)Ti50 experiment, with the earlier work of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (referred to as FFN) and subsequently with the large-scale shell model calculations. One curious finding of the paper is that the Brink's hypothesis, usually employed in large-scale shell model calculations, is not a good approximation to use at least in the case of V50. SNe Ia model calculations performed using FFN rates result in overproduction of Ti50, and were brought to a much acceptable value by employing shell model results. It might be interesting to study how the composition of the ejecta using presently reported QRPA rates compare with the observed abundances.

  20. Ratio of Gamow-Teller to Fermi strength observed in /sup 13,14/C(p,n) at 492 and 590 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Rapaport, J.; Lisowski, P.W.; Byrd, R.C.; Carey, T.; Taddeucci, T.N.; McClelland, J.; Rybarcyk, L.; Haight, R.C.; King, N.S.P.

    1988-01-01

    It has been recognized for a number of years that certain spin-isospin components of the nucleon-nucleus effective interaction can be inferred from (p,n) reactions to states of known nuclear structure. For L = 0, S = 0 and L = 0, S = 1 transitions, the 0-degree (p,n) cross section can be related respectively to Fermi and Gamow-Teller beta decay matrix elements. If these transitions occur in the same nucleus, the ratio of isovector spin-flip to non-spin-flip effective interactions can be measured without regard for absolute normalization. The best reaction to measure this is /sup 14/C(p,n) which goes by a pure Gamow-Teller transition to the 1/sup /plus// state at 3.95 MeV in /sup 14/N, and Fermi transition to the 2.31 MeV 0/sup /plus// state. This work extends the ratio measurements made at lower energies (ref. 1, 2, 3) to 492 and 590 MeV. We also report on the /sup 13/C(p,n) reaction which goes by a pure GT transition to the 3.51 MeV 3/2/sup /minus// state in /sup 13/N, but by a mixed Fermi plus Gamow-Teller transition to the 1/2/sup /minus// ground state. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Gamow-Teller transitions studied in the high-resolution Ni64(He3,t)Cu64 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, L.; Adachi, T.; Berg, G. P. A.; Brentano, P. Von; Frekers, D.; Frenne, D. De; Fujita, K.; Fujita, Y.; Grewe, E.-W.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hatanaka, K.; Jacobs, E.; Nakanishi, K.; Negret, A.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Uchida, M.; Wörtche, H. J.; Yosoi, M.

    2009-06-01

    To study the Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions to the pf-shell nucleus Cu64, the Ni64(He3,t)Cu64 experiment was performed at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) Ring Cyclotron, Osaka, using a He3 beam of 140 MeV/nucleon. The outgoing tritons were momentum analyzed by the Grand Raiden spectrometer at 0°. A high energy resolution of 32 keV (full width at half-maximum) allowed the separation of individual levels in the excitation-energy region from 0 to 3.5 MeV. In addition to the ground state (gs), known to be a Jπ=1+ GT state, many low-lying states showed L=0 nature, suggesting that they are candidates for GT states. Because the GT strength B(GT) for the gs transition is known from the β-decay measurement, the strengths for the excited states could be determined using the proportionality between the B(GT) and the reaction cross section extrapolated to q=0 momentum transfer. At higher excitation energies, the level density becomes high and the so-called GT giant resonance dominates the spectrum. The lower and the upper limits of the strength contained in this energy region were estimated. Our results show that less than 55% of the strength predicted by the Ikeda sum rule is located in the excitation-energy region from 0 to 17 MeV.

  2. Fermi to Gamow-Teller Mixing Ratios in the Nuclear Beta Decays of COBALT-58 and COBALT-56.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wen-Piao

    1981-06-01

    The Fermi to Gamow-Teller mixing ratios, y = C(,V)M(,F)/C(,A)M(,GT), in the isospin-hindered beta decays ((DELTA)J=0, T=('(+OR -))1) of ('58)Co and ('56)Co have been accurately determined from extensive and detailed studies of the directional distributions of beta rays and gamma rays emitted from oriented ('58)Co and ('56)Co nuclei. The cobalt nuclei were oriented in a thin foil of permendur (49%Co, 49%Fe, and 2%V) magnetically saturated at ultralow temperatures (10('-2o)K). The nuclear orientation system employed has the distinguished features of excellent long-term temperature stability and of allowing beta rays be measured at almost any desired angle with respect to the nuclear orientation axis with very little deflections from their original trajectories by the applied magnetizing fields. Beta-ray and gamma-ray spectra were measured, with a Si(Li) detector and a Ge(Li) detector respectively, at four different angles with respect to the nuclear orientation axis. The gamma-ray background in the beta-ray spectra is removed by means of a mechanical shutter. The beta -ray asymmetries and the gamma-ray anisotropies were determined independently at each angle by normalizing the cold ((TURNEQ)10(' -2o)K) spectra by the corresponding warm (4.2(DEGREES)K) spectra taken at the same angle. Necessary corrections made on the beta-ray spectra due to the various experimental effects are described in detail. The experimental beta -ray asymmetries after the proper corrections were found to be in very good agreement with the theoretical expectations over a wide energy region. Including all estimated systematic errors, the beta-ray asymmetry parameters, A(,(beta)), were determined to be A(,(beta))('58) = 0.341 (+OR-) 0.020 for ('58)Co and A('56) = 0.352 (+OR-) 0.015 for ('56)Co. The Fermi to Gamov-Teller mixing ratios y corresponding to these A(,(beta))'s are y('58) = -0.005 (+OR-) 0.012 for ('58)Co and y('56) = -0.086 (+OR-) 0.008 for ('56)Co. The obtained result of y('56) is in

  3. Calculation Of Two Neutrino Double Beta Decay Nuclear Matrix Elements For 128,130Te

    SciTech Connect

    Uenlue, S.; Salamov, D. I.; Babacan, T.; Kuecuekbursa, A.

    2006-04-26

    Based on Pyatov-Salamov method, spin-isospin (Gamow-Teller) effective interaction strength parameter has been found self-consistently. Then, the problem has been solved within the framework of QRPA. Gamow-Teller matrix elements for both {beta}- and {beta}+ transitions and two neutrino double beta decay nuclear matrix elements have been calculated for 128,130Te{yields}128,130Xe transitions. The obtained results have been compared with the corresponding experimental data and other theoretical results.

  4. Gamow-Teller strengths in A=34 isobars: Comparison of the mirror transitions T{sub z}=+1{yields}0 and T{sub z}=-1{yields}0

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Botha, N. T.

    2007-05-15

    With a high energy-resolution of {delta}E=21 keV in the {sup 34}S({sup 3}He,t){sup 34}Cl measurement at 0 degree sign and at 140 MeV/nucleon, strengths of Fermi and Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions between T{sub z}=+1 and T{sub z}=0 states were studied, where T{sub z} is the z component of isospin T. The corresponding isospin-symmetric transitions connecting T{sub z}=-1 and T{sub z}=0 states can be studied in the {sup 34}Ar {beta}{sup +} decay. The strengths of corresponding GT transitions were compared up to the excitation energy (E{sub x}) of 3.1 MeV. A good agreement was observed for the two strong transitions to states around E{sub x}=3 MeV, while a disagreement of 40% was observed for a weaker transition to a low-lying state.

  5. Specificity of /sup 71/Ga(p,n)/sup 71/Ge at 35 MeV for Gamow-Teller strength

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A.J.; Weneser, J.; Brown, B.A.; Rapaport, J.

    1985-01-01

    The motivation for considering the /sup 71/Ga(p,n)/sup 71/Ge reaction is to help determine the properties of /sup 71/Ga as a detector of solar neutrinos. The proposed solar neutrino experiment, /sup 71/Ga(nu,e/sup -/)/sup 71/Ge, has a threshold of only .236 MeV, and is thus sensitive to neutrinos produced in the basic burning process in the sun p + p ..-->.. /sup 2/H + e/sup +/ + nu, which has a .420 MeV endpoint. The excitation of the (5/2)/sup -/ state at .175 MeV in /sup 71/Ge could be important, however. Were the Gamow-Teller (G-T) transition to the 175 keV state equal in strength to the ground state transition there would be approx. 25% added to the detector signal, the greater part of this coming from the /sup 7/Be neutrinos; the desired sensitivity to the p-p neutrinos would then be less.

  6. Gamow-Teller Strength Distributions in {sup 48}Sc by the {sup 48}Ca(p,n) and {sup 48}Ti(n,p) Reactions and Two-Neutrino Double-beta Decay Nuclear Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yako, K.; Sasano, M.; Miki, K.; Sakai, H.; Noji, S.; Dozono, M.; Ihara, E.; Wakasa, T.; Frekers, D.; Greenfield, M. B.; Hatanaka, K.; Kato, M.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Tamii, A.; Kawabata, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Sasamoto, Y.; Shimizu, Y.

    2009-07-03

    The double-differential cross sections for the {sup 48}Ca(p,n) and {sup 48}Ti(n,p) reactions were measured at 300 MeV. A multipole decomposition technique was applied to the spectra to extract the Gamow-Teller (GT) components. The integrated GT strengths up to an excitation energy of 30 MeV in {sup 48}Sc are 15.3+-2.2 and 2.8+-0.3 in the (p,n) and (n,p) spectra, respectively. In the (n,p) spectra additional GT strengths were found above 8 MeV where shell models within the fp shell-model space predict almost no GT strengths, suggesting that the present shell-model description of the nuclear matrix element of the two-neutrino double-beta decay is incomplete.

  7. Measurements of the {sup 116}Cd(p,n) and {sup 116}Sn(n,p) reactions at 300 MeV for studying Gamow-Teller transition strengths in the intermediate nucleus of the {sup 116}Cd double-{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Sasano, M.; Kuboki, H.; Sekiguchi, K.; Sakai, H.; Yako, K.; Miki, K.; Noji, S.; Wakasa, T.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, K.; Greenfield, M. B.; Hatanaka, K.; Okamura, H.; Tamii, A.; Kawabata, T.; Maeda, Y.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Uesaka, T.; Sasamoto, Y.

    2009-11-09

    The double differential cross sections for the {sup 116}Cd(p,n) and {sup 116}Sn(n,p) reactions at 300 MeV have been measured over a wide excitation-energy region including Gamow-Teller (GT) giant resonance (GTGR) for studying GT transition strengths in the intermediate nucleus of the {sup 116}Cd double-{beta} decay, namely {sup 116}In. A large amount of the strengths in the {beta}{sup +} direction has been newly found in the energy region up to 30 MeV, which may imply that the GT strengths in the GTGR region contribute to the nuclear matrix element of the two-neutrino double-{beta} decay.

  8. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Moller, Peter; Wilson, William B

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than in previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra agree reasonably well with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors.

  9. Effects of stress rate and calculation method on subcritical crack growth parameters deduced from constant stress-rate flexural testing

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Jason A.; Alaqeel, Samer M.; Zhang, Yunlong; Miller, Amp W.; Cai, Zhuo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To more efficiently determine the subcritical crack growth (SCG) parameters of dental ceramics, the effects of stressing rate and choice of statistical regression model on estimates of SCG parameters were assessed. Methods Two dental ceramic materials, a veneering material having a single critical flaw population (S) and a framework material having partially concurrent flaw populations (PC), were analyzed using constant stress-rate testing, or “dynamic fatigue”, with a variety of testing protocols. For each material, 150 rectangular beam specimens were prepared and tested in four-point flexure according to ISO6872 and ASTM1368. A full-factorial study was conducted on the following factors: material, stress rate assumed vs. calculated, number of stress rates, and statistical regression method. Results The proportion of specimens for which the statistical models over-estimated reliability was not significantly different based on regression method for Material S (P = 0.96, power = 94%) and was significantly different based on regression method for Material PC (P < 0.001). The standard method resulted in SCG parameters, n and ln B, of 35.9 and -11.1 MPa2s for Material S and 12.4 and 9.61 MPa2s for Material PC. Significance The method of calculation that uses only the median strength value at each stress rate provided the most robust SCG parameter estimates. Using only two stress rates resulted in fatigue parameters comparable to those estimated using four stress rates having the same range. The stress rate of each specimen can be assumed to be the target stress rate with negligible difference in SCG parameter estimates. PMID:21167586

  10. The Nd150(He3,t) and Sm150(t,He3) reactions with applications to ββ decay of Nd150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guess, C. J.; Adachi, T.; Akimune, H.; Algora, A.; Austin, Sam M.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Caesar, C.; Deaven, J. M.; Ejiri, H.; Estevez, E.; Fang, D.; Faessler, A.; Frekers, D.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hatanaka, K.; Herlitzius, C.; Hirota, K.; Hitt, G. W.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Meharchand, R.; Molina, F.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Perdikakis, G.; Rodin, V.; Rubio, B.; Shimbara, Y.; Süsoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thies, J. H.; Tur, C.; Verhanovitz, N.; Yosoi, M.; Yurkon, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Zenihiro, J.

    2011-06-01

    The Nd150(He3,t) reaction at 140 MeV/u and Sm150(t,He3) reaction at 115 MeV/u were measured, populating excited states in Pm150. The transitions studied populate intermediate states of importance for the (neutrinoless) ββ decay of Nd150 to Sm150. Monopole and dipole contributions to the measured excitation-energy spectra were extracted by using multipole decomposition analyses. The experimental results were compared with theoretical calculations obtained within the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation, which is one of the main methods employed for estimating the half-life of the neutrinoless ββ decay (0νββ) of Nd150. The present results thus provide useful information on the neutrino responses for evaluating the 0νββ and 2νββ matrix elements. The 2νββ matrix element calculated from the Gamow-Teller transitions through the lowest 1+ state in the intermediate nucleus is maximally about half that deduced from the half-life measured in 2νββ direct counting experiments, and at least several transitions through 1+ intermediate states in Pm150 are required to explain the 2νββ half-life. Because Gamow-Teller transitions in the Sm150(t,He3) experiment are strongly Pauli blocked, the extraction of Gamow-Teller strengths was complicated by the excitation of the 2ℏω, ΔL=0, ΔS=1 isovector spin-flip giant monopole resonance (IVSGMR). However, the near absence of Gamow-Teller transition strength made it possible to cleanly identify this resonance, and the strength observed is consistent with the full exhaustion of the non-energy-weighted sum rule for the IVSGMR.

  11. The {sup 150}Nd({sup 3}He,t) and {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) reactions with applications to {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, C. J.; Brown, B. A.; Deaven, J. M.; Hitt, G. W.; Meharchand, R.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Zenihiro, J.; Akimune, H.; Algora, A.

    2011-06-15

    The {sup 150}Nd({sup 3}He,t) reaction at 140 MeV/u and {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) reaction at 115 MeV/u were measured, populating excited states in {sup 150}Pm. The transitions studied populate intermediate states of importance for the (neutrinoless) {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 150}Nd to {sup 150}Sm. Monopole and dipole contributions to the measured excitation-energy spectra were extracted by using multipole decomposition analyses. The experimental results were compared with theoretical calculations obtained within the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation, which is one of the main methods employed for estimating the half-life of the neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 150}Nd. The present results thus provide useful information on the neutrino responses for evaluating the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and 2{nu}{beta}{beta} matrix elements. The 2{nu}{beta}{beta} matrix element calculated from the Gamow-Teller transitions through the lowest 1{sup +} state in the intermediate nucleus is maximally about half that deduced from the half-life measured in 2{nu}{beta}{beta} direct counting experiments, and at least several transitions through 1{sup +} intermediate states in {sup 150}Pm are required to explain the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} half-life. Because Gamow-Teller transitions in the {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) experiment are strongly Pauli blocked, the extraction of Gamow-Teller strengths was complicated by the excitation of the 2({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}, {Delta}L=0, {Delta}S=1 isovector spin-flip giant monopole resonance (IVSGMR). However, the near absence of Gamow-Teller transition strength made it possible to cleanly identify this resonance, and the strength observed is consistent with the full exhaustion of the non-energy-weighted sum rule for the IVSGMR.

  12. Gamow-Teller decay population of 64Ni levels in the decay of 1+ 64Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, D.; Radulov, D.; Walters, W. B.; Darby, I. G.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Huyse, M.; Köster, U.; Marsh, B. A.; Popescu, L.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van de Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Wimmer, K.

    2012-12-01

    The 64Co β-decay feeding levels in the well-studied 64Ni nucleus were investigated. Whereas the previously known 64Co decay scheme merely contained 2 γ rays, the decay scheme established in this work contains 18, of which 5 are observed in this work and 6 were previously observed in an (n,γ) study but not placed in the 64Ni level scheme. Surprisingly, one additional level—placed at an excitation energy of 3578.7 keV—could be determined. The observed β-decay paths involve allowed νf5/2→πf7/2 and νp1/2→πp3/2 transitions. Three strongly fed levels around 4 MeV are interpreted to possess possible proton-intruder character.

  13. Double-β decay nuclear structure via electron capture on ^116In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrede, C.; Sjue, S. K. L.; García, A. A.; Swanson, H. E.; Ahmad, I.; Algora, A.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Reponen, M.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Äystö, J.

    2013-04-01

    The small electron-capture decay branch of ^116In has been measured using Penning trap assisted decay spectroscopy. The deduced Gamow-Teller transition strength helps to resolve longstanding differences between scattered charge-exchange reaction values and a previous electron-capture decay value that was less statistically significant than the present one. We argue that this transition can now be used as a reliable benchmark for nuclear-structure calculations of the matrix element for the neutrinoless double-β decay of ^116Cd and other nuclides.

  14. Detailed {beta}-decay study of {sup 33}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Adimi, N.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Madurga, M.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Matea, I.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Knudsen, H. H.; Suemmerer, K.

    2010-02-15

    The proton-rich nucleus {sup 33}Ar has been studied by detailed proton and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy at the low-energy facility of SPIRAL at GANIL. Proton and {gamma}-ray singles and coincidence measurements allowed to establish a quasicomplete decay scheme of this nucleus. By comparing the proton intensity to different daughter states, tentative spin assignments have been made for some of the states of {sup 33}Cl. The Gamow-Teller strength distribution is deduced and compared to shell-model calculations and a quenching factor is determined. States close to the isobaric analog state are searched for with respect to isospin mixing.

  15. New calculations of gross β-decay properties for astrophysical applications: Speeding-up the classical r process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Peter; Pfeiffer, Bernd; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig

    2003-05-01

    Recent compilations of experimental gross β-decay properties, i.e., half-lives (T1/2) and neutron-emission probabilities (Pn), are compared to improved global macroscopic-microscopic model predictions. The model combines calculations within the quasiparticle (QP) random-phase approximation for the Gamow-Teller (GT) part with an empirical spreading of the QP strength and the gross theory for the first-forbidden part of β- decay. Nuclear masses are either taken from the 1995 data compilation of Audi et al., when available, otherwise from the finite-range droplet model. Especially for spherical and neutron-(sub-)magic isotopes a considerable improvement compared to our earlier predictions for pure GT decay (ADNDT, 1997) is observed. T1/2 and Pn values up to the neutron drip line have been used in r-process calculations within the classical “waiting-point” approximation. With the new nuclear-physics input, a considerable speeding-up of the r-matter flow is observed, in particular at those r-abundance peaks which are related to magic neutron-shell closures.

  16. The Spectroscopic study of {sup 33}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Adimi, N.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Matea, I.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Knudsen, H. H.; Suemmerer, K.

    2011-10-28

    The proton-rich nucleus {sup 33}Ar has been produced at the low-energy facility SPIRAL at GANIL. Spectroscopic studies of gamma and p emission of this nucleus were performed with the 'Silicon Cube' detection system. The analysis of proton and gamma singles and coincidence spectra allowed us to establish a complete decay scheme of this nucleus. The comparison of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution deduced from our experiment and the theoretical one obtained with the Shell Model permitted the determination of a quenching factor for the Gamow-Teller strength.

  17. The N=83 nucleus149Dy from Gamow-Teller decay of its 11/2- and 1/2+ 149Ho parents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegazzo, R.; Kleinheinz, P.; Collatz, R.; Güven, H.; Styczen, J.; Schardt, D.; Keller, H.; Klepper, O.; Walter, G.; Huck, A.; Marguier, G.; Blomqvist, J.

    1994-03-01

    A high-sensitivity γ-spectroscopic study of the149Ho πh 11/2 and πs 1/2 β-decays using mass separated sources has located dominant 0+ → 1+ GT decay strength associated with decay of paired h 11/2 protons, leading to 3 п-states in the149Dy daughter nucleus. In their γ-decay low-lying149Dy levels characteristic of an N=83 nucleus are excited. They include the νf 7/2, νp 3/2, νh 9/2 and νp 1/2 single particle- and the νs {1/2/-1} and νd {3/2/-1} two-particle one-hole states, as well as the ν f 7/2 × 3- and νf 7/2 × 2+ particle-phonon multiplets. A synopsis is given of these excitations in the N=83 isotones from149Nd to153Yb. The149Dy GT decay strength is discussed in terms of the147Tb82 and148Dy82 decays. The strength function results are also compared with independent149Ho 11/2- decay data from the literature based on total γ-ray absorption measurements.

  18. General Constraints on Cross Sections Deduced from Surrogate Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W

    2003-08-14

    Cross sections that cannot be measured in the laboratory, e.g. because the target lifetime is too short, can be inferred indirectly from a different reaction forming the same compound system, but with a more accessible beam/target combination (the ''surrogate-reaction'' technique). The reactions share the same compound system and a common decay mechanism, but they involve different formation processes. Therefore, an implicit constraint is imposed on the inferred cross section deduced from the measured surrogate-reaction data, through the common decay mechanism. In this paper, the mathematical consequences of this implicit constraint are investigated. General formulas are derived from upper and lower bounds on the inferred cross section, estimated from surrogate data in a procedure which does not require any modeling of the common decay process. As an example, the formulas developed here are applied to the case of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section, deduced from {sup 234}U(t,pf) surrogate data. The calculated bounds are not very tight in this particular case. However, by introducing a few qualitative assumptions about the physics of the fission process, meaningful bounds on the deduced cross section are obtained. Upper and lower limits for the cross-section ratio of the (n,f) reaction on the {sup 235}U isomer at E{sub x} = 77 eV relative to the (n,f) reaction on the ground state are also calculated. The generalization of this technique to other surrogate reactions is discussed.

  19. Beta-Decay Studies near 100Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Karny, M.; Batist, L.; Banu, A.; Becker, F.; Blazhev, A.; Burkard, K.; Bruchle, W.; Doring, J.; Faestermann, T.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Janas, Z.; Jungclaus, A.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kirchner, R.; La Commara, M.; Mandal, S.; Mazzocchi, C.; Miernik, K.; Mukha, I.; Muralithar, S.; Plettner, C.; Plochocki, A.; Roeckl, E.; Romoli, M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schadel, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Zylicz, J.

    2005-01-01

    The {beta}-decay of {sup 102}Sn was studied by using high-resolution germanium detectors as well as a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). A decay scheme has been constructed based on the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data. The total experimental Gamow-Teller strength B{sub GT}{sup exp} of {sup 102}Sn was deduced from the TAS data to be 4.2(9). A search for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays of {sup 100}Sn decay remained unsuccessful. However, a Gamow-Teller hindrance factor h = 2.2(3), and a cross-section of about 3nb for the production of {sup 100}Sn in fusion-evaporation reaction between {sup 58}Ni beam and {sup 50}Cr target have been estimated from the data on heavier tin isotopes. The estimated hindrance factor is similar to the values derived for lower shell nuclei.

  20. Speeding up the r-PROCESS. Investigation of First Forbidden β Decays in N>50 Isotopes Near 78Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Liddick, S. N.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C.; Darby, I.; Gross, C. J.; Korgul, A.; Królas, W.; Mazzocchi, C.; Piechaczek, A.; Rajabali, M.; Rykaczewski, K.; Winger, J. A.; Zganjar, E.; Unirib Collaboration

    2008-08-01

    The calculation of β decay properties often only includes the Gamow-Teller allowed decays. Theory indicates that nuclei above Z=28, N=50 may need to include first forbidden decays as well in the calculations of β decay properties. An experiment will be conducted at the HRIBF of ORNL to investigate branching ratios of first forbidden decays in 86,88,90,92Br to Kr isotopes since nearly pure Br beams are available at the HRIBF.

  1. Evaluation of electron capture reaction rates in Ni isotopes in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Honma, Michio; Mao, Helene; Otsuka, Takaharu; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2011-04-15

    Electron capture rates in Ni isotopes are studied in stellar environments, that is, at high densities and high temperatures during the core-collapse and postbounce explosive nucleosynthesis in supernovae. Reaction rates in {sup 58}Ni and {sup 60}Ni, as well as in {sup 56}Ni, {sup 62}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni, are evaluated by shell-model calculations with the use of a new shell-model Hamiltonian in the fp shell, GXPF1J. While the previous shell-model calculations failed to reproduce the measured peaks of Gamow-Teller strength in {sup 58}Ni and {sup 60}Ni, the present new Hamiltonian is found to reproduce them very well, as well as the capture rates obtained from the observed strengths. Strengths and energies of the Gamow-Teller transitions in {sup 56}Ni, {sup 62}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni are also found to be consistent with the observations.

  2. Particle-vibration coupling effect on the β decay of magic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Niu, Y F; Niu, Z M; Colò, G; Vigezzi, E

    2015-04-10

    Nuclear β decay in magic nuclei is investigated, taking into account the coupling between particles and collective vibrations, on top of self-consistent random phase approximation calculations based on Skyrme density functionals. The low-lying Gamow-Teller strength is shifted downwards and at times becomes fragmented; as a consequence, the β-decay half-lives are reduced due to the increase of the phase space available for the decay. In some cases, this leads to a very good agreement between theoretical and experimental lifetimes: this happens, in particular, in the case of the Skyrme force SkM* that can also reproduce the line shape of the high-energy Gamow-Teller resonance as was previously shown.

  3. Particle-Vibration Coupling Effect on the β Decay of Magic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y. F.; Niu, Z. M.; Colò, G.; Vigezzi, E.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear β decay in magic nuclei is investigated, taking into account the coupling between particles and collective vibrations, on top of self-consistent random phase approximation calculations based on Skyrme density functionals. The low-lying Gamow-Teller strength is shifted downwards and at times becomes fragmented; as a consequence, the β -decay half-lives are reduced due to the increase of the phase space available for the decay. In some cases, this leads to a very good agreement between theoretical and experimental lifetimes: this happens, in particular, in the case of the Skyrme force SkM* that can also reproduce the line shape of the high-energy Gamow-Teller resonance as was previously shown.

  4. Spectroscopy of {sup 13}B via the {sup 13}C(t,{sup 3}He) reaction at 115A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, C. J.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Brown, B. A.; Deaven, J. M.; Hitt, G. W.; Meharchand, R.; Austin, Sam M.; Perdikakis, G.; Tur, C.; Bazin, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Caesar, C.; Herlitzius, C.; Noji, S.; Sakai, H.; Shimbara, Y.

    2009-08-15

    Gamow-Teller and dipole transitions to final states in {sup 13}B were studied via the {sup 13}C(t,{sup 3}He) reaction at E{sub t}=115A MeV. In addition to the strong Gamow-Teller transition to the {sup 13}B ground state, a weaker Gamow-Teller transition to a state at 3.6 MeV was found. This state was assigned a spin-parity of 3/2{sup -} by comparison with shell-model calculations using the WBP and WBT interactions which were modified to allow for mixing between n({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} and (n+2)({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} configurations. This assignment agrees with a recent result from a lifetime measurement of excited states in {sup 13}B. The shell-model calculations also explained the relatively large spectroscopic strength measured for a low-lying 1/2{sup +} state at 4.83 MeV in {sup 13}B. The cross sections for dipole transitions up to E{sub x}({sup 13}B)=20 MeV excited via the {sup 13}C(t,{sup 3}He) reaction were also compared with the shell-model calculations. The theoretical cross sections exceeded the data by a factor of about 1.8, which might indicate that the dipole excitations are ''quenched''. Uncertainties in the reaction calculations complicate that interpretation.

  5. Deducing high-altitude precipitation from glacier mass balance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesen, Rianne H.; Immerzeel, Walter W.; Wanders, Niko

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution of precipitation in mountainous terrain is generally not well known due to underrepresentation of gauge observations at higher elevations. Precipitation tends to increase with elevation, but since observations are mainly performed in the valleys, the vertical precipitation gradient cannot be deduced from these measurements. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of gridded meteorological data is often too coarse to resolve individual mountain chains. Still, a reliable estimate of high-elevation precipitation is required for many hydrological applications. We present a method to determine the vertical precipitation gradient in mountainous terrain, making use of glacier mass balance observations. These measurements have the advantage that they provide a basin-wide precipitation estimate at high elevations. The precipitation gradient is adjusted until the solid precipitation over the glacier area combined with the calculated melt gives the measured annual glacier mass balance. Results for the glacierized regions in Central Europe and Scandinavia reveal spatially coherent patterns, with predominantly positive precipitation gradients ranging from -4 to +28 % (100 m)‑1. In some regions, precipitation amounts at high elevations are up to four times as large as in the valleys. A comparison of the modelled winter precipitation with observed snow accumulation on glaciers shows a good agreement. Precipitation measured at the few high-altitude meteorological stations is generally lower than our estimate, which may result from precipitation undercatch. Our findings will improve the precipitation forcing for glacier modelling and hydrological studies in mountainous terrain.

  6. Deducing the 237U destruction cross-sections using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Escher, J; Dietrich, F S; Lyles, B F; Norman, E B; Phair, L W; Bleuel, D L; Clark, R M; Fallon, P; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Ai, H C; Beausang, C W; Crider, B

    2006-03-31

    We have deduced the destruction cross section of {sup 237}U via the (n, {gamma}) and (n,2n) reactions over an equivalent neutron energy range of 0 to 20 MeV using a new form of the Surrogate Ratio method [1-4] . The relative fission and neutron-evaporation decay probabilities of excited {sup 238}U populated via the ({alpha},{alpha}{prime}) inelastic scattering were measured using the silicon telescope array for reaction studies (STARS) coupled to the Livermore Berkeley array for collaborative experiments (LIBERACE). These relative probabilities were then combined with the {sup 237} U(n,f) cross section deduced by Burke et al., [4] to deduce the (n, {gamma}) and (n,2n) cross sections in a model independent fashion. These cross sections are then compared to the compound reaction cross section calculated using an optical model calculation tuned to reproduce scattering data in the transactinide region. Our results presented and the prospects for using this technique to deduce (n,x) cross sections on radioactive nuclei are discussed.

  7. Finite pure integer programming algorithms employing only hyperspherically deduced cuts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Three algorithms are developed that may be based exclusively on hyperspherically deduced cuts. The algorithms only apply, therefore, to problems structured so that these cuts are valid. The algorithms are shown to be finite.

  8. Isospin and spin-isospin modes in charge-exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harakeh, M. N.; Berg, A. M. van den; Brandenburg, S.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Akimune, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Laurent, H.; Willis, A.

    1999-11-16

    The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been investigated in the {sup 208}Pb({sup 3}He,tp){sup 207}Pb reaction at E({sup 3}He)=450 MeV and very forward scattering angles. The partial and total branching ratios and the escape widths for GTR and SDR decay to the residual neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb were deduced. These are found to be in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates. The ({sup 3}He,tp) reaction on Pb at E({sup 3}He)=177 MeV was also studied in order to locate isovector monopole strength corresponding to 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} transitions. Monopole strength at excitation energies above 25 MeV was discovered and compared to calculated strength due to the isovector giant monopole resonance and the spin-flip isovector monopole resonance. Calculations in a normal-mode framework show that all isovector monopole strength can be accounted for if the branching ratio for decay by proton emission is 20%.

  9. Isospin and Spin-Isospin Modes in Charge-Exchange Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harakeh, M.N.; Akimune, H.; van den Berg, A.M.; Brandenburg, S.; Fujiwara, M.; Laurent, H.; Willis, A.; Zegers, R.G.T.

    1999-12-31

    The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been investigated in the {sup 208}Pb({sup 3}He,tp){sup 207}Pb reaction at E{sup 3}He=450 MeV and very forward scattering angles. The partial and total branching ratios and the escape widths for GTR and SDR decay to the residual neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb were deduced. These are found to be in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates. The ({sup 3}He,tp) reaction on Pb at E({sup 3}He)=177 MeV was also studied in order to locate isovector monopole strength corresponding to 2{Dirac_h}{omega} transitions. Monopole strength at excitation energies above 25 MeV was discovered and compared to calculated strength due to the isovector giant monopole resonance and the spin-flip isovector monopole resonance. Calculations in a normal-mode framework show that all isovector monopole strength can be accounted for if the branching ratio for decay by proton emission is 20%.

  10. β -delayed γ-decay of 26 P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Loureiro, David; Wrede, C.; Bennett, M. B.; Liddick, S. N.; E10034 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The β-decay of proton-rich nuclei is a powerful tool in nuclear science; it can be used to probe quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength, isospin asymmetries, and nuclear astrophysics. 26P β-delayed γ-decay has been recently measured at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at MSU with much higher sensitivity than the previous experiment. A fast 26P beam produced using nuclear fragmentation was implanted into a planar germaninum detector. This detector was surrounded by the SeGA germanium array in order to detect the γ rays emitted in coincidence with β-decays with high resolution. Absolute γ-ray intensities were measured and a complete decay scheme was built for the allowed transitions to bound excited states of 26Si. Log ft values and Gamow-Teller strengths were determined for each transition and compared to shell model calculations and the β-decay of its mirror nucleus 26Na. Results of this study, including a larger Gamow-Teller quenching than the sd shell average and a substantial mirror asymmetry between the β+ and β- transitions to the first excited states of 26Si and 26Mg, respectively, will be presented and interpreted. This work is supported by the U.S. NSF under Grants PHY-1102511 and PHY-0822648, the U.S. DOE under contract DE-FG02-97ER41020 and the US NNSA under contract NA0000979.

  11. Deducing Reaction Mechanism: A Guide for Students, Researchers, and Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Simon J.; Pitman, Catherine L.; Miller, Alexander J. M.

    2016-01-01

    An introductory guide to deducing the mechanism of chemical reactions is presented. Following a typical workflow for probing reaction mechanism, the guide introduces a wide range of kinetic and mechanistic tools. In addition to serving as a broad introduction to mechanistic analysis for students and researchers, the guide has also been used by…

  12. Microcrack growth parameters for compact bone deduced from stiffness variations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D

    1998-07-01

    This paper shows how information on the fatigue behaviour of microcracks can be obtained by the analysis of stiffness changes measured during cyclic loading. Relationships between crack length, growth rate and cyclic stress intensity were deduced, and compared with previous empirical equations. Results show that the crack growth rate decreases rapidly with increasing length; this behaviour is typical of short-crack fatigue in many materials and is interpreted in terms of microstructural barriers to growth. Implications for the role of microcracks in remodelling and adaptation phenomena are discussed.

  13. Seven theses on pigeon homing deduced from empirical findings

    PubMed

    Wallraff

    1996-01-01

    Experimental findings obtained in recent years make it possible to recognize and distinguish the most relevant components determining homing flights of displaced pigeons. Conclusions deduced from these experiments, more or less compelling or tentative, are presented in the form of seven theses, supplemented by several subtheses along with reference to empirical data. The principal theses are as follows. (1) Passively displaced pigeons find the way home by using location-dependent signals and not by path integration based on recording of motion. Pigeons are able to home, even from unfamiliar areas, without access to potentially useful information during transport to the release site. (2) Home-related orientation of pigeons in unfamiliar areas requires positional information acquired olfactorily from atmospheric trace gases. Empirically deduced details of olfactory navigation are enumerated (connection with winds and the sun, inaccuracy, spatial range, time course of sampling and memorizing spatial information, etc.). The critical gap in our knowledge, i.e. the nature and spatio-temporal distribution of the substances involved, is provisionally filled by speculation. (3) In familiar areas, known from previous flights, the visual landscape is used additionally to find the way home. (4) Initial orientation of pigeons does not exclusively reflect home-related navigation but includes components independent of the position with respect to home. Observed bearings are co-determined by a general preference for a certain compass direction and by distracting features of the nearby landscape. (5) Proportions among components controlling initial orientation according to theses 2-4 are highly variable depending on local, temporal and experimental conditions and on the life histories of the pigeons. This complexity greatly restricts recognition of the navigationally relevant components of behaviour at a given release site. (6) Sensory inputs, being neither olfactory nor visual, do

  14. Optical pressure deduced from energy relations within relativistic formulations of electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Cheyenne J.; Kemp, Brandon A.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of plane waves normally incident upon moving media yields a velocity-dependent net flow of electromagnetic energy within the system such that optical pressures are deduced. Two common formulations (Chu and Minkowski) are employed to model the phenomena with respect to the Abraham-Minkowski debate. Within the framework of relativistic electrodynamics, two perfect reflectors submerged in a dielectric are used to compare the calculated optical work and pressure exerted to the system for both formulations via momentum and energy conservation. The perfect reflectors are represented by having zero electric field and zero magnetic field at the surface of the perfect electrical conductor and the perfect magnetic conductor, respectively. Comparison of these results gives valuable insight into the differences between Abraham and Minkowski momenta and provides theoretical evidence as to observable effects in actual optical moment transfer to media.

  15. Advance of the perihelion of Mercury deduced from QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    I deduce the new gravitational formula from the variance in mass of QFT and GR (H05-0029-08, E15-0039 -08, E14-0032-08, D31-0054-10) in the partial differential: f (QFT) = f (GR) = delta∂ (m v)/delta∂ t = f _{P} + f _{C} , f _{P} = m delta∂ v / delta∂ t = - ( G m M /r (2) ) r / r, f _{C} = v delta∂ m / delta∂ t = - ( G m M / r (2) ) v / c (1), f (QFT) is the quasi-Casimir pressure of net virtual neutrinos nuν _{0} flux (after counteract contrary direction nuν _{0}). f (GR) is equivalent to Einstein’s equation, Eq. (1) is a new version of GR and can be solved exactly. Its core content is that the gravity produced by particles collide cannot linear addition, i.e., the nonlinearity of Einstein equation had been replaced by the nonlinearity caused by the variable mass in Eq.(1). Einstein equation can be inferred from Eq.(1) thereby from QFT, but QFT cannot be inferred from Eq.(1) or GR. f (QFT) is essential but f (GR) is phenomenological. Eq.(1) is obtained just by to absorb the essence of corpuscule collided gravitation origin ism proposed by Fatio in 1690 and 1920 Majorana’s experiment concept about gravitational shield effect again fuse with QFT. In my paper ‘QFT’S advance of the perihelion of Mercury, China Science &Technology Overview 125 88-90 (2011)’ QFT gravitational potential U = - G M /r is just the distribution density of net nuν _{0} flux, from SR we again get that: f (QFT) = f _{P} + f _{C}, f _{P} = - m ( delta∂ U / delta∂ r) r / r, f _{C} = - m ( delta∂U / delta∂ r) v / c (2), f _{ P} correspond the change rate of three-dimensional momentum p, f _{C} correspond the change rate of fourth dimensional momentum i m c which show directly as a dissipative force of mass change. According to Eq.(2) the circular motion is instability and elliptic motion is in the auto-stability state. In the fluctuation vacuum a particle with mass M neighbor another particle with mass m, the renormalization mass M and m will be less than that when

  16. Red Cell Membrane Permeability Deduced from Bulk Diffusion Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Redwood, W. R.; Rall, E.; Perl, W.

    1974-01-01

    The permeability coefficients of dog red cell membrane to tritiated water and to a series of[14C]amides have been deduced from bulk diffusion measurements through a "tissue" composed of packed red cells. Red cells were packed by centrifugation inside polyethylene tubing. The red cell column was pulsed at one end with radiolabeled solute and diffusion was allowed to proceed for several hours. The distribution of radioactivity along the red cell column was measured by sequential slicing and counting, and the diffusion coefficient was determined by a simple plotting technique, assuming a one-dimensional diffusional model. In order to derive the red cell membrane permeability coefficient from the bulk diffusion coefficient, the red cells were assumed to be packed in a regular manner approximating closely spaced parallelopipeds. The local steady-state diffusional flux was idealized as a one-dimensional intracellular pathway in parallel with a one-dimensional extracellular pathway with solute exchange occurring within the series pathway and between the pathways. The diffusion coefficients in the intracellular and extracellular pathways were estimated from bulk diffusion measurements through concentrated hemoglobin solutions and plasma, respectively; while the volume of the extracellular pathway was determined using radiolabeled sucrose. The membrane permeability coefficients were in satisfactory agreement with the data of Sha'afi, R. I., C. M. Gary-Bobo, and A. K. Solomon (1971. J. Gen. Physiol. 58:238) obtained by a rapid-reaction technique. The method is simple and particularly well suited for rapidly permeating solutes. PMID:4443795

  17. Venus surface properties deduced from radar and radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, P. G.

    1989-01-01

    The brightness of surface features on side looking radar images of Venus is determined by many factors: the angles of incidence and reflection, polarization, surface geometry and composition, and so forth. The contribution from surface properties themselves can only be deduced by combining several types of measurement. For instance, without additional information, it is impossible to distinguish the effects of changes in surface roughness from those in dielectric constant. In common with the Moon and Mars, the surface of Venus appears to scatter radar waves in two ways: small-scale surface inhomogeneities, i.e., those smaller than the incident wavelength, depolarize and scatter the energy over a wide range of angles. The Pioneer Venus radar mapper experiment made three overlapping sets of measurements of the equatorial region of Venus from 15 deg S latitude to 45 deg N; the backscatter cross section at a range of incidence angles, the shape and intensity of radar echoes from the nadir, and the microwave brightness temperature of the surface. These techniques developed during the analysis of Pioneer Venus data will be used during the Magellan mission to extract measurements of surface slopes and dielectric constants over all areas covered by the SAR and altimeter antennae, with a resolution of about 10 km. A knowledge of the mechanisms that govern surface scattering will also be useful in the analysis of higher resolution side looking radar images, particularly in distinguishing the effects of changing roughness from those caused by a long range surface tilt or changing dielectric constant.

  18. Atmospheric response to Saharan dust deduced from ECMWF reanalysis increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, P.; Alpert, P.; Barkan, J.; Kirchner, I.; Machenhauer, B.

    2003-04-01

    This study focuses on the atmospheric temperature response to dust deduced from a new source of data - the European Reanalysis (ERA) increments. These increments are the systematic errors of global climate models, generated in reanalysis procedure. The model errors result not only from the lack of desert dust but also from a complex combination of many kinds of model errors. Over the Sahara desert the dust radiative effect is believed to be a predominant model defect which should significantly affect the increments. This dust effect was examined by considering correlation between the increments and remotely-sensed dust. Comparisons were made between April temporal variations of the ERA analysis increments and the variations of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer aerosol index (AI) between 1979 and 1993. The distinctive structure was identified in the distribution of correlation composed of three nested areas with high positive correlation (> 0.5), low correlation, and high negative correlation (<-0.5). The innermost positive correlation area (PCA) is a large area near the center of the Sahara desert. For some local maxima inside this area the correlation even exceeds 0.8. The outermost negative correlation area (NCA) is not uniform. It consists of some areas over the eastern and western parts of North Africa with a relatively small amount of dust. Inside those areas both positive and negative high correlations exist at pressure levels ranging from 850 to 700 hPa, with the peak values near 775 hPa. Dust-forced heating (cooling) inside the PCA (NCA) is accompanied by changes in the static stability of the atmosphere above the dust layer. The reanalysis data of the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast(ECMWF) suggests that the PCA (NCA) corresponds mainly to anticyclonic (cyclonic) flow, negative (positive) vorticity, and downward (upward) airflow. These facts indicate an interaction between dust-forced heating /cooling and atmospheric circulation. The

  19. Electron capture on iron group nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, D.J.; Chatterjee, L.; Strayer, M.R.; Dean, D.J.; Chatterjee, L.; Langanke, K.; Chatterjee, L.; Radha, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    We present Gamow-Teller strength distributions from shell model Monte Carlo studies of fp-shell nuclei that may play an important role in the precollapse evolution of supernovas. We then use these strength distributions to calculate the electron-capture cross sections and rates in the zero-momentum transfer limit. We also discuss the thermal behavior of the cross sections. We find large differences in these cross sections and rates when compared to the naive single-particle estimates. These differences need to be taken into account for improved modeling of the early stages of type-II supernova evolution. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. β-decay studies of neutron-rich Tl, Pb, and Bi isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. I.; Benzoni, G.; Gottardo, A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Corsi, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Gadea, A.; Lunardi, S.; Górska, M.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Zs.; Pfützner, M.; Pietri, S.; Boutachkov, P.; Weick, H.; Grebosz, J.; Bruce, A. M.; Núñez, J. Alcántara; Algora, A.; Al-Dahan, N.; Ayyad, Y.; Alkhomashi, N.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Bazzacco, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bowry, M.; Bunce, M.; Casarejos, E.; Cortes, M. L.; Bacelar, A. M. Denis; Deo, A. Y.; de Angelis, G.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Doncel, M.; Dombradi, Zs.; Engert, T.; Eppinger, K.; Farrelly, G. F.; Farinon, F.; Farnea, E.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Goel, N.; Gregor, E.; Habermann, T.; Hoischen, R.; Janik, R.; Klupp, S.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Mandal, S.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Napoli, D. R.; Naqvi, F.; Nociforo, C.; Prochazka, A.; Prokopowicz, W.; Recchia, F.; Ribas, R. V.; Reed, M. W.; Rudolph, D.; Sahin, E.; Schaffner, H.; Sharma, A.; Sitar, B.; Siwal, D.; Steiger, K.; Strmen, P.; Swan, T. P. D.; Szarka, I.; Ur, C. A.; Walker, P. M.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2014-01-01

    The fragmentation of relativistic uranium projectiles has been exploited at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung laboratory to investigate the β decay of neutron-rich nuclei just beyond 208Pb. This paper reports on β-delayed γ decays of 211-213Tl, 215Pb, and 215-219Bi de-exciting states in the daughters 211-213Pb, 215Bi, and 215-219Po. The resulting partial level schemes, proposed with the help of systematics and shell-model calculations, are presented. The role of allowed Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden β transitions in this mass region is discussed.

