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Sample records for calibration phantom errors

  1. The impact of calibration phantom errors on dual-energy digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xuanqin; Chen, Xi; Sun, Lijun; Yu, Hengyong; Ji, Zhen; Zhang, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Microcalcification is one of the earliest and main indicators of breast cancer. Because dual-energy digital mammography could suppress the contrast between the adipose and glandular tissues of the breast, it is considered a promising technique that will improve the detection of microcalcification. In dual-energy digital mammography, the imaged object is a human breast, while in calibration measurements only the phantoms of breast tissue equivalent materials are available. Consequently, the differences between phantoms and breast tissues will lead to calibration phantom errors. Based on the dual-energy imaging model, formulae of calibration phantom errors are derived in this paper. Then, this type of error is quantitatively analyzed using publicly available data and compared with other types of error. The results demonstrate that the calibration phantom error is large and dominant in dual-energy mammography, seriously decreasing calculation precision. Further investigations on the physical meaning of calibration phantom error reveal that the imaged objects with the same glandular ratio have identical calibration phantom error. Finally, an error correction method is proposed based on our findings. PMID:18936520

  2. Ultrasonic Calibration Wire Test Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Fisher, K A; Werve, M; Chambers, D H

    2004-09-24

    We designed and built a phantom consisting of vertical wires maintained under tension to be used as an ultrasonic test, calibration, and reconstruction object for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory annular array scanner. We provide a description of the phantom, present example data sets, preliminary reconstructions, example metadata, and MATLAB codes to read the data.

  3. Design and development of an ultrasound calibration phantom and system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Ackerman, Martin K.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the ultrasound transducer and the ultrasound image. A phantom or model with known geometry is also required. In this work, we design and test an ultrasound calibration phantom and software. The two main considerations in this work are utilizing our knowledge of ultrasound physics to design the phantom and delivering an easy to use calibration process to the user. We explore the use of a three-dimensional printer to create the phantom in its entirety without need for user assembly. We have also developed software to automatically segment the three-dimensional printed rods from the ultrasound image by leveraging knowledge about the shape and scale of the phantom. In this work, we present preliminary results from using this phantom to perform ultrasound calibration. To test the efficacy of our method, we match the projection of the points segmented from the image to the known model and calculate a sum squared difference between each point for several combinations of motion generation and filtering methods. The best performing combination of motion and filtering techniques had an error of 1.56 mm and a standard deviation of 1.02 mm.

  4. Tracked ultrasound calibration studies with a phantom made of LEGO bricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soehl, Marie; Walsh, Ryan; Rankin, Adam; Lasso, Andras; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-03-01

    In this study, spatial calibration of tracked ultrasound was compared by using a calibration phantom made of LEGO® bricks and two 3-D printed N-wire phantoms. METHODS: The accuracy and variance of calibrations were compared under a variety of operating conditions. Twenty trials were performed using an electromagnetic tracking device with a linear probe and three trials were performed using varied probes, varied tracking devices and the three aforementioned phantoms. The accuracy and variance of spatial calibrations found through the standard deviation and error of the 3-D image reprojection were used to compare the calibrations produced from the phantoms. RESULTS: This study found no significant difference between the measured variables of the calibrations. The average standard deviation of multiple 3-D image reprojections with the highest performing printed phantom and those from the phantom made of LEGO® bricks differed by 0.05 mm and the error of the reprojections differed by 0.13 mm. CONCLUSION: Given that the phantom made of LEGO® bricks is significantly less expensive, more readily available, and more easily modified than precision-machined N-wire phantoms, it prompts to be a viable calibration tool especially for quick laboratory research and proof of concept implementations of tracked ultrasound navigation.

  5. Assessment of Random Error in Phantom Dosimetry with the Use of Error Simulation in Statistical Software

    PubMed Central

    Hoogeveen, R. C.; Martens, E. P.; van der Stelt, P. F.; Berkhout, W. E. R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate if software simulation is practical for quantifying random error (RE) in phantom dosimetry. Materials and Methods. We applied software error simulation to an existing dosimetry study. The specifications and the measurement values of this study were brought into the software (R version 3.0.2) together with the algorithm of the calculation of the effective dose (E). Four sources of RE were specified: (1) the calibration factor; (2) the background radiation correction; (3) the read-out process of the dosimeters; and (4) the fluctuation of the X-ray generator. Results. The amount of RE introduced by these sources was calculated on the basis of the experimental values and the mathematical rules of error propagation. The software repeated the calculations of E multiple times (n = 10,000) while attributing the applicable RE to the experimental values. A distribution of E emerged as a confidence interval around an expected value. Conclusions. Credible confidence intervals around E in phantom dose studies can be calculated by using software modelling of the experiment. With credible confidence intervals, the statistical significance of differences between protocols can be substantiated or rejected. This modelling software can also be used for a power analysis when planning phantom dose experiments. PMID:26881200

  6. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom*

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Taynná Vernalha Rocha; Cordova Junior, Arno Lotar; Piedade, Pedro Argolo; da Silva, Cintia Mara; Marins, Priscila; Almeida, Cristiane Maria; Brincas, Gabriela R. Baseggio; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. PMID:27141132

  7. Construction of Chinese adult male phantom library and its application in the virtual calibration of in vivo measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yizheng; Qiu, Rui; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Junli

    2016-03-01

    In vivo measurement is a main method of internal contamination evaluation, particularly for large numbers of people after a nuclear accident. Before the practical application, it is necessary to obtain the counting efficiency of the detector by calibration. The virtual calibration based on Monte Carlo simulation usually uses the reference human computational phantom, and the morphological difference between the monitored personnel with the calibrated phantom may lead to the deviation of the counting efficiency. Therefore, a phantom library containing a wide range of heights and total body masses is needed. In this study, a Chinese reference adult male polygon surface (CRAM_S) phantom was constructed based on the CRAM voxel phantom, with the organ models adjusted to match the Chinese reference data. CRAMS phantom was then transformed to sitting posture for convenience in practical monitoring. Referring to the mass and height distribution of the Chinese adult male, a phantom library containing 84 phantoms was constructed by deforming the reference surface phantom. Phantoms in the library have 7 different heights ranging from 155 cm to 185 cm, and there are 12 phantoms with different total body masses in each height. As an example of application, organ specific and total counting efficiencies of Ba-133 were calculated using the MCNPX code, with two series of phantoms selected from the library. The influence of morphological variation on the counting efficiency was analyzed. The results show only using the reference phantom in virtual calibration may lead to an error of 68.9% for total counting efficiency. Thus the influence of morphological difference on virtual calibration can be greatly reduced using the phantom library with a wide range of masses and heights instead of a single reference phantom.

  8. A Phantom Tissue System for the Calibration of Perfusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Scott, Elaine P.; Diller, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to simulate the nondirectional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent® to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue when a thermal event (convective cooling) is applied. The blood perfusion and contact resistance are estimated by a parameter estimation code. From the experimental and analytical results, it was concluded that the probe displayed good measurement repeatability and sensitivity. The experimental perfusion measurements in the tissue were in good agreement with those of the CFD models and demonstrated the value of the phantom tissue system. PMID:19045509

  9. CREATION OF FEMALE COMPUTATIONAL PHANTOMS FOR CALIBRATION OF LUNG COUNTERS.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Pasquale Alessandro; Lebacq, Anne Laure; Vanhavere, Filip

    2016-09-01

    Plutonium isotopes are of high concern because they lead to high doses. In case of contamination, the activity burden inside the lungs should be assessed accurately. Many studies showed that the presence of breasts has a substantial influence on lung counting efficiencies. Currently, the calibration of most lung counting systems is done by means of physical phantoms representing only male chests. A set of female computational phantoms has been developed in order to provide gender-specific efficiency calibrations for the (241)Am gamma emission (59.54 keV). The phantoms were created starting from a library of female chest phantoms provided by Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire (IRSN) (Farah, J. Amélioration des mesures anthroporadiamétriques personnalisées assistées par calcul Monte Carlo: optimisation des temps de calculs et méthodologie de mesure pour l'établissement de la répartition d'activite. PhD Thesis, 2011). While the IRSN phantoms represent a supine measurement position, the SCK•CEN lung counter set-up requires the persons to be sitting in a chair. Using open-source software, the breast shapes of the original phantoms have been recreated to simulate the drooping of breasts in vertical sitting position. A Monte Carlo approach was chosen for calculating calibration coefficients for female lung counting. The results obtained with MCNPx 2.7 simulations showed a significant decrease in the detection efficiency. For bigger bust and breast sizes, the detection efficiency showed to be up to 10 times lower than the ones measured with the Livermore male torso phantom. PMID:26763902

  10. Regression Calibration with Heteroscedastic Error Variance

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, Donna; Logan, Roger; Grove, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The problem of covariate measurement error with heteroscedastic measurement error variance is considered. Standard regression calibration assumes that the measurement error has a homoscedastic measurement error variance. An estimator is proposed to correct regression coefficients for covariate measurement error with heteroscedastic variance. Point and interval estimates are derived. Validation data containing the gold standard must be available. This estimator is a closed-form correction of the uncorrected primary regression coefficients, which may be of logistic or Cox proportional hazards model form, and is closely related to the version of regression calibration developed by Rosner et al. (1990). The primary regression model can include multiple covariates measured without error. The use of these estimators is illustrated in two data sets, one taken from occupational epidemiology (the ACE study) and one taken from nutritional epidemiology (the Nurses’ Health Study). In both cases, although there was evidence of moderate heteroscedasticity, there was little difference in estimation or inference using this new procedure compared to standard regression calibration. It is shown theoretically that unless the relative risk is large or measurement error severe, standard regression calibration approximations will typically be adequate, even with moderate heteroscedasticity in the measurement error model variance. In a detailed simulation study, standard regression calibration performed either as well as or better than the new estimator. When the disease is rare and the errors normally distributed, or when measurement error is moderate, standard regression calibration remains the method of choice. PMID:22848187

  11. Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging: system calibration using hydration phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Garritano, James; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Tewari, Priyamvada; Sung, Shijun; Maccabi, Ashkan; Nowroozi, Bryan; Babakhanian, Meghedi; Sanghvi, Sajan; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) hydration sensing continues to gain traction in the medical imaging community due to its unparalleled sensitivity to tissue water content. Rapid and accurate detection of fluid shifts following induction of thermal skin burns as well as remote corneal hydration sensing have been previously demonstrated in vivo using reflective, pulsed THz imaging. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of this technology were recently confirmed in a parallel 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging study, in which burn areas are associated with increases in local mobile water content. Successful clinical translation of THz sensing, however, still requires quantitative assessments of system performance measurements, specifically hydration concentration sensitivity, with tissue substitutes. This research aims to calibrate the sensitivity of a novel, reflective THz system to tissue water content through the use of hydration phantoms for quantitative comparisons of THz hydration imagery.Gelatin phantoms were identified as an appropriate tissue-mimicking model for reflective THz applications, and gel composition, comprising mixtures of water and protein, was varied between 83% to 95% hydration, a physiologically relevant range. A comparison of four series of gelatin phantom studies demonstrated a positive linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with statistically significant hydration sensitivities (p < .01) ranging between 0.0209 - 0.038% (reflectivity: %hydration). The THz-phantom interaction is simulated with a three-layer model using the Transfer Matrix Method with agreement in hydration trends. Having demonstrated the ability to accurately and noninvasively measure water content in tissue equivalent targets with high sensitivity, reflective THz imaging is explored as a potential tool for early detection and intervention of corneal pathologies.

  12. Lambertian nature of tissue phantoms for use as calibrators in near infrared fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litorja, Maritoni; Lorenzo, Simón; Zhu, Banghe; Sevick Muraca, Eva

    2016-03-01

    The use of tissue phantoms as calibrators to transfer SI-referenced scale to an imager offers convenience, compared to other methods of calibration. The tissue phantoms are calibrated separately for radiance at emission wavelength per irradiance at excitation wavelength. This calibration is only performed at a single geometric configuration, typically with the detector normal to the sample. In the clinic however, the imager can be moved around, resulting in a geometric configuration different from the calibration configuration. In this study, radiometric measurements are made at different sample-imager angles to test whether the tissue phantoms are Lambertian and the angular limits to which the calibration values hold true.

  13. Assessment of variation in Elekta plastic spherical-calibration phantom and its impact on the Leksell Gamma Knife calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Josef Jr.; Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Johansson, Jonas; Bednarz, Greg; Ma, Lijun; Saiful Huq, M.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Traditionally, the dose-rate calibration (output) of the Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) unit is performed using a 160 mm diameter plastic spherical phantom provided by the vendor of the LGK, Elekta Instrument AB. The purpose of this study was to evaluate variations in the Elekta spherical phantom and to assess its impact and use for the LGK calibration. Methods: Altogether, 13 phantoms from six different centers were acquired, 10 of these phantoms were manufactured within the past 10 years and the last 3 approximately 15-20 years ago. To assess variation in phantoms, the diameter and mass densities were measured. To assess the impact on LGK calibration, the output of two models of LGK (LGK Perfexion and LGK 4C) were measured under identical irradiation conditions using all 13 phantoms for each LGK model. Results: The mean measured deviation in diameter from expected nominal 160 mm for 13 phantoms was 0.51 mm (range of 0.09-1.51 mm). The mean measured phantom mass density for 13 phantoms was 1.066{+-}0.019 g/cm{sup 3} (range of 1.046-1.102 g/cm{sup 3}). The percentage deviation of output for individual phantom from mean of 13 phantom outputs ranged from -0.37% to 0.55% for LGK Perfexion. Similarly, the percentage deviation of output for individual phantom from mean of 13 phantom outputs ranged from -0.72% to 0.47% for LGK 4C. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that small variations in terms of phantom size and mass density of the phantom material do not have a significant impact on dose-rate measurements of the Leksell Gamma Knife. Also, date of manufacture of the phantom did not show up to be a significant factor in this study.

  14. A methodology to develop computational phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Fonseca, T. C.; Bogaerts, R.; Hunt, John; Vanhavere, F.

    2014-11-01

    A Whole Body Counter (WBC) is a facility to routinely assess the internal contamination of exposed workers, especially in the case of radiation release accidents. The calibration of the counting device is usually done by using anthropomorphic physical phantoms representing the human body. Due to such a challenge of constructing representative physical phantoms a virtual calibration has been introduced. The use of computational phantoms and the Monte Carlo method to simulate radiation transport have been demonstrated to be a worthy alternative. In this study we introduce a methodology developed for the creation of realistic computational voxel phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration. The methodology makes use of different software packages to enable the creation and modification of computational voxel phantoms. This allows voxel phantoms to be developed on demand for the calibration of different WBC configurations. This in turn helps to study the major source of uncertainty associated with the in vivo measurement routine which is the difference between the calibration phantoms and the real persons being counted. The use of realistic computational phantoms also helps the optimization of the counting measurement. Open source codes such as MakeHuman and Blender software packages have been used for the creation and modelling of 3D humanoid characters based on polygonal mesh surfaces. Also, a home-made software was developed whose goal is to convert the binary 3D voxel grid into a MCNPX input file. This paper summarizes the development of a library of phantoms of the human body that uses two basic phantoms called MaMP and FeMP (Male and Female Mesh Phantoms) to create a set of male and female phantoms that vary both in height and in weight. Two sets of MaMP and FeMP phantoms were developed and used for efficiency calibration of two different WBC set-ups: the Doel NPP WBC laboratory and AGM laboratory of SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium.

  15. Improved accuracy of cortical bone mineralization measured by polychromatic microcomputed tomography using a novel high mineral density composite calibration phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Deuerling, Justin M.; Rudy, David J.; Niebur, Glen L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is increasingly used as a nondestructive alternative to ashing for measuring bone mineral content. Phantoms are utilized to calibrate the measured x-ray attenuation to discrete levels of mineral density, typically including levels up to 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, which encompasses levels of bone mineral density (BMD) observed in trabecular bone. However, levels of BMD observed in cortical bone and levels of tissue mineral density (TMD) in both cortical and trabecular bone typically exceed 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, requiring extrapolation of the calibration regression, which may result in error. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate (1) the relationship between x-ray attenuation and an expanded range of hydroxyapatite (HA) density in a less attenuating polymer matrix and (2) the effects of the calibration on the accuracy of subsequent measurements of mineralization in human cortical bone specimens. Methods: A novel HA-polymer composite phantom was prepared comprising a less attenuating polymer phase (polyethylene) and an expanded range of HA density (0-1860 mg HA/cm{sup 3}) inclusive of characteristic levels of BMD in cortical bone or TMD in cortical and trabecular bone. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the new HA-polymer calibration phantom were compared to measurements using a conventional HA-polymer phantom comprising 0-800 mg HA/cm{sup 3} and the corresponding ash density measurements on the same specimens. Results: The HA-polymer composite phantom exhibited a nonlinear relationship between x-ray attenuation and HA density, rather than the linear relationship typically employed a priori, and obviated the need for extrapolation, when calibrating the measured x-ray attenuation to high levels of mineral density. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the conventional phantom was significantly lower than the measured ash density by 19% (p<0.001, ANCOVA) and 33% (p<0

  16. Variation in thyroid calibration efficiencies as a function of phantom design for I-125

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Langille, E.; Sheetz, M.; Ricci, T.

    1987-01-01

    Four commercially available thyroid phantoms were evaluated to determine the effect that choice of phantom would have on the determination of I-125 activity in the thyroid. Efficiency calibration values for a 5.0-cm diameter 1-mm thick NaI (Tl) detector were determined as a function of distance from the phantom along the central axis and at angles up to 45 off axis using I-125 as the radionuclide of interest. Results indicate that substantial variations in the estimate of radioactivity in the thyroid will occur based on choice of calibration phantom. Using the Humanoid System, Inc. Realistic Phantom as the reference phantom, one could experience differences in estimated activity in the human thyroid that range from 0.86 to 2.94. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alfonso R; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-07-21

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (∼1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material.

  18. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Alfonso R.; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-07-01

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (˜1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material.

  19. Geometric error detection and calibration in laser trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zili; Lao, Dabao; Dong, Dengfeng; Zhou, Weihu

    2015-08-01

    Geometric errors in laser trackers such as light offset and transit tilt have essential influence on the system measurement errors. Thus error detection and calibration are very important for producers and customers to execute error compensation. Different methods are developed to detect and calibrate errors. However, the commonly used methods such as length measurement and two-face measurement are sensitive to several misalignments which cannot calibrate errors directly and separately. In this paper a series of methods for detecting and calibrating geometric errors such as mirror tilt, beam tilt and transit tilt were presented which can calibrate geometric errors individually and precisely. The mirror tilt could be detected with the help of two autocollimators and one polygon. Then the beam tilt and offset errors were calibrated using a CCD camera and condenser lenses. Finally the transit tilt error was calibrated using a gradient and a vertical plane. Experiments and error assessment were executed to show that the accuracy of the calibration methods can meet the user's demand.

  20. A suitability study of the fission product phantom and the bottle manikin absorption phantom for calibration of in vivo bioassay equipment for the DOELAP accreditation testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.C.; Lynch, T.P.

    1991-08-01

    Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) conducted an intercomparison study of the Fission Product phantom and the bottle manikin absorption (BOMAB) phantom for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the consistency of calibration response of the two phantoms and their suitability for certification and use under a planned bioassay laboratory accreditation program. The study was initiated to determine calibration factors for both types of phantoms and to evaluate the suitability of their use in DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) round-robin testing. The BOMAB was found to be more appropriate for the DOELAP testing program. 9 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Dose calibration optimization and error propagation in polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirasek, A.; Hilts, M.

    2014-02-01

    This study reports on the relative precision, relative error, and dose differences observed when using a new full-image calibration technique in NIPAM-based x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry. The effects of calibration parameters (e.g. gradient thresholding, dose bin size, calibration fit function, and spatial remeshing) on subsequent errors in calibrated gel images are reported. It is found that gradient thresholding, dose bin size, and fit function all play a primary role in affecting errors in calibrated images. Spatial remeshing induces minimal reductions or increases in errors in calibrated images. This study also reports on a full error propagation throughout the CT gel image pre-processing and calibration procedure thus giving, for the first time, a realistic view of the errors incurred in calibrated CT polymer gel dosimetry. While the work is based on CT polymer gel dosimetry, the formalism is valid for and easily extended to MRI or optical CT dosimetry protocols. Hence, the procedures developed within the work are generally applicable to calibration of polymer gel dosimeters.

  2. Intercomparison of whole-body counters using a multinuclide calibration phantom.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, J D; McKenzie, A L; Boddy, K

    1991-02-01

    Whole-body counters in the UK have been compared using a multinuclide anthropomorphic phantom. A standard Bush phantom was modified by inserting channels into the long axis of each section. Radionuclide sources sealed in a urea-formaldehyde polymer were then inserted into the channels to simulate distributions of radioactivity in a human. The phantom was taken to 10 whole-body counters in the UK and estimates of 134Cs, 137Cs and 40K were obtained both separately and as mixtures. Results showed close agreement between the median estimates and the known activities. The technique also allowed diagnosis of particular problems in calibration for several of the counters.

  3. Calibration of a radioactive ink-based stack phantom and its applications in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    El-Ali, H; Ljungberg, M; Strand, S-E; Palmer, J; Malmgren, L; Nilsson, J

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes a stack phantom useful for imaging complex activity distributions. It is based on images printed with radioactive ink using a commercial ink-jet printer. The application for the phantom is in the evaluation of planar and SPECT scintillation camera images and for validation of Monte Carlo simulated images. The accuracy in generating the activity distributions on paper sheets is especially important. Here we describe the calibration procedure for the ink-jet printer. The goal of the printer calibration is to find the relationship between the digital image count (voxel grey level) and its corresponding activity on the paper sheets (radioactivity). The relationship between the voxel grey level and the radioactivity on the paper sheets (measured by scanning technique and well counter) was found to be logarithmic, and a 3rd degree polynomial was found to fit the relationship. The distribution of radioactivity in the ink cartridge was investigated by pinhole SPECT. The distribution of (99m)Tc solution was found to be homogeneous in the ink solution. Experimental studies were done directly on Monte Carlo simulated heart images from the NCAT phantom. The result showed that the simulated images are similar to the images measured using the ink-jet technique. This stack phantom could be a promising solution with an advantage that the exact geometry generated in Monte Carlo could be imitated in the phantom. The phantom is a very flexible device and clearly much more versatile than conventional phantoms which have a fixed geometry and spatial limitation.

  4. Rectifying calibration error of Goldmann applanation tonometer is easy!

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Nikhil S; Moorthy, Krishna P; Tungikar, Vinod B; Kumar, Mohan; George, Ronnie; Rao, Harsha L; Senthil, Sirisha; Vijaya, Lingam; Garudadri, Chandra Sekhar

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) is the current Gold standard tonometer. However, its calibration error is common and can go unnoticed in clinics. Its company repair has limitations. The purpose of this report is to describe a self-taught technique of rectifying calibration error of GAT. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine slit-lamp-mounted Haag-Streit Goldmann tonometers (Model AT 900 C/M; Haag-Streit, Switzerland) were included in this cross-sectional interventional pilot study. The technique of rectification of calibration error of the tonometer involved cleaning and lubrication of the instrument followed by alignment of weights when lubrication alone didn't suffice. We followed the South East Asia Glaucoma Interest Group's definition of calibration error tolerance (acceptable GAT calibration error within ±2, ±3 and ±4 mm Hg at the 0, 20 and 60-mm Hg testing levels, respectively). Results: Twelve out of 29 (41.3%) GATs were out of calibration. The range of positive and negative calibration error at the clinically most important 20-mm Hg testing level was 0.5 to 20 mm Hg and -0.5 to -18 mm Hg, respectively. Cleaning and lubrication alone sufficed to rectify calibration error of 11 (91.6%) faulty instruments. Only one (8.3%) faulty GAT required alignment of the counter-weight. Conclusions: Rectification of calibration error of GAT is possible in-house. Cleaning and lubrication of GAT can be carried out even by eye care professionals and may suffice to rectify calibration error in the majority of faulty instruments. Such an exercise may drastically reduce the downtime of the Gold standard tonometer.

  5. A low-cost, easy-to-handle calibration phantom for MR thermometry in HIFU fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Julian; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Koch, Christian; Seifert, Frank; Klepsch, Tobias; Shaw, Adam

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a calibration phantom based on an electrical resistor heating rod is presented, which creates a temperature distribution similar to those in typical HIFU fields (diameter ˜2 mm, heating rate ˜10 K/s). The temperature distribution is measured first with a calibrated reference device and then with MR thermometry. Equal conditions for both measurements can be ensured by monitoring the voltage and current across the resistor during the heating. From the comparison of both measurements, the accuracy of the MR measurement can be assessed. The calibration phantom is MR compatible, and it has high reproducibility and low production costs. A wide variety of possible heating sequences can be employed and the phantom has a compact and easy setup. Thus, it can be used to quickly verify the results from newly developed MR thermometry sequences as well as to evaluate the uncertainties of existing sequences.

  6. Calibration of the Gamma Knife Perfexion using TG-21 and the solid water Leksell dosimetry phantom

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Daniel; Yount, Caroline; Koch, Nicholas; Ashenafi, Michael; Peng, Jean; Vanek, Kenneth

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To calibrate a Gamma Knife (GK) Perfexion using TG-21 with updated chamber-dependent values for modern microionization chambers in the new solid water Leksell dosimetry phantom. This work illustrates a calibration method using commercially available equipment, instruments, and an established dosimetry protocol that may be adopted at any GK center, thus reducing the interinstitutional variation in GK calibration. The calibration was verified by three third-party dosimetry checks. In addition, measurements of the relative output factors are presented and compared to available data and the new manufacturer-provided relative output factors yet to be released. Methods: An absolute dose calibration based on the TG-21 formalism, utilizing recently reported phantom material and chamber-dependent factors, was performed using a microionization chamber in a spherical solid water phantom. The result was compared to other calibration protocols based on TG-51. Independent verification of the machine output was conducted through M.D. Anderson Dosimetry Services (MDADS), using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in an anthropomorphic head phantom; the Radiological Physics Center (RPC), using TLDs in the standard Elekta ABS plastic calibration phantom (gray phantom), included with the GK; and through a collaborative international calibration survey by the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) using alanine dosimeters, also in the gray phantom. The alanine dosimeters were read by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Finally, Gafchromic EBT film was used to measure relative output factors and these factors were compared to values reported in the literature as well as new values announced for release by Elekta. The films were exposed in the solid water phantom using an included film insert accessory. Results: Compared to the TG-21 protocol in the solid water phantom, the modified and unmodified TG-51 calibrations resulted in dose rates which were 1

  7. Tissue-equivalent torso phantom for calibration of transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, A.L.; Dean, P.N.; Fisher, J.C.; Sundbeck, C.W.

    1986-01-16

    Several tissue-equivalent human-torso phantoms have been constructed for the calibration of counting systems used for in-vivo measurement of transuranic radionuclides. The phantoms contain a simulated human rib cage (in some cases, real bone) and removable model organs, and they include tissue-equivalent chest plates that can be placed over the torso to simulate people with a wide range of statures. The organs included are the lungs, liver, and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Polyurethane with varying concentrations of added calcium was used to simulate the linear photon-attenuation properties of various human tissues, including lean muscle, adipose-muscle mixtures, cartilage, and bone. Foamed polyurethane was used to simulate lung tissue. Organs have been loaded with highly pure /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, and other radionuclides of interest. The validity of the phantom as a calibration standard has been checked in separate intercomparison studies using human subjects whose lungs contained a plutonium simulant. The resulting phantom calibration factors generally compared to within +-20% of the average calibration factors obtained for the human subjects.

  8. Effect of multiple error sources on the calibration uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Badocco, Denis; Lavagnini, Irma; Mondin, Andrea; Pastore, Paolo

    2015-06-15

    The calibration uncertainty associated with the determination of metals at trace levels in a drinking water sample by ICP-MS was estimated when signals were affected by two error contributions, namely instrumental errors and operational condition errors. The calibration uncertainty was studied by using J concentration levels measured I times, as usual in experimental calibration procedures. The instrumental error was random in character whilst the operational error was assumed systematic at each concentration level but random among the J levels. The presence or the absence of the two error contributions was determined with an F-test between the ordinary least squares residual variance of the mean responses at each concentration and a pooled variance of the replicates. The theory was applied to the calibration of 30 elements present in a multi-standard solution and then to the analysis of boron, calcium, lithium, barium and manganese in a real drinking water sample. The need of using the proposed approach as calibration for almost all the analyzed elements resulted evident. The presence or the absence of the two error contributions was determined with an F-test between the ordinary least squares residual variance of the mean responses at each concentration and a pooled variance of the replicates. It was found that in the former instance the uncertainty determined using a two-components variance regression was greater than that obtainable from the one-variance regression.

  9. A Monte Carlo calibration of a whole body counter using the ICRP computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jenny; Isaksson, Mats

    2015-03-01

    A fast and versatile calibration of a whole body counter (WBC) is presented. The WBC, consisting of four large plastic scintillators, is to be used for measurements after accident or other incident involving ionising radiation. The WBC was calibrated using Monte Carlo modelling and the ICRP computational phantoms. The Monte Carlo model of the WBC was made in GATE, v6.2 (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) and MATLAB. The Monte Carlo model was verified by comparing simulated energy spectrum and simulated counting efficiency with experimental energy spectrum and experimental counting efficiency for high-energy monoenergetic gamma-emitting point sources. The simulated results were in good agreement with experimental results except when compared with experimental results from high dead-time (DT) measurements. The Monte Carlo calibration was made for a heterogeneous source distribution of (137)Cs and (40)K, respectively, inside the ICRP computational phantoms. The source distribution was based on the biokinetic model for (137)Cs.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Image Phantom Code System to Calibrate in vivo Measurement Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, DAVE

    1997-07-17

    Version 00 MRIPP provides relative calibration factors for the in vivo measurement of internally deposited photon emitting radionuclides within the human body. The code includes a database of human anthropometric structures (phantoms) that were constructed from whole body Magnetic Resonance Images. The database contains a large variety of human images with varying anatomical structure. Correction factors are obtained using Monte Carlo transport of photons through the voxel geometry of the phantom. Correction factors provided by MRIPP allow users of in vivo measurement systems (e.g., whole body counters) to calibrate these systems with simple sources and obtain subject specific calibrations. Note that the capability to format MRI data for use with this system is not included; therefore, one must use the phantom data included in this package. MRIPP provides a simple interface to perform Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport through the human body. MRIPP also provides anthropometric information (e.g., height, weight, etc.) for individuals used to generate the phantom database. A modified Voxel version of the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP4A code is used for the Monte Carlo simulation. The Voxel version Fortran patch to MCNP4 and MCNP4A (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport simulation) and the MCNP executable are included in this distribution, but the MCNP Fortran source is not included. It was distributed by RSICC as CCC-200 but is now obsoleted by the current release MCNP4B.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Image Phantom Code System to Calibrate in vivo Measurement Systems.

    1997-07-17

    Version 00 MRIPP provides relative calibration factors for the in vivo measurement of internally deposited photon emitting radionuclides within the human body. The code includes a database of human anthropometric structures (phantoms) that were constructed from whole body Magnetic Resonance Images. The database contains a large variety of human images with varying anatomical structure. Correction factors are obtained using Monte Carlo transport of photons through the voxel geometry of the phantom. Correction factors provided bymore » MRIPP allow users of in vivo measurement systems (e.g., whole body counters) to calibrate these systems with simple sources and obtain subject specific calibrations. Note that the capability to format MRI data for use with this system is not included; therefore, one must use the phantom data included in this package. MRIPP provides a simple interface to perform Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport through the human body. MRIPP also provides anthropometric information (e.g., height, weight, etc.) for individuals used to generate the phantom database. A modified Voxel version of the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP4A code is used for the Monte Carlo simulation. The Voxel version Fortran patch to MCNP4 and MCNP4A (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport simulation) and the MCNP executable are included in this distribution, but the MCNP Fortran source is not included. It was distributed by RSICC as CCC-200 but is now obsoleted by the current release MCNP4B.« less

  12. Quantifying and Reducing the Effect of Calibration Error on Variability of PET/CT Standardized Uptake Value Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Catherine M.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Alessio, Adam M.; McDougald, Wendy A.; Doot, Robert K.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the errors introduced by regular calibration of PET/CT scanners and to minimize the effect of calibration error on standardized uptake value measurements. Methods Global calibration factors from 2 PET/CT scanners were recorded for 3.5 and 1.8 y, comparing manufacturer-recommended protocols with modified protocols to evaluate error contributions due to operator-influenced procedures. Dose calibrator measurements were evaluated using National Institute of Standards and Technology–traceable sources. Results Dose calibrator variability was less than 1%, although there was a consistent bias. Global scaling variability was reduced from 6% to 4% for scanner 1 and from 11% to 4% for scanner 2 when quality assurance and quality control procedures were applied to the calibration protocol. When calibrations were done using a 68Ge/68Ga phantom, the variability for both scanners was reduced to approximately 3%. Conclusion Applying quality assurance and quality control procedures to scanner calibration reduces variability, but there is a still a residual longitudinal scanner variability of 3%–4%. The procedures proposed here reduce the impact of operator error on scanner calibration and thereby minimize longitudinal variability in standarized uptake value measurements. PMID:21233174

  13. Calibration of an eye oximeter with a dynamic eye phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabili, A.; Bardakci, D.; Helling, K.; Matyas, C.; Muro, S.; Ramella-Roman, J. C.

    2008-02-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about the eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as Diabetic Retinopathy. Recently we have realized an instrument capable of measuring oxygenation in the retina using six different wavelengths and capable of measuring blood flow using speckle-based techniques. The calibration of such instrument is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose we have realized an in vitro model of the human eye. The artificial eye is composed of four layers: the retina vessels, the choroids, the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), and the sclera. The retina vessels are modeled with 150 μm tube connected to a micro-pump delivering 34 μl/min. The micro-tube, the pump, and a blood reservoir were connected in a closed circulatory system; blood oxygenation in the vessel could be modified using an external oxygen reservoir. The optical properties of all other layers were mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer and ink as an absorber. The absorption coefficient μa and the scattering coefficient µs of these layers were independently measured using an integrating sphere. Absorption and scattering coefficient of all layers were modified before experimental measurements and a Monte Carlo program was finally used to model the experimental results.

  14. Some practical biological phantoms for calibrating multifrequency electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Holder, D S; Hanquan, Y; Rao, A

    1996-11-01

    Three groups of materials have been assessed with a Hewlett-Packard 4284A impedance analyser and Sheffield Mark 1 electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system for suitability for calibration of multifrequency EIT systems. They were required to be easy to use, stable over several hours, and have complex impedance similar to biological tissue. The groups were: (i) inorganic materials including barium titanate, polystyrene microspheres and fumed silica, all in aqueous suspension; these had phase angles below 1 degrees and so were unsuitable. (ii) Cucumber in KCl solution. Cucumber cortex had a phase angle of 40 degrees at a centre frequency of 50 kHz. Contrast between the cucumber and bathing solution could be selected by varying the KCl concentration. (iii) Polyurethane sponge immersed in packed red cells. The phase angle of packed cells was about 25 degrees at 1 MHz. Sponge resistivities and permittivities when immersed in packed cells were 5-20% higher than the bathing solution itself, for densities of 2-6.2% w/v. Both the biological materials appear suitable for the intended purpose; system (iii) is inherently more stable, and has capacitance in both bathing medium and test object. If an initial accuracy of greater than about +/- 15% is required, direct measurement with an impedance analyser is recommended prior to imaging studies.

  15. A new phantom for image quality, geometric destortion, and HU calibration in MSCT and CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Johannes M.; Blendl, Christian; Selbach, Markus; Uphoff, Clemens; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Flat panel cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is developing to the state-of-the-art technique in several medical disciplines such as dental and otorhinolaryngological imaging. Dental and otorhinolaryngological CBCT systems offer a variety of different field-of-view sizes from 6.0 to 17.0 cm. Standard phantoms are only designed for the use in multi-slices CT (MSCT) and there is no phantom which provides detail structures for all common characteristic values and Hounsfield calibration. In this study we present a new phantom specially designed for use with MSCT and CBCT systems providing detail structures for MTF, 3D MTF, NPS, SNR, geometric distortion and HU calibration. With this phantom you'll only need one acquisition for image quality investigation and assurance. Materials and methods: The phantom design is shown in figure 1. To investigate the practicability, the phantom was scanned using dedicated MSCT-scanners, 3D C-arms und digital volume tomographs. The acquired axial image stacks were analyzed using a dedicated computer program, which is provided as an ImageJ plugin. The MTF was compared to other methodologies such as a thin wire, a sphere or noise response [10, 13, 14]. The HU values were also computed using other common methods. Results: These results are similar to the results of others studies [10, 13, 14]. The method has proven to be stable and delivers comparable results to other methodologies such as using a thin wire. The NPS was calculated for all materials. Furthermore, CT numbers for all materials were computed and compared to the desired values. The measurement of geometric deformation has proven to be accurate. Conclusion: A unique feature of this phantom is to compute the geometric deformation of the 3D-volume image. This offers the chance to improve accuracy, e.g. in dental implant planning. Another convenient feature is that the phantom needs to be scanned only once with otorhinolaryngological volume tomographs to be fully displayed. It is

  16. Comparison of setup error using different reference images: a phantom and lung cancer patients study

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bo; Dai Jianrong; Zhang Ye; Zhang Ke; Men Kuo; Zhou Zongmei; Liang Jun; Wang Lvhua

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare setup errors obtained with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 2 different kinds of reference images, free-breathing 3D localization CT images (FB-CT) and the average images of 4-D localization CT images (AVG-CT) for phantom and lung cancer patients. This study also explored the correlation between the difference of translational setup errors and the gross tumor volume (GTV) motion. A respiratory phantom and 14 patients were enrolled in this study. For phantom and each patient, 3D helical CT and 4D CT images were acquired, and AVG-CT images were generated from the 4D CT. The setup errors were determined based on the image registration between the CBCT and the 2 different reference images, respectively. The data for both translational and rotational setup errors were analyzed and compared. The GTV centroid movement as well as its correlation with the translational setup error differences was also evaluated. In the phantom study, the AVG-CT method was more accurate than the FB-CT method. For patients, the translational setup errors based on FB-CT were significantly larger than those from AVG-CT in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions (p < 0.05). Translational setup errors differed by >1 mm in 32.6% and >2 mm in 12.9% of CBCT scans. The rotational setup errors from FB-CT were significantly different from those from AVG-CT in the LR and AP directions (p < 0.05). The correlation coefficient of the translational setup error differences and the GTV centroid movement in the LR, SI, and AP directions was 0.515 (p = 0.060), 0.902 (p < 0.001), and 0.510 (p = 0.062), respectively. For lung cancer patients, respiration may affect the on-line target position location. AVG-CT provides different reference information than FB-CT. The difference in SI direction caused by the 2 methods increases with the GTV movement. Therefore, AVG-CT should be the prefered choice of reference

  17. On the Error Sources in Absolute Individual Antenna Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Wim; Baire, Quentin; Bilich, Andria; Bruyninx, Carine; Legrand, Juliette

    2013-04-01

    The two main methods for antenna calibration currently in use, are anechoic chamber measurements on the one hand and outdoor robot calibration on the other hand. Both techniques differ completely in approach, setup and data processing. Consequently, the error sources for both techniques are totally different as well. Except for the (near field) multi path error, caused by the antenna positioning device, that alters results for both calibration methods. But not necessarily with the same order of magnitude. Literature states a (maximum deviation) repeatability for robot calibration of choke ring antennas of 0.5 mm on L1 and 1 mm on L2 [1]. For anechoic chamber calibration, a value of 1.5 mm on L2 for a resistive ground plane antenna can be found in [2]. Repeatability however masks systematic errors linked with the calibration technique. Hence, comparing an individual calibration obtained with a robot to a calibration of the same antenna in an anechoic chamber, may result in differences that surpass these repeatability thresholds. This was the case at least for all six choke ring antennas studied. The order of magnitude of the differences moreover corresponded well to the values given for a LEIAT504GG in [3]. For some error sources, such as the GNSS receiver measurement noise or the VNA measurement noise, estimates can be obtained from manufacturer specifications in data sheets. For other error sources, such as the finite distance between transmit and receive antenna, or the limited attenuation of reflections on wall absorber, back-of-the-envelope calculations can be made to estimate their order of magnitude. For the error due to (near field) multi path this is harder to do, if not impossible. The more because this strongly depends on the antenna type and its mount. Unfortunately it is, again, this (near field) multi path influence that might void the calibration once the antenna is installed at the station. Hence it can be concluded that at present, due to (near

  18. Generalized error-dependent prediction uncertainty in multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, Franco; Wentzell, Peter D; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2016-01-15

    Most of the current expressions used to calculate figures of merit in multivariate calibration have been derived assuming independent and identically distributed (iid) measurement errors. However, it is well known that this condition is not always valid for real data sets, where the existence of many external factors can lead to correlated and/or heteroscedastic noise structures. In this report, the influence of the deviations from the classical iid paradigm is analyzed in the context of error propagation theory. New expressions have been derived to calculate sample dependent prediction standard errors under different scenarios. These expressions allow for a quantitative study of the influence of the different sources of instrumental error affecting the system under analysis. Significant differences are observed when the prediction error is estimated in each of the studied scenarios using the most popular first-order multivariate algorithms, under both simulated and experimental conditions.

  19. A calibration phantom for direct, in vivo measurement of 241Am in the axillary lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Rachel; Lobaugh, Megan; Spitz, Henry; Glover, Samuel; Hickman, David

    2009-09-01

    A calibration phantom was developed at the University of Cincinnati (UC) to determine detection efficiency and estimate the quantity of activity deposited in the axillary lymph nodes of a worker who had unknowingly sustained a wound contaminated with 241Am at some distant time in the past. This paper describes how the Livermore Torso Phantom was modified for calibrating direct, in vivo measurements of 241Am deposited in the axillary lymph nodes. Modifications involved milling a pair of parallel, flat bottom, cylindrical holes into the left and right shoulders (below the humeral head) of the Livermore Torso Phantom in which solid, 1.40-cm-diameter cylindrical rods were inserted. Each rod was fabricated using a muscle tissue substitute. One end of each rod contained a precisely known quantity of Am sealed in a 1-cm-diameter, 2.54-cm-deep well to simulate the axillary lymph nodes when inserted into the modified Livermore Torso Phantom. The fixed locations for the axillary lymph nodes in the phantom were determined according to the position of the Level I and the combined Level II + III axillary lymph nodes reported in the literature. Discrete calibration measurements for 241Am in the simulated axillary lymph nodes located in the right and left sides of the thorax were performed using pairs of high-resolution germanium detectors at UC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The percent efficiency for measuring the 59.5 keV photon from Am deposited in the right and left axillary lymph nodes using a pair of 3,000 mm2 detectors is 2.60 +/- 0.03 counts gamma-1 and 5.45 +/- 0.07 counts gamma-1, respectively. Activity deposited in the right and left axillary lymph nodes was found to contribute 12.5% and 19.7%, respectively, to a lung measurement and 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively, to a liver measurement. Thus, radioactive material mobilized from a wound in a finger or hand and deposited in the axillary lymph nodes has been shown to confound results of a direct, in vivo

  20. Polarimeter calibration error gets far out of control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-09-01

    This is a sad story about a polarization calibration error gone amuck. A simple laboratory mistake was mistaken for a new phenomena. Aggressive management did their job and sold the flawed idea very effectively and substantial funding followed. Questions were raised and a Government lab tried but couldn't to recreate the breakthrough. The results were unpleasant and the field of infrared polarimetry developed a bad reputation for several years.

  1. Insights into multivariate calibration using errors-in-variables modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.V.

    1996-09-01

    A {ital q}-vector of responses, y, is related to a {ital p}-vector of explanatory variables, x, through a causal linear model. In analytical chemistry, y and x might represent the spectrum and associated set of constituent concentrations of a multicomponent sample which are related through Beer`s law. The model parameters are estimated during a calibration process in which both x and y are available for a number of observations (samples/specimens) which are collectively referred to as the calibration set. For new observations, the fitted calibration model is then used as the basis for predicting the unknown values of the new x`s (concentrations) form the associated new y`s (spectra) in the prediction set. This prediction procedure can be viewed as parameter estimation in an errors-in-variables (EIV) framework. In addition to providing a basis for simultaneous inference about the new x`s, consideration of the EIV framework yields a number of insights relating to the design and execution of calibration studies. A particularly interesting result is that predictions of the new x`s for individual samples can be improved by using seemingly unrelated information contained in the y`s from the other members of the prediction set. Furthermore, motivated by this EIV analysis, this result can be extended beyond the causal modeling context to a broader range of applications of multivariate calibration which involve the use of principal components regression.

  2. SU-E-T-550: Range Effects in Proton Therapy Caused by Systematic Errors in the Stoichiometric Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Doolan, P; Dias, M; Collins Fekete, C; Seco, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The procedure for proton treatment planning involves the conversion of the patient's X-ray CT from Hounsfield units into relative stopping powers (RSP), using a stoichiometric calibration curve (Schneider 1996). In clinical practice a 3.5% margin is added to account for the range uncertainty introduced by this process and other errors. RSPs for real tissues are calculated using composition data and the Bethe-Bloch formula (ICRU 1993). The purpose of this work is to investigate the impact that systematic errors in the stoichiometric calibration have on the proton range. Methods: Seven tissue inserts of the Gammex 467 phantom were imaged using our CT scanner. Their known chemical compositions (Watanabe 1999) were then used to calculate the theoretical RSPs, using the same formula as would be used for human tissues in the stoichiometric procedure. The actual RSPs of these inserts were measured using a Bragg peak shift measurement in the proton beam at our institution. Results: The theoretical calculation of the RSP was lower than the measured RSP values, by a mean/max error of - 1.5/-3.6%. For all seven inserts the theoretical approach underestimated the RSP, with errors variable across the range of Hounsfield units. Systematic errors for lung (average of two inserts), adipose and cortical bone were - 3.0/-2.1/-0.5%, respectively. Conclusion: There is a systematic underestimation caused by the theoretical calculation of RSP; a crucial step in the stoichiometric calibration procedure. As such, we propose that proton calibration curves should be based on measured RSPs. Investigations will be made to see if the same systematic errors exist for biological tissues. The impact of these differences on the range of proton beams, for phantoms and patient scenarios, will be investigated. This project was funded equally by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (UK) and Ion Beam Applications (Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium)

  3. SQUID-sensor-based ultra-low-field MRI calibration with phantom images: Towards quantitative imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabek, Juhani; Vesanen, Panu T.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Sepponen, Raimo; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2012-11-01

    In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), measured resonance signals oscillate at Larmor frequencies around 1 kHz compared to even above 100 MHz in high-field MRI. Thus, detection by induction coils in ULF MRI is not feasible, whereas superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors can measure these femtotesla-level signals. The signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by prepolarization in a field that is typically 100-1000 times higher than the field during acquisition. Based on both measurements and simulations, a procedure for calibrating a SQUID-sensor-based MRI system with MR images is presented in this article. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be integrated with ULF MRI, and may also benefit from such a calibration procedure. Conventionally, electromagnet probe signals have been used for the SQUID-sensor calibration in MEG; the presented ULF-MRI-based approach using an imaging phantom could replace this procedure in hybrid MEG-MRI or ULF MRI alone. The necessary theory is provided here with experimental verification. The calibration procedure opens the possibility of performing quantitative ULF MRI without sample-specific reference scans.

  4. SQUID-sensor-based ultra-low-field MRI calibration with phantom images: towards quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Dabek, Juhani; Vesanen, Panu T; Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Sepponen, Raimo; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2012-11-01

    In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), measured resonance signals oscillate at Larmor frequencies around 1 kHz compared to even above 100 MHz in high-field MRI. Thus, detection by induction coils in ULF MRI is not feasible, whereas superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors can measure these femtotesla-level signals. The signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by prepolarization in a field that is typically 100-1000 times higher than the field during acquisition. Based on both measurements and simulations, a procedure for calibrating a SQUID-sensor-based MRI system with MR images is presented in this article. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be integrated with ULF MRI, and may also benefit from such a calibration procedure. Conventionally, electromagnet probe signals have been used for the SQUID-sensor calibration in MEG; the presented ULF-MRI-based approach using an imaging phantom could replace this procedure in hybrid MEG-MRI or ULF MRI alone. The necessary theory is provided here with experimental verification. The calibration procedure opens the possibility of performing quantitative ULF MRI without sample-specific reference scans.

  5. A DXA Whole Body Composition Cross-Calibration Experience: Evaluation With Humans, Spine, and Whole Body Phantoms.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Diane; Libber, Jessie; Sanfilippo, Jennifer; Yu, Hui Jing; Horvath, Blaine; Miller, Colin G; Binkley, Neil

    2016-01-01

    New densitometer installation requires cross-calibration for accurate longitudinal assessment. When replacing a unit with the same model, the International Society for Clinical Densitometry recommends cross-calibrating by scanning phantoms 10 times on each instrument and states that spine bone mineral density (BMD) should be within 1%, whereas total body lean, fat, and %fat mass should be within 2% of the prior instrument. However, there is limited validation that these recommendations provide adequate total body cross-calibration. Here, we report a total body cross-calibration experience with phantoms and humans. Cross-calibration between an existing and new Lunar iDXA was performed using 3 encapsulated spine phantoms (GE [GE Lunar, Madison, WI], BioClinica [BioClinica Inc, Princeton, NJ], and Hologic [Hologic Inc, Bedford, MA]), 1 total body composition phantom (BioClinica), and 30 human volunteers. Thirty scans of each phantom and a total body scan of human volunteers were obtained on each instrument. All spine phantom BMD means were similar (within 1%; <-0.010 g/cm2 bias) between the existing and new dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry unit. The BioClinica body composition phantom (BBCP) BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) values were within 2% with biases of 0.005 g/cm2 and -3.4 g. However, lean and fat mass and %fat differed by 4.6%-7.7% with biases of +463 g, -496 g, and -2.8%, respectively. In vivo comparison supported BBCP data; BMD and BMC were within ∼2%, but lean and fat mass and %fat differed from 1.6% to 4.9% with biases of +833 g, -860 g, and -1.1%. As all body composition comparisons exceeded the recommended 2%, the new densitometer was recalibrated. After recalibration, in vivo bias was lower (<0.05%) for lean and fat; -23 and -5 g, respectively. Similarly, BBCP lean and fat agreement improved. In conclusion, the BBCP behaves similarly, but not identical, to human in vivo measurements for densitometer cross-calibration. Spine phantoms, despite good

  6. Calibration of a total body potassium monitor with an anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. D.; Allen, B. J.

    1996-11-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom was used to calibrate a supine geometry sodium iodide total body potassium monitor. Correction factors accommodating variability in subject size were empirically determined. Measurements on 12 males of weight 45 - 96 kg, height 161 - 184 cm and 18 females of weight 48 - 89 kg, height 153 - 175 cm, showed that the calibration factor was significantly correlated (r = 0.88, p < 0.0001) to subject , indicating comparable accuracy to -based calibration procedures. Fat-free mass determined from the potassium measurements of 16 subjects correlated significantly with fat-free mass estimated from skinfold thickness (r = 0.98, p < 0.0001), dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (r = 0.99, p < 0.0001) and bioimpedance analysis (r = 0.98, p < 0.0001). These data, together with the precision (coefficient of variation, CV = 1.5%) and accuracy (CV = 4.5%) of the system, indicate that this calibration procedure represents a relatively low-cost, non-invasive alternative to -based methods of calibrating total body potassium monitors.