  1. Half-lives of N = 126 Isotones and the r-Process

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Yoshida, Takashi; Utsuno, Yutaka

    2010-08-12

    Beta decays of N = 126 isotones are studied by shell model calculations. Both the Gamow-Teller (GT) and first-forbidden (FF) transitions are taken into account to evaluate the half-lives of the isotones (Z = 64-72) with the use of shell model interactions based on G-matrix. The FF transitions are found to be important to reduce the half-lives by twice to several times of those obtained by the GT contributions only. Possible implications of the short half-lives of the waiting point nuclei on the r-process nucleosynthesis during the supernova explosions are discussed.

  2. ({sup 3}He,t) reaction on the double {beta} decay nucleus {sup 48}Ca and the importance of nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Grewe, E.-W.; Frekers, D.; Rakers, S.; Baeumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Thies, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Botha, N. T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Neveling, R.

    2007-11-15

    High-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) measurements on the double {beta}-decay ({beta}{beta}) nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been performed at RCNP (Osaka, Japan) to determine Gamow-Teller (GT{sup -}) transitions to the nucleus {sup 48}Sc, which represents the intermediate nucleus in the second-order perturbative description of the {beta}{beta} decay. At a bombarding energy of E{sub {sup 3}He}=420 MeV an excitation energy resolution of 40 keV was achieved. The measurements were performed at two angle positions of the Grand Raiden Spectrometer (GRS): 0 deg. and 2.5 deg. The results of both settings were combined to achieve angular distributions, by which the character of single transitions could be determined. To characterize the different multipoles, theoretical angular distributions for states with J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +},2{sup +},2{sup -}, and 3{sup +} were calculated using the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) Code DW81. The GT{sup -} strength was extracted up to E{sub x}=7 MeV and combined with corresponding GT{sup +} strength deduced from the {sup 48}Ti(d,{sup 2}He){sup 48}Sc data to calculate the low-energy part of the {beta}{beta}-decay matrix element for the {sup 48}Ca 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay. We show that after applying trivial momentum corrections to the ({sup 3}He,t) spectrum, the two reaction probes (p,n) and ({sup 3}He,t) reveal a spectral response to an impressively high degree of similarity in the region of low momentum transfer.

  3. Advance of the perihelion of Mercury deduced from QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    I deduce the new gravitational formula from the variance in mass of QFT and GR (H05-0029-08, E15-0039 -08, E14-0032-08, D31-0054-10) in the partial differential: f (QFT) = f (GR) = delta∂ (m v)/delta∂ t = f _{P} + f _{C} , f _{P} = m delta∂ v / delta∂ t = - ( G m M /r (2) ) r / r, f _{C} = v delta∂ m / delta∂ t = - ( G m M / r (2) ) v / c (1), f (QFT) is the quasi-Casimir pressure of net virtual neutrinos nuν _{0} flux (after counteract contrary direction nuν _{0}). f (GR) is equivalent to Einstein’s equation, Eq. (1) is a new version of GR and can be solved exactly. Its core content is that the gravity produced by particles collide cannot linear addition, i.e., the nonlinearity of Einstein equation had been replaced by the nonlinearity caused by the variable mass in Eq.(1). Einstein equation can be inferred from Eq.(1) thereby from QFT, but QFT cannot be inferred from Eq.(1) or GR. f (QFT) is essential but f (GR) is phenomenological. Eq.(1) is obtained just by to absorb the essence of corpuscule collided gravitation origin ism proposed by Fatio in 1690 and 1920 Majorana’s experiment concept about gravitational shield effect again fuse with QFT. In my paper ‘QFT’S advance of the perihelion of Mercury, China Science &Technology Overview 125 88-90 (2011)’ QFT gravitational potential U = - G M /r is just the distribution density of net nuν _{0} flux, from SR we again get that: f (QFT) = f _{P} + f _{C}, f _{P} = - m ( delta∂ U / delta∂ r) r / r, f _{C} = - m ( delta∂U / delta∂ r) v / c (2), f _{ P} correspond the change rate of three-dimensional momentum p, f _{C} correspond the change rate of fourth dimensional momentum i m c which show directly as a dissipative force of mass change. According to Eq.(2) the circular motion is instability and elliptic motion is in the auto-stability state. In the fluctuation vacuum a particle with mass M neighbor another particle with mass m, the renormalization mass M and m will be less than that when

  4. Relative stability and magic numbers of nuclei deduced from behavior of cluster emission half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.; Abdurrahman, A.

    2016-08-01

    We calculated the half-life times (Tc) of the 14C, 20O, 20Ne, and 24Ne cluster emissions from heavy and superheavy nuclei. The variation of Tc with the neutron and proton numbers of daughter nuclei is studied to determine the minima in log10Tc at each neutron number for different daughter isotones. We found that each minimum for a given isotone corresponds to neutron magicity already indicated by other approaches. The proton numbers at neutron magic numbers were found to be also proton magic numbers or differ slightly from them. We arranged the different isotones at each neutron magic number according to their stability in the sense that the more stable daughter isotone corresponds to the lowest value of log10Tc . The magic neutron numbers predicted by the present study are N =126 , 148, 152, 154, 160, 162, 172, 176, 178, 180, 182, 184, and 200. The predicted magic proton numbers are Z =82 , 98, 100 102, 106, 108, 114, and 116. The values of N and Z mentioned above agree with magic numbers deduced in other studies.

  5. Thin cirrus clouds - Seasonal distribution over oceans deduced from Nimbus-4 IRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Fraser, R. S.; Dalu, G.; Wu, Man-Li C.; Curran, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Spectral differences in the extinction of the 10.8- and 12.6-micron bands of the IR window region, due to optically thin clouds, were found in the measurements made by both an airborne broadband IR radiometer and the IR interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) aboard the Nimbus-4 satellite; the extinction at 12.6 microns was significantly larger than that at 10.8 microns; both water and ice particles in the clouds can account for such spectral difference in extinction. Multiple scattering radiative transfer calculations of IRIS data revealed this spectral feature about 100 to 20 km away from the high-altitude cold clouds; it is assumed that this feature is related to the spreading of cirrus clouds. Based on this assumption, mean seasonal maps of the distribution of thin cirrus clouds over the oceans were deduced from the IRIS data. The maps show that such clouds are often present over the convectively active areas, such as ITCZ, SPCZ, and the Bay of Bengal during the summer monsoon.

  6. Transport of trace species deduced from LIMS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Lyjak, L. V.; Smith, A. K.; Bailey, P. L.; Massie, S. T.; Smythe, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    One of the critical problems in the middle atmosphere at this time is understanding the interaction between atmospheric motions and photochemistry, and the way in which these two processes maintain the distributions of photochemically active species such as ozone. Recent work has shown that a great deal can be learned by considering the zonally averaged distributions and transports, i.e., working in the latitude-altitude plane. This 2-dimensional approach has been used in the past in Eulerian formation. Recent work (DUNKERTON, 1978) has shown that formulating the transport problems in terms of the residual mean circulation, which has similarity to the Lagrangian mean motion, results in a more physical picture of the way in which the transport takes place. Here, data from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMB) experiment are used to investigate how well the residual mean formulation works with real data, in the sense of asking how well the predicted ozone changes match those in regions of the lower stratosphere in which chemical changes may be neglected. This allows a test of the approximations that are made, and of the strengths and weaknesses of this approach to transport calculation.

  7. Neutron spectrum and yield of the Hiroshima A-bomb deduced from radionuclide measurements at one location.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Kato, K; Korschinek, G; Morinaga, H; Nolte, E

    1995-07-01

    In this paper measurements of the radionuclides of 36Cl, 41Ca, 60Co, 152Eu and 154Eu in samples from Hiroshima, which were exposed to neutrons of the A-bomb explosion, are interpreted. In order to calculate the neutron spectrum at the sample site, neutron transport calculations using Monte Carlo techniques were carried out. Activation profiles in a granite mock-up irradiated with reactor neutrons could be reproduced by this method using DS86 input parameters. The calculated neutron spectrum at the sample site for non-thermal neutrons is identical to that obtained in DS86, but contains some 50% more thermal neutrons. The influence of parameters like soil composition, source terms and air humidity on the activation of these radioisotopes is discussed. The granite-covered earth at the sample site, for example, hardens the spectrum in comparison with DS86 values. Even when using a fission spectrum pointing downward and neglecting air humidity one cannot explain our 36Cl measurements. If the effective thermal neutron fluences, that have a similar ratio of resonance integral to thermal neutron capture cross sections obtained from 36Cl, 41Ca and 152Eu, are averaged, a bomb yield of about 16 kt is deduced in agreement with a bomb yield of (15 +/- 3) kt estimated in DS86.

  8. Haiti: Incentives To Improve Basic Education (IIBE)--Project Bilaterial d'Education (PROBED). Midterm Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locher, Uli; And Others

    Haiti's Incentives to Improve Basic Education (IIBE) or Project Bilteral d'Education (PROBED) program seeks to stimulate improvements in educational quality and efficiency in private primary schools. The program surpasses other efforts because of: (1) unusually thorough preparation; (2) rapid assumption of management by Haitians; (3) a…

  9. CONSISTENT USE OF THE KALMAN FILTER IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS (CTMS) FOR DEDUCING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past research has shown that emissions can be deduced using observed concentrations of a chemical, a Chemical Transport Model (CTM), and the Kalman filter in an inverse modeling application. An expression was derived for the relationship between the "observable" (i.e., the con...

  10. Estimation of uncertainty in isotherms deduced from Hugoniots resulting from shockwave generated defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of how defect concentrations produced in a shock experiment affect the isothermal equation of state is considered. From the few experimental results available that bear directly on this question, it appears the effect could be substantial, i.e., the pressure in material free of defects may be 10-25% lower at a given volume than the isothermal pressure deduced from Hugoniot data on the assumption that defects are negligible in the shocked material. This correction caused by the presence of defects is called the defect pressure.

  11. Comparison of selection methods to deduce natural background levels for groundwater units.

    PubMed

    Griffioen, Jasper; Passier, Hilde F; Klein, Janneke

    2008-07-01

    Establishment of natural background levels (NBL) for groundwater is commonly performed to serve as reference when assessing the contamination status of groundwater units. We compare various selection methods to establish NBLs using groundwater quality data for four hydrogeologically different areas in the highly populated and developed subcatchment Western River Rhine, The Netherlands: selection of old groundwater (before 1945), of tritium-free groundwater (i.e., infiltrated before 1950), and of groundwater having no agricultural contamination by NO3 and SO4. Differences as well as similarities in percentile values for Cl, NH4, and SO4 concentrations are observed among the selection methods as well as the spatial units, pointing out that selection of the data setis a crucial step in deducing NBLs. The following general points of attention are deduced: (1) reference to composition of recharge water (rain or river infiltrate) is necessary to confirm the statistical outcomes, (2) old analyses are affected by conservation errors after sampling for redox-sensitive solutes and may be obtained by selective sampling, (3) old analyses are the only direct reference for NBLs for groundwater units having only anthropogenically influenced, young groundwater at present, and (4) establishment of a priori percentile values as maximum NBL is not right and confirmation by additional process-based insight in the controls on water composition is necessary.

  12. Near-Surface Flow Fields Deduced Using Correlation Tracking and Time-Distance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeRosa, Marc; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Toomre, Juri

    1999-01-01

    Near-photospheric flow fields on the Sun are deduced using two independent methods applied to the same time series of velocity images observed by SOI-MDI on SOHO. Differences in travel times between f modes entering and leaving each pixel measured using time-distance helioseismology are used to determine sites of supergranular outflows. Alternatively, correlation tracking analysis of mesogranular scales of motion applied to the same time series is used to deduce the near-surface flow field. These two approaches provide the means to assess the patterns and evolution of horizontal flows on supergranular scales even near disk center, which is not feasible with direct line-of-sight Doppler measurements. We find that the locations of the supergranular outflows seen in flow fields generated from correlation tracking coincide well with the locations of the outflows determined from the time-distance analysis, with a mean correlation coefficient after smoothing of bar-r(sub s) = 0.840. Near-surface velocity field measurements can used to study the evolution of the supergranular network, as merging and splitting events are observed to occur in these images. The data consist of one 2048-minute time series of high-resolution (0.6" pixels) line-of-sight velocity images taken by MDI on 1997 January 16-18 at a cadence of one minute.

  13. Determining Electron-capture Rates of pf-shell Nuclei in Explosive Stellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, A. L.; Dombos, A. C.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Austin, Sam M.; Brown, B. A.; Valdez, L.; Gupta, S.; Hitt, G. W.

    2011-10-01

    The electron-capture rates on pf-shell nuclei are required to model the evolution of core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae. The majority of these rates are determined from calculated Gamow-Teller strength (B(GT)) distributions, as it's not feasible to measure the B(GT) distributions for all pf-shell nuclei. We present preliminary results of a systematic comparison between the electron-capture rates of 13 pf-shell nuclei determined from experimental B(GT) distribution measurements and the electron-capture rates of nuclei determined only from calculated B(GT) distributions, as measurements do not exist. The B(GT) distribution calculations were performed with the shell model using two different interaction Hamiltonians.

  14. Thermal quasiparticle random-phase approximation with Skyrme interactions and supernova neutral-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhioev, Alan A.; Vdovin, A. I.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Wambach, J.; Stoyanov, Ch.

    2016-07-01

    The thermal quasiparticle random-phase approximation is combined with the Skyrme energy density functional method (Skyrme-TQRPA) to study the response of a hot nucleus to an external perturbation. For the sample nuclei 56Fe and 82Ge, the Skyrme-TQRPA is applied to analyze thermal effects on the strength function of charge-neutral Gamow-Teller transitions, which dominate neutrino-nucleus reactions at Eν≲20 MeV. For the relevant supernova temperatures we calculate the cross sections for inelastic neutrino scattering. We also apply the method to examine the rate of neutrino-antineutrino pair emission by hot nuclei. The cross sections and rates are compared with those obtained earlier from the TQRPA calculations based on the phenomenological quasiparticle-phonon model Hamiltonian. For inelastic neutrino scattering on 56Fe we also compare the Skyrme-TQRPA results to those obtained earlier from a hybrid approach that combines shell-model and RPA calculations.

  15. Electron Capture Reactions and Beta Decays in Steller Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Mao, H.; Honma, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kajino, T.; Otsuka, T.

    2011-10-28

    Electron capture reactions on Ni and Co isotopes are investigated by shell model calculations in steller environments. The capture rates depend sensitively on the distribution of the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength. The capture rates obtained by using GXPF1J Hamiltonian for fp-shell are found to be consistent with the rates obtained from experimental GT strength in {sup 58}Ni and {sup 60}Ni. Capture rates in Co isotopes, where there were large discrepancies among previous calculations, are also investigated. Beta decays of the N = 126 isotones are studied by shell model calculations taking into account both the GT and first-forbidden (FF) transitions. The FF transitions are found to be important to reduce the half-lives by twice to several times of those by the GT contributions only. Implications of the short half-lives of the waiting point nuclei on the r-process nucleosynthesis are discussed for various astrophysical conditions.

  16. Neutrino absorption by hot nuclei in supernova environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhioev, Alan A.; Vdovin, A. I.; Wambach, J.

    2015-10-01

    Using the thermal quasiparticle random-phase approximation, we study the process of neutrino and antineutrino capture on hot nuclei in supernova environments. For the sample nuclei 56Fe and 82Ge we perform a detailed analysis of thermal effects on the strength distribution of allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions which dominate low-energy charged-current neutrino reactions. The finite-temperature cross sections are calculated taking into account the contributions of both allowed and forbidden transitions. The enhancement of the low-energy cross sections is explained by considering thermal effects on the GT± strength. For 56Fe we compare the calculated finite-temperature cross sections with those obtained from large-scale shell-model calculations.

  17. Deducing the Kinetics of Protein Synthesis In Vivo from the Transition Rates Measured In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rudorf, Sophia; Thommen, Michael; Rodnina, Marina V.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The molecular machinery of life relies on complex multistep processes that involve numerous individual transitions, such as molecular association and dissociation steps, chemical reactions, and mechanical movements. The corresponding transition rates can be typically measured in vitro but not in vivo. Here, we develop a general method to deduce the in-vivo rates from their in-vitro values. The method has two basic components. First, we introduce the kinetic distance, a new concept by which we can quantitatively compare the kinetics of a multistep process in different environments. The kinetic distance depends logarithmically on the transition rates and can be interpreted in terms of the underlying free energy barriers. Second, we minimize the kinetic distance between the in-vitro and the in-vivo process, imposing the constraint that the deduced rates reproduce a known global property such as the overall in-vivo speed. In order to demonstrate the predictive power of our method, we apply it to protein synthesis by ribosomes, a key process of gene expression. We describe the latter process by a codon-specific Markov model with three reaction pathways, corresponding to the initial binding of cognate, near-cognate, and non-cognate tRNA, for which we determine all individual transition rates in vitro. We then predict the in-vivo rates by the constrained minimization procedure and validate these rates by three independent sets of in-vivo data, obtained for codon-dependent translation speeds, codon-specific translation dynamics, and missense error frequencies. In all cases, we find good agreement between theory and experiment without adjusting any fit parameter. The deduced in-vivo rates lead to smaller error frequencies than the known in-vitro rates, primarily by an improved initial selection of tRNA. The method introduced here is relatively simple from a computational point of view and can be applied to any biomolecular process, for which we have detailed information

  18. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  19. Martian low-altitude magnetic topology deduced from MAVEN/SWEA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui; Mitchell, David; Liemohn, Michael; Fang, Xiaohua; Ma, Yingjuan; Luhmann, Janet; Brain, David; Steckiewicz, Morgane; Mazelle, Christian; Connerney, Jack; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission for the first time make regular particle and field measurements down to ~150 km altitude. The Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) instrument provides 3-D measurements of the electron energy and angular distributions. This study presents the pitch angle-resolved shape parameters that can separate photoelectrons from solar wind electrons, therefore used to deduce the Martian magnetic topology. The three-dimensional view of the magnetic topology is manifested for the first time. The northern hemisphere is found to be dominated by the crustal closed field lines, instead of draped interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF), on the dayside and more day-night connections through cross-terminator closed field lines than in the south. This study can also single out open field lines attached to the dayside ionosphere, which provide possible passage for ion outflow. Magnetic topology governs energetic electrons' movement, thus necessary to understand nightside ionosphere, and aurora.

  20. Wind speeds in two tornadic storms and a tornado, deduced from Doppler Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Zrnic, D.; Istok, M.

    1980-12-01

    Doppler spectra of a tornado were collected with a radar having a large unambiguous velocity range, +- 91 m s/sup -1/. Thus for the first time a presentation of nonaliased spectra was possible, showing direct measurement of radial velocities. By fitting the tornado model spectrum to data, the radius of maximum winds and tornado center location are deduced. Tornado spectral signature is defined as a double peak, symmetric with respect to the mean wind spectrum. Histograms of maximum measured wind speeds (from spectrum skirts) for two tornadic storms are obtained, and the histograms of velocity difference (between the left and right spectrum skirt) suggest that smaller scale turbulence (<500 m) is principally responsible for spectrum broadness.

  1. Distribution of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere deduced from Ogo 6 airglow observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Guenther, B.; Thomas, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The atomic oxygen distribution as a function of altitude between 80 and 120 km and as a function of latitude has been deduced from Ogo 6 557.7-nm airglow photometer data obtained between August 1969 and April 1970. The results indicate that the density ranges from 15 to 50 billion per cu cm at 120 km; that there is a semiannual variation by a factor of 3 in the global average density near 100 km in phase with the satellite drag semiannual effect; and that large latitudinal variations occur with maximums between 40 and 60 deg in the winter hemisphere and sometimes deep minimums in the tropics. The implication of these results for meridional and vertical transport patterns is discussed.

  2. Temperature structure of active regions deduced from helium-like sulphur lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hara, Hirohisa; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Hiei, Eijiro; Bentley, Robert D.; Lang, James; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.; Pike, C. David; Fludra, Andrzej; Bromage, Barbara J. I.

    1995-01-01

    Solar active-region temperatures have been determined from the full-Sun spectra of helium-like sulfur (S XV) observed by the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer on Board the Yohkoh satellite. The average temperature deduced from S XV is demonstrated to vary with the solar activity level: A temperature of 2.5 x 10(exp 6) K is derived from the spectra taken during low solar activity, similar to the general corona, while 4 x 10(exp 6) K is obtained during a higher activity phase. For the latter, the high- temperature tail of the differential emission measure of active regions is found most likely due to the superposition of numerous flare-like events (micro/nano-flares).

  3. Characteristics of middle and upper tropospheric clouds as deduced from rawinsonde data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, D. D. O.; Cox, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The static environment of middle and upper tropospheric clouds is characterized. Computed relative humidity with respect to ice is used to diagnose the presence of cloud layer. The deduced seasonal mean cloud cover estimates based on this technique are shown to be reasonable. The cases are stratified by season and pressure thickness, and the dry static stability, vertical wind speed shear, and Richardson number are computed for three layers for each case. Mean values for each parameter are presented for each stratification and layer. The relative frequency of occurrence of various structures is presented for each stratification. The observed values of each parameter and the observed structure of each parameter are quite variable. Structures corresponding to any of a number of different conceptual models may be found. Moist adiabatic conditions are not commonly observed and the stratification based on thickness yields substantially different results for each group.

  4. Atmospheric density variations at 140 kilometers deduced from precise satellite radar tracking data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, L. L.; Schusterman, L.; Bruce, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the technique of evaluating density values from precise radar-tracking data of satellites in the altitude region from 130 to 140 km. Inclinations of these satellites were between 106 and 112 deg. A detailed examination of all elements of the density-reduction techniques was conducted, and consideration was given to recent advances in geodesy, drag-coefficient modeling, and orbit-determination techniques. Ten days of high-resolution density data deduced from orbital decay of each of three satellites are presented. Three types of density variations at 140 km are discernible in these data: periodic daily density variations with a density amplitude of about 10%; density increases of up to 35% associated with enhanced geomagnetic activity during which the planetary geomagnetic index Kp reached a value of 8 units; and an observed semiannual variation of about 20%, which indicates a total semiannual variation of 35 to 40%.

  5. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave

    PubMed Central

    Arman, Samuel D.; Prideaux, Gavin J.

    2016-01-01

    The marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, was the largest-ever marsupial carnivore, and is one of the most iconic extinct Australian vertebrates. With a highly-specialised dentition, powerful forelimbs and a robust build, its overall morphology is not approached by any other mammal. However, despite >150 years of attention, fundamental aspects of its biology remain unresolved. Here we analyse an assemblage of claw marks preserved on surfaces in a cave and deduce that they were generated by marsupial lions. The distribution and skewed size range of claw marks within the cave elucidate two key aspects of marsupial lion biology: they were excellent climbers and reared young in caves. Scrutiny of >10,000 co-located Pleistocene bones reveals few if any marsupial lion tooth marks, which dovetails with the morphology-based interpretation of the species as a flesh specialist. PMID:26876952

  6. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave.

    PubMed

    Arman, Samuel D; Prideaux, Gavin J

    2016-02-15

    The marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, was the largest-ever marsupial carnivore, and is one of the most iconic extinct Australian vertebrates. With a highly-specialised dentition, powerful forelimbs and a robust build, its overall morphology is not approached by any other mammal. However, despite >150 years of attention, fundamental aspects of its biology remain unresolved. Here we analyse an assemblage of claw marks preserved on surfaces in a cave and deduce that they were generated by marsupial lions. The distribution and skewed size range of claw marks within the cave elucidate two key aspects of marsupial lion biology: they were excellent climbers and reared young in caves. Scrutiny of >10,000 co-located Pleistocene bones reveals few if any marsupial lion tooth marks, which dovetails with the morphology-based interpretation of the species as a flesh specialist.

  7. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave.

    PubMed

    Arman, Samuel D; Prideaux, Gavin J

    2016-01-01

    The marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, was the largest-ever marsupial carnivore, and is one of the most iconic extinct Australian vertebrates. With a highly-specialised dentition, powerful forelimbs and a robust build, its overall morphology is not approached by any other mammal. However, despite >150 years of attention, fundamental aspects of its biology remain unresolved. Here we analyse an assemblage of claw marks preserved on surfaces in a cave and deduce that they were generated by marsupial lions. The distribution and skewed size range of claw marks within the cave elucidate two key aspects of marsupial lion biology: they were excellent climbers and reared young in caves. Scrutiny of >10,000 co-located Pleistocene bones reveals few if any marsupial lion tooth marks, which dovetails with the morphology-based interpretation of the species as a flesh specialist. PMID:26876952

  8. Chaotic Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    Uses chaos theory to investigate the nonlinear phenomenon of population growth fluctuation. Illustrates the use of computers and computer programs to make calculations in a nonlinear difference equation system. (MDH)

  9. Primary structure of the 5 S subunit of transcarboxylase as deduced from the genomic DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Thornton, C G; Kumar, G K; Shenoy, B C; Haase, F C; Phillips, N F; Park, V M; Magner, W J; Hejlik, D P; Wood, H G; Samols, D

    1993-09-13

    Transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii is a complex biotin-containing enzyme composed of 30 polypeptides of three different types. It is composed of six dimeric outer subunits associated with a central cylindrical hexameric subunit through 12 biotinyl subunits; three outer subunits on each face of the central hexamer. Each outer dimer is termed a 5 S subunit which associates with two biotinyl subunits. The enzyme catalyzes a two-step reaction in which methylmalonyl-CoA and pyruvate form propionyl-CoA and oxalacetate, the 5 S subunit specifically catalyzing one of these reactions. We report here the cloning, sequencing and expression of the monomer of the 5 S subunit. The gene was identified by matching amino acid sequences derived from isolated authentic 5 S peptides with the deduced sequence of an open reading frame present on a cloned P. shermanii genomic fragment known to contain the gene encoding the 1.3 S biotinyl subunit. The cloned 5 S gene encodes a protein of 519 amino acids, M(r) 57,793. The deduced sequence shows regions of extensive homology with that of pyruvate carboxylase and oxalacetate decarboxylase, two enzymes which catalyze the same or reverse reaction. A fragment was subcloned into pUC19 in an orientation such that the 5 S open reading frame could be expressed from the lac promoter of the vector. Crude extracts prepared from these cells contained an immunoreactive band on Western blots which co-migrated with authentic 5 S and were fully active in catalyzing the 5 S partial reaction. We conclude that we have cloned, sequenced and expressed the monomer of the 5 S subunit and that the expressed product is catalytically active. PMID:8365490

  10. Charge-exchange QRPA with the Gogny Force for Axially-symmetric Deformed Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, M.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.

    2014-06-15

    In recent years fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations using finite range Gogny force have been performed to study electromagnetic excitations of several axially-symmetric deformed nuclei up to the {sup 238}U. Here we present the extension of this approach to the charge-exchange nuclear excitations (pnQRPA). In particular we focus on the Isobaric Analog and Gamow-Teller resonances. A comparison of the predicted GT strength distribution with existing experimental data is presented. The role of nuclear deformation is shown. Special attention is paid to β-decay half-lives calculations for which experimental data exist and for specific isotone chains of relevance for the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  11. Rate tables for the weak processes of sd-shell nuclei in stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Takeshi; Hino, Masayuki; Muto, Kazuo ); Takahara, Mariko ); Sato, Katsuhiko )

    1994-03-01

    The weak interaction rates in stellar matter are calculated for the sd-shell nuclei in the full-shell model configurations using the effective interaction of Wildenthal, taking into account the recent extensive compilations of experimental energy levels and Gamow-Teller [beta] decay rates. Based on comparisons between the present calculation and that of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (FFN), it is pointed out that correct treatment of nuclear structure effects is decisive in attaining reliable weak interaction rates in stellar matter. The weak rates are tabulated at the same grid points of density and temperature as those of FFN, for the ranges 10 [le] pY[sub e] (g[center dot]cm[sup [minus]3]) [le] 10[sup 11] and 0.01 [times] 10[sup 9] [le] T (K) [le] 30 [times] 10[sup 9]. 33 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni, and production of {sup 55}Mn in population III stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Honma, Michio; Higashiyama, Koji; Yoshida, Takashi; Umeda, Hideyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2009-06-15

    Neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni are investigated based on a new shell-model Hamiltonian for pf shell. The calculated charged current reaction cross section on {sup 56}Fe induced by decay-at-rest (DAR) neutrinos is shown to be consistent with the observation. The Gamow-Teller strength in {sup 56}Ni is found to be more spread compared to previous calculations and result in a considerably large branching ratio for the proton knock-out channel. As a consequence of this, the production yields of heavy elements such as {sup 55}Mn in population III stars are shown to be enhanced for the new Hamiltonian.

  13. β -decay properties of neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Ru, and Pd isotopes from deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, P.

    2015-04-01

    β -decay properties of even- and odd-A neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Ru, and Pd isotopes involved in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process are studied within a deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The underlying mean field is described self-consistently from deformed Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations with pairing correlations. Residual interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels are also included in the formalism. The isotopic evolution of the various nuclear equilibrium shapes and the corresponding charge radii are investigated in all the isotopic chains. The energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength as well as the β -decay half-lives are discussed and compared with the available experimental information. It is shown that nuclear deformation plays a significant role in the description of the decay properties in this mass region. Reliable predictions of the strength distributions are essential to evaluate decay rates in astrophysical scenarios.

  14. High Precision Determination of the β Decay Q(EC) Value of (11)C and Implications on the Tests of the Standard Model.

    PubMed

    Gulyuz, K; Bollen, G; Brodeur, M; Bryce, R A; Cooper, K; Eibach, M; Izzo, C; Kwan, E; Manukyan, K; Morrissey, D J; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Redshaw, M; Ringle, R; Sandler, R; Schwarz, S; Sumithrarachchi, C S; Valverde, A A; Villari, A C C

    2016-01-01

    We report the determination of the Q(EC) value of the mirror transition of (11)C by measuring the atomic masses of (11)C and (11)B using Penning trap mass spectrometry. More than an order of magnitude improvement in precision is achieved as compared to the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation (Ame2012) [Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012)]. This leads to a factor of 3 improvement in the calculated Ft value. Using the new value, Q(EC)=1981.690(61)  keV, the uncertainty on Ft is no longer dominated by the uncertainty on the Q(EC) value. Based on this measurement, we provide an updated estimate of the Gamow-Teller to Fermi mixing ratio and standard model values of the correlation coefficients. PMID:26799013

  15. Extraction of Weak Transition Strengths via the (He3, t) Reaction at 420MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, R. G. T.; Adachi, T.; Akimune, H.; Austin, Sam M.; van den Berg, A. M.; Brown, B. A.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Galès, S.; Guess, C. J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hashimoto, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Hayami, R.; Hitt, G. W.; Howard, M. E.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Kawase, K.; Kinoshita, M.; Matsubara, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Nakayama, S.; Okumura, S.; Ohta, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Scholl, C.; Simenel, C.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Uchida, M.; Yamagata, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2007-11-01

    Differential cross sections for transitions of known weak strength were measured with the (He3, t) reaction at 420 MeV on targets of C12, C13, O18, Mg26, Ni58, Ni60, Zr90, Sn118, Sn120, and Pb208. Using these data, it is shown that the proportionalities between strengths and cross sections for this probe follow simple trends as a function of mass number. These trends can be used to confidently determine Gamow-Teller strength distributions in nuclei for which the proportionality cannot be calibrated via β-decay strengths. Although theoretical calculations in the distorted-wave Born approximation overestimate the data, they allow one to understand the main experimental features and to predict deviations from the simple trends observed in some of the transitions.

  16. Extraction of weak transition strengths via the (3He, t) reaction at 420 MeV.

    PubMed

    Zegers, R G T; Adachi, T; Akimune, H; Austin, Sam M; van den Berg, A M; Brown, B A; Fujita, Y; Fujiwara, M; Galès, S; Guess, C J; Harakeh, M N; Hashimoto, H; Hatanaka, K; Hayami, R; Hitt, G W; Howard, M E; Itoh, M; Kawabata, T; Kawase, K; Kinoshita, M; Matsubara, M; Nakanishi, K; Nakayama, S; Okumura, S; Ohta, T; Sakemi, Y; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Scholl, C; Simenel, C; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Uchida, M; Yamagata, T; Yosoi, M

    2007-11-16

    Differential cross sections for transitions of known weak strength were measured with the (3He, t) reaction at 420 MeV on targets of 12C, 13C, 18O, 26Mg, 58Ni, 60Ni, 90Zr, 118Sn, 120Sn, and 208Pb. Using these data, it is shown that the proportionalities between strengths and cross sections for this probe follow simple trends as a function of mass number. These trends can be used to confidently determine Gamow-Teller strength distributions in nuclei for which the proportionality cannot be calibrated via beta-decay strengths. Although theoretical calculations in the distorted-wave Born approximation overestimate the data, they allow one to understand the main experimental features and to predict deviations from the simple trends observed in some of the transitions.

  17. High Precision Determination of the β Decay QEC Value of 11C and Implications on the Tests of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyuz, K.; Bollen, G.; Brodeur, M.; Bryce, R. A.; Cooper, K.; Eibach, M.; Izzo, C.; Kwan, E.; Manukyan, K.; Morrissey, D. J.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Redshaw, M.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Valverde, A. A.; Villari, A. C. C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the determination of the QEC value of the mirror transition of 11C by measuring the atomic masses of 11C and 11B using Penning trap mass spectrometry. More than an order of magnitude improvement in precision is achieved as compared to the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation (Ame2012) [Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012)]. This leads to a factor of 3 improvement in the calculated F t value. Using the new value, QEC=1981.690 (61 ) keV , the uncertainty on F t is no longer dominated by the uncertainty on the QEC value. Based on this measurement, we provide an updated estimate of the Gamow-Teller to Fermi mixing ratio and standard model values of the correlation coefficients.

  18. Shell-model analysis of the 136Xe double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

    PubMed

    Horoi, M; Brown, B A

    2013-05-31

    Neutrinoless double beta decay, if observed, could distinguish whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle, and it could be used to determine the absolute scale of the neutrino masses. 136Xe is one of the most promising candidates for observing this rare event. However, until recently there were no positive results for the allowed and less rare two-neutrino double beta decay mode. The small nuclear matrix element associated with the long half-life represents a challenge for nuclear structure models used for its calculation. We report a new shell-model analysis of the two-neutrino double beta decay of 136Xe, which takes into account all relevant nuclear orbitals necessary to fully describe the associated Gamow-Teller strength. We further use the new model to analyze the main contributions to the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element, and show that they are also diminished.

  19. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and {3}He.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Kievsky, A; Rosati, S; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2012-02-01

    The muon-capture reactions {2}H(μ{-},ν{μ})nn and {3}He(μ{-},ν{μ}){3}H are studied with nuclear potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived in chiral effective field theory. The low-energy constants (LECs) c{D} and c{E}, present in the three-nucleon potential and (c{D}) axial-vector current, are constrained to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. The muon-capture rates on deuteron and {3}He are predicted to be 399±3  sec{-1} and 1494±21  sec{-1}, respectively. The spread accounts for the cutoff sensitivity, as well as uncertainties in the LECs and electroweak radiative corrections. By comparing the calculated and precisely measured rates on {3}He, a value for the induced pseudoscalar form factor is obtained in good agreement with the chiral perturbation theory prediction.

  20. Neutrino reactions on {sup 12}C by the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Lee, Su Youn; Kim, K. S.; So, W. Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2010-02-15

    We applied the quasiparticle random-phase approximation to neutrino reactions on {sup 12}C target. The quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) has been found to successfully explain the nuclear {beta} and {beta}{beta} decays. To describe neutrino-nucleus reactions, various multipole transitions by weak interactions with finite momentum transfers are added to the Gamow Teller transition in the {beta} decays. Our results are shown to well reproduce most of experimental data for neutrino reactions on {sup 12}C target. In particular, energy dependence of cross sections for the exclusive reaction, {sup 12}C(nu{sub e},e{sup -}){sup 12}N{sub g.s.(1+)}, is discussed in detail by comparing the QRPA calculations to related experimental data.

  1. β-decay properties of neutron-deficient Pt, Hg, and Pb isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarriguren, P.; Boillos, J. M.; Moreno, O.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2015-10-15

    Neutron-deficient isotopes in the lead region are well established examples of the shape coexistence phenomenon in nuclei. In this work, bulk and decay properties, including deformation energy curves, charge mean square radii, Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distributions, and β-decay half-lives, are studied in neutron-deficient Pt, Hg, and Pb isotopes. The nuclear structure involved is described microscopically from deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations with residual interactions in both particle-hole and particle-particle channels, performed on top of a self-consistent deformed quasiparticle Skyrme Hartree-Fock basis. The sensitivity to deformation of the GT strength distributions in those isotopes is proposed as an additional complementary signature of the nuclear shape. The β-decay half-lives resulting from the GT strength distributions are compared to experiment to demonstrate the ability of the method.

  2. β -decay study within multireference density functional theory and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konieczka, M.; Bączyk, P.; Satuła, W.

    2016-04-01

    A pioneering study of Gamow-Teller (GT) and Fermi matrix elements (MEs) using no-core-configuration-interaction formalism rooted in multireference density functional theory is presented. After a successful test performed for 6He→6Liβ decay, the model is applied to compute MEs in the s d - and p f -shell T =1 /2 mirror nuclei. The calculated GT MEs and the isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections to the Fermi branch are found to be in very good agreement with shell-model predictions in spite of fundamental differences between these models concerning model space, treatment of correlations, or inclusion of a core. This result indirectly supports the two-body-current-based scenarios behind the quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant.

  3. How low-energy weak reactions can constrain three-nucleon forces and the neutron-neutron scattering length.

    PubMed

    Gårdestig, A; Phillips, D R

    2006-06-16

    We show that chiral symmetry and gauge invariance enforce relations between the short-distance physics that occurs in a number of electroweak and pionic reactions on light nuclei. Within chiral perturbation theory, this is manifested via the appearance of the same axial isovector two-body contact term in pi(-)d --> nngamma, p-wave pion production in NN collisions, tritium beta decay, pp fusion, nud scattering, and the hep reaction. Using a Gamow-Teller matrix element obtained from calculations of pp fusion as input, we compute the neutron spectrum obtained in pi(-)d --> nngamma. With the short-distance physics in this process controlled from pp --> de(=)nu(e), the theoretical uncertainty in the nn scattering length extracted from pi(-)d --> nngamma is reduced by a factor larger than 3, to approximately < or = 0.05 fm. PMID:16803373

  4. Beta-decay properties of neutron-rich medium-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    β-decay properties of even-even and odd-A neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ru, and Pd isotopes involved in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process are studied within a microscopic proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The underlying mean field is based on a self-consistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock + BCS calculation that includes deformation as a key ingredient. The isotopic evolution of the various nuclear equilibrium shapes and the corresponding charge radii are investigated in all the isotopic chains. The energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength, as well as the β-decay half-lives are discussed and compared with the available experimental information. It is shown that nuclear deformation plays a significant role in the description of the decay properties in this mass region. Reliable predictions of the strength distributions are essential to evaluate decay rates in astrophysical scenarios.

  5. Structural features of cartilage matrix protein deduced from cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Argraves, W S; Deák, F; Sparks, K J; Kiss, I; Goetinck, P F

    1987-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the Mr 54,000 chicken cartilage matrix protein (CMP) were selected from a cartilage cDNA expression library by immunological means. Antibodies elicited against insert-encoded protein purified from one of the clones reacted specifically with chicken CMP in immunoblots of total cartilage extract, providing positive identification of the cDNA clones isolated. The cDNAs detect a 3.4-kilobase transcript that was present in sternal cartilage and in cartilaginous but not in precartilaginous embryonic limb tissues. The cDNAs code for 416 amino acids of the chicken CMP, including its COOH terminus. There are two striking features in the deduced CMP amino acid sequence: first, it contains a region with significant homologies to repeat sequences in the precursor for epidermal growth factor; and second, it is made up of two large homologous repeat sequences. These results provide the first detailed structural information on the CMP and establish it as a developmentally regulated marker of cartilage differentiation. Images PMID:3025875

  6. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F S; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Fallon, P; Clark, R M; Deleplanque, M A; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S; Ai, H; Beausang, C; Cridder, B

    2005-12-29

    The authors have deduced the cross section for {sup 237}U(n,f) over an equivalent neutron energy range from 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions: {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}{prime}f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}{prime}f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). Scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} and 131{sup o}.

  7. Chemical composition of the Howardite Parent Body deduced from Kapoeta primary 'mafic' magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. R.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical data are presented for three 'mafic' clasts extracted from the Kapoeta howardite. Bulk compositions and petrologic observations suggest that two of these lithic clasts represent olivine-plagioclase bearing orthopyroxenites. Chondrite-relative refractory large ion lithophile abundances of two of the clasts are inferred to represent primary Mg-rich magmas produced by extensive (greater than about 70%) partial melting of a source composition indistinguishable from the silicate fraction of average CH-CL ordinary chondrites, with the exception of the depletion of the alkalis Na and K by a factor of 13 + or - 1 in the source composition. A metal-free and volatile depleted Kapoeta Parent Body (KPB) is subsequently deduced and is shown to compare very well with other similarly derived Achondrite Parent Body and Howardite Parent Body estimates but not to parent body estimates derived from inferences based on eucrite phase equilibrium studies. Other implications suggest that the KPB is heterogeneous with respect to Fe/Mg ratios.

  8. Hysteresis Loop for a No-loaded, Delta-connected Transformer Model Deduced from Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrodi, Yves; Kamei, Kenji; Kohyama, Haruhiko; Ito, Hiroki

    At a transformer's steady-state condition, whereby a transformer and its load are constantly supplied by a sinusoidal source, the current-flux pair within the transformer core and its windings will cycle along a hysteresis loop. This nonlinear current-flux characteristic becomes important while at transformer gets reenergized. A remaining residual flux and the fact that a transformer is typically used up to its saturation level can lead to high-amplitude magnetizing inrush currents and associated voltage disturbances. These disturbances can be reduced by controlled transformer switching. In order to pre-evaluate the effect of a specific controlled transformer energization, pre-simulations can be applied. In that case the hysteresis loop and its saturation characteristic will become the most important model parameter. If the corresponding manufacturer specifications are not available a standard hysteresis loops can be used, but might come up with an inaccurate simulation result. Therefore, this paper analyses the measured 3-phase currents from two delta-connected power transformers by “Fourier Series” in order to deduce a single-phase hysteresis loop, which can be implemented into a typical 3-phase transformer model. Additionally, the saturation behavior of a power-transformer will be estimated and a comparison of ATP/EMTP simulations will conclude this paper.

  9. Relations between aliphatics and silicate components in 12 stratospheric particles deduced from vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Merouane, S.; Djouadi, Z.; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, L.

    2014-01-10

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are among the most pristine extraterrestrial samples available in the laboratory for analyses with moderate to high spatial- and spectral-resolution spectroscopic techniques. Their composition can provide precious information on the early stages of the solar nebula as well as on the processes on the surfaces of different small bodies in the solar system from which IDPs originate. In this work, we have analyzed six anhydrous IDPs and six stratospheric particles possibly of cosmic origin through infrared (IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy to study and investigate their silicate and organic components. We find that the length/ramification of the aliphatic organics given by the CH{sub 2}/CH{sub 3} ratios in the IDPs is closely linked to the silicate family (pyroxene or olivine) present in the samples. Both IR and Raman data suggest that this relation is not correlated with either aqueous (as evidenced by the absence of aqueous related minerals) or thermal processes (as deduced from Raman measurements). Therefore, this observation might be related to the initial path of formation of the organics on the silicate surfaces, thus tracing a possible catalytic role that silicates would play in the formation and/or ramification of organic matter in the primitive nebula.

  10. The Seismic risk perception in Italy deduced by a statistical sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Pessina, Vera; Peruzza, Laura; Cerbara, Loredana; Crescimbene, Cristiana

    2015-04-01

    In 2014 EGU Assembly we presented the results of a web a survey on the perception of seismic risk in Italy. The data were derived from over 8,500 questionnaires coming from all Italian regions. Our questionnaire was built by using the semantic differential method (Osgood et al. 1957) with a seven points Likert scale. The questionnaire is inspired the main theoretical approaches of risk perception (psychometric paradigm, cultural theory, etc.) .The results were promising and seem to clearly indicate an underestimation of seismic risk by the italian population. Based on these promising results, the DPC has funded our research for the second year. In 2015 EGU Assembly we present the results of a new survey deduced by an italian statistical sample. The importance of statistical significance at national scale was also suggested by ISTAT (Italian Statistic Institute), considering the study as of national interest, accepted the "project on the perception of seismic risk" as a pilot study inside the National Statistical System (SISTAN), encouraging our RU to proceed in this direction. The survey was conducted by a company specialised in population surveys using the CATI method (computer assisted telephone interview). Preliminary results will be discussed. The statistical support was provided by the research partner CNR-IRPPS. This research is funded by Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC).

  11. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Line Mixing Deduced from Impulsive Solar Flare Particles.

    PubMed

    Mazur; Mason; Dwyer; Giacalone; Jokipii; Stone

    2000-03-20

    We have studied fine-scale temporal variations in the arrival profiles of approximately 20 keV nucleon-1 to approximately 2 MeV nucleon-1 ions from impulsive solar flares using instrumentation on board the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft at 1 AU between 1997 November and 1999 July. The particle events often had short-timescale ( approximately 3 hr) variations in their intensity that occurred simultaneously across all energies and were generally not in coincidence with any local magnetic field or plasma signature. These features appear to be caused by the convection of magnetic flux tubes past the observer that are alternately filled and devoid of flare ions even though they had a common flare source at the Sun. Thus, we have used the particles to study the mixing of the interplanetary magnetic field that is due to random walk. We deduce an average timescale of 3.2 hr for these features, which corresponds to a length of approximately 0.03 AU.

  12. Atmospheric emissions and trends of nitrous oxide deduced from 10 years of ALE-GAGE data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, R.; Cunnold, D.; Alyea, F.; Rasmussen, R.; Simmonds, P.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) obtained during the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment (ALE) and the Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (GAGE) for a period from 1978 to 1988 are presented and interpreted. It is observed that the average concentration in the Northern Hemisphere is 0.75 +/- 0.16 ppbv higher than in the Southern Hemisphere and that the global average linear trend in N2O lies in the range from 0.25 to 0.31 percent/year. The measured trends and latitudinal distributions are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that stratospheric photodissociation is the major atmospheric sink for N2O, while the cause of the N2O trend is suggested to be a combination of a growing tropical source and a growing Northern mid-latitude source. A 10-year average global N2O emission rate of (20.5 +/- 2.4) x 10 to the 12th g N2O/year is deduced from the ALE/GAGE data.

  13. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  14. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L W; Fallon, P; Clark, R; Delaplanque, M; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S

    2005-08-16

    The authors have deduced the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross-section over an equivalent neutron energy range of 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}'f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}'f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). The energies of the scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} to 131{sup o}.

  15. Optimization and performance calculation of dual-rotation propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is given which enables the design of dual-rotation propellers. It relies on the use of a new tip loss factor deduced from T. Theodorsen's measurements coupled with the general methodology of C. N. H. Lock. In addition, it includes the effect of drag in optimizing. Some values for the tip loss factor are calculated for one advance ratio.

  16. The use of the experimentally deduced Brunt-Vaisala frequency and turbulent velocity fluctuations to estimate the eddy diffusion coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottger, J.

    1986-01-01

    The determination of the turbulent energy dissipation rate or the eddy diffusion coefficient from radar observations can be done through the turbulence refractive index structure constant, deduced from calibrated echo power measurements, or through the turbulent velocity fluctuations, deduced from the echo spectrum width. Besides the radar parameters, power and spectrum width, the first approach needs knowledge of profiles of temperature and electron density in the mesosphere and the fraction of the radar volume filled with turbulence. The latter approach needs knowledge of the temperature profile, namely, the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. The use of this latter approach is demonstrated.

  17. WBGT Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Charles H.

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulate the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.

  18. WBGT Calculator

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  19. Deducing Anomalous Wave Source Regions during the Life Cycles of Persistent Flow Anomalies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Robert X.

    1997-04-01

    Anomalous wave source regions are identified during the life cycles of persistent flow anomalies occurring over the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans during boreal winter. These cases project strongly upon the Pacific-North American and Eastern Atlantic teleconnection patterns, respectively, and represent two of the primary modes of intraseasonal low frequency variability in the Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation. In the upper troposphere, these cases are manifested by wave trains of large-scale and large amplitude flow anomalies extending downstream from key regions near the Aleutian Islands and south of Iceland, respectively. The occurrence of persistent flow anomalies is closely linked to persistent extremes in surface weather and to variations in the skill of extended-range weather forecasts. Black and Dole performed a detailed diagnostic analysis of the onset of persistent cyclonic flow anomalies over the North Pacific. A key result of their study was that wave activity flux diagnoses correctly identified the location of anomalous wave source regions.Black and Dole's study is extended by diagnosing three-dimensional fluxes of wave activity during the onset, maintenance, and decay of cyclonic and anticyclonic persistent flow anomalies over the North Atlantic and North Pacific regions. The flux characterizes large-scale wave propagation, and the flux divergence is used to deduce the location of regional sources and sinks of anomalous wave activity. In all cases there is a marked upward and downstream flux of wave activity emanating from the lower troposphere near the key region. The results are consistent with a local wave source and Rossby-like wave propagation away from the source. There is little evidence that anomalous remote processes directly force persistent flow anomaly life cycles. The diagnostic analyses indicate that the primary anomalous wave sources for both cyclonic and anticyclonic persistent flow anomalies are local to the region of

  20. A novel computational framework for deducing muscle synergies from experimental joint moments

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Anantharaman; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior experimental studies have hypothesized the existence of a “muscle synergy” based control scheme for producing limb movements and locomotion in vertebrates. Such synergies have been suggested to consist of fixed muscle grouping schemes with the co-activation of all muscles in a synergy resulting in limb movement. Quantitative representations of these groupings (termed muscle weightings) and their control signals (termed synergy controls) have traditionally been derived by the factorization of experimentally measured EMG. This study presents a novel approach for deducing these weightings and controls from inverse dynamic joint moments that are computed from an alternative set of experimental measurements—movement kinematics and kinetics. This technique was applied to joint moments for healthy human walking at 0.7 and 1.7 m/s, and two sets of “simulated” synergies were computed based on two different criteria (1) synergies were required to minimize errors between experimental and simulated joint moments in a musculoskeletal model (pure-synergy solution) (2) along with minimizing joint moment errors, synergies also minimized muscle activation levels (optimal-synergy solution). On comparing the two solutions, it was observed that the introduction of optimality requirements (optimal-synergy) to a control strategy solely aimed at reproducing the joint moments (pure-synergy) did not necessitate major changes in the muscle grouping within synergies or the temporal profiles of synergy control signals. Synergies from both the simulated solutions exhibited many similarities to EMG derived synergies from a previously published study, thus implying that the analysis of the two different types of experimental data reveals similar, underlying synergy structures. PMID:25520645

  1. Deducing Electronic Unit Internal Response During a Vibration Test Using a Lumped Parameter Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    During random vibration testing of electronic boxes there is often a desire to know the dynamic response of certain internal printed wiring boards (PWBs) for the purpose of monitoring the response of sensitive hardware or for post-test forensic analysis in support of anomaly investigation. Due to restrictions on internally mounted accelerometers for most flight hardware there is usually no means to empirically observe the internal dynamics of the unit, so one must resort to crude and highly uncertain approximations. One common practice is to apply Miles Equation, which does not account for the coupled response of the board in the chassis, resulting in significant over- or under-prediction. This paper explores the application of simple multiple-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter modeling to predict the coupled random vibration response of the PWBs in their fundamental modes of vibration. A simple tool using this approach could be used during or following a random vibration test to interpret vibration test data from a single external chassis measurement to deduce internal board dynamics by means of a rapid correlation analysis. Such a tool might also be useful in early design stages as a supplemental analysis to a more detailed finite element analysis to quickly prototype and analyze the dynamics of various design iterations. After developing the theoretical basis, a lumped parameter modeling approach is applied to an electronic unit for which both external and internal test vibration response measurements are available for direct comparison. Reasonable correlation of the results demonstrates the potential viability of such an approach. Further development of the preliminary approach presented in this paper will involve correlation with detailed finite element models and additional relevant test data.

  2. Deducing growth mechanisms for minerals from the shapes of crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of natural and synthetic samples are observed to have several distinct and different shapes. We have simulated these CSDs using three simple equations: the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), a mass balance equation, and equations for Ostwald ripening. The following crystal growth mechanisms are simulated using these equations and their modifications: (1) continuous nucleation and growth in an open system, during which crystals nucleate at either a constant, decaying, or accelerating nucleation rate, and then grow according to the LPE; (2) surface-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with an essentially unlimited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (3) supply-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with a specified, limited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (4) supply- or surface-controlled Ostwald ripening in a closed system, during which the relative rate of crystal dissolution and growth is controlled by differences in specific surface area and by diffusion rate; and (5) supply-controlled random ripening in a closed system, during which the rate of crystal dissolution and growth is random with respect to specific surface area. Each of these mechanisms affects the shapes of CSDs. For example, mechanism (1) above with a constant nucleation rate yields asymptotically-shaped CSDs for which the variance of the natural logarithms of the crystal sizes (??2) increases exponentially with the mean of the natural logarithms of the sizes (??). Mechanism (2) yields lognormally-shaped CSDs, for which ??2 increases linearly with ??, whereas mechanisms (3) and (5) do not change the shapes of CSDs, with ??2 remaining constant with increasing ??. During supply-controlled Ostwald ripening (4), initial lognormally-shaped CSDs become more symmetric, with ??2 decreasing with increasing ??. Thus, crystal growth mechanisms often can be deduced by noting trends in ?? versus ??2 of CSDs for

  3. Spokes in Saturn's B Ring: dynamical and physical properties deduced from Voyager Saturn Ring images

    SciTech Connect

    Eplee, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This project studied dynamical and physical properties of spokes as deduced from Voyage Saturn ring images. Analysis of the orbital motion of two dynamically-anomalous spokes, in particular, set limits on the charge-to-mass ratios of spoke particles at various times during their dynamical evolution. These two spokes have charge-to-mass of at least -60 +/- 3 C kg/sup -1/ while corotating with Saturn, and charge-to-mass ratios of no more than -22 +/- 2 C kg/sup -1/ while orbiting Saturn at Keplerian velocities. Additionally, charge decay on the grains of these spokes, caused by solar UV photoemission, allowed a lower limit of 0.10 +/- 0.03 ..mu..m to be placed on the range of radii for spoke particles. In a study of spoke photometry, a single-scattering analysis of the 0.470-..mu..m phase function for spokes has set a mean radius for the dominant scatterers (at this wavelength) of 0.22 +/- 0.02 /sup +/m. The transport of angular momentum within the rings due to the radial motion of spoke grains is shown to be the most-significant effect of spoke activity on the dynamical evolution of the B Ring, as was predicted by Goertz et al. (1986, Nature 320, 141-143). The radial mass-transport velocity due to highly-charged spokes is -1 x 10/sup -9/m s/sup -1/. The subsequent spreading time for the B Ring is 600 million years, which is significantly less than the 4.6 billion-year age of the solar system.

  4. Deducing logical relationships between spatially registered cortical parcellations under conditions of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bezgin, Gleb; Wanke, Egon; Krumnack, Antje; Kötter, Rolf

    2008-10-01

    We propose a new technique, called Spatial Objective Relational Transformation (SORT), as an automated approach for derivation of logical relationships between cortical areas in different brain maps registered in the same Euclidean space. Recently, there have been large amounts of voxel-based three-dimensional structural and functional imaging data that provide us with coordinate-based information about the location of differently defined areas in the brain, whereas coordinate-independent, parcellation-based mapping is still commonly used in the majority of animal tracing and mapping studies. Because of the impact of voxel-based imaging methods and the need to attribute their features to coordinate-independent brain entities, this mapping becomes increasingly important. Our motivation here is not to make vague statements where more precise spatial statements would be better, but to find criteria for the identity (or other logical relationships) between areas that were delineated by different methods, in different individuals, or mapped to three-dimensional space using different deformation algorithms. The relevance of this problem becomes immediately obvious as one superimposes and compares different datasets in multimodal databases (e.g. CARET, http://brainmap.wustl.edu/caret), where voxel-based data are registered to surface nodes exploited by the procedure presented here. We describe the SORT algorithm and its implementation in the Java 2 programming language (http://java.sun.com/, which we make available for download. We give an example of practical use of our approach, and validate the SORT approach against a database of the coordinate-independent statements and inferences that have been deduced using alternative techniques.

  5. Characteristics of F-region dynamo currents deduced from CHAMP magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Lühr, Hermann; Min, Kyoung Wook

    2010-10-01

    Using magnetic field observations of the CHAMP satellite we provide the first comprehensive study of F-region dynamo currents as a function of season, local time, geographic longitude, and solar activity. From bipolar variations of the zonal magnetic field component the density of vertical current driven by the F-region dynamo is deduced. The current strength is smallest around June solstice, which is attributed to a reduced F-region Pedersen conductance caused by a lower electron density and neutral density at that season. During the hours around noon highest current densities are observed. They are flowing downward over the dip equator. A secondary peak of upward currents appears at dusk. The polarity switch occurs between15 and 16 (local time) independent of season. The noontime F-region dynamo current peaks at longitudes connected to the South Atlantic Anomaly, which can be explained by the enhanced conductivity in the region of reduced B field. The F-region current at dusk exhibits no peak in the longitude sector of the South Atlantic Anomaly. At noon, the F-region dynamo currents exhibit a wave 4 longitudinal structure during equinoxes and June solstice. The wave 4 signature becomes weak during December solstice. At dusk the wave 4 signature of F-region dynamo currents is much reduced in all seasons. This behavior can be explained by the DE3 tidal signature in the zonal wind at CHAMP altitude. F-region dynamo currents increase linearly with the solar flux index, F10.7, during both noon and dusk time sectors. The increase in current strength with increasing F10.7 is slightly higher at dusk than at noon.

  6. The complete set of spin observables for the (13)C(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(13)N and (15)N(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(15)O reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qun Qun

    1998-12-01

    The 13C(p,n)13N and 15N(p,n)15O reactions have been a puzzle for more than ten years. The ground state transitions are Jπ=1/2- to Jπ=1/2-. These are 'mixed' transitions because they can involve quantum number changes either (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=0,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=0), or (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=1,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=1); these quantum number changes are refered to as 'Fermi' and 'Gamow-Teller' respectively. Because the quantum number changes are the same as for Fermi and Gamow-Teller beta decay. From the systematics of (p,n) and (n,p) reactions on pure Fermi transitions (e.g. 0 + to 0+) and pure Gamow-Teller transitions (e.g. 0+ to 1+), calibrations have been established of cross section per unit B(F) or unit B(GT), where 'B' refers to doubly reduced matrix elements extracted from beta decay. However, cross sections for the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s.) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) reactions are substantially larger than one would then predict from the known B(F)s and B(GT)s for these transitions. To explore this anomaly, spin observables were used to extract separately the Fermi and Gamow-Teller cross sections for these reactions. To acquire the complete sets of polarization- transfer observables, a new neutron polarimeter was designed, built, commissioned and calibrated. This polarimeter, call the '2π polarimeter' because of its complete azimuthal coverage for scattered neutrons, has very good position and timing resolution (354 ps). The complete sets of spin-transfer coefficients Dij for 13C(p,n)13N (at 0o , 5.5o , and 11o ) and 15N(p,n)15O (at 0o ) at 135 MeV were measured. Following the formalism of Ichimura and Kawahigashi, we extracted the spin-longitudinal, and spin-transverse and spin-independent responses D0,/ Dq,/ Dn and Dp from the measured Dijs. The F and GT fractions of the (p,n) cross sections are then extracted as f F=D0 and fGT=Dn+Dp+Dq=1- d0. Values of Dk for both the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) were extracted. From these responses, we

  7. New constraints on the rupture process of the 1999 August 17 Izmit earthquake deduced from estimates of stress glut rate moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clévédé, E.; Bouin, M.-P.; Bukchin, B.; Mostinskiy, A.; Patau, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper illustrates the use of integral estimates given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 for constraining the rupture scenario of a large earthquake in the particular case of the 1999 Izmit mainshock. We determine the integral estimates of the geometry, source duration and rupture propagation given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 by inverting long-period surface wave (LPSW) amplitude spectra. Kinematic and static models of the Izmit earthquake published in the literature are quite different from one another. In order to extract the characteristic features of this event, we calculate the same integral estimates directly from those models and compare them with those deduced from our inversion. While the equivalent rupture zone and the eastward directivity are consistent among all models, the LPSW solution displays a strong unilateral character of the rupture associated with a short rupture duration that is not compatible with the solutions deduced from the published models. With the aim of understand this discrepancy, we use simple equivalent kinematic models to reproduce the integral estimates of the considered rupture processes (including ours) by adjusting a few free parameters controlling the western and eastern parts of the rupture. We show that the joint analysis of the LPSW solution and source tomographies allows us to elucidate the scattering of source processes published for this earthquake and to discriminate between the models. Our results strongly suggest that (1) there was significant moment released on the eastern segment of the activated fault system during the Izmit earthquake; (2) the apparent rupture velocity decreases on this segment.

  8. Comparison of transcripts in Phalaenopsis bellina and Phalaenopsis equestris (Orchidaceae) flowers to deduce monoterpene biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Kuoh, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Tian-Hsiang; Wang, Hei-Chia; Wu, Tian-Shung; Leu, Yann-Lii; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2006-01-01

    Background Floral scent is one of the important strategies for ensuring fertilization and for determining seed or fruit set. Research on plant scents has hampered mainly by the invisibility of this character, its dynamic nature, and complex mixtures of components that are present in very small quantities. Most progress in scent research, as in other areas of plant biology, has come from the use of molecular and biochemical techniques. Although volatile components have been identified in several orchid species, the biosynthetic pathways of orchid flower fragrance are far from understood. We investigated how flower fragrance was generated in certain Phalaenopsis orchids by determining the chemical components of the floral scent, identifying floral expressed-sequence-tags (ESTs), and deducing the pathways of floral scent biosynthesis in Phalaneopsis bellina by bioinformatics analysis. Results The main chemical components in the P. bellina flower were shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to be monoterpenoids, benzenoids and phenylpropanoids. The set of floral scent producing enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to geraniol and linalool were recognized through data mining of the P. bellina floral EST database (dbEST). Transcripts preferentially expressed in P. bellina were distinguished by comparing the scent floral dbEST to that of a scentless species, P. equestris, and included those encoding lipoxygenase, epimerase, diacylglycerol kinase and geranyl diphosphate synthase. In addition, EST filtering results showed that transcripts encoding signal transduction and Myb transcription factors and methyltransferase, in addition to those for scent biosynthesis, were detected by in silico hybridization of the P. bellina unigene database against those of the scentless species, rice and Arabidopsis. Altogether, we pinpointed 66% of the biosynthetic steps from G3P to geraniol, linalool and their derivatives. Conclusion This systems

  9. Active deformation processes of the Northern Caucasus deduced from the GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyukov, Vadim; Mironov, Alexey; Rogozhin, Eugeny; Steblov, Grigory; Gabsatarov, Yury

    2015-04-01

    The Northern Caucasus, as a part of the Alpine-Himalayan mobile belt, is a zone of complex tectonics associated with the interaction of the two major tectonic plates, Arabian and Eurasian. The first GPS study of the contemporary geodynamics of the Caucasus mountain system were launched in the early 1990s in the framework of the Russia-US joint project. Since 2005 observations of the modern tectonic motion of the Northern Caucasus are carried out using the continuous GPS network. This network encompasses the territory of three Northern Caucasian Republics of the Russian Federation: Karachay-Cherkessia, Kabardino-Balkaria, and North Ossetia. In the Ossetian part of the Northern Caucasus the network of GPS survey-mode sites has been deployed as well. The GPS velocities confirm weak general compression of the Northern Caucasus with at the rate of about 1-2 mm/year. This horizontal motion at the boundary of the Northern Caucasus with respect to the Eurasian plate causes the higher seismic and tectonic activity of this transition zone. This result confirms that the source of deformation of the Northern Caucasus is the sub-meridional drift of the Arabian plate towards the adjacent boundary of the Eastern European part of the Eurasian lithospheric plate. The concept of such convergence implies that the Caucasian segment of the Alpine-Himalayan mobile belt is under compression, the layers of sedimentary and volcanic rocks are folded, the basement blocks are subject to shifts in various directions, and the upper crust layers are ruptured by reverse faults and thrusts. Weak deviation of observed velocities from the pattern corresponding to homogeneous compression can also be revealed, and numerical modeling of deformations of major regional tectonic structures, such as the Main Caucasus Ridge, can explain this. The deformation tensor deduced from the velocity field also exhibits the sub-meridional direction of the major compressional axes which coincides with the direction of

  10. A history of chemically and radiatively important gases in air deduced from ALE/GAGE/AGAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.; Fraser, P. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Cunnold, D. M.; Alyea, F. N.; O'Doherty, S.; Salameh, P.; Miller, B. R.; Huang, J.; Wang, R. H. J.; Hartley, D. E.; Harth, C.; Steele, L. P.; Sturrock, G.; Midgley, P. M.; McCulloch, A.

    2000-07-01

    We describe in detail the instrumentation and calibrations used in the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment (ALE), the Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (GAGE), and the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) and present a history of the majority of the anthropogenic ozone-depleting and climate-forcing gases in air based on these experiments. Beginning in 1978, these three successive automated high-frequency in situ experiments have documented the long-term behavior of the measured concentrations of these gases over the past 20 years, and show both the evolution of latitudinal gradients and the high-frequency variability due to sources and circulation. We provide estimates of the long-term trends in total chlorine contained in long-lived halocarbons involved in ozone depletion. We summarize interpretations of these measurements using inverse methods to determine trace gas lifetimes and emissions. Finally, we provide a combined observational and modeled reconstruction of the evolution of chlorocarbons by latitude in the atmosphere over the past 60 years which can be used as boundary conditions for interpreting trapped air in glaciers and oceanic measurements of chlorocarbon tracers of the deep oceanic circulation. Some specific conclusions are as follows: (1) International compliance with the Montreal Protocol is so far resulting in chlorofluorocarbon and chlorocarbon mole fractions comparable to target levels; (2) mole fractions of total chlorine contained in long-lived halocarbons (CCl2F2, CCl3F, CH3CCl3, CCl4, CHClF2, CCl2FCClF2, CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl2=CCl2) in the lower troposphere reached maximum values of about 3.6 ppb in 1993 and are beginning to slowly decrease in the global lower atmosphere; (3) the chlorofluorocarbons have atmospheric lifetimes consistent with destruction in the stratosphere being their principal removal mechanism; (4) multiannual variations in chlorofluorocarbon and chlorocarbon emissions deduced from ALE/GAGE/AGAGE data are

  11. CMB and the elementary particles structure deduced from QFT of non-dot model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    In my paper ‘Planck Constant Deduced from Metrical Results of Doppler Effect of Moving Particle —Uncertainty Principle Caused by Collision of a Particle with CMB Photons and Virtual Photons (H05-0036-10)’ the absolute velocity is decided by CMB which as a mark of the vacuum. CMB come from the thermal radiation of stars via gravitational redshift about 10 (13) year (E14- 0032-08). In my paper ‘Quanta turn-advance ism, China Science && Technology Overview 131 192-210 (2011)’, QFT four-dimensional uncertainty principle and momentum-energy conservation law had been generalized as a five-dimensional equations: de Broglie wavelength as a position vector \\underline{q}= (i c t, r, s), momentum \\underline{P} = (i E / c, P, U c), \\underline{q} = i h / \\underline{P}, \\underline{q} \\underline{q} = 0, \\underline{P} \\underline{P} = 0, Sigma∑ \\underline{P} = \\underline{P} (0) . The five-dimensional time-space-spin had been quantized as a non-dot model basic cell, the lowest energy state vertical polarized left spin 1/2 neutrino and right spin 1/2 antineutrino are just the left, right advance unit quanta _{0}nuυ, nuυ _{0} and left, right back unit quanta (0) nuυ, nuυ (0) , it again compose into spin 1 unit advance photons _{0}nuυnuυ _{0} and back (0) nuυnuυ (0) , spin 0 unit rest mass nuυ _{0}nuυ (0) and anti-mass _{0}nuυ (0) nuυ, spin 0 unit positive charge _{0}nuυnuυ (0) and negative charge nuυ _{0} (0) nuυ. It accord to the high energy physics experimental results of the transformation among the photons, masses quanta and charges quanta. The physical vacuum is the even collocation of non-combinational nuυ _{0} or _{0}nuυ. QFT is no longer with divergence difficulty by the non-dot model. It is mathematically easy that from five-dimensional equations deduce out the Dirac, Klein-Gordan, Maxwell equations and Lorentz force formula, but appear some new results. The interactions between _{0}nuυ, nuυ _{0}, (0) nuυ, nuυ (0) , i.e., force f

  12. Deducing the magma chamber processes of middle Eocene volcanics, Sivas and Tokat regions; NE Turkey: Insights from clinopyroxene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmengil, Gönenç; Karacık, Zekiye; Genç, Ş. Can; Prelevic, Dejan

    2016-04-01

    Middle Eocene Tokat and Sivas volcanic successions occur within the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone. Different models are suggested for the development of the middle Eocene volcanism such as post-collisional, delamination and slab-breakoff models as well as the arc magmatism. In both areas, volcanic units cover all the basement units with a regional disconformity and comprise lavas spanning a compositional range from mainly basalt-basaltic andesite to a lesser amount trachyte. Here, we report mineral chemistry of different basaltic lavas through transect from northern continent (Tokat region, Pontides) to southern continent (Sivas region, Kırşehir block) to deduce the characteristics of the magma chamber processes which are active during the middle Eocene. Basaltic lavas include olivine bearing basalts (Ol-basalt: ± olivine + clinopyroxene + plagioclase); amphibole bearing basaltic andesite (Amp-basaltic andesite: amphibole + clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± biotite) and pyroxene bearing basaltic andesite (Px-basaltic andesite: clinopyroxene + plagioclase). Microlitic, glomeroporphyric and pilotaxitic texture are common. Clinopyroxene phenocrystals (macro ≥ 750 μm and micro ≤300 μm) are common in all three lava series which are investigated by transecting core to rim compositional profiles. They are generally augite and diopside; euhedral to subhedral in shape with oscillatory, normal and reverse zoning patterns. Also, all clinopyroxene phenocrystals are marked by moderately high Mg# (for Ol-basalt: 67-91; avg. 80; Amp-basaltic andesite: 76-83, avg: 80; Px -basaltic andesite 68-95, avg: 81). In Ol-basalt, clinopyroxene phenocrystals show normal zonation (high Mg# cores and low Mg# rims). In Amp-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxenes are generally homogenous in composition with minor variation of Mg# towards the rims. On the contrary, in Px-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxene macro phenocrystals show reverse zonation with the core with low Mg# and the rims with

  13. Global significance of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high-resolution seismic observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuchs, K.; Tittgemeyer, M.; Ryberg, T.; Wenzel, F.; Mooney, W.

    2002-01-01

    We infer the fine structure of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) at the top of the lithospheric mantle from high-resolution seismic observations of Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) on superlong-range profiles in Russia. Densely recorded seismograms permit recognition of previously unknown features of teleseismic propagation of the well known Pn and Sn phases, such as a band of incoherent, scattered, high-frequency seismic energy, developing consistently from station to station, apparent velocities of sub-Moho material, and high-frequency energy to distances of more than 3000 km with a coda band, incoherent at 10 km spacing and yet consistently observed to the end of the profiles. Estimates of the other key elements of the SMBL were obtained by finite difference calculations of wave propagation in elastic 2D models from a systematic grid search through parameter space. The SMBL consists of randomly distributed, mild velocity fluctuations of 2% or schlieren of high aspect ratios (???40) with long horizontal extent (???20 km) and therefore as thin as 0.5 km only; SMBL thickness is 60-100 km. It is suggested that the SMBL is of global significance as the physical base of the platewide observed high-frequency phases Pn and Sn. It is shown that wave propagation in the SMBL waveguide is insensitive to the background velocity distribution on which its schlieren are superimposed. This explains why the Pn and Sn phases traverse geological provinces of various age, heat flow, crustal thickness, and tectonic regimes. Their propagation appears to be independent of age. temperature, pressure, and stress. Dynamic stretching of mantle material during subduction or flow, possibly combined with chemical differentiation have to be considered as scale-forming processes in the upper mantle. However, it is difficult to distinguish with the present sets of Pn/Sn array data whether (and also where) the boundary layer is a frozen-in feature of paleo-processes or whether it is a response to

  14. A new paleointensity result deduced for the Oligocene period fromQatrani basalt, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Ahmed; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2016-04-01

    We have conducted paleodirection and paleointensity measurements of basalt flows from Qatrani basalt, Egypt. Published age of Qatrani basat is 25±2 Ma. Various rock magnetic analyses indicate that the main magnetic carriers of samples are one phase of pure magnetite (Ti-poor titanomagnetites), which have pseudo single domain (PSD) sizes. Directional analysis of the Oligocene basalts is very straightforward and updated mean VGPs have been calculated from the Qatrani (68N, 90E; Kappa=274; A95=1.8) which is coincide with the previous Oligocene paleomagnetic studies. The Tsunakawa-Shaw (LTD-DHT Shaw) method yielded five successful results of 12.9-17.5 μTfrom two sites, giving one acceptable site-mean paleointensityof 15.5 μT with a standard deviation of 1.8 μTat the 25±2Ma. In terms of a dipole moment, an average VDM is calculated to be 2.7×1022A m2with a standard deviation of 1.29×1022Am2. This is the first result from Egypt, and is associated with a reasonably high QPI value (Biggin and Paterson, 2015) of 5. The newly obtained VDM is indistinguishable from an average VDM of 3.55×1022Am2with a standard deviation of 0.67×1022Am2 calculated from theselected 65 site-mean Thellier paleointensity data from the latest paleointensity database, and is about third of the present geomagnetic dipole moment (˜8×1022 Am2).

  15. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them less favourable for studying the field generated by dynamo action in the core. We remove external field predictions, including a new way of characterizing the magnetospheric ring current, from the data and then calculate revised monthly means using robust methods. The geomagnetic secular variation (SV) is calculated as the first annual differences of these monthly means, which also removes the static crustal field. SV time-series based on revised monthly means are much less scattered than those calculated from ordinary monthly means, and their variances and correlations between components are smaller. On the annual to decadal timescale, the SV is generated primarily by advection in the fluid outer core. We demonstrate the utility of the revised monthly means by calculating models of the core surface advective flow between 1997 and 2013 directly from the SV data. One set of models assumes flow that is constant over three months; such models exhibit large and rapid temporal variations. For models of this type, less complex flows achieve the same fit to the SV derived from revised monthly means than those from ordinary monthly means. However, those obtained from ordinary monthly means are able to follow excursions in SV that are likely to be external field contamination rather than core signals. Having established that we can find models that fit the data adequately, we then assess how much temporal variability is required. Previous studies have suggested that the flow is consistent with torsional oscillations (TO), solid body-like oscillations of fluid on concentric cylinders with axes aligned along the Earth's rotation axis. TO have been proposed to explain decadal

  16. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them less favourable for studying the field generated by dynamo action in the core. We remove external field predictions, including a new way of characterising the magnetospheric ring current, from the data and then calculate revised monthly means using robust methods. The geomagnetic secular variation (SV) is calculated as the first annual differences of these monthly means, which also removes the static crustal field. SV time series based on revised monthly means are much less scattered than those calculated from ordinary monthly means, and their variances and correlations between components are smaller. On the annual to decadal timescale, the SV is generated primarily by advection in the fluid outer core. We demonstrate the utility of the revised monthly means by calculating models of the core surface advective flow between 1997 and 2013 directly from the SV data. One set of models assumes flow that is constant over three months; such models exhibit large and rapid temporal variations. For models of this type, less complex flows achieve the same fit to the SV derived from revised monthly means than those from ordinary monthly means. However, those obtained from ordinary monthly means are able to follow excursions in SV that are likely to be external field contamination rather than core signals. Having established that we can find models that fit the data adequately, we then assess how much temporal variability is required. Previous studies have suggested that the flow is consistent with torsional oscillations (TO), solid body-like oscillations of fluid on concentric cylinders with axes aligned along the Earth's rotation axis. TO have been proposed to explain decadal

  17. Fishing for biodiversity: novel methanopterin-linked C transfer genes deduced from the Sargasso Sea metagenome.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Nercessian, Olivier; Lapidus, Alla; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2005-12-01

    The recently generated database of microbial genes from an oligotrophic environment populated by a calculated 1800 major phylotypes (the Sargasso Sea metagenome-SSM) presents a great source for expanding local databases of genes indicative of a specific function. In this article we analyse the SSM for the presence of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer genes that are signature for methylotrophy. We conclude that more than 10 phylotypes possessing genes of interest are present in this environment. The sequences representative of these major phylotypes do not appear to belong to any known microbial group capable of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer. Instead, these sequences separate from all known sequences on phylogenetic trees, pointing toward their affiliation with novel microbial phyla. These data imply a broader distribution of methanopterin-linked functions in the microbial world than has been previously known.

  18. Fishing for biodiversity: Novel methanopterin-linked C1 transfergenes deduced from the Sargasso Sea metagenome

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Nercessian, Olivier; Lapidus, Alla; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2004-07-01

    The recently generated database of microbial genes from anoligotrophic environment populated by a calculated 1,800 of major phylotypes (the Sargasso Sea metagenome) presents a great source for expanding local databases of genes indicative of a specific function. In this paper we analyze the Sargasso Sea metagenome in terms of the presence of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer genes that are signature for methylotrophy. We conclude that more than 10 phylotypes possessing genes of interest are present in this environment, and a few of these are relatively abundant species. The sequences representative of the major phylotypes do not appear to belong to any known microbial group capable of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer. Instead, they separate from all known sequences on phylogenetic trees, pointing towards their affiliation with a novel microbial phylum. These data imply a broader distribution of methanopterin-linked functions in the microbial world than previously known.

  19. Properties of solar flare electrons, deduced from hard X-ray and spatially resolved microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, K. A.; Hurford, G. J.; Zirin, H.; Dulk, G. A.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    An important question concerning an understanding of impulsive solar flares is related to the energetic electrons responsible for the microwave and the hard X-ray emission. A description is presented of an investigation in which spatially resolved microwave observations of an impulsive flare and hard X-ray data from the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) are used to test the hypothesis that the two types of emission come from the same basic electron population. The considered observations are found to imply that the microwaves and hard X-rays were not produced by a common population of electrons with either a Maxwellian or single power-law energy distribution. It is suggested that the calculations should be repeated when observations of stronger events become available, for which a better determination of the X-ray spectrum is possible. The possibility is considered that microwaves and moderately hard X-rays come from spatially different regions.

  20. Deducing the nature of dark matter from direct and indirect detection experiments in the absence of collider signatures of new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, Maria; Hooper, Dan; Kolb, Edward W.; Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2009-08-15

    Despite compelling arguments that significant discoveries of physics beyond the standard model are likely to be made at the Large Hadron Collider, it remains possible that this machine will make no such discoveries, or will make no discoveries directly relevant to the dark matter problem. In this article, we study the ability of astrophysical experiments to deduce the nature of dark matter in such a scenario. In most dark matter studies, the relic abundance and detection prospects are evaluated within the context of some specific particle physics model or models (e.g., supersymmetry). Here, assuming a single weakly interacting massive particle constitutes the Universe's dark matter, we attempt to develop a model-independent approach toward the phenomenology of such particles in the absence of any discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, we consider generic fermionic or scalar dark matter particles with a variety of interaction forms, and calculate the corresponding constraints from and sensitivity of direct and indirect detection experiments. The results may provide some guidance in disentangling information from future direct and indirect detection experiments.

  1. On the moment of inertia in deformed Ba-Xe nuclei as deduced from gamma-gamma energy correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblad, Th.; Hildingsson, L.; Jerrestam, D.; Källberg, A.; Johnson, A.; Herrlander, C. J.; Klamra, W.; Kerek, A.; Lindén, C. G.; Kownacki, J.; kowski, J. Bial; Vertse, T.

    1982-04-01

    The γ-rays following reactions induced by bombarding targets of 114, 116, 118, 120, 122Sn with 118 MeV 12C ions were investigated using six NaI(Tl) detectors in a two-dimensional coincidence arrangement. Experimental energy-correlation spectra were extracted from the original coincidence matrices. The energy-correlation spectra exhibit the features expected for rotational nuclei and were used to deduce information on the moment of inertia I(2) = ΔI/Δω . The gross properties of the behaviour of I(2) in the Ba-Xe region are discussed together with their interpretation within the cranked shell model (CSM).

  2. Mean age of rifting and volcanism on Venus deduced from impact crater densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Maribeth; Suppe, John

    1994-12-01

    UNLIKE the extensively cratered highlands of the Moon and Mars, the surface of Venus does not preserve a record of heavy bombard-ment from the early history of the Solar System1-3. Those craters that are found on Venus appear to be statistically indistinguishable from a random spatial population and rarely show modification by folds, faults and lava flows1-3. Although the volcanic and tec-tonic history of Venus is still much debated2-5, there is mounting evidence for near-global resurfacing ˜300-500 Myr ago1,2,6. Moreover, it has recently been noted that the density of impact craters on large volcanic structures is less than the average crater density of the planet, suggestive of significant activity after the resurfacing event7. It is not clear, however, whether these features represent late remnants of the global event or continuing volcanism and tectonism of a still active planet. To address this question, we have used the regional variations in crater density to date volcan-oes, rifts and coronae which, based on stratigraphic evidence, clearly post-date the main resurfacing event8-11. The calculated mean ages of 70-125 Myr exclude the possibility that the majority of these features represent the final stages of the global event.

  3. The age of the Veritas asteroid family deduced by chaotic chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Andrea; Farinella, Paolo

    1994-07-01

    ASTEROID families are groups of objects produced in disruptive collisions of a parent body. Although family members are widely dispersed in real space, they cluster in the parameter space defined by their so-called proper elements, and can thus be distinguished from the background asteroid population1-3. For most asteroids, these parameters are very close to being invariants of motion and families are still apparent billions of years after their formation4'5. But these parameters undergo chaotic diffusion, and in some cases the rate of diffusion might be large enough that a family member exits from the region of proper-element space occupied by the family after a characteristic time which is shorter than the lifetime of the Solar System. In this case, the characteristic time should provide an approximate upper bound to the age of the family. Here we use this 'chaotic chronology' method to estimate the lifetime of the unusually compact Veritas family. Calculations of the evolu-tion of the proper elements of the family show that two members (including the largest, 490 Veritas) wander outside the borders of the family on a timescale of about 50 Myr, indicating that the family has an age of less than this.

  4. The production rate of cosmogenic 21-Ne in chondrites deduced from 81-Kr measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, L.; Freundel, M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic Ne-21 is used widely to calculate exposure ages of stone meteorites. In order to do so, the production rate P(21) must be known. This rate, however, is dependent on the chemical composition of the meteorite as well as the mass of, and position within, the meteoroid during its exposure to the cosmic radiation. Even for a mean shielding the production rates determined from measurments of different radionuclides vary by a factor of two. A method that can be used to determine exposure ages of meteorites that avoids shielding and chemical composition corrections is the -81-Kr-Kr-method. However, for chondrites, in many cases, the direct determination of production rates for the Kr isotopes is prevented by the trapped gases and the neutron effects on bromine. Therefore, this method was applied to four eucrite falls and then their 81-Kr-83-Kr-ages were compared to their cosmogenic Ne-21 and Ar-38 concentrations. The eucrites Bouvante-le-Haut, Juvinas, Sioux County, and Stannern were chosen for these measurements because of their similar chemical composition regarding the major elements.

  5. The verification of lightning location accuracy in Finland deduced from lightning strikes to trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, Antti; Mäkelä, Jakke; Haapalainen, Jussi; Porjo, Niko

    2016-05-01

    We present a new method to determine the ground truth and accuracy of lightning location systems (LLS), using natural lightning strikes to trees. Observations of strikes to trees are being collected with a Web-based survey tool at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Since the Finnish thunderstorms tend to have on average a low flash rate, it is often possible to identify from the LLS data unambiguously the stroke that caused damage to a given tree. The coordinates of the tree are then the ground truth for that stroke. The technique has clear advantages over other methods used to determine the ground truth. Instrumented towers and rocket launches measure upward-propagating lightning. Video and audio records, even with triangulation, are rarely capable of high accuracy. We present data for 36 quality-controlled tree strikes in the years 2007-2008. We show that the average inaccuracy of the lightning location network for that period was 600 m. In addition, we show that the 50% confidence ellipse calculated by the lightning location network and used operationally for describing the location accuracy is physically meaningful: half of all the strikes were located within the uncertainty ellipse of the nearest recorded stroke. Using tree strike data thus allows not only the accuracy of the LLS to be estimated but also the reliability of the uncertainty ellipse. To our knowledge, this method has not been attempted before for natural lightning.

  6. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results.

  7. Atomic oxygen on the Venus nightside: Global distribution deduced from airglow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, L.; Gérard, J.-C.; Montmessin, F.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.; Bertaux, J.-L.

    2012-02-01

    The Visible and Infra-Red Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument on board the Venus Express spacecraft has measured the O 2(a 1Δ) nightglow distribution at 1.27 μm in the Venus mesosphere for more than two years. Nadir observations have been used to create a statistical map of the emission on Venus nightside. It appears that the statistical 1.6 MR maximum of the emission is located around the antisolar point. Limb observations provide information on the altitude and on the shape of the emission layer. We combine nadir observations essentially covering the southern hemisphere, corrected for the thermal emission of the lower atmosphere, with limb profiles of the northern hemisphere to generate a global map of the Venus nightside emission at 1.27 μm. Given all the O 2(a 1Δ) intensity profiles, O 2(a 1Δ) and O density profiles have been calculated and three-dimensional maps of metastable molecular and atomic oxygen densities have been generated. This global O density nightside distribution improves that available from the VTS3 model, which was based on measurements made above 145 km. The O 2(a 1Δ) hemispheric average density is 2.1 × 10 9 cm -3, with a maximum value of 6.5 × 10 9 cm -3 at 99.2 km. The O density profiles have been derived from the nightglow data using CO 2 profiles from the empirical VTS3 model or from SPICAV stellar occultations. The O hemispheric average density is 1.9 × 10 11 cm -3 in both cases, with a mean altitude of the peak located at 106.1 km and 103.4 km, respectively. These results tend to confirm the modeled values of 2.8 × 10 11 cm -3 at 104 km and 2.0 × 10 11 cm -3 at 110 km obtained by Brecht et al. [Brecht, A., Bougher, S.W., Gérard, J.-C., Parkinson, C.D., Rafkin, S., Foster, B., 2011a. J. Geophys. Res., in press] and Krasnopolsky [Krasnopolsky, V.A., 2010. Icarus 207, 17-27], respectively. Comparing the oxygen density map derived from the O 2(a 1Δ) nightglow observations, it appears that the morphology is very

  8. Accretion timescale and impact history of Mars deduced from the isotopic systematics of martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Lars E.; Brennecka, Gregory A.; Symes, Steven J. K.

    2016-02-01

    High precision Sm-Nd isotopic analyses have been completed on a suite of 11 martian basaltic meteorites in order to better constrain the age of silicate differentiation on Mars associated with the formation of their mantle sources. These data are used to evaluate the merits and disadvantages of various mathematical approaches that have been employed in previous work on this topic. Ages determined from the Sm-Nd isotopic systematics of individual samples are strongly dependent on the assumed Nd isotopic composition of the bulk planet. This assumption is problematic given differences observed between the Nd isotopic composition of Earth and chondritic meteorites and the fact that these materials are both commonly used to represent bulk planetary Nd isotopic compositions. Ages determined from the slope of 146Sm-142Nd whole rock isochrons are not dependent on the assumed 142Nd/144Nd ratio of the planet, but require the sample suite to be derived from complementary, contemporaneously-formed reservoirs. In this work, we present a mathematical expression that defines the age of formation of the source regions of such a suite of samples that is based solely on the slope of a 143Nd-142Nd whole rock isochron and is also independent of any a priori assumptions regarding the bulk isotopic composition of the planet. This expression is also applicable to mineral isochrons and has been used to successfully calculate 143Nd-142Nd model crystallization ages of early refractory solids as well as lunar samples. This permits ages to be obtained using only Nd isotopic measurements without the need for 147Sm/144Nd isotope dilution determinations. When used in conjunction with high-precision Nd isotopic measurements completed on martian meteorites this expression yields an age of formation of the martian basaltic meteorite source regions of 4504 ± 6 Ma. Because the Sm-Nd model ages for the formation of martian source regions are commonly interpreted to record the age at which large scale

  9. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  10. The interstellar redding law in the ultraviolet deduced from filter photometry obtained by the OAO-2 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laget, M.

    1972-01-01

    Filter photometry has been obtained of 16 BO stars at ten effective wavelengths in the range 4250-1430 A. The wavelength dependence of the interstellar reddening law, deduced from a least squares fit of the observed values to the reddening line at each band, is found in satisfactory agreement with that derived by Bless and Savage (1972). Toward the shorter wavelengths the increase of the computed probable error of the slope of the mean reddening line suggests that large fluctuations in the law may occur from star to star. Similar computations, separating main-sequence stars and supergiants, indicate that the large fluctuations of the law appear to be well related to the luminosity of the stars; the supergiants show systematically less extinction, this deficiency becoming large toward the far UV. The small number in the sample however, does not allow a general conclusion to be drawn.

  11. Measurements of the magnetic field orientation in the Jovian ionosphere deduced from Pioneer 10 and 11 scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Yang, F.-C.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper the S band scintillations observed during the Pioneer 10 and 11 occultation measurements of Jupiter are analyzed. It is found that while the electron density irregularities are isotropic in the collision-dominated lower ionosphere, they are anisotropic in the upper ionosphere because of alignment along the magnetic field. By using Rytov's approximation the frequency spectrum of the log-amplitude scintillations is derived for a wave propagating in an anisotropic turbulent medium. It is shown that the spectrum depends to a large extent on the direction of anisotropy and is therefore useful for measuring the orientation of the magnetic field in regions that have not yet been probed by direct measurements. This new technique is applied to the Pioneer 10 and 11 observations, and is used to deduce the first measurements of magnetic field orientation in the ionosphere of Jupiter.

  12. Submarine paleoseismology of the northern Hikurangi subduction margin of New Zealand as deduced from Turbidite record since 16 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouderoux, Hugo; Proust, Jean-Noël; Lamarche, Geoffroy

    2014-01-01

    Paleoseismic studies seek to characterise the signature of pre-historical earthquakes by deriving quantitative information from the geological record such as the source, magnitude and recurrence of moderate to large earthquakes. In this study, we provide a ˜16,000 yr-long paleo-earthquake record of the 200 km-long northern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand, using cm-thick deep-sea turbidites identified in sediment cores. Cores were collected in strategic locations across the margin within three distinct morphological re-entrants - the Poverty, Ruatoria and Matakaoa re-entrants. The turbidite facies vary from muddy to sandy with evidence for rare hyperpycnites interbedded with hemipelagites and tephra. We use the Oxal probabilistic software to model the age of each turbidite, using the sedimentation rate of hemipelagite deduced from well-dated tephra layers and radiocarbon ages measurements on planktonic foraminifera.

  13. Field line equipotentiality and ion neutral collision frequencies in the dynamo region deduced from Saint-Santin ion drift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Taieb, C.; Blanc, M.

    1981-08-01

    We analyze three-dimensional ion drift data from the Saint-Santin incoherent scatter facility to test experimentally the theoretical description of ion transport in the ionospheric dynamo layer, and to deduce electric fields and ion neutral collision frequencies from the observed drifts. Using a geometrical representation of the ion momentum equation, we show that at middle latitudes, because horizontal neutral wind influences ion motions both parallel and orthogonal to the field lines in the ionospheric dynamo layer, the information contained in a three-dimensional ion drift measurement is redundant, thus permitting to check the standard theoretical description of ionospheric electrodynamics in two ways. First, assuming a model ion-neutral collision frequency profile, one can deduce the north-south perpendicular component of the electric field function of height in the E region from Saint-Santin drift data. We find that its altitude variations remain within the experimental uncertainty of the method, in agreement with the theoretical assumption of equipotential field lines. Second, assuming that the electric field is constant in altitude, one can determine the ion collision ratio, or ratio of the ion collision frequency to the ion gyrofrequency, from a comparison of E and F region drift measurements. Daily median values of the ion collision frequencies, thus obtained for each of the three seasons, are found to compare reasonably well with ion collision frequencies derived from the Jacchia neutral atmosphere model for the case of the equinox sample, but determinations for the other seasons are contaminated by a high level of measurement noise.