  7. Monte Carlo calculations for efficiency calibration of a whole-body monitor using BOMAB phantoms of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Bhati, S; Patni, H K; Ghare, V P; Singh, I S; Nadar, M Y

    2012-03-01

    Internal contamination due to high-energy photon (HEP) emitters is assessed using a scanning bed whole-body monitor housed in a steel room at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). The monitor consists of a (203 mm diameter × 102 mm thickness) NaI(Tl) detector and is calibrated using a Reference BOMAB phantom representative of an average Indian radiation worker. However, a series of different size physical phantoms are required to account for size variability in workers, which is both expensive and time consuming. Therefore, a theoretical approach based on Monte Carlo techniques has been employed to calibrate the system in scanning geometry with BOMAB phantoms of different sizes characterised by their weight (W) and height (H) for several radionuclides of interest ((131)I, (137)Cs, (60)Co and (40)K). A computer program developed for this purpose generates the detector response and the detection efficiencies (DEs) for the BARC Reference phantom (63 kg/168 cm), ICRP Reference male phantom (70 kg/170 cm) and several of its scaled versions. The results obtained for different size phantoms indicated a decreasing trend of DEs with the increase in W/H values of the phantoms. The computed DEs for uniform distribution of (137)Cs in BOMAB phantom varied from 3.52 × 10(-3) to 2.88 × 10(-3) counts per photon as the W/H values increased from 0.26 to 0.50. The theoretical results obtained for the BARC Reference phantom have been verified with experimental measurements. The Monte Carlo results from this study will be useful for in vivo assessment of HEP emitters in radiation workers of different physiques.

  8. Ionosphere Delay Calibration and Calibration Errors for Satellite Navigation of Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Ian; Manucci, Anthony; Iijima, Byron; Lindqwister, Ulf; Muna, Demitri; Pi, Xiaoqing; Wilson, Brian

    2000-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is implementing a satellite-based navigation system for aircraft using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Positioning accuracy of a few meters will be achieved by broadcasting corrections to the direct GPS signal. These corrections are derived using the wide-area augmentation system (WAAS), which includes a ground network of at least 24 GPS receivers across the Continental US (CONUS). WAAS will provide real-time total electron content (TEC) measurements that can be mapped to fixed grid points using a real-time mapping algorithm. These TECs will be converted into vertical delay corrections for the GPS L1 frequency and broadcast to users every five minutes via geosynchronous satellite. Users will convert these delays to slant calibrations along their own lines-of-sight (LOS) to GPS satellites. Uncertainties in the delay calibrations will also be broadcast, allowing users to estimate the uncertainty of their position. To maintain user safety without reverting to excessive safety margins an empirical model of user calibration errors has been developed. WAAS performance depends on factors that include geographic location (errors increase near WAAS borders), and ionospheric conditions, such as the enhanced spatial electron density gradients found during ionospheric storms.

  9. Whole body counter calibration using Monte Carlo modeling with an array of phantom sizes based on national anthropometric reference data.

    PubMed

    Shypailo, R J; Ellis, K J

    2011-05-21

    During construction of the whole body counter (WBC) at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), efficiency calibration was needed to translate acquired counts of (40)K to actual grams of potassium for measurement of total body potassium (TBK) in a diverse subject population. The MCNP Monte Carlo n-particle simulation program was used to describe the WBC (54 detectors plus shielding), test individual detector counting response, and create a series of virtual anthropomorphic phantoms based on national reference anthropometric data. Each phantom included an outer layer of adipose tissue and an inner core of lean tissue. Phantoms were designed for both genders representing ages 3.5 to 18.5 years with body sizes from the 5th to the 95th percentile based on body weight. In addition, a spherical surface source surrounding the WBC was modeled in order to measure the effects of subject mass on room background interference. Individual detector measurements showed good agreement with the MCNP model. The background source model came close to agreement with empirical measurements, but showed a trend deviating from unity with increasing subject size. Results from the MCNP simulation of the CNRC WBC agreed well with empirical measurements using BOMAB phantoms. Individual detector efficiency corrections were used to improve the accuracy of the model. Nonlinear multiple regression efficiency calibration equations were derived for each gender. Room background correction is critical in improving the accuracy of the WBC calibration.

  10. Whole body counter calibration using Monte Carlo modeling with an array of phantom sizes based on national anthropometric reference data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shypailo, R. J.; Ellis, K. J.

    2011-05-01

    During construction of the whole body counter (WBC) at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), efficiency calibration was needed to translate acquired counts of 40K to actual grams of potassium for measurement of total body potassium (TBK) in a diverse subject population. The MCNP Monte Carlo n-particle simulation program was used to describe the WBC (54 detectors plus shielding), test individual detector counting response, and create a series of virtual anthropomorphic phantoms based on national reference anthropometric data. Each phantom included an outer layer of adipose tissue and an inner core of lean tissue. Phantoms were designed for both genders representing ages 3.5 to 18.5 years with body sizes from the 5th to the 95th percentile based on body weight. In addition, a spherical surface source surrounding the WBC was modeled in order to measure the effects of subject mass on room background interference. Individual detector measurements showed good agreement with the MCNP model. The background source model came close to agreement with empirical measurements, but showed a trend deviating from unity with increasing subject size. Results from the MCNP simulation of the CNRC WBC agreed well with empirical measurements using BOMAB phantoms. Individual detector efficiency corrections were used to improve the accuracy of the model. Nonlinear multiple regression efficiency calibration equations were derived for each gender. Room background correction is critical in improving the accuracy of the WBC calibration.

  11. Whole body counter calibration using Monte Carlo modeling with an array of phantom sizes based on national anthropometric reference data.

    PubMed

    Shypailo, R J; Ellis, K J

    2011-05-21

    During construction of the whole body counter (WBC) at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), efficiency calibration was needed to translate acquired counts of (40)K to actual grams of potassium for measurement of total body potassium (TBK) in a diverse subject population. The MCNP Monte Carlo n-particle simulation program was used to describe the WBC (54 detectors plus shielding), test individual detector counting response, and create a series of virtual anthropomorphic phantoms based on national reference anthropometric data. Each phantom included an outer layer of adipose tissue and an inner core of lean tissue. Phantoms were designed for both genders representing ages 3.5 to 18.5 years with body sizes from the 5th to the 95th percentile based on body weight. In addition, a spherical surface source surrounding the WBC was modeled in order to measure the effects of subject mass on room background interference. Individual detector measurements showed good agreement with the MCNP model. The background source model came close to agreement with empirical measurements, but showed a trend deviating from unity with increasing subject size. Results from the MCNP simulation of the CNRC WBC agreed well with empirical measurements using BOMAB phantoms. Individual detector efficiency corrections were used to improve the accuracy of the model. Nonlinear multiple regression efficiency calibration equations were derived for each gender. Room background correction is critical in improving the accuracy of the WBC calibration. PMID:21490381

  12. Refractive errors and corrections for OCT images in an inflated lung phantom

    PubMed Central

    Golabchi, Ali; Faust, J.; Golabchi, F. N.; Brooks, D. H.; Gouldstone, A.; DiMarzio, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Visualization and correct assessment of alveolar volume via intact lung imaging is important to study and assess respiratory mechanics. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), a real-time imaging technique based on near-infrared interferometry, can image several layers of distal alveoli in intact, ex vivo lung tissue. However optical effects associated with heterogeneity of lung tissue, including the refraction caused by air-tissue interfaces along alveoli and duct walls, and changes in speed of light as it travels through the tissue, result in inaccurate measurement of alveolar volume. Experimentally such errors have been difficult to analyze because of lack of ’ground truth,’ as the lung has a unique microstructure of liquid-coated thin walls surrounding relatively large airspaces, which is difficult to model with cellular foams. In addition, both lung and foams contain airspaces of highly irregular shape, further complicating quantitative measurement of optical artifacts and correction. To address this we have adapted the Bragg-Nye bubble raft, a crystalline two-dimensional arrangement of elements similar in geometry to alveoli (up to several hundred μm in diameter with thin walls) as an inflated lung phantom in order to understand, analyze and correct these errors. By applying exact optical ray tracing on OCT images of the bubble raft, the errors are predicted and corrected. The results are validated by imaging the bubble raft with OCT from one edge and with a charged coupled device (CCD) camera in transillumination from top, providing ground truth for the OCT. PMID:22567599

  13. Low Frequency Error Analysis and Calibration for High-Resolution Optical Satellite's Uncontrolled Geometric Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mi; Fang, Chengcheng; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-06-01

    The low frequency error is a key factor which has affected uncontrolled geometry processing accuracy of the high-resolution optical image. To guarantee the geometric quality of imagery, this paper presents an on-orbit calibration method for the low frequency error based on geometric calibration field. Firstly, we introduce the overall flow of low frequency error on-orbit analysis and calibration, which includes optical axis angle variation detection of star sensor, relative calibration among star sensors, multi-star sensor information fusion, low frequency error model construction and verification. Secondly, we use optical axis angle change detection method to analyze the law of low frequency error variation. Thirdly, we respectively use the method of relative calibration and information fusion among star sensors to realize the datum unity and high precision attitude output. Finally, we realize the low frequency error model construction and optimal estimation of model parameters based on DEM/DOM of geometric calibration field. To evaluate the performance of the proposed calibration method, a certain type satellite's real data is used. Test results demonstrate that the calibration model in this paper can well describe the law of the low frequency error variation. The uncontrolled geometric positioning accuracy of the high-resolution optical image in the WGS-84 Coordinate Systems is obviously improved after the step-wise calibration.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of an anthropometric phantom used for calibrating in vivo K-XRF spectroscopy measurements of stable lead in bone.

    PubMed

    Lodwick, Camille J; Spitz, Henry B

    2008-12-01

    An anthropometric surrogate (phantom) of the human leg was defined in the constructs of the Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code to predict the response when used in calibrating K x-ray fluorescence (K-XRF) spectrometry measurements of stable lead in bone. The predicted response compared favorably with measurements using the anthropometric phantom containing a tibia with increasing stable lead content. These benchmark measurements confirmed the validity of a modified MCNP code to accurately simulate K-XRF spectrometry measurements of stable lead in bone. A second, cylindrical leg phantom was simulated to determine whether the shape of the calibration phantom is a significant factor in evaluating K-XRF performance. Simulations of the cylindrical and anthropometric calibration phantoms suggest that a cylindrical calibration standard overestimates lead content of a human leg up to 4%. A two-way analysis of variance determined that phantom shape is a statistically significant factor in predicting the K-XRF response. These results suggest that an anthropometric phantom provides a more accurate calibration standard compared to the conventional cylindrical shape, and that a cylindrical shape introduces a 4% positive bias in measured lead values.

  15. Inertial Sensor Error Reduction through Calibration and Sensor Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Stefan; Nogueira, Samuel L; Bortole, Magdo; Siqueira, Adriano A G; Terra, Marco H; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, José L

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the comparison between cooperative and local Kalman Filters (KF) for estimating the absolute segment angle, under two calibration conditions. A simplified calibration, that can be replicated in most laboratories; and a complex calibration, similar to that applied by commercial vendors. The cooperative filters use information from either all inertial sensors attached to the body, Matricial KF; or use information from the inertial sensors and the potentiometers of an exoskeleton, Markovian KF. A one minute walking trial of a subject walking with a 6-DoF exoskeleton was used to assess the absolute segment angle of the trunk, thigh, shank, and foot. The results indicate that regardless of the segment and filter applied, the more complex calibration always results in a significantly better performance compared to the simplified calibration. The interaction between filter and calibration suggests that when the quality of the calibration is unknown the Markovian KF is recommended. Applying the complex calibration, the Matricial and Markovian KF perform similarly, with average RMSE below 1.22 degrees. Cooperative KFs perform better or at least equally good as Local KF, we therefore recommend to use cooperative KFs instead of local KFs for control or analysis of walking. PMID:26901198

  16. Inertial Sensor Error Reduction through Calibration and Sensor Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lambrecht, Stefan; Nogueira, Samuel L.; Bortole, Magdo; Siqueira, Adriano A. G.; Terra, Marco H.; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, José L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the comparison between cooperative and local Kalman Filters (KF) for estimating the absolute segment angle, under two calibration conditions. A simplified calibration, that can be replicated in most laboratories; and a complex calibration, similar to that applied by commercial vendors. The cooperative filters use information from either all inertial sensors attached to the body, Matricial KF; or use information from the inertial sensors and the potentiometers of an exoskeleton, Markovian KF. A one minute walking trial of a subject walking with a 6-DoF exoskeleton was used to assess the absolute segment angle of the trunk, thigh, shank, and foot. The results indicate that regardless of the segment and filter applied, the more complex calibration always results in a significantly better performance compared to the simplified calibration. The interaction between filter and calibration suggests that when the quality of the calibration is unknown the Markovian KF is recommended. Applying the complex calibration, the Matricial and Markovian KF perform similarly, with average RMSE below 1.22 degrees. Cooperative KFs perform better or at least equally good as Local KF, we therefore recommend to use cooperative KFs instead of local KFs for control or analysis of walking. PMID:26901198

  17. Estimating breast thickness for dual-energy subtraction in contrast-enhanced digital mammography using calibration phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kristen C.; Kwon, Young Joon; Aziz, Moez Karim; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (DE CE-DM) uses an iodinated contrast agent to image the perfusion and vasculature of the breast. DE images are obtained by a weighted logarithmic subtraction of the high-energy (HE) and low-energy (LE) image pairs. We hypothesized that the optimal DE subtraction weighting factor is thickness-dependent, and developed a method for determining breast tissue composition and thickness in DE CE-DM. Phantoms were constructed using uniform blocks of 100% glandular-equivalent and 100% adipose-equivalent material. The thickness of the phantoms ranged from 3 to 8 cm, in 1 cm increments. For a given thickness, the glandular-adipose composition of the phantom was varied using different combinations of blocks. The logarithmic LE and logarithmic HE signal intensities were measured; they decrease linearly with increasing glandularity for a given thickness. The signals decrease with increasing phantom thickness and the x-ray signal decreases linearly with thickness for a given glandularity. As the thickness increases, the attenuation difference per additional glandular block decreases, indicating beam hardening. From the calibration mapping, we have demonstrated that we can predict percent glandular tissue and thickness when given two distinct signal intensities. Our results facilitate the subtraction of tissue at the boundaries of the breast, and aid in discriminating between contrast agent uptake in glandular tissue and subtraction artifacts.

  18. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  19. Capitalization on Item Calibration Error in Adaptive Testing. Research Report 98-07.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

    In adaptive testing, item selection is sequentially optimized during the test. Since the optimization takes place over a pool of items calibrated with estimation error, capitalization on these errors is likely to occur. How serious the consequences of this phenomenon are depends not only on the distribution of the estimation errors in the pool or…

  20. A new anthropometric phantom for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead in the human leg using X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, H.; Jenkins, M.; Lodwick, J.; Bornschein, R.

    2000-02-01

    A new anthropometric phantom has been developed for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead deposited in bone using x-ray fluorescence. The phantom reproduces the shape of the mid shaft of the adult human leg and is fabricated using polyurethanes and calcium carbonate to produce materials that exhibit the same density, energy transmission, and calcium content as cortical bone, bone marrow, and muscle. The phantom includes a removable tibia fabricated using simulants for cortical bone and bone marrow to which a precise amount of stable lead has been added to cortical bone. The formulations used in fabricating the new anthropometric phantom are much more uniform in density and composition than the conventional phantom made from Plexiglas cylinders filled with plaster-of-Paris. The energy spectrum from an x-ray fluorescence measurement of the phantom using a {sup 109}Cd source is indistinguishable from an in vivo x-ray fluorescence measurement of the human leg, demonstrating that the materials used in the phantom exhibit the same radiological properties as human tissue. Likewise, results from x-ray fluorescence measurements of the phantom exhibit the same positional dependency as the human leg and vary by approximately 36% when, for example, the phantom containing 54 ppm of stable lead in the tibia was rotated by only 15 degrees. The detection limit for a 30 min {sup 109}Cd K shell x-ray fluorescence in vivo measurement is approximately 20 ppm determined from a background measurement using the new phantom containing no added lead in the muscle, bone, or bone marrow. The new anthropometric phantom significantly improves in vivo x-ray fluorescence calibration measurements by (1) faithfully reproducing the anatomy of the human leg, (2) having components that exhibit radiological properties similar to that of human tissue, and (3) providing a realistic calibration standard that can be used for in vivo x-ray fluorescence intercomparison measurements.

  1. SU-E-I-22: Dependence On Calibration Phantom and Field Area of the Conversion Factor Used to Calculate Skin Dose During Neuro-Interventional Fluoroscopic Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, V K; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S R; Bednarek, D R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the appropriate calibration factor to use when calculating skin dose with our real-time dose-tracking system (DTS) during neuro-interventional fluoroscopic procedures by evaluating the difference in backscatter from different phantoms and as a function of entrance-skin field area. Methods: We developed a dose-tracking system to calculate and graphically display the cumulative skin-dose distribution in real time. To calibrate the DTS for neuro-interventional procedures, a phantom is needed that closely approximates the scattering properties of the head. We compared the x-ray backscatter from eight phantoms: 20-cm-thick solid water, 16-cm diameter water-filled container, 16-cm CTDI phantom, modified-ANSI head phantom, 20-cm-thick PMMA, Kyoto-Kagaku PBU- 50 head, Phantom-Labs SK-150 head, and RSD RS-240T head. The phantoms were placed on the patient table with the entrance surface at 15 cm tube-side from the isocenter of a Toshiba Infinix C-arm, and the entrance-skin exposure was measured with a calibrated 6-cc PTW ionization chamber. The measurement included primary radiation, backscatter from the phantom and forward scatter from the table and pad. The variation in entrance-skin exposure was also measured as a function of the skin-entrance area for a 30x30 cm by 20-cm-thick PMMA phantom and the SK-150 head phantom using four different added beam filters. Results: The entranceskin exposure values measured for eight different phantoms differed by up to 12%, while the ratio of entrance exposure of all phantoms relative to solid water showed less than 3% variation with kVp. The change in entrance-skin exposure with entrance-skin area was found to differ for the SK-150 head compared to the 20-cm PMMA phantom and the variation with field area was dependent on the added beam filtration. Conclusion: To accurately calculate skin dose for neuro-interventional procedures with the DTS, the phantom for calibration should be carefully chosen since different

  2. Calibrations of phase and ratio errors of current and voltage channels of energy meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlejnek, P.; Kaspar, P.

    2013-06-01

    This paper deals with measurement of phase and ratio errors of current and voltage channels of a new produced energy meter. This fully digitally controlled energy meter combines the classical static energy meter with power quality analyzer. The calibration of phase and ratio errors in wide frequency range is then necessary. Paper shows the results of error measurement, introduces the mathematical approximations and describes the calibration constants. It allows error compensation and power calculation of particular harmonics. The electric power of the higher harmonics can be interesting information of distributed electric energy quality.

  3. Force calibration using errors-in-variables regression and Monte Carlo uncertainty evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, Thomas; Stoudt, Sara; Possolo, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    An errors-in-variables regression method is presented as an alternative to the ordinary least-squares regression computation currently employed for determining the calibration function for force measuring instruments from data acquired during calibration. A Monte Carlo uncertainty evaluation for the errors-in-variables regression is also presented. The corresponding function (which we call measurement function, often called analysis function in gas metrology) necessary for the subsequent use of the calibrated device to measure force, and the associated uncertainty evaluation, are also derived from the calibration results. Comparisons are made, using real force calibration data, between the results from the errors-in-variables and ordinary least-squares analyses, as well as between the Monte Carlo uncertainty assessment and the conventional uncertainty propagation employed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The results show that the errors-in-variables analysis properly accounts for the uncertainty in the applied calibrated forces, and that the Monte Carlo method, owing to its intrinsic ability to model uncertainty contributions accurately, yields a better representation of the calibration uncertainty throughout the transducer’s force range than the methods currently in use. These improvements notwithstanding, the differences between the results produced by the current and by the proposed new methods generally are small because the relative uncertainties of the inputs are small and most contemporary load cells respond approximately linearly to such inputs. For this reason, there will be no compelling need to revise any of the force calibration reports previously issued by NIST.

  4. Optical System Error Analysis and Calibration Method of High-Accuracy Star Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; You, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The star tracker is a high-accuracy attitude measurement device widely used in spacecraft. Its performance depends largely on the precision of the optical system parameters. Therefore, the analysis of the optical system parameter errors and a precise calibration model are crucial to the accuracy of the star tracker. Research in this field is relatively lacking a systematic and universal analysis up to now. This paper proposes in detail an approach for the synthetic error analysis of the star tracker, without the complicated theoretical derivation. This approach can determine the error propagation relationship of the star tracker, and can build intuitively and systematically an error model. The analysis results can be used as a foundation and a guide for the optical design, calibration, and compensation of the star tracker. A calibration experiment is designed and conducted. Excellent calibration results are achieved based on the calibration model. To summarize, the error analysis approach and the calibration method are proved to be adequate and precise, and could provide an important guarantee for the design, manufacture, and measurement of high-accuracy star trackers. PMID:23567527

  5. Scalable in situ qubit calibration during repetitive error detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Megrant, A.; Jeffrey, E.; White, T. C.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J. Y.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Lucero, E.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a method to optimize qubit control parameters during error detection which is compatible with large-scale qubit arrays. We demonstrate our method to optimize single or two-qubit gates in parallel on a nine-qubit system. Additionally, we show how parameter drift can be compensated for during computation by inserting a frequency drift and using our method to remove it. We remove both drift on a single qubit and independent drifts on all qubits simultaneously. We believe this method will be useful in keeping error rates low on all physical qubits throughout the course of a computation. Our method is O (1 ) scalable to systems of arbitrary size, providing a path towards controlling the large numbers of qubits needed for a fault-tolerant quantum computer.

  6. Neural network calibration of a snapshot birefringent Fourier transform spectrometer with periodic phase errors.

    PubMed

    Luo, David; Kudenov, Michael W

    2016-05-16

    Systematic phase errors in Fourier transform spectroscopy can severely degrade the calculated spectra. Compensation of these errors is typically accomplished using post-processing techniques, such as Fourier deconvolution, linear unmixing, or iterative solvers. This results in increased computational complexity when reconstructing and calibrating many parallel interference patterns. In this paper, we describe a new method of calibrating a Fourier transform spectrometer based on the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs). In this way, it is demonstrated that a simpler and more straightforward reconstruction process can be achieved at the cost of additional calibration equipment. To this end, we provide a theoretical model for general systematic phase errors in a polarization birefringent interferometer. This is followed by a discussion of our experimental setup and a demonstration of our technique, as applied to data with and without phase error. The technique's utility is then supported by comparison to alternative reconstruction techniques using fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and linear unmixing.

  7. Neural network calibration of a snapshot birefringent Fourier transform spectrometer with periodic phase errors.

    PubMed

    Luo, David; Kudenov, Michael W

    2016-05-16

    Systematic phase errors in Fourier transform spectroscopy can severely degrade the calculated spectra. Compensation of these errors is typically accomplished using post-processing techniques, such as Fourier deconvolution, linear unmixing, or iterative solvers. This results in increased computational complexity when reconstructing and calibrating many parallel interference patterns. In this paper, we describe a new method of calibrating a Fourier transform spectrometer based on the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs). In this way, it is demonstrated that a simpler and more straightforward reconstruction process can be achieved at the cost of additional calibration equipment. To this end, we provide a theoretical model for general systematic phase errors in a polarization birefringent interferometer. This is followed by a discussion of our experimental setup and a demonstration of our technique, as applied to data with and without phase error. The technique's utility is then supported by comparison to alternative reconstruction techniques using fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and linear unmixing. PMID:27409947

  8. Oximetry system performance assessment with POM (acetal) phantoms incorporating hemoglobin calibration standards and customized saturation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyounguk; Singh, Karam; Wang, Hsing-Wen; Pfefer, T. J.; Chen, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Standardized approaches for performance assessment of biophotonic devices have the potential to facilitate system development and intercomparison, clinical trial standardization, recalibration, manufacturing quality control and quality assurance during clinical use. Evaluation of devices based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for detection of hemoglobin (Hb) content and oxygenation have often involved tissue-simulating phantoms incorporating artificial dyes or flow systems. Towards the development of simple, effective techniques for objective, quantitative evaluation of basic NIRS system performance, we have developed and evaluated two test methods. These methods are based on cuvette inserts in solid turbid phantoms for measuring commercially-available Hb oximetry standards and custom-formulated oxy/deoxy-Hb solutions. Both approaches incorporate solid acetal, or polyoxymethylene (POM), as a tissue-simulating matrix material. First, inverse-adding-doubling (IAD) based on measurements with a spectrophotometer and an integrating sphere was used to measure POM optical properties and their stability over time. Second, two fiberopticprobe- based NIRS systems were used to measure concentration change of oxy- and deoxy-Hb in standard Hb solutions and customized Hb solutions by adding yeast. Differences in system performance were likely due to differences in light source outputs and fiberoptic probe design. Our preliminary results indicate that simple phantom-based approaches based on commercially available polymers and inclusions containing Hb standards, or controlled oxygenation levels may be useful for benchtop assessment of NIRS device quality for a variety of biophotonic devices.

  9. Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System Modeling, Calibration, and Error Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; VanNorman, John; Siemers, Paul M.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Munk, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI)/Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) project installed seven pressure ports through the MSL Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield to measure heatshield surface pressures during entry. These measured surface pressures are used to generate estimates of atmospheric quantities based on modeled surface pressure distributions. In particular, the quantities to be estimated from the MEADS pressure measurements include the dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. This report describes the calibration of the pressure transducers utilized to reconstruct the atmospheric data and associated uncertainty models, pressure modeling and uncertainty analysis, and system performance results. The results indicate that the MEADS pressure measurement system hardware meets the project requirements.

  10. Modeling and calibration of pointing errors with alt-az telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Long; Ma, Wenli; Huang, Jinlong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new model for improving the pointing accuracy of a telescope. The Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) convention was used to perform an error analysis of the telescope's kinematics. A kinematic model was used to relate pointing errors to mechanical errors and the parameters of the kinematic model were estimated with a statistical model fit using data from two large astronomical telescopes. The model illustrates the geometric errors caused by imprecision in manufacturing and assembly processes and their effects on the pointing accuracy of the telescope. A kinematic model relates pointing error to axis position when certain geometric errors are assumed to be present in a telescope. In the parameter estimation portion, the semi-parametric regression model was introduced to compensate for remaining nonlinear errors. The experimental results indicate that the proposed semi-parametric regression model eliminates both geometric and nonlinear errors, and that the telescope's pointing accuracy significantly improves after this calibration.

  11. A novel separation and calibration method for DVL and compass error in dead reckoning navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanshun; Guo, Yajing; Yang, Tao; Li, Chunyu; Wang, Zhanqing

    2016-06-01

    The scale factor error δ C of the Doppler velocity log (DVL) and the heading angle error δ \\psi of a compass are so integrated in dead reckoning (DR) navigation systems that it is difficult to separate them. This paper aims to solve this problem by putting forward an online separation and calibration method for δ C and δ \\psi based on an ‘arc and linear’ trajectory. This method introduces the high-accuracy location information of a long base line (LBL) acoustic positioning system. At first, the relationship between the displacements on the ‘arc’ trajectory in directions of east and north, output by the LBL and DR systems, serves to judge the carrier direction and calibrate δ C . And then by compensating δ C , the displacement on the ‘linear’ trajectory is used to calibrate δ \\psi . Finally, a semi-physical simulation experiment is conducted to test and verify this calibration method to see how effective and accurate it is. Experimental results show that after calibration the residual error ratios of δ C and δ \\psi are 8.24% and 3.70% respectively. Therefore, online calibration of δ C and δ \\psi is realized effectively. What’s more, when the DR system is working alone in 400 s, this method reduces position error by up to 93.39%, from 18.91 m to 1.25 m.

  12. Estimation of the extrapolation error in the calibration of type S thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, P.; Garrity, K. M.; Rebagliati, M. Jiménez; García Skabar, J.

    2013-09-01

    Measurement results from the calibration performed at NIST of ten new type S thermocouples have been analyzed to estimate the extrapolation error. Thermocouples have been calibrated at the fixed points of Zn, Al, Ag and Au and calibration curves were calculated using different numbers of FPs. It was found for these thermocouples that the absolute value of the extrapolation error, evaluated by measurement at the Au freezing-point temperature, is at most 0.10 °C and 0.27 °C when the fixed-points of Zn, Al and Ag, or the fixed-points of Zn and Al, are respectively used to calculate the calibration curve. It is also shown that absolute value of the extrapolation error, evaluated by measurement at the Ag freezing-point temperature is at most 0.25 °C when the fixed-points of Zn and Al, are used to calculate the calibration curve. This study is oriented to help those labs that lack a direct mechanism to achieve a high temperature calibration. It supports, up to 1064 °C, the application of a similar procedure to that used by Burns and Scroger in NIST SP-250-35 for calibrating a new type S thermocouple. The uncertainty amounts a few tenths of a degree Celsius.

  13. Calibration of misalignment errors in composite waveplates using Mueller matrix ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Gu, Honggang; Liu, Shiyuan; Chen, Xiuguo; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-02-01

    Composite waveplates consisting of two or more single waveplates are widely used in optical instruments, such as ellipsometry, polarimetry, cryptography, and photoelasticity. Accurate calibration of the misalignment errors in composite waveplates is of great importance (to minimize or correct the spurious artifacts in the final collected spectral data of these instruments induced by the misalignment errors). In this paper, we choose the fast axis azimuth and the rotary angle of composite waveplates as the detected characteristic parameters to calibrate the misalignment errors in composite waveplates. We first derive a general analytical model to describe the relationship between the mislignment errors and the characteristic parameters, and then propose an inverse approach to the calibration of the misalignment errors in composite waveplates. An experimental device based on the dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometry principle is set up to measure the characteristic parameters of composite waveplates. Both numerical simulations and experiments on an MgF(2)-MgF(2)-quartz triplate demonstrate the correctness and efficiency of the proposed approach. It is expected that the proposed approach can be readily extended to calibrate the misalignment errors in more complex composite waveplates. PMID:25967775

  14. Assessment of measurement errors and dynamic calibration methods for three different tipping bucket rain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedekar, Vinayak S.; King, Kevin W.; Fausey, Norman R.; Soboyejo, Alfred B. O.; Harmel, R. Daren; Brown, Larry C.

    2016-09-01

    Three different models of tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs), viz. HS-TB3 (Hydrological Services Pty Ltd.), ISCO-674 (Isco, Inc.) and TR-525 (Texas Electronics, Inc.), were calibrated in the lab to quantify measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities (5 mm·h- 1 to 250 mm·h- 1) and three different volumetric settings. Instantaneous and cumulative values of simulated rainfall were recorded at 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20-min intervals. All three TBR models showed a substantial deviation (α = 0.05) in measurements from actual rainfall depths, with increasing underestimation errors at greater rainfall intensities. Simple linear regression equations were developed for each TBR to correct the TBR readings based on measured intensities (R2 > 0.98). Additionally, two dynamic calibration techniques, viz. quadratic model (R2 > 0.7) and T vs. 1/Q model (R2 = > 0.98), were tested and found to be useful in situations when the volumetric settings of TBRs are unknown. The correction models were successfully applied to correct field-collected rainfall data from respective TBR models. The calibration parameters of correction models were found to be highly sensitive to changes in volumetric calibration of TBRs. Overall, the HS-TB3 model (with a better protected tipping bucket mechanism, and consistent measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) was found to be the most reliable and consistent for rainfall measurements, followed by the ISCO-674 (with susceptibility to clogging and relatively smaller measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) and the TR-525 (with high susceptibility to clogging and frequent changes in volumetric calibration, and highly intensity-dependent measurement errors). The study demonstrated that corrections based on dynamic and volumetric calibration can only help minimize-but not completely eliminate the measurement errors. The findings from this study will be useful for correcting field data from TBRs; and may have major

  15. [Measurement Error Analysis and Calibration Technique of NTC - Based Body Temperature Sensor].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chi; Hu, Wei; Diao, Shengxi; Lin, Fujiang; Qian, Dahong

    2015-11-01

    A NTC thermistor-based wearable body temperature sensor was designed. This paper described the design principles and realization method of the NTC-based body temperature sensor. In this paper the temperature measurement error sources of the body temperature sensor were analyzed in detail. The automatic measurement and calibration method of ADC error was given. The results showed that the measurement accuracy of calibrated body temperature sensor is better than ± 0.04 degrees C. The temperature sensor has high accuracy, small size and low power consumption advantages.

  16. Continuous glucose monitoring in newborn infants: how do errors in calibration measurements affect detected hypoglycemia?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Felicity; Signal, Mathew; Harris, Deborah L; Weston, Philip J; Harding, Jane E; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemia is common and can cause serious brain injury. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) could improve hypoglycemia detection, while reducing blood glucose (BG) measurements. Calibration algorithms use BG measurements to convert sensor signals into CGM data. Thus, inaccuracies in calibration BG measurements directly affect CGM values and any metrics calculated from them. The aim was to quantify the effect of timing delays and calibration BG measurement errors on hypoglycemia metrics in newborn infants. Data from 155 babies were used. Two timing and 3 BG meter error models (Abbott Optium Xceed, Roche Accu-Chek Inform II, Nova Statstrip) were created using empirical data. Monte-Carlo methods were employed, and each simulation was run 1000 times. Each set of patient data in each simulation had randomly selected timing and/or measurement error added to BG measurements before CGM data were calibrated. The number of hypoglycemic events, duration of hypoglycemia, and hypoglycemic index were then calculated using the CGM data and compared to baseline values. Timing error alone had little effect on hypoglycemia metrics, but measurement error caused substantial variation. Abbott results underreported the number of hypoglycemic events by up to 8 and Roche overreported by up to 4 where the original number reported was 2. Nova results were closest to baseline. Similar trends were observed in the other hypoglycemia metrics. Errors in blood glucose concentration measurements used for calibration of CGM devices can have a clinically important impact on detection of hypoglycemia. If CGM devices are going to be used for assessing hypoglycemia it is important to understand of the impact of these errors on CGM data.

  17. SU-E-T-377: Inaccurate Positioning Might Introduce Significant MapCheck Calibration Error in Flatten Filter Free Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S; Chao, C; Chang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the calibration error of detector sensitivity for MapCheck due to inaccurate positioning of the device, which is not taken into account by the current commercial iterative calibration algorithm. We hypothesize the calibration is more vulnerable to the positioning error for the flatten filter free (FFF) beams than the conventional flatten filter flattened beams. Methods: MapCheck2 was calibrated with 10MV conventional and FFF beams, with careful alignment and with 1cm positioning error during calibration, respectively. Open fields of 37cmx37cm were delivered to gauge the impact of resultant calibration errors. The local calibration error was modeled as a detector independent multiplication factor, with which propagation error was estimated with positioning error from 1mm to 1cm. The calibrated sensitivities, without positioning error, were compared between the conventional and FFF beams to evaluate the dependence on the beam type. Results: The 1cm positioning error leads to 0.39% and 5.24% local calibration error in the conventional and FFF beams respectively. After propagating to the edges of MapCheck, the calibration errors become 6.5% and 57.7%, respectively. The propagation error increases almost linearly with respect to the positioning error. The difference of sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams was small (0.11 ± 0.49%). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the positioning error is not handled by the current commercial calibration algorithm of MapCheck. Particularly, the calibration errors for the FFF beams are ~9 times greater than those for the conventional beams with identical positioning error, and a small 1mm positioning error might lead to up to 8% calibration error. Since the sensitivities are only slightly dependent of the beam type and the conventional beam is less affected by the positioning error, it is advisable to cross-check the sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams to detect

  18. A revised 5 minute gravimetric geoid and associated errors for the North Atlantic calibration area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mader, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    A revised 5 minute gravimetric geoid and its errors were computed for the North Atlantic calibration area using GEM-8 potential coefficients and the latest gravity data available from the Defense Mapping Agency. This effort was prompted by a number of inconsistencies and small errors found in previous calculations of this geoid. The computational method and constants used are given in detail to serve as a reference for future work.

  19. Sparse Auto-Calibration for Radar Coincidence Imaging with Gain-Phase Errors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. The sparsity-driven approaches are commonly used in RCI, while the prior knowledge of imaging models needs to be known accurately. However, as one of the major model errors, the gain-phase error exists generally, and may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. In the present report, the sparse auto-calibration method is proposed to compensate the gain-phase error in RCI. The method can determine the gain-phase error as part of the imaging process. It uses an iterative algorithm, which cycles through steps of target reconstruction and gain-phase error estimation, where orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) and Newton’s method are used, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed method can improve the imaging quality significantly and estimate the gain-phase error accurately. PMID:26528981

  20. Local error calibration of EGM08 geoid using GNSS/levelling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Zoghi, Sedigheh

    2016-07-01

    The geoid error, computed from EGM08, is unrealistically large due to the continuation of the spherical harmonic coefficient errors down to the surface of the reference ellipsoid. In this study, we try to calibrate such an error by the differences between the EGM08 and GNSS/levelling geoids over Fennoscandia. We use the variance component estimation procedure through combined adjustments of the geoid and GNSS/levelling heights using corrector surfaces of 4-, 5- and 7-parameter. We also develop a simple iterative method to calibrate the geoid error from the a posteriori variance factor and the errors of GNSS/levelling geoid. Our numerical investigations show that performing the separate adjustment and variance component estimation for each country with a two-component stochastic model is more successful than performing it in the whole area with a five-component model. The number of GNSS/levelling data over Sweden and Norway are much larger than those in Denmark and Finland. This causes that the corrector surfaces are fitted better in these countries and consequently the estimated errors for the geoid become larger than what they should be in the others. Based on a 7-parameter corrector surface model, the average error of the EGM08 geoid becomes 12, 17, 51 and 34 mm, in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland, respectively. If the two-component stochastic model is used in a combined adjustment over Fennoscandia this average error will be 48 mm.

  1. SU-E-I-83: Error Analysis of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using a Preclinical Multi-Modality QA Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y; Fullerton, G; Goins, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous study a preclinical multi-modality quality assurance (QA) phantom that contains five tumor-simulating test objects with 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 mm diameters was developed for accurate tumor size measurement by researchers during cancer drug development and testing. This study analyzed the errors during tumor volume measurement from preclinical magnetic resonance (MR), micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) and ultrasound (US) images acquired in a rodent tumor model using the preclinical multi-modality QA phantom. Methods: Using preclinical 7-Tesla MR, US and micro-CT scanners, images were acquired of subcutaneous SCC4 tumor xenografts in nude rats (3–4 rats per group; 5 groups) along with the QA phantom using the same imaging protocols. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging was performed to determine reference tumor volume. Volumes measured for the rat tumors and phantom test objects were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three imaging modalities. Then linear regression analysis was performed to compare image-based tumor volumes with the reference tumor volume and known test object volume for the rats and the phantom respectively. Results: The slopes of regression lines for in-vivo tumor volumes measured by three imaging modalities were 1.021, 1.101 and 0.862 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. For phantom, the slopes were 0.9485, 0.9971 and 0.9734 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. Conclusion: For both animal and phantom studies, random and systematic errors were observed. Random errors were observer-dependent and systematic errors were mainly due to selected imaging protocols and/or measurement method. In the animal study, there were additional systematic errors attributed to ellipsoidal assumption for tumor shape. The systematic errors measured using the QA phantom need to be taken into account to reduce measurement

  2. Uncertainty quantification for radiation measurements: Bottom-up error variance estimation using calibration information.

    PubMed

    Burr, T; Croft, S; Krieger, T; Martin, K; Norman, C; Walsh, S

    2016-02-01

    One example of top-down uncertainty quantification (UQ) involves comparing two or more measurements on each of multiple items. One example of bottom-up UQ expresses a measurement result as a function of one or more input variables that have associated errors, such as a measured count rate, which individually (or collectively) can be evaluated for impact on the uncertainty in the resulting measured value. In practice, it is often found that top-down UQ exhibits larger error variances than bottom-up UQ, because some error sources are present in the fielded assay methods used in top-down UQ that are not present (or not recognized) in the assay studies used in bottom-up UQ. One would like better consistency between the two approaches in order to claim understanding of the measurement process. The purpose of this paper is to refine bottom-up uncertainty estimation by using calibration information so that if there are no unknown error sources, the refined bottom-up uncertainty estimate will agree with the top-down uncertainty estimate to within a specified tolerance. Then, in practice, if the top-down uncertainty estimate is larger than the refined bottom-up uncertainty estimate by more than the specified tolerance, there must be omitted sources of error beyond those predicted from calibration uncertainty. The paper develops a refined bottom-up uncertainty approach for four cases of simple linear calibration: (1) inverse regression with negligible error in predictors, (2) inverse regression with non-negligible error in predictors, (3) classical regression followed by inversion with negligible error in predictors, and (4) classical regression followed by inversion with non-negligible errors in predictors. Our illustrations are of general interest, but are drawn from our experience with nuclear material assay by non-destructive assay. The main example we use is gamma spectroscopy that applies the enrichment meter principle. Previous papers that ignore error in predictors

  3. Uncertainty quantification for radiation measurements: Bottom-up error variance estimation using calibration information.

    PubMed

    Burr, T; Croft, S; Krieger, T; Martin, K; Norman, C; Walsh, S

    2016-02-01

    One example of top-down uncertainty quantification (UQ) involves comparing two or more measurements on each of multiple items. One example of bottom-up UQ expresses a measurement result as a function of one or more input variables that have associated errors, such as a measured count rate, which individually (or collectively) can be evaluated for impact on the uncertainty in the resulting measured value. In practice, it is often found that top-down UQ exhibits larger error variances than bottom-up UQ, because some error sources are present in the fielded assay methods used in top-down UQ that are not present (or not recognized) in the assay studies used in bottom-up UQ. One would like better consistency between the two approaches in order to claim understanding of the measurement process. The purpose of this paper is to refine bottom-up uncertainty estimation by using calibration information so that if there are no unknown error sources, the refined bottom-up uncertainty estimate will agree with the top-down uncertainty estimate to within a specified tolerance. Then, in practice, if the top-down uncertainty estimate is larger than the refined bottom-up uncertainty estimate by more than the specified tolerance, there must be omitted sources of error beyond those predicted from calibration uncertainty. The paper develops a refined bottom-up uncertainty approach for four cases of simple linear calibration: (1) inverse regression with negligible error in predictors, (2) inverse regression with non-negligible error in predictors, (3) classical regression followed by inversion with negligible error in predictors, and (4) classical regression followed by inversion with non-negligible errors in predictors. Our illustrations are of general interest, but are drawn from our experience with nuclear material assay by non-destructive assay. The main example we use is gamma spectroscopy that applies the enrichment meter principle. Previous papers that ignore error in predictors

  4. Calibration method of the time synchronization error of many data acquisition nodes in the chained system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jia-jia; Duan, Fa-jie; Chen, Jin; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Kai; Chang, Zong-jie

    2012-08-01

    Time synchronization is very important in a distributed chained seismic acquisition system with a large number of data acquisition nodes (DANs). The time synchronization error has two causes. On the one hand, there is a large accumulated propagation delay when commands propagate from the analysis and control system to multiple distant DANs, which makes it impossible for different DANs to receive the same command synchronously. Unfortunately, the propagation delay of commands (PDCs) varies in different application environments. On the other hand, the phase jitter of both the master clock and the clock recovery phase-locked loop, which is designed to extract the timing signal, may also cause the time synchronization error. In this paper, in order to achieve accurate time synchronization, a novel calibration method is proposed which can align the PDCs of all of the DANs in real time and overcome the time synchronization error caused by the phase jitter. Firstly, we give a quantitative analysis of the time synchronization error caused by both the PDCs and the phase jitter. Secondly, we propose a back and forth model (BFM) and a transmission delay measurement method (TDMM) to overcome these difficulties. Furthermore, the BFM is designed as the hardware configuration to measure the PDCs and calibrate the time synchronization error. The TDMM is used to measure the PDCs accurately. Thirdly, in order to overcome the time synchronization error caused by the phase jitter, a compression and mapping algorithm (CMA) is presented. Finally, based on the proposed BFM, TDMM and CMA, a united calibration algorithm is developed to overcome the time synchronization error caused by both the PDCs and the phase jitter. The simulation experiment results show the effectiveness of the calibration method proposed in this paper.

  5. The effect of biomechanical variables on force sensitive resistor error: Implications for calibration and improved accuracy.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Jonathon S; Evans, Katherine R; Hebert, Jacqueline S; Marasco, Paul D; Carey, Jason P

    2016-03-21

    Force Sensitive Resistors (FSRs) are commercially available thin film polymer sensors commonly employed in a multitude of biomechanical measurement environments. Reasons for such wide spread usage lie in the versatility, small profile, and low cost of these sensors. Yet FSRs have limitations. It is commonly accepted that temperature, curvature and biological tissue compliance may impact sensor conductance and resulting force readings. The effect of these variables and degree to which they interact has yet to be comprehensively investigated and quantified. This work systematically assesses varying levels of temperature, sensor curvature and surface compliance using a full factorial design-of-experiments approach. Three models of Interlink FSRs were evaluated. Calibration equations under 12 unique combinations of temperature, curvature and compliance were determined for each sensor. Root mean squared error, mean absolute error, and maximum error were quantified as measures of the impact these thermo/mechanical factors have on sensor performance. It was found that all three variables have the potential to affect FSR calibration curves. The FSR model and corresponding sensor geometry are sensitive to these three mechanical factors at varying levels. Experimental results suggest that reducing sensor error requires calibration of each sensor in an environment as close to its intended use as possible and if multiple FSRs are used in a system, they must be calibrated independently. PMID:26903413

  6. Calibrating system errors of large scale three-dimensional profile measurement instruments by subaperture stitching method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Yunpeng; Su, Jingshi; Wu, Hengyu; Tam, Hon-Yuen

    2015-07-01

    This study presents a subaperture stitching method to calibrate system errors of several ∼2  m large scale 3D profile measurement instruments (PMIs). The calibration process was carried out by measuring a Φ460  mm standard flat sample multiple times at different sites of the PMI with a length gauge; then the subaperture data were stitched together using a sequential or simultaneous stitching algorithm that minimizes the inconsistency (i.e., difference) of the discrete data in the overlapped areas. The system error can be used to compensate the measurement results of not only large flats, but also spheres and aspheres. The feasibility of the calibration was validated by measuring a Φ1070  mm aspheric mirror, which can raise the measurement accuracy of PMIs and provide more reliable 3D surface profiles for guiding grinding, lapping, and even initial polishing processes. PMID:26193139

  7. Modelling, calibration, and error analysis of seven-hole pressure probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zillac, G. G.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the calibration of a nonnulling, conical, seven-hole pressure probe over a large range of flow onset angles. The calibration procedure is based on the use of differential pressures to determine the three components of velocity. The method allows determination of the flow angle and velocity magnitude to within an average error of 1.0 deg and 1.0 percent, respectively. Greater accuracy can be achieved by using high-quality pressure transducers. Also included is an examination of the factors which limit the use of the probe, a description of the measurement chain, an error analysis, and a typical experimental result. In addition, a new general analytical model of pressure probe behavior is described, and the validity of the model is demonstrated by comparing it with experimentally measured calibration data for a three-hole yaw meter and a seven-hole probe.

  8. Errors from Rayleigh-Jeans approximation in satellite microwave radiometer calibration systems.

    PubMed

    Weng, Fuzhong; Zou, Xiaolei

    2013-01-20

    The advanced technology microwave sounder (ATMS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite is a total power radiometer and scans across the track within a range of ±52.77° from nadir. It has 22 channels and measures the microwave radiation at either quasi-vertical or quasi-horizontal polarization from the Earth's atmosphere. The ATMS sensor data record algorithm employed a commonly used two-point calibration equation that derives the earth-view brightness temperature directly from the counts and temperatures of warm target and cold space, and the earth-scene count. This equation is only valid under Rayleigh-Jeans (RJ) approximation. Impacts of RJ approximation on ATMS calibration biases are evaluated in this study. It is shown that the RJ approximation used in ATMS radiometric calibration results in errors on the order of 1-2 K. The error is also scene count dependent and increases with frequency.

  9. Calibration of the straightness and orthogonality error of a laser feedback high-precision stage using self-calibration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongmin; Kim, Kihyun; Park, Sang Hyun; Jang, Sangdon

    2014-12-01

    An ultra high-precision 3-DOF air-bearing stage is developed and calibrated in this study. The stage was developed for the transportation of a glass or wafer with x and y following errors in the nanometer regime. To apply the proposed stage to display or semiconductor fabrication equipment, x and y straightness errors should be at the sub-micron level and the x-y orthogonality error should be in the region of several arcseconds with strokes of several hundreds of mm. Our system was designed to move a 400 mm stroke on the x axis and a 700 mm stroke on the y axis. To do this, 1000 mm and 550 mm bar-type mirrors were adopted for real time Δx and Δy laser measurements and feedback control. In this system, with the laser wavelength variation and instability being kept to a minimum through environmental control, the straightness and orthogonality become purely dependent upon the surface shape of the bar mirrors. Compensation for the distortion of the bar mirrors is accomplished using a self-calibration method. The successful application of the method nearly eliminated the straightness and orthogonality errors of the stage, allowing their specifications to be fully satisfied. As a result, the straightness and orthogonality errors of the stage were successfully decreased from 4.4 μm to 0.8 μm and from 0.04° to 2.48 arcsec, respectively.

  10. A Novel Error Model of Optical Systems and an On-Orbit Calibration Method for Star Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Geng, Yunhai; Jin, Rongyu

    2015-12-12

    In order to improve the on-orbit measurement accuracy of star sensors, the effects of image-plane rotary error, image-plane tilt error and distortions of optical systems resulting from the on-orbit thermal environment were studied in this paper. Since these issues will affect the precision of star image point positions, in this paper, a novel measurement error model based on the traditional error model is explored. Due to the orthonormal characteristics of image-plane rotary-tilt errors and the strong nonlinearity among these error parameters, it is difficult to calibrate all the parameters simultaneously. To solve this difficulty, for the new error model, a modified two-step calibration method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Least Square Methods (LSM) is presented. The former one is used to calibrate the main point drift, focal length error and distortions of optical systems while the latter estimates the image-plane rotary-tilt errors. With this calibration method, the precision of star image point position influenced by the above errors is greatly improved from 15.42% to 1.389%. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the presented measurement error model for star sensors has higher precision. Moreover, the proposed two-step method can effectively calibrate model error parameters, and the calibration precision of on-orbit star sensors is also improved obviously.