  14. WBN-1 Cycle 10 TPBAR Tritium Release, Deduced From Analysis of RCS Data TTP-1-3046-00, Rev 0

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Niehus, Mark T.; Love, Edward F.

    2012-02-19

    This document contains the calculation of the TPBAR tritium release from the Mark 9.2 design TPBARs irradiated in WBN cycle 10. The calculation utilizes the generalized cycle analysis methodology given in TTP-1-3045 Rev. 0.

  15. An Exact Formula for Calculating Inverse Radial Lens Distortions

    PubMed Central

    Drap, Pierre; Lefèvre, Julien

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a new approach to calculating the inverse of radial distortions. The method presented here provides a model of reverse radial distortion, currently modeled by a polynomial expression, that proposes another polynomial expression where the new coefficients are a function of the original ones. After describing the state of the art, the proposed method is developed. It is based on a formal calculus involving a power series used to deduce a recursive formula for the new coefficients. We present several implementations of this method and describe the experiments conducted to assess the validity of the new approach. Such an approach, non-iterative, using another polynomial expression, able to be deduced from the first one, can actually be interesting in terms of performance, reuse of existing software, or bridging between different existing software tools that do not consider distortion from the same point of view. PMID:27258288

  16. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  17. The application of striation analysis and focal mechanism stress inversion in deducing the kinematic history of faults: Examples from the Bristol Channel UK and the Ionian Zone Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Nikolaos S.; Miliorizos, Marios N.; Oshoano Aipoh, Hilary

    2013-04-01

    postulated to reactivate it. For example, structures are selected in the field from the tectonised strata of northern Corfu and from recent geological maps of north western Greece. These data are used in conjunction with the results of stress inversion of focal mechanisms, in order to anticipate and then test the gross senses of fault reactivation. Tests are investigated using structural field techniques and available international striation analysis software modules. The defined framework analysis is applied to both the data from ancient faults, in UK and the focal mechanisms of earthquakes, in Greece. Stress tensors are calculated and fault kinematic histories are evaluated. Hence, this application permits the effects of a modern stress regime to be deduced for a known fault framework, in order to complete and understand fully the kinematic history to the present day. As a corollary, the significant field techniques of tracing major fault lines across regional unconformities and measuring the sense of displacements across these stratigraphic boundaries permit kinematic histories to be defined more precisely in both terranes, than by using only structural techniques.

  18. Long term carbon dioxide exchange above a mixed forest in the Belgian Ardennes: evaluation of different approaches to deduce total ecosystem respiration from Eddy covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jérôme, Elisabeth; Aubinet, Marc; Heinesch, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    The general aim of this research is to analyze inter annual variability of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes exchanged by a mixed forest located at the Vielsalm experimental site in Belgium. At this site, CO2 flux measurements started in 1996 and are still going on. Thirteen complete years of measurements are thus available. Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) inter annual variability may be driven by gross primary productivity (GPP) or Total Ecosystem Respiration (TER), which should thus be both quantified. Using flux partitioning methods, TER is deduced from NEE measurements. GPP is then obtained by subtracting TER from NEE. Initially, a robust estimation of TER is required. This work seeks to compare two independent approaches to assess TER in order to quantify the implications on inter-annual variability. The comparison was performed on twelve complete years. TER estimates can be deduced by extrapolating to the whole day NEE measurements taken during selected night or day periods. In both case, the extrapolation is performed by using a respiration response to temperature. The first approach, referred as the night-time approach, consisted in calculating TER using a temperature response function derived from night-time data sets (Reichstein et al., 2005). The second approach, referred as the daytime approach, consisted in assessing TER from the intercept of the NEE/Photosynthetically Photon Flux Density (PPFD) response (Wohlfahrt et al., 2005). For each approach, different modalities were compared: the use of long term (annual) or short term (15 days) data sets for the night-time approach and the use of different types of regression for the daytime approach. In addition, the impact of the temperature choice was studied for each of the approaches. For the night-time approach, main results showed that air temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration derived from annual data did not reflect the short-term air temperature sensitivity. Vielsalm is a summer active ecosystem

  19. QM/MM Calculations on Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ryde, U

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, I discuss combined quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM; QM/MM) calculations for proteins. In QM/MM, a small but interesting part of the protein is treated by accurate QM methods, whereas the remainder is treated by faster MM methods. The prime problems with QM/MM calculations are bonds between the QM and MM systems, the selection of the QM system, and the local-minima problem. The two first problems can be solved by the big-QM approach, including in the QM calculation all groups within 4.5-6Å of the active site and all buried charges in the protein. The third problem can be solved by calculating free energies. It is important to study QM/MM energy components to ensure that the results are stable and reliable. They can also be used to understand the reaction and the effect of the surroundings, eg, by dividing the catalytic effect into bonded, van der Waals, electrostatic, and geometric components and to deduce which parts of the protein contribute most to the catalysis. It should be ensured that the QM calculations are reliable and converged by extending the basis set to quadruple-zeta quality, including a proper treatment of dispersion, as well as years experience and method development calculations with both pure and hybrid density functional theory methods. If the latter give differing results, calibration with high-level QM methods is needed. Reactions that change the net charge should be avoided. QM/MM calculations can be combined with experimental methods. PMID:27498637

  20. Deducing the temporal order of cofactor function in ligand-regulated gene transcription: theory and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Edward J; Guo, Chunhua; Simons, S Stoney; Chow, Carson C

    2012-01-01

    Cofactors are intimately involved in steroid-regulated gene expression. Two critical questions are (1) the steps at which cofactors exert their biological activities and (2) the nature of that activity. Here we show that a new mathematical theory of steroid hormone action can be used to deduce the kinetic properties and reaction sequence position for the functioning of any two cofactors relative to a concentration limiting step (CLS) and to each other. The predictions of the theory, which can be applied using graphical methods similar to those of enzyme kinetics, are validated by obtaining internally consistent data for pair-wise analyses of three cofactors (TIF2, sSMRT, and NCoR) in U2OS cells. The analysis of TIF2 and sSMRT actions on GR-induction of an endogenous gene gave results identical to those with an exogenous reporter. Thus new tools to determine previously unobtainable information about the nature and position of cofactor action in any process displaying first-order Hill plot kinetics are now available.

  1. Anti-platelet autoantibodies from ITP patients recognize an epitope in GPIIb/IIIa deduced by complementary hydropathy.

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, S J; Sabbaga, J; D'Amico, E; Pasqualini, R; Brentani, R

    1992-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a frequent platelet disorder due to the presence of anti-platelet autoantibodies. Recently a fibronectin/fibrinogen receptor in platelets, integrin GPIIb/IIIa, has been implicated as the antigen in chronic ITP. To examine the epitopes involved in the autoimmune response against GPIIb/IIIa we have used concepts from the complementary hydropathy principle. We used the peptide Trp-Thr-Val-Pro-Thr-Ala, WTVPTA (deduced from the complementary nucleotide sequence to that which codes for the Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD, domain in fibronectin), to test the immunologic activity of ITP sera. Sera from 31 patients with clinically defined ITP were tested in ELISA for reactivity towards WTVPTA and affinity purified GPIIb/IIIa. Seventeen sera (57%) reacted strongly with the glycoprotein complex, five of which reacted with the peptide. By affinity chromatography of one of these sera, we were able to show that antibodies that bind to the peptide are within the population that binds to GPIIb/IIIa. Liquid phase competition experiments revealed that binding of ITP serum to WTVPTA was inhibited only by a hydropathically compatible peptide. Our data indicate that autoantibodies can bind to hydropathically generated antigenic determinants and thus, render these peptides clinically important as diagnostic tools. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1371492

  2. Evolutionary relationships of a plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organism and Acholeplasma laidlawii deduced from two ribosomal protein gene sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, P O; Sears, B B

    1992-01-01

    The families within the class Mollicutes are distinguished by their morphologies, nutritional requirements, and abilities to metabolize certain compounds. Biosystematic classification of the plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) has been difficult because these organisms have not been cultured in vitro, and hence their nutritional requirements have not been determined nor have physiological characterizations been possible. To investigate the evolutionary relationship of the MLOs to other members of the class Mollicutes, a segment of a ribosomal protein operon was cloned and sequenced from an aster yellows-type MLO which is pathogenic for members of the genus Oenothera and from Acholeplasma laidlawii. The deduced amino acid sequence data from the rpl22 and rps3 genes indicate that the MLOs are more closely related to A. laidlawii than to animal mycoplasmas, confirming previous results from 16S rRNA sequence comparisons. This conclusion is also supported by the finding that the UGA codon is not read as a tryptophan codon in the MLO and A. laidlawii, in contrast to its usage in Mycoplasma capricolum. PMID:1556079

  3. Deducing the 236Pu(n,f) and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections via the surrogate ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. O.; Beausang, C. W.; Ross, T. J.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; McCleskey, M.; Cooper, N.; Escher, J. E.; Gell, K. B.; Good, E.; Humby, P.; Saastimoinen, A.; Tarlow, T. D.

    2013-10-01

    The short half-lives associated with certain minor actinide nuclei that are relevant to stockpile stewardship pursuits and the development of next-generation nuclear reactors make direct neutron measurements very challenging. In certain cases, a stable beam and target ``surrogate reaction'' can be used in lieu of the neutron-induced reaction, and the (n,f) cross section can then be deduced indirectly. Agreement between surrogate and direct measurements for (n,f) cross sections in actinide nuclei is usually within 10%. The present work reports on the measurement of the 236Pu(n,f) and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections via 239Pu(p,tf) and 239Pu(p,df) surrogate reactions, respectively. The experiment was performed at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Facility using a 28.5 MeV proton beam to bombard 239Pu and 235U targets. Outgoing light ions were detected in coincidence with fission fragments using the STAR-LiTe detector array. Results of the analysis will be presented. This work was supported by DoE Grant Numbers: DE-FG52-09NA29454 and DE-FG02-05ER41379 (Richmond), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-FG52-09NA29467 (TAMU).

  4. New prospects for deducing the evolutionary history of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes: Aromatic biosynthesis as a case-in-point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Suhail; Jensen, Roy A.

    1988-03-01

    Metabolic pathways of prokaryotes are more biochemically diverse than is generally recognized. Distinctive biochemical features are shared by phylogenetic clusters. The hierarchical levels of characterstate clustering depends upon evolutionary events which fortuitously became fixed in the genome of a common ancestor. Prokaryotes can now be ordered on a phylogenetic tree. This allows the evolutionary steps that underlie the construction and regulation of appropriately complex biochemical pathways to be traced in an evolutionary progression of prokaryote types that house these pathways. Essentially the approach is to deduce ancestral character states at ever deeper phylogenetic levels, utilizing logical principles of maximum parsimony. The current perspective on the evolution of the biochemical pathway for biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids is developed as a case-in-point model for analyses that should be feasible with many major metabolic systems. Phenylalanine biosynthesis probably arose prior to the addition of branches leading to tyrosine and tryptophan. An evolutionary scenario is developed that begins with non-enzymatic reactions which may have operated in primitive systems, followed by the evolution of an enzymatic system that pre-dated the divergence of major lineages of modern eubacteria (Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative purple bacteria, and cyanobacteria).

  5. Metabolic potential of the organic-solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E deduced from its annotated genome

    PubMed Central

    Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Daniels, Craig; Gómez, Manuel J; Molina-Henares, María A; Matilla, Miguel A; Roca, Amalia; Fernández, Matilde; Duque, Estrella; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2013-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E is an organic solvent tolerant strain capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report the DOT-T1E genomic sequence (6 394 153 bp) and its metabolic atlas based on the classification of enzyme activities. The genome encodes for at least 1751 enzymatic reactions that account for the known pattern of C, N, P and S utilization by this strain. Based on the potential of this strain to thrive in the presence of organic solvents and the subclasses of enzymes encoded in the genome, its metabolic map can be drawn and a number of potential biotransformation reactions can be deduced. This information may prove useful for adapting desired reactions to create value-added products. This bioengineering potential may be realized via direct transformation of substrates, or may require genetic engineering to block an existing pathway, or to re-organize operons and genes, as well as possibly requiring the recruitment of enzymes from other sources to achieve the desired transformation. Funding Information Work in our laboratory was supported by Fondo Social Europeo and Fondos FEDER from the European Union, through several projects (BIO2010-17227, Consolider-Ingenio CSD2007-00005, Excelencia 2007 CVI-3010, Excelencia 2011 CVI-7391 and EXPLORA BIO2011-12776-E). PMID:23815283

  6. Autistic Savant Calendar Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, Paul J.

    This study identified 10 savants with developmental disabilities and an exceptional ability to calculate calendar dates. These "calendar calculators" were asked to demonstrate their abilities, and their strategies were analyzed. The study found that the ability to calculate dates into the past or future varied widely among these calculators. Three…

  7. Coseismic Slip Distribution of the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Deduced from Land and Seafloor Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, T.; Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Inazu, D.; Ohzono, M.; Tsushima, H.; Hino, R.; Ohta, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Miura, S.; Shinohara, M.

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (M9.0) occurred on 11 March 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku district, northeastern Japan, where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the overriding continental plate. A number of models of the coseismic slip distribution of this earthquake have been already proposed based on seismological, geodetic, and tsunami data. Here, we present comprehensive coseismic slip distribution model based not only on land GPS data but also on seafloor geodetic observations, which are obtained through recent observation cruises. We combined displacements at seafloor sites that are deduced from two different types of seafloor observations with the displacements at land GPS stations. One is the seafloor crustal deformation observation with GPS/Acoustic ranging (GPS/A). Horizontal displacements associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake at 2 GPS/A stations are estimated by comparing the station positions deduced from the observations before and after the earthquake. Another type of the seafloor data is seafloor water pressure that is observed by means of ocean bottom pressure gauge (OBP). We analyzed OBP data observed at 2 cabled and 4 self pop-up stations, and estimated vertical displacements due to the main shock. Displacements at 5 GPS/A stations of Japan Coast Guard [Sato et al., 2011, science] are also included to estimate the coseismic slip distribution of the earthquake. Estimated slip distribution of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake shows following features. 1) The area of large slip ( > 20 m) is about 100 km x 200 km on the plate interface shallower than 30 km in depth. 2) There is no large slip occurred off southern Iwate prefecture on the plate interface throughout shallow to deep. 3) The latitudinal range of the area of large slip almost corresponds to the one of the area of strong interplate coupling zone off Miyagi prefecture. 4) Significant slip is estimated around the rupture area of 1978 M7.4 Miyagi-oki earthquake (40

  8. Utilization of metabonomics to identify serum biomarkers in murine H22 hepatocarcinoma and deduce antitumor mechanism of Rhizoma Paridis saponins.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peiyu; Man, Shuli; Yang, He; Fan, Wei; Yu, Peng; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-08-25

    Murine H22 hepatocarcinoma model is so popular to be used for the preclinical anticancer candidate's evaluation. However, the metabolic biomarkers of this model were not identified. Meanwhile, Rhizoma Paridis saponins (RPS) as natural products have been found to show strong antitumor activity, while its anti-cancer mechanism is not clear. To search for potential metabolite biomarkers of this model, serum metabonomics approach was applied to detect the variation of metabolite biomarkers and the related metabolism genes and signaling pathway were used to deduce the antitumor mechanisms of RPS. As a result, ten serum metabolites were identified in twenty-four mice including healthy mice, non-treated cancer mice, RPS-treated cancer mice and RPS-treated healthy mice. RPS significantly decreased tumor weight correlates to down-regulating lactate, acetate, N-acetyl amino acid and glutamine signals (p < 0.05), which were marked metabolites screened according to the very important person (VIP), loading plot and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) tests. For the analysis of metabolic enzyme related genes, RPS reversed the aerobic glycolysis through activating tumor suppressor p53 and PTEN, and suppressed FASN to inhibit lipogenesis. What's more, RPS repressed Myc and GLS expression and decreased glutamine level. The regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR and HIF-1α/Myc/Ras networks also participated in these metabolic changes. Taken together, RPS suppressed ATP product made the tumor growth slow, which indicated a good anti-cancer effect and new angle for understanding the mechanism of RPS. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the utility of (1)H NMR metabolic profiles taken together with tumor weight and viscera index was a promising screening tool for evaluating the antitumor effect of candidates. In addition, RPS was a potent anticancer agent through inhibiting cancer cellular metabolism to suppress proliferation in hepatoma H22 tumor murine, which promoted the

  9. Light regulation of cGMP metabolism in toad rod outer segments (ROS) deduced from intact photoreceptor and cellfree kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Dawis, S.M.; Graeff, R.M.; Heyman, R.A.; Walseth, T.F.; Butz, E.A.

    1987-05-01

    The rate of cGMP hydrolysis by phosphodiesterase (PDE) in intact ROS, monitored in dark-adapted isolated toad retina by the rate of /sup 18/O appearance in guanine nucleotide ..cap alpha..-phosphoryls, is 1/360th of that observed in disrupted ROS at a substrate concentration equivalent to the total (cGMP) in ROS. Low to moderate photic stimuli increase this cGMP hydrolytic rate up to 10-fold in intact ROS with little or no change in total (cGMP). G-protein activation determined in intact ROS by the fraction of GDP labeled with /sup 18/O corresponds with light-related increases in cGMP flux. In contrast, relatively high intensities and extended illumination cause attenuation of maximal cGMP hydrolysis with proportionate reductions in total (cGMP). From these observations combined with the effects of activated G-protein on kinetics and cGMP binding of ROS PDE the following model for light-regulation of cGMP metabolism was deduced: cGMP flux in intact ROS is severely restricted in the dark state because approximately 99% of the cGMP is bound to high affinity sites on the non-stimulated form of PDE. This constraint is relieved when activated G-protein converts the cGMP-binding form of PDE to a high K/sub m/ catalytic form. cGMP is then redistributed to a dynamic pool where it is available to PDE catalytic sites and lower affinity allosteric sites. The (cGMP) in the dynamic pool is maintained or further increased or decreased by modulating the activity of an apparently light-sensitive guanylyl cyclase.

  10. Evaluation des programmes de techniques d'education en services de garde (Evaluation of Programs of Educational Methods in Child Care Services. 2410-0521.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigneau, Paul, Comp.

    In March 1994, Quebec's Commission on the Evaluation of Collegiate Teaching initiated an evaluation of "Techniques d'education en services de garde" (TESG) programs, or educational methods in child care services. This report presents results from the evaluation in three parts. The first section describes the following four stages of the…

  11. Calculating drug doses.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Numeracy and calculation are key skills for nurses. As nurses are directly accountable for ensuring medicines are prescribed, dispensed and administered safely, they must be able to understand and calculate drug doses. PMID:27615351

  12. Calculator-Active Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.; Harris, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This journal contains brief descriptions of calculator-active materials that were found using Resource Finder, the searchable online catalog of curriculum resources from the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC). It features both the calculators themselves and the activity books that are used with them. Among the calculators included are those…

  13. Flexible Mental Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, John

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that strategy choice is a misleading characterization of efficient mental calculation and that teaching mental calculation methods as a whole is not conducive to flexibility. Proposes an alternative in which calculation is thought of as an interaction between noticing and knowledge. Presents an associated teaching approach to promote…

  14. Importance of parametrizing constraints in quantum-mechanical variational calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Kwong T.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    In variational calculations of quantum mechanics, constraints are sometimes imposed explicitly on the wave function. These constraints, which are deduced by physical arguments, are often not uniquely defined. In this work, the advantage of parametrizing constraints and letting the variational principle determine the best possible constraint for the problem is pointed out. Examples are carried out to show the surprising effectiveness of the variational method if constraints are parameterized. It is also shown that misleading results may be obtained if a constraint is not parameterized.

  15. Beta Decay of the Proton-Rich Nuclei 102Sn and 104Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Karny, M.; Batist, L.; Banu, A.; Becker, F.; Blazhev, A.; Brown, B. A.; Bruchle, W.; Doring, J.; Faestermann, T.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Janas, Z.; Jungclaus, A.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kirchner, R.; La Commara, M.; Mandal, S.; Mazzocchi, C.; Miernik, K.; Mukha, I.; Muralithar, S.; Plettner, C.; Plochocki, A.; Roeckl, E.; Romoli, M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schadel, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Zylicz, J.

    2006-01-01

    The {beta} decays of {sup 102}Sn and {sup 104}Sn were studied by using high-resolution germanium detectors as well as a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). For {sup 104}Sn, with three new {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays identified, the total Gamow-Teller strength (BGT) value of 2.7(3) was obtained. For {sup 102}Sn, the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data were collected for the first time, allowing us to considerably extend the decay scheme. This scheme was used to unfold the TAS data and to deduce a BGT value of 4.2(8) for this decay. This result is compared to shell model predictions, yielding a hindrance factor of 3.6(7) in agreement with those obtained previously for {sup 98}Cd and {sup 100}In. Together with the latter two, {sup 102}Sn completes the triplet of Z {le} 50, N {ge} 50 nuclei with two proton holes, one proton hole and one neutron particle, and two neutron particles with respect to the doubly magic {sup 100}Sn core.

  16. β decay of the exotic Tz=-2 nuclei 48Fe,52Ni , and 56Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrigo, S. E. A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Blank, B.; Cáceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Ganioǧlu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grévy, S.; Kamalou, O.; Kozer, H. C.; Kucuk, L.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Molina, F.; Popescu, L.; Rogers, A. M.; Susoy, G.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    The results of a study of the β decays of three proton-rich nuclei with Tz=-2 , namely 48Fe,52Ni , and 56Zn, produced in an experiment carried out at GANIL, are reported. In all three cases we have extracted the half-lives and the total β -delayed proton emission branching ratios. We have measured the individual β -delayed protons and β -delayed γ rays and the branching ratios of the corresponding levels. Decay schemes have been determined for the three nuclei, and new energy levels are identified in the daughter nuclei. Competition between β -delayed protons and γ rays is observed in the de-excitation of the T =2 isobaric analog states in all three cases. Absolute Fermi and Gamow-Teller transition strengths have been determined. The mass excesses of the nuclei under study have been deduced. In addition, we discuss in detail the data analysis taking as a test case 56Zn, where the exotic β -delayed γ -proton decay has been observed.

  17. SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaumann, Uwe; Duprat, Josette; Pujol, Claude; Labeyrie, Laurent D.

    1996-02-01

    leave the system.) (Paper 95PA01743,SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surfacetemperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments, UwePflaumann, Josette Duprat, Claude Pujol, and Laurent D. Labeyrie).Diskette may be ordered from American Geophysical Union, 2000Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009; Payment mustaccompany order.

  18. 600 yr High-Resolution Climate Reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation deduced from a Puerto Rican Speleothem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieten, Rolf; Winter, Amos; Scholz, Denis; Black, David; Spoetl, Christoph; Winterhalder, Sophie; Koltai, Gabriella; Schroeder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Terzer, Stefan; Zanchettin, Davide; Mangini, Augusto

    2016-04-01

    A multi-proxy speleothem study tracks the regional hydrological variability in Puerto Rico and highlights its close relation to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) describing low-frequency sea-surface temperature (SST) variability in the North Atlantic ocean. Our proxy record extends instrumental observations 600 years into the past, and reveals the range of natural hydrologic variability for the region. A detailed interpretation and understanding of the speleothem climate record is achieved by the combination of multi-proxy measurements, thin section petrography, XRD analysis and cave monitoring results. The speleothem was collected in Cueva Larga, a one mile-long cave system that has been monitored since 2012. MC-ICPMS 230Th/U-dating reveals that the speleothem grew constantly over the last 600 years. Trace element ratios (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) as well as stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ13C) elucidate significant changes in atmospheric precipitation at the site. Monthly cave monitoring results demonstrate that the epikarst system responds to multi-annual changes in seepage water recharge. The drip water isotope and trace element composition lack short term or seasonal variability. This hydrological system creates favorable conditions to deduce decadal climate variability from Cueva Larga's climate record. The speleothem time series mimics the most recent AMO reconstruction over the last 200 years (Svendsen et al., 2014) with a time lag of 10-20 years. The lag seems to results from slow atmospheric signal transmission through the epikarst but the effect of dating uncertainties cannot be ruled out. Warm SSTs in the North Atlantic are related to drier conditions in Puerto Rico. During times of decreased rainfall a relative increase in prior calcite precipitation seems to be the main process causing increased Mg/Ca trace element ratios. High trace element ratios correlate to higher δ13C values. The increase in both proxies indicates a shift towards time

  19. 600 yr High-Resolution Climate Reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability deduced from a Puerto Rican Speleothem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, A.; Vieten, R.

    2015-12-01

    A multi-proxy speleothem study tracks the regional hydrological variability in Puerto Rico and highlights its close relation to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Our proxy record extends instrumental observations 600 years into the past, and reveals the range of natural hydrologic variability for the region. A detailed interpretation and understanding of the speleothem climate record is achieved by the combination of multi-proxy measurements, thin section petrography, XRD analysis and cave monitoring results. The speleothem was collected in Cueva Larga, a one mile-long cave system that has been monitored since 2012. MC-ICPMS 230Th/U-dating reveals that the speleothem grew constantly over the last 600 years. Trace element ratios (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) as well as stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ13C) elucidate significant changes in atmospheric precipitation at the site. Monthly cave monitoring results demonstrate that the epikarst system responds to multi-annual changes in seepage water recharge. The drip water isotope and trace element composition lack short term or seasonal variability. This hydrological system creates favorable conditions to deduce decadal climate variability from Cueva Larga's climate record. The speleothem time series mimics the most-recently published AMO reconstruction over the last 200 years with a time lag of 10-20 years. The time lag seems to results from slow atmospheric signal transmission through the epikarst but the effect of dating uncertainties cannot be ruled out. Warm SSTs in the North Atlantic are related to drier conditions in Puerto Rico. During times of decreased rainfall a relative increase in prior calcite precipitation seems to be the main process causing increased Mg/Ca trace element ratios. High trace element ratios correlate to higher δ13C values. The increase in both proxies indicates a shift towards time periods of decreased rainfall. Over the past 600 years there are two intervals of increased Mg/Ca and δ13C values

  20. On calculating the potential vorticity flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-03-15

    We discuss and compare different approaches to calculating the dynamics of anisotropic flow structure formation in quasi two-dimensional turbulence based on potential vorticity (PV) transport in real space. The general structure of the PV flux in the relaxation processes is deduced non-perturbatively. The transport coefficients of the PV flux are then systematically calculated using perturbation theory. We develop two non-perturbative relaxation models: the first is a mean field theory for the dynamics of minimum enstrophy relaxation based on the requirement that the mean flux of PV dissipates total potential enstrophy but conserves total fluid kinetic energy. The results show that the structure of PV flux has the form of a sum of a positive definite hyper-viscous and a negative or positive viscous flux of PV. Turbulence spreading is shown to be related to PV mixing via the link of turbulence energy flux to PV flux. In the relaxed state, the ratio of the PV gradient to zonal flow velocity is homogenized. This homogenized quantity sets a constraint on the amplitudes of PV and zonal flow in the relaxed state. The second relaxation model is derived from symmetry principles alone. The form of PV flux contains a nonlinear convective term in addition to viscous and hyper-viscous terms. For both cases, the transport coefficients are calculated using perturbation theory. For a broad turbulence spectrum, a modulational calculation of the PV flux gives both a negative viscosity and a positive hyper-viscosity. For a narrow turbulence spectrum, the result of a parametric instability analysis shows that PV transport is also convective. In both relaxation and perturbative analyses, it is shown that turbulent PV transport is sensitive to flow structure, and the transport coefficients are nonlinear functions of flow shear.

  1. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  2. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  3. Origin of platinum-group mineral assemblages in a mantle tectonite at Unst deduced from mineral chemistry and osmium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badanina, Inna Yu.; Lord, Richard A.; Malitch, Kreshimir N.; Meisel, Thomas C.

    2013-04-01

    assemblage is likely to reflect processes such as in-situ serpentinisation, alteration during emplacement or regional greenschist metamorphism. Whole-rock platinum-group element (PGE) concentrations give negatively sloped chondrite-normalized PGE patterns, typical of podiform chromitite, where refractory PGE (Os, Ir and Ru) prevail over less refractory PGE (Rh, Pt and Pd). The osmium isotope results identify similarly 'unradiogenic' 187Os/188Os values for 'primary' and 'secondary' PGM assemblages (with mean 187Os/188Os values of 0.12419 and 0.12464, respectively), being within uncertainty of the chromitite composition (0.1240±0.0006). This implies that the whole-rock Os isotope budget is largely controlled by laurite-dominant assemblages, supporting the conclusion that the 'secondary' PGM assemblage inherited the subchondritic osmium isotope signature of the 'primary' PGM. No evidence for other source contributions during later thermal events has been observed. The Os-isotope data provide further support for an Enstatite Chondrite Reservoir model for the convective upper mantle as defined by Walker et al. (2002) and are consistent with origin of the complex as a Caledonian ophiolite formed in a supra-subduction zone. This study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 12-05-01166-a to IYuB) and the Uralian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences (project No 12-P-5-1020). References: Andrews, D.R.A., Brenan, J.M. (2002) Phase-equilibrium constraints on the magmatic origin of laurite and Os-Ir alloy. Can. Mineral. 40, 1705-1716. Walker, R.J., Prichard, H.M., Ishiwatari, A., Pimentel, M. (2002) The osmium isotopic composition of convecting upper mantle deduced from ophiolite chromites. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66, 329-345.

  4. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: The Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE)

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Monica M.; Rusincovitch, Shelley A.; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C.; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Methods Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of “smart dimensions”, and dynamically-generated user interfaces. Results DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort “join” functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Conclusions Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source

  5. First-forbidden β-decay rates, energy rates of β-delayed neutrons and probability of β-delayed neutron emissions for neutron-rich nickel isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Çakmak, Necla; Iftikhar, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    First-forbidden (FF) transitions can play an important role in decreasing the calculated half-lives specially in environments where allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are unfavored. Of special mention is the case of neutron-rich nuclei where, due to phase-space amplification, FF transitions are much favored. We calculate the allowed GT transitions in various pn-QRPA models for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel. Here we also study the effect of deformation on the calculated GT strengths. The FF transitions for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel are calculated assuming the nuclei to be spherical. Later we take into account deformation of nuclei and calculate GT + unique FF transitions, stellar β-decay rates, energy rate of β-delayed neutrons and probability of β-delayed neutron emissions. The calculated half-lives are in excellent agreement with measured ones and might contribute in speeding-up of the r-matter flow.

  6. Concentration of ore elements in magmatic melts and natural fluids as deduced from data on inclusions in minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, V. B.; Girnis, A. V.; Dorofeeva, V. A.; Kovalenker, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    Based on intergration of the published data on composition of inclusions in minerals and quenched glasses, the mean concentrations of 24 ore elements have been calculated for magmatic silicate melts formed in main geodynamic settings of the Earth and in natural fluids. The mean glass compositions normalized to the primitive mantle correlate with the partition coefficient between olivine and the basic melt. It is established that the degree of enrichment in ore elements depending on geodynamic setting is controlled by various contribution of fluids to the element transfer and accumulation. The ratios of element contents in each geodynamic setting to the mean concentrations of elements over all settings in the Earth have been calculated.

  7. Simulation of EAS properties on the basis of high energy interaction model deduced from the accelerator data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubiak, G.; Szabelski, J.; Wdeyozyk, J.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Calculations of extensive air showers in atmosphere were performed using formulae describing p-p and p-air nucleus interactions. The formulae fitted to the accelerator data were extrapolated taking the same trend up to 10 to the 16 eV. Above that energy it was assumed that the degree of scaling violating/alpha-parameter/ is saturating or even decreasing. The latter assumption follows from earlier work where it was found that without this restriction shower maxima at the highest energies are located too high in the atmosphere. Results of calculations have been compared with experimental data. The comparison was made separately for the curves obtained from the so called equal intensity cuts and for the Cerenkov data.

  8. Local fluctuations of ozone from 16 km to 45 km deduced from in situ vertical ozone profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, G.; Robert, C.

    1994-01-01

    A vertical ozone profile obtained by an in situ ozone sonde from 16 km to 45 km, has allowed to observe local ozone concentration variations. These variations can be observed, thanks to a fast measurement system based on a UV absorption KrF excimer laser beam in a multipass cell. Ozone standard deviation versus altitude calculated from the mean is derived. Ozone variations or fluctuations are correlated with the different dynamic zones of the stratosphere.

  9. Calculators and Polynomial Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, J. F.

    The intent of this paper is to suggest and illustrate how electronic hand-held calculators, especially non-programmable ones with limited data-storage capacity, can be used to advantage by students in one particular aspect of work with polynomial functions. The basic mathematical background upon which calculator application is built is summarized.…

  10. TI-73 Calculator Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips-Bey, Carol K.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes TI-73 calculator activities appropriate for middle school students. It was found that the use of the calculator allowed for higher-level thinking and a richer exploration of mathematical ideas by students. [Included with this article are "Dice Roll Worksheet" and "Transforming Tree Worksheet".] (Contains 9 figures.)

  11. Relativistic shell model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnstahl, R. J.

    1986-06-01

    Shell model calculations are discussed in the context of a relativistic model of nuclear structure based on renormalizable quantum field theories of mesons and baryons (quantum hadrodynamics). The relativistic Hartree approximation to the full field theory, with parameters determined from bulk properties of nuclear matter, predicts a shell structure in finite nuclei. Particle-hole excitations in finite nuclei are described in an RPA calculation based on this QHD ground state. The particle-hole interaction is prescribed by the Hartree ground state, with no additional parameters. Meson retardation is neglected in deriving the RPA equations, but it is found to have negligible effects on low-lying states. The full Dirac matrix structure is maintained throughout the calculation; no nonrelativistic reductions are made. Despite sensitive cancellations in the ground state calculation, reasonable excitation spectra are obtained for light nuclei. The effects of including charged mesons, problems with heavy nuclei, and prospects for improved and extended calculations are discussed.

  12. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    PubMed

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  13. Dose Calculation Spreadsheet

    1997-06-10

    VENTSAR XL is an EXCEL Spreadsheet that can be used to calculate downwind doses as a result of a hypothetical atmospheric release. Both building effects and plume rise may be considered. VENTSAR XL will run using any version of Microsoft EXCEL version 4.0 or later. Macros (the programming language of EXCEL) was used to automate the calculations. The user enters a minimal amount of input and the code calculates the resulting concentrations and doses atmore » various downwind distances as specified by the user.« less

  14. Correlation between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the field-aligned current regions deduced from DE 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, M.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Slavin, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite-observed high correlations between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the high-latitude field-aligned current regions are investigated by examining the dependence of the relationship between Delta-B and E on spatial scale, using the electric and magnetic field data obtained by DE 2 in the polar regions. The results are compared with the Pedersen conductivity inferred from the international reference ionosphere model and the Alfven wave velocity calculated from the in situ ion density and magnetic field measurements.

  15. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  16. The CIPW Normative Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Charles

    1979-01-01

    The author has rewritten rules for CIPW norm calculation and has written FORTRAN IV programs to assist the student in this procedure. Includes a set of problems utilizing the CIPW norm to illustrate principles of chemical petrology. (MA)

  17. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and hard alcohol calories you are consuming. Simply ... calories) Average Drinks Per Week Monthly Subtotal Calories Beer Regular 12 149 Regular Beer Light 12 110 ...

  18. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTY CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer models have been developed to estimate a wide range of physical-chemical properties from molecular structure. The SPARC modeling system approaches calculations as site specific reactions (pKa, hydrolysis, hydration) and `whole molecule' properties (vapor pressure, boilin...

  19. More Experiments and Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddons, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two experiments that illustrate basic ideas but would be difficult to carry out. Also presents activities and experiments on rainbow cups, electrical charges, electrophorus calculation, pulse electrometer, a skidding car, and on the Oersted effect. (JN)

  20. Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The current methods of quantum chemical calculations will be reviewed. The accent will be on the accuracy that can be achieved with these methods. The basis set requirements and computer resources for the various methods will be discussed. The utility of the methods will be illustrated with some examples, which include the calculation of accurate bond energies for SiF$_n$ and SiF$_n^+$ and the modeling of chemical data storage.

  1. Source and replica calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, P.P.

    1994-02-01

    The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem.

  2. Systematics and limit calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Wade; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    This note discusses the estimation of systematic uncertainties and their incorporation into upper limit calculations. Two different approaches to reducing systematics and their degrading impact on upper limits are introduced. An improved {chi}{sup 2} function is defined which is useful in comparing Poisson distributed data with models marginalized by systematic uncertainties. Also, a technique using profile likelihoods is introduced which provides a means of constraining the degrading impact of systematic uncertainties on limit calculations.

  3. Weak-interaction-mediated rates on iron isotopes for presupernova evolution of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, J.-Un

    2009-05-01

    During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, the isotopes of iron, 54, 55, 56Fe , are advocated to play a key role inside the cores primarily decreasing the electron-to-baryon ratio (Ye) mainly via electron capture processes thereby reducing the pressure support. Electron decay and positron capture on 55Fe , on the other hand, also have a consequential role in increasing the lepton ratio during the silicon burning phases of massive stars. The neutrinos and antineutrinos produced, as a result of these weak-interaction reactions, are transparent to the stellar matter and assist in cooling the core thereby reducing the entropy. The structure of the presupernova star is altered both by the changes in Ye and the entropy of the core material. The aim of this paper is to report the improved microscopic calculation of Gamow-Teller (GT±) strength distributions of these key isotopes of iron using the pn-QRPA theory. The main improvement comes from the incorporation of experimental deformation values for these nuclei. Additionally six different weak-interaction rates, namely electron and positron capture, electron and positron decay, and, neutrino and antineutrino cooling rates, were also calculated in presupernova matter. The calculated electron capture and neutrino cooling rates due to isotopes of iron are in good agreement with the large-scale shell model (LSSM) results. The calculated beta decay rates, however, are suppressed by three to five orders of magnitude.

  4. ON-LINE CALCULATOR: FORWARD CALCULATION JOHNSON ETTINGER MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  5. {beta}-decay in neutron-deficient Hg, Pb, and Po isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, O.; Sarriguren, P.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Guerra, E. Moya de

    2006-05-15

    The effect of nuclear deformation on the energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength is studied in neutron-deficient Hg, Pb, and Po even isotopes. The theoretical framework is based on a self-consistent deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations between like nucleons in BCS approximation and residual spin-isospin interactions treated in the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. After a systematic study of the Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the low-excitation-energy region, relevant for {beta}{sup +} decay, we have identified the best candidates to look for deformation signatures in their {beta}{sup +}-decay patterns. {beta}{sup +} half-lives and total Gamow-Teller strengths B(GT{sup {+-}}) are analyzed as well.

  6. Probabilistic Appraisal of Earthquake Hazard Parameters Deduced from a Bayesian Approach in the Northwest Frontier of the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. B. S.; Tsapanos, T. M.; Bayrak, Yusuf; Koravos, G. Ch.

    2013-03-01

    A straightforward Bayesian statistic is applied in five broad seismogenic source zones of the northwest frontier of the Himalayas to estimate the earthquake hazard parameters (maximum regional magnitude M max, β value of G-R relationship and seismic activity rate or intensity λ). For this purpose, a reliable earthquake catalogue which is homogeneous for M W ≥ 5.0 and complete during the period 1900 to 2010 is compiled. The Hindukush-Pamir Himalaya zone has been further divided into two seismic zones of shallow ( h ≤ 70 km) and intermediate depth ( h > 70 km) according to the variation of seismicity with depth in the subduction zone. The estimated earthquake hazard parameters by Bayesian approach are more stable and reliable with low standard deviations than other approaches, but the technique is more time consuming. In this study, quantiles of functions of distributions of true and apparent magnitudes for future time intervals of 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 years are calculated with confidence limits for probability levels of 50, 70 and 90 % in all seismogenic source zones. The zones of estimated M max greater than 8.0 are related to the Sulaiman-Kirthar ranges, Hindukush-Pamir Himalaya and Himalayan Frontal Thrusts belt; suggesting more seismically hazardous regions in the examined area. The lowest value of M max (6.44) has been calculated in Northern-Pakistan and Hazara syntaxis zone which have estimated lowest activity rate 0.0023 events/day as compared to other zones. The Himalayan Frontal Thrusts belt exhibits higher earthquake magnitude (8.01) in next 100-years with 90 % probability level as compared to other zones, which reveals that this zone is more vulnerable to occurrence of a great earthquake. The obtained results in this study are directly useful for the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment in the examined region of Himalaya.

  7. Fast focus field calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, Marcel; Geissbuehler, Matthias; Märki, Iwan; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Lasser, Theo

    2008-02-01

    We present a method for fast calculation of the electromagnetic field near the focus of an objective with a high numerical aperture (NA). Instead of direct integration, the vectorial Debye diffraction integral is evaluated with the fast Fourier transform for calculating the electromagnetic field in the entire focal region. We generalize this concept with the chirp z transform for obtaining a flexible sampling grid and an additional gain in computation speed. Under the conditions for the validity of the Debye integral representation, our method yields the amplitude, phase and polarization of the focus field for an arbitrary paraxial input field in the aperture of the objective. Our fast calculation method is particularly useful for engineering the point-spread function or for fast image deconvolution. We present several case studies by calculating the focus fields of high NA oil immersion objectives for various amplitude, polarization and phase distributions of the input field. In addition, the calculation of an extended polychromatic focus field generated by a Bessel beam is presented. This extended focus field is of particular interest for Fourier domain optical coherence tomography because it preserves a lateral resolution of a few micrometers over an axial distance in the millimeter range.

  8. Calculations for waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Measurements are the first step in the characterization of waste forms. The results are used to determine the types and amounts of radioactive material present. From this data, several characteristics are calculated which are used to satisfy site, Department of Energy (DOE), and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) requirements. How well these calculations are made becomes important to the waste characterization program. Several sources are available to obtain the required values needed to calculate these characteristics. To ensure consistency among all sites within the DOE complex, a standardized program for all necessary data needs to be established. The effects of several of the inconsistencies are presented along with a recommended list of criteria to be used.

  9. Hydrogen moderator performance calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Picton, D. J.; Beynon, T. D.; Broome, T. A.

    1997-09-01

    A comparison was made between MCNP calculations and experimental measurements of the neutron spectrum from the liquid hydrogen moderator on ISIS. The calculations were performed for varying ortho/para concentrations, and demonstrated a best fit for 100% para-hydrogen. The agreement between the measured and calculated results was good below 2Å (i.e. for energies above 20 meV) but significant deviations were seen for longer wavelengths. A second study used the MCNP code for a detailed comparison of the time distributions and neutron spectra from poisoned liquid hydrogen and liquid methane moderators. The results indicate that the replacement of a liquid methane moderator with liquid hydrogen, in order to eliminate radiation damage effects, is an option which can be seriously considered. (auth)

  10. Theoretical uncertainties in the nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay: The transition operator

    SciTech Connect

    Menéndez, Javier

    2013-12-30

    We explore the theoretical uncertainties related to the transition operator of neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay. The transition operator used in standard calculations is a product of one-body currents, that can be obtained phenomenologically as in Tomoda [1] or Šimkovic et al. [2]. However, corrections to the operator are hard to obtain in the phenomenological approach. Instead, we calculate the 0νββ decay operator in the framework of chiral effective theory (EFT), which gives a systematic order-by-order expansion of the transition currents. At leading orders in chiral EFT we reproduce the standard one-body currents of Refs. [1] and [2]. Corrections appear as two-body (2b) currents predicted by chiral EFT. We compute the effects of the leading 2b currents to the nuclear matrix elements of 0νββ decay for several transition candidates. The 2b current contributions are related to the quenching of Gamow-Teller transitions found in nuclear structure calculations.

  11. Concentrations of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in the free upper troposphere and lower stratosphere deduced from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results on the volume mixing ratio profiles of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, deduced from the spectroscopic analysis of IR solar absorption spectra obtained in the occultation mode with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during its mission aboard Spacelab 3. A comparison of the ATMOS measurements for both northern and southern latitudes with previous field investigations at low midlatitudes shows a relatively good agreement. Southern Hemisphere volume mixing ratio profiles for both molecules were obtained for the first time, as were the profiles for the Northern Hemisphere covering the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere simultaneously.

  12. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  13. Confidence Calculation with AMV+

    SciTech Connect

    Fossum, A.F.

    1999-02-19

    The iterative advanced mean value algorithm (AMV+), introduced nearly ten years ago, is now widely used as a cost-effective probabilistic structural analysis tool when the use of sampling methods is cost prohibitive (Wu et al., 1990). The need to establish confidence bounds on calculated probabilities arises because of the presence of uncertainties in measured means and variances of input random variables. In this paper an algorithm is proposed that makes use of the AMV+ procedure and analytically derived probability sensitivities to determine confidence bounds on calculated probabilities.

  14. Three recent TDHF calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, M.S.

    1981-05-01

    Three applications of TDHF are discussed. First, vibrational spectra of a post grazing collision /sup 40/Ca nucleus is examined and found to contain many high energy components, qualitatively consistent with recent Orsay experiments. Second, the fusion cross section in energy and angular momentum are calculated for /sup 16/O + /sup 24/Mg to exhibit the parameters of the low l window for this system. A sensitivity of the fusion cross section to the effective two body potential is discussed. Last, a preliminary analysis of /sup 86/Kr + /sup 139/La at E/sub lab/ = 505 MeV calculated in the frozen approximation is displayed, compared to experiment and discussed.

  15. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  16. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  17. Pulling Marbles from a Bag: Deducing the Regional Impact History of the SPA Basin from Impact Melt Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Coker, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin is an important target for absolute age-dating. Vertical and lateral impact mixing ensures that regolith within SPA will contain rock fragments from SPA itself, local impact craters, and faraway giant basins. About 20% of the regolith at any given site is foreign [1, 2], but much of this material will be cold ejecta, not impact melt. We calculated the fraction of contributed impact melt using scaling laws to estimate the amount and provenance of impact melt, demonstrating that SPA melt is the dominant impact melt rock (>70%) likely to be present. We also constructed a statistical model to illustrate how many randomly-selected impact-melt fragments would need to be dated, and with what accuracy, to confidently reproduce the impact history of a site. A detailed impact history becomes recognizable after a few hundred to a thousand randomly-selected marbles, however, it will be useful to have more information (e.g. compositional, mineralogical, remote sensing) to group fragments. These exercises show that SPA melt has a high probability of being present in a scoop sample and that dating of a few hundred to a thousand impact-melt fragments will yield the impact history of the SPA basin.