  11. A Novel Error Model of Optical Systems and an On-Orbit Calibration Method for Star Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuang; Geng, Yunhai; Jin, Rongyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the on-orbit measurement accuracy of star sensors, the effects of image-plane rotary error, image-plane tilt error and distortions of optical systems resulting from the on-orbit thermal environment were studied in this paper. Since these issues will affect the precision of star image point positions, in this paper, a novel measurement error model based on the traditional error model is explored. Due to the orthonormal characteristics of image-plane rotary-tilt errors and the strong nonlinearity among these error parameters, it is difficult to calibrate all the parameters simultaneously. To solve this difficulty, for the new error model, a modified two-step calibration method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Least Square Methods (LSM) is presented. The former one is used to calibrate the main point drift, focal length error and distortions of optical systems while the latter estimates the image-plane rotary-tilt errors. With this calibration method, the precision of star image point position influenced by the above errors is greatly improved from 15.42% to 1.389%. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the presented measurement error model for star sensors has higher precision. Moreover, the proposed two-step method can effectively calibrate model error parameters, and the calibration precision of on-orbit star sensors is also improved obviously. PMID:26703599

  12. On Inertial Body Tracking in the Presence of Model Calibration Errors.

    PubMed

    Miezal, Markus; Taetz, Bertram; Bleser, Gabriele

    2016-07-22

    In inertial body tracking, the human body is commonly represented as a biomechanical model consisting of rigid segments with known lengths and connecting joints. The model state is then estimated via sensor fusion methods based on data from attached inertial measurement units (IMUs). This requires the relative poses of the IMUs w.r.t. the segments-the IMU-to-segment calibrations, subsequently called I2S calibrations-to be known. Since calibration methods based on static poses, movements and manual measurements are still the most widely used, potentially large human-induced calibration errors have to be expected. This work compares three newly developed/adapted extended Kalman filter (EKF) and optimization-based sensor fusion methods with an existing EKF-based method w.r.t. their segment orientation estimation accuracy in the presence of model calibration errors with and without using magnetometer information. While the existing EKF-based method uses a segment-centered kinematic chain biomechanical model and a constant angular acceleration motion model, the newly developed/adapted methods are all based on a free segments model, where each segment is represented with six degrees of freedom in the global frame. Moreover, these methods differ in the assumed motion model (constant angular acceleration, constant angular velocity, inertial data as control input), the state representation (segment-centered, IMU-centered) and the estimation method (EKF, sliding window optimization). In addition to the free segments representation, the optimization-based method also represents each IMU with six degrees of freedom in the global frame. In the evaluation on simulated and real data from a three segment model (an arm), the optimization-based method showed the smallest mean errors, standard deviations and maximum errors throughout all tests. It also showed the lowest dependency on magnetometer information and motion agility. Moreover, it was insensitive w.r.t. I2S position and

  13. On Inertial Body Tracking in the Presence of Model Calibration Errors.

    PubMed

    Miezal, Markus; Taetz, Bertram; Bleser, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    In inertial body tracking, the human body is commonly represented as a biomechanical model consisting of rigid segments with known lengths and connecting joints. The model state is then estimated via sensor fusion methods based on data from attached inertial measurement units (IMUs). This requires the relative poses of the IMUs w.r.t. the segments-the IMU-to-segment calibrations, subsequently called I2S calibrations-to be known. Since calibration methods based on static poses, movements and manual measurements are still the most widely used, potentially large human-induced calibration errors have to be expected. This work compares three newly developed/adapted extended Kalman filter (EKF) and optimization-based sensor fusion methods with an existing EKF-based method w.r.t. their segment orientation estimation accuracy in the presence of model calibration errors with and without using magnetometer information. While the existing EKF-based method uses a segment-centered kinematic chain biomechanical model and a constant angular acceleration motion model, the newly developed/adapted methods are all based on a free segments model, where each segment is represented with six degrees of freedom in the global frame. Moreover, these methods differ in the assumed motion model (constant angular acceleration, constant angular velocity, inertial data as control input), the state representation (segment-centered, IMU-centered) and the estimation method (EKF, sliding window optimization). In addition to the free segments representation, the optimization-based method also represents each IMU with six degrees of freedom in the global frame. In the evaluation on simulated and real data from a three segment model (an arm), the optimization-based method showed the smallest mean errors, standard deviations and maximum errors throughout all tests. It also showed the lowest dependency on magnetometer information and motion agility. Moreover, it was insensitive w.r.t. I2S position and

  14. A Fully Bayesian Approach to Improved Calibration and Prediction of Groundwater Models With Structure Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Valocchi, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Effective water resource management typically relies on numerical models to analyse groundwater flow and solute transport processes. These models are usually subject to model structure error due to simplification and/or misrepresentation of the real system. As a result, the model outputs may systematically deviate from measurements, thus violating a key assumption for traditional regression-based calibration and uncertainty analysis. On the other hand, model structure error induced bias can be described statistically in an inductive, data-driven way based on historical model-to-measurement misfit. We adopt a fully Bayesian approach that integrates a Gaussian process error model to account for model structure error to the calibration, prediction and uncertainty analysis of groundwater models. The posterior distributions of parameters of the groundwater model and the Gaussian process error model are jointly inferred using DREAM, an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler. We test the usefulness of the fully Bayesian approach towards a synthetic case study of surface-ground water interaction under changing pumping conditions. We first illustrate through this example that traditional least squares regression without accounting for model structure error yields biased parameter estimates due to parameter compensation as well as biased predictions. In contrast, the Bayesian approach gives less biased parameter estimates. Moreover, the integration of a Gaussian process error model significantly reduces predictive bias and leads to prediction intervals that are more consistent with observations. The results highlight the importance of explicit treatment of model structure error especially in circumstances where subsequent decision-making and risk analysis require accurate prediction and uncertainty quantification. In addition, the data-driven error modelling approach is capable of extracting more information from observation data than using a groundwater model alone.

  15. On Inertial Body Tracking in the Presence of Model Calibration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Miezal, Markus; Taetz, Bertram; Bleser, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    In inertial body tracking, the human body is commonly represented as a biomechanical model consisting of rigid segments with known lengths and connecting joints. The model state is then estimated via sensor fusion methods based on data from attached inertial measurement units (IMUs). This requires the relative poses of the IMUs w.r.t. the segments—the IMU-to-segment calibrations, subsequently called I2S calibrations—to be known. Since calibration methods based on static poses, movements and manual measurements are still the most widely used, potentially large human-induced calibration errors have to be expected. This work compares three newly developed/adapted extended Kalman filter (EKF) and optimization-based sensor fusion methods with an existing EKF-based method w.r.t. their segment orientation estimation accuracy in the presence of model calibration errors with and without using magnetometer information. While the existing EKF-based method uses a segment-centered kinematic chain biomechanical model and a constant angular acceleration motion model, the newly developed/adapted methods are all based on a free segments model, where each segment is represented with six degrees of freedom in the global frame. Moreover, these methods differ in the assumed motion model (constant angular acceleration, constant angular velocity, inertial data as control input), the state representation (segment-centered, IMU-centered) and the estimation method (EKF, sliding window optimization). In addition to the free segments representation, the optimization-based method also represents each IMU with six degrees of freedom in the global frame. In the evaluation on simulated and real data from a three segment model (an arm), the optimization-based method showed the smallest mean errors, standard deviations and maximum errors throughout all tests. It also showed the lowest dependency on magnetometer information and motion agility. Moreover, it was insensitive w.r.t. I2S position and

  16. Water vapor calibration errors in some capnometers: respiratory conventions misunderstood by manufacturers?

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, J W

    1989-06-01

    Incorrect calibration has been included in several recently introduced CO2 analyzers. They display a value of "PCO2" internally calculated as FCO2 X Pb rather than FCO2(Pb - 47) where Pb is barometric pressure. This conceptual error appears to have been introduced because new sampling catheter material has become available that effectively removes water vapor before samples reach the sample cell. This seems to have led some manufacturers to assume, incorrectly, that the 47 mmHg factor used to compute PCO2 in patients would no longer be needed. Users can test whether this error is present in an instrument by testing the effect of wet versus dry gases, and make appropriate corrections if the errors are present. Manufacturers should promptly correct this error in all instruments sold previously. PMID:2499226

  17. New error calibration tests for gravity models using subset solutions and independent data - Applied to GEM-T3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Chinn, D. S.; Chan, J. C.; Patel, G. B.; Klosko, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    A new method has been developed to provide a direct test of the error calibrations of gravity models based on actual satellite observations. The basic approach projects the error estimates of the gravity model parameters onto satellite observations, and the results of these projections are then compared with data residual computed from the orbital fits. To allow specific testing of the gravity error calibrations, subset solutions are computed based on the data set and data weighting of the gravity model. The approach is demonstrated using GEM-T3 to show that the gravity error estimates are well calibrated and that reliable predictions of orbit accuracies can be achieved for independent orbits.

  18. Global Warming Estimation from MSU: Correction for Drift and Calibration Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.

    2000-01-01

    Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer observations in Ch 2 (53.74 GHz), made in the nadir direction from sequential, sun-synchronous, polar-orbiting NOAA morning satellites (NOAA 6, 10 and 12 that have approximately 7am/7pm orbital geometry) and. afternoon satellites (NOAA 7, 9, 11 and 14 that have approximately 2am/2pm orbital geometry) are analyzed in this study to derive global temperature trend from 1980 to 1998. In order to remove the discontinuities between the data of the successive satellites and to get a continuous time series, first we have used shortest possible time record of each satellite. In this way we get a preliminary estimate of the global temperature trend of 0.21 K/decade. However, this estimate is affected by systematic time-dependent errors. One such error is the instrument calibration error eo. This error can be inferred whenever there are overlapping measurements made by two satellites over an extended period of time. From the available successive satellite data we have taken the longest possible time record of each satellite to form the time series during the period 1980 to 1998 to this error eo. We find eo can decrease the global temperature trend by approximately 0.07 K/decade. In addition there are systematic time dependent errors ed and ec present in the data that are introduced by the drift in the satellite orbital geometry. ed arises from the diurnal cycle in temperature and ec is the drift related change in the calibration of the MSU. In order to analyze the nature of these drift related errors the multi-satellite Ch 2 data set is partitioned into am and pm subsets to create two independent time series. The error ed can be assessed in the am and pm data of Ch 2 on land and can be eliminated. Observation made in the MSU Ch 1 (50.3 GHz) support this approach. The error ec is obvious only in the difference between the pm and am observations of Ch 2 over the ocean. We have followed two different paths to assess the impact of the

  19. Global Warming Estimation from MSU: Correction for Drift and Calibration Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer observations in Ch 2 (53.74 GHz), made in the nadir direction from sequential, sun-synchronous, polar-orbiting NOAA morning satellites (NOAA 6, 10 and 12 that have about 7am/7pm orbital geometry) and afternoon satellites (NOAA 7, 9, 11 and 14 that have about 2am/2pm orbital geometry) are analyzed in this study to derive global temperature trend from 1980 to 1998. In order to remove the discontinuities between the data of the successive satellites and to get a continuous time series, first we have used shortest possible time record of each satellite. In this way we get a preliminary estimate of the global temperature trend of 0.21 K/decade. However, this estimate is affected by systematic time-dependent errors. One such error is the instrument calibration error. This error can be inferred whenever there are overlapping measurements made by two satellites over an extended period of time. From the available successive satellite data we have taken the longest possible time record of each satellite to form the time series during the period 1980 to 1998 to this error. We find we can decrease the global temperature trend by about 0.07 K/decade. In addition there are systematic time dependent errors present in the data that are introduced by the drift in the satellite orbital geometry arises from the diurnal cycle in temperature which is the drift related change in the calibration of the MSU. In order to analyze the nature of these drift related errors the multi-satellite Ch 2 data set is partitioned into am and pm subsets to create two independent time series. The error can be assessed in the am and pm data of Ch 2 on land and can be eliminated. Observations made in the MSU Ch 1 (50.3 GHz) support this approach. The error is obvious only in the difference between the pm and am observations of Ch 2 over the ocean. We have followed two different paths to assess the impact of the errors on the global temperature trend. In one path the

  20. The effect of error in theoretical Earth tide on calibration of borehole strainmeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, John

    2010-01-01

    Since the installation of borehole strainmeters into the ground locally distorts the strain in the rock, these strainmeters require calibration from a known source which typically is the Earth tide. Consequently, the accuracy of the observed strain changes from borehole strainmeters depends upon the calibration derived from modeling the Earth tide. Previous work from the mid-1970s, which is replicated here, demonstrate that the theoretical tide can differ by 30% from the tide observed at surface-mounted, long-baseline strainmeters. In spite of possible inaccurate tidal models, many of the 74 borehole strainmeters installed since 2005 can be “calibrated”. However, inaccurate tidal models affect the amplitude and phase of observed transient strain changes which needs to be considered along with the precision of the data from the inherent drift of these borehole instruments. In particular, the error from inaccurate tidal model dominates the error budget in the observation of impulsive, sub-daily, strain-transients.

  1. Study and mitigation of calibration error sources in a water vapour Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Leslie; Bock, Olivier; Bosser, Pierre; Thom, Christian; Pelon, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of water vapour throughout the atmosphere is important for many scientific applications (weather forecasting, climate research, calibration of GNSS altimetry measurements). Measuring water vapour remains a technical challenge because of its high variability in space and time. The major issues are achieving long-term stability (e.g., for climate trends monitoring) and high accuracy (e.g. for calibration/validation applications). LAREG and LOEMI at Institut National de l'Information Géographique et Forestière (IGN) have developed a mobile scanning water vapour Raman lidar in collaboration with LATMOS at CNRS. This system aims at providing high accuracy water vapour measurements throughout the troposphere for calibrating GNSS wet delay signals and thus improving vertical positioning. Current developments aim at improving the calibration method and long term stability of the system to allow the Raman lidar to be used as a reference instrument. The IGN-LATMOS lidar was deployed in the DEMEVAP (Development of Methodologies for Water Vapour Measurement) campaign that took place in 2011 at the Observatoire de Haute Provence. The goals of DEMEVAP were to inter-compare different water vapour sounding techniques (lidars, operational and research radiosondes, GPS,…) and to study various calibration methods for the Raman lidar. A significant decrease of the signals and of the calibration constants of the IGN-LATMOS Raman lidar has been noticed all along the campaign. This led us to study the likely sources of uncertainty and drifts in each part of the instrument: emission, reception and detection. We inventoried several error sources as well as instability sources. The impact of the temperature dependence of the Raman lines on the filter transmission or the fluorescence in the fibre, are examples of the error sources. We investigated each error source and each instability source (uncontrolled laser beam jitter, temporal fluctuations of the photomultiplier

  2. A GPS-Based Pitot-Static Calibration Method Using Global Output-Error Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John V.; Cunningham, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Pressure-based airspeed and altitude measurements for aircraft typically require calibration of the installed system to account for pressure sensing errors such as those due to local flow field effects. In some cases, calibration is used to meet requirements such as those specified in Federal Aviation Regulation Part 25. Several methods are used for in-flight pitot-static calibration including tower fly-by, pacer aircraft, and trailing cone methods. In the 1990 s, the introduction of satellite-based positioning systems to the civilian market enabled new inflight calibration methods based on accurate ground speed measurements provided by Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Use of GPS for airspeed calibration has many advantages such as accuracy, ease of portability (e.g. hand-held) and the flexibility of operating in airspace without the limitations of test range boundaries or ground telemetry support. The current research was motivated by the need for a rapid and statistically accurate method for in-flight calibration of pitot-static systems for remotely piloted, dynamically-scaled research aircraft. Current calibration methods were deemed not practical for this application because of confined test range size and limited flight time available for each sortie. A method was developed that uses high data rate measurements of static and total pressure, and GPSbased ground speed measurements to compute the pressure errors over a range of airspeed. The novel application of this approach is the use of system identification methods that rapidly compute optimal pressure error models with defined confidence intervals in nearreal time. This method has been demonstrated in flight tests and has shown 2- bounds of approximately 0.2 kts with an order of magnitude reduction in test time over other methods. As part of this experiment, a unique database of wind measurements was acquired concurrently with the flight experiments, for the purpose of experimental validation of the

  3. Simulation of temperature field for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation using a hyperbolic bioheat equation and temperature-varied voltage calibration: a liver-mimicking phantom study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Lin, Lan; Gao, Hongjian; Feng, Yusheng

    2015-12-21

    This study aims at improving the accuracy of temperature simulation for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation (RFA). We proposed a new voltage-calibration method in the simulation and investigated the feasibility of a hyperbolic bioheat equation (HBE) in the RFA simulation with longer durations and higher power. A total of 40 RFA experiments was conducted in a liver-mimicking phantom. Four mathematical models with multipolar electrodes were developed by the finite element method in COMSOL software: HBE with/without voltage calibration, and the Pennes bioheat equation (PBE) with/without voltage calibration. The temperature-varied voltage calibration used in the simulation was calculated from an experimental power output and temperature-dependent resistance of liver tissue. We employed the HBE in simulation by considering the delay time τ of 16 s. First, for simulations by each kind of bioheat equation (PBE or HBE), we compared the differences between the temperature-varied voltage-calibration and the fixed-voltage values used in the simulations. Then, the comparisons were conducted between the PBE and the HBE in the simulations with temperature-varied voltage calibration. We verified the simulation results by experimental temperature measurements on nine specific points of the tissue phantom. The results showed that: (1) the proposed voltage-calibration method improved the simulation accuracy of temperature-controlled RFA for both the PBE and the HBE, and (2) for temperature-controlled RFA simulation with the temperature-varied voltage calibration, the HBE method was 0.55 °C more accurate than the PBE method. The proposed temperature-varied voltage calibration may be useful in temperature field simulations of temperature-controlled RFA. Besides, the HBE may be used as an alternative in the simulation of long-duration high-power RFA. PMID:26583919

  4. Simulation of temperature field for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation using a hyperbolic bioheat equation and temperature-varied voltage calibration: a liver-mimicking phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Man; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Lin, Lan; Gao, Hongjian; Feng, Yusheng

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at improving the accuracy of temperature simulation for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation (RFA). We proposed a new voltage-calibration method in the simulation and investigated the feasibility of a hyperbolic bioheat equation (HBE) in the RFA simulation with longer durations and higher power. A total of 40 RFA experiments was conducted in a liver-mimicking phantom. Four mathematical models with multipolar electrodes were developed by the finite element method in COMSOL software: HBE with/without voltage calibration, and the Pennes bioheat equation (PBE) with/without voltage calibration. The temperature-varied voltage calibration used in the simulation was calculated from an experimental power output and temperature-dependent resistance of liver tissue. We employed the HBE in simulation by considering the delay time τ of 16 s. First, for simulations by each kind of bioheat equation (PBE or HBE), we compared the differences between the temperature-varied voltage-calibration and the fixed-voltage values used in the simulations. Then, the comparisons were conducted between the PBE and the HBE in the simulations with temperature-varied voltage calibration. We verified the simulation results by experimental temperature measurements on nine specific points of the tissue phantom. The results showed that: (1) the proposed voltage-calibration method improved the simulation accuracy of temperature-controlled RFA for both the PBE and the HBE, and (2) for temperature-controlled RFA simulation with the temperature-varied voltage calibration, the HBE method was 0.55 °C more accurate than the PBE method. The proposed temperature-varied voltage calibration may be useful in temperature field simulations of temperature-controlled RFA. Besides, the HBE may be used as an alternative in the simulation of long-duration high-power RFA.

  5. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-02: Estimation of the Dosimetric Error Caused by the Voxelization of Hybrid Computational Phantoms Using Triangle Mesh-Based Monte Carlo Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Badal, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Computational voxel phantom provides realistic anatomy but the voxel structure may result in dosimetric error compared to real anatomy composed of perfect surface. We analyzed the dosimetric error caused from the voxel structure in hybrid computational phantoms by comparing the voxel-based doses at different resolutions with triangle mesh-based doses. Methods: We incorporated the existing adult male UF/NCI hybrid phantom in mesh format into a Monte Carlo transport code, penMesh that supports triangle meshes. We calculated energy deposition to selected organs of interest for parallel photon beams with three mono energies (0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) in antero-posterior geometry. We also calculated organ energy deposition using three voxel phantoms with different voxel resolutions (1, 5, and 10 mm) using MCNPX2.7. Results: Comparison of organ energy deposition between the two methods showed that agreement overall improved for higher voxel resolution, but for many organs the differences were small. Difference in the energy deposition for 1 MeV, for example, decreased from 11.5% to 1.7% in muscle but only from 0.6% to 0.3% in liver as voxel resolution increased from 10 mm to 1 mm. The differences were smaller at higher energies. The number of photon histories processed per second in voxels were 6.4×10{sup 4}, 3.3×10{sup 4}, and 1.3×10{sup 4}, for 10, 5, and 1 mm resolutions at 10 MeV, respectively, while meshes ran at 4.0×10{sup 4} histories/sec. Conclusion: The combination of hybrid mesh phantom and penMesh was proved to be accurate and of similar speed compared to the voxel phantom and MCNPX. The lowest voxel resolution caused a maximum dosimetric error of 12.6% at 0.1 MeV and 6.8% at 10 MeV but the error was insignificant in some organs. We will apply the tool to calculate dose to very thin layer tissues (e.g., radiosensitive layer in gastro intestines) which cannot be modeled by voxel phantoms.

  6. Current profilers and current meters: compass and tilt sensors errors and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Menn, M.; Lusven, A.; Bongiovanni, E.; Le Dû, P.; Rouxel, D.; Lucas, S.; Pacaud, L.

    2014-08-01

    Current profilers and current meters have a magnetic compass and tilt sensors for relating measurements to a terrestrial reference frame. As compasses are sensitive to their magnetic environment, they must be calibrated in the configuration in which they will be used. A calibration platform for magnetic compasses and tilt sensors was built, based on a method developed in 2007, to correct angular errors and guarantee a measurement uncertainty for instruments mounted in mooring cages. As mooring cages can weigh up to 800 kg, it was necessary to find a suitable place to set up this platform, map the magnetic fields in this area and dimension the platform to withstand these loads. It was calibrated using a GPS positioning technique. The platform has a table that can be tilted to calibrate the tilt sensors. The measurement uncertainty of the system was evaluated. Sinusoidal corrections based on the anomalies created by soft and hard magnetic materials were tested, as well as manufacturers’ calibration methods.

  7. How errors in the calibration of GRACE accelerometers affect the estimates of temporal gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregoning, P.; McClusky, S.; Purcell, A. P.; McQueen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Non-gravitational accelerations acting on each of the GRACE satellites are measured in the along-track, cross-track and radial directions by the accelerometers onboard each satellite. The calibration of the observed non-gravitational accelerations requires determining a scaling factor and (at least) an offset for the observations in each of the three directions. We demonstrate in this presentation how small errors in the scale factors used to calibrate the accelerometer observations affect the noise level in the estimated temporal gravity field. We performed a parameter space search to find the optimal scale factors that generated the smallest prefit range-rate residuals and found that we can model the satellite orbits without the use of any empirical parameters, whilst still being able to identify the temporal gravity field signal in the prefit KBRR residuals. We will describe some physical conditions when the satellites are in the shadow of the Earth that we use to constrain the estimates of calibration biases and scales and show how the noise level of the estimated temporal gravity field varies with and without the use of the optimal calibration values for the accelerometer observations. A similar approach will be both required and effective to calibrate the accelerometers onboard the GRACE Follow-On mission.

  8. Analysis and Calibration of Sources of Electronic Error in PSD Sensor Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Navarro, David; Lázaro-Galilea, José Luis; Bravo-Muñoz, Ignacio; Gardel-Vicente, Alfredo; Tsirigotis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In order to obtain very precise measurements of the position of agents located at a considerable distance using a sensor system based on position sensitive detectors (PSD), it is necessary to analyze and mitigate the factors that generate substantial errors in the system’s response. These sources of error can be divided into electronic and geometric factors. The former stem from the nature and construction of the PSD as well as the performance, tolerances and electronic response of the system, while the latter are related to the sensor’s optical system. Here, we focus solely on the electrical effects, since the study, analysis and correction of these are a prerequisite for subsequently addressing geometric errors. A simple calibration method is proposed, which considers PSD response, component tolerances, temperature variations, signal frequency used, signal to noise ratio (SNR), suboptimal operational amplifier parameters, and analog to digital converter (ADC) quantitation SNRQ, etc. Following an analysis of these effects and calibration of the sensor, it was possible to correct the errors, thus rendering the effects negligible, as reported in the results section. PMID:27136562

  9. Analysis and Calibration of Sources of Electronic Error in PSD Sensor Response.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, David; Lázaro-Galilea, José Luis; Bravo-Muñoz, Ignacio; Gardel-Vicente, Alfredo; Tsirigotis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In order to obtain very precise measurements of the position of agents located at a considerable distance using a sensor system based on position sensitive detectors (PSD), it is necessary to analyze and mitigate the factors that generate substantial errors in the system's response. These sources of error can be divided into electronic and geometric factors. The former stem from the nature and construction of the PSD as well as the performance, tolerances and electronic response of the system, while the latter are related to the sensor's optical system. Here, we focus solely on the electrical effects, since the study, analysis and correction of these are a prerequisite for subsequently addressing geometric errors. A simple calibration method is proposed, which considers PSD response, component tolerances, temperature variations, signal frequency used, signal to noise ratio (SNR), suboptimal operational amplifier parameters, and analog to digital converter (ADC) quantitation SNRQ, etc. Following an analysis of these effects and calibration of the sensor, it was possible to correct the errors, thus rendering the effects negligible, as reported in the results section.

  10. Estimating pole/zero errors in GSN-IRIS/USGS network calibration metadata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, A.T.; Hutt, C.R.; Aster, R.; Bolton, H.; Gee, L.S.; Storm, T.

    2012-01-01

    Mapping the digital record of a seismograph into true ground motion requires the correction of the data by some description of the instrument's response. For the Global Seismographic Network (Butler et al., 2004), as well as many other networks, this instrument response is represented as a Laplace domain pole–zero model and published in the Standard for the Exchange of Earthquake Data (SEED) format. This Laplace representation assumes that the seismometer behaves as a linear system, with any abrupt changes described adequately via multiple time-invariant epochs. The SEED format allows for published instrument response errors as well, but these typically have not been estimated or provided to users. We present an iterative three-step method to estimate the instrument response parameters (poles and zeros) and their associated errors using random calibration signals. First, we solve a coarse nonlinear inverse problem using a least-squares grid search to yield a first approximation to the solution. This approach reduces the likelihood of poorly estimated parameters (a local-minimum solution) caused by noise in the calibration records and enhances algorithm convergence. Second, we iteratively solve a nonlinear parameter estimation problem to obtain the least-squares best-fit Laplace pole–zero–gain model. Third, by applying the central limit theorem, we estimate the errors in this pole–zero model by solving the inverse problem at each frequency in a two-thirds octave band centered at each best-fit pole–zero frequency. This procedure yields error estimates of the 99% confidence interval. We demonstrate the method by applying it to a number of recent Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology/United States Geological Survey (IRIS/USGS) network calibrations (network code IU).

  11. Optimum data weighting and error calibration for estimation of gravitational parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.

    1989-01-01

    A new technique was developed for the weighting of data from satellite tracking systems in order to obtain an optimum least squares solution and an error calibration for the solution parameters. Data sets from optical, electronic, and laser systems on 17 satellites in GEM-T1 (Goddard Earth Model, 36x36 spherical harmonic field) were employed toward application of this technique for gravity field parameters. Also, GEM-T2 (31 satellites) was recently computed as a direct application of the method and is summarized here. The method employs subset solutions of the data associated with the complete solution and uses an algorithm to adjust the data weights by requiring the differences of parameters between solutions to agree with their error estimates. With the adjusted weights the process provides for an automatic calibration of the error estimates for the solution parameters. The data weights derived are generally much smaller than corresponding weights obtained from nominal values of observation accuracy or residuals. Independent tests show significant improvement for solutions with optimal weighting as compared to the nominal weighting. The technique is general and may be applied to orbit parameters, station coordinates, or other parameters than the gravity model.

  12. Reconstruction Error of Calibration Volume’s Coordinates for 3D Swimming Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Machado, Leandro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reliability of above and underwater 3D reconstruction of three calibration volumes with different control points disposal (#1 - on vertical and horizontal rods; #2 - on vertical and horizontal rods and facets; #3 - on crossed horizontal rods). Each calibration volume (3 × 2 × 3 m) was positioned in a 25 m swimming pool (half above and half below the water surface) and recorded with four underwater and two above water synchronised cameras (50 Hz). Reconstruction accuracy was determined calculating the RMS error of twelve validation points. The standard deviation across all digitisation of the same marker was used for assessing the reliability estimation. Comparison among different number of control points showed that the set of 24 points produced the most accurate results. The volume #2 presented higher accuracy (RMS errors: 5.86 and 3.59 mm for x axis, 3.45 and 3.11 mm for y axis and 4.38 and 4.00 mm for z axis, considering under and above water, respectively) and reliability (SD: underwater cameras ± [0.2; 0.6] mm; above water cameras ± [0.2; 0.3] mm) that may be considered suitable for 3D swimming kinematic analysis. Results revealed that RMS error was greater during underwater analysis, possibly due to refraction. PMID:23486761

  13. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  14. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by 6 different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses (EUD), and 2%-2mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, < 5% in treatment planning, and < 2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT

  15. GOME Total Ozone and Calibration Error Derived Usign Version 8 TOMS Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Qin, W.; Ahn, C.; Gopalan, A.; Bhartia, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a hyper-spectral satellite instrument measuring the ultraviolet backscatter at relatively high spectral resolution. GOME radiances have been slit averaged to emulate measurements of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) made at discrete wavelengths and processed using the new TOMS Version 8 Ozone Algorithm. Compared to Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques based on local structure in the Huggins Bands, the TOMS uses differential absorption between a pair of wavelengths including the local stiucture as well as the background continuum. This makes the TOMS Algorithm more sensitive to ozone, but it also makes the algorithm more sensitive to instrument calibration errors. While calibration adjustments are not needed for the fitting techniques like the DOAS employed in GOME algorithms, some adjustment is necessary when applying the TOMS Algorithm to GOME. Using spectral discrimination at near ultraviolet wavelength channels unabsorbed by ozone, the GOME wavelength dependent calibration drift is estimated and then checked using pair justification. In addition, the day one calibration offset is estimated based on the residuals of the Version 8 TOMS Algorithm. The estimated drift in the 2b detector of GOME is small through the first four years and then increases rapidly to +5% in normalized radiance at 331 nm relative to 385 nm by mid 2000. The lb detector appears to be quite well behaved throughout this time period.

  16. Array error calibration methods in downward-looking linear-array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weixian; Huang, Pingping; Han, Kuoye; Liu, Qi; Peng, Xueming

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve high-precision three-dimensional (3-D) imaging with an airborne downward-looking linear-array 3-D synthetic aperture radar (LA-3D-SAR), a uniform virtual antenna array can be obtained by aperture synthesis of the cross-track sparse multiple-input-multiple-output array. However, the actual 3-D imaging quality is unavoidably degraded by array errors such as the multichannel amplitude-phase errors due to the nonideal antenna characteristics, and the virtual element position errors due to vibrations and motion measurement deviations. We investigate the effects of these errors on the forms and the degrees of image quality degradation and consider the use of corresponding calibration methods to eliminate the effects of errors. For the multichannel amplitude-phase errors, the target response is subject to an integrated sidelobe level increase introduced by the phase error, which can be calibrated based on external (parallel or point target) calibrators, as proposed in the paper. For the virtual element position errors, they mainly the result of contrast degradation and noise in the image along the cross-track direction and have little impact on the range and along-track directions. The imaging performance is more sensitive to the error component in the height direction as compared to other components, the precision requirement of which should be established as the calibration reference. A calibration method based on time-divided active calibrators is proposed to estimate and correct the virtual element position errors. Both numerical simulations and real data experiments have shown the validity of the analyses as well as the effectiveness of the proposed calibration methods.

  17. Effect of Correlated Precision Errors on Uncertainty of a Subsonic Venturi Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, S. T.; Bordelon, W. J., Jr.; Coleman, H. W.

    1996-01-01

    An uncertainty analysis performed in conjunction with the calibration of a subsonic venturi for use in a turbine test facility produced some unanticipated results that may have a significant impact in a variety of test situations. Precision uncertainty estimates using the preferred propagation techniques in the applicable American National Standards Institute/American Society of Mechanical Engineers standards were an order of magnitude larger than precision uncertainty estimates calculated directly from a sample of results (discharge coefficient) obtained at the same experimental set point. The differences were attributable to the effect of correlated precision errors, which previously have been considered negligible. An analysis explaining this phenomenon is presented. The article is not meant to document the venturi calibration, but rather to give a real example of results where correlated precision terms are important. The significance of the correlated precision terms could apply to many test situations.

  18. Multiplicative errors in the galaxy power spectrum: self-calibration of unknown photometric systematics for precision cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Daniel L.; Huterer, Dragan

    2015-03-01

    We develop a general method to `self-calibrate' observations of galaxy clustering with respect to systematics associated with photometric calibration errors. We first point out the danger posed by the multiplicative effect of calibration errors, where large-angle error propagates to small scales and may be significant even if the large-scale information is cleaned or not used in the cosmological analysis. We then propose a method to measure the arbitrary large-scale calibration errors and use these measurements to correct the small-scale (high-multipole) power which is most useful for constraining the majority of cosmological parameters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on synthetic examples and briefly discuss how it may be applied to real data.

  19. Power Pattern Sensitivity to Calibration Errors and Mutual Coupling in Linear Arrays through Circular Interval Arithmetics

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Nicola; Salucci, Marco; Rocca, Paolo; Massa, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity to both calibration errors and mutual coupling effects of the power pattern radiated by a linear array is addressed. Starting from the knowledge of the nominal excitations of the array elements and the maximum uncertainty on their amplitudes, the bounds of the pattern deviations from the ideal one are analytically derived by exploiting the Circular Interval Analysis (CIA). A set of representative numerical results is reported and discussed to assess the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach also in comparison with state-of-the-art methods and full-wave simulations. PMID:27258274

  20. Power Pattern Sensitivity to Calibration Errors and Mutual Coupling in Linear Arrays through Circular Interval Arithmetics.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Nicola; Salucci, Marco; Rocca, Paolo; Massa, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity to both calibration errors and mutual coupling effects of the power pattern radiated by a linear array is addressed. Starting from the knowledge of the nominal excitations of the array elements and the maximum uncertainty on their amplitudes, the bounds of the pattern deviations from the ideal one are analytically derived by exploiting the Circular Interval Analysis (CIA). A set of representative numerical results is reported and discussed to assess the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach also in comparison with state-of-the-art methods and full-wave simulations. PMID:27258274

  1. A gamma ray observatory ground attitude error analysis study using the generalized calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) will be responsible for performing ground attitude determination for Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) support. The study reported in this paper provides the FDD and the GRO project with ground attitude determination error information and illustrates several uses of the Generalized Calibration System (GCS). GCS, an institutional software tool in the FDD, automates the computation of the expected attitude determination uncertainty that a spacecraft will encounter during its mission. The GRO project is particularly interested in the uncertainty in the attitude determination using Sun sensors and a magnetometer when both star trackers are inoperable. In order to examine the expected attitude errors for GRO, a systematic approach was developed including various parametric studies. The approach identifies pertinent parameters and combines them to form a matrix of test runs in GCS. This matrix formed the basis for this study.

  2. Hand-writing motion tracking with vision-inertial sensor fusion: calibration and error correction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengli; Fei, Fei; Zhang, Guanglie; Liu, Yunhui; Li, Wen J

    2014-08-25

    The purpose of this study was to improve the accuracy of real-time ego-motion tracking through inertial sensor and vision sensor fusion. Due to low sampling rates supported by web-based vision sensor and accumulation of errors in inertial sensors, ego-motion tracking with vision sensors is commonly afflicted by slow updating rates, while motion tracking with inertial sensor suffers from rapid deterioration in accuracy with time. This paper starts with a discussion of developed algorithms for calibrating two relative rotations of the system using only one reference image. Next, stochastic noises associated with the inertial sensor are identified using Allan Variance analysis, and modeled according to their characteristics. Finally, the proposed models are incorporated into an extended Kalman filter for inertial sensor and vision sensor fusion. Compared with results from conventional sensor fusion models, we have shown that ego-motion tracking can be greatly enhanced using the proposed error correction model.

  3. Assessment and Calibration of Ultrasonic Measurement Errors in Estimating Weathering Index of Stone Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Estimating the degree of weathering in stone cultural heritage, such as pagodas and statues is very important to plan conservation and restoration. The ultrasonic measurement is one of commonly-used techniques to evaluate weathering index of stone cultual properties, since it is easy to use and non-destructive. Typically we use a portable ultrasonic device, PUNDIT with exponential sensors. However, there are many factors to cause errors in measurements such as operators, sensor layouts or measurement directions. In this study, we carried out variety of measurements with different operators (male and female), different sensor layouts (direct and indirect), and sensor directions (anisotropy). For operators bias, we found that there were not significant differences by the operator's sex, while the pressure an operator exerts can create larger error in measurements. Calibrating with a standard sample for each operator is very essential in this case. For the sensor layout, we found that the indirect measurement (commonly used for cultural properties, since the direct measurement is difficult in most cases) gives lower velocity than the real one. We found that the correction coefficient is slightly different for different types of rocks: 1.50 for granite and sandstone and 1.46 for marble. From the sensor directions, we found that many rocks have slight anisotropy in their ultrasonic velocity measurement, though they are considered isotropic in macroscopic scale. Thus averaging four different directional measurement (0°, 45°, 90°, 135°) gives much less errors in measurements (the variance is 2-3 times smaller). In conclusion, we reported the error in ultrasonic meaurement of stone cultural properties by various sources quantitatively and suggested the amount of correction and procedures to calibrate the measurements. Acknowledgement: This study, which forms a part of the project, has been achieved with the support of national R&D project, which has been hosted by

  4. On Calibrating the Sensor Errors of a PDR-Based Indoor Localization System

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Kun-Chan; Shih, Wen-Yuah

    2013-01-01

    Many studies utilize the signal strength of short-range radio systems (such as WiFi, ultrasound and infrared) to build a radio map for indoor localization, by deploying a large number of beacon nodes within a building. The drawback of such an infrastructure-based approach is that the deployment and calibration of the system are costly and labor-intensive. Some prior studies proposed the use of Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) for indoor localization, which does not require the deployment of beacon nodes. In a PDR system, a small number of sensors are put on the pedestrian. These sensors (such as a G-sensor and gyroscope) are used to estimate the distance and direction that a user travels. The effectiveness of a PDR system lies in its success in accurately estimating the user's moving distance and direction. In this work, we propose a novel waist-mounted based PDR that can measure the user's step lengths with a high accuracy. We utilize vertical acceleration of the body to calculate the user's change in height during walking. Based on the Pythagorean Theorem, we can then estimate each step length using this data. Furthermore, we design a map matching algorithm to calibrate the direction errors from the gyro using building floor plans. The results of our experiment show that we can achieve about 98.26% accuracy in estimating the user's walking distance, with an overall location error of about 0.48 m. PMID:23575036

  5. On calibrating the sensor errors of a PDR-based indoor localization system.

    PubMed

    Lan, Kun-Chan; Shih, Wen-Yuah

    2013-01-01

    Many studies utilize the signal strength of short-range radio systems (such as WiFi, ultrasound and infrared) to build a radio map for indoor localization, by deploying a large number of beacon nodes within a building. The drawback of such an infrastructure-based approach is that the deployment and calibration of the system are costly and labor-intensive. Some prior studies proposed the use of Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) for indoor localization, which does not require the deployment of beacon nodes. In a PDR system, a small number of sensors are put on the pedestrian. These sensors (such as a G-sensor and gyroscope) are used to estimate the distance and direction that a user travels. The effectiveness of a PDR system lies in its success in accurately estimating the user's moving distance and direction. In this work, we propose a novel waist-mounted based PDR that can measure the user's step lengths with a high accuracy. We utilize vertical acceleration of the body to calculate the user's change in height during walking. Based on the Pythagorean Theorem, we can then estimate each step length using this data. Furthermore, we design a map matching algorithm to calibrate the direction errors from the gyro using building floor plans. The results of our experiment show that we can achieve about 98.26% accuracy in estimating the user's walking distance, with an overall location error of about 0.48 m.

  6. A computer simulated phantom study of tomotherapy dose optimization based on probability density functions (PDF) and potential errors caused by low reproducibility of PDF

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Ke; Cai Jing; Brookeman, James; Molloy, Janelle; Christopher, John; Read, Paul

    2006-09-15

    Lung tumor motion trajectories measured by four-dimensional CT or dynamic MRI can be converted to a probability density function (PDF), which describes the probability of the tumor at a certain position, for PDF based treatment planning. Using this method in simulated sequential tomotherapy, we study the dose reduction of normal tissues and more important, the effect of PDF reproducibility on the accuracy of dosimetry. For these purposes, realistic PDFs were obtained from two dynamic MRI scans of a healthy volunteer within a 2 week interval. The first PDF was accumulated from a 300 s scan and the second PDF was calculated from variable scan times from 5 s (one breathing cycle) to 300 s. Optimized beam fluences based on the second PDF were delivered to the hypothetical gross target volume (GTV) of a lung phantom that moved following the first PDF. The reproducibility between two PDFs varied from low (78%) to high (94.8%) when the second scan time increased from 5 s to 300 s. When a highly reproducible PDF was used in optimization, the dose coverage of GTV was maintained; phantom lung receiving 10%-20% prescription dose was reduced by 40%-50% and the mean phantom lung dose was reduced by 9.6%. However, optimization based on PDF with low reproducibility resulted in a 50% underdosed GTV. The dosimetric error increased nearly exponentially as the PDF error increased. Therefore, although the dose of the tumor surrounding tissue can be theoretically reduced by PDF based treatment planning, the reliability and applicability of this method highly depend on if a reproducible PDF exists and is measurable. By correlating the dosimetric error and PDF error together, a useful guideline for PDF data acquisition and patient qualification for PDF based planning can be derived.

  7. Flight Test Results of an Angle of Attack and Angle of Sideslip Calibration Method Using Output-Error Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Marie-Michele; Martos, Borja; Foster, John V.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a joint partnership between the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) and the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), research on advanced air data calibration methods has been in progress. This research was initiated to expand a novel pitot-static calibration method that was developed to allow rapid in-flight calibration for the NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) facility. This approach uses Global Positioning System (GPS) technology coupled with modern system identification methods that rapidly computes optimal pressure error models over a range of airspeed with defined confidence bounds. Subscale flight tests demonstrated small 2-s error bounds with significant reduction in test time compared to other methods. Recent UTSI full scale flight tests have shown airspeed calibrations with the same accuracy or better as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accepted GPS 'four-leg' method in a smaller test area and in less time. The current research was motivated by the desire to extend this method for inflight calibration of angle of attack (AOA) and angle of sideslip (AOS) flow vanes. An instrumented Piper Saratoga research aircraft from the UTSI was used to collect the flight test data and evaluate flight test maneuvers. Results showed that the output-error approach produces good results for flow vane calibration. In addition, maneuvers for pitot-static and flow vane calibration can be integrated to enable simultaneous and efficient testing of each system.

  8. Theoretic Studies of Full Constraints on a Star Tracker's Influential Error Sources for In-orbit Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Cai Hao, Yun; Wang, Li; Long, Ye

    2016-03-01

    To collect star transits data qualified for in-orbit calibration, this study derives the full error constraints to limit star tracker's influential error sources and computes their error boundaries from a theoretical perspective. The full constraints, including not only the minimum variance estimation of position but also the error bound prediction of scale and intensity of Gaussian-shaped starspots, are studied based on the Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) theorem. By imposing these constraints on motion, drift in focal length, and other factors, their boundaries could be determined before launch. Therefore, the in-orbit correction accuracy is expected to be close to CRLB through suitable implementation of these constraints. The correctness of the theoretical position error of motion is demonstrated by the data-fitting procedure against test results of star tracker on dynamic performance. The simulation result shows that the drift in focal length can generate an error with the same magnitude as detector noise and thus might be the dominant error source when star tracker is working under stationary circumstance. Using the accuracy performance of some typical star trackers, this study shows that the CRLB constraint may be very effective to estimate the overall position error of a starspot or one axis, valuable data that can be used for online calibration. The overall position uncertainty analysis shows that a weighted method can be employed for calibration, a process where star data can be given a weight in inverse proportion to the CRLB value.

  9. Phantom Effects in School Composition Research: Consequences of Failure to Control Biases Due to Measurement Error in Traditional Multilevel Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Televantou, Ioulia; Marsh, Herbert W.; Kyriakides, Leonidas; Nagengast, Benjamin; Fletcher, John; Malmberg, Lars-Erik

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to quantify the impact of failing to account for measurement error on school compositional effects. Multilevel structural equation models were incorporated to control for measurement error and/or sampling error. Study 1, a large sample of English primary students in Years 1 and 4, revealed a significantly…

  10. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  11. Solar Cell Short Circuit Current Errors and Uncertainties During High Altitude Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David D.

    2012-01-01

    High altitude balloon based facilities can make solar cell calibration measurements above 99.5% of the atmosphere to use for adjusting laboratory solar simulators. While close to on-orbit illumination, the small attenuation to the spectra may result in under measurements of solar cell parameters. Variations of stratospheric weather, may produce flight-to-flight measurement variations. To support the NSCAP effort, this work quantifies some of the effects on solar cell short circuit current (Isc) measurements on triple junction sub-cells. This work looks at several types of high altitude methods, direct high altitude meas urements near 120 kft, and lower stratospheric Langley plots from aircraft. It also looks at Langley extrapolation from altitudes above most of the ozone, for potential small balloon payloads. A convolution of the sub-cell spectral response with the standard solar spectrum modified by several absorption processes is used to determine the relative change from AMO, lscllsc(AMO). Rayleigh scattering, molecular scatterin g from uniformly mixed gases, Ozone, and water vapor, are included in this analysis. A range of atmosph eric pressures are examined, from 0. 05 to 0.25 Atm to cover the range of atmospheric altitudes where solar cell calibrations a reperformed. Generally these errors and uncertainties are less than 0.2%

  12. Calibration of an instrumented treadmill using a precision-controlled device with artificial neural network-based error corrections.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hong-Jung; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Chen, Ting-Yi; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Instrumented treadmills (ITs) are used to measure reaction forces (RF) and center of pressure (COP) movements for gait and balance assessment. Regular in situ calibration is essential to ensure their accuracy and to identify conditions when a factory re-calibration is needed. The current study aimed to develop and calibrate in situ an IT using a portable, precision-controlled calibration device with an artificial neural network (ANN)-based correction method. The calibration device was used to apply static and dynamic calibrating loads to the surface of the IT at 189 and 25 grid-points, respectively, at four belt speeds (0, 4, 6 and 8 km/h) without the need of a preset template. Part of the applied and measured RF and COP were used to train a threelayered, back-propagation ANN model while the rest of the data were used to evaluate the performance of the ANN. The percent errors of Fz and errors of the Px and Py were significantly decreased from a maximum of -1.15%, -1.64 mm and -0.73 mm to 0.02%, 0.02 mm and 0.03 mm during static calibration, respectively. During dynamic calibration, the corresponding values were decreasing from -3.65%, 2.58 mm and -4.92 mm to 0.30%, -0.14 mm and -0.47 mm, respectively. The results suggest that the calibration device and associated ANN will be useful for correcting measurement errors in vertical loads and COP for ITs. PMID:26979909

  13. Empirical calibrated radiocarbon sampler: a tool for incorporating radiocarbon-date and calibration error into Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Molak, Martyna; Suchard, Marc A.; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Beilman, David W.; Shapiro, Beth

    2014-01-01

    Studies of DNA from ancient samples provide a valuable opportunity to gain insight into past evolutionary and demographic processes. Bayesian phylogenetic methods can estimate evolutionary rates and timescales from ancient DNA sequences, with the ages of the samples acting as calibrations for the molecular clock. Sample ages are often estimated using radiocarbon dating, but the associated measurement error is rarely taken into account. In addition, the total uncertainty quantified by converting radiocarbon dates to calendar dates is typically ignored. Here we present a tool for incorporating both of these sources of uncertainty into Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA. This empirical calibrated radiocarbon sampler (ECRS) integrates the age uncertainty for each ancient sequence over the calibrated probability density function estimated for its radiocarbon date and associated error. We use the ECRS to analyse three ancient DNA data sets. Accounting for radiocarbon-dating and calibration error appeared to have little impact on estimates of evolutionary rates and related parameters for these data sets. However, analyses of other data sets, particularly those with few or only very old radiocarbon dates, might be more sensitive to using artificially precise sample ages and should benefit from use of the ECRS. PMID:24964386

  14. Empirical calibrated radiocarbon sampler: a tool for incorporating radiocarbon-date and calibration error into Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Molak, Martyna; Suchard, Marc A; Ho, Simon Y W; Beilman, David W; Shapiro, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Studies of DNA from ancient samples provide a valuable opportunity to gain insight into past evolutionary and demographic processes. Bayesian phylogenetic methods can estimate evolutionary rates and timescales from ancient DNA sequences, with the ages of the samples acting as calibrations for the molecular clock. Sample ages are often estimated using radiocarbon dating, but the associated measurement error is rarely taken into account. In addition, the total uncertainty quantified by converting radiocarbon dates to calendar dates is typically ignored. Here, we present a tool for incorporating both of these sources of uncertainty into Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA. This empirical calibrated radiocarbon sampler (ECRS) integrates the age uncertainty for each ancient sequence over the calibrated probability density function estimated for its radiocarbon date and associated error. We use the ECRS to analyse three ancient DNA data sets. Accounting for radiocarbon-dating and calibration error appeared to have little impact on estimates of evolutionary rates and related parameters for these data sets. However, analyses of other data sets, particularly those with few or only very old radiocarbon dates, might be more sensitive to using artificially precise sample ages and should benefit from use of the ECRS.

  15. Exploiting Task Constraints for Self-Calibrated Brain-Machine Interface Control Using Error-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Iturrate, Iñaki; Grizou, Jonathan; Omedes, Jason; Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Lopes, Manuel; Montesano, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for self-calibration BCI for reaching tasks using error-related potentials. The proposed method exploits task constraints to simultaneously calibrate the decoder and control the device, by using a robust likelihood function and an ad-hoc planner to cope with the large uncertainty resulting from the unknown task and decoder. The method has been evaluated in closed-loop online experiments with 8 users using a previously proposed BCI protocol for reaching tasks over a grid. The results show that it is possible to have a usable BCI control from the beginning of the experiment without any prior calibration. Furthermore, comparisons with simulations and previous results obtained using standard calibration hint that both the quality of recorded signals and the performance of the system were comparable to those obtained with a standard calibration approach. PMID:26131890

  16. Exploiting Task Constraints for Self-Calibrated Brain-Machine Interface Control Using Error-Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Iturrate, Iñaki; Grizou, Jonathan; Omedes, Jason; Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Lopes, Manuel; Montesano, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for self-calibration BCI for reaching tasks using error-related potentials. The proposed method exploits task constraints to simultaneously calibrate the decoder and control the device, by using a robust likelihood function and an ad-hoc planner to cope with the large uncertainty resulting from the unknown task and decoder. The method has been evaluated in closed-loop online experiments with 8 users using a previously proposed BCI protocol for reaching tasks over a grid. The results show that it is possible to have a usable BCI control from the beginning of the experiment without any prior calibration. Furthermore, comparisons with simulations and previous results obtained using standard calibration hint that both the quality of recorded signals and the performance of the system were comparable to those obtained with a standard calibration approach. PMID:26131890

  17. Sources of systematic error in calibrated BOLD based mapping of baseline oxygen extraction fraction.

    PubMed

    Blockley, Nicholas P; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Stone, Alan J; Hare, Hannah V; Bulte, Daniel P

    2015-11-15

    Recently a new class of calibrated blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods were introduced to quantitatively measure the baseline oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). These methods rely on two respiratory challenges and a mathematical model of the resultant changes in the BOLD functional MRI signal to estimate the OEF. However, this mathematical model does not include all of the effects that contribute to the BOLD signal, it relies on several physiological assumptions and it may be affected by intersubject physiological variability. The aim of this study was to investigate these sources of systematic error and their effect on estimating the OEF. This was achieved through simulation using a detailed model of the BOLD signal. Large ranges for intersubject variability in baseline physiological parameters such as haematocrit and cerebral blood volume were considered. Despite this the uncertainty in the relationship between the measured BOLD signals and the OEF was relatively low. Investigations of the physiological assumptions that underlie the mathematical model revealed that OEF measurements are likely to be overestimated if oxygen metabolism changes during hypercapnia or cerebral blood flow changes under hyperoxia. Hypoxic hypoxia was predicted to result in an underestimation of the OEF, whilst anaemic hypoxia was found to have only a minimal effect.