  18. A comprehensive model of postseismic deformation of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake deduced from GPS observations in northern Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Endra; Sagiya, Takeshi; Ito, Takeo; Kimata, Fumiaki; Tabei, Takao; Ohta, Yusaku; Meilano, Irwan; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Agustan; Nurdin, Irwandi; Sugiyanto, Didik

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the postseismic deformation of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (SAE) using 5 years of Global Positioning System (GPS) data located in northern Sumatra. Continuous GPS data from northern Sumatra suggest that the relaxation time in the vertical displacement is longer than horizontal displacements. This implies that there are multiple physical mechanisms that control the postseismic deformation, which refer to afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. In this study, we introduce an analysis strategy of postseismic deformation to simultaneously calculate multiple mechanisms of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. The afterslip inversion results indicate that the distribution of the afterslip and the coseismic slip are compensatory of each other. Also, afterslip has a limited contribution to vertical deformation in northern Sumatra. In our rheology model, we use a gravitational Maxwell viscoelastic response and the result indicates that the elastic layer thickness is 65 ± 5 km and the Maxwell viscosity is 8.0 ± 1.0 × 1018 Pa s. We find that afterslip plus Maxwell viscoelastic relaxation are appropriate to explain the deformation in northern Sumatra. We also find that our rheology model reproduces the long-term features of the GPS time series in Thailand. Applying our rheology model to the data in Andaman Islands our afterslip estimation is located at the down-dip part of the plate boundary. Finally, we showed that our rheology model is applicable to the GPS datasets of postseismic deformation of the 2004 SAE located in northern Sumatra, Thailand, and Andaman-Nicobar, respectively.

  19. Deducing transmissivity from specific capacity in the heterogeneous upper aquifer system of Jifarah Plain, NW-Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Farrah, Nawal; Van Camp, Marc; Walraevens, Kristine

    2013-09-01

    The hydraulic characterisation of aquifer systems is important for the development of exploitation scenarios and management strategies. Especially in lithologically heterogeneous aquifers, local scale variations in transmissivity (T) may not be neglected. Field scale transmissivity values are usually derived from pumping tests, but in most cases their number and availability is rather limited. Therefore T values are often estimated from specific well capacities (SC) which can easily be measured in exploitation wells based on static and dynamic water levels. Empirical relations allow T to be calculated from SC values using a power law relation of the form T = A * SCN. In this paper this relation is investigated for three aquifers in north-west Lybia, using the results from step-drawdown tests which allow determination of well efficiencies, which can be incorporated into the regression analysis. The obtained fitting coefficients of the power law relations were compared with published values from other studies. Both parameters of the power law relation (scale factor and power coefficient) seem to be highly correlated following an exponential relationship (R2 = 0.89), reducing the T-SC relation to a single parameter equation, which is mainly related to lithology.

  20. Primary structure of bovine pituitary secretory protein I (chromogranin A) deduced from the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T.G.; Cohn, D.V.; Gorr, S.U.; Ornstein, D.L.; Kashdan, M.A.; Levine, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    Secretory protein I (SP-I), also referred to as chromogranin A, is an acidic glycoprotein that has been found in every tissue of endocrine and neuroendocrine origin examined but never in exocrine or epithelial cells. Its co-storage and co-secretion with peptide hormones and neurotransmitters suggest that it has an important endocrine or secretory function. The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a bovine pituitary lambdagt11 expression library using an antiserum to parathyroid SP-I. The largest clone (SP4B) hybridized to a transcript of 2.1 kilobases in RNA from parathyroid, pituitary, and adrenal medulla. Immunoblots of bacterial lysates derived from SP4B lysognes demonstrated specific antibody binding to an SP4B/..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein (160 kDa) with a cDNA-derived component of 46 kDa. Radioimmunoassay of the bacterial lystates with SP-I antiserum yielded parallel displacement curves of /sup 125/I-labeled SP-I by the SP4B lysate and authentic SP-I. SP4B contains a cDNA of 1614 nucleotides that encodes a 449-amino acid protein (calculated mass, 50 kDa). The nucleotide sequences of the pituitary SP-I cDNA and adrenal medullary SP-I cDNAs are nearly identical. Analysis of genomic DNA suggests that pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid SP-I are products of the same gene.

  1. Calculation of enviromental indices

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This portion of the Energy Vision 2020 draft report discusses the development of environmental indices. These indices were developed to be a quantitative measure of characterizing how TVA power system operations and alternative energy strategies might affect the environment. All indices were calculated relative to the reference strategy, and for the environmental review, the reference strategy was `no action`.

  2. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  3. Curvature calculations with GEOCALC

    SciTech Connect

    Moussiaux, A.; Tombal, P.

    1987-04-01

    A new method for calculating the curvature tensor has been recently proposed by D. Hestenes. This method is a particular application of geometric calculus, which has been implemented in an algebraic programming language on the form of a package called GEOCALC. They show how to apply this package to the Schwarzchild case and they discuss the different results.

  4. Calculation of magnetostriction constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatebayashi, T.; Ohtsuka, S.; Ukai, T.; Mori, N.

    1986-02-01

    The magnetostriction constants h1 and h2 for Ni and Fe metals and the anisotropy constants K1 and K2 for Fe metal are calculated on the basis of the approximate d bands obtained by Deegan's prescription, by using Gilat-Raubenheimer's method. The obtained results are compared with the experimental ones.

  5. A Computer Calculated Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Francis J.

    The Gunning Fog Index of readability indicates both the average length of words and the difficult words (three or more syllables) in written material. This document describes a business communication course at Wayne State University in which students calculate the Gunning Fog Index of two of their writing assignments with the aid of the…

  6. A Specific Calculating Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mike; O'Connor, Neil; Hermelin, Beate

    1998-01-01

    Studied the calculating ability used by a low IQ savant to identify prime numbers in two experiments comparing him to control subjects, one involving reaction time and the other involving inspection time. Concludes that this individual uses a complex computational algorithm to identify primes and discusses the apparent contradiction of his low IQ.…

  7. Calendrical Calculation and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Neil; Cowan, Richard; Samella, Katerina

    2000-01-01

    Studied the ability to name the days of the week for dates in the past and future (calendrical calculation) of 10 calendrical savants with Wechlser Adult Intelligence Scale scores from 50 to 97. Results suggest that although low intelligence does not prevent the development of this skill, the talent depends on general intelligence. (SLD)

  8. Solar Guide and Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazria, Edward; Winitsky, David

    This guide provides users with a basic understanding of where and how the sun works in relation to a building and site and provides a simplified method of calculating sun angles and the available heat energy from the sun on vertical and horizontal surfaces. (Author/IRT)

  9. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  10. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  11. Gravity anomalies and lithospheric flexure around the Longmen Shan deduced from combinations of in situ observations and EGM2008 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Yawen; Fu, Guangyu; Wang, Zhuohua; Liu, Tai; Xu, Changyi; Jin, Honglin

    2016-10-01

    The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. These new FGAs show pairs of positive and negative anomalies along the eastern edges of the Tibetan Plateau. The FGAs are used to calculate effective elastic thickness ( T e) and load ratios ( F) of the lithosphere. Admittance analysis indicates the T e of Longmen Shan (LMS) to be 6 km, and profile analysis indicates that the T e of the Sichuan Basin excesses 30 km. The load ratio ( F 1 = 1) confirms that the lithospheric flexure of the LMS area can be attributed solely to the surface load of the crust. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. With the new FGAs data, the lithospheric strength of the study area is studied by the authors, and they also give a combined model to illustrate the uplift mechanism of this area.

  12. 3-D Structure of Arcade Type Flares Deduced from Soft X-Ray Observations of a Homologous Flare Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Uchida, Y.; Hirose, S.

    2002-01-01

    In the solar flare problems, no ultimate model that matches observations has been established. One of the reasons for this is due to the restrictions in the observational data lacking information about the third dimension. Thus, many researchers have tried to get information about the three dimensional (3-D) coronal structures by using various techniques or ideas; like movie analysis, calculations using vector or line-of-sight components of photospheric magnetic data, and etc.. In the near future, a mission named STEREO which will obtain information about the 3-D coronal structures from two satellites, is planned. In the present paper, we noted the homology in a homologous flare series of February 1992. We derived a 3-D coronal structures by making use of the images obtained from the three different sight-lines at some common phases in them with Yohkoh SXT. The result of this analysis has made it clear that the so-called ``cusped arcade'' at the maximum phase in the well-known 1992 February 21 flare is, contrary to the general views, an ``elongated arch'' seen with a shallow oblique angle. It is not the ``flare arcade'' seen axis-on as widely conceived. This elongated arch coincides roughly with a diagonal of the main body of the "soft X-ray arcade" that came up later. The magnetic structure causing the flare as a whole turned out in this analysis to be a structure with quadruple magnetic sources. The relative locations of these four characteristic sources stayed almost the same throughout the period of this homologous flare series, determining the fundamental shape of this homologous series. We also examined the corresponding features for other similar events, also using information from other satellites, and will report the results.

  13. Calculation of recoil implantation profiles using known range statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C. D.; Avila, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed to calculate the depth distribution of recoil atoms that result from ion implantation onto a substrate covered with a thin surface layer. The calculation includes first order recoils considering projected range straggles, and lateral straggles of recoils but neglecting lateral straggles of projectiles. Projectile range distributions at intermediate energies in the surface layer are deduced from look-up tables of known range statistics. A great saving of computing time and human effort is thus attained in comparison with existing procedures. The method is used to calculate recoil profiles of oxygen from implantation of arsenic through SiO2 and of nitrogen from implantation of phosphorus through Si3N4 films on silicon. The calculated recoil profiles are in good agreement with results obtained by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation and they also compare very well with available experimental results in the literature. The deviation between calculated and experimental results is discussed in relation to lateral straggles. From this discussion, a range of surface layer thickness for which the method applies is recommended.

  14. A Hypothesis: Life Initiated from Two Genes, as Deduced from the RNA World Hypothesis and the Characteristics of Life-Like Systems.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2016-08-02

    RNA played a central role in the emergence of the first life-like system on primitive Earth since RNA molecules contain both genetic information and catalytic activity. However, there are several drawbacks regarding the RNA world hypothesis. Here, I briefly discuss the feasibility of the RNA world hypothesis to deduce the RNA functions that are essential for forming a life-like system. At the same time, I have conducted a conceptual analysis of the characteristics of biosystems as a useful approach to deduce a realistic life-like system in relation to the definition of life. For instance, an RNA-based life-like system should possess enough stability to resist environmental perturbations, by developing a cell-like compartment, for instance. Here, a conceptual viewpoint is summarized to provide a realistic life-like system that is compatible with the primitive Earth environment and the capabilities of RNA molecules. According to the empirical and conceptual analysis, I propose the hypothesis that the first life-like system could have initiated from only two genes.

  15. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach).

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event-the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids-as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches.

  16. A Hypothesis: Life Initiated from Two Genes, as Deduced from the RNA World Hypothesis and the Characteristics of Life-Like Systems.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    RNA played a central role in the emergence of the first life-like system on primitive Earth since RNA molecules contain both genetic information and catalytic activity. However, there are several drawbacks regarding the RNA world hypothesis. Here, I briefly discuss the feasibility of the RNA world hypothesis to deduce the RNA functions that are essential for forming a life-like system. At the same time, I have conducted a conceptual analysis of the characteristics of biosystems as a useful approach to deduce a realistic life-like system in relation to the definition of life. For instance, an RNA-based life-like system should possess enough stability to resist environmental perturbations, by developing a cell-like compartment, for instance. Here, a conceptual viewpoint is summarized to provide a realistic life-like system that is compatible with the primitive Earth environment and the capabilities of RNA molecules. According to the empirical and conceptual analysis, I propose the hypothesis that the first life-like system could have initiated from only two genes. PMID:27490571

  17. A Hypothesis: Life Initiated from Two Genes, as Deduced from the RNA World Hypothesis and the Characteristics of Life-Like Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    RNA played a central role in the emergence of the first life-like system on primitive Earth since RNA molecules contain both genetic information and catalytic activity. However, there are several drawbacks regarding the RNA world hypothesis. Here, I briefly discuss the feasibility of the RNA world hypothesis to deduce the RNA functions that are essential for forming a life-like system. At the same time, I have conducted a conceptual analysis of the characteristics of biosystems as a useful approach to deduce a realistic life-like system in relation to the definition of life. For instance, an RNA-based life-like system should possess enough stability to resist environmental perturbations, by developing a cell-like compartment, for instance. Here, a conceptual viewpoint is summarized to provide a realistic life-like system that is compatible with the primitive Earth environment and the capabilities of RNA molecules. According to the empirical and conceptual analysis, I propose the hypothesis that the first life-like system could have initiated from only two genes. PMID:27490571

  18. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach)

    PubMed Central

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event—the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids—as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches. PMID:26821048

  19. Modification of magicity toward the dripline and its impact on electron-capture rates for stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2016-02-01

    The importance of microphysical inputs from laboratory nuclear experiments and theoretical nuclear structure calculations in the understanding of core-collapse dynamics and the subsequent supernova explosion is largely recognized in the recent literature. In this work, we analyze the impact of the masses of very neutron-rich nuclei on the matter composition during collapse and the corresponding electron-capture rate. To this end, we introduce an empirical modification of the popular Duflo-Zuker mass model to account for possible shell quenching far from stability. We study the effect of this quenching on the average electron-capture rate. We show that the pre-eminence of the closed shells with N =50 and N =82 in the collapse dynamics is considerably decreased if the shell gaps are reduced in the region of 78Ni and beyond. As a consequence, local modifications of the overall electron-capture rate of up to 30% can be expected, depending on the strength of magicity quenching. This finding has potentially important consequences on the entropy generation, the neutrino emissivity, and the mass of the core at bounce. Our work underlines the importance of new experimental measurements in this region of the nuclear chart, the most crucial information being the nuclear mass and the Gamow-Teller strength. Reliable microscopic calculations of the associated elementary rate, in a wide range of temperatures and electron densities, optimized on these new empirical information, will be additionally needed to get quantitative predictions of the collapse dynamics.

  20. Global description of β- decay in even-even nuclei with the axially-deformed Skyrme finite-amplitude method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustonen, M. T.; Engel, J.

    2016-01-01

    We use the finite-amplitude method for computing charge-changing Skyrme-quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) transition strengths in axially-deformed nuclei together with a modern Skyrme energy-density functional to fit several previously unconstrained parameters in the charge-changing time-odd part of the functional. With the modified functional we then calculate rates of β- decay for all medium-mass and heavy even-even nuclei between the valley of stability and the neutron drip line. We fit the Skyrme parameters to a limited set of β -decay rates, a set of Gamow-Teller resonance energies, and a set of spin-dipole resonance energies, in both spherical and deformed nuclei. Comparison to available experimental β -decay rates shows agreement at roughly the same level as in other global QRPA calculations. We estimate the uncertainty in our rates all the way to the neutron drip line through a construction that extrapolates the errors of known β -decay rates in nuclei with intermediate Q values to less stable isotopes with higher Q values.

  1. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    This Institute annual report for the period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 covers a period which has seen the initial runs of three new spectrometers which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP), the Mass Achromat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. These devices are now available to pursue the studies of Gamow Teller states, reactions of astrophysical interest, and giant resonance studies for which they were constructed, as well as for other experiments. A beam analysis system which will deliver high resolution beams to the MDM spectrometer is currently under construction. With the completion of these spectrometer projects, the facility emphasis is now focused on the development of the full capabilities of the K500 cyclotron and on the research program. During the report period, the ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons, the latter as a probe of the QCD phase transition. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. In atomic physics, new measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported.

  2. Paleoenvironmental conditions and strontium isotope stratigraphy in the Paleogene Gafsa Basin (Tunisia) deduced from geochemical analyses of phosphatic fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, László; Ounis, Anouar; Chaabani, Fredj; Salah, Neili Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Fossil shark teeth and coprolites from three major phosphorite occurrences in the Gafsa Basin (southwestern Tunisia) were investigated for their geochemical compositions to improve local stratigraphy and to better assess paleoenvironmental conditions. 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios of shark teeth from the Early Maastrichtian El Haria Formation and from the Early Eocene Métlaoui s.s. Formation yielded Sr isotope ages of 68 ± 1 and 47.9 ± 1.3 Ma, respectively, which accord with the expected stratigraphic positions of these sediments. Conversely, shark teeth from the Paleocene-Eocene Chouabine Formation have large variation in Sr isotope ratios even within individual layers. After statistical treatment and then elimination of certain outlier samples, three age-models are proposed and discussed. The most reasonable solution includes three subsequent Sr ages of 61.8 ± 2.2 Ma, 57.2 ± 1.8 and 54.6 ± 1.6 for layer IX, layers VIII-V and layers IV-0, respectively. Three scenarios are discussed for explanation of the presence of the outliers: (1) diagenesis, (2) re-working and (3) locally controlled seawater Sr isotope ratio. The most plausible account for the higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios relative to the global ocean in some fossils is enhanced intrabasinal re-working due to low sea level. Conversely, the sample with lower 87Sr/86Sr than the global seawater may link to diagenesis or to seawater influenced by weathering of Late Cretaceous marine carbonates, which latter is supported by model calculation as well. The ɛNd values of these fossils are very similar to those reported for Paleogene and Late Cretaceous Tethyan seawater and are compatible with the above interpretations. The relatively low oxygen isotope values in shark teeth from the topmost phosphate bed of the Chouabine Formation, together with the Sr isotope results, point toward recovering better connections with the open sea. These δ18O data reflect elevated ambient temperature, which may link to the Early Eocene

  3. Charge exchange reactions and solar neutrino detection in 81Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. F.; Gabbard, F.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of 81Br as the detector of the solar neutrino flux hinges upon the knowledge of the Gamow-Teller matrix element from the ground state of 81Br to the 52- state at 0.457 MeV in 81Kr. The possibility of obtaining this matrix element is discussed in terms of the (p, n) and (3He, t) charge exchange reactions. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 81Br(p, n)81Kr and 81Br(3He, t)81Kr Gamow-Teller transitions; solar neutrino detection.

  4. Calculations concerning the HCO+/HOC+ abundance ratio in dense interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    DeFrees, D J; McLean, A D; Herbst, E

    1984-04-01

    Calculations have been performed to determine the rate coefficients of several reactions involved in both the formation and depletion of interstellar HCO+ and HOC+. The abundance of HOC+ deduced from these calculations is consistent with the tentative identification of HOC+ in Sgr B2 by Woods et al. The large HCO+/HOC+ abundance ratio observed by Woods et al. is due at least in part to a more rapid formation rate for HCO+ and probably due as well as to a more rapid depletion rate for HOC+.

  5. New reaction rates for improved primordial D /H calculation and the cosmic evolution of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coc, Alain; Petitjean, Patrick; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Descouvemont, Pierre; Iliadis, Christian; Longland, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historically strong evidences for the big bang model. Standard BBN is now a parameter-free theory, since the baryonic density of the Universe has been deduced with an unprecedented precision from observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. There is a good agreement between the primordial abundances of 4He, D, 3He, and 7Li deduced from observations and from primordial nucleosynthesis calculations. However, the 7Li calculated abundance is significantly higher than the one deduced from spectroscopic observations and remains an open problem. In addition, recent deuterium observations have drastically reduced the uncertainty on D /H , to reach a value of 1.6%. It needs to be matched by BBN predictions whose precision is now limited by thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties. This is especially important as many attempts to reconcile Li observations with models lead to an increased D prediction. Here, we reevaluate the d (p ,γ )3He, d (d ,n ) 3H3, and d (d ,p ) 3H reaction rates that govern deuterium destruction, incorporating new experimental data and carefully accounting for systematic uncertainties. Contrary to previous evaluations, we use theoretical ab initio models for the energy dependence of the S factors. As a result, these rates increase at BBN temperatures, leading to a reduced value of D /H =(2.45 ±0.10 )×10-5 (2 σ ), in agreement with observations.

  6. CONVEYOR FOUNDATIONS CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Romanos

    1995-03-10

    The purpose of these calculations is to design foundations for all conveyor supports for the surface conveyors that transport the muck resulting from the TBM operation, from the belt storage to the muck stockpile. These conveyors consist of: (1) Conveyor W-TO3, from the belt storage, at the starter tunnel, to the transfer tower. (2) Conveyor W-SO1, from the transfer tower to the material stacker, at the muck stockpile.

  7. Strength calculations on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, A

    1925-01-01

    Every strength calculation, including those on airplanes, must be preceded by a determination of the forces to be taken into account. In the following discussion, it will be assumed that the magnitudes of these forces are known and that it is only a question of how, on the basis of these known forces, to meet the prescribed conditions on the one hand and the practical requirements on the other.

  8. Nuclear Material Variance Calculation

    1995-01-01

    MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculations) is a custom spreadsheet that significantly reduces the effort required to make the variance and covariance calculations needed to determine the detection sensitivity of a materials accounting system and loss of special nuclear material (SNM). The user is required to enter information into one of four data tables depending on the type of term in the materials balance (MB) equation. The four data tables correspond to input transfers, output transfers,more » and two types of inventory terms, one for nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements and one for measurements made by chemical analysis. Each data entry must contain an identification number and a short description, as well as values for the SNM concentration, the bulk mass (or solution volume), the measurement error standard deviations, and the number of measurements during an accounting period. The user must also specify the type of error model (additive or multiplicative) associated with each measurement, and possible correlations between transfer terms. Predefined spreadsheet macros are used to perform the variance and covariance calculations for each term based on the corresponding set of entries. MAVARIC has been used for sensitivity studies of chemical separation facilities, fuel processing and fabrication facilities, and gas centrifuge and laser isotope enrichment facilities.« less

  9. Secular crustal deformation and interplate coupling of the Japanese Islands as deduced from continuous GPS array, 1996 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fiky, Gamal; Kato, Teruyuki

    2006-08-01

    Data from the nation-wide GPS continuous tracking network that has been operated by the Geographical Survey Institute of Japan since April 1996 were used to study crustal deformation in the Japanese Islands. We first extracted site coordinate from daily SINEX files for the period from April 1, 1996 to February 24, 2001. Since raw time series of station coordinates include coseismic and postseismic displacements as well as seasonal variation, we model each time series as a combination of linear and trigonometric functions and jumps for episodic events. Estimated velocities were converted into a kinematic reference frame [Heki, K., 1996. Horizontal and vertical crustal movements from three-dimensional very long baseline interferometry kinematic reference frame: implication for reversal timescale revision. J. Geophys. Res., 101: 3187-3198.] to discuss the crustal deformation relative to the stable interior of the Eurasian plate. A Least-Squares Prediction technique has been used to segregate the signal and noise in horizontal as well as vertical velocities. Estimated horizontal signals (horizontal displacement rates) were then differentiated in space to calculate principal components of strain. Dilatations, maximum shear strains, and principal axes of strain clearly portray tectonic environments of the Japanese Islands. On the other hand, the interseismic vertical deformation field of the Japanese islands is derived for the same GPS data interval. The GPS vertical velocities are combined with 31 year tide gage records to estimate absolute vertical velocity. The results of vertical deformation show that (1) the existence of clear uplift of about 6 mm/yr in Shikoku and Kii Peninsula, whereas pattern of subsidence is observed in the coast of Kyushu district. This might reflect strong coupling between the Philippine Sea plate and overriding plate at the Nankai Trough and weak coupling off Kyushu, (2) no clear vertical deformation pattern exists along the Pacific coast of

  10. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  11. Calculation of Electron Trajectories

    1982-06-01

    EGUN, the SLAC Electron Trajectory Program, computes trajectories of charged particles in electrostatic and magnetostatic focusing systems including the effects of space charge and self-magnetic fields. Starting options include Child''s Law conditions on cathodes of various shapes, user-specified initial conditions for each ray, and a combination of Child''s Law conditions and user specifications. Either rectangular or cylindrically symmetric geometry may be used. Magnetic fields may be specified using arbitrary configuration of coils, or the outputmore » of a magnet program, such as Poisson, or by an externally calculated array of the axial fields.« less

  12. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the

  13. Iterative Calculation of Plasma Density from a Cylindrical Probe Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Lu, Wenqi

    2013-08-01

    A novel method is proposed for treating cylindrical probe characteristics to obtain plasma density. The method consists of exponential extrapolation of the transitional part of the I-V curve to the floating potential for the ion saturation current, other than the existing theories which use the ion branch, and an iterative sheath thickness correction procedure for improved accuracy. The method was tested by treating Langmuir probe I-V characteristics obtained from inductively coupled Ar discharges at various pressures, and comparing the present results with those deduced by existing theories. It was shown that the plasma densities obtained by the present method are in good agreement with those calculated by the Allen-Boyd-Reynolds (ABR) theory, suggesting the effectiveness of the proposed method. Without need of manual setting and adjustment of fitting parameters, the method may be suitable for automatic and real time processing of probe characteristics.

  14. Report to the DOE Nuclear Data Committee, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Lanier, R.G.

    1985-02-01

    Progress is reported on the following measurements: the leakage multiplication from hollow beryllium spheres; /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/Li neutron-induced tritium production cross sections at 15 MeV; fast neutron fission yields; /sup 238/U(t,X) cross sections; neutron capture cross sections for /sup 86/ /sup 87/Sr at stellar temperatures; influence of realistic single particle spacings on precompound decay spectra; spontaneous fissions from a source of /sup 260/Md; and excitation functions from proton and deutron bombardment of natural Ti. Progress on the following calculations are reported: using modeled discrete levels; modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei; test of a phenomenological model of odd-odd deformed nuclei (an ARC study of /sup 176/Lu); absolute dipole gamma-ray strength functions for /sup 176/Lu; Gamow-Teller matrix elements for the /sup 11/B(p,n)/sup 11/C reaction at Ep = 26 MeV; K-distribution for neutron fission of /sup 232/Th; shell model study of the /sup 71/Ga(nu, anti e)/sup 71/Ge neutrino detector; and extension of microscopic models for neutron and proton scattering to inelastic scattering and charge-exchange reactions. Also, the status of the re-evaluation of the /sup 9/Be(n, 2n) reaction is given. (WHK)

  15. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and $^3$He

    SciTech Connect

    Laura E. Marcucci, A. Kievsky, S. Rosati, R. Schiavilla, M. Viviani

    2012-01-01

    The muon-capture reactions {sup 2}H({mu}{sup -}, {nu}{sub {mu}})nn and {sup 3}He({mu}{sup -},{nu}{sub {mu}}){sup 3}H are studied with nuclear strong-interaction potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived in chiral effective field theory. The low-energy constants (LEC's) c{sub D} and c{sub E}, present in the three-nucleon potential and (c{sub D}) axial-vector current, are constrained to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. The vector weak current is related to the isovector component of the electromagnetic current via the conserved-vector-current constraint, and the two LEC's entering the contact terms in the latter are constrained to reproduce the A=3 magnetic moments. The muon capture rates on deuteron and {sup 3}He are predicted to be 399 {+-} 3 sec{sup -1} and 1494 {+-} 21 sec{sup -1}, respectively, where the spread accounts for the cutoff sensitivity as well as uncertainties in the LEC's and electroweak radiative corrections. By comparing the calculated and precisely measured rates on {sup 3}He, a value for the induced pseudoscalar form factor is obtained in good agreement with the chiral perturbation theory prediction.

  16. Nuclear response theory for spin-isospin excitations in a relativistic quasiparticle-phonon coupling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Caroline; Litvinova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    A new theoretical approach to spin-isospin excitations in open-shell nuclei is presented. The developed method is based on the relativistic meson-exchange nuclear Lagrangian of Quantum Hadrodynamics and extends the response theory for superfluid nuclear systems beyond relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation in the proton-neutron channel (pn-RQRPA). The coupling between quasiparticle degrees of freedom and collective vibrations (phonons) introduces a time-dependent effective interaction, in addition to the exchange of pion and ρ -meson taken into account without retardation. The time-dependent contributions are treated in the resonant time-blocking approximation, in analogy to the previously developed relativistic quasiparticle time-blocking approximation (RQTBA) in the neutral (non-isospin-flip) channel. The new method is called proton-neutron RQTBA (pn-RQTBA) and is applied to the Gamow-Teller resonance in a chain of neutron-rich nickel isotopes 68-78Ni . A strong fragmentation of the resonance along with quenching of the strength, as compared to pn-RQRPA, is obtained. Based on the calculated strength distribution, beta-decay half-lives of the considered isotopes are computed and compared to pn-RQRPA half-lives and to experimental data. It is shown that a considerable improvement of the half-life description is obtained in pn-RQTBA because of the spreading effects, which bring the lifetimes to a very good quantitative agreement with data.

  17. Tritium β decay in chiral effective field theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Schiavilla, R.; Viviani, M.

    2016-08-18

    We evaluate the Fermi and Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix elements in tritiummore » $$\\beta$$-decay by including in the charge-changing weak current the corrections up to one loop recently derived in nuclear chiral effective field theory ($$\\chi$$ EFT). The trinucleon wave functions are obtained from hyperspherical-harmonics solutions of the Schroedinger equation with two- and three-nucleon potentials corresponding to either $$\\chi$$ EFT (the N3LO/N2LO combination) or meson-exchange phenomenology (the AV18/UIX combination). We find that contributions due to loop corrections in the axial current are, in relative terms, as large as (and in some cases, dominate) those from one-pion exchange, which nominally occur at lower order in the power counting. Furthermore, we also provide values for the low-energy constants multiplying the contact axial current and three-nucleon potential, required to reproduce the experimental GT matrix element and trinucleon binding energies in the N3LO/N2LO and AV18/UIX calculations.« less

  18. Studies on the double-{beta} decay nucleus {sup 64}Zn using the (d,{sup 2}He) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Grewe, E.-W.; Baeumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Frekers, D.; Hollstein, S.; Rakers, S.; Thies, J. H.; Harakeh, M. N.; Berg, A. M. van den; Woertche, H. J.; Johansson, H.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Petermann, I.; Sieja, K.; Simon, H.; Langanke, K.; Nowacki, F.; Popescu, L.; Savran, D.; Zilges, A.

    2008-06-15

    The (d,{sup 2}He) charge-exchange reaction on the double-{beta} decay ({beta}{beta}) nucleus {sup 64}Zn has been studied at an incident energy of 183 MeV. The two protons in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state (indicated as {sup 2}He) were both momentum analyzed and detected simultaneously by the BBS magnetic spectrometer and its position-sensitive detector. {sup 2}He spectra with a resolution of about 115 keV (FWHM) have been obtained allowing identification of many levels in the residual nucleus {sup 64}Cu with high precision. {sup 64}Zn is one of the rare cases undergoing a {beta}{beta} decay in {beta}{sup +} direction. In the experiment presented here, Gamow-Teller (GT{sup +}) transition strengths have been extracted. Together with the GT{sup -} transition strengths from {sup 64}Ni({sup 3}He,t) data to the same intermediate nucleus {sup 64}Cu, the nuclear matrix elements of the {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 64}Zn have been evaluated. Finally, the GT{sup {+-}} distributions are compared with shell-model calculations and a critical assessment is given of the various residual interactions presently employed for the pf shell.

  19. Proton-Proton Weak Capture in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marcucci, Laura Elisa; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, MIchele

    2013-05-01

    The astrophysical $S$-factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0--100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants (LEC's) entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the $A=3$ binding energies and magnetic moments, and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium $\\beta$ decay. Contributions from $S$ and $P$ partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The $S$-factor at zero energy is found to be $S(0)=(4.030 \\pm 0.006)\\times 10^{-23}$ MeV fm$^2$, with a $P$-wave contribution of $0.020\\times 10^{-23}$ MeV fm$^2$. The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the LEC's and to the cutoff dependence. It is shown that polynomial fits to parametrize the energy dependence of the $S$-factor are inherently unstable.

  20. Proton-proton weak capture in chiral effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2013-05-10

    The astrophysical S factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0-100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and magnetic moments and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium β decay. Contributions from S and P partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The S factor at zero energy is found to be S(0)=(4.030±0.006)×10(-23) MeV fm(2), with a P-wave contribution of 0.020×10(-23) MeV fm(2). The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the low-energy constants and to the cutoff dependence.

  1. Weak interaction processes in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, I. N.

    2004-04-01

    Major astrophysical applications involve a huge number of exotic nuclei. An important effort has been devoted during the last decades to the measurements of the masses and β-decay rates of very neutron-rich nuclei at RIB facilities. However, most of them cannot be synthesised in terrestrial laboratories and only theoretical predictions can fill the gap. We concentrate mainly on the β-decay rates needed for the stellar r-process modeling and for performing the RIB experiments. The continuum QRPA approach based on the self-consistent ground state description in the framework of the density functional theory is briefly described. The model for the large-scale calculations of total β-decay half-lives accounts for the Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions. Due to the shell configuration effect, the first-forbidden decays have a strong impact on the total half-lives of the r-process relevant nuclei at N=126, Z=60-70. The performance of existing global models for the nuclides near the r-process paths at N=126 is critically analyzed and confronted with the recent RIB experiments in the region ``east'' of 208Pb . The possible role of neutrino nucleosynthesis is exemplified by the production of rare isotope 138La via the neutrino process.

  2. Tritium β decay in chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Schiavilla, R.; Viviani, M.

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the Fermi and Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix elements in tritium β decay by including in the charge-changing weak current the corrections up to one loop recently derived in nuclear chiral effective field theory (χ EFT ). The trinucleon wave functions are obtained from hyperspherical-harmonics solutions of the Schrödinger equation with two- and three-nucleon potentials corresponding to either χ EFT (the N3LO/N2LO combination) or meson-exchange phenomenology (the AV18/UIX combination). We find that contributions due to loop corrections in the axial current are, in relative terms, as large as (and in some cases, dominate) those from one-pion exchange, which nominally occur at lower order in the power counting. We also provide values for the low-energy constants multiplying the contact axial current and three-nucleon potential, required to reproduce the experimental GT matrix element and trinucleon binding energies in the N3LO/N2LO and AV18/UIX calculations.

  3. Proton-proton weak capture in chiral effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2013-05-10

    The astrophysical S factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0-100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and magnetic moments and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium β decay. Contributions from S and P partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The S factor at zero energy is found to be S(0)=(4.030±0.006)×10(-23) MeV fm(2), with a P-wave contribution of 0.020×10(-23) MeV fm(2). The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the low-energy constants and to the cutoff dependence. PMID:23705703

  4. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and {3}He.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Kievsky, A; Rosati, S; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2012-02-01

    The muon-capture reactions {2}H(μ{-},ν{μ})nn and {3}He(μ{-},ν{μ}){3}H are studied with nuclear potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived in chiral effective field theory. The low-energy constants (LECs) c{D} and c{E}, present in the three-nucleon potential and (c{D}) axial-vector current, are constrained to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. The muon-capture rates on deuteron and {3}He are predicted to be 399±3  sec{-1} and 1494±21  sec{-1}, respectively. The spread accounts for the cutoff sensitivity, as well as uncertainties in the LECs and electroweak radiative corrections. By comparing the calculated and precisely measured rates on {3}He, a value for the induced pseudoscalar form factor is obtained in good agreement with the chiral perturbation theory prediction. PMID:22400928

  5. Spin Responses in Nuclei, Neutrino-Induced Reactions and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2010-05-12

    New evaluations of neutrino-nucleus reaction rates are made for f p-shell and light p-shell nuclei as well as {sup 4}He based on new shell model Hamiltonians, which give good account of spin dependent properties such as Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions and magnetic moments in the nuclei. The reaction cross sections in light nuclei are found to be enhanced compared with those obtained by conventional Hamiltonians and previous calculations. The production yields of {sup 7}Li and {sup 11}B during supernova explosions are found to be enhanced. The GT strengths in Fe and Ni isotopes are found to be more fragmented than those by conventional Hamiltonians. In particular, this results in an enhancement of the neutrino-induced cross section on {sup 56}Ni for proton emission channel, and also an enhanced production yield of {sup 55}Mn in population III stars. Electron capture rates on Fe and Ni isotopes in astrophysical environment are studied, and they are found to be reduced systematically compared with those by conventional Hamiltonians.

  6. Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions at MeV Region based on New Shell-Model Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino-nucleus reactions at MeV region are evaluated by using new shell model Hamiltonians, which are found to improve the description of spin degrees of freedom in nuclei as well as shell evolutions. The light element synthesis by neutrino processes in supernova explosions is discussed with the use of the new reaction cross sections for {sup 12}C and {sup 4}He. Possible constraints on the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the neutrino mass hierarchy are pointed out to be imposed by the production yields of {sup 7}Li and {sup 11}B. Spin-dipole transition strengths in {sup 16}O and neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 16}O are investigated with the new improved Hamiltonian. The Gamow-Teller transition strength in {sup 56}Ni for the new Hamiltonian, which is more fragmented compared to previous calculations, is found to lead to the enhancement of the production yield of {sup 55}Mn in population III stars.

  7. Structure of Light Neutron-Rich Nuclei and Important Roles of Tensor Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2009-08-26

    Structure of light neutron-rich nuclei are investigated by shell model calculations with the use of our new shell model Hamiltonians. The new Hamiltonians take into account important roles of the tensor interaction, and can explain well the Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in nuclei with mass 14 and 12. A new version with repulsive corrections in T = 1 monopole terms is applied to study structure of neutron-rich carbon isotopes. Characteristics of effective neutron single particle enrgies and shell evolutions toward the drip-line are discussed. Ground state energies and low lying energy levels of the isotopes are found to be well reproduced. The anomalous quenching of the magnetic dipole (M1) transition strength in {sup 17}C is also found to be well explained. GT transitions in {sup 19}C are studied. The halo nature of {sup 19}C is investigated from a retarted GT transition. Contributions from three-nucleon forces induced by {delta} excitations are shown to be the main origin of the repulsive monopole corrections in the T = 1 channel.

  8. Buoyant plume calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures.

  9. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activity: nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of an ADP-ribosylation factor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Price, S R; Nightingale, M; Tsai, S C; Williamson, K C; Adamik, R; Chen, H C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1988-01-01

    Three (two soluble and one membrane) guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that enhance ADP-ribosylation of the Gs alpha stimulatory subunit of the adenylyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) complex by choleragen have recently been purified from bovine brain. To further define the structure and function of these ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), we isolated a cDNA clone (lambda ARF2B) from a bovine retinal library by screening with a mixed heptadecanucleotide probe whose sequence was based on the partial amino acid sequence of one of the soluble ARFs from bovine brain. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of lambda ARF2B with sequences of peptides from the ARF protein (total of 60 amino acids) revealed only two differences. Whether these are cloning artifacts or reflect the existence of more than one ARF protein remains to be determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of ARF, Go alpha (the alpha subunit of a G protein that may be involved in regulation of ion fluxes), and c-Ha-ras gene product p21 show similarities in regions believed to be involved in guanine nucleotide binding and GTP hydrolysis. ARF apparently lacks a site analogous to that ADP-ribosylated by choleragen in G-protein alpha subunits. Although both the ARF proteins and the alpha subunits bind guanine nucleotides and serve as choleragen substrates, they must interact with the toxin A1 peptide in different ways. In addition to serving as an ADP-ribose acceptor, ARF interacts with the toxin in a manner that modifies its catalytic properties. PMID:3135549

  10. Genetic makeup of the Corynebacterium glutamicum LexA regulon deduced from comparative transcriptomics and in vitro DNA band shift assays.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, Nina; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Czaja, Lisa F; Brinkrolf, Karina; Brune, Iris; Hüser, Andrea T; Hansmeier, Nicole; Pühler, Alfred; Borovok, Ilya; Tauch, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    The lexA gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was deleted to create the mutant strain C. glutamicum NJ2114, which has an elongated cell morphology and an increased doubling time. To characterize the SOS regulon in C. glutamicum, the transcriptomes of NJ2114 and a DNA-damage-induced wild-type strain were compared with that of a wild-type control using DNA microarray hybridization. The expression data were combined with bioinformatic pattern searches for LexA binding sites, leading to the detection of 46 potential SOS boxes located upstream of differentially expressed transcription units. Binding of a hexahistidyl-tagged LexA protein to 40 double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the potential SOS boxes was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. It turned out that LexA binds not only to SOS boxes in the promoter-operator region of upregulated genes, but also to SOS boxes detected upstream of downregulated genes. These results demonstrated that LexA controls directly the expression of at least 48 SOS genes organized in 36 transcription units. The deduced genes encode a variety of physiological functions, many of them involved in DNA repair and survival after DNA damage, but nearly half of them have hitherto unknown functions. Alignment of the LexA binding sites allowed the corynebacterial SOS box consensus sequence TcGAA(a/c)AnnTGTtCGA to be deduced. Furthermore, the common intergenic region of lexA and the differentially expressed divS-nrdR operon, encoding a cell division suppressor and a regulator of deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, was characterized in detail. Promoter mapping revealed differences in divS-nrdR expression during SOS response and normal growth conditions. One of the four LexA binding sites detected in the intergenic region is involved in regulating divS-nrdR transcription, whereas the other sites are apparently used for negative autoregulation of lexA expression.

  11. Primary structure of the monomer of the 12S subunit of transcarboxylase as deduced from DNA and characterization of the product expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thornton, C G; Kumar, G K; Haase, F C; Phillips, N F; Woo, S B; Park, V M; Magner, W J; Shenoy, B C; Wood, H G; Samols, D

    1993-09-01

    Transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii is a complex biotin-containing enzyme composed of 30 polypeptides of three different types: a hexameric central 12S subunit to which 6 outer 5S subunits are attached through 12 1.3S biotinyl subunits. The enzyme catalyzes a two-step reaction in which methylmalonyl coenzyme A and pyruvate serve as substrates to form propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) and oxalacetate, the 12S subunit specifically catalyzing one of the two reactions. We report here the cloning, sequencing, and expression of the 12S subunit. The gene was identified by matching amino acid sequences derived from isolated authentic 12S peptides with the deduced sequence of an open reading frame present in a cloned P. shermanii genomic fragment known to contain the gene encoding the 1.3S biotinyl subunit. The cloned 12S gene encodes a protein of 604 amino acids and of M(r) 65,545. The deduced sequence shows regions of extensive homology with the beta subunit of mammalian propionyl-CoA carboxylase as well as regions of homology with acetyl-CoA carboxylase from several species. Two genomic fragments were subcloned into pUC19 in an orientation such that the 12S open reading frame could be expressed from the lac promoter of the vector. Crude extracts prepared from these cells contained an immunoreactive band on Western blots (immunoblots) which comigrated with authentic 12S. The Escherichia coli-expressed 12S was purified to apparent homogeneity by a three-step procedure and compared with authentic 12S from P. shermanii. Their quaternary structures were identical by electron microscopy, and the E. coli 12S preparation was fully active in the reactions catalyzed by this subunit. We conclude that we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed the 12S subunit which exists in a hexameric active form in E.coli. PMID:8366018

  12. Genetic makeup of the Corynebacterium glutamicum LexA regulon deduced from comparative transcriptomics and in vitro DNA band shift assays.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, Nina; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Czaja, Lisa F; Brinkrolf, Karina; Brune, Iris; Hüser, Andrea T; Hansmeier, Nicole; Pühler, Alfred; Borovok, Ilya; Tauch, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    The lexA gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was deleted to create the mutant strain C. glutamicum NJ2114, which has an elongated cell morphology and an increased doubling time. To characterize the SOS regulon in C. glutamicum, the transcriptomes of NJ2114 and a DNA-damage-induced wild-type strain were compared with that of a wild-type control using DNA microarray hybridization. The expression data were combined with bioinformatic pattern searches for LexA binding sites, leading to the detection of 46 potential SOS boxes located upstream of differentially expressed transcription units. Binding of a hexahistidyl-tagged LexA protein to 40 double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the potential SOS boxes was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. It turned out that LexA binds not only to SOS boxes in the promoter-operator region of upregulated genes, but also to SOS boxes detected upstream of downregulated genes. These results demonstrated that LexA controls directly the expression of at least 48 SOS genes organized in 36 transcription units. The deduced genes encode a variety of physiological functions, many of them involved in DNA repair and survival after DNA damage, but nearly half of them have hitherto unknown functions. Alignment of the LexA binding sites allowed the corynebacterial SOS box consensus sequence TcGAA(a/c)AnnTGTtCGA to be deduced. Furthermore, the common intergenic region of lexA and the differentially expressed divS-nrdR operon, encoding a cell division suppressor and a regulator of deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, was characterized in detail. Promoter mapping revealed differences in divS-nrdR expression during SOS response and normal growth conditions. One of the four LexA binding sites detected in the intergenic region is involved in regulating divS-nrdR transcription, whereas the other sites are apparently used for negative autoregulation of lexA expression. PMID:19372162

  13. Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchet, F.; Lis, D.; Caudano, Y.; Mani, A. A.; Peremans, A.; Champagne, B.; Guthmuller, J.

    2012-03-01

    The knowledge of the first hyperpolarizability tensor elements of molecular groups is crucial for a quantitative interpretation of the sum frequency generation (SFG) activity of thin organic films at interfaces. Here, the SFG response of the terminal methyl group of a dodecanethiol (DDT) monolayer has been interpreted on the basis of calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level of approximation. In particular, DFT calculations have been carried out on three classes of models for the aliphatic chains. The first class of models consists of aliphatic chains, containing from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, in which only one methyl group can freely vibrate, while the rest of the chain is frozen by a strong overweight of its C and H atoms. This enables us to localize the probed vibrational modes on the methyl group. In the second class, only one methyl group is frozen, while the entire remaining chain is allowed to vibrate. This enables us to analyse the influence of the aliphatic chain on the methyl stretching vibrations. Finally, the dodecanethiol (DDT) molecule is considered, for which the effects of two dielectrics, i.e. n-hexane and n-dodecane, are investigated. Moreover, DDT calculations are also carried out by using different exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in order to assess the DFT approximations. Using the DFT IR vectors and Raman tensors, the SFG spectrum of DDT has been simulated and the orientation of the methyl group has then been deduced and compared with that obtained using an analytical approach based on a bond additivity model. This analysis shows that when using DFT molecular properties, the predicted orientation of the terminal methyl group tends to converge as a function of the alkyl chain length and that the effects of the chain as well as of the dielectric environment are small. Instead, a more significant difference is observed when comparing the DFT-based results with those obtained from the analytical approach, thus indicating

  14. Smile esthetics: calculated beauty?

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Guillaume; Truong Tan Trung, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Esthetic demand from patients continues to increase. Consequently, the treatments we offer are moving towards more discreet or invisible techniques using lingual brackets in order to achieve harmonious, balanced results in line with our treatment goals. As orthodontists, we act upon relationships between teeth and bone. And the equilibrium they create impacts the entire face via the smile. A balanced smile is essential to an esthetic outcome and is governed by rules, which guide both the practitioner and patient. A smile can be described in terms of mathematical ratios and proportions but beauty cannot be calculated. For the smile to sit harmoniously within the face, we need to take into account facial proportions and the possibility of their being modified by our orthopedic appliances or by surgery.