  18. A Simultaneously Calibration Approach for Installation and Attitude Errors of an INS/GPS/LDS Target Tracker

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Daidai; Sun, Xiangyu; Wang, Tongda

    2015-01-01

    To obtain the absolute position of a target is one of the basic topics for non-cooperated target tracking problems. In this paper, we present a simultaneously calibration method for an Inertial navigation system (INS)/Global position system (GPS)/Laser distance scanner (LDS) integrated system based target positioning approach. The INS/GPS integrated system provides the attitude and position of observer, and LDS offers the distance between the observer and the target. The two most significant errors are taken into jointly consideration and analyzed: (1) the attitude measure error of INS/GPS; (2) the installation error between INS/GPS and LDS subsystems. Consequently, a INS/GPS/LDS based target positioning approach considering these two errors is proposed. In order to improve the performance of this approach, a novel calibration method is designed to simultaneously estimate and compensate these two main errors. Finally, simulations are conducted to access the performance of the proposed target positioning approach and the designed simultaneously calibration method. PMID:25658391

  19. Channel calibration for digital array radar in the presence of amplitude-phase and mutual coupling errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weixing; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Jianzhi; Chen, Zengping

    2015-10-01

    Amplitude-phase errors and mutual coupling errors among multi-channels in digital array radar (DAR) will seriously deteriorate the performance of signal processing such as digital beam-forming (DBF) and high resolution direction finding. In this paper, a combined algorithm for error calibration in DAR has been demonstrated. The algorithm firstly estimates the amplitude-phase errors of each channel using interior calibration sources with the help of the calibration network. Then the signals from far field are received and the amplitude-phase errors are compensated. According to the subspace theories, the relationship between the principle eigenvectors and distorted steering vectors is expressed, and the cost function containing the mutual coupling matrix (MCM) and incident directions is established. Making use of the properties of MCM of uniform linear array, Gauss-Newton method is implied to iteratively compute the MCM and the direction of arrival (DOA). Simulation results have shown the effectiveness and performance of proposed algorithm. Based on an 8-elements DAR test-bed, experiments are carried out in anechoic chamber. The results illustrate that the algorithm is feasible in actual systems.

  20. A simultaneously calibration approach for installation and attitude errors of an INS/GPS/LDS target tracker.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Daidai; Sun, Xiangyu; Wang, Tongda

    2015-01-01

    To obtain the absolute position of a target is one of the basic topics for non-cooperated target tracking problems. In this paper, we present a simultaneously calibration method for an Inertial navigation system (INS)/Global position system (GPS)/Laser distance scanner (LDS) integrated system based target positioning approach. The INS/GPS integrated system provides the attitude and position of observer, and LDS offers the distance between the observer and the target. The two most significant errors are taken into jointly consideration and analyzed: (1) the attitude measure error of INS/GPS; (2) the installation error between INS/GPS and LDS subsystems. Consequently, a INS/GPS/LDS based target positioning approach considering these two errors is proposed. In order to improve the performance of this approach, a novel calibration method is designed to simultaneously estimate and compensate these two main errors. Finally, simulations are conducted to access the performance of the proposed target positioning approach and the designed simultaneously calibration method. PMID:25658391

  1. Application of advanced shearing techniques to the calibration of autocollimators with small angle generators and investigation of error sources.

    PubMed

    Yandayan, T; Geckeler, R D; Aksulu, M; Akgoz, S A; Ozgur, B

    2016-05-01

    The application of advanced error-separating shearing techniques to the precise calibration of autocollimators with Small Angle Generators (SAGs) was carried out for the first time. The experimental realization was achieved using the High Precision Small Angle Generator (HPSAG) of TUBITAK UME under classical dimensional metrology laboratory environmental conditions. The standard uncertainty value of 5 mas (24.2 nrad) reached by classical calibration method was improved to the level of 1.38 mas (6.7 nrad). Shearing techniques, which offer a unique opportunity to separate the errors of devices without recourse to any external standard, were first adapted by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to the calibration of autocollimators with angle encoders. It has been demonstrated experimentally in a clean room environment using the primary angle standard of PTB (WMT 220). The application of the technique to a different type of angle measurement system extends the range of the shearing technique further and reveals other advantages. For example, the angular scales of the SAGs are based on linear measurement systems (e.g., capacitive nanosensors for the HPSAG). Therefore, SAGs show different systematic errors when compared to angle encoders. In addition to the error-separation of HPSAG and the autocollimator, detailed investigations on error sources were carried out. Apart from determination of the systematic errors of the capacitive sensor used in the HPSAG, it was also demonstrated that the shearing method enables the unique opportunity to characterize other error sources such as errors due to temperature drift in long term measurements. This proves that the shearing technique is a very powerful method for investigating angle measuring systems, for their improvement, and for specifying precautions to be taken during the measurements.

  2. Parameterizations for reducing camera reprojection error for robot-world hand-eye calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate robot-world, hand-eye calibration is crucial to automation tasks. In this paper, we discuss the robot-world, hand-eye calibration problem which has been modeled as the linear relationship AX equals ZB, where X and Z are the unknown calibration matrices composed of rotation and translation ...

  3. Whole body counter calibration using Monte Carlo modeling with an array of phantom sizes based on national anthropometric reference data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During construction of the whole body counter (WBC) at the Children’s Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), efficiency calibration was needed to translate acquired counts of 40K to actual grams of potassium for measurement of total body potassium (TBK) in a diverse subject population. The MCNP Monte Car...

  4. Error Budget for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  5. Sensitivity analysis, calibration, and testing of a distributed hydrological model using error-based weighting and one objective function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foglia, L.; Hill, M.C.; Mehl, S.W.; Burlando, P.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the utility of three interrelated means of using data to calibrate the fully distributed rainfall-runoff model TOPKAPI as applied to the Maggia Valley drainage area in Switzerland. The use of error-based weighting of observation and prior information data, local sensitivity analysis, and single-objective function nonlinear regression provides quantitative evaluation of sensitivity of the 35 model parameters to the data, identification of data types most important to the calibration, and identification of correlations among parameters that contribute to nonuniqueness. Sensitivity analysis required only 71 model runs, and regression required about 50 model runs. The approach presented appears to be ideal for evaluation of models with long run times or as a preliminary step to more computationally demanding methods. The statistics used include composite scaled sensitivities, parameter correlation coefficients, leverage, Cook's D, and DFBETAS. Tests suggest predictive ability of the calibrated model typical of hydrologic models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Analysis of Calibration Errors for Both Short and Long Stroke White Light Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Xaiopei

    2006-01-01

    This work will analyze focusing and tilt variations introduced by thermal changes in calibration processes. In particular the accuracy limits are presented for common short- and long-stroke experiments. A new, simple, practical calibration scheme is proposed and analyzed based on the SIM PlanetQuest's Micro-Arcsecond Metrology (MAM) testbed experiments.

  7. Line fiducial material and thickness considerations for ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; McLeod, A. J.; Baxter, John S. H.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound calibration is a necessary procedure in many image-guided interventions, relating the position of tools and anatomical structures in the ultrasound image to a common coordinate system. This is a necessary component of augmented reality environments in image-guided interventions as it allows for a 3D visualization where other surgical tools outside the imaging plane can be found. Accuracy of ultrasound calibration fundamentally affects the total accuracy of this interventional guidance system. Many ultrasound calibration procedures have been proposed based on a variety of phantom materials and geometries. These differences lead to differences in representation of the phantom on the ultrasound image which subsequently affect the ability to accurately and automatically segment the phantom. For example, taut wires are commonly used as line fiducials in ultrasound calibration. However, at large depths or oblique angles, the fiducials appear blurred and smeared in ultrasound images making it hard to localize their cross-section with the ultrasound image plane. Intuitively, larger diameter phantoms with lower echogenicity are more accurately segmented in ultrasound images in comparison to highly reflective thin phantoms. In this work, an evaluation of a variety of calibration phantoms with different geometrical and material properties for the phantomless calibration procedure was performed. The phantoms used in this study include braided wire, plastic straws, and polyvinyl alcohol cryogel tubes with different diameters. Conventional B-mode and synthetic aperture images of the phantoms at different positions were obtained. The phantoms were automatically segmented from the ultrasound images using an ellipse fitting algorithm, the centroid of which is subsequently used as a fiducial for calibration. Calibration accuracy was evaluated for these procedures based on the leave-one-out target registration error. It was shown that larger diameter phantoms with lower

  8. Magnetoencephalography Phantom Comparison and Validation: Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) Requisite

    PubMed Central

    OMAR, Hazim; AHMAD, Alwani Liyan; HAYASHI, Noburo; IDRIS, Zamzuri; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been extensively used to measure small-scale neuronal brain activity. Although it is widely acknowledged as a sensitive tool for deciphering brain activity and source localisation, the accuracy of the MEG system must be critically evaluated. Typically, on-site calibration with the provided phantom (Local phantom) is used. However, this method is still questionable due to the uncertainty that may originate from the phantom itself. Ideally, the validation of MEG data measurements would require cross-site comparability. Method: A simple method of phantom testing was used twice in addition to a measurement taken with a calibrated reference phantom (RefPhantom) obtained from Elekta Oy of Helsinki, Finland. The comparisons of two main aspects were made in terms of the dipole moment (Qpp) and the difference in the dipole distance from the origin (d) after the tests of statistically equal means and variance were confirmed. Result: The result of Qpp measurements for the LocalPhantom and RefPhantom were 978 (SD24) nAm and 988 (SD32) nAm, respectively, and were still optimally within the accepted range of 900 to 1100 nAm. Moreover, the shifted d results for the LocalPhantom and RefPhantom were 1.84 mm (SD 0.53) and 2.14 mm (SD 0.78), respectively, and these values were below the maximum acceptance range of within 5.0 mm of the nominal dipole location. Conclusion: The Local phantom seems to outperform the reference phantom as indicated by the small standard error of the former (SE 0.094) compared with the latter (SE 0.138). The result indicated that HUSM MEG system was in excellent working condition in terms of the dipole magnitude and localisation measurements as these values passed the acceptance limits criteria of the phantom test. PMID:27006634

  9. Traceable micro-CT scaling accuracy phantom for applications requiring exact measurement of distances or volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Waring, C.S.; Bax, J.S.; Samarabandu, A.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Fenster, A.; Lacefield, J.C.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Volumetric x-ray microcomputed tomography (CT) can be employed in a variety of quantitative research applications such as image-guided interventions or characterization of medical devices. To ensure the highest geometric fidelity of images for these applications, a phantom and image processing algorithm have been developed to calibrate the scaling accuracy of micro-CT scanners to a traceable standard and provide corrections to image voxel sizing. Methods: The calibration phantom contains six borosilicate beads whose separations have been measured to a traceable standard. An image processing algorithm compares the known separations of the beads to their separations in micro-CT images. A least-squares solution is used to determine linear scaling correction factors along each of the three scanner axes to minimize errors in the bead separations within the images by correcting the image voxel size. The correction factors were applied to images of a similar phantom with beads at different positions to evaluate the ability of the correction factors to reduce errors at points independent of the fiducial locations in the calibration phantom. The calibration phantom was used to evaluate the scaling accuracy of five different micro-CT scanners representing four different scanner models. Results: In two of the five scanners evaluated, the correction factors significantly reduced the mean error in bead separations in the images from 0.17% to 0.05% and from 0.37% to 0.07% of the actual bead separations, respectively. Scanners yielding similar voxel sizes possessed comparable geometric errors after correction using the phantom. Conclusions: Although the magnitude of the corrections is small, such corrections can be important for demanding micro-CT applications. Even if no voxel size correction is required, the phantom provides an easily implemented method to verify the geometric fidelity of micro-CT scanners to a traceable standard of measurement.

  10. Multiple-response Bayesian calibration of watershed water quality models with significant input and model structure errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Feng; Zheng, Yi

    2016-02-01

    While watershed water quality (WWQ) models have been widely used to support water quality management, their profound modeling uncertainty remains an unaddressed issue. Data assimilation via Bayesian calibration is a promising solution to the uncertainty, but has been rarely practiced for WWQ modeling. This study applied multiple-response Bayesian calibration (MRBC) to SWAT, a classic WWQ model, using the nitrate pollution in the Newport Bay Watershed (southern California, USA) as the study case. How typical input and model structure errors would impact modeling uncertainty, parameter identification and management decision-making was systematically investigated through both synthetic and real-situation modeling cases. The main study findings include: (1) with an efficient sampling scheme, MRBC is applicable to WWQ modeling in characterizing its parametric and predictive uncertainties; (2) incorporating hydrology responses, which are less susceptible to input and model structure errors than water quality responses, can improve the Bayesian calibration results and benefit potential modeling-based management decisions; and (3) the value of MRBC to modeling-based decision-making essentially depends on pollution severity, management objective and decision maker's risk tolerance.

  11. Suppression of fiber modal noise induced radial velocity errors for bright emission-line calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  12. Errors in measurements of 222Rn in methane and carbon dioxide using scintillation cells calibrated for 222Rn in air.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Phillip H; Burkhart, James F; Camley, Robert E

    2014-03-01

    Scintillation cells are used typically for measuring the concentration of (222)Rn in air and are calibrated for that purpose. However, scintillation cells are sometimes used for measuring (222)Rn in natural gas or carbon dioxide. The counting efficiencies of scintillation cells for measurements of (222)Rn in these gases should be different from those for measuring (222)Rn in air because the ranges of alpha particles emitted by (222)Rn and its progeny are greater in methane and smaller in carbon dioxide than in air. If these effects are not taken into consideration, measurements of (222)Rn in natural gas will be biased high and in carbon dioxide will be biased low. The authors previously investigated the effects of barometric pressure on measurements of (222)Rn in air using scintillation cells. A modeling technique was used in a previous study to calculate theoretical errors that would result if atmospheric pressure were not considered. In the current study, the same modeling technique was used to calculate theoretical errors that would be made for measurements of (222)Rn in methane and carbon dioxide if the calibration for (222)Rn in air were used. Results are presented for four types of scintillation cells of varying geometries and for barometric pressures representative of four elevations ranging from sea level to 1,963 m (6,440 feet). These results indicate that the errors introduced by the ranges of the alpha particles in gases different from air can be significant. Depending on the type of cell and the local pressure, a measurement of (222)Rn in methane may be biased high by 2-7%, while a measurement of (222)Rn in CO2 may be biased low by 15-20% if the calibration for (222)Rn in air is used. PMID:25208015

  13. Performance analysis for time-frequency MUSIC algorithm in presence of both additive noise and array calibration errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodja, Mohamed; Belouchrani, Adel; Abed-Meraim, Karim

    2012-12-01

    This article deals with the application of Spatial Time-Frequency Distribution (STFD) to the direction finding problem using the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC)algorithm. A comparative performance analysis is performed for the method under consideration with respect to that using data covariance matrix when the received array signals are subject to calibration errors in a non-stationary environment. An unified analytical expression of the Direction Of Arrival (DOA) error estimation is derived for both methods. Numerical results show the effect of the parameters intervening in the derived expression on the algorithm performance. It is particularly observed that for low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and high Signal to sensor Perturbation Ratio (SPR) the STFD method gives better performance, while for high SNR and for the same SPR both methods give similar performance.

  14. A simple method for high-precision calibration of long-range errors in an angle encoder using an electronic nulling autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnane, Mark N.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert; Mendenhall, Marcus H.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a simple method for high-precision rotary angle encoder calibration for long-range angular errors. By using a redesigned electronic nulling autocollimator, an optical-polygon artifact is calibrated simultaneously with determining the encoder error function over a rotation of 2π rad. The technique is applied to the NIST vacuum double crystal spectrometer, which depends on precise measurement of diffraction angles to determine absolute x-ray wavelengths. By oversampling, the method returned the encoder error function with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 0.004 s of plane angle. Knowledge of the error function permits the instrument to make individual encoder readings with an accuracy of 0.06 s (k = 2), which is limited primarily by the least count and noise of the encoder electronics. While the error function lay within the nominal specifications, it differed from the intrinsic factory curve, indicating the need for in situ calibration in high-precision applications.

  15. The Influence of Item Calibration Error on Variable-Length Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Jeffrey M.; Cheng, Ying; Yuan, Ke-Hai; Diao, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Variable-length computerized adaptive testing (VL-CAT) allows both items and test length to be "tailored" to examinees, thereby achieving the measurement goal (e.g., scoring precision or classification) with as few items as possible. Several popular test termination rules depend on the standard error of the ability estimate, which in turn depends…

  16. Variation in the calibrated response of LiF, Al2O3, and silicon dosimeters when used for in-phantom measurements of source photons with energies between 30 KeV AND 300 KeV.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Sashi; Currier, Blake; Medich, David C

    2015-04-01

    The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used to quantify changes in the absorbed dose conversion factor for LiF, Al2O3, and silicon-based electronic dosimeters calibrated in-air using standard techniques and summarily used to measure absorbed dose to water when placed in a water phantom. A mono-energetic photon source was modeled at energies between 30 keV and 300 keV for a point-source placed at the center of a water phantom, a point-source placed at the surface of the phantom, and for a 10-cm radial field geometry. Dosimetric calculations were obtained for water, LiF, Al2O3, and silicon at depths of 0.2 cm and 10 cm from the source. These results were achieved using the MCNP5 *FMESH photon energy-fluence tally, which was coupled with the appropriate DE/DF card for each dosimetric material studied to convert energy-fluence into the absorbed dose. The dosimeter's absorbed dose conversion factor was calculated as a ratio of the absorbed dose to water to that of the dosimeter measured at a specified phantom depth. The dosimeter's calibration value also was obtained. Based on these results, the absorbed dose conversion factor for a LiF dosimeter was found to deviate from its calibration value by up to 9%, an Al2O3 dosimeter by 43%, and a silicon dosimeter by 61%. These data therefore can be used to obtain LiF, Al2O3, and silicon dosimeter correction factors for mono-energetic and poly-energetic sources at measurement depths up to 10 cm under the irradiation geometries investigated herein.

  17. An automated construction of error models for uncertainty quantification and model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josset, L.; Lunati, I.

    2015-12-01

    To reduce the computational cost of stochastic predictions, it is common practice to rely on approximate flow solvers (or «proxy»), which provide an inexact, but computationally inexpensive response [1,2]. Error models can be constructed to correct the proxy response: based on a learning set of realizations for which both exact and proxy simulations are performed, a transformation is sought to map proxy into exact responses. Once the error model is constructed a prediction of the exact response is obtained at the cost of a proxy simulation for any new realization. Despite its effectiveness [2,3], the methodology relies on several user-defined parameters, which impact the accuracy of the predictions. To achieve a fully automated construction, we propose a novel methodology based on an iterative scheme: we first initialize the error model with a small training set of realizations; then, at each iteration, we add a new realization both to improve the model and to evaluate its performance. More specifically, at each iteration we use the responses predicted by the updated model to identify the realizations that need to be considered to compute the quantity of interest. Another user-defined parameter is the number of dimensions of the response spaces between which the mapping is sought. To identify the space dimensions that optimally balance mapping accuracy and risk of overfitting, we follow a Leave-One-Out Cross Validation. Also, the definition of a stopping criterion is central to an automated construction. We use a stability measure based on bootstrap techniques to stop the iterative procedure when the iterative model has converged. The methodology is illustrated with two test cases in which an inverse problem has to be solved and assess the performance of the method. We show that an iterative scheme is crucial to increase the applicability of the approach. [1] Josset, L., and I. Lunati, Local and global error models for improving uncertainty quantification, Math

  18. The solar vector error within the SNPP Common GEO code, the correction, and the effects on the VIIRS SDR RSB calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulbright, Jon; Anderson, Samuel; Lei, Ning; Efremova, Boryana; Wang, Zhipeng; McIntire, Jeffrey; Chiang, Kwofu; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2014-11-01

    Due to a software error, the solar and lunar vectors reported in the on-board calibrator intermediate product (OBC-IP) files for SNPP VIIRS are incorrect. The magnitude of the error is about 0.2 degree, and the magnitude is increasing by about 0.01 degree per year. This error, although small, has an effect on the radiometric calibration of the reflective solar bands (RSB) because accurate solar angles are required for calculating the screen transmission functions and for calculating the illumination of the Solar Diffuser panel. In this paper, we describe the error in the Common GEO code, and how it may be fixed. We present evidence for the error from within the OBC-IP data. We also describe the effects of the solar vector error on the RSB calibration and the Sensor Data Record (SDR). In order to perform this evaluation, we have reanalyzed the yaw-maneuver data to compute the vignetting functions required for the on-orbit SD RSB radiometric calibration. After the reanalysis, we find effect of up to 0.5% on the shortwave infrared (SWIR) RSB calibration.

  19. Novel anthropomorphic hip phantom corrects systemic interscanner differences in proximal femoral vBMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaretti, S.; Carpenter, R. D.; Saeed, I.; Burghardt, A. J.; Yu, L.; Bruesewitz, M.; Khosla, S.; Lang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is increasingly used in osteoporosis studies to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone quality and strength. However, QCT is confronted by technical issues in the clinical research setting, such as potentially confounding effects of body size on vBMD measurements and lack of standard approaches to scanner cross-calibration, which affects measurements of vBMD in multicenter settings. In this study, we addressed systematic inter-scanner differences and subject-dependent body size errors using a novel anthropomorphic hip phantom, containing a calibration hip to estimate correction equations, and a contralateral test hip to assess the quality of the correction. We scanned this phantom on four different scanners and we applied phantom-derived corrections to in vivo images of 16 postmenopausal women scanned on two scanners. From the phantom study, we found that vBMD decreased with increasing phantom size in three of four scanners and that inter-scanner variations increased with increasing phantom size. In the in vivo study, we observed that inter-scanner corrections reduced systematic inter-scanner mean vBMD differences but that the inter-scanner precision error was still larger than expected from known intra-scanner precision measurements. In conclusion, inter-scanner corrections and body size influence should be considered when measuring vBMD from QCT images.

  20. Radio metric errors due to mismatch and offset between a DSN antenna beam and the beam of a troposphere calibration instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R. P.; Wilcox, J. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Two components of the error of a troposphere calibration measurement were quantified by theoretical calculations. The first component is a beam mismatch error, which occurs when the calibration instrument senses a conical volume different from the cylindrical volume sampled by a Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna. The second component is a beam offset error, which occurs if the calibration instrument is not mounted on the axis of the DSN antenna. These two error sources were calculated for both delay (e.g., VLBI) and delay rate (e.g., Doppler) measurements. The beam mismatch error for both delay and delay rate drops rapidly as the beamwidth of the troposphere calibration instrument (e.g., a water vapor radiometer or an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer) is reduced. At a 10-deg elevation angle, the instantaneous beam mismatch error is 1.0 mm for a 6-deg beamwidth and 0.09 mm for a 0.5-deg beam (these are the full angular widths of a circular beam with uniform gain out to a sharp cutoff). Time averaging for 60-100 sec will reduce these errors by factors of 1.2-2.2. At a 20-deg elevation angle, the lower limit for current Doppler observations, the beam-mismatch delay rate error is an Allan standard deviation over 100 sec of 1.1 x 10(exp -14) with a 4-deg beam and 1.3 x 10(exp -l5) for a 0.5-deg beam. A 50-m beam offset would result in a fairly modest (compared to other expected error sources) delay error (less than or equal to 0.3 mm for 60-sec integrations at any elevation angle is greater than or equal to 6 deg). However, the same offset would cause a large error in delay rate measurements (e.g., an Allan standard deviation of 1.2 x 10(exp -14) over 100 sec at a 20-deg elevation angle), which would dominate over other known error sources if the beamwidth is 2 deg or smaller. An on-axis location is essential for accurate troposphere calibration of delay rate measurements. A half-power beamwidth (for a beam with a tapered gain profile) of 1.2 deg or smaller is

  1. SU-E-I-24: Design and Fabrication of a Multi-Functional Neck and Thyroid Phantom for Medical Dosimetry and Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdizadeh, S; Sina, S; Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Faghihi, R; Babaei, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is the design and fabrication of a multipurpose anthropomorphic neck and thyroid phantom for use in medical applications (i.e. quality control of images in nuclear medicine, and dosimetry). Methods: The designed neck phantom is composed of seven elliptic cylindrical slices with semi-major axis of 14 and semi-minor axis of 12.5 cm, each having the thickness of 2cm. Thyroid gland, bony part of the neck, and the wind pipe were also built inside the neck phantom. Results: The phantom contains some removable plugs,inside and at its surface to accommodate the TLD chips with different shapes and dimensions, (i.e. rod, cylindrical and cubical TLD chips)for the purpose of medical dosimetry (i.e. in radiology, radiotherapy, and nuclear medicine). For the purpose of quality control of images in nuclear medicine, the removable thyroid gland was built to accommodate the radioactive iodine. The female and male thyroid glands were built in two sizes separately. Conclusion: The designed phantom is a multi-functional phantom which is applicable for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy, and quality control of images in nuclear medicine.

  2. Calibration and systematic error analysis for the COBE(1) DMR 4year sky maps

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A.J.; Bennett, C.L.; Gorski, K.M.; Hinshaw,G.; Jackson, P.D.; Keegstra, P.; Lineweaver, C.; Smoot, G.F.; Tenorio,L.; Wright, E.L.

    1996-01-04

    The Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has mapped the full microwave sky to mean sensitivity 26 mu K per 7 degrees held of view. The absolute calibration is determined to 0.7 percent with drifts smaller than 0.2 percent per year. We have analyzed both the raw differential data and the pixelized sky maps for evidence of contaminating sources such as solar system foregrounds, instrumental susceptibilities, and artifacts from data recovery and processing. Most systematic effects couple only weakly to the sky maps. The largest uncertainties in the maps result from the instrument susceptibility to Earth's magnetic field, microwave emission from Earth, and upper limits to potential effects at the spacecraft spin period. Systematic effects in the maps are small compared to either the noise or the celestial signal: the 95 percent confidence upper limit for the pixel-pixel rms from all identified systematics is less than 6 mu K in the worst channel. A power spectrum analysis of the (A-B)/2 difference maps shows no evidence for additional undetected systematic effects.

  3. Using a Blackbody to Calculate Net-longwave Responsivity of Shortwave Solar Pyranometers to Correct for Their Thermal Offset Error During Outdoor Calibration Using the Component Sum Method

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Hickey, J. R.; Long, Charles N.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.; Wilcox, S.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Nelson, D. W.

    2005-10-10

    Thermopile pyranometers’ thermal offset has been recognized since the pyranometer’s inception. This offset is often overlooked or ignored because its magnitude is small compared to the overall solar signal at higher irradiance. With the demand of smaller uncertainty in measuring solar radiation, recent publications have described a renewed interest in this offset, its magnitude, and its effect on solar measurement networks for atmospheric science and solar energy applications. Recently, it was suggested that the magnitude of the pyranometer thermal offset is the same if the pyranometer is shaded or unshaded. Therefore, calibrating a pyranometer using a method known as the shade/unshade method would result in accurate responsivity calculations, because the thermal offset error is canceled. When using the common summation calibration method, or component sum, for the pyranometer calibration, the thermal offset error, which is typically negative when the sky is cloudless, does not cancel, resulting in an underestimated shortwave responsivity. Most operational pyranometers that are in use for solar radiation measuring networks are calibrated using the summation method since it is possible to calibrate many pyranometers simultaneously. From this arises the importance of correcting the summation method results to account for the thermal offset error. In this article, we describe a method of using a blackbody system to calculate the net-longwave responsivity of pyranometers, which is largely responsible for the offset error. This longwave responsivity is then used to correct the pyranometer’s shortwave responsivity during the summation method calibrations and thereby substantially reduces the effect of the offset error on the final pyranometer responsivity. Practical procedures for performing this calibration procedure along with its limitations and remaining uncertainties are given.

  4. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  5. Calibration of symmetric and non-symmetric errors for interferometry of ultra-precise imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D W; Sommargren, G E; Johnson, M A; Decker, T A; Taylor, J S; Gomie, Y; Kakuchi, O; Takeuchi, S

    2005-06-29

    The azimuthal Zernike coefficients for shells of Zernike functions with shell numbers nerrors would then be known. Physically, the measurements in circles A and B are accomplished by rotating each pinhole aligner about an aligned axis, then about an oblique axis. Absolute measurement accuracies better than 0.2 nm were achieved.

  6. Keck constraints on a varying fine-structure constant: wavelength calibration errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Webb, John K.; Flambaum, Victor V.

    2010-11-01

    The Keck telescope's High Resolution Spectrograph (HIRES) has previously provided evidence for a smaller fine-structure constant, α, compared to the current laboratory value, in a sample of 143 quasar absorption systems: Δα/α=(-0.57±0.11)×10-5. The analysis was based on a variety of metal-ion transitions which, if α varies, experience different relative velocity shifts. This result is yet to be robustly contradicted, or confirmed, by measurements on other telescopes and spectrographs; it remains crucial to do so. It is also important to consider new possible instrumental systematic effects which may explain the Keck/HIRES results. Griest et al. (2009) recently identified distortions in the echelle order wavelength scales of HIRES with typical amplitudes ±250 m s-1. Here we investigate the effect such distortions may have had on the Keck/HIRES varying α results. Using a simple model of these intra-order distortions, we demonstrate that they cause a random effect on Δα/α from absorber to absorber because the systems are at different redshifts, placing the relevant absorption lines at different positions in different echelle orders. The typical magnitude of the effect on Δα/α is ~0.4×10-5 for individual absorbers which, compared to the median error on Δα/α in the sample, ~1.9×10-5, is relatively small. Consequently, the weighted mean value changes by less than 0.05×10-5 if the corrections we calculate are applied. Unsurprisingly, with corrections this small, we do not find direct evidence that applying them is actually warranted. Nevertheless, we urge caution, particularly for analyses aiming to achieve high precision Δα/α measurements on individual systems or small samples, that a much more detailed understanding of such intra-order distortions and their dependence on observational parameters is important if they are to be avoided or modelled reliably.

  7. Automatic 3D ultrasound calibration for image guided therapy using intramodality image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Kirmizibayrak, Can; Shamdasani, Vijay; Metz, Steve; Hristov, Dimitre

    2013-11-01

    Many real time ultrasound (US) guided therapies can benefit from management of motion-induced anatomical changes with respect to a previously acquired computerized anatomy model. Spatial calibration is a prerequisite to transforming US image information to the reference frame of the anatomy model. We present a new method for calibrating 3D US volumes using intramodality image registration, derived from the ‘hand-eye’ calibration technique. The method is fully automated by implementing data rejection based on sensor displacements, automatic registration over overlapping image regions, and a self-consistency error metric evaluated continuously during calibration. We also present a novel method for validating US calibrations based on measurement of physical phantom displacements within US images. Both calibration and validation can be performed on arbitrary phantoms. Results indicate that normalized mutual information and localized cross correlation produce the most accurate 3D US registrations for calibration. Volumetric image alignment is more accurate and reproducible than point selection for validating the calibrations, yielding <1.5 mm root mean square error, a significant improvement relative to previously reported hand-eye US calibration results. Comparison of two different phantoms for calibration and for validation revealed significant differences for validation (p = 0.003) but not for calibration (p = 0.795).

  8. Absolute calibration for complex-geometry biomedical diffuse optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Jiang, Shudong; El-Ghussein, Fadi; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-03-01

    We have presented methodology to calibrate data in NIRS/MRI imaging versus an absolute reference phantom and results in both phantoms and healthy volunteers. This method directly calibrates data to a diffusion-based model, takes advantage of patient specific geometry from MRI prior information, and generates an initial guess without the need for a large data set. This method of calibration allows for more accurate quantification of total hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water content, scattering, and lipid concentration as compared with other, slope-based methods. We found the main source of error in the method to be derived from incorrect assignment of reference phantom optical properties rather than initial guess in reconstruction. We also present examples of phantom and breast images from a combined frequency domain and continuous wave MRI-coupled NIRS system. We were able to recover phantom data within 10% of expected contrast and within 10% of the actual value using this method and compare these results with slope-based calibration methods. Finally, we were able to use this technique to calibrate and reconstruct images from healthy volunteers. Representative images are shown and discussion is provided for comparison with existing literature. These methods work towards fully combining the synergistic attributes of MRI and NIRS for in-vivo imaging of breast cancer. Complete software and hardware integration in dual modality instruments is especially important due to the complexity of the technology and success will contribute to complex anatomical and molecular prognostic information that can be readily obtained in clinical use.

  9. A Full-Envelope Air Data Calibration and Three-Dimensional Wind Estimation Method Using Global Output-Error Optimization and Flight-Test Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    A novel, efficient air data calibration method is proposed for aircraft with limited envelopes. This method uses output-error optimization on three-dimensional inertial velocities to estimate calibration and wind parameters. Calibration parameters are based on assumed calibration models for static pressure, angle of attack, and flank angle. Estimated wind parameters are the north, east, and down components. The only assumptions needed for this method are that the inertial velocities and Euler angles are accurate, the calibration models are correct, and that the steady-state component of wind is constant throughout the maneuver. A two-minute maneuver was designed to excite the aircraft over the range of air data calibration parameters and de-correlate the angle-of-attack bias from the vertical component of wind. Simulation of the X-48B (The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) aircraft was used to validate the method, ultimately using data derived from wind-tunnel testing to simulate the un-calibrated air data measurements. Results from the simulation were accurate and robust to turbulence levels comparable to those observed in flight. Future experiments are planned to evaluate the proposed air data calibration in a flight environment.

  10. An anatomically realistic brain phantom for quantification with positron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Molliver, M.E.; Hengst, T.C.; Clifford, C.M.; Buhle, L.; Bryan, M.; Stumpf, M.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Phantom studies are useful in assessing and maximizing the accuracy and precision of quantification of absolute activity, assessing errors associated with patient positioning, and dosimetry. Most phantoms are limited by the use of simple shapes, which do not adequately reflect real anatomy. The authors have constructed an anatomically realistic life-size brain phantom for positron tomography studies. The phantom consists of separately fillable R + L caudates, R + L putamens, R + L globus passidus and cerebellum. These structures are contained in proper anatomic orientation within a fillable cerebrum. Solid ventricles are also present. The entire clear vinyl cerebrum is placed in a human skull. The internal brain structures were fabricated from polyester resin, with dimensions, shapes and sizes of the structures obtained from digitized contours of brain slices in the U.C.S.D. computerized brain atlas. The structures were filled with known concentrations of Ga-68 in water and scanned with our NeuroECAT. The phantom was aligned in the scanner for each structure, such that the tomographic slice passed through that structure's center. After calibration of the scanner with a standard phantom for counts/pixel uCi/cc conversion, the measured activity concentrations were compared with the actual concentrations. The ratio of measured to actual activity concentration (''recovery coefficient'') for the caudate was 0.33; for the putamen 0.42. For comparison, the ratio for spheres of diameters 9.5, 16,19 and 25.4 mm was 0.23, 0.54, 0.81, and 0.93. This phantom provides more realistic assessment of performance and allows calculation of correction factors.

  11. Tissue-like phantoms

    DOEpatents

    Frangioni, John V.; De Grand, Alec M.

    2007-10-30

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  12. Flight Test Results of a GPS-Based Pitot-Static Calibration Method Using Output-Error Optimization for a Light Twin-Engine Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martos, Borja; Kiszely, Paul; Foster, John V.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), a novel pitot-static calibration method was developed to allow rapid in-flight calibration for subscale aircraft while flying within confined test areas. This approach uses Global Positioning System (GPS) technology coupled with modern system identification methods that rapidly computes optimal pressure error models over a range of airspeed with defined confidence bounds. This method has been demonstrated in subscale flight tests and has shown small 2- error bounds with significant reduction in test time compared to other methods. The current research was motivated by the desire to further evaluate and develop this method for full-scale aircraft. A goal of this research was to develop an accurate calibration method that enables reductions in test equipment and flight time, thus reducing costs. The approach involved analysis of data acquisition requirements, development of efficient flight patterns, and analysis of pressure error models based on system identification methods. Flight tests were conducted at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) utilizing an instrumented Piper Navajo research aircraft. In addition, the UTSI engineering flight simulator was used to investigate test maneuver requirements and handling qualities issues associated with this technique. This paper provides a summary of piloted simulation and flight test results that illustrates the performance and capabilities of the NASA calibration method. Discussion of maneuver requirements and data analysis methods is included as well as recommendations for piloting technique.

  13. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system’s unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  14. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Cesare H; Naczynski, Dominik J; Yu, Shu-Jung S; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system's unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  15. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Cesare H; Naczynski, Dominik J; Yu, Shu-Jung S; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system's unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  16. Error estimates for ocean surface winds: Applying Desroziers diagnostics to the Cross-Calibrated, Multi-Platform analysis of wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Ross N.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Leidner, S. Mark; Smith, Deborah K.; Atlas, Robert M.

    2013-04-01

    The cross-calibrated, multi-platform (CCMP) ocean surface wind project [Atlas et al., 2011] generates high-quality, high-resolution, vector winds over the world's oceans beginning with the 1987 launch of the SSM/I F08, using Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) microwave satellite wind retrievals, as well as in situ observations from ships and buoys. The variational analysis method [VAM, Hoffman et al., 2003] is at the center of the CCMP project's analysis procedures for combining observations of the wind. The VAM was developed as a smoothing spline and so implicitly defines the background error covariance by means of several constraints with adjustable weights, and does not provide an explicit estimate of the analysis error. Here we report on our research to develop uncertainty estimates for wind speed for the VAM inputs and outputs, i.e., for the background (B), the observations (O) and the analysis (A) wind speed, based on the Desroziers et al. [2005] diagnostics (DD hereafter). The DD are applied to the CCMP ocean surface wind data sets to estimate wind speed errors of the ECMWF background, the microwave satellite observations and the resulting CCMP analysis. The DD confirm that the ECMWF operational surface wind speed error standard deviations vary with latitude in the range 0.7-1.5 m/s and that the cross-calibrated Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) wind speed retrievals standard deviations are in the range 0.5-0.8 m/s. Further the estimated CCMP analysis wind speed standard deviations are in the range 0.2-0.4 m/s. The results suggests the need to revise the parameterization of the errors due to the FGAT (first guess at the appropriate time) procedure. Errors for wind speeds < 16 m/s are homogeneous, but for the relatively rare, but critical higher wind speed situations, errors are much larger. Atlas, R., R. N. Hoffman, J. Ardizzone, S. M. Leidner, J. C. Jusem, D. K. Smith, and D. Gombos, A cross-calibrated, multi-platform ocean surface wind velocity product for

  17. New polymer-based phantom for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Nishi, Taiji; Tanikawa, Yukari; Nitta, Naotaka

    2014-03-01

    We will report newly developed polymer-based phantom for photoacoustic (PA) imaging systems. Phantoms are important for performance evaluation and calibration of new modalities; however, there is no established method for making phantoms with no long-term change. We have developed skin mimicking phantoms simulating both optical and acoustic properties (i.e. optical scattering and absorption coefficients, and sound velocity). Furthermore, the phantoms are able to give accurate simulation of blood vessels by Inkjet-printing. Newly developed phantoms are consisted of castor oil included acrylic block copolymer and we can fabricate 0.8mm or less thick sheets and pile them using their self-adhesiveness.

  18. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  19. Analysis of calibration data for the uranium active neutron coincidence counting collar with attention to errors in the measured neutron coincidence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Burr, Tom; Favalli, Andrea; Nicholson, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The declared linear density of 238U and 235U in fresh low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel assemblies can be verified for nuclear safeguards purposes using a neutron coincidence counter collar in passive and active mode, respectively. The active mode calibration of the Uranium Neutron Collar - Light water reactor fuel (UNCL) instrument is normally performed using a non-linear fitting technique. The fitting technique relates the measured neutron coincidence rate (the predictor) to the linear density of 235U (the response) in order to estimate model parameters of the nonlinear Padé equation, which traditionally is used to model the calibration data. Alternatively, following a simple data transformation, the fitting can also be performed using standard linear fitting methods. This paper compares performance of the nonlinear technique to the linear technique, using a range of possible error variance magnitudes in the measured neutron coincidence rate. We develop the required formalism and then apply the traditional (nonlinear) and alternative approaches (linear) to the same experimental and corresponding simulated representative datasets. We find that, in this context, because of the magnitude of the errors in the predictor, it is preferable not to transform to a linear model, and it is preferable not to adjust for the errors in the predictor when inferring the model parameters.

  20. Reduction of Systematic Errors in Diagnostic Receivers Through the Use of Balanced Dicke-Switching and Y-Factor Noise Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    John Musson, Trent Allison, Roger Flood, Jianxun Yan

    2009-05-01

    Receivers designed for diagnostic applications range from those having moderate sensitivity to those possessing large dynamic range. Digital receivers have a dynamic range which are a function of the number of bits represented by the ADC and subsequent processing. If some of this range is sacrificed for extreme sensitivity, noise power can then be used to perform two-point load calibrations. Since load temperatures can be precisely determined, the receiver can be quickly and accurately characterized; minute changes in system gain can then be detected, and systematic errors corrected. In addition, using receiver pairs in a balanced approach to measuring X+, X-, Y+, Y-, reduces systematic offset errors from non-identical system gains, and changes in system performance. This paper describes and demonstrates a balanced BPM-style diagnostic receiver, employing Dicke-switching to establish and maintain real-time system calibration. Benefits of such a receiver include wide bandwidth, solid absolute accuracy, improved position accuracy, and phase-sensitive measurements. System description, static and dynamic modelling, and measurement data are presented.

  1. New ANSI standard for thyroid phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, Michael W.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Fulmer, Philip C.; Jue, Tracy M.; McCurdy, David E.; Pillay, Mike; Xu, X. George

    2015-08-01

    Here, a new ANSI standard titled “Thyroid Phantom Used in Occupational Monitoring” (Health Physics Society 2014) has been published. The standard establishes the criteria for acceptable design, fabrication, or modeling of a phantom suitable for calibrating in vivo monitoring systems to measure photon-emitting radionuclides deposited in the thyroid. The current thyroid phantom standard was drafted in 1973 (ANSI N44.3-1973), last reviewed in 1984, and a revision of the standard to cover a more modern approach was deemed warranted.

  2. Vetting Galactic Leavitt Law Calibrators Using Radial Velocities: On the Variability, Binarity, and Possible Parallax Error of 19 Long-period Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. I.; Casertano, S.; Riess, A. G.; Melis, C.; Holl, B.; Semaan, T.; Papics, P. I.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Eyer, L.; Mowlavi, N.; Palaversa, L.; Roelens, M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the radial velocity (RV) variability and spectroscopic binarity of 19 Galactic long-period ({P}{puls} ≳ 10 days) classical Cepheid variable stars whose trigonometric parallaxes are being measured using the Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia. Our primary objective is to constrain possible parallax error due to undetected orbital motion. Using over 1600 high-precision RVs measured between 2011 and 2016, we find no indication of orbital motion on ≲5 year timescales for 18 Cepheids and determine upper limits on allowed configurations for a range of input orbital periods. The results constrain the unsigned parallax error due to orbital motion to <2% for 16 stars, and <4% for 18. We improve the orbital solution of the known binary YZ Carinae and show that the astrometric model must take into account orbital motion to avoid significant error (∼±100 μarcsec). We further investigate long-timescale ({P}{orb} > 10 years) variations in pulsation-averaged velocity v γ via a template fitting approach using both new and literature RVs. We discover the spectroscopic binarity of XZ Car and CD Cyg, find first tentative evidence for AQ Car, and reveal KN Cen’s orbital signature. Further (mostly tentative) evidence of time-variable v γ is found for SS CMa, VY Car, SZ Cyg, and X Pup. We briefly discuss considerations regarding a vetting process of Galactic Leavitt law calibrators and show that light contributions by companions are insignificant for most distance scale applications.

  3. Segmentation and quantification of materials with energy discriminating computed tomography: A phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Le, Huy Q.; Molloi, Sabee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate whether a computed tomography (CT) system based on CdZnTe (CZT) detectors in conjunction with a least-squares parameter estimation technique can be used to decompose four different materials. Methods: The material decomposition process was divided into a segmentation task and a quantification task. A least-squares minimization algorithm was used to decompose materials with five measurements of the energy dependent linear attenuation coefficients. A small field-of-view energy discriminating CT system was built. The CT system consisted of an x-ray tube, a rotational stage, and an array of CZT detectors. The CZT array was composed of 64 pixels, each of which is 0.8×0.8×3 mm. Images were acquired at 80 kVp in fluoroscopic mode at 50 ms per frame. The detector resolved the x-ray spectrum into energy bins of 22–32, 33–39, 40–46, 47–56, and 57–80 keV. Four phantoms were constructed from polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene, polyoxymethylene, hydroxyapatite, and iodine. Three phantoms were composed of three materials with embedded hydroxyapatite (50, 150, 250, and 350 mg∕ml) and iodine (4, 8, 12, and 16 mg∕ml) contrast elements. One phantom was composed of four materials with embedded hydroxyapatite (150 and 350 mg∕ml) and iodine (8 and 16 mg∕ml). Calibrations consisted of PMMA phantoms with either hydroxyapatite (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 mg∕ml) or iodine (5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 mg∕ml) embedded. Filtered backprojection and a ramp filter were used to reconstruct images from each energy bin. Material segmentation and quantification were performed and compared between different phantoms. Results: All phantoms were decomposed accurately, but some voxels in the base material regions were incorrectly identified. Average quantification errors of hydroxyapatite∕iodine were 9.26∕7.13%, 7.73∕5.58%, and 12.93∕8.23% for the three-material PMMA, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene phantoms, respectively. The

  4. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 {+-} 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 {+-} 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 {+-} 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 {+-} 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  5. Absolute vs. relative error characterization of electromagnetic tracking accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Gutierrez, Luis; Chan, Raymond; Jain, Ameet

    2010-02-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) tracking systems are often used for real time navigation of medical tools in an Image Guided Therapy (IGT) system. They are specifically advantageous when the medical device requires tracking within the body of a patient where line of sight constraints prevent the use of conventional optical tracking. EM tracking systems are however very sensitive to electromagnetic field distortions. These distortions, arising from changes in the electromagnetic environment due to the presence of conductive ferromagnetic surgical tools or other medical equipment, limit the accuracy of EM tracking, in some cases potentially rendering tracking data unusable. We present a mapping method for the operating region over which EM tracking sensors are used, allowing for characterization of measurement errors, in turn providing physicians with visual feedback about measurement confidence or reliability of localization estimates. In this instance, we employ a calibration phantom to assess distortion within the operating field of the EM tracker and to display in real time the distribution of measurement errors, as well as the location and extent of the field associated with minimal spatial distortion. The accuracy is assessed relative to successive measurements. Error is computed for a reference point and consecutive measurement errors are displayed relative to the reference in order to characterize the accuracy in near-real-time. In an initial set-up phase, the phantom geometry is calibrated by registering the data from a multitude of EM sensors in a non-ferromagnetic ("clean") EM environment. The registration results in the locations of sensors with respect to each other and defines the geometry of the sensors in the phantom. In a measurement phase, the position and orientation data from all sensors are compared with the known geometry of the sensor spacing, and localization errors (displacement and orientation) are computed. Based on error thresholds provided by the

  6. Systematic calibration of an integrated x-ray and optical tomography system for preclinical radiation research

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yidong; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Wong, John W.; Eslami, Sohrab; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Patterson, Michael S.

    2015-04-15

    .0% difference between simulated and measured signal. The calibration of the entire system was confirmed through the CBCT and BLT reconstruction of a bioluminescence source placed inside a tissue-simulating optical phantom. Using a spatial region constraint, the source position was reconstructed with less than 1 mm error and the source strength reconstructed with less than 24% error. Conclusions: A practical and systematic method has been developed to calibrate an integrated x-ray and optical tomography imaging system, including the respective CBCT and optical tomography system calibration and the geometrical calibration of the entire system. The method can be modified and adopted to calibrate CBCT and optical tomography systems that are operated independently or hybrid x-ray and optical tomography imaging systems.

  7. Monte Carlo verification of polymer gel dosimetry applied to radionuclide therapy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gear, J. I.; Charles-Edwards, E.; Partridge, M.; Flux, G. D.

    2011-11-01

    This study evaluates the dosimetric performance of the polymer gel dosimeter 'Methacrylic and Ascorbic acid in Gelatin, initiated by Copper' and its suitability for quality assurance and analysis of I-131-targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry. Four batches of gel were manufactured in-house and sets of calibration vials and phantoms were created containing different concentrations of I-131-doped gel. Multiple dose measurements were made up to 700 h post preparation and compared to equivalent Monte Carlo simulations. In addition to uniformly filled phantoms the cross-dose distribution from a hot insert to a surrounding phantom was measured. In this example comparisons were made with both Monte Carlo and a clinical scintigraphic dosimetry method. Dose-response curves generated from the calibration data followed a sigmoid function. The gels appeared to be stable over many weeks of internal irradiation with a delay in gel response observed at 29 h post preparation. This was attributed to chemical inhibitors and slow reaction rates of long-chain radical species. For this reason, phantom measurements were only made after 190 h of irradiation. For uniformly filled phantoms of I-131 the accuracy of dose measurements agreed to within 10% when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. A radial cross-dose distribution measured using the gel dosimeter compared well to that calculated with Monte Carlo. Small inhomogeneities were observed in the dosimeter attributed to non-uniform mixing of monomer during preparation. However, they were not detrimental to this study where the quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution of polymer gel dosimetry were far superior to that calculated using scintigraphy. The difference between Monte Carlo and gel measurements was of the order of a few cGy, whilst with the scintigraphic method differences of up to 8 Gy were observed. A manipulation technique is also presented which allows 3D scintigraphic dosimetry measurements to be compared to polymer

  8. Solid anthropomorphic infant whole body DXA phantom: Design, evaluation, and multisite testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) requires phantoms for quality control and cross-calibration. No commercially available phantoms are designed specifically for infant whole-body scanning. We fabricated a phantom closely matching a 7-kg human infant in body habitus using PVC, nylon-mix, and poly...

  9. Initial testing of a 3D printed perfusion phantom using digital subtraction angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Rachel P.; Khobragade, Parag; Ying, Leslie; Snyder, Kenneth; Wack, David; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2015-03-01

    Perfusion imaging is the most applied modality for the assessment of acute stroke. Parameters such as Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), Cerebral Blood volume (CBV) and Mean Transit Time (MTT) are used to distinguish the tissue infarct core and ischemic penumbra. Due to lack of standardization these parameters vary significantly between vendors and software even when provided with the same data set. There is a critical need to standardize the systems and make them more reliable. We have designed a uniform phantom to test and verify the perfusion systems. We implemented a flow loop with different flow rates (250, 300, 350 ml/min) and injected the same amount of contrast. The images of the phantom were acquired using a Digital Angiographic system. Since this phantom is uniform, projection images obtained using DSA is sufficient for initial validation. To validate the phantom we measured the contrast concentration at three regions of interest (arterial input, venous output, perfused area) and derived time density curves (TDC). We then calculated the maximum slope, area under the TDCs and flow. The maximum slope calculations were linearly increasing with increase in flow rate, the area under the curve decreases with increase in flow rate. There was 25% error between the calculated flow and measured flow. The derived TDCs were clinically relevant and the calculated flow, maximum slope and areas under the curve were sensitive to the measured flow. We have created a systematic way to calibrate existing perfusion systems and assess their reliability.

  10. Three-dimensional printed optical phantoms with customized absorption and scattering properties.

    PubMed

    Diep, Phuong; Pannem, Sanjana; Sweer, Jordan; Lo, Justine; Snyder, Michael; Stueber, Gabriella; Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Istfan, Raeef; Wu, Junjie; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Roblyer, Darren

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers the promise of fabricating optical phantoms with arbitrary geometry, but commercially available thermoplastics provide only a small range of physiologically relevant absorption (µa) and reduced scattering (µs`) values. Here we demonstrate customizable acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) filaments for dual extrusion 3D printing of tissue mimicking optical phantoms. µa and µs` values were adjusted by incorporating nigrosin and titanium dioxide (TiO2) in the filament extrusion process. A wide range of physiologically relevant optical properties was demonstrated with an average repeatability within 11.5% for µa and 7.71% for µs`. Additionally, a mouse-simulating phantom, which mimicked both the geometry and optical properties of a hairless mouse with an implanted xenograft tumor, was printed using dual extrusion methods. 3D printed tumor optical properties matched the live tumor with less than 3% error at a wavelength of 659 nm. 3D printing with user defined optical properties may provide a viable method for durable optically diffusive phantoms for instrument characterization and calibration.

  11. Three-dimensional printed optical phantoms with customized absorption and scattering properties

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Phuong; Pannem, Sanjana; Sweer, Jordan; Lo, Justine; Snyder, Michael; Stueber, Gabriella; Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Istfan, Raeef; Wu, Junjie; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Roblyer, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers the promise of fabricating optical phantoms with arbitrary geometry, but commercially available thermoplastics provide only a small range of physiologically relevant absorption (µa) and reduced scattering (µs`) values. Here we demonstrate customizable acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) filaments for dual extrusion 3D printing of tissue mimicking optical phantoms. µa and µs` values were adjusted by incorporating nigrosin and titanium dioxide (TiO2) in the filament extrusion process. A wide range of physiologically relevant optical properties was demonstrated with an average repeatability within 11.5% for µa and 7.71% for µs`. Additionally, a mouse-simulating phantom, which mimicked both the geometry and optical properties of a hairless mouse with an implanted xenograft tumor, was printed using dual extrusion methods. 3D printed tumor optical properties matched the live tumor with less than 3% error at a wavelength of 659 nm. 3D printing with user defined optical properties may provide a viable method for durable optically diffusive phantoms for instrument characterization and calibration. PMID:26600987

  12. Influence of Manufacturing Processes on the Performance of Phantom Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, Richard J.

    2008-10-01

    Chest counting is an important tool for estimating the radiation dose to individuals who have inhaled radioactive materials. Chest counting systems are calibrated by counting the activity in the lungs of phantoms where the activity in the phantom lungs is known. In the United States a commonly used calibration phantom was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is referred to as the Livermore Torso Phantom. An important feature of this phantom is that the phantom lungs can be interchanged so that the counting system can be challenged by different combinations of radionuclides and activity. Phantom lungs are made from lung tissue substitutes whose constituents are foaming plastics and various adjuvants selected to make the lung tissue substitute similar to normal healthy lung tissue. Some of the properties of phantom lungs cannot be readily controlled by phantom lung manufacturers. Some, such as density, are a complex function of the manufacturing process, while others, such as elemental composition of the bulk plastic are controlled by the plastics manufacturer without input, or knowledge of the phantom manufacturer. Despite the fact that some of these items cannot be controlled, they can be measured and accounted for. This report describes how manufacturing processes can influence the performance of phantom lungs. It is proposed that a metric that describes the brightness of the lung be employed by the phantom lung manufacturer to determine how well the phantom lung approximates the characteristics of a human lung. For many purposes, the linear attenuation of the lung tissue substitute is an appropriate surrogate for the brightness.

  13. Active point out-of-plane ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Hyunjae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common intraoperative medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the transducer and the ultrasound image. Point-based phantoms are considered to be accurate, but their calibration framework assumes that the point is in the image plane. In this work, we present the use of an active point phantom and a calibration framework that accounts for the elevational uncertainty of the point. Given the lateral and axial position of the point in the ultrasound image, we approximate a circle in the axial-elevational plane with a radius equal to the axial position. The standard approach transforms all of the imaged points to be a single physical point. In our approach, we minimize the distances between the circular subsets of each image, with them ideally intersecting at a single point. We simulated in noiseless and noisy cases, presenting results on out-of-plane estimation errors, calibration estimation errors, and point reconstruction precision. We also performed an experiment using a robot arm as the tracker, resulting in a point reconstruction precision of 0.64mm.

  14. MO-C-17A-05: A Three-Dimensional Head-And-Neck Phantom for Validation of Kilovoltage- and Megavoltage-Based Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N; Singhrao, K; Pouliot, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a three-dimensional (3D) deformable head-and-neck (H and N) phantom with realistic tissue contrast for both kilovoltage and megavoltage computed tomography and use it to objectively evaluate deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: The phantom represents H and N patient anatomy. It is constructed from thermoplastic, which becomes pliable in boiling water, and hardened epoxy resin. Using a system of additives, the Hounsfield unit (HU) values of these materials were tuned to mimic anatomy for both kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging. The phantom opened along a sagittal midsection to reveal nonradiopaque markers, which were used to characterize the phantom deformation. The deformed and undeformed phantom was scanned with kV and MV computed tomography. Additionally, a calibration curve was created to change the HUs of the MV scans to be similar to kV HUs, (MC). The extracted ground-truth deformation was then compared to the results of two commercially available DIR algorithms, from Velocity Medical Solutions and MIM Software. Results: The phantom produced a 3D deformation, representing neck flexion, with a magnitude of up to 8 mm and was able represent tissue HUs for both kV and MV imaging modalities. The two tested deformation algorithms yielded vastly different results. For kV-kV registration, MIM made the lowest mean error, and Velocity made the lowest maximum error. For MV-MV, kV-MV, and kV-MC Velocity produced both the lowest mean and lowest maximum errors. Conclusion: The application of DIR across different imaging modalities is particularly difficult, due to differences in tissue HUs and the presence of imaging artifacts. For this reason, DIR algorithms must be validated specifically for this purpose. The developed H and N phantom is an effective tool for this purpose.

  15. 3D printing of tissue-simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for biomedical optical measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Erbao; Wang, Minjie; Shen, Shuwei; Han, Yilin; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Optical phantoms are commonly used to validate and calibrate biomedical optical devices in order to ensure accurate measurement of optical properties in biological tissue. However, commonly used optical phantoms are based on homogenous materials that reflect neither optical properties nor multi-layer heterogeneities of biological tissue. Using these phantoms for optical calibration may result in significant bias in biological measurement. We propose to characterize and fabricate tissue simulating phantoms that simulate not only the multi-layer heterogeneities but also optical properties of biological tissue. The tissue characterization module detects tissue structural and functional properties in vivo. The phantom printing module generates 3D tissue structures at different scales by layer-by-layer deposition of phantom materials with different optical properties. The ultimate goal is to fabricate multi-layer tissue simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for optimal calibration of biomedical optical spectral devices.

  16. Evaluation of three 3D US calibration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Kaar, Marcus; Hoffmann, Rainer; Bhatia, Amon; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Figl, Michael

    2013-03-01

    With the introduction of 3D US image devices the demand for accurate and fast 3D calibration methods arose. We implemented three different calibration methods and compared the calibration results in terms of fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE). The three calibration methods included a multi-points phantom (MP), a feature based model (FM) and a membrane model (MM). With respect to the sphere method a simple point-to-point registration was applied. For the feature based model we employed a phantom consisting of spheres, pyramids and cones. These objects were imaged from different angles and a 3D3D registration was applied for all possible image combinations. The last method was accomplished by imaging a simple membrane which allows for calculation of the calibration matrix. For a first evaluation we computed the FRE for each method. To assess the calibration success on real patient data we used ten 3D3D registrations between images from the prostate. The FRE for the sphere method amounted to 1.40 mm, for the figure method to 1.05 mm and with respect to the membrane method to 1.12 mm. The deviation arising from ten 3D3D patient registration were 3.44 mm (MP), 2.93 mm (FM)and 2.84 mm (MM). The MM revealed to be the most accurate of the evaluated procedure while the MP has shown significant higher errors. The results from FM were close to the one from MM and also significant better than the one with the SM. Between FM and MM no significant difference was to detect.

  17. Establishing a standard calibration methodology for MOSFET detectors in computed tomography dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L.; Kaufman, R. A.

    2012-06-15

    coefficients for the eventual use for phantom dosimetry, a measurement error {approx}12% will be reflected in the dosimetry results. The calibration process must emulate the eventual CT dosimetry process by matching or excluding scatter when calibrating the MOSFETs. Finally, the authors recommend that the MOSFETs are energy calibrated approximately every 2500-3000 mV.

  18. Predictive sensor based x-ray calibration using a physical model.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Matías; Lutz, Peter; Wirtz, Dieter C; Radermacher, Klaus

    2007-04-01

    Many computer assisted surgery systems are based on intraoperative x-ray images. To achieve reliable and accurate results these images have to be calibrated concerning geometric distortions, which can be distinguished between constant distortions and distortions caused by magnetic fields. Instead of using an intraoperative calibration phantom that has to be visible within each image resulting in overlaying markers, the presented approach directly takes advantage of the physical background of the distortions. Based on a computed physical model of an image intensifier and a magnetic field sensor, an online compensation of distortions can be achieved without the need of an intraoperative calibration phantom. The model has to be adapted once to each specific image intensifier through calibration, which is based on an optimization algorithm systematically altering the physical model parameters, until a minimal error is reached. Once calibrated, the model is able to predict the distortions caused by the measured magnetic field vector and build an appropriate dewarping function. The time needed for model calibration is not yet optimized and takes up to 4 h on a 3 GHz CPU. In contrast, the time needed for distortion correction is less than 1 s and therefore absolutely acceptable for intraoperative use. First evaluations showed that by using the model based dewarping algorithm the distortions of an XRII with a 21 cm FOV could be significantly reduced. The model was able to predict and compensate distortions by approximately 80% to a remaining error of 0.45 mm (max) (0.19 mm rms). PMID:17500446

  19. Predictive sensor based x-ray calibration using a physical model

    SciTech Connect

    Fuente, Matias de la; Lutz, Peter; Wirtz, Dieter C.; Radermacher, Klaus

    2007-04-15

    Many computer assisted surgery systems are based on intraoperative x-ray images. To achieve reliable and accurate results these images have to be calibrated concerning geometric distortions, which can be distinguished between constant distortions and distortions caused by magnetic fields. Instead of using an intraoperative calibration phantom that has to be visible within each image resulting in overlaying markers, the presented approach directly takes advantage of the physical background of the distortions. Based on a computed physical model of an image intensifier and a magnetic field sensor, an online compensation of distortions can be achieved without the need of an intraoperative calibration phantom. The model has to be adapted once to each specific image intensifier through calibration, which is based on an optimization algorithm systematically altering the physical model parameters, until a minimal error is reached. Once calibrated, the model is able to predict the distortions caused by the measured magnetic field vector and build an appropriate dewarping function. The time needed for model calibration is not yet optimized and takes up to 4 h on a 3 GHz CPU. In contrast, the time needed for distortion correction is less than 1 s and therefore absolutely acceptable for intraoperative use. First evaluations showed that by using the model based dewarping algorithm the distortions of an XRII with a 21 cm FOV could be significantly reduced. The model was able to predict and compensate distortions by approximately 80% to a remaining error of 0.45 mm (max) (0.19 mm rms)

  20. Imaging CDMAM phantom with tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baorui; Smith, Andy; Ruth, Chris; Jing, Zhenxue

    2008-03-01

    We studied the use of the mammography contrast detail phantom (CDMAM) with tomosynthesis to evaluate the performance of our system as well as to explore the application of CDMAM in 3D breast imaging. The system was Hologic's 1st generation tomosynthesis machine. CDMAM phantom plus PMMA slabs were imaged at 3 cm, 5 cm, 7 cm, and 9 cm PMMA-equivalent thickness with 11 projections per scan and the scan angle selected from 0, 15 and 28 degrees. CDMAM images were reconstructed using the back projection method, and were scored with the CDCOM automatic analysis program. The threshold thickness of each disk size was obtained with psychometric curve fitting. We first studied errors and variability associated with the results when different numbers of images were used in contrast detail analysis, then studied factors that affected CDMAM results in tomosynthesis, including the x-ray dose, the scan angle, the in-plane reconstruction pixel size, the slice-to-slice step size, the location of the CDMAM inside the PMMA slabs, and the scatter effect. This paper will present results of CDMAM performance of our tomosynthesis system, as well as their dependence on the various factors, and the comparison with 2D mammography. Additionally we will discuss the novel processing and analysis methods developed during this study, and make proposals to modify the CDMAM phantom and the CDCOM analysis program to optimize the method for 3D tomosynthesis.

  1. Phantom Crossing DGP Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Koichi; Komiya, Zen

    2010-08-12

    We propose a phantom crossing Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) model. In our model, the effective equation of state of the DGP gravity crosses the phantom divide line. We demonstrate crossing of the phantom divide does not occur within the framework of the original DGP model or the DGP model developed by Dvali and Turner. By extending their model, we construct a model that realizes crossing of the phantom divide. DGP models can account for late-time acceleration of the universe without dark energy. Phantom Crossing DGP model is more compatible with recent observational data from Type Ia Supernovae (SNIa), Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) than the original DGP model or the DGP model developed by Dvali and Turner.

  2. A three-dimensional head-and-neck phantom for validation of multimodality deformable image registration for adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Singhrao, Kamal; Kirby, Neil; Pouliot, Jean

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a three-dimensional (3D) deformable head-and-neck (H and N) phantom with realistic tissue contrast for both kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging modalities and use it to objectively evaluate deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: The phantom represents H and N patient anatomy. It is constructed from thermoplastic, which becomes pliable in boiling water, and hardened epoxy resin. Using a system of additives, the Hounsfield unit (HU) values of these materials were tuned to mimic anatomy for both kV and MV imaging. The phantom opens along a sagittal midsection to reveal radiotransparent markers, which were used to characterize the phantom deformation. The deformed and undeformed phantoms were scanned with kV and MV imaging modalities. Additionally, a calibration curve was created to change the HUs of the MV scans to be similar to kV HUs, (MC). The extracted ground-truth deformation was then compared to the results of two commercially available DIR algorithms, from Velocity Medical Solutions and MIM software. Results: The phantom produced a 3D deformation, representing neck flexion, with a magnitude of up to 8 mm and was able to represent tissue HUs for both kV and MV imaging modalities. The two tested deformation algorithms yielded vastly different results. For kV–kV registration, MIM produced mean and maximum errors of 1.8 and 11.5 mm, respectively. These same numbers for Velocity were 2.4 and 7.1 mm, respectively. For MV–MV, kV–MV, and kV–MC Velocity produced similar mean and maximum error values. MIM, however, produced gross errors for all three of these scenarios, with maximum errors ranging from 33.4 to 41.6 mm. Conclusions: The application of DIR across different imaging modalities is particularly difficult, due to differences in tissue HUs and the presence of imaging artifacts. For this reason, DIR algorithms must be validated specifically for this purpose. The developed H and N phantom is an effective tool

  3. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  4. Calibration of neutron albedo dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R B; Eisenhauer, C M

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that by calibrating neutron albedo dosemeters under the proper conditions, two complicating effects will essentially cancel out, allowing accurate calibrations with no need for explicit corrections. The 'proper conditions' are: a large room (> or = 8 m on a side). use of a D2O moderated 252Cf source, and a source-to-phantom calibration distance of approximately 70 cm. PMID:12212898

  5. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, P.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.

    1993-11-30

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ``authentic lung tissue`` or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  6. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  7. Geometric Parameters Estimation and Calibration in Cone-Beam Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jintao; Hu, Xiaodong; Zou, Jing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-01-01

    The quality of Computed Tomography (CT) images crucially depends on the precise knowledge of the scanner geometry. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate and calibrate the misalignments before image acquisition. In this paper, a Two-Piece-Ball (TPB) phantom is used to estimate a set of parameters that describe the geometry of a cone-beam CT system. Only multiple projections of the TPB phantom at one position are required, which can avoid the rotation errors when acquiring multi-angle projections. Also, a corresponding algorithm is derived. The performance of the method is evaluated through simulation and experimental data. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is valid and easy to implement. Furthermore, the experimental results from the Micro-CT system demonstrate the ability to reduce artifacts and improve image quality through geometric parameter calibration. PMID:26371008

  8. Stability of phantom wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.

    2005-06-15

    It has recently been shown that traversable wormholes may be supported by phantom energy. In this work phantom wormhole geometries are modeled by matching an interior traversable wormhole solution, governed by the equation of state p={omega}{rho} with {omega}<-1, to an exterior vacuum spacetime at a finite junction interface. The stability analysis of these phantom wormholes to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations about static equilibrium solutions is carried out. A master equation dictating the stability regions is deduced, and by separating the cases of a positive and a negative surface energy density, it is found that the respective stable equilibrium configurations may be increased by strategically varying the wormhole throat radius. The first model considered, in the absence of a thin shell, is that of an asymptotically flat phantom wormhole spacetime. The second model constructed is that of an isotropic pressure phantom wormhole, which is of particular interest, as the notion of phantom energy is that of a spatially homogeneous cosmic fluid, although it may be extended to inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes.

  9. Quantum phantom cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    DaPbrowski, Mariusz P.; Kiefer, Claus; Sandhoefer, Barbara

    2006-08-15

    We apply the formalism of quantum cosmology to models containing a phantom field. Three models are discussed explicitly: a toy model, a model with an exponential phantom potential, and a model with phantom field accompanied by a negative cosmological constant. In all these cases we calculate the classical trajectories in configuration space and give solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation in quantum cosmology. In the cases of the toy model and the model with exponential potential we are able to solve the Wheeler-DeWitt equation exactly. For comparison, we also give the corresponding solutions for an ordinary scalar field. We discuss, in particular, the behavior of wave packets in minisuperspace. For the phantom field these packets disperse in the region that corresponds to the big-rip singularity. This thus constitutes a genuine quantum region at large scales, described by a regular solution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. For the ordinary scalar field, the big-bang singularity is avoided. Some remarks on the arrow of time in phantom models as well as on the relation of phantom models to loop quantum cosmology are given.

  10. The impact of anthropometric patient-phantom matching on organ dose: A hybrid phantom study for fluoroscopy guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry B.; Geyer, Amy; Borrego, David; Ficarrotta, Kayla; Johnson, Kevin; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching for determining organ dose during fluoroscopy guided interventions. Methods: In this study, 27 CT datasets representing patients of different sizes and genders were contoured and converted into patient-specific computational models. Each model was matched, based on height and weight, to computational phantoms selected from the UF hybrid patient-dependent series. In order to investigate the influence of phantom type on patient organ dose, Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate two cardiac projections (PA/left lateral) and two abdominal projections (RAO/LPO). Organ dose conversion coefficients were then calculated for each patient-specific and patient-dependent phantom and also for a reference stylized and reference hybrid phantom. The coefficients were subsequently analyzed for any correlation between patient-specificity and the accuracy of the dose estimate. Accuracy was quantified by calculating an absolute percent difference using the patient-specific dose conversion coefficients as the reference. Results: Patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to heavy patients. In these cases, the improvement over using a reference stylized phantom ranged from approximately 50% to 120% for abdominal projections and for a reference hybrid phantom from 20% to 60% for all projections. For lighter individuals, patient-phantom matching was clearly superior to using a reference stylized phantom, but not significantly better than using a reference hybrid phantom for certain fields and projections. Conclusions: The results indicate two sources of error when patients are matched with phantoms: Anatomical error, which is inherent due to differences in organ size and location, and error attributed to differences in the total soft tissue attenuation. For small patients, differences in soft tissue attenuation are minimal and are exceeded by inherent anatomical differences

  11. Phantom energy traversable wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.

    2005-04-15

    It has been suggested that a possible candidate for the present accelerated expansion of the Universe is 'phantom energy'. The latter possesses an equation of state of the form {omega}{identical_to}p/{rho}<-1, consequently violating the null energy condition. As this is the fundamental ingredient to sustain traversable wormholes, this cosmic fluid presents us with a natural scenario for the existence of these exotic geometries. 'Note, however, that the notion of phantom energy is that of a homogeneously distributed fluid. Nevertheless, it can be extended to inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes, and it is shown that traversable wormholes may be supported by phantom energy. Because of the fact of the accelerating Universe, macroscopic wormholes could naturally be grown from the submicroscopic constructions that originally pervaded the quantum foam. One could also imagine an advanced civilization mining the cosmic fluid for phantom energy necessary to construct and sustain a traversable wormhole. In this context, we investigate the physical properties and characteristics of traversable wormholes constructed using the equation of state p={omega}{rho}, with {omega}<-1. We analyze specific wormhole geometries, considering asymptotically flat spacetimes and imposing an isotropic pressure. We also construct a thin shell around the interior wormhole solution, by imposing the phantom energy equation of state on the surface stresses. Using the 'volume integral quantifier' we verify that it is theoretically possible to construct these geometries with vanishing amounts of averaged null energy condition violating phantom energy. Specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity and time are also deduced from the traversability conditions for a particular wormhole geometry. These phantom energy traversable wormholes have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications. For instance, an advanced civilization may use these geometries to induce closed timelike

  12. Stable phantoms for characterization of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Van de Sompel, Dominique; Bodapati, Sandhya; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging modality that combines the high contrast of optical imaging, with the spatial resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound, by exploiting the photoacoustic effect. As with any new imaging modality, reliable physical phantoms are needed to: calibrate instruments; validate performance; optimize signal-to-noise; perform routine quality control; and compare systems. Phantom materials for testing small animal PAT systems should also mimic both the optical and acoustic properties of soft tissue, while for calibration purposes should be resistant to degradation over long time periods. We show here that polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) phantoms enable calibration and performance validation using two PAT systems with distinct designs (Visualsonics Vevo LAZR and Endra Nexus 128) across a wavelength range of 680 nm - 950 nm. Inclusions between 2 and 3.2 mm in diameter were fabricated from PVCP using a range of dye concentrations (0 % to 0.256 % Black Plastic Color, BPC) in a custom mold. A calibration phantom was imaged repeatedly on both systems, over time scales of minutes, hours and days, to assess system stability. Both systems demonstrated good reproducibility over time, with the coefficient of variation in the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) being less than 15% over the course of 30 days. Imaging performance was optimized by plotting SNR as a function of different system parameters. The visualization of objects embedded in optically absorbing and scattering backgrounds was also assessed. PVCP is easy to work with and provides stable phantoms for assessing PAT system performance.

  13. Is your system calibrated? MRI gradient system calibration for pre-clinical, high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, James; Wells, Jack; Richardson, Simon; Holmes, Holly; Yu, Yichao; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Siow, Bernard; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    High-field, pre-clinical MRI systems are widely used to characterise tissue structure and volume in small animals, using high resolution imaging. Both applications rely heavily on the consistent, accurate calibration of imaging gradients, yet such calibrations are typically only performed during maintenance sessions by equipment manufacturers, and potentially with acceptance limits that are inadequate for phenotyping. To overcome this difficulty, we present a protocol for gradient calibration quality assurance testing, based on a 3D-printed, open source, structural phantom that can be customised to the dimensions of individual scanners and RF coils. In trials on a 9.4 T system, the gradient scaling errors were reduced by an order of magnitude, and displacements of greater than 100 µm, caused by gradient non-linearity, were corrected using a post-processing technique. The step-by-step protocol can be integrated into routine pre-clinical MRI quality assurance to measure and correct for these errors. We suggest that this type of quality assurance is essential for robust pre-clinical MRI experiments that rely on accurate imaging gradients, including small animal phenotyping and diffusion MR.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of a geometric calibration method using projection matrices for digital tomosynthesis systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To study the sensitivity of a geometric calibration method using projection matrices for digital tomosynthesis systems. Methods: A generic geometric calibration method for tomographic imaging systems has been presented in our previous work. The method involves a scan of a calibration phantom with multiple markers. Their locations in projection images are detected and are associated with their 3D coordinates to compute 3x4 projection matrices, which can be used in subsequent image reconstruction. The accuracy of geometric calibration may be affected by errors in the input data of marker positions. The effects of errors may depend on the number of markers and the volume surrounded by them in 3D space. This work analyzed the sensitivity of the calibration method to the above factors. A 6 cm CIRS breast research phantom and a prototype breast tomosynthesis system were used for our tests. A high contrast ring and two small speck groups were reconstructed in various testing cases for comparison. To achieve quantitative assessment, a 15x15 point detection mask was adopted for detecting signals and for computing changes between testing cases and the regular geometric calibration. Results: When 3D coordinates and 2D projections of markers were accurate, all tested numbers of markers, 6-44, provided similar high quality reconstructions of the ring and the two speck groups. Errors in marker positions resulted in image degradations and signal changes, which increased with fewer markers and smaller volume surrounded by markers in the 3D object space. Signal changes of small specks were more significant than those of the ring. Errors in marker projections produced drastic image degradations. Coplanar marker placement caused a failure in projection matrix computation. Conclusions: For practical geometric calibration phantom design, ample markers are desired. They need to have a large volumetric coverage in the 3D space and be far from being coplanar. Precise

  15. Improving self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßlin, Torsten A.; Junklewitz, Henrik; Winderling, Lars; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore, better schemes, in sense of minimal square error, can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise, the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that nonparametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.

  16. The Phantom brane revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    The Phantom brane is based on the normal branch of the DGP braneworld. It possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, but no big-rip future singularity. In this braneworld, the cosmological constant is dynamically screened at late times. Consequently it provides a good fit to SDSS DR11 measurements of H(z) at high redshifts. We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations on the brane. Perturbations of radiation, matter and the Weyl fluid are self-consistently evolved until the present epoch. We find that the late time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials φ, Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which φ = Ψ. On the Brane, by contrast, the ratio φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter dominated epoch (z ≤ 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large scale structure. The phantom brane also displays a pole in its equation of state, which provides a key test of this dark energy model.

  17. Jamitons: Phantom Traffic Jams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowszun, Jorj

    2013-01-01

    Traffic on motorways can slow down for no apparent reason. Sudden changes in speed by one or two drivers can create a chain reaction that causes a traffic jam for the vehicles that are following. This kind of phantom traffic jam is called a "jamiton" and the article discusses some of the ways in which traffic engineers produce…

  18. Egg White Phantoms for HIFU

    SciTech Connect

    Divkovic, Gabriela; Jenne, Juergen W.

    2005-03-28

    We used fresh egg white and polyacrylamide to create a transparent tissue mimicking phantom. Heating of phantoms by HIFU leads to egg white protein denaturation and creation of visible white lesions. We measured the acoustical and thermal properties and investigated the possibility to use such phantoms to study the lesion formation during the HIFU therapy.

  19. BOMAB phantom manufacturing quality assurance study using Monte Carlo computations

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to assess the importance of and quantify quality assurance protocols in the manufacturing of the Bottle-Manikin-Absorption (BOMAB) phantom for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The parameters characterizing the BOMAB phantom that were examined included height, fill volume, fill material density, wall thickness, and source concentration. Transport simulation was performed for monoenergetic photon sources of 0.200, 0.662, and 1,460 MeV. A linear response was observed in the photon current exiting the exterior surface of the BOMAB phantom due to variations in these parameters. Sensitivity studies were also performed for an in vivo system in operation at the Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, WA. Variations in detector current for this in vivo system are reported for changes in the BOMAB phantom parameters studied here. Physical justifications for the observed results are also discussed.

  20. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. X. Geroge Xu

    2011-01-28

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  1. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  2. Calibration and evaluation of a magnetically tracked ICE probe for guidance of left atrial ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Dilger, Ben; Gunawan, Mia S.; Arunachalam, Shivaram P.; Holmes, David R., III; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.

    2012-02-01

    The novel prototype system for advanced visualization for image-guided left atrial ablation therapy developed in our laboratory permits ready integration of multiple imaging modalities, surgical instrument tracking, interventional devices and electro-physiologic data. This technology allows subject-specific procedure planning and guidance using 3D dynamic, patient-specific models of the patient's heart, augmented with real-time intracardiac echocardiography (ICE). In order for the 2D ICE images to provide intuitive visualization for accurate catheter to surgical target navigation, the transducer must be tracked, so that the acquired images can be appropriately presented with respect to the patient-specific anatomy. Here we present the implementation of a previously developed ultrasound calibration technique for a magnetically tracked ICE transducer, along with a series of evaluation methods to ensure accurate imaging and faithful representation of the imaged structures. Using an engineering-designed phantom, target localization accuracy is assessed by comparing known target locations with their transformed locations inferred from the tracked US images. In addition, the 3D volume reconstruction accuracy is also estimated by comparing a truth volume to that reconstructed from sequential 2D US images. Clinically emulating validation studies are conducted using a patient-specific left atrial phantom. Target localization error of clinically-relevant surgical targets represented by nylon fiducials implanted within the endocardial wall of the phantom was assessed. Our studies have demonstrated 2.4 +/- 0.8 mm target localization error in the engineering-designed evaluation phantoms, 94.8 +/- 4.6 % volume reconstruction accuracy, and 3.1 +/- 1.2 mm target localization error in the left atrial-mimicking phantom. These results are consistent with those disseminated in the literature and also with the accuracy constraints imposed by the employed technology and the clinical

  3. Microfluidics based phantoms of superficial vascular network

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Long; Roman, Patrick A.; Mathews, Scott A.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-01-01

    Several new bio-photonic techniques aim to measure flow in the human vasculature non-destructively. Some of these tools, such as laser speckle imaging or Doppler optical coherence tomography, are now reaching the clinical stage. Therefore appropriate calibration and validation techniques dedicated to these particular measurements are therefore of paramount importance. In this paper we introduce a fast prototyping technique based on laser micromachining for the fabrication of dynamic flow phantoms. Micro-channels smaller than 20 µm in width can be formed in a variety of materials such as epoxies, plastics, and household tape. Vasculature geometries can be easily and quickly modified to accommodate a particular experimental scenario. PMID:22741081

  4. Regular phantom black holes.

    PubMed

    Bronnikov, K A; Fabris, J C

    2006-06-30

    We study self-gravitating, static, spherically symmetric phantom scalar fields with arbitrary potentials (favored by cosmological observations) and single out 16 classes of possible regular configurations with flat, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. Among them are traversable wormholes, bouncing Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmologies, and asymptotically flat black holes (BHs). A regular BH has a Schwarzschild-like causal structure, but the singularity is replaced by a de Sitter infinity, giving a hypothetic BH explorer a chance to survive. It also looks possible that our Universe has originated in a phantom-dominated collapse in another universe, with KS expansion and isotropization after crossing the horizon. Explicit examples of regular solutions are built and discussed. Possible generalizations include k-essence type scalar fields (with a potential) and scalar-tensor gravity.

  5. Monte Carlo dose calculations for phantoms with hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazalova, M.; Coolens, C.; Cury, F.; Childs, P.; Beaulieu, L.; Verhaegen, F.

    2008-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients with hip prostheses are severely degraded by metal streaking artefacts. The low image quality makes organ contouring more difficult and can result in large dose calculation errors when Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are used. In this work, the extent of streaking artefacts produced by three common hip prosthesis materials (Ti-alloy, stainless steel, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy) was studied. The prostheses were tested in a hypothetical prostate treatment with five 18 MV photon beams. The dose distributions for unilateral and bilateral prosthesis phantoms were calculated with the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC code. This was done in three phantom geometries: in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry, and in an artefact-corrected geometry. The artefact-corrected geometry was created using a modified filtered back-projection correction technique. It was found that unilateral prosthesis phantoms do not show large dose calculation errors, as long as the beams miss the artefact-affected volume. This is possible to achieve in the case of unilateral prosthesis phantoms (except for the Co-Cr-Mo prosthesis which gives a 3% error) but not in the case of bilateral prosthesis phantoms. The largest dose discrepancies were obtained for the bilateral Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis phantom, up to 11% in some voxels within the prostate. The artefact correction algorithm worked well for all phantoms and resulted in dose calculation errors below 2%. In conclusion, a MC treatment plan should include an artefact correction algorithm when treating patients with hip prostheses.

  6. SU-D-204-01: Dual-Energy Calibration for Breast Density Measurement Using Spectral Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, H; Cho, H; Kumar, N; Sennung, D; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of minimizing the systematic errors in dual-energy breast density quantification induced by the use of tissue-equivalent plastic phantoms as the calibration basis materials. Methods: Dual-energy calibration using tissue-equivalent plastic phantoms was performed on a spectral mammography system based on scanning multi-slit Si strip photon-counting detectors. The plastic phantom calibration used plastic water and adipose-equivalent phantoms as the basis materials, which have different x-ray attenuation properties compared to water and lipid in actual breast tissue. Two methods were used to convert the dual-energy decomposition measurements in plastic phantom thicknesses into true water and lipid basis. The first method was based entirely on the theoretical x-ray attenuation coefficients of the investigated materials in the mammographic energy range. The conversion matrix was determined from least-squares fitting of the target material using the reported attenuation coefficients of water and lipid. The second method was developed based on experimental calibrations, which measured the low-and high-energy signals of pure water and lipid of known thicknesses. A non-linear rational function was used to correlate the decomposed thicknesses to the known values, so that the conversion coefficients can be determined. Both methods were validated using independent measurements of water and lipid mixture phantoms. The correlation of the dual-energy decomposition measurements and the known values were studied with linear regression analysis. Results: There was an excellent linear correlation between the converted water thicknesses and the known values. The slopes of the linear fits were determined to be 0.63 and 1.03 for the simulation and experimental results, respectively. The non-linear fitting in the experimental approach reduced the root-mean-square (RMS) errors from approximately 3.4 mm to 1.5 mm. Conclusion: The results suggested

  7. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography Using Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-02-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and infrared imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with infrared-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (-0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (-0.69 ± 0.18°C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the infrared-measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45°C-50°C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies in which thermocouples or water bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results indicate that high-resolution infrared thermography is a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods.

  8. Accurate extraction of optical properties and top layer thickness of two-layered mucosal tissue phantoms from spatially resolved reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Kung-Bin; Shih, Kuang-Wei; Hsu, Fang-Wei; Hsieh, Hong-Po; Chuang, Min-Jie; Hsiao, Yi-Hsien; Su, Yu-Hui; Tien, Gen-Hao

    2014-07-01

    We are reporting on an experimental investigation of a movable diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system to extract diagnostically relevant optical properties of two-layered tissue phantoms simulating mucosae that are covered with stratified squamous epithelium. The reflectance spectra were measured at multiple source-detector separations using two imaging fiber bundles in contact with the phantoms, one with its optical axis perpendicular to the sample surface (perpendicular probe) and the other with its distal end beveled and optical axis tilted at 45 deg (oblique probe). Polystyrene microspheres and purified human hemoglobin were used to make tissue phantoms whose scattering and absorption properties could be well controlled and theoretically predicted. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the reflectance spectra for system calibration and an iterative curve fitting that simultaneously extracted the top layer reduced scattering coefficient, thickness, bottom layer reduced scattering coefficient, and hemoglobin concentration of the phantoms. The errors of the recovered parameters ranged from 7% to 20%. The oblique probe showed higher accuracy in the extracted top layer reduced scattering coefficient and thickness than the perpendicular probe. The developed system and data analysis methods provide a feasible tool to quantify the optical properties in vivo.

  9. Comparison of the accuracy of the calibration model on the double and single integrating sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Karsten, A.

    2011-06-01

    The accuracy of the calibration model for the single and double integrating sphere systems are compared for a white light system. A calibration model is created from a matrix of samples with known absorption and reduced scattering coefficients. In this instance the samples are made using different concentrations of intralipid and black ink. The total and diffuse transmittance and reflectance is measured on both setups and the accuracy of each model compared by evaluating the prediction errors of the calibration model for the different systems. Current results indicate that the single integrating sphere setup is more accurate than the double system method. This is based on the low prediction errors of the model for the single sphere system for a He-Ne laser as well as a white light source. The model still needs to be refined for more absorption factors. Tests on the prediction accuracies were then determined by extracting the optical properties of solid resin based phantoms for each system. When these properties of the phantoms were used as input to the modeling software excellent agreement between measured and simulated data was found for the single sphere systems.

  10. 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of optical phantoms simulating heterogeneous biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minjie; Shen, Shuwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    The performance of biomedical optical imaging devices heavily relies on appropriate calibration. However, many of existing calibration phantoms for biomedical optical devices are based on homogenous materials without considering the multi-layer heterogeneous structures observed in biological tissue. Using such a phantom for optical calibration may result in measurement bias. To overcome this problem, we propose a 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of tissue simulating phantoms with multilayer heterogeneous structure. The phantom simulates not only the morphologic characteristics of biological tissue but also absorption and scattering properties. The printing system is based on a 3D motion platform with coordinated control of the DC motors. A special jet nozzle is designed to mix base, scattering, and absorption materials at different ratios. 3D tissue structures are fabricated through layer-by-layer printing with selective deposition of phantom materials of different ingredients. Different mixed ratios of base, scattering and absorption materials have been tested in order to optimize the printing outcome. A spectrometer and a tissue spectrophotometer are used for characterizing phantom absorption and scattering properties. The goal of this project is to fabricate skin tissue simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for the calibration of biomedical optical spectral devices.

  11. A novel simple phantom for verifying the dose of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Chang, L T; Shiau, A C; Chen, C W; Liao, Y J; Li, W J; Lee, M S; Hsu, S M

    2015-01-01

    A standard protocol of dosimetric measurements is used by the organizations responsible for verifying that the doses delivered in radiation-therapy institutions are within authorized limits. This study evaluated a self-designed simple auditing phantom for use in verifying the dose of radiation therapy; the phantom design, dose audit system, and clinical tests are described. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used as postal dosimeters, and mailable phantoms were produced for use in postal audits. Correction factors are important for converting TLD readout values from phantoms into the absorbed dose in water. The phantom scatter correction factor was used to quantify the difference in the scattered dose between a solid water phantom and homemade phantoms; its value ranged from 1.084 to 1.031. The energy-dependence correction factor was used to compare the TLD readout of the unit dose irradiated by audit beam energies with (60)Co in the solid water phantom; its value was 0.99 to 1.01. The setup-condition factor was used to correct for differences in dose-output calibration conditions. Clinical tests of the device calibrating the dose output revealed that the dose deviation was within 3%. Therefore, our homemade phantoms and dosimetric system can be applied for accurately verifying the doses applied in radiation-therapy institutions.

  12. A Novel Simple Phantom for Verifying the Dose of Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Chang, L. T.; Shiau, A. C.; Chen, C. W.; Liao, Y. J.; Li, W. J.; Lee, M. S.; Hsu, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    A standard protocol of dosimetric measurements is used by the organizations responsible for verifying that the doses delivered in radiation-therapy institutions are within authorized limits. This study evaluated a self-designed simple auditing phantom for use in verifying the dose of radiation therapy; the phantom design, dose audit system, and clinical tests are described. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used as postal dosimeters, and mailable phantoms were produced for use in postal audits. Correction factors are important for converting TLD readout values from phantoms into the absorbed dose in water. The phantom scatter correction factor was used to quantify the difference in the scattered dose between a solid water phantom and homemade phantoms; its value ranged from 1.084 to 1.031. The energy-dependence correction factor was used to compare the TLD readout of the unit dose irradiated by audit beam energies with 60Co in the solid water phantom; its value was 0.99 to 1.01. The setup-condition factor was used to correct for differences in dose-output calibration conditions. Clinical tests of the device calibrating the dose output revealed that the dose deviation was within 3%. Therefore, our homemade phantoms and dosimetric system can be applied for accurately verifying the doses applied in radiation-therapy institutions. PMID:25883980

  13. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a 'self-calibration' of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM-e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE-e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  14. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a 'self-calibration' of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM-e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE-e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  15. Factors for converting dose measured in polystyrene phantoms to dose reported in water phantoms for incident proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Vatnitsky, A. S.; Vatnitsky, S. M.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Previous dosimetry protocols allowed calibrations of proton beamline dose monitors to be performed in plastic phantoms. Nevertheless, dose determinations were referenced to absorbed dose-to-muscle or absorbed dose-to-water. The IAEA Code of Practice TRS 398 recommended that dose calibrations be performed with ionization chambers only in water phantoms because plastic-to-water dose conversion factors were not available with sufficient accuracy at the time of its writing. These factors are necessary, however, to evaluate the difference in doses delivered to patients if switching from calibration in plastic to a protocol that only allows calibration in water. Methods: This work measured polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors for this purpose. Uncertainties in the results due to temperature, geometry, and chamber effects were minimized by using special experimental set-up procedures. The measurements were validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results: At the peak of non-range-modulated beams, measured polystyrene-to-water factors ranged from 1.015 to 1.024 for beams with ranges from 36 to 315 mm. For beams with the same ranges and medium sized modulations, the factors ranged from 1.005 to 1.019. The measured results were used to generate tables of polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors. Conclusions: The dose conversion factors can be used at clinical proton facilities to support beamline and patient specific dose per monitor unit calibrations performed in polystyrene phantoms.

  16. The standfast whole body counter and the sliced BOMAB phantom: efficiency as a function of number of sources and energy modeled by MCNP5.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gary H; Capello, Kevin

    2007-02-01

    Previously, using Monte Carlo simulations, this laboratory conceptualized a new phantom: the sliced Bottle Manikin Absorber (BOMAB) phantom. It was intended for calibration or performance testing of whole body counters and the HML subsequently built and tested that phantom. Also, this laboratory tested another phantom used for the calibration of the StandFast whole body counter and identified some deficiencies. This paper investigates the use of the sliced BOMAB phantom as an alternative for the calibration of the StandFast and shows how the 165 sources required for a full loading of the sliced BOMAB can be reduced to a much smaller number without compromising the calibration. The agreement of the sliced BOMAB with eight sources is approximately 1% when compared with a conventional BOMAB phantom.

  17. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  18. In-phantom dose verification of prostate IMRT and VMAT deliveries using plastic scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Klein, David; Briere, Tina Marie; Kudchadker, Rajat; Archambault, Louis; Beaulieu, Luc; Lee, Andrew; Beddar, Sam

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) incorporated into a prostate immobilization device to verify doses in vivo delivered during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated-arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer. The treatment plans for both modalities had been developed for a patient undergoing prostate radiation therapy. First, a study was performed to test the dependence, if any, of PSD accuracy on the number and type of calibration conditions. This study included PSD measurements of each treatment plan being delivered under quality assurance (QA) conditions using a rigid QA phantom. PSD results obtained under these conditions were compared to ionization chamber measurements. After an optimal set of calibration factors had been found, the PSD was combined with a commercial endorectal balloon used for rectal distension and prostate immobilization during external beam radiotherapy. This PSD-enhanced endorectal balloon was placed inside of a deformable anthropomorphic phantom designed to simulate male pelvic anatomy. PSD results obtained under these so-called "simulated treatment conditions" were compared to doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). With the PSD still inserted in the pelvic phantom, each plan was delivered once again after applying a shift of 1 cm anterior to the original isocenter to simulate a treatment setup error.The mean total accumulated dose measured using the PSD differed the TPS-calculated doses by less than 1% for both treatment modalities simulated treatment conditions using the pelvic phantom. When the isocenter was shifted, the PSD results differed from the TPS calculations of mean dose by 1.2% (for IMRT) and 10.1% (for VMAT); in both cases, the doses were within the dose range calculated over the detector volume for these regions of steep dose gradient. Our results suggest that the system could benefit prostate cancer patient

  19. In-phantom dose verification of prostate IMRT and VMAT deliveries using plastic scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David; Briere, Tina Marie; Kudchadker, Rajat; Archambault, Louis; Beaulieu, Luc; Lee, Andrew; Beddar, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) incorporated into a prostate immobilization device to verify doses in vivo delivered during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated-arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer. The treatment plans for both modalities had been developed for a patient undergoing prostate radiation therapy. First, a study was performed to test the dependence, if any, of PSD accuracy on the number and type of calibration conditions. This study included PSD measurements of each treatment plan being delivered under quality assurance (QA) conditions using a rigid QA phantom. PSD results obtained under these conditions were compared to ionization chamber measurements. After an optimal set of calibration factors had been found, the PSD was combined with a commercial endorectal balloon used for rectal distension and prostate immobilization during external beam radiotherapy. This PSD-enhanced endorectal balloon was placed inside of a deformable anthropomorphic phantom designed to simulate male pelvic anatomy. PSD results obtained under these so-called “simulated treatment conditions” were compared to doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). With the PSD still inserted in the pelvic phantom, each plan was delivered once again after applying a shift of 1 cm anterior to the original isocenter to simulate a treatment setup error. The mean total accumulated dose measured using the PSD differed the TPS-calculated doses by less than 1% for both treatment modalities simulated treatment conditions using the pelvic phantom. When the isocenter was shifted, the PSD results differed from the TPS calculations of mean dose by 1.2% (for IMRT) and 10.1% (for VMAT); in both cases, the doses were within the dose range calculated over the detector volume for these regions of steep dose gradient. Our results suggest that the system could benefit prostate cancer

  20. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  1. Reference Phantom Method for Acoustic Backscatter Coefficient and Attenuation Coefficient Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linxin

    1990-08-01

    In previous work in our laboratory accurate backscatter coefficient measurements were obtained with a data reduction method that explicitly accounts for experimental factors involved in recording echo data. An alternative, relative processing method for determining the backscatter coefficient and the attenuation coefficient is presented here. This method involves comparison of echo data from a sample with data recorded from a reference phantom whose backscatter and attenuation coefficients are known. The ratio of the signals cancels depth-dependent instrumentation factors. This saves the efforts of beam profile computation and various calibrations. The attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient of the sample are found from these ratios and the known acoustic properties of the reference phantom. This method is tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms with known scattering and attenuation properties. Various experiments have been done using clinical scanners with different transducers to compute attenuation coefficients and backscatter coefficients, and to make quantitative images. This method has been found to be accurate for media containing Rayleigh scatterers, as well as samples containing intermediate-size scatterers. Accuracy was maintained over different frequency bands and for a wide range of transducer-to-ROI distances. Measurements were done in vivo for human livers, kidneys and dog myocardium. The results have shown that the reference phantom method simplifies the measurement procedure as well as keeps the accuracy, and therefore is practical clinically. Statistical uncertainties propagated in the data reduction have been analyzed in detail. Formulae are deduced to predict statistical errors in the attenuation and backscatter coefficients measured with the reference phantom method. Spatial correlations of the echo signals are also considered. A 2-dimensional lateral correlation matrix is introduced to compute the number of effective independent

  2. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  3. Evaluation of Multiple-Sampling Function used with a Microtek flatbed scanner for Radiation Dosimetry Calibration of EBT2 Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Ding, Hueisch-Jy; Hwang, Ing-Ming; Chen, Pang-Yu; Lee, Tsair-Fwu

    2016-10-01

    The radiochromic EBT2 film is a widely used quality assurance device for radiation therapy. This study evaluated the film calibration performance of the multiple-sampling function, a function of the ScanWizard Pro scanning software provided by the manufacturer, when used with Microtek 9800XL plus (9800XL+) flatbed scanner. By using the PDD method, each one of the eight EBT2 films, four delivered by 290 monitor unit (MU) and four by 88 MU via 6-MV photon beams, was tightly sandwiched in a 303-cm3 water equivalent polystyrene phantom prior to irradiation. Before and after irradiation, all films were scanned using the Microtek 9800XL+ scanner with five different modes of the multiple-sampling function, which could generate the image with the averaged result of multiple-sampling. The net optical densities (netOD) on the beam central axis of film were assigned to corresponding depth doses for calibration. For each sampling mode with either delivered MU, the depth-dose uncertainty of a single film from repeated scans and that of a single scan of the four films were analyzed. Finally, the calibration error and the combined calibration uncertainty between film determined depth-doses and delivered depth-doses were calculated and evaluated for each sampling mode. All standard deviations and the calibration error were demonstrated to be unrelated to the number of sampling lines. The calibration error of the 2-line and 16-line mode was within 3 cGy and better than that of the other modes. The combined uncertainty of the 2-line mode was the lowest, which was generally less than 6 cGy except for the delivered dose around 100 cGy. The evaluation described herein revealed that the EBT2 film calibrated with the 2-line mode has relatively lower error, scanning time and combined uncertianty. Therefore, it is recommended for routine EBT2 film calibration and verification of treatment plans.

  4. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D–2D image registration

    PubMed Central

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM = 0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE = 0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional

  5. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  6. Ge well detector calibration by means of a trial and error procedure using the dead layers as a unique parameter in a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtine, Fabien; Pilleyre, Thierry; Sanzelle, Serge; Miallier, Didier

    2008-11-01

    The project aimed at modelling an HPGe well detector in view to predict its photon-counting efficiency by means of the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT4. Although a qualitative and quantitative description of the crystal and housing was available, uncertainties were associated to parameters controlling the detector response. This induced poor agreement between the efficiency calculated on the basis of nominal data and the actual efficiency experimentally measured with a 137Cs point source. It was then decided to improve the model, by parameterization of a trial and error method. The distribution of the dead layers was adopted as a unique parameter, in order to explore the possibilities and pertinence of this parameter. In the course of the work, it appeared necessary to introduce the possibility that the thickness of the dead layers was not uniform for a given surface. At the end of the process, the results allowed to conclude that the approach was able to give a model adapted to practical application with a satisfactory precision in the calculated efficiency. The pattern of the "dead layers" that was obtained is characterized by a variable thickness which seems to be physically relevant. It implicitly and partly accounts for effects that are not originated from actual dead layers, such as incomplete charge collection. But, such effects, which are uneasily accounted for, can, in a first approximation, be represented by "dead layers"; this is an advantage of the parameterization that was adopted.

  7. Definition of the limit of quantification in the presence of instrumental and non-instrumental errors. Comparison among various definitions applied to the calibration of zinc by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badocco, Denis; Lavagnini, Irma; Mondin, Andrea; Favaro, Gabriella; Pastore, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The limit of quantification (LOQ) in the presence of instrumental and non-instrumental errors was proposed. It was theoretically defined combining the two-component variance regression and LOQ schemas already present in the literature and applied to the calibration of zinc by the ICP-MS technique. At low concentration levels, the two-component variance LOQ definition should be always used above all when a clean room is not available. Three LOQ definitions were accounted for. One of them in the concentration and two in the signal domain. The LOQ computed in the concentration domain, proposed by Currie, was completed by adding the third order terms in the Taylor expansion because they are of the same order of magnitude of the second ones so that they cannot be neglected. In this context, the error propagation was simplified by eliminating the correlation contributions by using independent random variables. Among the signal domain definitions, a particular attention was devoted to the recently proposed approach based on at least one significant digit in the measurement. The relative LOQ values resulted very large in preventing the quantitative analysis. It was found that the Currie schemas in the signal and concentration domains gave similar LOQ values but the former formulation is to be preferred as more easily computable.