  15. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance,more » roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.« less

  16. EXAFS spectroscopy and MNDO/AM1/PM3 calculations: a structural study of a model system for Friedel—Crafts alkylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, Teja Sebastian; Bertagnolli, Helmut

    1993-12-01

    The results of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic investigations and supporting theoretical MNDO/AM1/PM1 calculations for a model system of Friedel—Crafts alkylation (benzene, nitrobenzene, AlX 3 where X = Cl or Br, CH 3CH 2Br) are presented. Detailed structural models for the system are deduced with the help of the EXAFS-determined distances. The conclusions drawn from the EXAFS data are confirmed by the results of the theoretical calculations.

  17. Numerical calculation of the radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yipeng; Zhu, Dingqiang

    2014-11-01

    The heat flux density of radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas is one of the most important factors to decide temperature of nozzle's wall. It also provides an invaluable references advice for choosing the material of wall and type of cooling. The numerical calculation based on finite volume method is introduced in the paper. After analysis of the formula of FVM without the influence of scattering, a formula that is used to let spectral radiant intensity that is the calculation of FVM be converted into heat flux density of radiation heat transfer is deduced. It is compiled that the program based on FVM is used to calculate the heat flux density. At the end, the heat flux density of radiation heat transfer of 3D model of double-arc nozzle's wall is calculated under different condition, then simply analysis cooling system is performed.

  18. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings.

  19. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  20. MBPT calculations with ABINIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giantomassi, Matteo; Huhs, Georg; Waroquiers, David; Gonze, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) defines a rigorous framework for the description of excited-state properties based on the Green's function formalism. Within MBPT, one can calculate charged excitations using e.g. Hedin's GW approximation for the electron self-energy. In the same framework, neutral excitations are also well described through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). In this talk, we report on the recent developments concerning the parallelization of the MBPT algorithms available in the ABINIT code (www.abinit.org). In particular, we discuss how to improve the parallel efficiency thanks to a hybrid version that employs MPI for the coarse-grained parallelization and OpenMP (a de facto standard for parallel programming on shared memory architectures) for the fine-grained parallelization of the most CPU-intensive parts. Benchmark results obtained with the new implementation are discussed. Finally, we present results for the GW corrections of amorphous SiO2 in the presence of defects and the BSE absorption spectrum. This work has been supported by the Prace project (PaRtnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, http://www.prace-ri.eu).

  1. Calculations in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Photiadis, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The author analyzes two problems which extend the predictive ability of Quantum Chromodynamics. He studies composite operators in lattice gauge theory that reduce to operators of the form anti psi gamma DDDD ... psi in the continuum limit; such operators arise in perturbative analyses of quantum chromodynamics. Using these results and the data of a numerical simulation one could normalize exclusive processes and predict moments of deep inelastic scattering structure functions. To initiate the program the author constructs and renormalizes lattice operators to the one-loop level. He is encouraged that the hadronic matrix elements of the simpler operators are within reach of numerical simulations. The author also calculates a corrected photon spectrum in the endpoint region, z ..-->.. 1, for direct photon decay of the upsilon by summing the leading logarithms of (1-z) to all orders in perturbation theory. This effect causes the cross section to level out at approx. = = .8, removing the sharp peak in the tree level prediction, but does not cause the cross section to turn over.

  2. Calculations in Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Photiadis, Douglas Marc

    I analyze two problems which extend the predictive ability of Quantum Chromodynamics. I study composite operators in lattice gauge theory that reduce to operators of the form (')(psi) (GAMMA) DDDD . . . (psi) in the continuum limit; such operators arise in perturbative analyses of quantum chromodynamics. Using our results and the data of a numerical simulation one could normalize exclusive processes and predict moments of deep inelastic scattering structure functions. To initiate the program we construct and renormalize lattice operators to the one-loop level. We are encouraged that the hadronic matrix elements of the simpler operators are within reach of numerical simulations. I also calculate a corrected photon spectrum in the endpoint region, z (--->) 1, for direct photon decay of the upsilon by summing the leading logarithms of (1 -z) to all orders in perturbation theory. This effect causes the cross section to level out at (DBLTURN)z = .8, removing the sharp peak in the tree level prediction, but does not cause the cross section to turn over.

  3. Summary of Vulcan Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J.D.

    2000-03-23

    This is a summary of the results of my calculations compared to Elisabeth Wolfrum's data on the Vulcan imprint experiments. The material strength makes essentially no difference to the growth of perturbations seeded by the laser imprint. For the low-intensity case (30 J laser energy, beam intensity of 0.5 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) the thin (2 microns) Al foil melts quickly from the front (driven) surface and decompresses quickly from the back surface, so there is actually only a fraction of the foil that is solid and compressed, and then for only a short time. And this solid fraction is not accelerating much during this short time. In particular, the shock (which is at about 250 kbar when it is about half way through the foil) travels entirely through the foil in about 0.25 ns. At 0.3 ns the ablation front is 0.6 {micro}m in from the original position of the front surface, the next 0.6 {micro}m is melted, so only the back 0.8 {micro}m is solid and compressed. This solid portion, though, is not moving much; the place where the imprinted perturbations are growing is back at the ablation front, where the perturbations are clearly growing fluid-like. By 0.5 ns the entire foil is melted and decompressing from both ends. Thus, the actual foil distortion looks little different with and without strength.

  4. Relative Hazard Calculation Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    DL Strenge; MK White; RD Stenner; WB Andrews

    1999-09-07

    The methodology presented in this document was developed to provide a means of calculating the RH ratios to use in developing useful graphic illustrations. The RH equation, as presented in this methodology, is primarily a collection of key factors relevant to understanding the hazards and risks associated with projected risk management activities. The RH equation has the potential for much broader application than generating risk profiles. For example, it can be used to compare one risk management activity with another, instead of just comparing it to a fixed baseline as was done for the risk profiles. If the appropriate source term data are available, it could be used in its non-ratio form to estimate absolute values of the associated hazards. These estimated values of hazard could then be examined to help understand which risk management activities are addressing the higher hazard conditions at a site. Graphics could be generated from these absolute hazard values to compare high-hazard conditions. If the RH equation is used in this manner, care must be taken to specifically define and qualify the estimated absolute hazard values (e.g., identify which factors were considered and which ones tended to drive the hazard estimation).

  5. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  6. New calculations of neutron kerma coefficients and dose equivalent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhou; Chen, Jinxiang

    2008-06-01

    For neutron energies ranging from 1 keV to 20 MeV, the kerma coefficients for elements H, C, N, O, light water, and ICRU tissue were deduced respectively from microscopic cross sections and Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP code). The results are consistent within admitted uncertainties with values evaluated by an international group (Chadwick et al 1999 Med. Phys. 26 974-91). The ambient dose equivalent generated in the ISO-recommended neutron field for an Am-Be neutron source (ISO 8529-1: 2001(E)) was obtained from the kerma coefficients and Monte Carlo calculation. In addition, it was calculated directly by multiplying the neutron fluence by the fluence-to-ambient dose conversion coefficients recommended by ICRP (ICRP 1996 ICRP Publication 74 (Oxford: Pergamon)). The two results agree well with each other. The main feature of this work is our Monte Carlo simulation design and the treatments differing from the work of others in the calculation of neutron energy transfer in non-elastic processes. PMID:18495982

  7. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the physical processes of impact cratering on planetary surfaces and atmospheres as well as collisions of finite-size self-gravitating objects is vitally important to planetary science. The observation has often been made that craters are the most ubiquitous landform on the solid planets and the satellites. The density of craters is used to date surfaces on planets and satellites. For large ringed basin craters (e.g. Chicxulub), the issue of identification of exactly what 'diameter' transient crater is associated with this structure is exemplified by the arguments of Sharpton et al. (1993) versus those of Hildebrand et al. (1995). The size of a transient crater, such as the K/T extinction crater at Yucatan, Mexico, which is thought to be the source of SO,-induced sulfuric acid aerosol that globally acidified surface waters as the result of massive vaporization of CASO, in the target rock, is addressed by our present project. The impact process excavates samples of planetary interiors. The degree to which this occurs (e.g. how deeply does excavation occur for a given crater diameter) has been of interest, both with regard to exposing mantle rocks in crater floors, as well as launching samples into space which become part of the terrestrial meteorite collection (e.g. lunar meteorites, SNC's from Mars). Only in the case of the Earth can we test calculations in the laboratory and field. Previous calculations predict, independent of diameter, that the depth of excavation, normalized by crater diameter, is d(sub ex)/D = 0.085 (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1993). For Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) fragments impacting Jupiter, predicted excavation depths of different gas-rich layers in the atmosphere, were much larger. The trajectory and fate of highly shocked material from a large impact on the Earth, such as the K/T bolide is of interest. Melosh et al. (1990) proposed that the condensed material from the impact upon reentering the Earth's atmosphere induced. radiative

  8. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  9. The four hexamerin genes in the honey bee: structure, molecular evolution and function deduced from expression patterns in queens, workers and drones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hexamerins are hemocyanin-derived proteins that have lost the ability to bind copper ions and transport oxygen; instead, they became storage proteins. The current study aimed to broaden our knowledge on the hexamerin genes found in the honey bee genome by exploring their structural characteristics, expression profiles, evolution, and functions in the life cycle of workers, drones and queens. Results The hexamerin genes of the honey bee (hex 70a, hex 70b, hex 70c and hex 110) diverge considerably in structure, so that the overall amino acid identity shared among their deduced protein subunits varies from 30 to 42%. Bioinformatics search for motifs in the respective upstream control regions (UCRs) revealed six overrepresented motifs including a potential binding site for Ultraspiracle (Usp), a target of juvenile hormone (JH). The expression of these genes was induced by topical application of JH on worker larvae. The four genes are highly transcribed by the larval fat body, although with significant differences in transcript levels, but only hex 110 and hex 70a are re-induced in the adult fat body in a caste- and sex-specific fashion, workers showing the highest expression. Transcripts for hex 110, hex 70a and hex70b were detected in developing ovaries and testes, and hex 110 was highly transcribed in the ovaries of egg-laying queens. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that HEX 110 is located at the most basal position among the holometabola hexamerins, and like HEX 70a and HEX 70c, it shares potential orthology relationship with hexamerins from other hymenopteran species. Conclusions Striking differences were found in the structure and developmental expression of the four hexamerin genes in the honey bee. The presence of a potential binding site for Usp in the respective 5' UCRs, and the results of experiments on JH level manipulation in vivo support the hypothesis of regulation by JH. Transcript levels and patterns in the fat body and gonads suggest that

  10. EPA's National Stormwater Calculator (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster will demonstrate how EPA's National Stormwater Calculator works. The National Stormwater Calculator (SWC) estimates the amount of stormwater runoff generated from a site under different development and control scenarios over a long period of historical rainfall. The a...

  11. Calculates Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel.

    1989-11-10

    Version 00 THRUSH computes the thermal neutron scattering kernel by the phonon expansion method for both coherent and incoherent scattering processes. The calculation of the coherent part is suitable only for calculating the scattering kernel for heavy water.

  12. Assessment of volatile compound profiles and the deduced sensory significance of virgin olive oils from the progeny of Picual×Arbequina cultivars.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Ana G; de la Rosa, Raúl; Pascual, Mar; Sánchez-Ortiz, Araceli; Romero-Segura, Carmen; León, Lorenzo; Sanz, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Volatile compounds are responsible for most of the sensory qualities of virgin olive oil and they are synthesized when enzymes and substrates come together as olive fruit is crushed during the industrial process to obtain the oil. Here we have studied the variability among the major volatile compounds in virgin olive oil prepared from the progeny of a cross of Picual and Arbequina olive cultivars (Olea europaea L.). The volatile compounds were isolated by SPME, and analyzed by HRGC-MS and HRGC-FID. Most of the volatile compounds found in the progeny's oil are produced by the enzymes in the so-called lipoxygenase pathway, and they may be clustered into different groups according to their chain length and polyunsaturated fatty acid origin (linoleic and linolenic acids). In addition, a group of compounds derived from amino acid metabolism and two terpenes also contributed significantly to the volatile fraction, some of which had significant odor values in most of the genotypes evaluated. The volatile compound content of the progeny was very varied, widely transgressing the progenitor levels, suggesting that in breeding programs it might be more effective to consider a larger number of individuals within the same cross than using different crosses with fewer individuals. Multivariate analysis allowed genotypes with particularly interesting volatile compositions to be identified and their flavor quality deduced.

  13. Sequence of cDNA for rat cystathionine gamma-lyase and comparison of deduced amino acid sequence with related Escherichia coli enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, P F; Maxwell, I H; Su, L J; Baumann, M; Glode, L M

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone for cystathionine gamma-lyase was isolated from a rat cDNA library in lambda gt11 by screening with a monospecific antiserum. The identity of this clone, containing 600 bp proximal to the 3'-end of the gene, was confirmed by positive hybridization selection. Northern-blot hybridization showed the expected higher abundance of the corresponding mRNA in liver than in brain. Two further cDNA clones from a plasmid pcD library were isolated by colony hybridization with the first clone and were found to contain inserts of 1600 and 1850 bp. One of these was confirmed as encoding cystathionine gamma-lyase by hybridization with two independent pools of oligodeoxynucleotides corresponding to partial amino acid sequence information for cystathionine gamma-lyase. The other clone (estimated to represent all but 8% of the 5'-end of the mRNA) was sequenced and its deduced amino acid sequence showed similarity to those of the Escherichia coli enzymes cystathionine beta-lyase and cystathionine gamma-synthase throughout its length, especially to that of the latter. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2201285

  14. Primary structure of human corticosteroid binding globulin, deduced from hepatic and pulmonary cDNAs, exhibits homology with serine protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, G.L.; Smith, C.L.; Goping, I.S.; Underhill, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced cDNAs for corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) prepared from human liver and lung mRNAs. The results indicate that CBG mRNA is relatively abundant in the liver but is also present in the lung, testis, and kidney. The liver CBG cDNA contains an open reading frame for a 405-amino acid (M/sub r/ 45,149) polypeptide. This includes a predominantly hydrophobic, leader sequence of 22 residues that precedes the known NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence of human CBG. We, therefore, predict that the mature protein is composed of 383 amino acids and is a polypeptide of M/sub r/ 42,646. A second, in-frame, 72-base-pair cistron of unknown significance exists between the TAA termination codon for CBG and a possible polyadenylylation signal (AATAAA) located 16 nucleotides before the polyadenylylation site. The deduced amino acid sequence of mature CBG contains two cysteine residues and consensus sequences for the attachment of six possible N-linked oligosaccharide chains. The sequences of the human lung and liver CBG cDNAs differ by only one nucleotide within the proposed leader sequence,and they attribute this to a point mutation. No sequence homology was found between CBG and other steroid binding proteins, but there is a remarkable similarity between the amino acid sequences of CBG and of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, and this extends to other members of the serpin (serine protease inhibitor) superfamily

  15. Metabolic Switches and Adaptations Deduced from the Proteomes of Streptomyces coelicolor Wild Type and phoP Mutant Grown in Batch Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Louise; Hodgson, David A.; Wentzel, Alexander; Nieselt, Kay; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Moore, Jonathan; Morrissey, Edward R.; Legaie, Roxane; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Martín, Juan F.; Burroughs, Nigel J.; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Smith, Margaret C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Streptomyces are soil-dwelling oligotrophs and important producers of secondary metabolites. Previously, we showed that global messenger RNA expression was subject to a series of metabolic and regulatory switches during the lifetime of a fermentor batch culture of Streptomyces coelicolor M145. Here we analyze the proteome from eight time points from the same fermentor culture and, because phosphate availability is an important regulator of secondary metabolite production, compare this to the proteome of a similar time course from an S. coelicolor mutant, INB201 (ΔphoP), defective in the control of phosphate utilization. The proteomes provide a detailed view of enzymes involved in central carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Trends in protein expression over the time courses were deduced from a protein abundance index, which also revealed the importance of stress pathway proteins in both cultures. As expected, the ΔphoP mutant was deficient in expression of PhoP-dependent genes, and several putatively compensatory metabolic and regulatory pathways for phosphate scavenging were detected. Notably there is a succession of switches that coordinately induce the production of enzymes for five different secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways over the course of the batch cultures. PMID:22147733

  16. Experimental and data analysis techniques for deducing collision-induced forces from photographic histories of engine rotor fragment impact/interaction with a containment ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeghiayan, R. P.; Leech, J. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis method termed TEJ-JET is described whereby measured transient elastic and inelastic deformations of an engine-rotor fragment-impacted structural ring are analyzed to deduce the transient external forces experienced by that ring as a result of fragment impact and interaction with the ring. Although the theoretical feasibility of the TEJ-JET concept was established, its practical feasibility when utilizing experimental measurements of limited precision and accuracy remains to be established. The experimental equipment and the techniques (high-speed motion photography) employed to measure the transient deformations of fragment-impacted rings are described. Sources of error and data uncertainties are identified. Techniques employed to reduce data reading uncertainties and to correct the data for optical-distortion effects are discussed. These procedures, including spatial smoothing of the deformed ring shape by Fourier series and timewise smoothing by Gram polynomials, are applied illustratively to recent measurements involving the impact of a single T58 turbine rotor blade against an aluminum containment ring. Plausible predictions of the fragment-ring impact/interaction forces are obtained by one branch of this TEJ-JET method; however, a second branch of this method, which provides an independent estimate of these forces, remains to be evaluated.

  17. Systematical calculation of α decay half-lives with a generalized liquid drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hongfei; Zhang, Haifei; Royer, G.; Li, Junqing

    2014-01-01

    A systematic calculation of α decay half-lives is presented for even-even nuclei between Te and Z = 118 isotopes. The potential energy governing α decay has been determined within a liquid drop model including proximity effects between the α particle and the daughter nucleus and taking into account the experimental Q value. The α decay half-lives have been deduced from the WKB barrier penetration probability. The α decay half-lives obtained agree reasonably well with the experimental data.

  18. Influence on isotope effect calculations of the method of obtaining force constants from vibrational data

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, D.Z.; Sarpal, S.K.; Bopp, P.; Wolfsberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    Reduced isotopic partition function ratios (s/sub 2//s/sub 1/)f are employed in the calculation of isotope effects on thermodynamic equilibrium constrants. The quadratic force constants of the molecular force field are needed to evaluate (s/sub 2//s/sub 1/)f. Often these force constants are directly deduced from observed fundamentals in vibrational spectra and the (s/sub 2//s/sub 1/)f values so obtained are labeled (ANHARM). In a theroretically more valid procedure that is more difficult, one corrects observed fundamentals for anharmonicity on the basis of observed overtone and combination bands and then deduces force constants from these observed harmonic frequencies. The (s/sub 2//s/sub 1/)f values obtained from these force constants are labeled (HARM). (HARM) values and (ANHARM) values are evaluated and the isotope effects calculated with these values are discussed. It is concluded that the consistent use of (ANHARM) values in such calculations is a valid procedure.

  19. Airplane stability calculations with a card programmable pocket calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Programs are presented for calculating airplane stability characteristics with a card programmable pocket calculator. These calculations include eigenvalues of the characteristic equations of lateral and longitudinal motion as well as stability parameters such as the time to damp to one-half amplitude or the damping ratio. The effects of wind shear are included. Background information and the equations programmed are given. The programs are written for the International System of Units, the dimensional form of the stability derivatives, and stability axes. In addition to programs for stability calculations, an unusual and short program is included for the Euler transformation of coordinates used in airplane motions. The programs have been written for a Hewlett Packard HP-67 calculator. However, the use of this calculator does not constitute an endorsement of the product by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Structure of the (111) surface of bismuth: LEED analysis and first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moenig, H.; Wells, J.; Hofmann, Ph.; Sun, J.; Pohl, K.; Koroteev, Yu.M.; Bihlmayer, G.; Chulkov, E.V.

    2005-08-15

    The surface structure of Bi(111) was investigated by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) intensity analysis for temperatures between 140 and 313 K and by first-principles calculations. The diffraction pattern reveals a (1x1) surface structure and LEED intensity versus energy simulations confirm that the crystal is terminated with a Bi bilayer. Excellent agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured diffraction intensities in the whole temperature range. The first interlayer spacing shows no significant relaxation at any temperature while the second interlayer spacing expands slightly. The Debye temperatures deduced from the optimized atomic vibrational amplitudes for the two topmost layers are found to be significantly lower than in the bulk. The experimental results for the relaxations agree well with those of our first-principles calculation.

  1. An effective method for calculating phase-matching conditions in biaxial crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Guangwen; Wang, Yongcang; Zhang, Meizhi

    2015-08-01

    We present an effective method for calculating phase-matching conditions in biaxial crystals, especially for nonlinear orthorhombic crystals. Exploiting the angle definition introduced by Japanese mathematician Kodaira Kunihiko, we deduce the angular relations in geometry and obtain the expressions of refractive indices depending on angular orientation of wave vector k and optical axis angle. Then, we directly calculate the phase-matching conditions with BIBO crystal in spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) process and gain the optimum phase matching schemes for the type I and type II. On its basis, we discuss the angular gradients of the pump and emission wave refractive index near the exact phase matching direction and compare the SPDC with double-frequency process in geometrical relations of the refractive index ellipsoids. This method based on angle-dependent refractive index can be applied to three-wave interactions. It is convenient to calculate the phase matching parameters without solving the quadratic Fresnel equations.

  2. Calculation of surface enthalpy of solids from an ab initio electronegativity based model: case of ice.

    PubMed

    Douillard, J M; Henry, M

    2003-07-15

    A very simple route to calculation of the surface energy of solids is proposed because this value is very difficult to determine experimentally. The first step is the calculation of the attractive part of the electrostatic energy of crystals. The partial charges used in this calculation are obtained by using electronegativity equalization and scales of electronegativity and hardness deduced from physical characteristics of the atom. The lattice energies of the infinite crystal and of semi-infinite layers are then compared. The difference is related to the energy of cohesion and then to the surface energy. Very good results are obtained with ice, if one compares with the surface energy of liquid water, which is generally considered a good approximation of the surface energy of ice.

  3. Edward Teller and Nuclei:. Along the Trail to the Neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.

    2010-01-01

    I discuss two of Edward Teller's contributions to nuclear physics, the introduction of the Gamow-Teller operator in β decay and the formulation of the Goldhaber-Teller model for electric dipole transitions, in the context of efforts to understand the weak interaction and the nature of the neutrino.

  4. Deduced consensus sequence of Sindbis virus strain AR339: mutations contained in laboratory strains which affect cell culture and in vivo phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, K L; Simpson, D A; Lin, S C; Knott, T A; Polo, J M; Pence, D F; Johannsen, D B; Heidner, H W; Davis, N L; Johnston, R E

    1996-01-01

    The consensus sequence of the Sindbis virus AR339 isolate, the prototype alphavirus, has been deduced. THe results presented here suggest (i) that a substantial proportion of the sequence divergence evident between the consensus sequence and sequences of laboratory strains of AR339 has resulted from selection for efficient growth in cell culture, (ii) that many of these changes affect the virulence of the virus in animal models, and (iii) that such modified genetic backgrounds present in laboratory strains can exert a significant influence on genetic studies of virus pathogenesis and host range. A laboratory strain of Sindbis virus AR339 was sequenced and cloned as a cDNA (pTRSB) from which infectious virus (TRSB) could be derived. The consensus sequence was deduced from the complete sequences of pTRSB and HRsp (E. G. Strauss, C. M. Rice, and J. H. Strauss, Virology 133:92-110, 1984), from partial sequences of the glycoprotein genes of three other AR339 laboratory strains, and by comparison with the sequences of the glycoprotein genes of three other AR339 sequence. HRsp differed form the consensus sequence by eight coding changes, and TRSB differed by three coding changes. In the 5' untranslated region, HRsp differed from the consensus sequence at nucleotide (nt) 5. These differences were likely the result of cell culture passage of the original AR339 isolate. At three of the difference loci (one in TRSB and two in HRsp), selection of cell-culture-adaptive mutations was documented with Sindbis virus or other alphaviruses. Selection in cell culture often results in attenuation of virulence in animals. Considering the TRSB and HRsp sequences together, one noncoding difference from the consensus (an A-for-G substitution in the 5' untranslated region at nt 5) and six coding differences in the glycoprotein genes (at E2 amino acids 1, 3, 70, and 172 and at E1 amino acids 72 and 237) were at loci which, either individually or in combination, significantly affected

  5. How to deduce and teach the logical and unambiguous answer, namely L = ∑C, to “What is Life?” using the principles of communication?

    PubMed Central

    De Loof, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Is it possible to understand the very nature of ‘Life’ and ‘Death’ based on contemporary biology? The usual spontaneous reaction is: “No way. Life is far too complicated. It involves both material- and an immaterial dimensions, and this combination exceeds the capacities of the human brain.” In this paper, a fully contrarian stand is taken. Indeed it will be shown that without invoking any unknown principle(s) unambiguous definitions can be logically deduced. The key? First ask the right questions. Next, thoroughly imbue contemporary biology with the principles of communication, including both its ‘hardware’ and its ‘software’ aspects. An integrative yet simple principle emerges saying that: 1. All living matter is invariably organized as sender-receiver compartments that incessantly handle and transfer information (= communicate); 2. The ‘communicating compartment’ is better suited to serve as universal unit of structure, function and evolution than ‘the (prokaryotic) cell’, the smallest such unit; 3. ‘Living matter’ versus ‘non-living’ are false opposites while ‘still alive’ and ‘just not alive anymore’ are true opposites; 4. ‘Death’ ensues when a given sender-receiver compartment irreversibly loses its ability to handle information at its highest level of compartmental organization; 5. The verb ‘Life’ (L) denotes nothing else than the total sum (∑) of all acts of communication (C) executed by a sender-receiver at all its levels of compartmental organization: L = ∑C; 6. Any act of communication is a problem-solving act; 6. Any Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES) should have the definition of Life at its core. PMID:27064373

  6. How to deduce and teach the logical and unambiguous answer, namely L = ∑C, to "What is Life?" using the principles of communication?

    PubMed

    De Loof, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Is it possible to understand the very nature of 'Life' and 'Death' based on contemporary biology? The usual spontaneous reaction is: "No way. Life is far too complicated. It involves both material- and an immaterial dimensions, and this combination exceeds the capacities of the human brain." In this paper, a fully contrarian stand is taken. Indeed it will be shown that without invoking any unknown principle(s) unambiguous definitions can be logically deduced. The key? First ask the right questions. Next, thoroughly imbue contemporary biology with the principles of communication, including both its 'hardware' and its 'software' aspects. An integrative yet simple principle emerges saying that: 1. All living matter is invariably organized as sender-receiver compartments that incessantly handle and transfer information (= communicate); 2. The 'communicating compartment' is better suited to serve as universal unit of structure, function and evolution than 'the (prokaryotic) cell', the smallest such unit; 3. 'Living matter' versus 'non-living' are false opposites while 'still alive' and 'just not alive anymore' are true opposites; 4. 'Death' ensues when a given sender-receiver compartment irreversibly loses its ability to handle information at its highest level of compartmental organization; 5. The verb 'Life' (L) denotes nothing else than the total sum (∑) of all acts of communication (C) executed by a sender-receiver at all its levels of compartmental organization: L = ∑C; 6. Any act of communication is a problem-solving act; 6. Any Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES) should have the definition of Life at its core. PMID:27064373

  7. How to deduce and teach the logical and unambiguous answer, namely L = ∑C, to "What is Life?" using the principles of communication?

    PubMed

    De Loof, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Is it possible to understand the very nature of 'Life' and 'Death' based on contemporary biology? The usual spontaneous reaction is: "No way. Life is far too complicated. It involves both material- and an immaterial dimensions, and this combination exceeds the capacities of the human brain." In this paper, a fully contrarian stand is taken. Indeed it will be shown that without invoking any unknown principle(s) unambiguous definitions can be logically deduced. The key? First ask the right questions. Next, thoroughly imbue contemporary biology with the principles of communication, including both its 'hardware' and its 'software' aspects. An integrative yet simple principle emerges saying that: 1. All living matter is invariably organized as sender-receiver compartments that incessantly handle and transfer information (= communicate); 2. The 'communicating compartment' is better suited to serve as universal unit of structure, function and evolution than 'the (prokaryotic) cell', the smallest such unit; 3. 'Living matter' versus 'non-living' are false opposites while 'still alive' and 'just not alive anymore' are true opposites; 4. 'Death' ensues when a given sender-receiver compartment irreversibly loses its ability to handle information at its highest level of compartmental organization; 5. The verb 'Life' (L) denotes nothing else than the total sum (∑) of all acts of communication (C) executed by a sender-receiver at all its levels of compartmental organization: L = ∑C; 6. Any act of communication is a problem-solving act; 6. Any Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES) should have the definition of Life at its core.

  8. Use of primary deuterium and /sup 15/N isotope effects to deduce the relative rates of steps in the mechanisms of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.M.; Chen, C.Y.; Cleland, W.W.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-06-28

    The authors have used deuterium and /sup 15/N isotope effects to study the relative rates of the steps in the mechanisms of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases. The proposed chemical mechanisms for these enzymes involve carbinolamine formation, imine formation, and reduction of the imine to the amino acid. These steps are almost equally rate limiting for V/K/sub ammonia/ with alanine dehydrogenase, while with glutamate dehydrogenase carbinolamine formation, imine formation, and release of glutamate after hydride transfer provide most of the rate limitation of V/K/sub ammonia/. Release of oxidized nucleotide is largely rate limiting for V/sub max/ for both enzymes. When ..beta..-hydroxypyruvate replaces pyruvate, or 3-acetylpyridine NADH (Acpyr-NADH) or thio-NADH replaces NADH with alanine dehydrogenase, nucleotide release no longer limits V/sub max/, and hydride transfer becomes more rate limiting. With glutamate dehydrogenase, replacement of ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate by ..cap alpha..-ketovalerate makes hydride transfer more rate limiting. Use of Acpyr-NADPH has a minimal effect with ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate but causes an 8-fold decrease in V/sub max/ with ..cap alpha..-ketovalerate, with hydride transfer the major rate-limiting step. In contrast, thio-NADPH with either ..cap alpha..-keto acid causes carbinolamide formation to become almost completely rate limiting. These studies show the power of multiple isotope effects in deducing details of the chemistry and changes in rate-limiting step(s) in complicated reaction mechanisms such as those of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases.

  9. Lambda-Nucleon Potential Calculated from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nemura, Hidekatsu

    2011-10-21

    We present our studies of Lambda-Nucleon ({Lambda}N) interaction by using lattice QCD. The equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) amplitude of the lowest energy scattering state of a proton-{Lambda} system is calculated from lattice QCD. In this report, two different types of gauge configurations are employed: (i) Quenched QCD configurations at {beta} = 5.7 (a = 0.1416(9) fm) on a 32{sup 3}x48 lattice, whose spatial volume is (4.5 fm){sup 3}.(ii)2+1 flavor full QCD configurations generated by the PACS-CS collaboration at {beta} = 1.9 (a = 0.0907(13) fm) on a 32{sup 3}x64 lattice, whose spatial volume is (2.90 fm){sup 3}. The spin-singlet central potential is calculated from the NBS wave function for the spin J = 0 state, whereas the spin-triplet central potential as well as the tensor potential are deduced simultaneously from the NBS wave function for the spin J = 1 state by dividing it into the S-wave and the D-wave components.

  10. Equilibrium calculations of firework mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Tanaka, Katsumi; Iida, Mitsuaki; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    1994-12-31

    Thermochemical equilibrium calculations have been used to calculate detonation conditions for typical firework components including three report charges, two display charges, and black powder which is used as a fuse or launch charge. Calculations were performed with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculations with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. The detonation calculations presented in this paper are thought to be the first report on the theoretical study of firework detonation. Measured velocities for two report charges are available and compare favorably to predicted detonation velocities. However, the measured velocities may not be true detonation velocities. Fast deflagration rather than an ideal detonation occurs when reactants contain significant amounts of slow reacting constituents such as aluminum or titanium. Despite such uncertainties in reacting pyrotechnics, the detonation calculations do show the complex nature of condensed phase formation at elevated pressures and give an upper bound for measured velocities.

  11. Global nuclear-structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1990-04-20

    The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to {epsilon}{sub 2} and {epsilon}{sub 4} used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and {Beta}-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential.

  12. Handheld calculator program simplifies calculation of data for gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Karger, W.

    1982-01-11

    For natural gases having several components, Elliott Co.'s handheld calculator program can characterize the gas mixture with a printout that provides its molecular weight, molar specific heat at constant pressure, pseudocritical pressure and temperature, ratio of specific heats, and adiabatic compression exponent. The program also provides for further calculations that yield specific gravity, specific heat/lb, and compressibility.

  13. Calculator. Owning a Small Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Seven activities are presented in this student workbook designed for an exploration of small business ownership and the use of the calculator in this career. Included are simulated situations in which students must use a calculator to compute property taxes; estimate payroll taxes and franchise taxes; compute pricing, approximate salaries,…

  14. Design Calculations for Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldin, B.

    1983-01-01

    Nine simplified analytic models based on average properties accurately predict heat rates for silicon/germanium thermoelectric generators. Solutions from simplified models were compared with those obtained using sophisticated numerical analysis. Maximum errors in calculated heat rate range from about 4 percent to about 0.2 percent. Models also used to calculate power delivered to load and thermodynamic efficiency.

  15. Deconstructing Calculation Methods: Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this series of four articles is to look critically, and in some detail, at the primary strategy approach to written calculation, as set out on pages 5 to 16 of the "Guidance paper" "Calculation." The underlying principle of that approach is that children should use mental methods whenever they are appropriate, whereas for calculations…

  16. relline: Relativistic line profiles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauser, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    relline calculates relativistic line profiles; it is compatible with the common X-ray data analysis software XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) and ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The two basic forms are an additive line model (RELLINE) and a convolution model to calculate relativistic smearing (RELCONV).

  17. CELSS scenario analysis: Breakeven calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    A model of the relative mass requirements of food production components in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) based on regenerative concepts is described. Included are a discussion of model scope, structure, and example calculations. Computer programs for cultivar and breakeven calculations are also included.

  18. Scattering calculations and confining interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1993-01-01

    Most of the research work performed under this grant were concerned with strong interaction processes ranging from kaon-nucleon interaction to proton-nucleus scattering calculations. Research performed under this grant can be categorized into three groups: (1) parametrization of fundamental interactions, (2) development of formal theory, and (3) calculations based upon the first two. Parametrizations of certain fundamental interactions, such as kaon-nucleon interaction, for example, were necessary because kaon-nucleon scattering amplitude was needed to perform kaon-nucleus scattering calculations. It was possible to calculate kaon-nucleon amplitudes from the first principle, but it was unnecessary for the purpose of the project. Similar work was also done for example for anti-protons and anti-nuclei. Formal developments to some extent were also pursued so that consistent calculations can be done.

  19. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  20. Metabolic and evolutionary insights into the closely-related species Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans deduced from high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Whilst being closely related to the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), S. lividans 66 differs from it in several significant and phenotypically observable ways, including antibiotic production. Previous comparative gene hybridization studies investigating such differences have used low-density (one probe per gene) PCR-based spotted arrays. Here we use new experimentally optimised 104,000 × 60-mer probe arrays to characterize in detail the genomic differences between wild-type S. lividans 66, a derivative industrial strain, TK24, and S. coelicolor M145. Results The high coverage and specificity (detection of three nucleotide differences) of the new microarrays used has highlighted the macroscopic genomic differences between two S. lividans strains and S. coelicolor. In a series of case studies we have validated the microarray and have identified subtle changes in genomic structure which occur in the Asp-activating adenylation domains of CDA non-ribosomal peptide synthetase genes which provides evidence of gene shuffling between these domains. We also identify single nucleotide sequence inter-species differences which exist in the actinorhodin biosynthetic gene cluster. As the glyoxylate bypass is non-functional in both S. lividans strains due to the absence of the gene encoding isocitrate lyase it is likely that the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway functions as the alternative mechanism for the assimilation of C2 compounds. Conclusions This study provides evidence for widespread genetic recombination, rather than it being focussed at 'hotspots', suggesting that the previously proposed 'archipelago model' of genomic differences between S. coelicolor and S. lividans is unduly simplistic. The two S. lividans strains investigated differ considerably in genetic complement, with TK24 lacking 175 more genes than its wild-type parent when compared to S. coelicolor. Additionally, we confirm the presence of bldB in S. lividans and deduce that S. lividans 66

  1. β-Decay half-lives and nuclear structure of exotic proton-rich waiting point nuclei under rp-process conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Böyükata, Mahmut

    2016-03-01

    We investigate even-even nuclei in the A ∼ 70 mass region within the framework of the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) and the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). Our work includes calculation of the energy spectra and the potential energy surfaces V (β , γ) of Zn, Ge, Se, Kr and Sr nuclei with the same proton and neutron number, N = Z. The parametrization of the IBM-1 Hamiltonian was performed for the calculation of the energy levels in the ground state bands. Geometric shape of the nuclei was predicted by plotting the potential energy surfaces V (β , γ) obtained from the IBM-1 Hamiltonian in the classical limit. The pn-QRPA model was later used to compute half-lives of the neutron-deficient nuclei which were found to be in very good agreement with the measured ones. The pn-QRPA model was also used to calculate the Gamow-Teller strength distributions and was found to be in decent agreement with the measured data. We further calculate the electron capture and positron decay rates for these N = Z waiting point (WP) nuclei in the stellar environment employing the pn-QRPA model. For the rp-process conditions, our total weak rates are within a factor two compared with the Skyrme HF +BCS +QRPA calculation. All calculated electron capture rates are comparable to the competing positron decay rates under rp-process conditions. Our study confirms the finding that electron capture rates form an integral part of the weak rates under rp-process conditions and should not be neglected in the nuclear network calculations.

  2. Additional calculations of triton moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lally, D. F.; Levinger, J. S.

    1982-02-01

    The formalism of hyperspherical harmonics is used to calculate several moments of the triton photoeffect for a Volkov potential with Serber exchange. The accuracy of Clare's calculations of moments σ0 and σ1 is improved by including more terms in the hyperspherical harmonic expansion of the potential and of the ground state wave function. The moment σ2=8.9×104 MeV3 mb is calculated using one term in the hyperspherical harmonic expansions of the potential and wave function. We invert four moments and find reasonable agreement with Gorbunov's measurements of the 3He photoeffect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Triton photoeffect, hyperspherical harmonics, moments of photoeffect, inversion of moments.

  3. Multi-calculation rate simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Akhter, M.

    1977-01-01

    It is common in real time simulations of large aerospace systems to separate the high and low frequency subsystems within the simulation and perform the integrations of the subsystems at different calculation rates. This is done to strike a balance between accuracy of calculation and capacity of the digital computer. Questions arising as to the accuracy of this structure compared to single calculation rates were studied using a linear aircraft model. Also investigated were interactions arising to cause errors worse than those expected. Problems are specifically identified and guidelines are given for selection of sample rates for multiple rate simulations.

  4. [Using Fourier transform to calculate gas concentration in DOAS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian-lin; Wang, Li-shi; Huang, Xin-jian; Wu, Yan-dan; Xiao, Ming-wei

    2008-12-01

    Being an analysis tool of high sensitivity, high resolution, multicomponents, real-time and fast monitoring, the differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) is becoming a new method in atmosphere pollution monitoring. In the DOAS technique, many gases spectra have periodicity evidently, such as those from SO2, NO, NH3 and NO2. Aiming at three kinds of main air-polluted gases, i.e., SO2, NO and NO2 in atmosphere, the DOAS technique is used to monitor them, and Fourier transform is used to analyse the above-mentioned absorption spectra. Under the condition of Hanning Windows, Fourier transforma is used to process various gases spectra which have periodicity. In the process, the value of the characteristic frequency has a linearity relation to the gas concentration. So a new analysis method of DOAS is proposed, which is utilizing the relation between the value of the characteristic frequency and the gas concentration to deduce a linearity formula to calculate the gas concentration. So the value of the characteristic frequency can be used to get the gas concentration. For the gases with evident spectrum periodicity, such as SO2 and NO, this method is good. But for some gases with periodicity not evident, the error in the calculated concentration is beyond the allowable value. So in this method, the important process is frequency separation. It is also the main part in the future study. In a word, this method frees itself from the basic theory in the DOAS technique, cuts down on the process of the concentration calculation and the spectral analysis, and deserves further study. PMID:19248493

  5. Analytical polarization calculations beyond SLIM

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.P. , Notkestrasse, 85, 2000 Hamburg 52, Federal Republic of Germany )

    1989-05-05

    A comparison is made between the theories of Bell and Leinaas and of Derbenev and Kondratenko for the spin polarization in electron storage rings. A calculation of polarization in HERA using the program SMILE of Mane is presented.

  6. Calculate Your Body Mass Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can! ) Health Professional Resources Calculate Your Body Mass Index Body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based ... to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SEARCH | SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | PRIVACY STATEMENT | FOIA | OIG | CONTACT US National ...

  7. Transfer Area Mechanical Handling Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    B. Dianda

    2004-06-23

    This calculation is intended to support the License Application (LA) submittal of December 2004, in accordance with the directive given by DOE correspondence received on the 27th of January 2004 entitled: ''Authorization for Bechtel SAX Company L.L. C. to Include a Bare Fuel Handling Facility and Increased Aging Capacity in the License Application, Contract Number DE-AC28-01R W12101'' (Arthur, W.J., I11 2004). This correspondence was appended by further Correspondence received on the 19th of February 2004 entitled: ''Technical Direction to Bechtel SAIC Company L.L. C. for Surface Facility Improvements, Contract Number DE-AC28-OIRW12101; TDL No. 04-024'' (BSC 2004a). These documents give the authorization for a Fuel Handling Facility to be included in the baseline. The purpose of this calculation is to establish preliminary bounding equipment envelopes and weights for the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) transfer areas equipment. This calculation provides preliminary information only to support development of facility layouts and preliminary load calculations. The limitations of this preliminary calculation lie within the assumptions of section 5 , as this calculation is part of an evolutionary design process. It is intended that this calculation is superseded as the design advances to reflect information necessary to support License Application. The design choices outlined within this calculation represent a demonstration of feasibility and may or may not be included in the completed design. This calculation provides preliminary weight, dimensional envelope, and equipment position in building for the purposes of defining interface variables. This calculation identifies and sizes major equipment and assemblies that dictate overall equipment dimensions and facility interfaces. Sizing of components is based on the selection of commercially available products, where applicable. This is not a specific recommendation for the future use of these components or their related

  8. Interactive Software For Astrodynamical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaifer, Ronald S.; Skinner, David L.; Roberts, Phillip H.

    1995-01-01

    QUICK computer program provides user with facilities of sophisticated desk calculator performing scalar, vector, and matrix arithmetic; propagate conic-section orbits; determines planetary and satellite coordinates; and performs other related astrodynamic calculations within FORTRAN-like software environment. QUICK is interpreter, and no need to use compiler or linker to run QUICK code. Outputs plotted in variety of formats on variety of terminals. Written in RATFOR.

  9. Calculated diffusion coefficients and the growth rate of olivine in a basalt magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Concentration gradients in glass adjacent to skeletal olivines in a basalt have been examined by electron probe. The glass is depleted in Mg, Fe, and Cr and enriched in Si, Al, Na, and Ca relative to that far from olivine. Ionic diffusion coefficients for the glass compositions are calculated from temperature, ionic radius and melt viscosity, using the Stokes-Einstein relation. At 1170 C, the diffusion coefficient of Mg(2+) ions in the basalt is 4.5 billionths sq cm per sec. Comparison with measured diffusion coefficients in a mugearite suggests this value may be 16 times too small. The concentration gradient data and the diffusion coefficients are used to calculate instantaneous olivine growth rates. Growth necessarily preceded emplacement such that the composition of the crystals plus the enclosing glass need not be that of a melt. The computed olivine growth rates are compatible with the rate of crystallization deduced for the Skaegaard intrusion.

  10. SURFACE FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-03-02

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality evaluation for the fuel handling, transfer and storage operations to be performed in the Surface Facility documented in BSC 2003c. The scope of this design calculation covers the operations in the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF) and Remediation Building (RB) and their processes as established at the date of this calculation. Also, this design calculation focuses on intact commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, i.e., pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) SNF. A description of the changes is as follows: (1) Update the supporting calculations for the various Category 1 and 2 event sequences as identified in the ''Preliminary Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2003a, Section 7). (2) Include comments from an informal review conducted by Y-12, located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Su 2004). (3) Revise the BWR calculations to reflect a different Boral loading. (4) Assess effects of potential moderator intrusion into the storage rack area with various water levels for defense in depth based on the new design of the DTF and RB.

  11. Impact delivery of organic matter on the acapulcoite-lodranite parent-body deduced from C, N isotopes and nanostructures of carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, E.; Aléon, J.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Lodran. Carbon phases in Lodran would have been formed by the secondary carbonization of hydrocarbon fluids released during the primary carbonization of IOM. In the framework of this model, the C isotopic compositions can be reproduced using Rayleigh distillation at each carbonization step and the N isotopic compositions can be understood as resulting from the variable loss and preservation of 15N-rich nitriles (δ15N ∼ +800‰) and 15N-poor pyrroles (δ15N = -140‰) during carbonization. The combined interpretation of the temperatures deduced from this model, petrographic cooling rates, and thermochronological indicators suggest that the CI-CM IOM could have been introduced in the parent-body by an impact, about 10 Myr after solar system formation.