  8. MO-E-17A-12: Direct Realization of the CT Dose to Phantom: Energy to Heat Conversion in Polyethylene Using Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen-Mayer, H; Tosh, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a primary reference standard for absorbed dose to phantom for medical CT dosimetry. CT dosimetry relies on the implementation of the CTDI standard based on air kerma. We are taking a step toward an absorbed dose to water standard by first investigating the dose in a solid phantom. By directly measuring the heat converted from the incident radiation, the absorbed dose in the phantom at a point can be assessed with primary methods without relying on indirect conversions. Methods: The calorimeter contains two small thermistors embedded in a removable PE “core” inserted into the cylindrical HDPE phantom. A core made with polystyrene (PS) was also tested because of its purportedly negligible heat defect. Measurements were made using the two cores and with a calibrated ionization chamber in a CT beam. The air chamber values were converted to the dose to medium using appropriate stopping-power ratios from the literature, and then compared to the thermal data. Results: The PS core data yielded a dose of 1.3 times (4-run average, 3% std. dev.) higher than the converted chamber value, whereas the PE core data were inexplicably higher. The possible systematic errors include 1) excess heat from the thermistors, 2) in PE the exothermic chemical reactions, 3) uncertainties of the specific heat capacities of the materials, 4) thermal drift, and 5) theoretical conversion of chamber values. Monte Carlo simulations and finite element heat transfer calculations were performed to address some of these issues. The general validity was assessed in a 6 MV photon beam with an entirely different calibration scheme. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility but also revealed the difficulty in developing a new primary reference standard for absorbed dose to material for CT. Additional experimental and theoretical work is planned to achieve our goal.

  9. Distortion correction, calibration, and registration: toward an integrated MR and x-ray interventional suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Luis F.; Shechter, Guy; Lederman, Robert J.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Ozturk, Cengizhan

    2005-04-01

    We present our co-registration results of two complementary imaging modalities, MRI and X-ray angiography (XA), using dual modality fiducial markers. Validation experiments were conducted using a vascular phantom with eight fiducial markers around its periphery. Gradient-distortion-corrected 3D MRI was used to image the phantom and determine the 3D locations of the markers. XA imaging was performed at various C-arm orientations. These images were corrected for geometric distortion, and projection parameters were optimized using a calibration phantom. Closed-form 3D-to-3D rigid-body registration was performed between the MR markers and a 3D reconstruction of the markers from multiple XA images. 3D-to-2D registration was performed using a single XA image by projecting the MR markers onto the XA image and iteratively minimizing the 2D errors between the projected markers and their observed locations in the image. The RMS registration error was 0.77 mm for the 3D-to-3D registration, and 1.53 pixels for the 3D-to-2D registration. We also showed that registration can be performed at a large IS where many markers are visible, then the image can be zoomed in maintaining the registration. This requires calibration of imperfections in the zoom operation of the image intensifier. When we applied the registration used for an IS of 330 mm to an image acquired with an IS of 130 mm, the error was 42.16 pixels before zoom correction and 3.37 pixels after. This method offers the possibility of new therapies where the soft-tissue contrast of MRI and the high-resolution imaging of XA are both needed.

  10. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration: development and application to tasked-based imaging with a robotic C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G.; Uneri, A.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Robotic C-arm systems are capable of general noncircular orbits whose trajectories can be driven by the particular imaging task. However obtaining accurate calibrations for reconstruction in such geometries can be a challenging problem. This work proposes a method to perform a unique geometric calibration of an arbitrary C-arm orbit by registering 2D projections to a previously acquired 3D image to determine the transformation parameters representing the system geometry. Methods: Experiments involved a cone-beam CT (CBCT) bench system, a robotic C-arm, and three phantoms. A robust 3D-2D registration process was used to compute the 9 degree of freedom (DOF) transformation between each projection and an existing 3D image by maximizing normalized gradient information with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of the 3D volume. The quality of the resulting "self-calibration" was evaluated in terms of the agreement with an established calibration method using a BB phantom as well as image quality in the resulting CBCT reconstruction. Results: The self-calibration yielded CBCT images without significant difference in spatial resolution from the standard ("true") calibration methods (p-value >0.05 for all three phantoms), and the differences between CBCT images reconstructed using the "self" and "true" calibration methods were on the order of 10-3 mm-1. Maximum error in magnification was 3.2%, and back-projection ray placement was within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The proposed geometric "self" calibration provides a means for 3D imaging on general noncircular orbits in CBCT systems for which a geometric calibration is either not available or not reproducible. The method forms the basis of advanced "task-based" 3D imaging methods now in development for robotic C-arms.

  11. Absorbed dose to water reference dosimetry using solid phantoms in the context of absorbed-dose protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, Jan; Olivares, Marina; Evans, Michael; Podgorsak, Ervin

    2005-09-15

    For reasons of phantom material reproducibility, the absorbed dose protocols of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (TRS-398) have made the use of liquid water as a phantom material for reference dosimetry mandatory. In this work we provide a formal framework for the measurement of absorbed dose to water using ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water but irradiated in solid phantoms. Such a framework is useful when there is a desire to put dose measurements using solid phantoms on an absolute basis. Putting solid phantom measurements on an absolute basis has distinct advantages in verification measurements and quality assurance. We introduce a phantom dose conversion factor that converts a measurement made in a solid phantom and analyzed using an absorbed dose calibration protocol into absorbed dose to water under reference conditions. We provide techniques to measure and calculate the dose transfer from solid phantom to water. For an Exradin A12 ionization chamber, we measured and calculated the phantom dose conversion factor for six Solid Water{sup TM} phantoms and for a single Lucite phantom for photon energies between {sup 60}Co and 18 MV photons. For Solid Water{sup TM} of certified grade, the difference between measured and calculated factors varied between 0.0% and 0.7% with the average dose conversion factor being low by 0.4% compared with the calculation whereas for Lucite, the agreement was within 0.2% for the one phantom examined. The composition of commercial plastic phantoms and their homogeneity may not always be reproducible and consistent with assumed composition. By comparing measured and calculated phantom conversion factors, our work provides methods to verify the consistency of a given plastic for the purpose of clinical reference dosimetry.

  12. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use.

  13. Dosimetry in Mammography: Average Glandular Dose Based on Homogeneous Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Benevides, Luis A.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2011-05-05

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 and 46 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  14. Dosimetry in Mammography: Average Glandular Dose Based on Homogeneous Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis A.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 and 46 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  15. A novel composite material specifically developed for ultrasound bone phantoms: cortical, trabecular and skull.

    PubMed

    Wydra, A; Maev, R Gr

    2013-11-21

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, help in implementation, testing and calibrations. Phantoms are especially useful in developing new applications and training new doctors in medical schools. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc will require the phantom to be made of different physical properties. In this paper we introduce the properties of recently designed new materials for developing phantoms for ultrasonic human body investigation, which in today's market make up more than 30% in the world of phantoms. We developed a novel composite material which allows fabrication of various kinds of ultrasound bone phantoms to mimic most of the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to the ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain the physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time; moreover, these properties can be custom designed and created to suit specific needs. As a result, we introduce three examples of ultrasound phantoms that we manufactured in our laboratory: cortical, trabecular and skull bone phantoms. The paper also presents the results of a comparison study between the acoustical and physical properties of actual human bones (reported in the referenced literatures) and the phantoms manufactured by us.

  16. A novel composite material specifically developed for ultrasound bone phantoms: cortical, trabecular and skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wydra, A.; Maev, R. Gr

    2013-11-01

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, help in implementation, testing and calibrations. Phantoms are especially useful in developing new applications and training new doctors in medical schools. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc will require the phantom to be made of different physical properties. In this paper we introduce the properties of recently designed new materials for developing phantoms for ultrasonic human body investigation, which in today's market make up more than 30% in the world of phantoms. We developed a novel composite material which allows fabrication of various kinds of ultrasound bone phantoms to mimic most of the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to the ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain the physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time; moreover, these properties can be custom designed and created to suit specific needs. As a result, we introduce three examples of ultrasound phantoms that we manufactured in our laboratory: cortical, trabecular and skull bone phantoms. The paper also presents the results of a comparison study between the acoustical and physical properties of actual human bones (reported in the referenced literatures) and the phantoms manufactured by us.

  17. Calibration-free device sizing using an inverse geometry x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Speidel, Michael A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) can be used to support device size selection for cardiovascular interventions. The accuracy of QCA measurements using conventional x-ray fluoroscopy depends on proper calibration using a reference object and avoiding vessel foreshortening. The authors have developed a novel interventional device sizing method using the inverse geometry scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy system. The proposed method can measure the diameter and length of vessel segments without imaging a reference object and when vessels appear foreshortened. Methods: SBDX creates multiple tomosynthetic x-ray images corresponding to planes through the patient volume. The structures that lie in the plane are in focus and the features above and below the plane are blurred. Three-dimensional localization of the vessel edges was performed by examining the degree of blurring at each image plane. A 3D vessel centerline was created and used to determine vessel magnification and angulation relative to the image planes. Diameter measurements were performed using a model-based method and length measurements were calculated from the 3D centerline. Phantom validation was performed by measuring the diameter and length of vessel segments with nominal diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2.8 mm and nominal lengths of 42 mm. The phantoms were imaged at a range of positions between the source and the detector ({+-}16 cm relative to isocenter) and with a range of foreshortening angles (0 deg. - 75 deg.). Results: Changes in vessel phantom position created magnifications ranging from 87% to 118% relative to isocenter magnification. Average diameter errors were less than 0.15 mm. Average length measurements were within 1% (0.3 mm) of the true length. No trends were observed between measurement accuracy and magnification. Changes in vessel phantom orientation resulted in decreased apparent length down to 28% of the original nonforeshortened length. Average diameter

  18. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  19. Software For Calibration Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jakob; Zebker, Howard; Freeman, Anthony; Holt, John; Dubois, Pascale; Chapman, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    POLCAL (Polarimetric Radar Calibration) software tool intended to assist in calibration of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) systems. In particular, calibrates Stokes-matrix-format data produced as standard product by NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne imaging synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR). Version 4.0 of POLCAL is upgrade of version 2.0. New options include automatic absolute calibration of 89/90 data, distributed-target analysis, calibration of nearby scenes with corner reflectors, altitude or roll-angle corrections, and calibration of errors introduced by known topography. Reduces crosstalk and corrects phase calibration without use of ground calibration equipment. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  20. The use of a virtual reality simulator to explore and understand the impact of Linac mis-calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, Andrew W.; Ward, James W.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: In recent years there has been interest in using Computer Simulation within Medical training. The VERT (Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training) system is a Flight Simulator for Radiation Oncology professionals, wherein fundamental concepts, techniques and problematic scenarios can be safely investigated. Methods: The system provides detailed simulations of several Linacs and the ability to display DICOM treatment plans. Patients can be mis-positioned with 'set-up errors' which can be explored visually, dosimetrically and using IGRT. Similarly, a variety of Linac calibration and configuration parameters can be altered manually or randomly via controlled errors in the simulated 3D Linac and its component parts. The implication of these can be investigated by following through a treatment scenario or using QC devices available within a Physics software module. Results: One resultant exercise is a systematic mis-calibration of 'lateral laser height' by 2mm. The offset in patient alignment is easily identified using IGRT and once corrected by reference to the 'in-room monitor'. The dosimetric implication is demonstrated to be 0.4% by setting a dosimetry phantom by the lasers (and ignoring TSD information). Finally, the need for recalibration can be shown by the Laser Alignment Phantom or by reference to the front pointer. Conclusions: The VERT system provides a realistic environment for training and enhancing understanding of radiotherapy concepts and techniques. Linac error conditions can be explored in this context and valuable experience gained in a controlled manner in a compressed period of time.

  1. Angle interferometer cross axis errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.B.; Carter, D.L.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Angle interferometers are commonly used to measure surface plate flatness. An error can exist when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the surface plate and the guide bar for the mirror sled is curved. Typical errors can be one to two microns per meter. A similar error can exist in the calibration of rotary tables when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the axes of rotation of the angle calibrator and the calibrator axis is not parallel to the rotary table axis. Commercial double comer cube assemblies typically have non-parallelism errors of ten milli-radians between their centerlines and their sides and similar values for non-squareness between their centerlines and end surfaces. The authors have developed a simple method for measuring these errors and correcting them by remachining the reference surfaces.

  2. Variations in backscatter observed in PMMA whole-body dosimetry slab phantoms.

    PubMed

    Schwahn, Scott O; Gesell, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is a useful material for dosimetry phantoms in many ways including approximate tissue equivalence, stability, accessibility and ease of use. However, recent studies indicate that PMMA may have some unanticipated variation in backscatter from one phantom to another. While the reasons behind the variations have not been identified, it has been demonstrated that the backscatter from one phantom to another may vary by as much as 15%, resulting in a dosemeter response variation of as much as 5%. This unexpected contribution to uncertainty in delivered dose to a dosemeter may be quite large compared to the normally estimated uncertainty, potentially causing problems with calibration and performance testing. This paper includes data supporting the differences in backscatter among phantoms, and results from tests on the phantoms performed in an effort to identify possible causes.

  3. A geometric calibration method for inverse geometry computed tomography using P-matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagowski, Jordan M.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Hatt, Charles R.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and artifact free reconstruction of tomographic images requires precise knowledge of the imaging system geometry. This work proposes a novel projection matrix (P-matrix) based calibration method to enable C-arm inverse geometry CT (IGCT). The method is evaluated for scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX), a C-arm mounted inverse geometry fluoroscopic technology. A helical configuration of fiducials is imaged at each gantry angle in a rotational acquisition. For each gantry angle, digital tomosynthesis is performed at multiple planes and a composite image analogous to a cone-beam projection is generated from the plane stack. The geometry of the C-arm, source array, and detector array is determined at each angle by constructing a parameterized 3D-to-2D projection matrix that minimizes the sum-of-squared deviations between measured and projected fiducial coordinates. Simulations were used to evaluate calibration performance with translations and rotations of the source and detector. In a geometry with 1 mm translation of the central ray relative to the axis-of-rotation and 1 degree yaw of the detector and source arrays, the maximum error in the recovered translational parameters was 0.4 mm and maximum error in the rotation parameter was 0.02 degrees. The relative rootmean- square error in a reconstruction of a numerical thorax phantom was 0.4% using the calibration method, versus 7.7% without calibration. Changes in source-detector-distance were the most challenging to estimate. Reconstruction of experimental SBDX data using the proposed method eliminated double contour artifacts present in a non-calibrated reconstruction. The proposed IGCT geometric calibration method reduces image artifacts when uncertainties exist in system geometry.

  4. Organosilicon phantom for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Kusmic, Claudia; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Meucci, Sandro; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Pini, Roberto; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique. Although commercially available photoacoustic imaging systems currently exist, the technology is still in its infancy. Therefore, the design of stable phantoms is essential to achieve semiquantitative evaluation of the performance of a photoacoustic system and can help optimize the properties of contrast agents. We designed and developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom with exceptionally fine geometry; the phantom was tested using photoacoustic experiments loaded with the standard indocyanine green dye and compared to an agar phantom pattern through polyethylene glycol-gold nanorods. The linearity of the photoacoustic signal with the nanoparticle number was assessed. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast were employed as image quality parameters, and enhancements of up to 50 and up to 300%, respectively, were measured with the PDMS phantom with respect to the agar one. A tissue-mimicking (TM)-PDMS was prepared by adding TiO2 and India ink; photoacoustic tests were performed in order to compare the signal generated by the TM-PDMS and the biological tissue. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  5. Phantom stars and topology change

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Andrew; Garattini, Remo; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2008-11-15

    In this work, we consider time-dependent dark-energy star models, with an evolving parameter {omega} crossing the phantom divide {omega}=-1. Once in the phantom regime, the null energy condition is violated, which physically implies that the negative radial pressure exceeds the energy density. Therefore, an enormous negative pressure in the center may, in principle, imply a topology change, consequently opening up a tunnel and converting the dark-energy star into a wormhole. The criteria for this topology change are discussed and, in particular, we consider a Casimir energy approach involving quasilocal energy difference calculations that may reflect or measure the occurrence of a topology change. We denote these exotic geometries consisting of dark-energy stars (in the phantom regime) and phantom wormholes as phantom stars. The final product of this topological change, namely, phantom wormholes, have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications, as in addition to being used for interstellar shortcuts, an absurdly advanced civilization may manipulate these geometries to induce closed timelike curves, consequently violating causality.

  6. Organosilicon phantom for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Kusmic, Claudia; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Meucci, Sandro; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Pini, Roberto; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique. Although commercially available photoacoustic imaging systems currently exist, the technology is still in its infancy. Therefore, the design of stable phantoms is essential to achieve semiquantitative evaluation of the performance of a photoacoustic system and can help optimize the properties of contrast agents. We designed and developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom with exceptionally fine geometry; the phantom was tested using photoacoustic experiments loaded with the standard indocyanine green dye and compared to an agar phantom pattern through polyethylene glycol-gold nanorods. The linearity of the photoacoustic signal with the nanoparticle number was assessed. The signal-tonoiseratio and contrast were employed as image quality parameters, and enhancements of up to 50 and up to 300%, respectively, were measured with the PDMS phantom with respect to the agar one. A tissue-mimicking (TM)-PDMS was prepared by adding TiO2 and India ink; photoacoustic tests were performed in order to compare the signal generated by the TM-PDMS and the biological tissue. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  7. A stoichiometric calibration method for dual energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Alexandra E; Carrier, Jean-François; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-04-21

    The accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculation relies crucially on patient composition data. The computed tomography (CT) calibration methods based on the stoichiometric calibration of Schneider et al (1996 Phys. Med. Biol. 41 111-24) are the most reliable to determine electron density (ED) with commercial single energy CT scanners. Along with the recent developments in dual energy CT (DECT) commercial scanners, several methods were published to determine ED and the effective atomic number (EAN) for polyenergetic beams without the need for CT calibration curves. This paper intends to show that with a rigorous definition of the EAN, the stoichiometric calibration method can be successfully adapted to DECT with significant accuracy improvements with respect to the literature without the need for spectrum measurements or empirical beam hardening corrections. Using a theoretical framework of ICRP human tissue compositions and the XCOM photon cross sections database, the revised stoichiometric calibration method yields Hounsfield unit (HU) predictions within less than ±1.3 HU of the theoretical HU calculated from XCOM data averaged over the spectra used (e.g., 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 140 kVp and 140/Sn kVp). A fit of mean excitation energy (I-value) data as a function of EAN is provided in order to determine the ion stopping power of human tissues from ED-EAN measurements. Analysis of the calibration phantom measurements with the Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source CT scanner shows that the present formalism yields mean absolute errors of (0.3 ± 0.4)% and (1.6 ± 2.0)% on ED and EAN, respectively. For ion therapy, the mean absolute errors for calibrated I-values and proton stopping powers (216 MeV) are (4.1 ± 2.7)% and (0.5 ± 0.4)%, respectively. In all clinical situations studied, the uncertainties in ion ranges in water for therapeutic energies are found to be less than 1.3 mm, 0.7 mm and 0.5 mm for protons, helium and carbon ions respectively, using a

  8. Hybrid computational phantoms of the male and female newborn patient: NURBS-based whole-body models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hasenauer, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L.; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-07-01

    phantom is performed in three steps: polygonization of the voxel phantom, organ modeling via NURBS surfaces and phantom voxelization. Two 3D graphic tools, 3D-DOCTOR™ and Rhinoceros™, were utilized to polygonize the newborn voxel phantom and generate NURBS surfaces, while an in-house MATLAB™ code was used to voxelize the resulting NURBS model into a final computational phantom ready for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations. A total of 126 anatomical organ and tissue models, including 38 skeletal sites and 31 cartilage sites, were described within the hybrid phantom using either NURBS or polygon surfaces. A male hybrid newborn phantom was constructed following the development of the female phantom through the replacement of female-specific organs with male-specific organs. The outer body contour and internal anatomy of the NURBS-based phantoms were adjusted to match anthropometric and reference newborn data reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in their Publication 89. The voxelization process was designed to accurately convert NURBS models to a voxel phantom with minimum volumetric change. A sensitivity study was additionally performed to better understand how the meshing tolerance and voxel resolution would affect volumetric changes between the hybrid-NURBS and hybrid-voxel phantoms. The male and female hybrid-NURBS phantoms were constructed in a manner so that all internal organs approached their ICRP reference masses to within 1%, with the exception of the skin (-6.5% relative error) and brain (-15.4% relative error). Both hybrid-voxel phantoms were constructed with an isotropic voxel resolution of 0.663 mm—equivalent to the ICRP 89 reference thickness of the newborn skin (dermis and epidermis). Hybrid-NURBS phantoms used to create their voxel counterpart retain the non-uniform scalability of stylized phantoms, while maintaining the anatomic realism of segmented voxel phantoms with respect to organ shape, depth and

  9. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  10. A C-arm calibration method with application to fluoroscopic image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Gibbs, Jason D.; Wibowo, Henky

    2012-02-01

    C-arm fluoroscopy units provide continuously updating X-ray video images during surgical procedure. The modality is widely adopted for its low cost, real-time imaging capabilities, and its ability to display radio-opaque tools in the anatomy. It is, however, important to correct for fluoroscopic image distortion and estimate camera parameters, such as focal length and camera center, for registration with 3D CT scans in fluoroscopic imageguided procedures. This paper describes a method for C-arm calibration and evaluates its accuracy in multiple C-arm units and in different viewing orientations. The proposed calibration method employs a commerciallyavailable unit to track the C-arm and a calibration plate. The method estimates both the internal calibration parameters and the transformation between the coordinate systems of tracker and C-arm. The method was successfully tested on two C-arm units (GE OEC 9800 and GE OEC 9800 Plus) of different image intensifier sizes and verified with a rigid airway phantom model. The mean distortion-model error was found to be 0.14 mm and 0.17 mm for the respective C-arms. The mean overall system reprojection error (which measures the accuracy of predicting an image using tracker coordinates) was found to be 0.63 mm for the GE OEC 9800.

  11. Investigating a compact phantom and setup for testing body sound transducers

    PubMed Central

    Mansy, Hansen A; Grahe, Joshua; Royston, Thomas J; Sandler, Richard H

    2011-01-01

    Contact transducers are a key element in experiments involving body sounds. The characteristics of these devices are often not known with accuracy. There are no standardized calibration setups or procedures for testing these sensors. This study investigated the characteristics of a new computer-controlled sound source phantom for testing sensors. Results suggested that sensors with different sizes require special phantom requirements. The effectiveness of certain approaches on increasing the spatial and spectral uniformity of the phantom surface signal was studied. Non-uniformities >20 dB were removable, which can be particularly helpful in comparing the characteristics of different size sensors more accurately. PMID:21496795

  12. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  13. Multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system with automatic self-calibration for long-term monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wi, Hun; Sohal, Harsh; McEwan, Alistair Lee; Woo, Eung Je; Oh, Tong In

    2014-02-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a safe medical imaging technology, requiring no ionizing or heating radiation, as opposed to most other imaging modalities. This has led to a clinical interest in its use for long-term monitoring, possibly at the bedside, for ventilation monitoring, bleeding detection, gastric emptying and epilepsy foci diagnosis. These long-term applications demand auto-calibration and high stability over long time periods. To address this need we have developed a new multi-frequency EIT system called the KHU Mark2.5 with automatic self-calibration and cooperation with other devices via a timing signal for synchronization with other medical instruments. The impedance measurement module (IMM) for flexible configuration as a key component includes an independent constant current source, an independent differential voltmeter, and a current source calibrator, which allows automatic self-calibration of the current source within each IMM. We installed a resistor phantom inside the KHU Mark2.5 EIT system for intra-channel and inter-channel calibrations of all voltmeters in multiple IMMs. We show the deterioration of performance of an EIT system over time and the improvement due to automatic self-calibration. The system is able to maintain SNR of 80 dB for frequencies up to 250 kHz and below 0.5% reciprocity error over continuous operation for 24 hours. Automatic calibration at least every 3 days is shown to maintain SNR above 75 dB and reciprocity error below 0.7% over 7 days at 1 kHz. A clear degradation in performance results with increasing time between automatic calibrations allowing the tailoring of calibration to suit the performance requirements of each application.

  14. Multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system with automatic self-calibration for long-term monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wi, Hun; Sohal, Harsh; McEwan, Alistair Lee; Woo, Eung Je; Oh, Tong In

    2014-02-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a safe medical imaging technology, requiring no ionizing or heating radiation, as opposed to most other imaging modalities. This has led to a clinical interest in its use for long-term monitoring, possibly at the bedside, for ventilation monitoring, bleeding detection, gastric emptying and epilepsy foci diagnosis. These long-term applications demand auto-calibration and high stability over long time periods. To address this need we have developed a new multi-frequency EIT system called the KHU Mark2.5 with automatic self-calibration and cooperation with other devices via a timing signal for synchronization with other medical instruments. The impedance measurement module (IMM) for flexible configuration as a key component includes an independent constant current source, an independent differential voltmeter, and a current source calibrator, which allows automatic self-calibration of the current source within each IMM. We installed a resistor phantom inside the KHU Mark2.5 EIT system for intra-channel and inter-channel calibrations of all voltmeters in multiple IMMs. We show the deterioration of performance of an EIT system over time and the improvement due to automatic self-calibration. The system is able to maintain SNR of 80 dB for frequencies up to 250 kHz and below 0.5% reciprocity error over continuous operation for 24 hours. Automatic calibration at least every 3 days is shown to maintain SNR above 75 dB and reciprocity error below 0.7% over 7 days at 1 kHz. A clear degradation in performance results with increasing time between automatic calibrations allowing the tailoring of calibration to suit the performance requirements of each application. PMID:24681925

  15. Design and evaluation of a cochlear implant strategy based on a "Phantom" channel.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Waldo; Litvak, Leonid M; Saoji, Aniket A; Büchner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Unbalanced bipolar stimulation, delivered using charge balanced pulses, was used to produce "Phantom stimulation", stimulation beyond the most apical contact of a cochlear implant's electrode array. The Phantom channel was allocated audio frequencies below 300 Hz in a speech coding strategy, conveying energy some two octaves lower than the clinical strategy and hence delivering the fundamental frequency of speech and of many musical tones. A group of 12 Advanced Bionics cochlear implant recipients took part in a chronic study investigating the fitting of the Phantom strategy and speech and music perception when using Phantom. The evaluation of speech in noise was performed immediately after fitting Phantom for the first time (Session 1) and after one month of take-home experience (Session 2). A repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) within factors strategy (Clinical, Phantom) and interaction time (Session 1, Session 2) revealed a significant effect for the interaction time and strategy. Phantom obtained a significant improvement in speech intelligibility after one month of use. Furthermore, a trend towards a better performance with Phantom (48%) with respect to F120 (37%) after 1 month of use failed to reach significance after type 1 error correction. Questionnaire results show a preference for Phantom when listening to music, likely driven by an improved balance between high and low frequencies. PMID:25806818

  16. Phantom black holes and sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Azreg-Aienou, Mustapha; Clement, Gerard; Fabris, Julio C.; Rodrigues, Manuel E.

    2011-06-15

    We construct static multicenter solutions of phantom Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory from null geodesics of the target space, leading to regular black holes without spatial symmetry for certain discrete values of the dilaton coupling constant. We also discuss the three-dimensional gravitating sigma models obtained by reduction of phantom Einstein-Maxwell, phantom Kaluza-Klein and phantom Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion theories. In each case, we generate by group transformations phantom charged black hole solutions from a neutral seed.

  17. Calibration of a high precision rotary table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heyan; Xue, Zi; Shen, Ni; Huang, Yao

    2015-02-01

    In order to calibrate a high precision rotary table, a calibration system was established to measure the position error and repeatability of rotary table. The position error was measured with a polygon, an index table and an autocollimator to separate the angular error of the polygon from the position error of the rotary table, and the position error of rotary table was calculated using least square method. The rotary table was compensated and calibrated with the position error measured. The repeatability of the rotary table established through 10 times full circle rotations was 0.02 arc second. The measurement results indicated that the combination calibration method was suitable for the calibration of a high precision rotary table. It was found through the analysis that the angular measurement uncertainty was 0.08 arc second.

  18. An arm phantom for in vivo determination of Americium-241 in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, G.S.; Palmer, H.E.

    1988-04-01

    The focus of this research has been to construct a realistic arm phantom as a calibration tool in estimation of /sup 241/Am in the bone. The United States Transuranium Registry (USTR), through its program of whole body donations, continues to provide data on transuranic incorporation in man that would not otherwise be readily available (Norwood 1972; Breitenstein 1981; Swint, et al. 1985). This project uses well-characterized human bones loaned by the USTR for the construction of realistic phantoms for improvement of whole-body counter calibrations. 27 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Low abundances of synthetics lipids in phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Santiago-Alvarado, A.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Aguilar-Soto, J.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    Phantoms simulate optical characteristics of tissues. Phantoms use to mimic light distributions in living tissue. Several Phantoms compositions made of silicone, polyester, polyurethane, and epoxy resin have been described in the literature. These kinds of phantoms have the problem of long time preservation. In this work, we describe the fabrication and characterization of phantoms with low concentrations of synthetic lipid using Raman spectroscopy. We fabricate four phantoms made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These phantoms have synthetic lipid content of cholesterol and triglycerides. The size of our phantoms is 1 x 1 cm and 5 mm of thickness.We used the point-to-point mapping technique. Finally, we compared advantages and performance of made PDMS and gelatin phantoms.

  20. Estimating Bias Error Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Finley, Tom D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper formulates the general methodology for estimating the bias error distribution of a device in a measuring domain from less accurate measurements when a minimal number of standard values (typically two values) are available. A new perspective is that the bias error distribution can be found as a solution of an intrinsic functional equation in a domain. Based on this theory, the scaling- and translation-based methods for determining the bias error distribution arc developed. These methods are virtually applicable to any device as long as the bias error distribution of the device can be sufficiently described by a power series (a polynomial) or a Fourier series in a domain. These methods have been validated through computational simulations and laboratory calibration experiments for a number of different devices.

  1. Control volume based hydrocephalus research; a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Madsen, Joseph; Wei, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a complex spectrum of neurophysiological disorders involving perturbation of the intracranial contents; primarily increased intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume and intracranial pressure are observed. CSF dynamics are highly coupled to the cerebral blood flows and pressures as well as the mechanical properties of the brain. Hydrocephalus, as such, is a very complex biological problem. We propose integral control volume analysis as a method of tracking these important interactions using mass and momentum conservation principles. As a first step in applying this methodology in humans, an in vitro phantom is used as a simplified model of the intracranial space. The phantom's design consists of a rigid container filled with a compressible gel. Within the gel a hollow spherical cavity represents the ventricular system and a cylindrical passage represents the spinal canal. A computer controlled piston pump supplies sinusoidal volume fluctuations into and out of the flow phantom. MRI is used to measure fluid velocity and volume change as functions of time. Independent pressure measurements and momentum flow rate measurements are used to calibrate the MRI data. These data are used as a framework for future work with live patients and normal individuals. Flow and pressure measurements on the flow phantom will be presented through the control volume framework.

  2. Eigenbreasts for statistical breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ketcha, M.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.; Park, Subok; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-03-01

    To facilitate rigorous virtual clinical trials using model observers for breast imaging optimization and evaluation, we demonstrated a method of defining statistical models, based on 177 sets of breast CT patient data, in order to generate tens of thousands of unique digital breast phantoms. In order to separate anatomical texture from variation in breast shape, each training set of breast phantoms were deformed to a consistent atlas compressed geometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then performed on the shape-matched breast CT volumes to capture the variation of patient breast textures. PCA decomposes the training set of N breast CT volumes into an N-1-dimensional space of eigenvectors, which we call eigenbreasts. By summing weighted combinations of eigenbreasts, a large ensemble of different breast phantoms can be newly created. Different training sets can be used in eigenbreast analysis for designing basis models to target sub-populations defined by breast characteristics, such as size or density. In this work, we plan to generate ensembles of 30,000 new phantoms based on glandularity for an upcoming virtual trial of lesion detectability in digital breast tomosynthesis. Our method extends our series of digital and physical breast phantoms based on human subject anatomy, providing the capability to generate new, unique ensembles consisting of tens of thousands or more virtual subjects. This work represents an important step towards conducting future virtual trials for tasks-based assessment of breast imaging, where it is vital to have a large ensemble of realistic phantoms for statistical power as well as clinical relevance.

  3. The phantom robot - Predictive displays for teleoperation with time delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Kim, Won S.; Venema, Steven C.

    1990-01-01

    An enhanced teleoperation technique for time-delayed bilateral teleoperator control is discussed. The control technique selected for time delay is based on the use of a high-fidelity graphics phantom robot that is being controlled in real time (without time delay) against the static task image. Thus, the motion of the phantom robot image on the monitor predicts the motion of the real robot. The real robot's motion will follow the phantom robot's motion on the monitor with the communication time delay implied in the task. Real-time high-fidelity graphics simulation of a PUMA arm is generated and overlaid on the actual camera view of the arm. A simple camera calibration technique is used for calibrated graphics overlay. A preliminary experiment is performed with the predictive display by using a very simple tapping task. The results with this simple task indicate that predictive display enhances the human operator's telemanipulation task performance significantly during free motion when there is a long time delay. It appears, however, that either two-view or stereoscopic predictive displays are necessary for general three-dimensional tasks.

  4. New method for geometric calibration and distortion correction of conventional C-arm.

    PubMed

    Meng, Cai; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Fugen; Wang, Tianmiao

    2014-09-01

    Image distortion correction and geometric calibration are critical operations for using C-arm DSA (Digital Subtraction Angiography) images to digitally navigate vascular interventional surgery. In traditional ways, C-arm images are corrected with global or local correction methods where a supposed virtual ideal image is needed, and then the corrected images are utilized to calibrate the C-arm with a pin-hole model. In this paper, we propose a new method to calibrate the C-arm with a nonlinear model and to improve navigation performance. We first calibrate the C-arm with a nonlinear model and then the distortion correction is accomplished without virtual ideal image. In this paper, the nonlinear model of C-arm imaging system is addressed at first, and then the C-arm is calibrated with a two-stage method. In the first stage, the C-arm is calibrated with the markers in image center by RAC (radial alignment constraint) method, and in the second stage the calibration parameters are optimized with Levenberg-Marquadt algorithm by minimizing the sum of the square of difference between all markers׳ real distorted positions and their theoretical distorted positions in the phantom image. Based on the calibration result, the image distortion can be corrected. To verify our method, experiments were conducted with a conventional DSA C-arm machine in hospital. The errors in distortion correction and 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction were quantitatively compared with the global polynomial correction method and visual model method, and the results showed that the proposed method had better performance in distortion correction and 3D reconstruction.

  5. POLCAL - POLARIMETRIC RADAR CALIBRATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, J.

    1994-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric radar systems is a field of research in which great progress has been made over the last few years. POLCAL (Polarimetric Radar Calibration) is a software tool intended to assist in the calibration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. In particular, POLCAL calibrates Stokes matrix format data produced as the standard product by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne imaging synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR). POLCAL was designed to be used in conjunction with data collected by the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system. AIRSAR is a multifrequency (6 cm, 24 cm, and 68 cm wavelength), fully polarimetric SAR system which produces 12 x 12 km imagery at 10 m resolution. AIRSTAR was designed as a testbed for NASA's Spaceborne Imaging Radar program. While the images produced after 1991 are thought to be calibrated (phase calibrated, cross-talk removed, channel imbalance removed, and absolutely calibrated), POLCAL can and should still be used to check the accuracy of the calibration and to correct it if necessary. Version 4.0 of POLCAL is an upgrade of POLCAL version 2.0 released to AIRSAR investigators in June, 1990. New options in version 4.0 include automatic absolute calibration of 89/90 data, distributed target analysis, calibration of nearby scenes with calibration parameters from a scene with corner reflectors, altitude or roll angle corrections, and calibration of errors introduced by known topography. Many sources of error can lead to false conclusions about the nature of scatterers on the surface. Errors in the phase relationship between polarization channels result in incorrect synthesis of polarization states. Cross-talk, caused by imperfections in the radar antenna itself, can also lead to error. POLCAL reduces cross-talk and corrects phase calibration without the use of ground calibration equipment. Removing the antenna patterns during SAR processing also forms a very important part of the calibration of SAR data. Errors in the

  6. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and lens of your eye helps you focus. Refractive errors are vision problems that happen when the shape ... cornea, or aging of the lens. Four common refractive errors are Myopia, or nearsightedness - clear vision close up ...

  7. Calorimeters for pulsed lasers: calibration.

    PubMed

    Thacher, P D

    1976-07-01

    A calibration technique is developed and tested in which a calorimeter used for single-shot laser pulse energy measurements is calibrated with reference to a cw power standard using a chopped cw laser beam. A pulsed laser is required only to obtain the relative time response of the calorimeter to a pulse. With precautions as to beam alignment and wavelength, the principal error of the technique is that of the cw standard. Calibration of two thermopiles with cone receivers showed -2.5% and -3.5% agreement with previous calibrations made by the National Bureau of Standards. PMID:20165270

  8. Comparison of six phantoms for entrance skin dose evaluation in 11 standard X-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Compagnone, Gaetano; Pagan, Laura; Bergamini, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    Entrance skin dose (ESD) is an important parameter for assessing the dose received by a patient in a single radiographic exposure. The most useful way to evaluate ESD is either by direct measurement on phantoms using an ionization chamber or using calculations based on a mathematical model. We compared six phantoms (three anthropomorphic, two physical, and one mathematical) in 11 standard clinical examinations (anterior-posterior (AP) abdomen, posterior-anterior (PA) chest, AP chest, lateral (LAT) chest, AP lumbar spine, LAT lumbar spine, LAT lumbo-sacral joint, AP pelvis, PA skull, LAT skull, and AP urinary tract) for two reasons: to determine the conversion factors to use for ESDs measured on different phantoms and to validate the mathematical model used. First, a comparison was done between the three anthropomorphic phantoms (Alderson Rando, chest RSD-77SPL, and 3M skull) and the two physical phantoms (Uniform and AAPM 31); for each examination we obtained "relative entrance skin dose factors." Second, we compared these five phantoms with the mathematical phantom: the overall accuracy of the model was better than 14%. Total mathematical model and total ionization chamber uncertainties, calculated by quadratic propagation of errors of the single components, were estimated to be on the order of +/-12% and +/-3%, respectively. To reduce the most significant source of uncertainty, the overall accuracy of the model was recalculated using new backscatter factors. The overall accuracy of the model improved: better than 12%. For each examination an anthropomorphic phantom was considered as the gold standard relative to the physical phantoms. In this way, it was possible to analyze the variations in phantom design and characteristics. Finally, the mathematical model was validated by more than 400 measurements taken on different phantoms and using a variety of radiological equipment. We conclude that the mathematical model can be used satisfactorily in ESD evaluations

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of skull and knee voxel phantoms for the assessment of skeletal burden of low-energy photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Nadar, M Y; Akar, D K; Patni, H K; Singh, I S; Mishra, L; Rao, D D; Pradeepkumar, K S

    2014-12-01

    In case of internal contamination due to long-lived actinides by inhalation or injection pathway, a major portion of activity will be deposited in the skeleton and liver over a period of time. In this study, calibration factors (CFs) of Phoswich and an array of HPGe detectors are estimated using skull and knee voxel phantoms. These phantoms are generated from International Commission of Radiation Protection reference male voxel phantom. The phantoms as well as 20 cm diameter phoswich, having 1.2 cm thick NaI (Tl) primary and 5cm thick CsI (Tl) secondary detector and an array of three HPGe detectors (each of diameter of 7 cm and thickness of 2.5 cm) are incorporated in Monte Carlo code 'FLUKA'. Biokinetic models of Pu, Am, U and Th are solved using default parameters to identify different parts of the skeleton where activity will accumulate after an inhalation intake of 1 Bq. Accordingly, CFs are evaluated for the uniform source distribution in trabecular bone and bone marrow (TBBM), cortical bone (CB) as well as in both TBBM and CB regions for photon energies of 18, 60, 63, 74, 93, 185 and 238 keV describing sources of (239)Pu, (241)Am, (238)U, (235)U and (232)Th. The CFs are also evaluated for non-uniform distribution of activity in TBBM and CB regions. The variation in the CFs for source distributed in different regions of the bones is studied. The assessment of skeletal activity of actinides from skull and knee activity measurements is discussed along with the errors.

  10. Intersubject coregistration of brain images: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusinek, Henry; Tsui, Wai-Hon; Sanfilipo, Michael; Wolkin, Adam

    1998-06-01

    Inter-subject coregistration is a powerful neuroimaging technique that enables comparison and detection of morphological differences across groups of subjects. The present study uses digital phantoms to evaluate errors in two widely employed approaches to inter-subject coregistration of structural MR images of the brain: the manual step-wise approach and the automated method provided with the software package SPM96. Phantoms were constructed by deforming a high resolution T1-weighted MR image in which we have embedded 12 landmarks. For the manual method the accuracy ranged from 0.8 mm in quadrigeminal plate to 2.4 mm in superior central sulcus and occipital lobe. The average error was 1.5 mm. For the automated SPM96 method and the 9 parameter model, the accuracy ranged from 0.8 mm to 2.1 mm and averaged 1.1 mm. Error of the manual method correlated strongly with the distance from the center of the image (r equals 0.77, slope equals .020, p equals .003). The linear correlation of the error obtained with the automated method with the distance was poor (r equals 0.39, slope equals .008, p > 0.2). The results suggest that the inferior performance of the manual method is due to its step-wise approach and to a relatively large rotational error.

  11. Anatomically correct deformable colon phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, James A.; Barton, Michael D.; Davis, Brynmor J.; Bieszczad, Jerry; Meunier, Norm L.; Brown, Nathan W.; Kynor, David B.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a technique to build a soft-walled colon phantom that provides realistic lumen anatomy in computed tomography (CT) images. The technique begins with the geometry of a human colon measured during CT colonography (CTC). The three-dimensional air-filled colonic lumen is segmented and then replicated using stereolithography (SLA). The rigid SLA model includes large-scale features (e.g., haustral folds and tenia coli bands) down to small-scale features (e.g., a small pedunculated polyp). Since the rigid model represents the internal air-filled volume, a highly-pliable silicone polymer is painted onto the rigid model. This thin layer of silicone, when removed, becomes the colon wall. Small 3 mm diameter glass beads are affixed to the outer wall. These glass beads show up with high intensity in CT scans and provide a ground truth for evaluating performance of algorithms designed to register prone and supine CTC data sets. After curing, the silicone colon wall is peeled off the rigid model. The resulting colon phantom is filled with air and submerged in a water bath. CT images and intraluminal fly-through reconstructions from CTC scans of the colon phantom are compared against patient data to demonstrate the ability of the phantom to simulate a human colon.

  12. PERSONALISED BODY COUNTER CALIBRATION USING ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    Pölz, S; Breustedt, B

    2016-09-01

    Current calibration methods for body counting offer personalisation for lung counting predominantly with respect to ratios of body mass and height. Chest wall thickness is used as an intermediate parameter. This work revises and extends these methods using a series of computational phantoms derived from medical imaging data in combination with radiation transport simulation and statistical analysis. As an example, the method is applied to the calibration of the In Vivo Measurement Laboratory (IVM) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) comprising four high-purity germanium detectors in two partial body measurement set-ups. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code and the Extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) phantom series have been used. Analysis of the computed sample data consisting of 18 anthropometric parameters and calibration factors generated from 26 photon sources for each of the 30 phantoms reveals the significance of those parameters required for producing an accurate estimate of the calibration function. Body circumferences related to the source location perform best in the example, while parameters related to body mass show comparable but lower performances, and those related to body height and other lengths exhibit low performances. In conclusion, it is possible to give more accurate estimates of calibration factors using this proposed approach including estimates of uncertainties related to interindividual anatomical variation of the target population. PMID:26396263

  13. Accurately characterized optical tissue phantoms: how, why and when?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Veilleux, Isra"l.; Noiseux, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy

    2011-03-01

    Optical tissue phantoms are very important tools for the development of biomedical imaging applications. Optical phantoms are often used as ground truth against which instruments results can be compared. It is therefore important that the optical properties of reference phantoms be measured in a manner that is traceable to the international system of units. SI traceability insures long term consistency of results and will therefore improve the effectiveness of diffuse optics research effort more effective by reducing unwanted variability in the data produced and shared by the community. The ultimate benefit of rigorous SI traceability is the reduction of variability in the data produced by novel diagnostic devices, which will in turn increase the statistical power of clinical trials aiming at validating their clinical usefulness. SI traceability, and therefore uncertainty analysis, is also relevant to traceability aspects mandated by FDA regulations. SI traceability is achieved through a thorough analysis of the measurement principle and its potential error sources. The uncertainty analysis should be ultimately validated by inter-laboratory comparison until a consensus is attained on the best practices for measuring the optical properties of tissue phantoms.

  14. Development of a novel linearly-filled Derenzo microPET phantom

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Benjamin L; Graves, Stephen A; Farhoud, Mohammed; Barnhart, Todd E; Jeffery, Justin J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Nickles, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) phantoms are used to calibrate PET scanners so that inter-scanner and inter-isotope comparison can be made between PET datasets. Hot rod style phantoms have a hole pattern, which is filled with a positron-emitting isotope and typically involves using two radioisotope reservoirs with the pattern created with channels in between. However, this configuration is difficult to fill and requires an excess of activity and volume. Here we present an alternative design, a phantom that is linearly filled-one channel at a time. The process of fabrication of prototypes of the design is described and PET images of the prototyped phantom are also shown for a variety of commonly used radioisotopes (52Mn, 64Cu, 76Br, 124I). This design allows for a large reduction in isotope volume and required filling time making a quality assurance (QA) protocol safer, more efficient and less costly. PMID:27508106

  15. Development of a novel linearly-filled Derenzo microPET phantom.

    PubMed

    Cox, Benjamin L; Graves, Stephen A; Farhoud, Mohammed; Barnhart, Todd E; Jeffery, Justin J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Nickles, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) phantoms are used to calibrate PET scanners so that inter-scanner and inter-isotope comparison can be made between PET datasets. Hot rod style phantoms have a hole pattern, which is filled with a positron-emitting isotope and typically involves using two radioisotope reservoirs with the pattern created with channels in between. However, this configuration is difficult to fill and requires an excess of activity and volume. Here we present an alternative design, a phantom that is linearly filled-one channel at a time. The process of fabrication of prototypes of the design is described and PET images of the prototyped phantom are also shown for a variety of commonly used radioisotopes ((52)Mn, (64)Cu, (76)Br, (124)I). This design allows for a large reduction in isotope volume and required filling time making a quality assurance (QA) protocol safer, more efficient and less costly. PMID:27508106

  16. Microfabrication of polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to simulate tumor hypoxia and vascular anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Dong, Erbao; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a microfluidic approach to simulate tumor hypoxia and vascular anomaly. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantoms with embedded microchannel networks were fabricated by a soft lithography process. A dialysis membrane was sandwiched between two PDMS slabs to simulate the controlled mass transport and oxygen metabolism. A tortuous microchannel network was fabricated to simulate tumor microvasculature. A dual-modal multispectral and laser speckle imaging system was used for oxygen and blood flow imaging in the tumor-simulating phantom. The imaging results were compared with those of the normal vasculature. Our experiments demonstrated the technical feasibility of simulating tumor hypoxia and vascular anomalies using the proposed PDMS phantom. Such a phantom fabrication technique may be potentially used to calibrate optical imaging devices, to study the mechanisms for tumor hypoxia and angiogenesis, and to optimize the drug delivery strategies.

  17. Microfabrication of polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to simulate tumor hypoxia and vascular anomaly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiang; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Dong, Erbao; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a microfluidic approach to simulate tumor hypoxia and vascular anomaly. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantoms with embedded microchannel networks were fabricated by a soft lithography process. A dialysis membrane was sandwiched between two PDMS slabs to simulate the controlled mass transport and oxygen metabolism. A tortuous microchannel network was fabricated to simulate tumor microvasculature. A dual-modal multispectral and laser speckle imaging system was used for oxygen and blood flow imaging in the tumor-simulating phantom. The imaging results were compared with those of the normal vasculature. Our experiments demonstrated the technical feasibility of simulating tumor hypoxia and vascular anomalies using the proposed PDMS phantom. Such a phantom fabrication technique may be potentially used to calibrate optical imaging devices, to study the mechanisms for tumor hypoxia and angiogenesis, and to optimize the drug delivery strategies. PMID:26456687

  18. Error analysis of cine phase contrast MRI velocity measurements used for strain calculation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elisabeth R; Morrow, Duane A; Felmlee, Joel P; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    Cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI offers unique insight into localized skeletal muscle behavior by providing the ability to quantify muscle strain distribution during cyclic motion. Muscle strain is obtained by temporally integrating and spatially differentiating CPC-encoded velocity. The aim of this study was to quantify CPC measurement accuracy and precision and to describe error propagation into displacement and strain. Using an MRI-compatible jig to move a B-gel phantom within a 1.5 T MRI bore, CPC-encoded velocities were collected. The three orthogonal encoding gradients (through plane, frequency, and phase) were evaluated independently in post-processing. Two systematic error types were corrected: eddy current-induced bias and calibration-type error. Measurement accuracy and precision were quantified before and after removal of systematic error. Through plane- and frequency-encoded data accuracy were within 0.4 mm/s after removal of systematic error - a 70% improvement over the raw data. Corrected phase-encoded data accuracy was within 1.3 mm/s. Measured random error was between 1 to 1.4 mm/s, which followed the theoretical prediction. Propagation of random measurement error into displacement and strain was found to depend on the number of tracked time segments, time segment duration, mesh size, and dimensional order. To verify this, theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally calculated displacement and strain error. For the parameters tested, experimental and theoretical results aligned well. Random strain error approximately halved with a two-fold mesh size increase, as predicted. Displacement and strain accuracy were within 2.6 mm and 3.3%, respectively. These results can be used to predict the accuracy and precision of displacement and strain in user-specific applications.

  19. Error Analysis of Cine Phase Contrast MRI Velocity Measurements used for Strain Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elisabeth R.; Morrow, Duane A.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2014-01-01

    Cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI offers unique insight into localized skeletal muscle behavior by providing the ability to quantify muscle strain distribution during cyclic motion. Muscle strain is obtained by temporally integrating and spatially differentiating CPC-encoded velocity. The aim of this study was to quantify measurement accuracy and precision and to describe error propagation into displacement and strain. Using an MRI-compatible jig to move a B-gel phantom within a 1.5T MRI bore, CPC-encoded velocities were collected. The three orthogonal encoding gradients (through plane, frequency, and phase) were evaluated independently in post-processing. Two systematic error types were corrected: eddy current-induced bias and calibration-type error. Measurement accuracy and precision were quantified before and after removal of systematic error. Through plane- and frequency-encoded data accuracy were within 0.4mm/s after removal of systematic error – a 70% improvement over the raw data. Corrected phase-encoded data accuracy was within 1.3mm/s. Measured random error was between 1 to 1.4mm/s, which followed the theoretical prediction. Propagation of random measurement error into displacement and strain was found to depend on the number of tracked time segments, time segment duration, mesh size, and dimensional order. To verify this, theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally calculated displacement and strain error. For the parameters tested, experimental and theoretical results aligned well. Random strain error approximately halved with a two-fold mesh size increase, as predicted. Displacement and strain accuracy were within 2.6mm and 3.3%, respectively. These results can be used to predict the accuracy and precision of displacement and strain in user-specific applications. PMID:25433567

  20. Optical characterization of tissue mimicking phantoms by a vertical double integrating sphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yilin; Jia, Qiumin; Shen, Shuwei; Liu, Guangli; Guo, Yuwei; Zhou, Ximing; Chu, Jiaru; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Erbao; Allen, David W.; Lemaillet, Paul; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Accurate characterization of absorption and scattering properties for biologic tissue and tissue-simulating materials enables 3D printing of traceable tissue-simulating phantoms for medical spectral device calibration and standardized medical optical imaging. Conventional double integrating sphere systems have several limitations and are suboptimal for optical characterization of liquid and soft materials used in 3D printing. We propose a vertical double integrating sphere system and the associated reconstruction algorithms for optical characterization of phantom materials that simulate different human tissue components. The system characterizes absorption and scattering properties of liquid and solid phantom materials in an operating wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm. Absorption and scattering properties of the phantoms are adjusted by adding titanium dioxide powder and India ink, respectively. Different material compositions are added in the phantoms and characterized by the vertical double integrating sphere system in order to simulate the human tissue properties. Our test results suggest that the vertical integrating sphere system is able to characterize optical properties of tissue-simulating phantoms without precipitation effect of the liquid samples or wrinkling effect of the soft phantoms during the optical measurement.

  1. Demonstration of spectral calibration for stellar interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demers, Richard T.; An, Xin; Tang, Hong; Rud, Mayer; Wayne, Leonard; Kissil, Andrew; Kwack, Eug-Yun

    2006-01-01

    A breadboard is under development to demonstrate the calibration of spectral errors in microarcsecond stellar interferometers. Analysis shows that thermally and mechanically stable hardware in addition to careful optical design can reduce the wavelength dependent error to tens of nanometers. Calibration of the hardware can further reduce the error to the level of picometers. The results of thermal, mechanical and optical analysis supporting the breadboard design will be shown.

  2. Development of A phantom for ophthalmic beta source applicator quality control using TL dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, N. A.; da Rosa, L. A. R.; Braz, D.

    2015-11-01

    Concave eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta ray sources are usually used in brachytherapy for the treatment of superficial intraocular tumors as uveal melanoma with thickness up to 5 mm. The calculation of the dose delivered to the eye is carried out based on the data present in the beta source calibration certificate. Therefore, it would be interesting to have a system that could evaluate that dose. In this work, an eye phantom to be used with 106Ru/106Rh betatherapy applicators was developed in solid water. This phantom can hold nine micro-cube thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-100. The characteristics of the TL response of the dosimeters, namely reproducibility and individual sensitivity, were determined for a 60Co source. Using Monte Carlo code MCNPX, the dose to a water eye was determined at different depths. Exposing the eye phantom with TL dosimeters to the 106Ru/106Rh applicator, it is possible to assess calibration factors using the dose values obtained by Monte Carlo simulation to each depth. Using mean calibration factors, dose values obtained by TL dosimetry were compared to the data present in the applicators certificate. Mean differences for both applicators were lower than ±10%, maximum value 17% and minimum value 0.08%. Considering that the certificate values present an uncertainty of ±20%, the calibration procedure and the developed phantom are validated and can be applied.

  3. Patient positioning with X-ray detector self-calibration for image guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Selby, Boris Peter; Sakas, Georgios; Groch, Wolfgang-Dieter; Stilla, Uwe

    2011-09-01

    Automatic alignment estimation from projection images has a range of applications, but misaligned cameras induce inaccuracies. Calibration methods for optical cameras requiring calibration bodies or detectable features have been a matter of research for years. Not so for image guided therapy, although exact patient pose recovery is crucial. To image patient anatomy, X-ray instead of optical equipment is used. Feature detection is often infeasible. Furthermore, a method not requiring a calibration body, usable during treatment, would be desirable to improve accuracy of the patient alignment. We present a novel approach not relying on image features but combining intensity based calibration with 3D pose recovery. A stereoscopic X-ray camera model is proposed, and effects of erroneous parameters on the patient alignment are evaluated. The relevant camera parameters are automatically computed by comparison of X-ray to CT images and are incorporated in the patient alignment computation. The methods were tested with ground truth data of an anatomic phantom with artificially produced misalignments and available real-patient images from a particle therapy machine. We show that our approach can compensate patient alignment errors through mis-calibration of a camera from more than 5 mm to below 0.2 mm. Usage of images with artificial noise shows that the method is robust against image degradation of 2-5%. X-ray camera self-calibration improves accuracy when cameras are misaligned. We could show that rigid body alignment was computed more accurately and that self-calibration is possible, even if detection of corresponding image features is not.

  4. Tissue-Like Phantoms for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging System Assessment and the Training of Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    De Grand, Alec M.; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Lee, Deborah S.; Pietrzykowski, Matthew; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Morgan, Timothy G.; Gogbashian, Andrew; Laurence, Rita G.; Frangioni, John V.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate how to construct calibrated, stable, and inexpensive tissue-like phantoms for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging applications. The bulk phantom material is composed of gelatin, intralipid, hemoglobin, and indocyanine green (ICG). Absorbance, scatter, background fluorescence, and texture can be tuned as desired. NIR fluorescent inclusions are comprised of ICG-labeled polystyrene divinylbenzene beads and Pam78-labeled hydroxyapatite crystals. The former mimic tumor masses of controllable size and contrast agent concentration, and the latter mimic microcalcifications in breast cancer. NIR-fluorescent inclusions can be positioned precisely in phantoms, with one or more regions having different optical properties, and their position can be verified independently using micro-computed tomography. We demonstrate how these phantoms can be used to calibrate and compare imaging systems, and to train surgeons to operate under NIR fluorescence image guidance. PMID:16526884

  5. A deformable head and neck phantom with in-vivo dosimetry for adaptive radiotherapy quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Yan Jiang; Smith, Arthur-Allen; Mcilvena, David; Manilay, Zherrina; Lai, Yuet Kong; Rice, Roger; Mell, Loren; Cerviño, Laura E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B. E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Patients’ interfractional anatomic changes can compromise the initial treatment plan quality. To overcome this issue, adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been introduced. Deformable image registration (DIR) is an important tool for ART and several deformable phantoms have been built to evaluate the algorithms’ accuracy. However, there is a lack of deformable phantoms that can also provide dosimetric information to verify the accuracy of the whole ART process. The goal of this work is to design and construct a deformable head and neck (HN) ART quality assurance (QA) phantom with in vivo dosimetry. Methods: An axial slice of a HN patient is taken as a model for the phantom construction. Six anatomic materials are considered, with HU numbers similar to a real patient. A filled balloon inside the phantom tissue is inserted to simulate tumor. Deflation of the balloon simulates tumor shrinkage. Nonradiopaque surface markers, which do not influence DIR algorithms, provide the deformation ground truth. Fixed and movable holders are built in the phantom to hold a diode for dosimetric measurements. Results: The measured deformations at the surface marker positions can be compared with deformations calculated by a DIR algorithm to evaluate its accuracy. In this study, the authors selected a Demons algorithm as a DIR algorithm example for demonstration purposes. The average error magnitude is 2.1 mm. The point dose measurements from the in vivo diode dosimeters show a good agreement with the calculated doses from the treatment planning system with a maximum difference of 3.1% of prescription dose, when the treatment plans are delivered to the phantom with original or deformed geometry. Conclusions: In this study, the authors have presented the functionality of this deformable HN phantom for testing the accuracy of DIR algorithms and verifying the ART dosimetric accuracy. The authors’ experiments demonstrate the feasibility of this phantom serving as an end

  6. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W.; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications. PMID:26502383

  7. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W; Rice, Joseph P; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-01-01

    A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications.

  8. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W.; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-12-01

    A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications.

  9. In-Flight Pitot-Static Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John V. (Inventor); Cunningham, Kevin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A GPS-based pitot-static calibration system uses global output-error optimization. High data rate measurements of static and total pressure, ambient air conditions, and GPS-based ground speed measurements are used to compute pitot-static pressure errors over a range of airspeed. System identification methods rapidly compute optimal pressure error models with defined confidence intervals.

  10. Thematic Mapper thermal infrared calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, J. R.; Volchok, W. J.

    1985-09-01

    TM band 6 data from Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 are analyzed by correcting the observed radiance for the spectral characteristics of the sensor, along with atmospheric propagation parameters derived from LOWTRAN models. The resultant surface radiance values or surface temperatures are compared to surface temperatures derived from underflight and ground truth data. Correlation of these data indicate that significant systematic error is evident in the satellite-derived surface temperatures. Evaluation of the expected error introduced by the LOWTRAN modeling technique results in compensation of some of this systematic error. The remaining error indicates that the satellite internal calibration, specifically the sensor gain, corrections are not completely compensating for gain shifts.

  11. Error Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Input data as well as the results of elementary operations have to be represented by machine numbers, the subset of real numbers which is used by the arithmetic unit of today's computers. Generally this generates rounding errors. This kind of numerical error can be avoided in principle by using arbitrary precision arithmetics or symbolic algebra programs. But this is unpractical in many cases due to the increase in computing time and memory requirements. Results from more complex operations like square roots or trigonometric functions can have even larger errors since series expansions have to be truncated and iterations accumulate the errors of the individual steps. In addition, the precision of input data from an experiment is limited. In this chapter we study the influence of numerical errors on the uncertainties of the calculated results and the stability of simple algorithms.

  12. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer. PMID:20059246

  13. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-11-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  14. ``Phantom'' Modes in Ab Initio Tunneling Calculations: Implications for Theoretical Materials Optimization, Tunneling, and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, Sergey V.; Pramanik, Dipankar

    2015-03-01

    Development of low-leakage dielectrics for semiconductor industry, together with many other areas of academic and industrial research, increasingly rely upon ab initio tunneling and transport calculations. Complex band structure (CBS) is a powerful formalism to establish the nature of tunneling modes, providing both a deeper understanding and a guided optimization of materials, with practical applications ranging from screening candidate dielectrics for lowest ``ultimate leakage'' to identifying charge-neutrality levels and Fermi level pinning. We demonstrate that CBS is prone to a particular type of spurious ``phantom'' solution, previously deemed true but irrelevant because of a very fast decay. We demonstrate that (i) in complex materials, phantom modes may exhibit very slow decay (appearing as leading tunneling terms implying qualitative and huge quantitative errors), (ii) the phantom modes are spurious, (iii) unlike the pseudopotential ``ghost'' states, phantoms are an apparently unavoidable artifact of large numerical basis sets, (iv) a presumed increase in computational accuracy increases the number of phantoms, effectively corrupting the CBS results despite the higher accuracy achieved in resolving the true CBS modes and the real band structure, and (v) the phantom modes cannot be easily separated from the true CBS modes. We discuss implications for direct transport calculations. The strategy for dealing with the phantom states is discussed in the context of optimizing high-quality high- κ dielectric materials for decreased tunneling leakage.

  15. An externally and internally deformable, programmable lung motion phantom

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yam; Sawant, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Most clinically deployed strategies for respiratory motion management in lung radiotherapy (e.g., gating and tracking) use external markers that serve as surrogates for tumor motion. However, typical lung phantoms used to validate these strategies are based on a rigid exterior and a rigid or a deformable-interior. Such designs do not adequately represent respiration because the thoracic anatomy deforms internally as well as externally. In order to create a closer approximation of respiratory motion, the authors describe the construction and experimental testing of an externally as well as internally deformable, programmable lung phantom. Methods: The outer shell of a commercially available lung phantom (RS-1500, RSD, Inc.) was used. The shell consists of a chest cavity with a flexible anterior surface, and embedded vertebrae, rib-cage and sternum. A custom-made insert was designed using a piece of natural latex foam block. A motion platform was programmed with sinusoidal and ten patient-recorded lung tumor trajectories. The platform was used to drive a rigid foam “diaphragm” that compressed/decompressed the phantom interior. Experimental characterization comprised of determining the reproducibility and the external–internal correlation of external and internal marker trajectories extracted from kV x-ray fluoroscopy. Experiments were conducted to illustrate three example applications of the phantom—(i) validating the geometric accuracy of the VisionRT surface photogrammetry system; (ii) validating an image registration tool, NiftyReg; and (iii) quantifying the geometric error due to irregular motion in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Results: The phantom correctly reproduced sinusoidal and patient-derived motion, as well as realistic respiratory motion-related effects such as hysteresis. The reproducibility of marker trajectories over multiple runs for sinusoidal as well as patient traces, as characterized by fluoroscopy, was within 0

  16. An externally and internally deformable, programmable lung motion phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yam; Sawant, Amit

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Most clinically deployed strategies for respiratory motion management in lung radiotherapy (e.g., gating and tracking) use external markers that serve as surrogates for tumor motion. However, typical lung phantoms used to validate these strategies are based on a rigid exterior and a rigid or a deformable-interior. Such designs do not adequately represent respiration because the thoracic anatomy deforms internally as well as externally. In order to create a closer approximation of respiratory motion, the authors describe the construction and experimental testing of an externally as well as internally deformable, programmable lung phantom. Methods: The outer shell of a commercially available lung phantom (RS-1500, RSD, Inc.) was used. The shell consists of a chest cavity with a flexible anterior surface, and embedded vertebrae, rib-cage and sternum. A custom-made insert was designed using a piece of natural latex foam block. A motion platform was programmed with sinusoidal and ten patient-recorded lung tumor trajectories. The platform was used to drive a rigid foam “diaphragm” that compressed/decompressed the phantom interior. Experimental characterization comprised of determining the reproducibility and the external–internal correlation of external and internal marker trajectories extracted from kV x-ray fluoroscopy. Experiments were conducted to illustrate three example applications of the phantom—(i) validating the geometric accuracy of the VisionRT surface photogrammetry system; (ii) validating an image registration tool, NiftyReg; and (iii) quantifying the geometric error due to irregular motion in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Results: The phantom correctly reproduced sinusoidal and patient-derived motion, as well as realistic respiratory motion-related effects such as hysteresis. The reproducibility of marker trajectories over multiple runs for sinusoidal as well as patient traces, as characterized by fluoroscopy, was within 0

  17. A Monte Carlo study of lung counting efficiency for female workers of different breast sizes using deformable phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegenbart, L.; Na, Y. H.; Zhang, J. Y.; Urban, M.; Xu, X. George

    2008-10-01

    There are currently no physical phantoms available for calibrating in vivo counting devices that represent women with different breast sizes because such phantoms are difficult, time consuming and expensive to fabricate. In this work, a feasible alternative involving computational phantoms was explored. A series of new female voxel phantoms with different breast sizes were developed and ported into a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for performing virtual lung counting efficiency calibrations. The phantoms are based on the RPI adult female phantom, a boundary representation (BREP) model. They were created with novel deformation techniques and then voxelized for the Monte Carlo simulations. Eight models have been selected with cup sizes ranging from AA to G according to brassiere industry standards. Monte Carlo simulations of a lung counting system were performed with these phantoms to study the effect of breast size on lung counting efficiencies, which are needed to determine the activity of a radionuclide deposited in the lung and hence to estimate the resulting dose to the worker. Contamination scenarios involving three different radionuclides, namely Am-241, Cs-137 and Co-60, were considered. The results show that detector efficiencies considerably decrease with increasing breast size, especially for low energy photon emitting radionuclides. When the counting efficiencies of models with cup size AA were compared to those with cup size G, a difference of up to 50% was observed. The detector efficiencies for each radionuclide can be approximated by curve fitting in the total breast mass (polynomial of second order) or the cup size (power).

  18. A Gold Sensors Array for Imaging The Real Tissue Phantom in Electrical Impedance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanti Bera, Tushar; Nagaraju, J.

    2015-02-01

    Surface electrodes in Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) phantoms usually reduce the SNR of the boundary potential data due to their design and development errors. A novel gold sensors array with high geometric precision is developed for EIT phantoms to improve the resistivity image quality. Gold thin films are deposited on a flexible FR4 sheet using electro-deposition process to make a sixteen electrode array with electrodes of identical geometry. A real tissue gold electrode phantom is developed with chicken tissue paste and the fat cylinders as the inhomogeneity. Boundary data are collected using a USB based high speed data acquisition system in a LabVIEW platform for different inhomogeneity positions. Resistivity images are reconstructed using EIDORS and compared with identical stainless steel electrode systems. Image contrast parameters are calculated from the resistivity matrix and the reconstructed images are evaluated for both the phantoms. Image contrast and image resolution of resistivity images are improved with gold electrode array.

  19. Pilot study of patient and phantom breast dose measurements in Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramova-Cholakova, Simona; Vassileva, Jenia

    2008-01-01

    A pilot study of breast dose measurements on two mammography units in Bulgaria was conducted. The mean glandular doses (MGDs) to samples of approximately 60 women per unit were measured. MGD with a standard PMMA phantom was measured as well. The MGDs were calculated according to the European protocol on dosimetry in mammography as well as to the European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening. The measured women's MGDs were divided into three groups depending on the compressed breast thicknesses. The results for the group of thicknesses in the interval 40-60 mm were compared with the results from the measurements on the standard 45 mm PMMA phantom. Some differences were found which could be due to errors in breast thickness measurements, differences in breast and phantom densities and other factors. A standardized procedure was elaborated for patient dose measurement and calculation both from patient and phantom studies.

  20. Psychophysical correlates of phantom limb experience.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, J

    1992-01-01

    Phantom limb phenomena were correlated with psychophysiological measures of peripheral sympathetic nervous system activity measured at the amputation stump and contralateral limb. Amputees were assigned to one of three groups depending on whether they reported phantom limb pain, non-painful phantom limb sensations, or no phantom limb at all. Skin conductance and skin temperature were recorded continuously during two 30 minute sessions while subjects continuously monitored and rated the intensity of any phantom limb sensation or pain they experienced. The results from both sessions showed that mean skin temperature was significantly lower at the stump than the contralateral limb in the groups with phantom limb pain and non-painful phantom limb sensations, but not among subjects with no phantom limb at all. In addition, stump skin conductance responses correlated significantly with the intensity of non-painful phantom limb paresthesiae but not other qualities of sensation or pain. Between-limb measures of pressure sensitivity were not significantly different in any group. The results suggest that the presence of a phantom limb, whether painful or painless, is related to the sympathetic-efferent outflow of cutaneous vasoconstrictor fibres in the stump and stump neuromas. The hypothesis of a sympathetic-efferent somatic-afferent mechanism involving both sudomotor and vasoconstrictor fibres is proposed to explain the relationship between stump skin conductance responses and non-painful phantom limb paresthesiae. It is suggested that increases in the intensity of phantom limb paresthesiae follow bursts of sympathetic activity due to neurotransmitter release onto apposing sprouts of large diameter primary afferents located in stump neuromas, and decreases correspond to periods of relative sympathetic inactivity. The results of the study agree with recent suggestions that phantom limb pain is not a unitary syndrome, but a symptom class with each class subserved by

  1. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  2. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  3. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  4. Muon Energy Calibration of the MINOS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Paul S.

    2004-09-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to search for conclusive evidence of neutrino oscillations and to measure the oscillation parameters precisely. MINOS comprises two iron tracking calorimeters located at Fermilab and Soudan. The Calibration Detector at CERN is a third MINOS detector used as part of the detector response calibration programme. A correct energy calibration between these detectors is crucial for the accurate measurement of oscillation parameters. This thesis presents a calibration developed to produce a uniform response within a detector using cosmic muons. Reconstruction of tracks in cosmic ray data is discussed. This data is utilized to calculate calibration constants for each readout channel of the Calibration Detector. These constants have an average statistical error of 1.8%. The consistency of the constants is demonstrated both within a single run and between runs separated by a few days. Results are presented from applying the calibration to test beam particles measured by the Calibration Detector. The responses are calibrated to within 1.8% systematic error. The potential impact of the calibration on the measurement of oscillation parameters by MINOS is also investigated. Applying the calibration reduces the errors in the measured parameters by {approx} 10%, which is equivalent to increasing the amount of data by 20%.

  5. Self-calibration of a cone-beam micro-CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, V.; Chityala, R. N.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2009-01-15

    Use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more frequent. For proper reconstruction, the geometry of the CBCT systems must be known. While the system can be designed to reduce errors in the geometry, calibration measurements must still be performed and corrections applied. Investigators have proposed techniques using calibration objects for system calibration. In this study, the authors present methods to calibrate a rotary-stage CB micro-CT (CB{mu}CT) system using only the images acquired of the object to be reconstructed, i.e., without the use of calibration objects. Projection images are acquired using a CB{mu}CT system constructed in the authors' laboratories. Dark- and flat-field corrections are performed. Exposure variations are detected and quantified using analysis of image regions with an unobstructed view of the x-ray source. Translations that occur during the acquisition in the horizontal direction are detected, quantified, and corrected based on sinogram analysis. The axis of rotation is determined using registration of antiposed projection images. These techniques were evaluated using data obtained with calibration objects and phantoms. The physical geometric axis of rotation is determined and aligned with the rotational axis (assumed to be the center of the detector plane) used in the reconstruction process. The parameters describing this axis agree to within 0.1 mm and 0.3 deg with those determined using other techniques. Blurring due to residual calibration errors has a point-spread function in the reconstructed planes with a full-width-at-half-maximum of less than 125 {mu}m in a tangential direction and essentially zero in the radial direction for the rotating object. The authors have used this approach on over 100 acquisitions over the past 2 years and have regularly obtained high-quality reconstructions, i.e., without artifacts and no detectable blurring of the reconstructed objects. This self-calibrating approach not only obviates

  6. TH-C-BRD-05: Reducing Proton Beam Range Uncertainty with Patient-Specific CT HU to RSP Calibrations Based On Single-Detector Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Doolan, P; Sharp, G; Testa, M; Lu, H-M; Bentefour, E; Royle, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam range uncertainty in proton treatment comes primarily from converting the patient's X-ray CT (xCT) dataset to relative stopping power (RSP). Current practices use a single curve for this conversion, produced by a stoichiometric calibration based on tissue composition data for average, healthy, adult humans, but not for the individual in question. Proton radiographs produce water-equivalent path length (WEPL) maps, dependent on the RSP of tissues within the specific patient. This work investigates the use of such WEPL maps to optimize patient-specific calibration curves for reducing beam range uncertainty. Methods: The optimization procedure works on the principle of minimizing the difference between the known WEPL map, obtained from a proton radiograph, and a digitally-reconstructed WEPL map (DRWM) through an RSP dataset, by altering the calibration curve that is used to convert the xCT into an RSP dataset. DRWMs were produced with Plastimatch, an in-house developed software, and an optimization procedure was implemented in Matlab. Tests were made on a range of systems including simulated datasets with computed WEPL maps and phantoms (anthropomorphic and real biological tissue) with WEPL maps measured by single detector proton radiography. Results: For the simulated datasets, the optimizer showed excellent results. It was able to either completely eradicate or significantly reduce the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) in the WEPL for the homogeneous phantoms (to zero for individual materials or from 1.5% to 0.2% for the simultaneous optimization of multiple materials). For the heterogeneous phantom the RMSE was reduced from 1.9% to 0.3%. Conclusion: An optimization procedure has been designed to produce patient-specific calibration curves. Test results on a range of systems with different complexities and sizes have been promising for accurate beam range control in patients. This project was funded equally by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research

  7. Uncertainty and calibration analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1991-03-01

    All measurements contain some deviation from the true value which is being measured. In the common vernacular this deviation between the true value and the measured value is called an inaccuracy, an error, or a mistake. Since all measurements contain errors, it is necessary to accept that there is a limit to how accurate a measurement can be. The undertainty interval combined with the confidence level, is one measure of the accuracy for a measurement or value. Without a statement of uncertainty (or a similar parameter) it is not possible to evaluate if the accuracy of the measurement, or data, is appropriate. The preparation of technical reports, calibration evaluations, and design calculations should consider the accuracy of measurements and data being used. There are many methods to accomplish this. This report provides a consistent method for the handling of measurement tolerances, calibration evaluations and uncertainty calculations. The SRS Quality Assurance (QA) Program requires that the uncertainty of technical data and instrument calibrations be acknowledged and estimated. The QA Program makes some specific technical requirements related to the subject but does not provide a philosophy or method on how uncertainty should be estimated. This report was prepared to provide a technical basis to support the calculation of uncertainties and the calibration of measurement and test equipment for any activity within the Experimental Thermal-Hydraulics (ETH) Group. The methods proposed in this report provide a graded approach for estimating the uncertainty of measurements, data, and calibrations. The method is based on the national consensus standard, ANSI/ASME PTC 19.1.

  8. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the risk of medication errors to industry and others at FDA. Additionally, DMEPA prospectively reviews ... List of Abbreviations Regulations and Guidances Guidance for Industry: Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication ...

  9. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines cure infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used ... You can help prevent errors by Knowing your medicines. Keep a list of the names of your ...

  10. Unifying phantom inflation with late-time acceleration: scalar phantom-non-phantom transition model and generalized holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2006-08-01

    The unifying approach to early-time and late-time universe based on phantom cosmology is proposed. We consider gravity-scalar system which contains usual potential and scalar coupling function in front of kinetic term. As a result, the possibility of phantom-non-phantom transition appears in such a way that universe could have effectively phantom equation of state at early time as well as at late time. In fact, the oscillating universe may have several phantom and non-phantom phases. Role in each of two phase and can be absorbed into the redefinition of the scalar field. Right on the transition point, however, the factor cannot be absorbed into the redefinition and play the role to connect two phases smoothly. Holographic dark energy where infrared cutoff is identified with combination of FRW parameters: Hubble constant, particle and future horizons, cosmological constant and universe life-time (if finite). Depending on the specific choice of the model the number of interesting effects occur: the possibility to solve the coincidence problem, crossing of phantom divide and unification of early-time inflationary and late-time accelerating phantom universe. The bound for holographic entropy which decreases in phantom era is also discussed.

  11. Customized three-dimensional printed optical phantoms with user defined absorption and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannem, Sanjana; Sweer, Jordan; Diep, Phuong; Lo, Justine; Snyder, Michael; Stueber, Gabriella; Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Istfan, Raeef; Wu, Junjie; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Roblyer, Darren M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of reliable tissue-simulating phantoms spans multiple applications in spectroscopic imaging including device calibration and testing of new imaging procedures. Three-dimensional (3D) printing allows for the possibility of optical phantoms with arbitrary geometries and spatially varying optical properties. We recently demonstrated the ability to 3D print tissue-simulating phantoms with customized absorption (μa) and reduced scattering (μs`) by incorporating nigrosin, an absorbing dye, and titanium dioxide (TiO2), a scattering agent, to acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) during filament extrusion. A physiologically relevant range of μa and μs` was demonstrated with high repeatability. We expand our prior work here by evaluating the effect of two important 3D-printing parameters, percent infill and layer height, on both μa and μs`. 2 cm3 cubes were printed with percent infill ranging from 10% to 100% and layer height ranging from 0.15 to 0.40 mm. The range in μa and μs` was 27.3% and 19.5% respectively for different percent infills at 471 nm. For varying layer height, the range in μa and μs` was 27.8% and 15.4% respectively at 471 nm. These results indicate that percent infill and layer height substantially alter optical properties and should be carefully controlled during phantom fabrication. Through the use of inexpensive hobby-level printers, the fabrication of optical phantoms may advance the complexity and availability of fully customizable phantoms over multiple spatial scales. This technique exhibits a wider range of adaptability than other common methods of fabricating optical phantoms and may lead to improved instrument characterization and calibration.

  12. Microfluidic laminate-based phantom for diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI).

    PubMed

    Samuel, R; Sant, H J; Jiao, F; Johnson, C R; Gale, B K

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports fabrication of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phantom created by stacking of multiple thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers. PDMS is spin coated on SU-8 molds to obtain the desired layer thickness and imprints of the microchannel patterns that define the phantom geometry. This paper also identifies the unique challenges related to the fabrication and assembly of multiple thin layers and reports for the first time assembly of a large number of thin laminates of this nature. Use of photolithography techniques allows us to create a wide range of phantom geometries. The target dimensions of the phantoms reported here are (i) a stack of 30 thin PDMS layers of 10 µm thickness (ii) curved 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 8.7 µm spacing, and (iii) straight 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 3.6 µm spacing. SEM scans of the assembled phantoms show open microchannels and a monolithic cross-section with no visible interface between PDMS layers. Based on the results of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) scan, the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules due to the physical restriction of the microchannels was detected, which means that the phantom can be used to calibrate and optimize MRI instrumentation. PMID:22865956

  13. Microfluidic laminate-based phantom for diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, R; Sant, H J; Jiao, F; Johnson, C R; Gale, B K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports fabrication of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phantom created by stacking of multiple thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers. PDMS is spin coated on SU-8 molds to obtain the desired layer thickness and imprints of the microchannel patterns that define the phantom geometry. This paper also identifies the unique challenges related to the fabrication and assembly of multiple thin layers and reports for the first time assembly of a large number of thin laminates of this nature. Use of photolithography techniques allows us to create a wide range of phantom geometries. The target dimensions of the phantoms reported here are (i) a stack of 30 thin PDMS layers of 10 µm thickness (ii) curved 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 8.7 µm spacing, and (iii) straight 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 3.6 µm spacing. SEM scans of the assembled phantoms show open microchannels and a monolithic cross-section with no visible interface between PDMS layers. Based on the results of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) scan, the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules due to the physical restriction of the microchannels was detected, which means that the phantom can be used to calibrate and optimize MRI instrumentation. PMID:22865956

  14. Indirect check of the stability of the reference ion chamber used for accelerator output calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Soah; Hwang, Taejin; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Bae, Hoonsik

    2014-11-01

    A linear accelerator's output is periodically checked by using a reference ion chamber which is also periodically calibrated at the accredited standard dosimetry laboratories. We suggest a simple procedure for checking the chamber's stability between calibrations by comparison with another ion chamber. To identify the long-term stability of chambers, we collected and assessed the dose-to-water conversion factors provided by standard laboratories for three chambers during a period of four years. To develop the chamber constancy check program, we used one Farmer-type reference ion chamber FC65-G, two ion chambers (CC13a and CC13b) and one CC01 ion chamber (IBA). Under the accelerator, each chamber was placed inside the solid phantom and irradiated; the experimental configurations were identical. To check the variation in charge collection of the reference chamber, we monitored the ratios of the FC65-G values over each chamber reading. Based on the error propagation of the two chamber ratios, we estimated the uncertainty of the output calibration from the chamber variation. The calibration factors provided for the three chambers showed 0.04 ˜ 0.12% standard deviations during four years. For procedure development, the reading ratios of FC65-G over CCxx showed very good stability; the ratios of FC65-G over CC13a, CC13b and CC01 varied less than 0.059, 0.087 and 0.248%, respectively, over five measurements. By ascribing possible uncertainties of the ratio to the reference chamber alone, we could conservatively check the stability of the reference chamber for treatment safety. An extension of the chamber calibration period was also evaluated. In conclusion, we designed a stability check procedure for the reference chamber based on a reading ratio of two chambers. This could help the user assess the chamber stability between periodic chamber calibration, and the associated patient treatment could be carried out with enhanced safety.

  15. Neutron dosimetry in solid water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, Jorge Luis; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2014-11-07

    The neutron spectra, the Kerma and the absorbed dose due to neutrons were estimated along the incoming beam in a solid water phantom. Calculations were carried out with the MCNP5 code, where the bunker, the phantom and the model of the15 MV LINAC head were modeled. As the incoming beam goes into the phantom the neutron spectrum is modified and the dosimetric values are reduced.

  16. Neutron dosimetry in solid water phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites-Rengifo, Jorge Luis; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2014-11-01

    The neutron spectra, the Kerma and the absorbed dose due to neutrons were estimated along the incoming beam in a solid water phantom. Calculations were carried out with the MCNP5 code, where the bunker, the phantom and the model of the15 MV LINAC head were modeled. As the incoming beam goes into the phantom the neutron spectrum is modified and the dosimetric values are reduced.

  17. Development of a new forming process to fabricate a wide range of phantoms that highly match the acoustical properties of human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wydra, Adrian

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, and help with implementation, testing and calibrations. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc. require the phantom to be made with different physical properties. This thesis deals with ultrasound and it introduces a novel composite material and a new forming process to fabricate a wide range of phantoms that highly match the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain its custom designed physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time. As results, the author introduces examples of already manufactured ultrasound phantoms (i.e. human head phantom) and a novel method of simultaneous measurements of skull thickness and its sound velocity using a set of skull bone phantoms.

  18. Mammography dosimetry using an in-house developed polymethyl methacrylate phantom.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Mayya, Y S; Chourasiya, G

    2012-08-01

    Phantom-based measurements in mammography are well-established for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures involving equipment performance and comparisons of X-ray machines. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is among the best suitable materials for simulation of the breast. For carrying out QA/QC exercises in India, a mammographic PMMA phantom with engraved slots for keeping thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) has been developed. The radiation transmission property of the developed phantom was compared with the commercially available phantoms for verifying its suitability for mammography dosimetry. The breast entrance exposure (BEE), mean glandular dose (MGD), percentage depth dose (PDD), percentage surface dose distribution (PSDD), calibration testing of automatic exposure control (AEC) and density control function of a mammography machine were measured using this phantom. MGD was derived from the measured BEE following two different methodologies and the results were compared. The PDD and PSDD measurements were carried out using LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips. The in-house phantom was found comparable with the commercially available phantoms. The difference in the MGD values derived using two different methods were found in the range of 17.5-32.6 %. Measured depth ranges in the phantom lie between 0.32 and 0.40 cm for 75 % depth dose, 0.73 and 0.92 cm for 50 % depth dose, and 1.54 and 1.78 cm for 25 % depth dose. Higher PSDD value was observed towards chest wall edge side of the phantom, which is due to the orientation of cathode-anode axis along the chest wall to the nipple direction. Results obtained for AEC configuration testing shows that the observed mean optical density (O.D) of the phantom image was 1.59 and O.D difference for every successive increase in thickness of the phantom was within±0.15 O.D. Under density control function testing, at -2 and -1 density settings, the variation in film image O.D was within±0.15 O.D of the normal density

  19. Fabrication and characterization of silicone-based tissue phantoms with tunable optical properties in the visible and near infrared domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, Frederick; Grant, Alex; Kuo, Danny; Cuccia, David J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2008-02-01

    We present a fabrication process for Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tissue simulating phantoms with tunable optical properties to be used for optical system calibration and performance testing. Compared to liquid phantoms, cured PDMS phantoms are easier to transport and use, and have a longer usable life than gelatin based phantoms. Additionally, the deformability of cured PDMS makes it a better option over hard phantoms such as polyurethane optical phantoms when using optical probes which require tissue contact. PDMS has a refractive index of about 1.43 in the near infrared domain which is in the range of the refractive index of tissue. Absorption properties are determined through the addition of india ink, a broad band absorber in the visible and near infrared spectrum. Scattering properties are set by adding titanium dioxide, an inexpensive and widely available scattering agent which yields a wavelength dependent scattering coefficient similar to that observed in tissue in the near infrared. Phantom properties were characterized and validated using a two-distance, broadband frequency-domain photon migration system. Repeatability and predictability for the phantom fabrication process will be presented.

  20. Phantom perception: voluntary and involuntary nonretinal vision.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joel; Westbrook, Fred

    2015-05-01

    Hallucinations, mental imagery, synesthesia, perceptual filling-in, and many illusions are conscious visual experiences without a corresponding retinal stimulus: what we call 'phantom perception'. Such percepts show that our experience of the world is not solely determined by direct sensory input. Some phantom percepts are voluntary, whereas others are involuntarily, occurring automatically. Here, by way of review, we compare and contrast these two types of phantom perception and their neural representations. We propose a dichotomous framework for phantom vision, analogous to the subtypes of attention: endogenous and exogenous. This framework unifies findings from different fields and species, providing a guide to study the constructive nature of conscious sensory perception.

  1. Phantom perception: voluntary and involuntary nonretinal vision.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joel; Westbrook, Fred

    2015-05-01

    Hallucinations, mental imagery, synesthesia, perceptual filling-in, and many illusions are conscious visual experiences without a corresponding retinal stimulus: what we call 'phantom perception'. Such percepts show that our experience of the world is not solely determined by direct sensory input. Some phantom percepts are voluntary, whereas others are involuntarily, occurring automatically. Here, by way of review, we compare and contrast these two types of phantom perception and their neural representations. We propose a dichotomous framework for phantom vision, analogous to the subtypes of attention: endogenous and exogenous. This framework unifies findings from different fields and species, providing a guide to study the constructive nature of conscious sensory perception. PMID:25863415

  2. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  3. The phantom limb in dreams.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Mulder and colleagues [Mulder, T., Hochstenbach, J., Dijkstra, P. U., Geertzen, J. H. B. (2008). Born to adapt, but not in your dreams. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1266-1271.] report that a majority of amputees continue to experience a normally-limbed body during their night dreams. They interprete this observation as a failure of the body schema to adapt to the new body shape. The present note does not question this interpretation, but points to the already existing literature on the phenomenology of the phantom limb in dreams. A summary of published investigations is complemented by a note on phantom phenomena in the dreams of paraplegic patients and persons born without a limb. Integration of the available data allows the recommendation for prospective studies to consider dream content in more detail. For instance, "adaptation" to the loss of a limb can also manifest itself by seeing oneself surrounded by amputees. Such projective types of anosognosia ("transitivism") in nocturnal dreams should also be experimentally induced in normally-limbed individuals, and some relevant techniques are mentioned.

  4. Transorbital therapy delivery: phantom testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Martha-Conley; Atuegwu, Nkiruka; Mawn, Louise; Galloway, Robert L.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a combined image-guided and minimally invasive system for the delivery of therapy to the back of the eye. It is composed of a short 4.5 mm diameter endoscope with a magnetic tracker embedded in the tip. In previous work we have defined an optimized fiducial placement for accurate guidance to the back of the eye and are now moving to system testing. The fundamental difficulty in testing performance is establishing a target in a manner which closely mimics the physiological task. We have to have a penetrable material which obscures line of sight, similar to the orbital fat. In addition we need to have some independent measure of knowing when a target has been reached to compare to the ideal performance. Lastly, the target cannot be rigidly attached to the skull phantom since the optic nerve lies buried in the orbital fat. We have developed a skull phantom with white cloth stellate balls supporting a correctly sized globe. Placed in the white balls are red, blue, orange and yellow balls. One of the colored balls has been soaked in barium to make it bright on CT. The user guides the tracked endoscope to the target as defined by the images and tells us its color. We record task accuracy and time to target. We have tested this with 28 residents, fellows and attending physicians. Each physician performs the task twice guided and twice unguided. Results will be presented.

  5. Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography: Phantom imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sujin; Jun, Sung Chan; Seo, Jin Keun; Lee, Jeehyun; Woo, Eung Je; Holder, David

    2010-04-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) using a weighted voltage difference has been proposed as a means to provide images of admittivity changes at different frequencies. This weighted difference method is an effective way to extract anomaly information while eliminating background effects by unknown boundary geometry, uncertainty in electrode positions and other systematic measurement artefacts. It also properly handles the interplay between conductivity and permittivity in measured boundary voltage data. Though the proposed fdEIT algorithm is promising for applications such as detection of hemorrhagic stroke and breast cancer, more validation studies are needed. In this paper, we performed two-and three-dimensional numerical simulations and phantom experiments. Backgrounds of imaging objects were either saline or carrot pieces suspended in saline. We used carrot pieces to simulate a more realistic frequency-dependent admittivity distribution. Test objects were banana, potato or conductive gel with known admittivity spectra. When the background was saline, both simple and weighted difference approaches produced reasonably accurate images. The weighted difference method yielded better images from two-dimensional imaging objects with background of carrot pieces. For the three-dimensional head-shaped phantom, the advantage of the weighted frequency difference method over the simple difference method is not as obvious as in the case of the two-dimensional phantom. It is unclear if this is due to measurement errors or limitations in the linear algorithm. Further refinement and validation of the frequency difference image reconstructions are currently in progress.

  6. Satellite altimeter calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.; Martin, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines calibration techniques which can most effectively satisfy the requirements of future satellites carrying high-accuracy radar altimeters, such as the ESA ERS-1 and the NASA/CNES Topex/Poseidon satellites scheduled for launch during the next five years. The calibration accuracies and the advantages and disadvantages of the four currently proposed calibration techniques for over-water calibration are discussed: (1) a tide gauge on a tower at-sea and a nearby laser, (2) a laser and a tide gauge on an island with an offshore satellite pass and a geoid tie between the satellite ground track and the laser, (3) a tide gauge on a tower at-sea with satellite positioning from multiple lasers and a GPS, and (4) a laser and a tide gauge on a tower at-sea. Error budgets for these techniques, developed on the basis of state-of-the-art tracking systems, were found to have one sigma height uncertainties in the 2.8 to 4.9 cm range.

  7. Satellite altimeter calibration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.; Martin, C. F.

    This paper examines calibration techniques which can most effectively satisfy the requirements of future satellites carrying high-accuracy radar altimeters, such as the ESA ERS-1 and the NASA/CNES Topex/Poseidon satellites scheduled for launch during the next five years. The calibration accuracies and the advantages and disadvantages of the four currently proposed calibration techniques for over-water calibration are discussed: (1) a tide gauge on a tower at-sea and a nearby laser, (2) a laser and a tide gauge on an island with an offshore satellite pass and a geoid tie between the satellite ground track and the laser, (3) a tide gauge on a tower at-sea with satellite positioning from multiple lasers and a GPS, and (4) a laser and a tide gauge on a tower at-sea. Error budgets for these techniques, developed on the basis of state-of-the-art tracking systems, were found to have one sigma height uncertainties in the 2.8 to 4.9 cm range.

  8. Summary of OARE flight calibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.

    1995-01-01

    To date, the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) has flown on the shuttle orbiter for five missions; namely, STS-40, STS-50, STS-58, STS-62, and STS-65. The OARE instrument system contains a three-axis accelerometer which can resolve accelerations to the nano-g (10(exp -9) g) level and a full calibration station to permit in situ bias and scale factor calibration measurements. This calibration capability eliminates the large uncertainty encountered with accelerometers flown in the past on the orbiter which use ground-based calibrations to provide absolute acceleration measurements. A detailed flight data report presentation is given for the OARE calibration measurements from all missions, along with an estimate of the calibration errors. The main aim is to collect, process, and present the calibration data in one archival report. These calibration data are the necessary key ingredient to produce the absolute acceleration levels from the OARE acceleration flight data.

  9. NIST digitally synthesized power calibration source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, N. M.; Laug, O. B.; Waltrip, B. C.; Palm, R. H.

    1990-08-01

    A digitally-synthesized source of phantom power for calibration electrical power and energy meters is described. Independent sources of voltage, current, and phase angle are programmable between 0-240 volts, 0-5 amps, and 0-360 degrees, respectively. The uncertainty of the active and reactive power is estimated to be within +/- 100 ppm of the full scale apparent power (volt-amps).

  10. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  11. Flow Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Flow Technology Inc. worked with Lewis Research Center to develop a system for monitoring two different propellants being supplied to a spacecraft rocket thruster. They then commercialized the technology in the Microtrack, an extremely precise low-flow calibration system. Moog Inc., one of the device's primary users, measures the flow rate or the speed at which hydraulic oil flows through pin sized holes in disc shaped sapphires with the Microtrack. Using this data, two orifices with exactly the same flow rate can be matched as a pair and used as masters in servovalve production. The microtrack can also be used to calibrate other equipment.

  12. Phantom study and accuracy evaluation of an image-to-world registration approach used with electro-magnetic tracking system for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Sarment, David

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive neurosurgery needs intraoperative imaging updates and high efficient image guide system to facilitate the procedure. An automatic image guided system utilized with a compact and mobile intraoperative CT imager was introduced in this work. A tracking frame that can be easily attached onto the commercially available skull clamp was designed. With known geometry of fiducial and tracking sensor arranged on this rigid frame that was fabricated through high precision 3D printing, not only was an accurate, fully automatic registration method developed in a simple and less-costly approach, but also it helped in estimating the errors from fiducial localization in image space through image processing, and in patient space through the calibration of tracking frame. Our phantom study shows the fiducial registration error as 0.348+/-0.028mm, comparing the manual registration error as 1.976+/-0.778mm. The system in this study provided a robust and accurate image-to-patient registration without interruption of routine surgical workflow and any user interactions involved through the neurosurgery.

  13. Simulated evaluation of an intraoperative surface modeling method for catheter ablation by a real phantom simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Deyu; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Packer, Douglas; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we propose a phantom experiment method to quantitatively evaluate an intraoperative left-atrial modeling update method. In prior work, we proposed an update procedure which updates the preoperative surface model with information from real-time tracked 2D ultrasound. Prior studies did not evaluate the reconstruction using an anthropomorphic phantom. In this approach, a silicone heart phantom (based on a high resolution human atrial surface model reconstructed from CT images) was made as simulated atriums. A surface model of the left atrium of the phantom was deformed by a morphological operation - simulating the shape difference caused by organ deformation between pre-operative scanning and intra-operative guidance. During the simulated procedure, a tracked ultrasound catheter was inserted into right atrial phantom - scanning the left atrial phantom in a manner mimicking the cardiac ablation procedure. By merging the preoperative model and the intraoperative ultrasound images, an intraoperative left atrial model was reconstructed. According to results, the reconstruction error of the modeling method is smaller than the initial geometric difference caused by organ deformation. As the area of the left atrial phantom scanned by ultrasound increases, the reconstruction error of the intraoperative surface model decreases. The study validated the efficacy of the modeling method.

  14. Absolute flux density calibrations: Receiver saturation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiley, A. J.; Ohlson, J. E.; Seidel, B. L.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of receiver saturation was examined for a total power radiometer which uses an ambient load for calibration. Extension to other calibration schemes is indicated. The analysis shows that a monotonic receiver saturation characteristic could cause either positive or negative measurement errors, with polarity depending upon operating conditions. A realistic model of the receiver was made by using a linear-cubic voltage transfer characteristic. The evaluation of measurement error for this model provided a means for correcting radio source measurements.

  15. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  16. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a (60)Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  17. Construction of boundary-surface-based Chinese female astronaut computational phantom and proton dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjuan; Jia, Xianghong; Xie, Tianwu; Xu, Feng; Liu, Qian

    2013-03-01

    With the rapid development of China's space industry, the importance of radiation protection is increasingly prominent. To provide relevant dose data, we first developed the Visible Chinese Human adult Female (VCH-F) phantom, and performed further modifications to generate the VCH-F Astronaut (VCH-FA) phantom, incorporating statistical body characteristics data from the first batch of Chinese female astronauts as well as reference organ mass data from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP; both within 1% relative error). Based on cryosection images, the original phantom was constructed via Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) boundary surfaces to strengthen the deformability for fitting the body parameters of Chinese female astronauts. The VCH-FA phantom was voxelized at a resolution of 2 × 2 × 4 mm(3)for radioactive particle transport simulations from isotropic protons with energies of 5000-10 000 MeV in Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. To investigate discrepancies caused by anatomical variations and other factors, the obtained doses were compared with corresponding values from other phantoms and sex-averaged doses. Dose differences were observed among phantom calculation results, especially for effective dose with low-energy protons. Local skin thickness shifts the breast dose curve toward high energy, but has little impact on inner organs. Under a shielding layer, organ dose reduction is greater for skin than for other organs. The calculated skin dose per day closely approximates measurement data obtained in low-Earth orbit (LEO).

  18. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  19. Dose assessment in contrast enhanced digital mammography using simple phantoms simulating standard model breasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, R. W.; van Engen, R. E.; Young, K. C.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Dance, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    Slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE) slabs are used to simulate standard model breasts for the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). These phantoms are optimized for the energy spectra used in DM and DBT, which normally have a lower average energy than used in contrast enhanced digital mammography (CEDM). In this study we have investigated whether these phantoms can be used for the evaluation of AGD with the high energy x-ray spectra used in CEDM. For this purpose the calculated values of the incident air kerma for dosimetry phantoms and standard model breasts were compared in a zero degree projection with the use of an anti scatter grid. It was found that the difference in incident air kerma compared to standard model breasts ranges between -10% to +4% for PMMA slabs and between 6% and 15% for PMMA-PE slabs. The estimated systematic error in the measured AGD for both sets of phantoms were considered to be sufficiently small for the evaluation of AGD in quality control procedures for CEDM. However, the systematic error can be substantial if AGD values from different phantoms are compared.

  20. Calibration of the Malvern particle sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, L. G.

    1984-01-01

    A relatively simple technique has been developed to calibrate particle- and droplet-sizing instruments manufactured by Malvern and other similar Fraunhofer diffraction particle-sizing instruments. Measurements of standard reticles using an instrument calibrated in this manner demonstrate the effectiveness of the procedure. In addition, guidelines are presented to avoid errors due to vignetting of the scattered light signal.

  1. Quantitative CT of lung nodules: Dependence of calibration on patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size for single- and dual-energy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Way, Ted W.; Schipper, Mathew J.; Larson, Sandra C.; Christodoulou, Emmanuel G.

    2009-07-15

    Calcium concentration may be a useful feature for distinguishing benign from malignant lung nodules in computer-aided diagnosis. The calcium concentration can be estimated from the measured CT number of the nodule and a CT number vs calcium concentration calibration line that is derived from CT scans of two or more calcium reference standards. To account for CT number nonuniformity in the reconstruction field, such calibration lines may be obtained at multiple locations within lung regions in an anthropomorphic phantom. The authors performed a study to investigate the effects of patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size on the derived calibration lines at ten lung region positions using both single energy (SE) and dual energy (DE) CT techniques. Simulated spherical lung nodules of two concentrations (50 and 100 mg/cc CaCO{sub 3}) were employed. Nodules of three different diameters (4.8, 9.5, and 16 mm) were scanned in a simulated thorax section representing the middle of the chest with large lung regions. The 4.8 and 9.5 mm nodules were also scanned in a section representing the upper chest with smaller lung regions. Fat rings were added to the peripheries of the phantoms to simulate larger patients. Scans were acquired on a GE-VCT scanner at 80, 120, and 140 kVp and were repeated three times for each condition. The average absolute CT number separations between the calibration lines were computed. In addition, under- or overestimates were determined when the calibration lines for one condition (e.g., small patient) were used to estimate the CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules for a different condition (e.g., large patient). The authors demonstrated that, in general, DE is a more accurate method for estimating the calcium contents of lung nodules. The DE calibration lines within the lung field were less affected by patient body size, calibration nodule size, and nodule position than the SE calibration lines. Under- or overestimates in Ca

  2. Kerr-like phantom wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Galaxia; Matos, Tonatiuh; García, Nadiezhda Montelongo

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study a Kerr-like wormhole with an scalar field with opposite sign as source (Phantom). It has three parameters: mass, angular momentum and scalar field charge. This space-time has a naked ring singularity, otherwise it is regular everywhere. The main feature of this wormhole is that the mouth of the throat lies on a sphere of the same radius as the ring singularity and apparently does not allow any observer to reach the singularity, it behaves like an anti-horizon. After analyzing the geodesics of the wormhole we find that an observer can go through the wormhole without troubles, but the equator presents an infinite potential barrier which does not allow any geodesic from reaching the throat. From an analysis of the Riemann tensor we obtain that the tidal forces are small and could allow the wormhole to be traversable, from the north pole, for an observer like a human being.

  3. Wormholes supported by a phantom energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sushkov, Sergey

    2005-02-15

    We extend the notion of phantom energy, which is generally accepted for homogeneously distributed matter with w<-1 in the universe, on inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetime configurations. A spherically symmetric distribution of phantom energy is shown to be able to support the existence of static wormholes. We find an exact solution describing a static spherically symmetric wormhole with phantom energy and show that a spatial distribution of the phantom energy is mainly restricted by the vicinity of the wormhole's throat. The maximal size of the spherical region, surrounding the throat and containing the most part of the phantom energy, depends on the equation-of-state parameter w and cannot exceed some upper limit.