  12. Pu236(n,f), Pu237(n,f), and Pu238(n,f) cross sections deduced from (p,t), (p,d), and (p,p') surrogate reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. O.; Beausang, C. W.; Ross, T. J.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Cooper, N.; Escher, J. E.; Gell, K.; Good, E.; Humby, P.; McCleskey, M.; Saastimoinen, A.; Tarlow, T. D.; Thompson, I. J.

    2014-07-01

    The Pu236(n,f), Pu237(n,f) and Pu238(n,f) cross sections have been inferred by utilizing the surrogate ratio method. Targets of Pu239 and U235 were bombarded with 28.5-MeV protons, and the light ion recoils, as well as fission fragments, were detected using the STARS detector array at the K150 Cyclotron at the Texas A&M cyclotron facility. The (p, tf) reaction on Pu239 and U235 targets was used to deduce the σ (Pu236(n ,f))/σ(U232(n,f)) ratio, and the Pu236(n,f) cross section was subsequently determined for En=0.5-7.5 MeV. Similarly, the (p,df) reaction on the same two targets was used to deduce the σ(Pu237(n ,f))/σ(U233(n,f)) ratio, and the Pu237(n,f) cross section was extracted in the energy range En=0.5-7 MeV. The Pu238(n,f) cross section was also deduced by utilizing the (p,p') reaction channel on the same targets. There is good agreement with the recent ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluated cross section data for Pu238(n,f) in the range En=0.5-10.5 MeV and for Pu237(n,f) in the range En=0.5-7 MeV; however, the Pu236(n,f) cross section deduced in the present work is higher than the evaluation between 2 and 7 MeV.

  13. Ab initio calculations of free-energy reaction barriers.

    PubMed

    Bucko, T

    2008-02-13

    The theoretical description of chemical reactions was until recently limited to a 'static' approach in which important parameters such as the rate constant are deduced from the local topology of the potential energy surface close to minima and saddle points. Such an approach has, however, serious limitations. The growing computational power allows us now to use advanced simulation techniques to determine entropic effects accurately for medium-sized systems at ab initio level. Recently, we have implemented free-energy simulation techniques based on molecular dynamics, in particular on the blue-moon ensemble technique and on metadynamics, in the popular DFT code VASP. In the thermodynamic integration (blue-moon ensemble) technique, the free-energy profile is calculated as the path integral over the restoring forces along a parametrized reaction coordinate. In metadynamics, an image of the free-energy surface is constructed on the fly during the simulation by adding small repulsive Gaussian-shaped hills to the Lagrangian driving the dynamics. The two methods are tested on a simple chemical reaction-the nucleophilic substitution of methyl chloride by a chlorine anion.

  14. Ab initio calculations of free-energy reaction barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucko, T.

    2008-02-01

    The theoretical description of chemical reactions was until recently limited to a 'static' approach in which important parameters such as the rate constant are deduced from the local topology of the potential energy surface close to minima and saddle points. Such an approach has, however, serious limitations. The growing computational power allows us now to use advanced simulation techniques to determine entropic effects accurately for medium-sized systems at ab initio level. Recently, we have implemented free-energy simulation techniques based on molecular dynamics, in particular on the blue-moon ensemble technique and on metadynamics, in the popular DFT code VASP. In the thermodynamic integration (blue-moon ensemble) technique, the free-energy profile is calculated as the path integral over the restoring forces along a parametrized reaction coordinate. In metadynamics, an image of the free-energy surface is constructed on the fly during the simulation by adding small repulsive Gaussian-shaped hills to the Lagrangian driving the dynamics. The two methods are tested on a simple chemical reaction—the nucleophilic substitution of methyl chloride by a chlorine anion.

  15. The primary composition beyond 10 to the 5th power GeV as deduced from high energy hadrons and muons in air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    1985-01-01

    Data obtained from a large set of air shower simulation calculations with use of highly refined hadronic interaction and shower simulation model are presented, in an attempt to solve the problem of primary chemical composition beyond 100,000 GeV total energy. It is rated that high energy hadrons in air showers offer a rather unique primary mass signature and show that the interpretation of high energy muon data is much more ambiguous. Predictions are compared with experimental data.

  16. SIMULATE-4 pin power calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadir, T.; Lindahl, S. Oe

    2006-07-01

    A new pin power reconstruction module has been implemented in Studsvik Scandpower's next generation nodal code, SIMULATE-4. Heterogeneous pin powers are calculated by modulating multi-group pin powers from the sub-mesh solver of SIMULATE-4 with pin form factors from single-assembly CASMO-5 lattice calculations. The multi-group pin power model captures instantaneous spectral effects, and actinide tracking on the assembly sub-mesh describes exposure-induced pin power variations. Model details and verification tests against high order multi-assembly transport methods are presented. The accuracy of the new methods is also demonstrated by comparing SIMULATE-4 calculations with measured critical experiment pin powers. (authors)

  17. Insertion device calculations with mathematica

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.; Lidia, S.

    1995-02-01

    The design of accelerator insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators has usually been aided by numerical modeling on digital computers, using code in high level languages like Fortran. In the present era, there are higher level programming environments like IDL{reg_sign}, MatLab{reg_sign}, and Mathematica{reg_sign} in which these calculations may be performed by writing much less code, and in which standard mathematical techniques are very easily used. The authors present a suite of standard insertion device modeling routines in Mathematica to illustrate the new techniques. These routines include a simple way to generate magnetic fields using blocks of CSEM materials, trajectory solutions from the Lorentz force equations for given magnetic fields, Bessel function calculations of radiation for wigglers and undulators and general radiation calculations for undulators.

  18. Comparison of energy calculation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuda, T.

    1981-08-01

    ASHRAE has developed a simplified energy-calculation procedure suitable for small calculators that applied to nonresidential buildings and includes all the essential calculation elements - climatic data, buildings construction, operational characteristics, utility system and equipment performance, and internal heat gain due to lighting, occupancy, cooking, etc. A comparison of the results predicted by the proposed method for four typical HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) systems in an office building in Washington, DC, against the predictions of seven detailed computer-simulation programs - AXCESS, BLAST, BLDSIM, DOE-2, E-CUBE, ESAS, and TRACE - revealed that the similarity of the results depended more on which analyst employed the methods than on which methods were used.

  19. Comparative Calculations of Solubility Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.

    2000-07-25

    The uncertainties in calculated solubilities in the Na-F-PO{sub 4}-HPO{sub 4}-OH system. at 25 C for NaOH concentrations up to 5 mol/kg were assessed. These uncertainties were based on an evaluation of the range of values for the Gibbs energies of the solids. Comparative calculations using the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) and SOLGASMIX indicated that the variation in activity coefficients with NaOH concentration is much greater in the ESP code than in SOLGASMIX. This resulted in ESP calculating a higher solubility in water and a lower solubility in NaOH concentrations above 1 mol/kg: There was a marked discrepancy in the solubilities of the pure components sodium fluoride and trisodium phosphate predicted by ESP and SOLGASMIX. In addition, different solubilities for these components were obtained using different options in ESP. Because of these observations, a Best Practices Guide for ESP will be assembled.

  20. Multigroup Reactor Lattice Cell Calculation

    1990-03-01

    The Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS), is a general code for reactor lattice cell calculations on a wide range of reactor systems. In particular, the code will accept rod or plate fuel geometries in either regular arrays or in clusters, and the energy group structure has been chosen primarily for thermal calculations. The basic library has been compiled with 14 fast groups, 13 resonance groups and 42 thermal groups, but the user is offered themore » choice of accurate solutions in many groups or rapid calculations in few groups. Temperature dependent thermal scattering matrices for a variety of scattering laws are available in the library for the principal moderators which include hydrogen, deuterium, graphite, beryllium and oxygen. WIMSD5 is a succesor version of WIMS-D/4.« less

  1. Verification of Internal Dose Calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aissi, Abdelmadjid

    The MIRD internal dose calculations have been in use for more than 15 years, but their accuracy has always been questionable. There have been attempts to verify these calculations; however, these attempts had various shortcomings which kept the question of verification of the MIRD data still unanswered. The purpose of this research was to develop techniques and methods to verify the MIRD calculations in a more systematic and scientific manner. The research consisted of improving a volumetric dosimeter, developing molding techniques, and adapting the Monte Carlo computer code ALGAM to the experimental conditions and vice versa. The organic dosimetric system contained TLD-100 powder and could be shaped to represent human organs. The dosimeter possessed excellent characteristics for the measurement of internal absorbed doses, even in the case of the lungs. The molding techniques are inexpensive and were used in the fabrication of dosimetric and radioactive source organs. The adaptation of the computer program provided useful theoretical data with which the experimental measurements were compared. The experimental data and the theoretical calculations were compared for 6 source organ-7 target organ configurations. The results of the comparison indicated the existence of an agreement between measured and calculated absorbed doses, when taking into consideration the average uncertainty (16%) of the measurements, and the average coefficient of variation (10%) of the Monte Carlo calculations. However, analysis of the data gave also an indication that the Monte Carlo method might overestimate the internal absorbed doses. Even if the overestimate exists, at least it could be said that the use of the MIRD method in internal dosimetry was shown to lead to no unnecessary exposure to radiation that could be caused by underestimating the absorbed dose. The experimental and the theoretical data were also used to test the validity of the Reciprocity Theorem for heterogeneous

  2. Dose calculation for electron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebreamlak, Wondesen T.

    The dose delivered by electron beams has a complex dependence on the shape of the field; any field shaping shields, design of collimator systems, and energy of the beam. This complicated dependence is due to multiple scattering of the electron beam as the beam travels from the accelerator head to the patient. The dosimetry of only regular field shapes (circular, square, or rectangular) is well developed. However, most tumors have irregular shapes and their dosimetry is calculated by direct measurement. This is laborious and time consuming. In addition, error can be introduced during measurements. The lateral build up ratio method (LBR), which is based on the Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, calculates the dosimetry of irregular electron beam shapes. The accuracy of this method depends on the function sigma r(r,E) (the mean square radial displacement of the electron beam in the medium) used in the calculation. This research focuses on improving the accuracy of electron dose calculations using lateral build up ratio method by investigating the properties of sigmar(r,E). The percentage depth dose curves of different circular cutouts were measured using four electron beam energies (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV), four electron applicator sizes (6x6, 10x10, 14x14, and 20x20 cm), three source-surface distance values (100, 105, 110 cm). The measured percentage depth dose curves were normalized at a depth of 0.05 cm. Using the normalized depth dose, the lateral build up ratio curves were determined. Using the cutout radius and the lateral build up ratio values, sigmar(z,E) were determined. It is shown that the sigma value increases linearly with cutout size until the cutout radius reaches the equilibrium range of the electron beam. The sigma value of an arbitrary circular cutout was determined from the interpolation of sigma versus cutout curve. The corresponding LBR value of the circular cutout was determined using its radius and sigma values. The depth dose distribution of

  3. Sensitivity analysis of thermodynamic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, C. L.; Obrien, T. J.

    Iterative solution methods and sensitivity analysis for mathematical models of chemical equilibrium are formally similar. For models which are a Newton-type iterative solution scheme, such as the NASA-Lewis CEC code or the R-Gibbs unit of ASPEN, it is shown that extensive sensitivity information is available for approximately the cost of one additional Newton iteration. All matrices and vectors required for implementation of first and second order sensitivity analysis in the CEC code are given in an appendix. A simple problem for which an analytical solution is possible is presented to illustrate the calculations and verify the computer calculations.

  4. Tektite ablation - Some confirming calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, J. A., III; Silver, A. D.; Cameron, W. S.; Adams , E. W.; Warmbrod, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The calculation of tektite ablation has been redone, taking into account transient effects, internal radiation, melting and nonequilibrium vaporization of the glass, and the drag effect of the flanges. It is found that the results confirm the earlier calculations of Chapman and his group and of Adams and his co-workers. The general trend of the results is not sensitive to reasonable changes of the physical parameters. The ablation is predominantly by melting rather than by vaporization at all velocities up to 11 km/sec; this is surprising in view of the lack of detectable melt flow in most tektites. Chemical effects have not been considered.

  5. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  6. Algorithm Calculates Cumulative Poisson Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowerman, Paul N.; Nolty, Robert C.; Scheuer, Ernest M.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithm calculates accurate values of cumulative Poisson distribution under conditions where other algorithms fail because numbers are so small (underflow) or so large (overflow) that computer cannot process them. Factors inserted temporarily to prevent underflow and overflow. Implemented in CUMPOIS computer program described in "Cumulative Poisson Distribution Program" (NPO-17714).

  7. EXHAUST MAIN PERSONNEL EXPOSURE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Su

    1999-09-29

    The purpose of this activity is to identify and determine potential radiation hazards in the service exhaust main due to a waste package leakage from an emplacement drift. This work supports the subsurface ventilation system design for the EDA II, which consists of an accessible service exhaust main for personnel, and an exhaust main for hot air flow. The objective is to provide the necessary radiation exposure calculations to determine if the service exhaust main is accessible following a waste package leak. This work includes the following items responsive to the stated purpose and objective: Calculate the limiting transient radiation exposure of personnel in the service exhaust main due to the passage of airborne radioactive material through the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise to the exhaust main in the event of a leaking waste package Calculate the potential exposures to maintenance workers in the service exhaust main from residual radioactive material deposited inside of the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise This calculation is limited to external radiation only, since the airborne and contamination sources will be contained in the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise.

  8. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  9. ITER Port Interspace Pressure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Van Hove, Walter A

    2016-01-01

    The ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) is equipped with 54 access ports. Each of these ports has an opening in the bioshield that communicates with a dedicated port cell. During Tokamak operation, the bioshield opening must be closed with a concrete plug to shield the radiation coming from the plasma. This port plug separates the port cell into a Port Interspace (between VV closure lid and Port Plug) on the inner side and the Port Cell on the outer side. This paper presents calculations of pressures and temperatures in the ITER (Ref. 1) Port Interspace after a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a pipe of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) with high temperature water. It is assumed that this DEGB occurs during the worst possible conditions, which are during water baking operation, with water at a temperature of 523 K (250 C) and at a pressure of 4.4 MPa. These conditions are more severe than during normal Tokamak operation, with the water at 398 K (125 C) and 2 MPa. Two computer codes are employed in these calculations: RELAP5-3D Version 4.2.1 (Ref. 2) to calculate the blowdown releases from the pipe break, and MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 (Ref. 3) to calculate the pressures and temperatures in the Port Interspace. A sensitivity study has been performed to optimize some flow areas.

  10. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG INACTIVATION CALCULATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix O of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) Guidance Manual introduces the CeffT10 (i.e., reaction zone outlet C value and T10 time) method for calculating ozone CT value and Giardia and virus log inactivation. The LT2ESWTR Pre-proposal Draft Regulatory Language for St...

  11. Monte Carlo calculations of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.

    1997-10-01

    Nuclear many-body calculations have the complication of strong spin- and isospin-dependent potentials. In these lectures the author discusses the variational and Green`s function Monte Carlo techniques that have been developed to address this complication, and presents a few results.

  12. Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This "Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator" helps school systems quantify all current spending aimed at improving teaching effectiveness. Part I provides worksheets to analyze total investment. Part II provides a system for evaluating investments based on purpose, target group, and delivery. In this Spending Calculator…

  13. Affect and Graphing Calculator Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Allison W.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study of six high school calculus students designed to build an understanding about the affect associated with graphing calculator use in independent situations. DeBellis and Goldin's (2006) framework for affect as a representational system was used as a lens through which to understand the ways in which…

  14. A few ways of calculating the similarity parameter kappa* for real gases. [increase Reynolds number in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz-Meyer, W.

    1977-01-01

    In connection with the question on the applicability of test results obtained from cryogenic wind tunnels to the large-scale model the similarity parameter is referred to. A simple method is given for calculating the similarity parameter. From the numerical values obtained it can be deduced that nitrogen behaves practically like an ideal gas when it is close to the saturation point and in a pressure range up to 4 bar. The influence of this parameter on the pressure distribution of a supercritical profile confirms this finding.

  15. Inelastic Scattering and Single and Double Charge Exchange Reactions Within the A=27 Isobaric Multiplet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinzie, Matthew Gordon

    1995-01-01

    Angular distributions for the reactions ^{27}Al, ^{28 }Si(pi^{+/- },pi^{+/-} ) at T_pi = 180 MeV and an excitation function at theta_ {rm lab.} = 5^{ rm o} for the reaction ^{27}Al(pi^{+}, pi^{-})^{27}P were measured using the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Angular distributions for the reaction ^{27}Al(n,p)^ {27}Mg were measured at T_ {rm N} = 198 MeV using the Medium Resolution Spectrometer at Canada's Tri-University Meson Facility in Vancouver, British Columbia. Multipole matrix elements were extracted in a macroscopic manner from the pion inelastic angular distributions using the distorted-wave impulse approximation and collective -model transition densities. Microscopic calculations of these extracted matrix elements and of the pion angular distributions were examined. Double charge exchange (DCX) excitation functions to the ^{27}P ground state and an excited state were measured at nine incident pion energies from T_pi = 100 to 293.4 MeV. The systematics of DCX excitation functions to low-lying states is reviewed in light of these data. Microscopic calculations of DCX for and near A = 27 are investigated. Double giant resonances in ^{27}P were observed at the three highest energies. The (n,p) charge exchange angular distributions were obtained for theta_{rm lab.} = 0^circ, 4^circ, 8^ circ, 12^circ, 18^circ and 24^ circ. The Gamow-Teller strength distribution was measured and compared to a microscopic calculation. The constant of proportionality between reduced transition probability and cross section (the unit cross section) was generalized and examined for configuration dependence. Data for higher spin-multipole isovector excitations are presented, including low-lying spin-isospin E2 strength and negative -parity giant resonances.

  16. Neutrino mean free paths in cold symmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, S.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    2004-09-01

    The neutrino mean free paths (NMFP) for scattering and absorption in cold symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) are calculated using two-body effective interactions and one-body effective weak operators obtained from realistic models of nuclear forces using correlated basis theory. The infinite system is modeled in a box with periodic boundary conditions and the one particle-hole (p-h) response functions are calculated using the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). For the densities {rho}=(1/2), 1 (3/2){rho}{sub 0}, where {rho}{sub 0} is the equilibrium density of SNM, the strength of the response is shifted to higher energy transfers when compared to a noninteracting Fermi gas (FG). This and the weakness of effective operators compared to the bare operators, significantly reduces the cross sections, enhancing the NMFP by factors of {approx}2.5-3.5 at the densities considered. The NMFP at the equilibrium density {rho}{sub 0} are also calculated using the TDA and random phase approximation (RPA) using zero range Skyrme-like effective interactions with parameters chosen to reproduce the equation of state and spin-isospin susceptibilities of matter. Their results indicate that RPA corrections to correlated TDA may further increase the NMFP by {approx}25% to 3-4 times those in a noninteracting FG. Finally, the sums and the energy weighted sums of the Fermi and Gamow-Teller responses obtained from the correlated ground state are compared with those of the 1 p-h response functions to extract the sum and mean energies of multi p-h contributions to the weak response. The relatively large mean energy of the multi p-h excitations suggests that they may not contribute significantly to low energy NMFP.

  17. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  18. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging

  19. The comparison of calculated transition probabilities with luminescence characteristics of erbium(III) in fluoride glasses and in the mixed yttrium-zirconium oxide crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisfeld, R.; Katz, G.; Jacoboni, C.; De Pape, R.; Drexhage, M. G.; Brown, R. N.; Jørgensen, C. K.

    1983-07-01

    Fluorozirconate glasses containing 2 mole% ErF 3 were prepared by melting the binary fluorides with ammonium bifluoride under an atmosphere of carbon tetrachloride and argon at 850°C. Absorption spectra of these glasses were obtained and the Judd-Ofelt parameters were calculated. Emission spectra and lifetimes of erbium in fluorozirconate glass, in lead-gallium-zinc fluoride glass, and in yttrium-zirconium oxide crystal were measured and compared with the theoretical calculations. Laser emission lines in these materials are deduced from these measurements. It is suggested that materials doped with erbium may serve as light sources for fiber optic waveguides made from the undoped materials.

  20. Tectonothermal history in the Mattawa area, Ontario, Canada, deduced from paleomagnetism and Ar-40/Ar-39 dating of a Grenville dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Hironobu; York, Derek; Dunlop, David J.

    1993-10-01

    The paleomagnetic ambient has been determined from samples at various distances from a Grenville diabase dike cutting late Protozoic tonalitic gneiss near Mattawa in the Grenville Province, Canada. Using the Ar-40/Ar-39 technique, the intrusion age of the dike is estimated to be 570 +/- 3 Ma from a 0.5-mm-diameter chilled margin chip. The paleo-ambient temperature of the country rock at the time of intrusion, 184 +/- 40 C was calculated from Jaeger's (1964) one-dimensional heat conduction model. The burial depth of the presently exposed rocks is estimated to be 6.5 +/- 1.7 km, assuming a surface temperature of 15 C and a geothermal gradient of 26 C/km. This depth at 570 Ma is discordant with the presence of Ordovician shallow-water (less than 100 m) limestones about 200 km distant, suggesting that differential uplift may have occurred between the two areas.

  1. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear mass formulas: crossing the 0.6 MeV accuracy threshold with microscopically deduced pairing.

    PubMed

    Goriely, S; Chamel, N; Pearson, J M

    2009-04-17

    We present a new Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear-mass model in which the contact-pairing force is constructed from microscopic pairing gaps of symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter calculated from realistic two- and three-body forces, with medium-polarization effects included. With the pairing being treated more realistically than in any of our earlier models, the rms deviation with respect to essentially all the available mass data falls to 0.581 MeV, the best value ever found within the mean-field framework. Since our Skyrme force is also constrained by the properties of pure neutron matter, this new model is particularly well suited for application to astrophysical problems involving a neutron-rich environment, such as the elucidation of the r process of nucleosynthesis, and the description of supernova cores and neutron-star crusts. PMID:19518625

  2. Geothermometer calculations for geothermal assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    Geothermal exploration programs have relied on the calculation of geothermometers from hot spring chemistry as an early estimation of geothermal reservoir temperatures. Calibration of the geothermometers has evolved from experimental determinations of mineral solubility as a function of temperature to calibration from analyses of water chemistry from known depths and temperatures in thermal wells. Most of the geothermometers were calibrated from analyses of sodium-chloride type waters, and the application of some geothermometers should be restricted to waters of the chemical types that were used in their calibration. Chemical analyses must be determined to be reliable before they are used to calculate geothermometers. The USGS Geothermal Resource Assessment will rely on the silica geothermometer developed by Giggenbach that approximates the transition between chalcedony at 20??C and quartz at 200??C. Above 200??C, the assessment will rely on the quartz geothermometer. In addition, the assessment will also rely on the potassium-magnesium geothermometer.

  3. Electrostatic ion thruster optics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whealton, John H.; Kirkman, David A.; Raridon, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations have been performed which encompass both a self-consistent ion source extraction plasma sheath and the primary ion optics including sheath and electrode-induced aberrations. Particular attention is given to the effects of beam space charge, accelerator geometry, and properties of the downstream plasma sheath on the position of the electrostatic potential saddle point near the extractor electrode. The electron blocking potential blocking is described as a function of electrode thickness and secondary plasma processes.

  4. [IOL calculation for high ametropia].

    PubMed

    Haigis, W

    2008-11-01

    Long and short eyes are connected with high ametropia and constitute special problems for biometry and IOL calculations. Ultrasound measurements on these eyes, which often have altered geometries, are frequently more difficult than in normal eyes. This holds especially for long eyes, which significantly benefit from optical biometry. Measurement errors, IOL manufacturing tolerances and uncertainties regarding the effective lens position affect short eyes much more than normal eyes. The selection of a suitable IOL formula is of special importance for the refractive outcome. For short eyes, Holladay-2, HofferQ and Haigis are recommended, for long eyes Holladay-1, Holladay-2 and Haigis. In each case, optimized IOL constants must be used. If minus lenses for extremely long eyes are calculated with the same constants as plus lenses, a hyperopic refractive error is created, which can be avoided by a separate set of constants for minus lenses. For extremely short eyes the commonly used approximation of thinner lenses fails necessitating a thick lens calculation or raytracing. PMID:18998145

  5. β -delayed γ decay of P26 : Possible evidence of a proton halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Wrede, C.; Bennett, M. B.; Liddick, S. N.; Bowe, A.; Brown, B. A.; Chen, A. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Cooper, N.; Irvine, D.; McNeice, E.; Montes, F.; Naqvi, F.; Ortez, R.; Pain, S. D.; Pereira, J.; Prokop, C. J.; Quaglia, J.; Quinn, S. J.; Sakstrup, J.; Santia, M.; Schwartz, S. B.; Shanab, S.; Simon, A.; Spyrou, A.; Thiagalingam, E.

    2016-06-01

    Background: Measurements of β decay provide important nuclear structure information that can be used to probe isospin asymmetries and inform nuclear astrophysics studies. Purpose: To measure the β -delayed γ decay of P26 and compare the results with previous experimental results and shell-model calculations. Method: A P26 fast beam produced using nuclear fragmentation was implanted into a planar germanium detector. Its β -delayed γ -ray emission was measured with an array of 16 high-purity germanium detectors. Positrons emitted in the decay were detected in coincidence to reduce the background. Results: The absolute intensities of P26 β -delayed γ rays were determined. A total of six new β -decay branches and 15 new γ -ray lines have been observed for the first time in P26 β decay. A complete β -decay scheme was built for the allowed transitions to bound excited states of Si26 . f t values and Gamow-Teller strengths were also determined for these transitions and compared with shell-model calculations and the mirror β decay of Na26 , revealing significant mirror asymmetries. Conclusions: A very good agreement with theoretical predictions based on the USDB shell model is observed. The significant mirror asymmetry observed for the transition to the first excited state (δ =51 (10 )% ) may be evidence for a proton halo in P26 .

  6. Amino acid sequence homology between N- and C-terminal halves of a carbonic anhydrase in Porphyridium purpureum, as deduced from the cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, S; Miyachi, S

    1996-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) from Porphyridium purpureum, a unicellular red alga, was purified >209-fold to a specific activity of 1,147 units/mg protein. cDNA clones for this CA were isolated. The longest clone, comprising 1,960 base pairs, contained an open reading frame which encoded a 571-amino acid polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 62,094 Da. The N- and C-terminal halves of the putative mature Porphyridium CA have amino acid sequence homology to each other (>70%) and to other prokaryotic-type CAs. Both regions contain, at equivalent positions, one set of three possible zinc-liganding amino acid residues conserved among prokaryotic-type CAs. CA purified from Porphyridium contained two atoms of zinc per molecule. We propose that the Porphyridium CA has evolved by duplication of an ancestral CA gene followed by the fusion of the duplicated CA gene. The CA truncated into the putative mature form was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein was active. Clones expressing separately the N- and C-terminal halves of the CA were constructed. CA activity was present in extracts of E. coli cells expressing the N-terminal half, while no detectable activity was found in cells expressing the C-terminal half.

  7. Binding stoichiometry of the gene 32 protein of phage T4 in the complex with single stranded DNA deduced from boundary sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Scheerhagen, M A; Vlaanderen, C A; Blok, J; van Grondelle, R

    1986-04-01

    Short 145 base DNA fragments in complex with the helix destabilizing protein of bacteriophage T4, GP32, have been studied with boundary sedimentation. The sedimentation coefficient was determined as a function of concentration, protein-nucleic acid ratio, temperature and salt concentration. It can be concluded that the measured values reflect the properties of the saturated DNA-GP32 complex. A combination of the earlier obtained translational diffusion coefficient of the complex with the sedimentation coefficient yields its anhydrous molecular weight (Mw = 5.4.10(5) D), which corresponds to a size of the binding site of 10 nucleotides per protein. This procedure is not sensitive to the presence of non-binding protein molecules and to the assumed protein concentration, and therefore, it seems more reliable than a determination from titration experiments. Similar sedimentation measurements were performed with tRNA-complexes containing 76 nucleotides. The translational diffusion coefficient can be calculated from the measured rotational diffusion coefficient and assuming the same hydrodynamic diameter for this complex as obtained for the 145 b DNA complex. The molecular weight derived from the data then also leads to a binding site size of about 10 nucleotides. This suggests that also the short tRNA-complex forms an open, strongly solvated structure, as was proposed for the 145 b DNA-GP32 complex.

  8. Aerial photographic surveys analyzed to deduce oil spill movement during the decay and breakup of fast ice, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, I.M.; Baird, D.A.

    1982-09-01

    During the summers of 1979 and 1980 aerial photographs of the land fast ice north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, were taken. These photographs, covering two-week periods, highlight the decay and break-up of the land fast ice sheet. During the period of photography, wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, and tidal height measurements were recorded continuously. Several larger ice floes were 'tagged' with colored plywood markers during 1979. Both these marked flows and other distinctively shaped floes were tracked on the photographic surveys to determine the effect the wind had on their movement. Within the barrier islands, average ice floe velocities as a percentage of wind speed exceeded the 3.5% figure 'normally' found in the literature. North of these islands average ice floe velocities as a percentage of wind speed were less than the 3.5% value. In addition to the flow drift calculations the photographs provide information on melt pool formation and a comparison of the decay and breakup processes between the 1979 and 1980 seasons. The decay and breakup process appears to be triggered by strong wind events in early July.

  9. Astrophysical Impact of the Updated 9Be(p,α)6Li and 10B(p,α)7Be Reaction Rates As Deduced By THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    The complete understanding of the stellar abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron represents one of the most interesting open problems in astrophysics. These elements are largely used to probe stellar structure and mixing phenomena in different astrophysical scenarios, such as pre-main-sequence or main-sequence stars. Their different fragility against (p,α) burning reactions allows one to investigate different depths of the stellar interior. Such fusion mechanisms are triggered at temperatures between T ≈ (2-5) × {10}6 K, thus defining a corresponding Gamow energy between ≈ 3-10 keV, where S(E)-factor measurements need to be performed to get reliable reaction rate evaluations. The Trojan Horse Method is a well defined procedure to measure cross sections at Gamow energies overcoming the uncertainties due to low-energy S(E)-factor extrapolation as well as electron screening effects. Taking advantage of the {\\mathtt{THM}} measure of the 9Be(p,α)6Li and 10B(p,α)7Be cross sections, the corresponding reaction rates have been calculated and compared with the evaluations by the NACRE collaboration, widely used in the literature. The impact on surface abundances of the updated 9Be and 10B (p,α) burning rates is discussed for pre-MS stars.

  10. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  11. Calculation of gas turbine characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaev, B. I.; Murashko, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    The reasons and regularities of vapor flow and turbine parameter variation depending on the total pressure drop rate π* and rotor rotation frequency n are studied, as exemplified by a two-stage compressor turbine of a power-generating gas turbine installation. The turbine characteristic is calculated in a wide range of mode parameters using the method in which analytical dependences provide high accuracy for the calculated flow output angle and different types of gas dynamic losses are determined with account of the influence of blade row geometry, blade surface roughness, angles, compressibility, Reynolds number, and flow turbulence. The method provides satisfactory agreement of results of calculation and turbine testing. In the design mode, the operation conditions for the blade rows are favorable, the flow output velocities are close to the optimal ones, the angles of incidence are small, and the flow "choking" modes (with respect to consumption) in the rows are absent. High performance and a nearly axial flow behind the turbine are obtained. Reduction of the rotor rotation frequency and variation of the pressure drop change the flow parameters, the parameters of the stages and the turbine, as well as the form of the characteristic. In particular, for decreased n, nonmonotonic variation of the second stage reactivity with increasing π* is observed. It is demonstrated that the turbine characteristic is mainly determined by the influence of the angles of incidence and the velocity at the output of the rows on the losses and the flow output angle. The account of the growing flow output angle due to the positive angle of incidence for decreased rotation frequencies results in a considerable change of the characteristic: poorer performance, redistribution of the pressure drop at the stages, and change of reactivities, growth of the turbine capacity, and change of the angle and flow velocity behind the turbine.

  12. Film shape calculations on supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Both scalar and vector operations are described to demonstrate usefulness of supercomputers (computers with peak computing speeds exceeding 100 million operative per second) in solving tribological problems. A simple kernel of the film shape calculations in an elastohydrodynamic lubricated rectangular contact is presented and the relevant equations are described. Both scalar and vector versions of the film shape code are presented. The run times of the two types of code indicate that over a 50-to-1 speedup of scalar to vector computational time for vector lengths typically used in elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis is obtained.

  13. Fake molecular-orbital calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Frank E.; Trautwein, Alfred; Delhalle, Joseph

    1980-06-01

    The FAKE method of approximate molecular-orbital calculations is presented and illustrated by application to a number of molecules. The method is of the extended Huckel type but uses accurately computed kinetic-energy matrix elements and avoids scale factors of the Wolfsberg—Helmholtz type. It also includes neighbor-atom charge effects and single-center off-diagonal matrix elements. These features permit FAKE occupied-orbital energies and charge distributions to come into close agreement with corresponding ab initio quantities.

  14. Lack of support for adaptive superstructure NiPt7 : Experiment and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönfeld, B.; Engelke, M.; Ruban, A. V.

    2009-02-01

    Order and effective interaction parameters on the Pt-rich side of solid Ni-Pt alloys have been investigated by experimental and first-principles theoretical techniques. Diffuse x-ray scattering was taken from single-crystalline Ni-87.8at.%Pt aged at 603 K to set up a state of thermal equilibrium. From the separated short-range order scattering, effective pair interaction parameters were determined. These experimentally deduced values do not produce the suggested NiPt7 superstructure at lower temperatures. Instead of that, phase separation into NiPt3 regions with L12 structure and a Pt-rich matrix is observed in Monte Carlo simulations and supported by x-ray scattering of Ni-75.2at.%Pt . First-principles calculations at 0 K also show that the suggested NiPt7 phase is unstable against decomposition into NiPt3 and Pt.

  15. H{sub 2}-He vibrational line-shape parameters: Measurement and semiclassical calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, J.W.; Bonamy, J.; Robert, D.; Berger, J.P.; Saint-Loup, R.; Berger, H.

    1995-10-01

    High-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the line shifting and line broadening coefficients of H{sub 2} perturbed by He. Measurements have been made for the {ital Q}-branch transitions ({ital J}=0{r_arrow}5) in a density range of 10 to 20 amagat and from 296 to 995 K. Up to 795 K we have directly deduced from the experimental broadening coefficients the inelastic rotational state-to-state and vibrational dephasing rates. At higher temperatures, owing to the larger number of channels of relaxation which occur, the results have been analyzed using a scaling law. The line shift and broadening coefficients exhibit a square root and a linear dependence on temperature, respectively, and a significant {ital J} dependence. Semiclassical calculations based on an accurate {ital ab} {ital initio} potential lead to line-shape parameters consistent with experiment. They allow a clear understanding of their observed temperature dependence.

  16. A T-matrix calculation for in-medium heavy-quark gluon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, K.; Rapp, R.

    2012-12-01

    The interactions of charm and bottom quarks in a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) are evaluated using a thermodynamic 2-body T-matrix. We specifically focus on heavy-quark (HQ) interactions with thermal gluons with an input potential motivated by lattice-QCD computations of the HQ free energy. The latter is implemented into a field-theoretic ansatz for color-Coulomb and (remnants of) confining interactions. This, in particular, enables to discuss corrections to the potential approach, specifically hard-thermal-loop corrections to the vertices, relativistic corrections deduced from pertinent Feynman diagrams, and a suitable projection on transverse thermal gluons. The resulting potentials are applied to compute scattering amplitudes in different color channels and utilized for a calculation of the corresponding HQ drag coefficient in the QGP. A factor of ˜2-3 enhancement over perturbative results is obtained, mainly driven by the resummation in the attractive color-channels.

  17. Validity of local density prescriptions for microscopic calculations of proton nucleus elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, R.; Johnson, R.C.; Tostevin, J.A. )

    1994-12-01

    The validity of the local density approximation as applied to the construction of the nucleon-nucleus optical potential is studied. A Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) local equivalent potential to the second-order term of the Kerman, McManus, and Thaler (KMT) multiple scattering expansion of the nucleon nucleus optical potential is derived. Assuming that the nucleon-nucleon transition amplitude is on the energy shell, we compare the microscopic KMT optical potential with the approximate potential deduced from the nuclear matter limit by use of the local density approximation. Calculations are presented for the nucleon-[sup 16]O system at 135 and 200 MeV incident energies. It is shown that the use of the local density prescription leads to surface peaking of the optical potential. This effect is absent from the second-order term of the optical potential derived microscopically from the KMT approach.

  18. Calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields for low-Z elements

    SciTech Connect

    Nekkab, M.; Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, N. Küp; Aylikçi, V.

    2015-03-30

    The analytical methods based on X-ray fluorescence are advantageous for practical applications in a variety of fields including atomic physics, X-ray fluorescence surface chemical analysis and medical research and so the accurate fluorescence yields (ω{sub K}) are required for these applications. In this contribution we report a new parameters for calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields (ω{sub K}) of elements in the range of 11≤Z≤30. The experimental data are interpolated by using the famous analytical function (ω{sub k}/(1−ω{sub k})){sup 1/q} (were q=3, 3.5 and 4) vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields. A comparison is made between the results of the procedures followed here and those theoretical and other semi-empirical fluorescence yield values. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  19. Using a Hand-Held Electronic Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Roger

    1975-01-01

    The arithmetic needed for complex calculation using an electronic calculator is explained and exemplified. Problems involving square roots, number theory, Fibonacci numbers, and electrical resistances are solved. (SD)

  20. Marked longevity of human lung parenchymal elastic fibers deduced from prevalence of D-aspartate and nuclear weapons-related radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.D.; Endicott, S.K.; Province, M.A.; Pierce, J.A.; Campbell, E.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Normal structure and function of the lung parenchyma depend upon elastic fibers. Amorphous elastin is biochemically stable in vitro, and may provide a metabolically stable structural framework for the lung parenchyma. To test the metabolic stability of elastin in the normal human lung parenchyma, we have (a) estimated the time elapsed since the synthesis of the protein through measurement of aspartic acid racemization and (b) modeled the elastin turnover through measurement of the prevalence of nuclear weapons-related {sup 14}C. Elastin purified by a new technique from normal lung parenchyma was hydrolyzed; then the prevalences of D-aspartate and {sup 14}C were measured by gas chromatography and accelerator-mass spectrometry, respectively. D-aspartate increased linearly with age; Kasp (1.76 x 10{sup {minus} 3} yr{sup {minus} 1}) was similar to that previously found for extraordinarily stable human tissues, indicating that the age of lung parenchymal elastin corresponded with the age of the subject. Radiocarbon prevalence data also were consistent with extraordinary metabolic stability of elastin; the calculated mean carbon residence time in elastin was 74 yr (95% confidence limits, 40-174 yr). These results indicate that airspace enlargement characteristic of 'aging lung' is not associated with appreciable new synthesis of lung parenchymal elastin. The present study provides the first tissue-specific evaluation of turnover of an extracellular matrix component in humans and underscores the potential importance of elastin for maintenance of normal lung structure. Most importantly, the present work provides a foundation for strategies to directly evaluate extracellular matrix injury and repair in diseases of lung (especially pulmonary emphysema), vascular tissue, and skin.

  1. Rapid coastal subsidence in the central Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (Bangladesh) since the 17th century deduced from submerged salt-producing kilns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanebuth, T. J.; Kudrass, H.; Linstädter, J.; Islam, B.; Zander, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The densely populated low lying Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta is highly vulnerable to the global sea-level rise. In order to estimate the subsidence of the delta over historical time scales, we examined submerged salt-producing kiln sites in the coastal Sundarbans. These kilns were built just above the previous winterly spring high-tide level, but are currently located ~155 × 15 cm below the corresponding modern level. According to optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, the kilns were ultimately fired ~300 years ago (1705 × 35 AD) and salt production was terminated abruptly by a catastrophic event (major cyclone), which affected the kiln sites at different levels and locations. Two particular buried mangrove root horizons 80 cm below this kiln level also indicate catastrophic scenarios (probably subsidence events related to a regional earthquake). AMS-14C ages measured on the charcoal layers at the kiln's bases and on these associated mangrove stump horizons support the OSL dates. Based on the respective elevations of these kiln and mangrove palaeo-horizons and on the ages, the 300-year-average rate of sinking of the outer delta is 5.2 × 1.2 mm/a, which includes 0.8 mm/a of eustatic sea-level rise over this historical period. Expecting further acceleration of the eustatic sea-level rise of up to 7 mm/a, we calculate a rise in relative sea level of up to 8.9 × 3.3 mm/a for the next few decased, which will dramatically aggravate the already present problematic situation. Only a prudently-managed control of sediment accretion will keep southern Bangladesh above the sea level. (Hanebuth et al., Geology, Sept 2013, doi: 10.1130/G34646.1.)

  2. Deduced amino acid sequence of the small hydrophobic protein of US avian pneumovirus has greater identity with that of human metapneumovirus than those of non-US avian pneumoviruses.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Abdul S; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Huang, Zhuhui; Samal, Siba K

    2003-05-01

    We report here the nucleotide and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus strain Colorado (APV/CO). The SH gene of APV/CO is 628 nucleotides in length from gene-start to gene-end. The longest ORF of the SH gene encoded a protein of 177 aas in length. Comparison of the deduced aa sequence of the SH protein of APV/CO with the corresponding published sequences of other members of genera metapneumovirus showed 28% identity with the newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV), but no discernable identity with the APV subgroup A or B. Collectively, this data supports the hypothesis that: (i) APV/CO is distinct from European APV subgroups and belongs to the novel subgroup APV/C (APV/US); (ii) APV/CO is more closely related to hMPV, a mammalian metapneumovirus, than to either APV subgroup A or B. The SH gene of APV/CO was cloned using a genomic walk strategy which initiated cDNA synthesis from genomic RNA that traversed the genes in the order 3'-M-F-M2-SH-G-5', thus confirming that gene-order of APV/CO conforms in the genus Metapneumovirus. We also provide the sequences of transcription-signals and the M-F, F-M2, M2-SH and SH-G intergenic regions of APV/CO.

  3. Role of pyroclast recycling on style of small basaltic explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy, deduced from real-time collected ash samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, T.; Kawaguchi, R.; Nishimura, T.; Aoyama, H.; Yamada, T.; Fujita, E.

    2015-12-01

    Understandings of controlling mechanism on the style of volcanic explosion is one of the most important subject not only for volcanology but also for hazard mitigation. Vesiculation, outgassing and crystallization of magma, and interaction with external water have been considered as essential factors for the controlling mechanism (e.g., Houghton and Gonnerman, 2005). In contrast, recent studies suggested that vigorous recyclings of pyroclast into the vent occur at basaltic volcanoes with repeating small explosions (D'Oriano et al., 2014). The recycling of pyroclast that fills the shallow conduit can affect explosion dynamics such as shape and ejection speed of jet cloud (e.g., Ohba et al., 2002). This study examined component, texture and chemical composition of ash samples collected during normal activity at Stromboli to discuss a controlling mechanism of small explosion styles in basaltic volcano. During studied term (14:26-18:29, May 21th, 2014), ash-rich explosion occurred in NE crater, and ash-poor explosion occurred in the central and SW craters. We performed real-time collection of falling ash every 4-18 minutes. The real-time collection permits direct comparison of the ash samples with explosion activity. We classify the ash particles into Juvenile (glassy particles having similar composition with HP magma), Recycled (similar texture with reheated basaltic ash; D'Oriano et al., 2013), Altered, and Crystal particles. Bulk component of recycled particle calculated from componentry variations with grain size and grain size distribution shows that the volume fraction of recycled particles increases with ash falling rate at sampling site. The ash falling rate at sampling site increased after the occurrence of ash rich explosions at NE crater. Our ash observation indicates that burial of eruptive vent by recycled pyroclasts relates with occurrence of ash rich explosion at NE crater. Therefore, we suggest that combination of the amount of gas supplied from a

  4. Sample size calculation: Basic principles

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Mitra, Koel; Mandal, Mohanchandra

    2016-01-01

    Addressing a sample size is a practical issue that has to be solved during planning and designing stage of the study. The aim of any clinical research is to detect the actual difference between two groups (power) and to provide an estimate of the difference with a reasonable accuracy (precision). Hence, researchers should do a priori estimate of sample size well ahead, before conducting the study. Post hoc sample size computation is not encouraged conventionally. Adequate sample size minimizes the random error or in other words, lessens something happening by chance. Too small a sample may fail to answer the research question and can be of questionable validity or provide an imprecise answer while too large a sample may answer the question but is resource-intensive and also may be unethical. More transparency in the calculation of sample size is required so that it can be justified and replicated while reporting. PMID:27729692

  5. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  6. The shell model as a unified view of nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Nowacki, F.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A.P.

    2005-04-01

    The last decade has witnessed both quantitative and qualitative progress in shell-model studies, which have resulted in remarkable gains in our understanding of the structure of the nucleus. Indeed, it is now possible to diagonalize matrices in determinantal spaces of dimensionality up to 10{sup 9} using the Lanczos tridiagonal construction, whose formal and numerical aspects are analyzed in this review. In addition, many new approximation methods have been developed in order to overcome the dimensionality limitations. New effective nucleon-nucleon interactions have been constructed that contain both two- and three-body contributions. The former are derived from realistic potentials (i.e., potentials consistent with two-nucleon data). The latter incorporate the pure monopole terms necessary to correct the bad saturation and shell-formation properties of the realistic two-body forces. This combination appears to solve a number of hitherto puzzling problems. The present review concentrates on those results which illustrate the global features of the approach: the universality of the effective interaction and the capacity of the shell model to describe simultaneously all the manifestations of the nuclear dynamics, either single-particle or collective in nature. The review also treats in some detail the problems associated with rotational motion, the origin of quenching of the Gamow-Teller transitions, double-{beta} decays, the effect of isospin nonconserving nuclear forces, and the specificities of neutron-rich nuclei. Many other calculations--which appear to have 'merely' spectroscopic interest--are touched upon briefly, although the authors are fully aware that much of the credibility of the shell model rests on them.

  7. Study of 14O as a test of the unitarity of the CKM matrix and the CVC hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Jason Timothy

    2004-06-01

    The study of superallowed beta decay in nuclei, in conjunction with other experiments, provide a test of the unitarity of the quark mixing matrix or CKM matrix. Nonunitarity of the CKM matrix could imply the existence of a fourth generation of quarks, right handed currents in the weak interaction, and/or new exotic fermions. Advances in radioactive beam techniques allow the creation of nearly pure samples of nuclei for beta decay studies. The subject of this thesis is the development of a radioactive beam of 14O and the study of the 14O halflife and branching ratio. The radioactive beam is produced by ionizing 12C14O radioactive gas and then accelerating with an ECR ion source. The 14O nucleus decays via superallowed beta decay with a branching ratio > 99 percent. The low Z of 14O is important for calculating reliable corrections to the beta decay that generally increase in with Z. The > 99 percent branching ratio can be established with modest precision on the complementary branching ratio.When this work began the experimentally determined CKM matrix was nonunitary by 2.5 standard deviations. Recent studies of Kaon, Hyperon, and B meson decays have been used to determine Vus and Vub matrix elements. In this work the halflife and branching ratio of 14O are measured and used to establish Vud. The unitarity of the CKM matrix is then assessed. The halflife of 14O was determined to be 70.683 +- 0.015 s and the GamowTeller branching ratio was found to be 0.643 +- 0.020 percent. Using these results the value of Vud is 0.9738 +- 0.0005. Incorporating the new values for Vus of 0.2272 +- 0.0030 and Vub of 0.0035 +- 0.0015 the squared sum of the first row of the CKM matrix is 0.9999 +- 0.0017 which is consistent with unitarity.

  8. Dyscalculia and the Calculating Brain.

    PubMed

    Rapin, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Dyscalculia, like dyslexia, affects some 5% of school-age children but has received much less investigative attention. In two thirds of affected children, dyscalculia is associated with another developmental disorder like dyslexia, attention-deficit disorder, anxiety disorder, visual and spatial disorder, or cultural deprivation. Infants, primates, some birds, and other animals are born with the innate ability, called subitizing, to tell at a glance whether small sets of scattered dots or other items differ by one or more item. This nonverbal approximate number system extends mostly to single digit sets as visual discrimination drops logarithmically to "many" with increasing numerosity (size effect) and crowding (distance effect). Preschoolers need several years and specific teaching to learn verbal names and visual symbols for numbers and school agers to understand their cardinality and ordinality and the invariance of their sequence (arithmetic number line) that enables calculation. This arithmetic linear line differs drastically from the nonlinear approximate number system mental number line that parallels the individual number-tuned neurons in the intraparietal sulcus in monkeys and overlying scalp distribution of discrete functional magnetic resonance imaging activations by number tasks in man. Calculation is a complex skill that activates both visual and spatial and visual and verbal networks. It is less strongly left lateralized than language, with approximate number system activation somewhat more right sided and exact number and arithmetic activation more left sided. Maturation and increasing number skill decrease associated widespread non-numerical brain activations that persist in some individuals with dyscalculia, which has no single, universal neurological cause or underlying mechanism in all affected individuals. PMID:27515455

  9. Calculating the GONG Leakage Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, F.; Howe, R.

    Since spherical harmonics do not form a complete orthonormal basis set over a portion of a sphere, helioseismic spectra computed for a specific target mode with degree ellt and azimuthal degree mt also contain modes with nearby ell'' and m''. These spatial leaks greatly increase the complexity of the observed spectrum, complicating the spectral fitting and degrading the resulting mode parameter estimates. This is particularly true where the target mode and the leaks have similar frequencies. Some strategies for fitting helioseismic spectra explicitly include the leakage matrix which estimates the relative strength of a mode (ell'' and m'') in the spectrum at (ellt,mt). Since the fitting methods assume that the matrix is correct and apply it as a constraint, an inaccurate matrix introduces systematic errors in the estimated mode parameters. It is thus important to have as accurate a matrix as possible. Here we report on the calculation of the leakage matrix for the GONG observations. The matrix elements are essentially the integrals (over the observed portion of the solar surface) of the crossproducts of the two spherical harmonics. However, several effects have been included to increase the accuracy of the matrix. These include the projection factor of the observable (velocity, intensity, modulation), the spatial apodization applied to the data, the finite rectangular pixel dimensions of the observations, and possible errors in the estimated image geometry. Other factors to be incorporated are the observed MTF, the merging of the GONG images, and the horizontal components of the oscillatory velocity field. We will compare the latest calculation with the observed spectrum and assess the relative importance of the input factors. We will also compare the leakage matrices for velocity and intensity to estimate their contribution to the large apparent differences in the helioseismic spectra obtained from these observables.

  10. 40 CFR 89.207 - Credit calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Trading Provisions § 89.207 Credit calculation. (a) Requirements for calculating NO X credits from Tier 1... be used in the credit generation calculation described in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. If an... the credit generation calculation described in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. If the credits...

  11. 40 CFR 89.207 - Credit calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Trading Provisions § 89.207 Credit calculation. (a) Requirements for calculating NO X credits from Tier 1... be used in the credit generation calculation described in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. If an... the credit generation calculation described in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. If the credits...

  12. 46 CFR 50.20-25 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculations. 50.20-25 Section 50.20-25 Shipping COAST... and Approval § 50.20-25 Calculations. (a) Calculations shall be forwarded with plans submitted for... taken to identify sources of equations, factors and other information upon which the calculations...

  13. Technique for Calculating the Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshnyakov, V. A.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2014-10-01

    A comparative analysis of different techniques for calculating the bulk modulus of solid bodies has been performed. A new technique for calculating the bulk modulus is proposed which is especially adapted for theoretical calculations of the elastic properties of crystals. The new technique makes it possible to calculate the values of bulk moduli at high pressures with greater accuracy.

  14. Calculating Masses, Densities, And Compositions Of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, H.

    1990-01-01

    Metallurgical Programs include three simple programs calculating solutions to problems common to metallurgical engineers and persons making metal castings. First program calculates mass of binary ideal mixture (alloy). Second, calculates densities of binary ideal mixture. Third, converts atomic percentages of binary mixture to weight percentages. Uses simple equations to assist with routine calculations. Written in Microsoft QuickBASIC.

  15. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  17. Broadening of the R(0) and P(2) Lines in the 13CO Fundamental by Helium Atoms from 300 K down to 12 K: Measurements and Comparison with Close-Coupling Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibault, F.; Mantz, A. W.; Claveau, C.; Valentin, A.; Hurtmans, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of He-broadening parameters for the R(0) and O(2) lines in the fundamental band of 13CO at different temperatures between 12K and room temperature. The broadening parameters are determined, taking into account confinement narrowing, by simultaneous least-squares fitting of spectra recorded using a frequency stabilized diode laser spectrometer. The pressure broadening cross sections are deduced and compared to close-coupling calculations and earlier results obtained for rotational transitions of 12 CO.

  18. Calculations of Nuclear Astrophysics and Californium Fission Neutron Spectrum Averaged Cross Section Uncertainties Using ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-fidelity Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear astrophysics and californium fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections and their uncertainties for ENDF materials have been calculated. Absolute values were deduced with Maxwellian and Mannhart spectra, while uncertainties are based on ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-Fidelity covariances. These quantities are compared with available data, independent benchmarks, EXFOR library, and analyzed for a wide range of cases. Recommendations for neutron cross section covariances are given and implications are discussed.

  19. Calculations of Nuclear Astrophysics and Californium Fission Neutron Spectrum Averaged Cross Section Uncertainties Using ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-fidelity Covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritychenko, B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics and californium fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections and their uncertainties for ENDF materials have been calculated. Absolute values were deduced with Maxwellian and Mannhart spectra, while uncertainties are based on ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-Fidelity covariances. These quantities are compared with available data, independent benchmarks, EXFOR library, and analyzed for a wide range of cases. Recommendations for neutron cross section covariances are given and implications are discussed.

  20. Geodetic mass balance record with rigorous uncertainty estimates deduced from aerial photographs and lidar data - Case study from Drangajökull ice cap, NW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnússon, E.; Muñoz-Cobo Belart, J.; Pálsson, F.; Ágústsson, H.; Crochet, P.

    2016-01-01

    changes caused by uncertainties of the SGSim bias correction, the seasonal bias correction and the interpolation of glacier surface where data are lacking. The record shows a glacier-wide mass balance rate of Ḃ = -0.26 ± 0.04 m w.e. a-1 for the entire study period (1946-2011). We observe significant decadal variability including periods of mass gain, peaking in 1985-1994 with Ḃ = 0.27 ± 0.11 m w.e. a-1. There is a striking difference when Ḃ is calculated separately for the western and eastern halves of Drangajökull, with a reduction of eastern part on average ˜ 3 times faster than the western part. Our study emphasizes the need for applying rigorous geostatistical methods for obtaining uncertainty estimates of geodetic mass balance, the importance of seasonal corrections of DEMs from glaciers with high mass turnover and the risk of extrapolating mass balance record from one glacier to another even over short distances.

  1. Distribution and nature of the crust-mantle transition layer deduced from amplitude modeling of wide-angle seismic data along the Izu-Bonin island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Kodaira, S.; Takahashi, N.; Miura, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin island arc formed by subducting of the Pacific plate beneath the Philippine Sea plate is a region of the crustal growth. This arc is divided into the northern and the southern part by the Sofu-gan tectonic line, due to the difference of the geological and geophysical characters (Yuasa, 1985). In the seismic velocity structure along the volcanic front in the northern Izu-Bonin island arc, it is clarified that this arc has not only the middle and the lower crust but also the 7.2-7.6 km/s layer (crust-mantle transition layer) underlying the lower crust (Kodaira et al., 2007, accepted). However, since this velocity structure along the volcanic front in this arc is calculated by the tomography method, the nature of the crust-mantle transition layer and uppermost mantle is unknown. To understand the nature of the crust-mantle transition layer in the Izu-Bonin island arc on the crustal growth, it is also important to know the seismic reflectivity at the top and bottom of this transition layer in this arc. In this study, we clarify the distribution of the seismic reflectivity at the top and bottom of the crust-mantle transition layer along the volcanic front in this arc using the velocity contrast values at these reflectors estimated by the amplitude modeling of wide-angle data. In 2004 and 2005, seismic refraction/reflection surveys using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) and controlled sources were conducted along the volcanic front in the Izu-Bonin island arc from the Sagami Bay to Kaitoku Seamount (Kodaira et al., accepted). In record sections of several OBSs, not only the first arrived phases but also later phases reflected from interfaces in the crust and uppermost mantle can be observed. The velocity contrast values at the top and bottom of this transition layer were estimated from the comparison of the observed and synthetic wave forms computed by a finite difference wave propagation program code "e3d" (Larsen and Grieger, 1998). Along the northern Izu

  2. Nature of the crust-mantle transition layer during the crustal growth along the Izu-Bonin island arc deduced from the seismic amplitude modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Kodaira, S.; Takahashi, N.; Miura, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin island arc is a typical oceanic island arc formed by subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the Philippine Sea plate and the location that the continental middle crust is produced (e.g., Suyehiro et al., 1996). From the seismic velocity structure, the Izu-Bonin island arc beneath the volcanic front has the 7.2-7.6 km/s layer (crust-mantle transition layer) underlying the lower crust (Kodaira et al., 2007). The crust-mantle transition layer is considered as the composition formed by the interaction between the crust and uppermost mantle during the crustal growth (e.g., Tatsumi et al., 2008). However, since this velocity structure beneath the volcanic front along this arc is calculated by the tomography method, the nature of the crust-mantle transition layer and uppermost mantle and the depth of the Moho are unknown. To understand the nature of this transition layer and the depth of the Moho along this arc, it is also important to know the seismic reflectivity at the top and bottom of this transition layer. In this study, we clarify the distribution of the seismic reflectivity at the top and bottom of the crust-mantle transition layer beneath the volcanic front along this arc using the velocity contrast values at these reflectors estimated by the amplitude modeling of wide-angle data. In 2004 and 2005, seismic refraction/reflection surveys using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) and controlled sources were conducted beneath the volcanic front along the Izu-Bonin island arc from Sagami Bay to Kaitoku Seamount (Kodaira et al., 2007). In record sections of several OBSs, not only the first arrival phases but also later phases reflected from interfaces in the crust and uppermost mantle are visible. These later phases can be considered as the reflected from the top and bottom of this transition layer. The velocity contrast values at the top and bottom of this transition layer were estimated from the comparison of the observed and synthetic wave forms computed

  3. Volcanic Signatures in Estimates of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Distribution Width, Surface Area, and Volume Deduced from Global Satellite-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, J. J.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    Volcanic signatures in the stratospheric aerosol layer are revealed by two independent techniques which retrieve aerosol information from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. Both techniques combine the 4-wavelength Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II extinction measurements (0.385 <= lambda <= 1.02 microns) with the 7.96 micron and 12.82 micron extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument. The algorithms use the SAGE II/CLAES composite extinction spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub R). The first technique is a multi-wavelength Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm which retrieves values and uncertainties of R(sub eff) by comparing ratios of extinctions from SAGE II and CLAES (e.g., E(sub lambda)/E(sub 1.02) to pre-computed extinction ratios which are based on a range of unimodal lognormal size distributions. The pre-computed ratios are presented as a function of R(sub eff) for a given sigma(sub g); thus the comparisons establish the range of R(sub eff) consistent with the measured spectra for that sigma(sub g). The fact that no solutions are found for certain sigma(sub g) values provides information on the acceptable range of sigma(sub g), which is found to evolve in response to volcanic injections and removal periods. Analogous comparisons using absolute extinction spectra and error bars establish the range of S and V. The second technique is a Parameter Search Technique (PST) which estimates R(sub eff) and sigma(sub g) within a month-latitude-altitude bin by minimizing the chi-squared values obtained by comparing the SAGE II/CLAES extinction spectra and error bars with spectra calculated by varying the lognormal fitting parameters: R(sub eff), sigma(sub g), and the total number of particles N(sub 0). For both techniques, possible biases in

  4. Factors affecting calculation of L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotola, Mark P.

    2001-08-01

    A detectable extraterrestrial civilization can be modeled as a series of successive regimes over time each of which is detectable for a certain proportion of its lifecycle. This methodology can be utilized to produce an estimate for L. Potential components of L include quantity of fossil fuel reserves, solar energy potential, quantity of regimes over time, lifecycle patterns of regimes, proportion of lifecycle regime is actually detectable, and downtime between regimes. Relationships between these components provide a means of calculating the lifetime of communicative species in a detectable state, L. An example of how these factors interact is provided, utilizing values that are reasonable given known astronomical data for components such as solar energy potential while existing knowledge about the terrestrial case is used as a baseline for other components including fossil fuel reserves, quantity of regimes over time, and lifecycle patterns of regimes, proportion of lifecycle regime is actually detectable, and gaps of time between regimes due to recovery from catastrophic war or resource exhaustion. A range of values is calculated for L when parameters are established for each component so as to determine the lowest and highest values of L. roadmap for SETI research at the SETI Institute for the next few decades. Three different approaches were identified. 1) Continue the radio search: build an affordable array incorporating consumer market technologies, expand the search frequency, and increase the target list to 100,000 stars. This array will also serve as a technology demonstration and enable the international radio astronomy community to realize an array that is a hundred times larger and capable (among other things) of searching a million stars. 2) Begin searches for very fast optical pulses from a million stars. 3) As Moore's Law delivers increased computational capacity, build an omni-directional sky survey array capable of detecting strong, transient

  5. Nightside plasmapause positions observed by DE-1 as a function of geomagnetic indices - Comparison with whistler observations and model calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decreau, P. M. E.; Lemaire, J.; Chappell, C. R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The paper analyzes 28 plasmapause crossings made by the DE1 satellite in the night local time sector (from January to March 1982). Different signatures obtained by the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer instrument have been used for this analysis. The observed plasmapause positions (Lpp) have been organized as a function of geomagnetic indices. They are compared with the empirical relationship deduced by Carpenter and Parks (1973) from whistler observations. Moreover, the dependence of Lpp versus Kp has been inferred from model calculations using Kp dependent electric and magnetic fields derived from McIlwain's (1974) E3H electric field model and M2 magnetic field model respectively. Stationary models as well as time dependent ones, have been used to determine the positions of the plasmapause. The results of the model calculations are compared to the observations.

  6. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-07-01

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  7. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  8. McEliece PKC Calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, Repka

    2015-01-01

    The original McEliece PKC proposal is interesting thanks to its resistance against all known attacks, even using quantum cryptanalysis, in an IND-CCA2 secure conversion. Here we present a generic implementation of the original McEliece PKC proposal, which provides test vectors (for all important intermediate results), and also in which a measurement tool for side-channel analysis is employed. To our best knowledge, this is the first such an implementation. This Calculator is valuable in implementation optimization, in further McEliece/Niederreiter like PKCs properties investigations, and also in teaching. Thanks to that, one can, for example, examine side-channel vulnerability of a certain implementation, or one can find out and test particular parameters of the cryptosystem in order to make them appropriate for an efficient hardware implementation. This implementation is available [1] in executable binary format, and as a static C++ library, as well as in form of source codes, for Linux and Windows operating systems.

  9. Selfconsistent calculations for hyperdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Molique, H.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.; Luo, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Properties of the hyperdeformed nuclei in the A {approximately} 170 mass range are re-examined using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with the SOP parametrization. A comparison with the previous predictions that were based on a non-selfconsistent approach is made. The existence of the {open_quotes}hyper-deformed shell closures{close_quotes} at the proton and neutron numbers Z=70 and N=100 and their very weak dependence on the rotational frequency is suggested; the corresponding single-particle energy gaps are predicted to play a role similar to that of the Z=66 and N=86 gaps in the super-deformed nuclei of the A {approximately} 150 mass range. Selfconsistent calculations suggest also that the A {approximately} 170 hyperdeformed structures have neglegible mass asymmetry in their shapes. Very importantly for the experimental studies, both the fission barriers and the {open_quotes}inner{close_quotes} barriers (that separate the hyperdeformed structures from those with smaller deformations) are predicted to be relatively high, up to the factor of {approximately}2 higher than the corresponding ones in the {sup 152}Dy superdeformed nucleus used as a reference.

  10. Calculating system reliability with SRFYDO

    SciTech Connect

    Morzinski, Jerome; Anderson - Cook, Christine M; Klamann, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    SRFYDO is a process for estimating reliability of complex systems. Using information from all applicable sources, including full-system (flight) data, component test data, and expert (engineering) judgment, SRFYDO produces reliability estimates and predictions. It is appropriate for series systems with possibly several versions of the system which share some common components. It models reliability as a function of age and up to 2 other lifecycle (usage) covariates. Initial output from its Exploratory Data Analysis mode consists of plots and numerical summaries so that the user can check data entry and model assumptions, and help determine a final form for the system model. The System Reliability mode runs a complete reliability calculation using Bayesian methodology. This mode produces results that estimate reliability at the component, sub-system, and system level. The results include estimates of uncertainty, and can predict reliability at some not-too-distant time in the future. This paper presents an overview of the underlying statistical model for the analysis, discusses model assumptions, and demonstrates usage of SRFYDO.

  11. cDNA cloning and deduced amino acid sequence of a major, glycine-rich cuticular protein from the coleopteran Tenebrio molitor. Temporal and spatial distribution of the transcript during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Charles, J P; Bouhin, H; Quennedey, B; Courrent, A; Delachambre, J

    1992-06-15

    In Coleoptera, the elytra (forewings), with a very hard and thick cuticle, protect the membranous and delicate hindwings against mechanical stress. We have isolated and characterized a cDNA encoding a major cuticle protein in Tenebrio molitor, named ACP-20. The deduced amino acid sequence is roughly tripartite, with two terminal glycine-rich domains and a central region showing pronounced similarities with some other hard cuticle proteins. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses reveal that ACP-20 gene expression is developmentally regulated since transcript accumulation occurs only in epidermal regions synthesizing hard cuticle and is restricted to the period of preecdysial adult cuticle deposition. Moreover, application of a juvenile hormone analogue prevents the appearance of the transcript, indicating that juvenile hormone, a key molecule involved in the control of insect metamorphosis, negatively regulates the expression of the ACP-20 gene.

  12. On a Riesz basis of exponentials related to the eigenvalues of an analytic operator and application to a non-selfadjoint problem deduced from a perturbation method for sound radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ellouz, Hanen; Feki, Ines; Jeribi, Aref

    2013-11-15

    In the present paper, we prove that the family of exponentials associated to the eigenvalues of the perturbed operator T(ε) ≔ T{sub 0} + εT{sub 1} + ε{sup 2}T{sub 2} + … + ε{sup k}T{sub k} + … forms a Riesz basis in L{sup 2}(0, T), T > 0, where ε∈C, T{sub 0} is a closed densely defined linear operator on a separable Hilbert space H with domain D(T{sub 0}) having isolated eigenvalues with multiplicity one, while T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, … are linear operators on H having the same domain D⊃D(T{sub 0}) and satisfying a specific growing inequality. After that, we generalize this result using a H-Lipschitz function. As application, we consider a non-selfadjoint problem deduced from a perturbation method for sound radiation.

  13. Relativistic Thomson Scatter from Factor Calculation

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this program is calculate the fully relativistic Thomson scatter from factor in unmagnetized plasmas. Such calculations are compared to experimental diagnoses of plasmas at such facilities as the Jupiter laser facility here a LLNL.

  14. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  15. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  16. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  17. Exact Computer Calculations with Infinitely Repeating Decimals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.; Liu, Fengshan; Nandakumar, N. R.

    2002-01-01

    Both computers and calculators are limited by architecture, operating system, and software, to some predetermined level of precision within decimal number presentation and calculation. However, there exists a base that produces a terminating decimal. (MM)

  18. Spherical Target Temperature by Extended CFAST Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C W

    2009-05-05

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature at the surface of a spherical target made of polyethylene during a room fire. The current calculation is separated into 2 steps: (1) CFAST code calculation--Calculate the air temperature; radiation flux to the target from the fire, surrounding air, and walls; convection flux; and target temperature. (2) Extended model calculation--Calculate the temperature of the target sphere taking into account the density, heat capacity, heat conductivity, and the spherical geometry of the target by solving the coupled finite difference equations. The second step calculation utilizes the air temperature and radiation flux determined by the CFAST code calculation in the first step.

  19. 76 FR 71431 - Civil Penalty Calculation Methodology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Civil Penalty Calculation Methodology AGENCY: Federal... its civil penalty methodology. Part of this evaluation includes a forthcoming explanation of the Uniform Fine Assessment (UFA) algorithm, which FMCSA currently uses for calculation of civil...

  20. 46 CFR 170.170 - Calculations required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Weather Criteria § 170.170 Calculations required. (a) Each vessel must... weather deck or abnormal sheer. (c) When doing the calculations required by paragraph (a) of this...

  1. SW New Mexico BHT geothermal gradient calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shari Kelley

    2015-07-24

    This file contains a compilation of BHT data from oil wells in southwestern New Mexico. Surface temperature is calculated using the collar elevation. An estimate of geothermal gradient is calculated using the estimated surface temperature and the uncorrected BHT data.

  2. Teaching Waves with a Graphing Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raggett, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    Stresses the value of graphing and computer algebra systems calculators when teaching about waves. Discusses how to input data into these calculators. Highlights the Texas Instruments' (TI) Web site at http://www.ti.com. (YDS)

  3. Final disposal room structural response calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    Finite element calculations have been performed to determine the structural response of waste-filled disposal rooms at the WIPP for a period of 10,000 years after emplacement of the waste. The calculations were performed to generate the porosity surface data for the final set of compliance calculations. The most recent reference data for the stratigraphy, waste characterization, gas generation potential, and nonlinear material response have been brought together for this final set of calculations.

  4. Pressure Vessel Calculations for VVER-440 Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordósy, G.; Hegyi, Gy.; Keresztúri, A.; Maráczy, Cs.; Temesvári, E.; Vértes, P.; Zsolnay, É.

    2003-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were performed for a selected cycle of the Paks NPP Unit II to test a computational model. In the model the source term was calculated by the core design code KARATE and the neutron transport calculations were performed by the MCNP. Different forms of the source specification were examined. The calculated results were compared with measurements and in most cases fairly good agreement was found.

  5. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  6. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  7. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  8. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  9. Decimals, Denominators, Demons, Calculators, and Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Len; Swan, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The authors provide activities for overcoming some fraction misconceptions using calculators specially designed for learners in primary years. The writers advocate use of the calculator as a way to engage children in thinking about mathematics. By engaging with a calculator as part of mathematics learning, children are learning about and using the…

  10. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  11. 46 CFR 172.130 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculations. 172.130 Section 172.130 Shipping COAST... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.130 Calculations. (a) Except as provided in § 153.7 of this chapter, each tankship must be shown by design calculations to meet the survival conditions in § 172.150 in...

  12. 7 CFR 1416.603 - Payment calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment calculations. 1416.603 Section 1416.603 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... PROGRAMS Nursery Disaster Program § 1416.603 Payment calculations. (a) Payments are calculated...

  13. Mathematical Creative Activity and the Graphic Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Janina

    2011-01-01

    Teaching mathematics using graphic calculators has been an issue of didactic discussions for years. Finding ways in which graphic calculators can enrich the development process of creative activity in mathematically gifted students between the ages of 16-17 is the focus of this article. Research was conducted using graphic calculators with…

  14. A general formalism for phase space calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Deutchman, Philip A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1988-01-01

    General formulas for calculating the interactions of galactic cosmic rays with target nuclei are presented. Methods for calculating the appropriate normalization volume elements and phase space factors are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining correct phase space factors for 2-, and 3-body final states. Calculations for both Lorentz-invariant and noninvariant phase space are presented.

  15. Three-dimensional RF structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. K.; Browman, M. J.; Weiland, T.

    1989-04-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described.

  16. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Browman, M.J.; Weiland, T.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  17. Workbook, Basic Mathematics and Wastewater Processing Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Albany.

    This workbook serves as a self-learning guide to basic mathematics and treatment plant calculations and also as a reference and source book for the mathematics of sewage treatment and processing. In addition to basic mathematics, the workbook discusses processing and process control, laboratory calculations and efficiency calculations necessary in…

  18. Chemistry Calculations Using MULTIPLAN and the Macintosh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Joel M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a spreadsheet computer program which can be used with an Apple Macintosh computer to perform a multitude of calculations. Discusses two types of calculations taught in general chemistry. Demonstrates how to use the spreadsheet to calculate mass percent and the formula of a compound. (TW)

  19. LUST ON-LINE CALCULATOR INTRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a suite of on-line calculators to assist in performing site assessment and modeling calculations for leaking underground storage tank sites (http://www.epa.gov/athens/onsite). The calculators are divided into four types: parameter estimation, models, scientific...

  20. 47 CFR 1.1623 - Probability calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Probability calculation. 1.1623 Section 1.1623 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Random Selection Procedures for Mass Media Services General Procedures § 1.1623 Probability calculation. (a) All calculations shall...

  1. Investigation of the Local Ge Concentration in Si/SiGe Multi-QW Structures by CBED Analysis and FEM Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, E.; Mussler, G.; Müller, E.; Grützmacher, D.

    The local Ge concentration in Si/SiGe multiquantum well structures was investigated by CBED analysis. Series of bright field CBED patterns were taken across the quantum wells using the [340]-zone axis in STEM mode. The HOLZ lines in these patterns were fitted with the JEMS program [1] in order to deduce the local lattice parameters. With finite-element calculations taking the plastic relaxation of the thin TEM foil into account the Ge concentrations corresponding to these sets of lattice parameters were determined.

  2. Isospin Mixing in MAGNESIUM-24.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Charles David

    The (beta)-(gamma) circular polarization correlation asymmetry was measured for the pure Gamow-Teller decay of ('28)Al, for the pure Fermi decay of ('14)O and for the mixed decay of the ('24)Al 4('+) ground state to the 8.437 MeV, 4('+) state in ('24)Mg. The expected results were obtained for the pure Gamow-Teller and Fermi decays. From the results of the ('24)Al decay the isospin mixing of the 8.437 MeV, 4('+) state and the 9.515 MeV, 4('+) analog state in ('24)Mg was determined. The charge dependent matrix element mixing these two states was determined to be -95 (+OR-) 36 keV. This is the largest charge dependent matrix element observed in (beta) decay to date. This large value has not been completely explained and suggests the existence of a (DELTA)T = 1 nuclear force.

  3. Deducing dust emission mechanisms from field measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations are needed to both develop and test theories on dust emission for use in global modeling systems. The mechanism of dust emission (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) and the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under ...

  4. "Le Theatre d'Education": An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Considers how in the past 15 years, with renewed interest in women writers and education for girls, there has been a revival of interest in the Theatre of Education, a large, coherent body of plays for children written in Europe and America between 1750 and 1830. Discusses plays written for children from the 1500s to the early 1900s. (SG)

  5. Calculation of the magnetic gradient tensor from total magnetic anomaly field based on regularized method in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gang; Zhang, Yingtang; Mi, Songlin; Fan, Hongbo; Li, Zhining

    2016-11-01

    To obtain accurate magnetic gradient tensor data, a fast and robust calculation method based on regularized method in frequency domain was proposed. Using the potential field theory, the transform formula in frequency domain was deduced in order to calculate the magnetic gradient tensor from the pre-existing total magnetic anomaly data. By analyzing the filter characteristics of the Vertical vector transform operator (VVTO) and Gradient tensor transform operator (GTTO), we proved that the conventional transform process was unstable which would zoom in the high-frequency part of the data in which measuring noise locate. Due to the existing unstable problem that led to a low signal-to-noise (SNR) for the calculated result, we introduced regularized method in this paper. By selecting the optimum regularization parameters of different transform phases using the C-norm approach, the high frequency noise was restrained and the SNR was improved effectively. Numerical analysis demonstrates that most value and characteristics of the calculated data by the proposed method compare favorably with reference magnetic gradient tensor data. In addition, calculated magnetic gradient tensor components form real aeromagnetic survey provided better resolution of the magnetic sources and original profile.

  6. Furanose ring conformation: the application of ab initio molecular orbital calculations to the structure and dynamics of erythrofuranose and threofuranose rings

    SciTech Connect

    Serianni, A.S.; Chipman, D.M.

    1987-09-02

    Ab initiao molecular orbital calculations have been conducted on four tetrofuranose anomers, ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-D-erythrofuranose and ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-D-threofuranose, to study the effect of ring conformation on molecular parameters (bond lengths, bond angles, bond torsions) and on total energies. Geometric optimizations of envelope and planar conformers were conducted using the STO-3G basis set; single-point calculations were also performed with the 3-21G basis set. Preferred solution conformations deduced from previous NMR studies are in good agreement with those predicted by calculation, indicating that the intrinsic structures of these furanoses dictate their preferred geometries, and that solvation by water (/sup 2/H/sub 2/O) does not appear to be a major conformational determinant. The ..beta..-D-erythro configuration, which is structurally related to the ..beta..-D-ribo configuration found in RNA, was found to have significantly different conformational behavior from the other three configurations.

  7. Nuclear magnetic moments and related sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Arima, Akito

    2011-05-06

    We first review the history and our present understanding of nuclear magnetic moments and Gamow-Teller transitions, with emphasis on the roles of configuration mixing and meson exchange currents. Then we discuss the renormalization of the orbital g-factor in nuclei, and its relation to the E1 sum rule for photoabsorption and the M1 sum rule for the scissors mode of deformed nuclei.

  8. Slit observations and empirical calculations for HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, I. F.; Gruenwald, R.; Viegas, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    When analysing HII regions, a possible source of systematic error on empirically derived quantities, such as the gas temperature and the chemical composition, is the limited size of the slit used for the observations. In order to evaluate this type of systematic error, we use the photoionization code AANGABA to create a virtual photoionized region and mimic the effect of a slit observation. A grid of models was built varying the ionizing radiation spectrum emitted by a central stellar cluster, as well as the gas abundance. The calculated line surface brightness was then used to simulate slit observations and to derive empirical parameters using the usual methods described in the literature. Depending on the fraction of the object covered by the slit, the empirically derived physical parameters and chemical composition can be different from those obtained from observations of the whole object. This effect is mainly dependent on the age of the ionizing stellar cluster. The low-ionization lines, which originate in the outer layers of the ionized gas, are more sensitive to the size of the area covered by the slit than the high-ionization forbidden lines or recombination lines, because these lines are mainly produced closer to the inner radius of the nebula. For a slit covering 50 per cent or less of the total area, the measured [OIII], [OII] and [OI] line intensities are less than 78, 62 and 58 per cent of the total intensity for a young HII region (t < 3 Myr); for older objects the effect due to the slit is less significant. Regarding the temperature indicator T[OIII], the slit effects are small (usually less than 5 per cent) because this temperature is derived from [OIII] high-ionization lines. On the other hand, for the abundance (and temperature) indicator R23, which depends also on the [OII] line, the slit effect is slightly higher. Therefore, the systematic error due to slit observations on the O abundance is low, being usually less than 10 per cent, except for

  9. Electronic properties of RDX and HMX: Compton scattering experiment and first-principles calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, B L; Jain, Pradeep; Sahariya, Jagrati; Heda, N L; Soni, Pramod

    2013-07-11

    The first-ever electron momentum density (EMD) measurements of explosive materials, namely, RDX (1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane, (CH2-N-NO2)3) and HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane, (CH2-N-NO2)4), have been reported using a 740 GBq (137)Cs Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profiles (CPs) are compared with the EMDs derived from linear combination of atomic orbitals with density functional theory. It is found that the CPs deduced from generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with Wu-Cohen exchange energies give a better agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles than those from local density approximation and other schemes of GGA. Further, Mulliken population, energy bands, partial and total density of states, and band gap have also been reported using GGA calculations. Present ground state calculations unambiguously show large band gap semiconductor nature of both RDX and HMX. A similar type of bonding in these materials is uniquely established using Compton data and density of states. It is also outstandingly consistent with the Mulliken population, which predicts almost equal amount of charge transfer (0.84 and 0.83 e(-)) from H1 + H2 + N2 to C1 + N1 + O1 + O2 in both the explosives.

  10. First-Principle Calculations of Large Fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Calaminici, Patrizia; Geudtner, Gerald; Köster, Andreas M

    2009-01-13

    State of-the-art density functional theory calculations have been performed for the large fullerenes C180, C240, C320, and C540 using the linear combination of Gaussian-type orbitals density functional theory (LCGTO-DFT) approach. For the calculations all-electron basis sets were employed. All fullerene structures were fully optimized without symmetry constrains. The analysis of the obtained structures as well as a study on the evolution of the bond lengths and calculated binding energies are presented. The fullerene results are compared to diamond and graphene which were calculated at the same level of theory. This represents the first systematic study on these large fullerenes based on nonsymmetry adapted first-principle calculations, and it demonstrates the capability of DFT calculations for energy and structure computations of large scale structures without any symmetry constraint.

  11. GPU-based calculations in digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, R.; Acebal, P.; Blaya, S.; Carretero, L.; Fimia, A.; Serrano, F.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we are going to apply GPU (Graphical Processing Units) with CUDA environment for scientific calculations, concretely high cost computations on the field of digital holography. For this, we have studied three typical problems in digital holography such as Fourier transforms, Fresnel reconstruction of the hologram and the calculation of vectorial diffraction integral. In all cases the runtime at different image size and the corresponding accuracy were compared to the obtained by traditional calculation systems. The programs have been carried out on a computer with a graphic card of last generation, Nvidia GTX 680, which is optimized for integer calculations. As a result a large reduction of runtime has been obtained which allows a significant improvement. Concretely, 15 fold shorter times for Fresnel approximation calculations and 600 times for the vectorial diffraction integral. These initial results, open the possibility for applying such kind of calculations in real time digital holography.

  12. Microscopic Calculations of 240Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2007-09-11

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations have been performed with the Gogny finite-range effective interaction for {sup 240}Pu out to scission, using a new code developed at LLNL. A first set of calculations was performed with constrained quadrupole moment along the path of most probable fission, assuming axial symmetry but allowing for the spontaneous breaking of reflection symmetry of the nucleus. At a quadrupole moment of 345 b, the nucleus was found to spontaneously scission into two fragments. A second set of calculations, with all nuclear moments up to hexadecapole constrained, was performed to approach the scission configuration in a controlled manner. Calculated energies, moments, and representative plots of the total nuclear density are shown. The present calculations serve as a proof-of-principle, a blueprint, and starting-point solutions for a planned series of more comprehensive calculations to map out a large set of scission configurations, and the associated fission-fragment properties.

  13. Computer program for calculation of oxygen uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, B. L.; Castle, G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A description and operational precedures are presented for a computer program, written in Super Basic, that calculates oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, and related ventilation parameters. Program features include: (1) the option of entering slope and intercept values of calibration curves for the O2 and CO2 and analyzers; (2) calculation of expired water vapor pressure; and (3) the option of entering inspured O2 and CO2 concentrations. The program is easily adaptable for programmable laboratory calculators.

  14. CJAM: First and second velocity moments calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Laura L.; den Brok, Mark

    2013-12-01

    CJAM calculates first and second velocity moments using the Jeans Anisotropic MGE (JAM) models of Cappellari (2008) and Cappellari (2012). These models have been extended to calculate all three (x, y, z) first moments and all six (xx, yy, zz, xy, xz, yz) second moments. CJAM, written in C, is based on the IDL implementation of the line-of-sight calculations by Michele Cappellari.

  15. Impedance Calculation and Verification in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.

    2005-01-31

    For both the SLC damping rings and the DAPHNE collider a systematic approach to understanding single bunch, longitudinal, current dependent behavior was taken: First, using a bunch significantly shorter than nominal, a careful calculation of the wakefield of the entire vacuum chamber was obtained. This ''pseudo-Green'' function was then used in bunch lengthening and instability calculations. We review, for both projects, the history of these calculations and comparisons with measurement.

  16. Status of lattice field theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: overview of all present calculation; reliability criteria for quenched calculation; quenched versus full QCD, and difficulties facing full QCD; results for the quenched pion wavefunction''; results for the quenched hadron spectrum; results for quenched B{sub K}; A new method for calculating the surface tension; the non-pertubative upper bound on the Higgs mass; and toward the TERAFLOP machine.

  17. The Band Structure of Polymers: Its Calculation and Interpretation. Part 2. Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, B. J.; O'Leary, Brian

    1988-01-01

    Details ab initio crystal orbital calculations using all-trans-polyethylene as a model. Describes calculations based on various forms of translational symmetry. Compares these calculations with ab initio molecular orbital calculations discussed in a preceding article. Discusses three major approximations made in the crystal case. (CW)

  18. Calculation principles for a synchronous electromagnetic clutch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panasenkov, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed explanation of the calculation principles, for a synchronous salient-pole electromagnetic clutch with lumped excitation windings is supplied by direct current. Practical recommendations are given.

  19. Comparison of RESRAD with hand calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is a continuation of an earlier comparison done with two other computer programs, GENII and PATHRAE. The dose calculations by the two programs were compared with each other and with hand calculations. These band calculations have now been compared with RESRAD Version 5.41 to examine the use of standard models and parameters in this computer program. The hand calculations disclosed a significant computational error in RESRAD. The Pu-241 ingestion doses are five orders of magnitude too small. In addition, the external doses from some nuclides differ greatly from expected values. Both of these deficiencies have been corrected in later versions of RESRAD.

  20. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  1. Neutron-proton correlations in an exactly solvable model

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Pittel, S.; Stoitsov, M.; Vogel, P.; Dukelsky, J.

    1997-04-01

    We examine isovector and isoscalar neutron-proton correlations in an exactly solvable model based on the algebra SO(8). We look particularly closely at Gamow-Teller strength and double {beta} decay, both to isolate the effects of the two kinds of pairing and to test two approximation schemes: the renormalized neutron-proton quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) and generalized BCS theory. When isoscalar pairing correlations become strong enough a phase transition occurs and the dependence of the Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} strength on isospin changes in a dramatic and unfamiliar way, actually increasing as neutrons are added to an N=Z core. Renormalization eliminates the well-known instabilities that plague the QRPA as the phase transition is approached, but only by unnaturally suppressing the isoscalar correlations. Generalized BCS theory, on the other hand, reproduces the Gamow-Teller strength more accurately in the isoscalar phase than in the usual isovector phase, even though its predictions for energies are equally good everywhere. It also mixes T=0 and T=1 pairing, but only on the isoscalar side of the phase transition. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Primary structure of the T3 gamma subunit of the T3/T cell antigen receptor complex deduced from cDNA sequences: evolution of the T3 gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Krissansen, G W; Owen, M J; Verbi, W; Crumpton, M J

    1986-01-01

    cDNA clones, whose fusion proteins were recognised by an anti-(T3 gamma chain) serum, were isolated from a lambda gt11 expression library prepared from the human T leukaemia cell line J6. The clones encoded a unique sequence related to that of the T3 delta chain, and hybridised to two mRNA transcripts of 0.8 and 3.5 kb in size, whose expression was restricted to T lymphocytes. The 182 amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA revealed a typical signal peptide, a predominantly hydrophilic 89 amino residue domain with two N-glycosylation sites, a hydrophobic domain with a centrally located glutamic acid residue and a 44-residue domain with at least one potential serine phosphorylation site for protein kinase C. Given this arrangement the T3 gamma polypeptide most probably has a transmembrane orientation with the N-terminal domain exposed on the cell surface. The amino acid and nucleotide sequences showed marked homology with those of the T3 delta chain, suggesting that the respective genes arose by duplication about 200 million years ago. The intracellular and membrane-proximal half of the extracellular domains were especially well conserved. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:2944745

  3. Calculation of particulate dispersion in a design-basis tornadic storm from the Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D.W.

    1980-10-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model is used to calculate ground-level air concentration and deposition (due to precipitation scavenging) after a hypothetical tornado strike at the Battelle Memorial Institute at Columbus, Ohio. Plutonium particles less than 20 ..mu..m in diameter are assumed to be lifted into the tornadic storm cell by the vortex. The rotational characteristics of the tornadic storm are embedded within the larger mesoscale flow of the storm system. The design-basis translational wind value is based on probabilities associated with existing records of tornado strikes in the vicinity of the plant site. Turbulence exchange coefficients are based on empirical values deduced from experimental data in severe storms and from theoretical assumptions obtained from the literature. The method of moments is used to incorporate subgrid-scale resolution of the concentration within a grid cell volume.

  4. Calculation of Temperature Rise in Calorimetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.; Witt, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Gives a simple but fuller account of the basis for accurately calculating temperature rise in calorimetry. Points out some misconceptions regarding these calculations. Describes two basic methods, the extrapolation to zero time and the equal area method. Discusses the theoretical basis of each and their underlying assumptions. (CW)

  5. Bill Calculator V1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-19

    Utitlity tariffs vary significantly from utility to utility. Each utility has its own rates and sets of rules by which bills are calculated. The Bill Calculator reconstructs the tariff based on these rules, stored in data tables, and access the appropriate charges for a given energy consumption and demand. The software reconstructs the tariff logic from the rules stored in data tables. Changes are tallied as the logic is reconstructed. This is essentially an accounting program. The main limitation is on the time to search for each tariff element. It is currently on O(N) search. Also, since the Bill calculator first stores all tariffs in an array and then reads the array to reconstruct a specific tariff, the memory limitatins of a particular system would limit the number of tariffs that could be handled. This tool allows a user to calculate a bill from any sampled utility without prior knowledge of the tariff logic or structure. The peculiarities of the tariff logic are stored in data tables and manged by the Bill Calculator software. This version of the software is implemented as a VB module that operates within Microsoft Excel. Input data tables are stored in Excel worksheets. In this version the Bill Calculator functions can be assessed through Excel as user defined worksheet functions. Bill Calculator can calculate approximately 50,000 bills in less than 30 minutes.

  6. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... specified in § 1065.665 to determine THCE or NMHCE and the calculations specified in 40 CFR 1066.635...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  11. Using Calculators in Mathematics 11. Student Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rising, Gerald R.; And Others

    This student textbook is designed to incorporate programable calculators in grade 11 mathematics. The eight chapters contained in this document are: (1) Using Calculators in Mathematics; (2) Exponents and Logarithms; (3) Trigonometry of the Right Triangle; (4) Trigonometry Beyong the Right Triangle; (5) Graphs of the Trigonometric Functions and…

  12. Using Calculators in Mathematics 12. Student Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rising, Gerald R.; And Others

    This student textbook is designed to incorporate programable calculators in grade 12 mathematics. The seven chapters contained in this document are: (1) Using Calculators in Mathematics; (2) Sequences, Series, and Limits; (3) Iteration, Mathematical Induction, and the Binomial Theorem; (4) Applications of the Fundamental Counting Principle; (5)…

  13. 46 CFR 154.448 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Tank Type B § 154.448 Calculations. The following calculations for an independent tank type B must be... analysis of the stress exerted by the hull on the tank, its support, and its keys. (c) The response of the... formula: EC02FE91.088 where: ni=the number of stress cycles at each stress level during the life of...

  14. Calculation of the Poisson cumulative distribution function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowerman, Paul N.; Nolty, Robert G.; Scheuer, Ernest M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for calculating the Poisson cdf (cumulative distribution function) is presented. The method avoids computer underflow and overflow during the process. The computer program uses this technique to calculate the Poisson cdf for arbitrary inputs. An algorithm that determines the Poisson parameter required to yield a specified value of the cdf is presented.

  15. Teaching Discrete Mathematics with Graphing Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masat, Francis E.

    Graphing calculator use is often thought of in terms of pre-calculus or continuous topics in mathematics. This paper contains examples and activities that demonstrate useful, interesting, and easy ways to use a graphing calculator with discrete topics. Examples are given for each of the following topics: functions, mathematical induction and…

  16. 7 CFR 760.406 - Payment calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment calculation. 760.406 Section 760.406 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... calculation. (a) Under this subpart, separate payment rates for eligible livestock owners and...

  17. 47 CFR 65.306 - Calculation accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation accuracy. 65.306 Section 65.306 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Exchange Carriers § 65.306 Calculation...

  18. 46 CFR 174.360 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., as amended, chapter II-1, part B-1. 46 CFR Ch. I (10-1-10 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculations. 174.360 Section 174.360 Shipping COAST... SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Dry Cargo Ships § 174.360 Calculations. Each ship...

  19. 30 CFR 5.30 - Fee calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fee calculation. 5.30 Section 5.30 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FEES FOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS § 5.30 Fee calculation....

  20. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.