  4. Enceladus' 101 Geysers: Phantoms? Hardly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C.; Nimmo, F.; DiNino, D.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery by the Cassini mission of present-day geysering activity capping the southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Enceladus (eg, Porco, C. C. et al. Science 311, 1393, 2006) and sourced within a subsurface body of liquid water (eg, Postberg, F. et al. Nature 459, 1098, 2009; Porco, C.C. et al. AJ 148, 45, 2014, hereafter PEA], laced with organic compounds (eg, Waite, J.H. et al. Science 311, 1419, 2006), has been a significant one, with far-reaching astrobiological implications. In an extensive Cassini imaging survey of the moon's south polar terrain (SPT), PEA identified 101 distinct, narrow jets of small icy particles erupting, with varying strengths, from the four major fractures crossing the SPT. A sufficient spread in stereo angles of the 107 images used in that work allowed (in some cases, many) pair-wise triangulations to be computed; precise surface locations were derived for 98 jets. Recently, it has been claimed (Spitale, J.N. et al. Nature 521, 57, 2015) that the majority of the geysers are not true discrete jets, but are "phantoms" that appear in shallow-angle views of a dense continuous curtain of material with acute bends in it. These authors also concluded that the majority of the eruptive material is not in the form of jets but in the form of fissure-style 'curtain' eruptions. We argue below the contrary, that because almost all the moon's geysers were identified by PEA using multiple images with favorable viewing geometries, the vast majority of them, and likely all, are discrete jets. Specifically, out of 98 jets, no fewer than 90 to 95 were identified with viewing geometries that preclude the appearance of phantoms. How the erupting solids (i.e., icy particles) that are seen in Cassini images are partitioned between jets and inter-jet curtains is still an open question.

  5. Assessment of Spectral Doppler for an Array-Based Preclinical Ultrasound Scanner Using a Rotating Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Kenwright, David A.; Anderson, Tom; Moran, Carmel M.; Hoskins, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Velocity measurement errors were investigated for an array-based preclinical ultrasound scanner (Vevo 2100, FUJIFILM VisualSonics, Toronto, ON, Canada). Using a small-size rotating phantom made from a tissue-mimicking material, errors in pulse-wave Doppler maximum velocity measurements were observed. The extent of these errors was dependent on the Doppler angle, gate length, gate depth, gate horizontal placement and phantom velocity. Errors were observed to be up to 172% at high beam–target angles. It was found that small gate lengths resulted in larger velocity errors than large gate lengths, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported (e.g., for a beam–target angle of 0°, the error was 27.8% with a 0.2-mm gate length and 5.4% with a 0.98-mm gate length). The error in the velocity measurement with sample volume depth changed depending on the operating frequency of the probe. Some edge effects were observed in the horizontal placement of the sample volume, indicating a change in the array aperture size. The error in the velocity measurements increased with increased phantom velocity, from 22% at 2.4 cm/s to 30% at 26.6 cm/s. To minimise the impact of these errors, an angle-dependent correction factor was derived based on a simple ray model of geometric spectral broadening. Use of this angle-dependent correction factor reduces the maximum velocity measurement errors to <25% in all instances, significantly improving the current estimation of maximum velocity from pulse-wave Doppler ultrasound. PMID:25957754

  6. Extracting the MESA SR4000 calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charleston, Sean A.; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Streeter, Lee; Cree, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    Time-of-flight range imaging cameras are capable of acquiring depth images of a scene. Some algorithms require these cameras to be run in `raw mode', where any calibrations from the off-the-shelf manufacturers are lost. The calibration of the MESA SR4000 is herein investigated, with an attempt to reconstruct the full calibration. Possession of the factory calibration enables calibrated data to be acquired and manipulated even in "raw mode." This work is motivated by the problem of motion correction, in which the calibration must be separated into component parts to be applied at different stages in the algorithm. There are also other applications, in which multiple frequencies are required, such as multipath interference correction. The other frequencies can be calibrated in a similar way, using the factory calibration as a base. A novel technique for capturing the calibration data is described; a retro-reflector is used on a moving platform, which acts as a point source at a distance, resulting in planar waves on the sensor. A number of calibrations are retrieved from the camera, and are then modelled and compared to the factory calibration. When comparing the factory calibration to both the "raw mode" data, and the calibration described herein, a root mean squared error improvement of 51:3mm was seen, with a standard deviation improvement of 34:9mm.

  7. Image based Monte Carlo Modeling for Computational Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mengyun; Wang, Wen; Zhao, Kai; Fan, Yanchang; Long, Pengcheng; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    The evaluation on the effects of ionizing radiation and the risk of radiation exposure on human body has been becoming one of the most important issues for radiation protection and radiotherapy fields, which is helpful to avoid unnecessary radiation and decrease harm to human body. In order to accurately evaluate the dose on human body, it is necessary to construct more realistic computational phantom. However, manual description and verfication of the models for Monte carlo(MC)simulation are very tedious, error-prone and time-consuming. In addiation, it is difficult to locate and fix the geometry error, and difficult to describe material information and assign it to cells. MCAM (CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport Simulation) was developed as an interface program to achieve both CAD- and image-based automatic modeling by FDS Team (Advanced Nuclear Energy Research Team, http://www.fds.org.cn). The advanced version (Version 6) of MCAM can achieve automatic conversion from CT/segmented sectioned images to computational phantoms such as MCNP models. Imaged-based automatic modeling program(MCAM6.0) has been tested by several medical images and sectioned images. And it has been applied in the construction of Rad-HUMAN. Following manual segmentation and 3D reconstruction, a whole-body computational phantom of Chinese adult female called Rad-HUMAN was created by using MCAM6.0 from sectioned images of a Chinese visible human dataset. Rad-HUMAN contains 46 organs/tissues, which faithfully represented the average anatomical characteristics of the Chinese female. The dose conversion coefficients(Dt/Ka) from kerma free-in-air to absorbed dose of Rad-HUMAN were calculated. Rad-HUMAN can be applied to predict and evaluate dose distributions in the Treatment Plan System (TPS), as well as radiation exposure for human body in radiation protection.

  8. Microdosimetric measurements for photons in a water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, M N; Baum, J W; Kliauga, P; Bond, V P

    1980-01-01

    Microdosimetric event distributions were determined in air at three primary photon energies (60, 660 and 1250 keV) and at depths of 2, 5, and 10 cm in a water phantom (30 x 30 x 30cm) from measurements of charge produced in a walled Rossi-type proportional counter. For 660 and 1250 keV photon energies free air sources of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co, respectively, were used at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) calibration facility and for 60 keV a 300 mCi /sup 241/Am source was used. Event size spectra were taken at simulated site diameters of 0.5, 1, and 2 ..mu..m. The frequency mean (anti Y/sub F/) and dose mean (anti Y/sub D/) of lineal energy density were determined from these measurements. Our results without a phantom indicate reasonably good agreement for anti Y/sub F/ and anti Y/sub D/ with measurements reported in the literature for walled proportional counters. Ratios anti Y/sub F/(water)/anti Y/sub F/(air) and anti Y/sub D/(water)/anti Y/sub D/(air) were determined for each site diameter and depth in the phantom. For 60 keV photons the maximum increase in these ratios was approximately 8 percent for a site diameter of 2 microns at 10 cm depth in the phantom. For 660 keV photons the maximum increase in these ratios was 24 percent whereas for 1250 keV photons this maximum increase was approximately 15 percent. However, for 60 keV photons only about 8 percent increase was observed; this small increase is consistent with the fact that about half of the scattered photons are removed by photoelectric processes. Since anti Y/sub D/ in the phantom increased only by about 24 percent large changes in biological effectiveness are not expected as a function of depth in typical biological systems.

  9. A solid iodinated phantom material for use in tomographic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Melissa L.; Mainprize, James G.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2009-10-15

    PURPOSE: Iodinated phantoms are of value in x-ray imaging for quality control measurements, system calibration, and for use in the research setting; however, the liquid phantoms that are most often used have several limitations including variability between repeated dilutions, inhomogeneities from air bubbles or precipitants, and long set up times. Although suitable materials have been investigated for projection radiography, quantitative measurements of contrast enhancement in computed tomography (CT) have become increasingly important in the clinic, and a need exists for a durable and reproducible iodinated phantom material. In this work, the authors describe a solid radiographic phantom material that has an accurately known concentration of iodine distributed uniformly throughout its volume and that has stable properties over time. This material can be molded or machined into a desired shape to create a test object or for use in an anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: Two sets of calibration phantoms were produced with a clinically relevant range of iodine concentrations. Measurements were made on these phantoms to characterize the material properties in terms of accuracy of iodine concentration, radiographic uniformity, temporal stability of x-ray attenuation, and manufacturing repeatability. Experimentally measured linear x-ray attenuation coefficients were compared to those predicted by a theoretical model. The uniformity of the iodine distribution in the material was assessed by measuring image intensity variation, both in projection images and in reconstructed CT volumes. The reproducibility of manufacture was estimated on a set of independently produced samples. A longitudinal study was performed to assess the stability of the material x-ray characteristics over time by making measurements at 6 month intervals. Results: Good agreement was seen between the experimental measurements of effective attenuation and the theoretically predicted values. It is

  10. Compact and extended objects from self-interacting phantom fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Makhmudov, Arislan; Urazalina, Ainur; Singleton, Douglas; Scott, John

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate localized and extended objects for gravitating, self-interacting phantom fields. The phantom fields come from two scalar fields with a "wrong-sign" (negative) kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian. This study covers several solutions supported by these phantom fields: phantom balls, traversable wormholes, phantom cosmic strings, and "phantom" domain walls. These four systems are solved numerically, and we try to draw out general, interesting features in each case.

  11. Camera calibration correction in shape from inconsistent silhouette

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of shape from silhouette for reconstruction tasks is plagued by two types of real-world errors: camera calibration error and silhouette segmentation error. When either error is present, we call the problem the Shape from Inconsistent Silhouette (SfIS) problem. In this paper, we show how sm...

  12. Calibrated breast density methods for full field digital mammography: A system for serial quality control and inter-system generalization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, B.; Smallwood, A. M.; Sellers, T. A.; Drukteinis, J. S.; Heine, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors are developing a system for calibrated breast density measurements using full field digital mammography (FFDM). Breast tissue equivalent (BTE) phantom images are used to establish baseline (BL) calibration curves at time zero. For a given FFDM unit, the full BL dataset is comprised of approximately 160 phantom images, acquired prior to calibrating prospective patient mammograms. BL curves are monitored serially to ensure they produce accurate calibration and require updating when calibration accuracy degrades beyond an acceptable tolerance, rather than acquiring full BL datasets repeatedly. BL updating is a special case of generalizing calibration datasets across FFDM units, referred to as cross-calibration. Serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration techniques were developed and evaluated. Methods: BL curves were established for three Hologic Selenia FFDM units at time zero. In addition, one set of serial phantom images, comprised of equal proportions of adipose and fibroglandular BTE materials (50/50 compositions) of a fixed height, was acquired biweekly and monitored with the cumulative sum (Cusum) technique. These 50/50 composition images were used to update the BL curves when the calibration accuracy degraded beyond a preset tolerance of ±4 standardized units. A second set of serial images, comprised of a wide-range of BTE compositions, was acquired biweekly to evaluate serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration techniques. Results: Calibration accuracy can degrade serially and is a function of acquisition technique and phantom height. The authors demonstrated that all heights could be monitored simultaneously while acquiring images of a 50/50 phantom with a fixed height for each acquisition technique biweekly, translating into approximately 16 image acquisitions biweekly per FFDM unit. The same serial images are sufficient for serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration. Serial calibration accuracy was

  13. Optimizing the accuracy of a helical diode array dosimeter: A comprehensive calibration methodology coupled with a novel virtual inclinometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kozelka, Jakub; Robinson, Joshua; Nelms, Benjamin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Savitskij, Dennis; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The goal of any dosimeter is to be as accurate as possible when measuring absolute dose to compare with calculated dose. This limits the uncertainties associated with the dosimeter itself and allows the task of dose QA to focus on detecting errors in the treatment planning (TPS) and/or delivery systems. This work introduces enhancements to the measurement accuracy of a 3D dosimeter comprised of a helical plane of diodes in a volumetric phantom. Methods: We describe the methods and derivations of new corrections that account for repetition rate dependence, intrinsic relative sensitivity per diode, field size dependence based on the dynamic field size determination, and positional correction. Required and described is an accurate ''virtual inclinometer'' algorithm. The system allows for calibrating the array directly against an ion chamber signal collected with high angular resolution. These enhancements are quantitatively validated using several strategies including ion chamber measurements taken using a ''blank'' plastic shell mimicking the actual phantom, and comparison to high resolution dose calculations for a variety of fields: static, simple arcs, and VMAT. A number of sophisticated treatment planning algorithms were benchmarked against ion chamber measurements for their ability to handle a large air cavity in the phantom. Results: Each calibration correction is quantified and presented vs its independent variable(s). The virtual inclinometer is validated by direct comparison to the gantry angle vs time data from machine log files. The effects of the calibration are quantified and improvements are seen in the dose agreement with the ion chamber reference measurements and with the TPS calculations. These improved agreements are a result of removing prior limitations and assumptions in the calibration methodology. Average gamma analysis passing rates for VMAT plans based on the AAPM TG-119 report are 98.4 and 93.3% for the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm dose-error

  14. A statistically defined anthropomorphic software breast phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Beverly A.; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms have emerged in the past decade because of recent advances in 3D breast x-ray imaging techniques. Computer phantoms in the literature have incorporated power-law noise to represent glandular tissue and branching structures to represent linear components such as ducts. When power-law noise is added to those phantoms in one piece, the simulated fibroglandular tissue is distributed randomly throughout the breast, resulting in dense tissue placement that may not be observed in a real breast. The authors describe a method for enhancing an existing digital anthropomorphic breast phantom by adding binarized power-law noise to a limited area of the breast. Methods: Phantoms with (0.5 mm){sup 3} voxel size were generated using software developed by Bakic et al. Between 0% and 40% of adipose compartments in each phantom were replaced with binarized power-law noise ({beta} = 3.0) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 volumetric glandular fraction. The phantoms were compressed to 7.5 cm thickness, then blurred using a 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 boxcar kernel and up-sampled to (0.1 mm){sup 3} voxel size using trilinear interpolation. Following interpolation, the phantoms were adjusted for volumetric glandular fraction using global thresholding. Monoenergetic phantom projections were created, including quantum noise and simulated detector blur. Texture was quantified in the simulated projections using power-spectrum analysis to estimate the power-law exponent {beta} from 25.6 Multiplication-Sign 25.6 mm{sup 2} regions of interest. Results: Phantoms were generated with total volumetric glandular fraction ranging from 3% to 24%. Values for {beta} (averaged per projection view) were found to be between 2.67 and 3.73. Thus, the range of textures of the simulated breasts covers the textures observed in clinical images. Conclusions: Using these new techniques, digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms can be generated with a variety of glandular fractions

  15. Wavelength selection-based nonlinear calibration for transcutaneous blood glucose sensing using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Barman, Ishan; Kang, Jeon Woong; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-08-01

    While Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for noninvasive and real time diagnostics of biological samples, its translation to the clinical setting has been impeded by the lack of robustness of spectroscopic calibration models and the size and cumbersome nature of conventional laboratory Raman systems. Linear multivariate calibration models employing full spectrum analysis are often misled by spurious correlations, such as system drift and covariations among constituents. In addition, such calibration schemes are prone to overfitting, especially in the presence of external interferences that may create nonlinearities in the spectra-concentration relationship. To address both of these issues we incorporate residue error plot-based wavelength selection and nonlinear support vector regression (SVR). Wavelength selection is used to eliminate uninformative regions of the spectrum, while SVR is used to model the curved effects such as those created by tissue turbidity and temperature fluctuations. Using glucose detection in tissue phantoms as a representative example, we show that even a substantial reduction in the number of wavelengths analyzed using SVR lead to calibration models of equivalent prediction accuracy as linear full spectrum analysis. Further, with clinical datasets obtained from human subject studies, we also demonstrate the prospective applicability of the selected wavelength subsets without sacrificing prediction accuracy, which has extensive implications for calibration maintenance and transfer. Additionally, such wavelength selection could substantially reduce the collection time of serial Raman acquisition systems. Given the reduced footprint of serial Raman systems in relation to conventional dispersive Raman spectrometers, we anticipate that the incorporation of wavelength selection in such hardware designs will enhance the possibility of miniaturized clinical systems for disease diagnosis in the near future.

  16. 3-D geometry calibration and markerless electromagnetic tracking with a mobile C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Barrett, Johnny; Wang, Zhonghua; Litvin, Andrew; Hamadeh, Ali; Beaudet, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The design of mobile X-ray C-arm equipment with image tomography and surgical guidance capabilities involves the retrieval of repeatable gantry positioning in three-dimensional space. Geometry misrepresentations can cause degradation of the reconstruction results with the appearance of blurred edges, image artifacts, and even false structures. It may also amplify surgical instrument tracking errors leading to improper implant placement. In our prior publications we have proposed a C-arm 3D positioner calibration method comprising separate intrinsic and extrinsic geometry calibration steps. Following this approach, in the present paper, we extend the intrinsic geometry calibration of C-gantry beyond angular positions in the orbital plane into angular positions on a unit sphere of isocentric rotation. Our method makes deployment of markerless interventional tool guidance with use of high-resolution fluoro images and electromagnetic tracking feasible at any angular position of the tube-detector assembly. Variations of the intrinsic parameters associated with C-arm motion are measured off-line as functions of orbital and lateral angles. The proposed calibration procedure provides better accuracy, and prevents unnecessary workflow steps for surgical navigation applications. With a slight modification, the Misalignment phantom, a tool for intrinsic geometry calibration, is also utilized to obtain an accurate 'image-to-sensor' mapping. We show simulation results, image quality and navigation accuracy estimates, and feasibility data acquired with the prototype system. The experimental results show the potential of high-resolution CT imaging (voxel size below 0.5 mm) and confident navigation in an interventional surgery setting with a mobile C-arm.

  17. Preparation of a skin equivalent phantom with interior micron-scale vessel structures for optical imaging experiments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Klämpfl, Florian; Knipfer, Christian; Riemann, Max; Kanawade, Rajesh; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A popular alternative of preparing multilayer or microfluidic chip based phantoms could have helped to simulate the subsurface vascular network, but brought inevitable problems. In this work, we describe the preparation method of a single layer skin equivalent tissue phantom containing interior vessel channels, which mimick the superficial microvascular structure. The fabrication method does not disturb the optical properties of the turbiding matrix material. The diameter of the channels reaches a value of 50 μm. The size, as well as the geometry of the generated vessel structures are investigated by using the SD-OCT system. Our preliminary results confirm that fabrication of such a phantom is achievable and reproducible. Prospectively, this phantom is used to calibrate the optical angiographic imaging approaches. PMID:25401027

  18. Preparation of a skin equivalent phantom with interior micron-scale vessel structures for optical imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Klämpfl, Florian; Knipfer, Christian; Riemann, Max; Kanawade, Rajesh; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-09-01

    A popular alternative of preparing multilayer or microfluidic chip based phantoms could have helped to simulate the subsurface vascular network, but brought inevitable problems. In this work, we describe the preparation method of a single layer skin equivalent tissue phantom containing interior vessel channels, which mimick the superficial microvascular structure. The fabrication method does not disturb the optical properties of the turbiding matrix material. The diameter of the channels reaches a value of 50 μm. The size, as well as the geometry of the generated vessel structures are investigated by using the SD-OCT system. Our preliminary results confirm that fabrication of such a phantom is achievable and reproducible. Prospectively, this phantom is used to calibrate the optical angiographic imaging approaches.

  19. Using patient-specific phantoms to evaluate deformable image registration algorithms for adaptive radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Nick; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Kim, Jinkoo; Adams, Jeffrey; Li, Shunshan; Wen, Ning; Chetty, Indrin J; Zhong, Hualiang

    2013-11-04

    The quality of adaptive treatment planning depends on the accuracy of its underlying deformable image registration (DIR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of two DIR algorithms, B-spline-based deformable multipass (DMP) and deformable demons (Demons), implemented in a commercial software package. Evaluations were conducted using both computational and physical deformable phantoms. Based on a finite element method (FEM), a total of 11 computational models were developed from a set of CT images acquired from four lung and one prostate cancer patients. FEM generated displacement vector fields (DVF) were used to construct the lung and prostate image phantoms. Based on a fast-Fourier transform technique, image noise power spectrum was incorporated into the prostate image phantoms to create simulated CBCT images. The FEM-DVF served as a gold standard for verification of the two registration algorithms performed on these phantoms. The registration algorithms were also evaluated at the homologous points quantified in the CT images of a physical lung phantom. The results indicated that the mean errors of the DMP algorithm were in the range of 1.0 ~ 3.1 mm for the computational phantoms and 1.9 mm for the physical lung phantom. For the computational prostate phantoms, the corresponding mean error was 1.0-1.9 mm in the prostate, 1.9-2.4mm in the rectum, and 1.8-2.1 mm over the entire patient body. Sinusoidal errors induced by B-spline interpolations were observed in all the displacement profiles of the DMP registrations. Regions of large displacements were observed to have more registration errors. Patient-specific FEM models have been developed to evaluate the DIR algorithms implemented in the commercial software package. It has been found that the accuracy of these algorithms is patient dependent and related to various factors including tissue deformation magnitudes and image intensity gradients across the regions of interest. This may suggest that

  20. Design of a phantom equivalent to measure bone-fluorine in a human's hand via delayed neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Prestwich, W V; Inskip, M

    2013-05-01

    Fluorine is an element that can be either beneficial or harmful, depending on the total amount accumulated in the teeth or bones. In our laboratory, we have developed a non-invasive technique for the in vivo measurement of fluoride in bone using neutron activation analysis and performed the first pilot human study. Fluoride in humans is quantified by comparing the γ-ray signal from a person to the γ-ray signal obtained from appropriate anthropomorphic calibration phantoms. An identified problem with existing fluoride phantoms is contamination with aluminum. Aluminum creates an interfering γ-ray signal which, although it can be subtracted out, increases the uncertainty in the measurement and worsens the detection limit. This paper outlines a series of studies undertaken to develop a better calibration phantom for fluorine measurement, which does not have aluminum contamination. PMID:23587669

  1. Assessment of spectral Doppler in preclinical ultrasound using a small-size rotating phantom.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Sun, Chao; Anderson, Tom; Moran, Carmel M; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Gray, Gillian A; Hoskins, Peter R

    2013-08-01

    Preclinical ultrasound scanners are used to measure blood flow in small animals, but the potential errors in blood velocity measurements have not been quantified. This investigation rectifies this omission through the design and use of phantoms and evaluation of measurement errors for a preclinical ultrasound system (Vevo 770, Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada). A ray model of geometric spectral broadening was used to predict velocity errors. A small-scale rotating phantom, made from tissue-mimicking material, was developed. True and Doppler-measured maximum velocities of the moving targets were compared over a range of angles from 10° to 80°. Results indicate that the maximum velocity was overestimated by up to 158% by spectral Doppler. There was good agreement (<10%) between theoretical velocity errors and measured errors for beam-target angles of 50°-80°. However, for angles of 10°-40°, the agreement was not as good (>50%). The phantom is capable of validating the performance of blood velocity measurement in preclinical ultrasound. PMID:23711503

  2. Validation of practical diffusion approximation for virtual near infrared spectroscopy using a digital head phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, Yosuke; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Okada, Eiji

    2009-03-01

    Light propagation in the digital head phantom for virtual near infrared spectroscopy and imaging is calculated by diffusion theory. In theory, diffusion approximation is not valid in a low-scattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer around the brain. The optical path length and spatial sensitivity profile predicted by the finite element method based upon the diffusion theory are compared with those predicted by the Monte Carlo method to validate a practical implementation of diffusion approximation to light propagation in an adult head. The transport scattering coefficient of the CSF layer is varied from 0.01 to 1.0 mm-1 to evaluate the influence of that layer on the error caused by diffusion approximation. The error is practically ignored and the geometry of the brain surface such as the sulcus structure in the digital head phantom scarcely affects the error when the transport scattering coefficient of the CSF layer is greater than 0.3 mm-1.

  3. Biomimetic phantom for cardiac diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Irvin; Zhou, Feng‐Lei; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.; Parker, Geoffrey J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to characterize cardiac tissue microstructure, necessitating the use of physiologically relevant phantoms for methods development. Existing phantoms are generally simplistic and mostly simulate diffusion in the brain. Thus, there is a need for phantoms mimicking diffusion in cardiac tissue. Materials and Methods A biomimetic phantom composed of hollow microfibers generated using co‐electrospinning was developed to mimic myocardial diffusion properties and fiber and sheet orientations. Diffusion tensor imaging was carried out at monthly intervals over 4 months at 9.4T. 3D fiber tracking was performed using the phantom and compared with fiber tracking in an ex vivo rat heart. Results The mean apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of the phantom remained stable over the 4‐month period, with mean values of 7.53 ± 0.16 × 10‐4 mm2/s and 0.388 ± 0.007, respectively. Fiber tracking of the 1st and 3rd eigenvectors generated analogous results to the fiber and sheet‐normal direction respectively, found in the left ventricular myocardium. Conclusion A biomimetic phantom simulating diffusion in the heart was designed and built. This could aid development and validation of novel diffusion MRI methods for investigating cardiac microstructure, decrease the number of animals and patients needed for methods development, and improve quality control in longitudinal and multicenter cardiac diffusion MRI studies. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:594–600. PMID:26213152

  4. Galactic dark matter in the phantom field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Hsun; Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the possibility that the galactic dark matter exists in a scenario where the phantom field is responsible for the dark energy. We obtain the statically and spherically approximate solution for this kind of galaxy system with a supermassive black hole at its center. The solution of the metric functions is satisfied with gtt=-grr-1. Constrained by the observation of the rotational stars moving in circular orbits with nearly constant tangential speed in a spiral galaxy, the background of the phantom field which is spatially inhomogeneous has an exponential potential. To avoid the well-known quantum instability of the vacuum at high frequencies, the phantom field defined in an effective theory is valid only at low energies. Under this assumption, we further investigate the following properties. The absorption cross section of the low-energy S-wave excitations of the phantom field into the central black hole is shown to be the horizontal area of the central black hole. Because the infalling phantom particles have a total negative energy, the accretion of the phantom energy is related to the decrease of the black hole mass, which is estimated to be much less than a solar mass in the lifetime of the Universe. Using a simple model with the cold dark matter very weakly coupled to the “low-frequency” phantom particles that are generated from the background, we show that these two densities can be quasistable in the galaxy.

  5. Partial volume simulation in software breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feiyu; Pokrajac, David; Shi, Xiquan; Liu, Fengshan; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-03-01

    A modification to our previous simulation of breast anatomy is proposed, in order to improve the quality of simulated projections generated using software breast phantoms. Anthropomorphic software breast phantoms have been used for quantitative validation of breast imaging systems. Previously, we developed a novel algorithm for breast anatomy simulation, which did not account for the partial volume (PV) of various tissues in a voxel; instead, each phantom voxel was assumed to contain single tissue type. As a result, phantom projection images displayed notable artifacts near the borders between regions of different materials, particularly at the skin-air boundary. These artifacts diminished the realism of phantom images. One solution is to simulate smaller voxels. Reducing voxel size, however, extends the phantom generation time and increases memory requirements. We achieved an improvement in image quality without reducing voxel size by the simulation of PV in voxels containing more than one simulated tissue type. The linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of each voxel is calculated by combining attenuation coefficients proportional to the voxel subvolumes occupied by the various tissues. A local planar approximation of the boundary surface is employed, and the skin volume in each voxel is computed by decomposition into simple geometric shapes. An efficient encoding scheme is proposed for the type and proportion of simulated tissues in each voxel. We illustrate the proposed methodology on phantom slices and simulated mammographic projections. Our results show that the PV simulation has improved image quality by reducing quantization artifacts.

  6. The reference phantoms: voxel vs polygon.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Yeom, Y S; Nguyen, T T; Wang, Z J; Kim, H S; Han, M C; Lee, J K; Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N; Bolch, W E; Lee, C; Chung, B S

    2016-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference male and female adult phantoms, described in Publication 110, are voxel phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography scans of a male and a female patient, respectively. The voxel in-plane resolution and the slice thickness, of the order of a few millimetres, are insufficient for proper segmentation of smaller tissues such as the lens of the eye, the skin, and the walls of some organs. The calculated doses for these tissues therefore present some limitations, particularly for weakly penetrating radiation. Similarly, the Publication 110 phantoms cannot represent 8-40-µm-thick target regions in respiratory or alimentary tract organs. Separate stylised models have been used to represent these tissues for calculation of the ICRP reference dose coefficients (DCs). ICRP Committee 2 recently initiated a research project, the ultimate goal of which is to convert the Publication 110 phantoms to a high-quality polygon-mesh (PM) format, including all source and target regions, even those of the 8-40-µm-thick alimentary and respiratory tract organs. It is expected that the converted phantoms would lead to the same or very similar DCs as the Publication 110 reference phantoms for penetrating radiation and, at the same time, provide more accurate DCs for weakly penetrating radiation and small tissues. Additionally, the reference phantoms in the PM format would be easily deformable and, as such, could serve as a starting point to create phantoms of various postures for use, for example, in accidental dose calculations. This paper will discuss the current progress of the phantom conversion project and its significance for ICRP DC calculations.

  7. The Role of Anthropomorphic Phantoms in Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging for Disease Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, L. M.; King, D. M.; Browne, J. E.

    2009-04-19

    An anthropomorhic phantom is an object that can mimic a region of the human anatomy. Anthropomorphic phantoms have a variety of roles in diagnostic ultrasound. These roles include quality assurance testing of ultrasound machines, calibration and testing of new imaging techniques, training of sonographers, and--most importantly--use as a tool to obtain a better understanding of disease progression in the relevant anatomy. To be anthropomorphic a phantom must accurately mimic the body in terms of its ultrasonic and mechanical properties, as well as anatomically. The acoustic properties are speed of sound, attenuation, and backscatter. The mechanical properties are elasticity and density. Phantoms are constructed from tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs). TMMs are prepared from a variety of ingredients, such as gelatine, agar, safflower oil, and glass beads. These ingredients are then boiled and cooled under controlled conditions to produce a solid TMM. To determine if the TMM has the correct acoustic properties, acoustic measurements are performed using a scanning acoustic macroscope. Mechanical measurements are also performed to test the elasticity and density properties. TMMs with the correct properties are subsequently put through a series of moulding procedures to produce the anthropomorphic phantom.

  8. The Role of Anthropomorphic Phantoms in Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging for Disease Characterization (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, L. M.; King, D. M.; Browne, J. E.

    2009-04-01

    An anthropomorhic phantom is an object that can mimic a region of the human anatomy. Anthropomorphic phantoms have a variety of roles in diagnostic ultrasound. These roles include quality assurance testing of ultrasound machines, calibration and testing of new imaging techniques, training of sonographers, and-most importantly-use as a tool to obtain a better understanding of disease progression in the relevant anatomy. To be anthropomorphic a phantom must accurately mimic the body in terms of its ultrasonic and mechanical properties, as well as anatomically. The acoustic properties are speed of sound, attenuation, and backscatter. The mechanical properties are elasticity and density. Phantoms are constructed from tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs). TMMs are prepared from a variety of ingredients, such as gelatine, agar, safflower oil, and glass beads. These ingredients are then boiled and cooled under controlled conditions to produce a solid TMM. To determine if the TMM has the correct acoustic properties, acoustic measurements are performed using a scanning acoustic macroscope. Mechanical measurements are also performed to test the elasticity and density properties. TMMs with the correct properties are subsequently put through a series of moulding procedures to produce the anthropomorphic phantom.

  9. Acoustic characterization of polyvinyl chloride and self-healing silicone as phantom materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry M.; Chen, Elvis C. S.

    2015-03-01

    Phantoms are physical constructs used in procedure planning, training, medical imaging research, and machine calibration. Depending on the application, the material a phantom is made out of is very important. With ultrasound imaging, phantom materials used need to have similar acoustic properties, specifically speed of sound and attenuation, as a specified tissue. Phantoms used with needle insertion require a material with a similar tensile strength as tissue and, if possible, the ability to self heal increasing its overall lifespan. Soft polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and silicone were tested as possible needle insertion phantom materials. Acoustic characteristics were determined using a time of flight technique, where a pulse was passed through a sample contained in a water bath. The speed of sound and attenuation were both determined manually and through spectral analysis. Soft PVC was determined to have a speed of sound of approximately 1395 m/s and attenuation of 0.441 dB/cm (at 1 MHz). For the silicone mixture, the respective speed of sound values was within a range of 964.7 m/s and 1250.0 m/s with an attenuation of 0.547 dB/cm (at 1 MHz).

  10. Determining inertial errors from navigation-in-place data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Don N.; Roberts, Chris E.

    To validate the self-calibration performance of a missile system's inertial navigation system (INS), an inertial error estimator (IEE) and a calibration procedure were developed and tested. The IEE was developed using a least squares fit of navigation-in-place (nav-in-place) data to calculate the accelerometer biases, the gyro biases, and the axis misalignments. It was found that the estimation error due to highly correlated regression functions decreases with navigation time. A tradeoff study was performed to select the optimum nav-in-place time allowed for determining the estimation of the inertial errors. Once the optimum navigation time was determined, an INS calibration procedure incorporating the IEE was developed. The calibration procedure was validated by applying corrections for the inertial errors to the INS, and then navigating in place to show a reduced position error profile. Test results showing the outcome of the INS calibration procedure are included.

  11. Quantile Regression With Measurement Error

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ying; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Regression quantiles can be substantially biased when the covariates are measured with error. In this paper we propose a new method that produces consistent linear quantile estimation in the presence of covariate measurement error. The method corrects the measurement error induced bias by constructing joint estimating equations that simultaneously hold for all the quantile levels. An iterative EM-type estimation algorithm to obtain the solutions to such joint estimation equations is provided. The finite sample performance of the proposed method is investigated in a simulation study, and compared to the standard regression calibration approach. Finally, we apply our methodology to part of the National Collaborative Perinatal Project growth data, a longitudinal study with an unusual measurement error structure. PMID:20305802

  12. Twenty-Five Years of Landsat Thermal Band Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Markham, Brian L.; Schoff, John R.; Hook, Simon J.; Raqueno, Nina G.

    2010-01-01

    Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper+ (ETM+), launched in April 1999, and Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM), launched in 1984, both have a single thermal band. Both instruments thermal band calibrations have been updated previously: ETM+ in 2001 for a pre-launch calibration error and TM in 2007 for data acquired since the current era of vicarious calibration has been in place (1999). Vicarious calibration teams at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have been working to validate the instrument calibration since 1999. Recent developments in their techniques and sites have expanded the temperature and temporal range of the validation. The new data indicate that the calibration of both instruments had errors: the ETM+ calibration contained a gain error of 5.8% since launch; the TM calibration contained a gain error of 5% and an additional offset error between 1997 and 1999. Both instruments required adjustments in their thermal calibration coefficients in order to correct for the errors. The new coefficients were calculated and added to the Landsat operational processing system in early 2010. With the corrections, both instruments are calibrated to within +/-0.7K.

  13. Computer analysis of mammography phantom images (CAMPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.

    1997-05-01

    Computer analysis of mammography phantom images (CAMPI) is a method for objective and precise measurements of phantom image quality in mammography. This investigation applied CAMPI methodology to the Fischer Mammotest Stereotactic Digital Biopsy machine. Images of an American College of Radiology phantom centered on the largest two microcalcification groups were obtained on this machine under a variety of x-ray conditions. Analyses of the images revealed that the precise behavior of the CAMPI measures could be understood from basic imaging physics principles. We conclude that CAMPI is sensitive to subtle image quality changes and can perform accurate evaluations of images, especially of directly acquired digital images.

  14. Achieving calibration cost savings through data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, A.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    Air displacement type pipettes have been used effectively at the Savannah River Site (SRS) since the mid-1980`s when they replaced expensive glass microliter pipettes. A paper presented at the 1987 INMM Annual Meeting by John P. Clark detailed the implementation at SRS. At that time, calibration frequency and required documentation were established according to regulatory and standard practice requirements. Pipettes are still being used at SRS in compliance with NQA-1-12, ``Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M and TE)`` requirements, which includes defined calibration intervals and 5-year calibration record retention. A recent analysis of the pipette calibration historical data indicated that pipettes were rarely out of calibration when they were checked. In other words, calibration checks were being performed too frequently. As a result, pipette calibration frequencies were decreased, with the potential accompanying annual cost savings of over $30,000 in reduced labor and materials. Concurrently, the number of calibration check replicates was increased to prevent statistical errors in calibration check decision making. The benefits derived in the pipette calibration example are applicable to any M and TE where calibration history data are maintained and where analysis indicates excessive calibration checks. Details of the data analysis and cost savings are presented in the paper.

  15. Hybrid computational phantoms of the 15-year male and female adolescent: Applications to CT organ dosimetry for patients of variable morphometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2008-06-15

    female phantoms were further developed from the 50th percentile phantoms through adjustments in the body contour to match the total body masses given in CDC pediatric growth curves. The resulting six NURBS phantoms, male and female phantoms representing their 10th, 50th, and 90th weight percentiles, were used to investigate the influence of body fat distributions on internal organ doses following CT imaging. The phantoms were exposed to multislice chest and abdomen helical CT scans, and in-field organ absorbed doses were calculated. The results demonstrated that the use of traditional stylized phantoms yielded organ dose estimates that deviate from those given by the UF reference hybrid phantoms by up to a factor of 2. The study also showed that use of reference, or 50th percentile, phantoms to assess organ doses in underweight 15-year-old children would not lead to significant organ dose errors (typically less than 10%). However, more significant errors were noted (up to {approx}30%) when reference phantoms are used to represent overweight children in CT imaging dosimetry. These errors are expected to only further increase as one considers CT organ doses in overweight and obese individuals of the adult patient population, thus emphasizing the advantages of patient-sculptable phantom technology.

  16. Quantitative flow phantom for contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nock, Melissa L.; Kempston, Michael P.; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2007-03-01

    The use of contrast agents can help to overcome a lack of intrinsic radiographic contrast between malignant and benign breast tissue by taking advantage of the properties of tumour angiogenesis. Studies of contrast-enhanced mammography have demonstrated increased lesion conspicuity and have shown that this technique provides information on contrast uptake kinetics. It has been suggested that malignant and benign lesions can be differentiated in part by their uptake kinetics, so this additional data may lead to more accurate diagnoses. Tomosynthesis is a 3D x-ray imaging technique that permits lesion depth localization and increased conspicuity in comparison with 2D x-ray projection techniques. This modality, used in combination with contrast agents, promises to be a sensitive method of breast cancer detection. To develop the technique of contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis, a dynamic flow phantom has been constructed to provide the same types of imaging challenges anticipated in the clinical setting. These challenges include a low-contrast tumour space, relevant temporal contrast agent uptake and washout profiles, and a need for quantitative analysis of enhancement levels. The design of a flow phantom will be presented that includes a dynamic tumour space, a background that masks the tumour space in images without contrast enhancement, and flow characteristics that simulate tumour contrast agent uptake and washout kinetics. The system is calibrated to relate signal to concentration of the contrast agent using a well plate filled with iodinated water. Iodine detectability in the flow phantom is evaluated in terms of the signal-difference-to-noise ratio for various tomosynthesis image acquisition parameters including number of acquired angular views, angular extent, and reconstruction voxel size.

  17. Simplified stereo-optical ultrasound plane calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoßbach, Martin; Noll, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Image guided therapy is a natural concept and commonly used in medicine. In anesthesia, a common task is the injection of an anesthetic close to a nerve under freehand ultrasound guidance. Several guidance systems exist using electromagnetic tracking of the ultrasound probe as well as the needle, providing the physician with a precise projection of the needle into the ultrasound image. This, however, requires additional expensive devices. We suggest using optical tracking with miniature cameras attached to a 2D ultrasound probe to achieve a higher acceptance among physicians. The purpose of this paper is to present an intuitive method to calibrate freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems employing a rigid stereo camera system. State of the art methods are based on a complex series of error prone coordinate system transformations which makes them susceptible to error accumulation. By reducing the amount of calibration steps to a single calibration procedure we provide a calibration method that is equivalent, yet not prone to error accumulation. It requires a linear calibration object and is validated on three datasets utilizing di erent calibration objects: a 6mm metal bar and a 1:25mm biopsy needle were used for experiments. Compared to existing calibration methods for freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems, we are able to achieve higher accuracy results while additionally reducing the overall calibration complexity. Ke

  18. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  19. Inverse Monte Carlo for estimation of scattering and absorption in liquid optical phantoms.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hanna; Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2012-05-21

    A spectroscopic probe with multiple detecting fibers was used for quantifying absorption and scattering in liquid optical phantoms. The phantoms were mixtures of Intralipid and red and blue food dyes. Intensity calibration for the detecting fibers was undertaken using either a microsphere suspension (absolute calibration) or a uniform detector illumination (relative calibration between detectors). Two different scattering phase functions were used in an inverse Monte Carlo algorithm. Data were evaluated for residual spectra (systematic deviations and magnitude) and accuracy in estimation of scattering and absorption. Spectral fitting was improved by allowing for a 10% intensity relaxation in the optimization algorithm. For a multi-detector setup, non-systematic residual spectrum was only found using the more complex Gegenbauer-kernel phase function. However, the choice of phase function did not influence the accuracy in the estimation of absorption and scattering. Similar estimation accuracy as in the multi-detector setup was also obtained using either two relative calibrated detectors or one absolute calibrated detector at a fiber separation of 0.46 mm. PMID:22714213

  20. Gas dynamics in residual gas analyzer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Santeler, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers are used for measuring partial flow rates as well as for measuring partial pressures. The required calibration may also be obtained with either known flow rates or known pressures. The calibration and application procedures are straightforward when both are of the same type; however, substantial errors may occur if the two types are mixed. This report develops the basic equations required to convert between partial pressure calibrations and partial flow rate calibrations. It also discusses the question of fractionating and nonfractionating gas flow in various gas inlet and pumping systems.

  1. Mariner 9 television calibration - Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, Ken E.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Murray, Bruce C.; Danielson, G. Edward

    1988-01-01

    Mariner 9 TV data from the 1971-1972 encounter with Mars, which contain good synoptic coverage of of the planet as well as the highest-resolution images thus far obtained for the south polar region, can lead to more accurate photometric analysis if subjected to improved processing methods. While calibration errors are rather greater than those of the Viking Orbiter cameras, both calibration data and processing software applicable to an improvement program have become available through the USGS's Planetary Image Cartography System.

  2. Experimental verification of the planned dose perturbation algorithm in an anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feygelman, V.; Opp, D.; Zhang, G.; Stevens, C.; Nelms, B.

    2013-06-01

    3DVH software is capable of generating a volumetric patient VMAT dose by applying a volumetric perturbation algorithm based on comparing measurement-guided dose reconstruction and TPS calculated dose to a cylindrical phantom. The primary purpose of this paper is to validate this dose reconstruction method on an anthropomorphic heterogeneous thoracic phantom by direct comparison to independent measurements. Reconstructed "patient" doses compare well with the independent dose profile measurements in the unit-density target inside a thoracic phantom lung. The largest differences are observed in lung and are associated with the highly modulated plan with narrow (few mm) MLC openings. Such a plan is instructive as a stress test of the algorithm but is not likely to be clinically encountered in lung. This residual disagreement underscores the fact that 3DVH is not designed to correct the errors related to the TPS dose calculations in the low-density media.

  3. Wall-less Flow Phantom for High-Frequency Ultrasound Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kenwright, David A.; Laverick, Nicola; Anderson, Tom; Moran, Carmel M.; Hoskins, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    There are currently very few test objects suitable for high-frequency ultrasound scanners that can be rapidly manufactured, have appropriate acoustic characteristics and are suitably robust. Here we describe techniques for the creation of a wall-less flow phantom using a physically robust konjac and carrageenan-based tissue-mimicking material. Vessel dimensions equivalent to those of mouse and rat arteries were achieved with steady flow, with the vessel at a depth of 1.0 mm. We then employed the phantom to briefly investigate velocity errors using pulsed wave Doppler with a commercial preclinical ultrasound system. This phantom will provide a useful tool for testing preclinical ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:25542496

  4. Custom molded thermal MRg-FUS phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Snell, John W.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes a method for creating custom-molded thermal phantoms for use with MR-guided focused ultrasound systems. The method is defined here for intracranial applications, though it may be modified for other anatomical targets.

  5. Spectralon diffuser calibration for MERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olij, Carina; Schaarsberg, Jos G.; Werij, Henri G.; Zoutman, Erik; Baudin, Gilles; Chommeloux, Beatrice; Bezy, Jean-Loup; Gourmelon, Georges

    1997-12-01

    One of the key payload instruments of ESA's ENVISAT polar platform is the medium resolution imaging spectrometer (MERIS), aiming at improved knowledge of our planet in the fields of bio-optical oceanography, and atmospheric and land surface processes. MERIS, which is built under responsibility of Aerospatiale, will monitor the solar irradiation scattered by the Earth by employing five cameras which simultaneously record data in 15 visible and near-infrared programmable spectral bands with very low degree of polarization sensitivity. The combined field-of-view of the five cameras spans a range of 68.5 degrees. Crucial for obtaining the desired high accuracy during a four-years lifetime, is the on- board calibration unit. This calibration unit contains a set of Spectralon diffusers, which were manufactured having in mind excellent in-flight stability as well as spectral and spatial uniformity. Preflight calibration of the Spectralon diffusers was carried out at TNO-TPD. This calibration includes the measurement of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) for applicable angles and wavelengths, i.e., while varying angle of incidence, angle of observation, observation area on the elongated diffusers, wavelength and polarization. The diffuser calibration was performed in a class 100 cleanroom. For these measurements the TPD calibration facility, which is described in detail, has been adapted, so that it now has five geometrical degrees of freedom. Detectors have been optimized to minimize stray light. Due to extensive commissioning of the calibration setup the absolute error (1 sigma) of these measurements amounts to less than 0.5%; relative errors are in the 0.3 - 0.4% range.

  6. VOXMAT: Hybrid Computational Phantom for Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) computational phantoms have been the standard for assessing the radiation dose due to internal and external exposure over the past three decades. In these phantoms, the body surface and each organ are approximated by mathematical equations; hence, some of the organs are not necessarily realistic in their shape. Over the past two decades, these phantoms have been revised and updated: some of the missing internal organs have been added and the locations of the existing organs have been revised (e.g., thyroid). In the original phantom, only three elemental compositions were used to describe all body tissues. Recently, the compositions of the organs have been updated based on ICRP-89 standards. During the past decade, phantoms based on CT scans were developed for use in dose assessment. Although their shapes are realistic, some computational challenges are noted; including increased computational times and increased memory requirements. For good spatial resolution, more than several million voxels are used to represent the human body. Moreover, when CT scans are obtained, the subject is in a supine position with arms at the side. In some occupational exposure cases, it is necessary to evaluate the dose with the arms and legs in different positions. It will be very difficult and inefficient to reposition the voxels defining the arms and legs to simulate these exposure geometries. In this paper, a new approach for computational phantom development is presented. This approach utilizes the combination of a mathematical phantom and a voxelized phantom for the representation of the anatomy.

  7. Study of geopotential error models used in orbit determination error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, C.; Kelbel, D.; Lee, T.; Samii, M. V.; Mistretta, G. D.; Hart, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The uncertainty in the geopotential model is currently one of the major error sources in the orbit determination of low-altitude Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The results of an investigation of different geopotential error models and modeling approaches currently used for operational orbit error analysis support at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) are presented, with emphasis placed on sequential orbit error analysis using a Kalman filtering algorithm. Several geopotential models, known as the Goddard Earth Models (GEMs), were developed and used at GSFC for orbit determination. The errors in the geopotential models arise from the truncation errors that result from the omission of higher order terms (omission errors) and the errors in the spherical harmonic coefficients themselves (commission errors). At GSFC, two error modeling approaches were operationally used to analyze the effects of geopotential uncertainties on the accuracy of spacecraft orbit determination - the lumped error modeling and uncorrelated error modeling. The lumped error modeling approach computes the orbit determination errors on the basis of either the calibrated standard deviations of a geopotential model's coefficients or the weighted difference between two independently derived geopotential models. The uncorrelated error modeling approach treats the errors in the individual spherical harmonic components as uncorrelated error sources and computes the aggregate effect using a combination of individual coefficient effects. This study assesses the reasonableness of the two error modeling approaches in terms of global error distribution characteristics and orbit error analysis results. Specifically, this study presents the global distribution of geopotential acceleration errors for several gravity error models and assesses the orbit determination errors resulting from these error models for three types of spacecraft - the Gamma Ray Observatory, the Ocean Topography Experiment, and the Cosmic

  8. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  9. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  10. Fast Monte Carlo simulation on a voxelized human phantom deformed to a patient

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, G.; Déniz, O.; Carrascosa, C. B.; Delgado, J. M.; Brualla, L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A method for performing fast simulations of absorbed dose using a patient’s computerized tomography (CT) scan without explicitly relying on a calibration curve is presented. Methods: The method is based on geometrical deformations performed on a standard voxelized human phantom. This involves spatially transforming the human phantom to align it with the patient CT image. Since the chemical composition and density of each voxel are given in the phantom data, a calibration curve is not used in the proposed method. For this study, the Monte Carlo (MC) code PENELOPE has been used as the simulation of reference. The results obtained with PENELOPE simulations are compared to those obtained with PENFAST and with the collapsed cone convolution algorithm implemented in a commercial treatment planning system. Results: The comparisons of the absorbed doses calculated with the different algorithms on two patient CTs and the corresponding deformed phantoms show a maximum distance to agreement of 2 mm, and in general, the obtained absorbed dose distributions are compatible within the reached statistical uncertainty. The validity of the deformation method for a broad range of patients is shown using MC simulations in random density phantoms. A PENFAST simulation of a 6 MV photon beam impinging on a patient CT reaches 2% statistical uncertainty in the absorbed dose, in a 0.1 cm3 voxel along the central axis, in 10 min running on a single core of a 2.8 GHz CPU. Conclusions: The proposed method of the absorbed dose calculation in a deformed voxelized phantom allows for dosimetric studies in the geometry of a patient CT scan. This is due to the fact that the chemical composition and material density of the phantom are known. Furthermore, simulation using the phantom geometry can provide dosimetric information for each organ. The method can be used for quality assurance procedures. In relation to PENFAST, it is shown that a purely condensed-history algorithm (class I) can

  11. A dosimetry intercomparison phantom for intraoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Armoogum, Kris; Watson, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using very low kV x-rays is a promising new treatment modality and has proven to be effective for managing breast and neurological tumours. We have treated in excess of 75 patients using four Zeiss Intrabeam x-ray sources (XRS). To date there has been no published data of any dosimetric intercomparison of this type of x-ray source used at other cancer centres worldwide. This paper describes the design of a simple dosimetry intercomparison phantom for use with these very low kV x-ray sources. A prototype polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom has been manufactured, the dimensions of which were determined by the dimensions of the XRS, the beam energy and the attenuating properties of PMMA. The phantom is used in conjunction with Gafchromic XR Type-R film (GC-XRR) and its purpose is to measure the absorbed dose at a fixed distance from the effective point source at the tip of the XRS. The utility of this phantom is further enhanced through the use of an interlock, which eliminates the need to use the mobile gantry. We have used this phantom to conduct a qualitative dosimetric intercomparison of four Zeiss Intrabeam x-ray sources with positive results. This phantom is low cost, easy to manufacture, simple to use and could be adopted as a standard method of dosimetric intercomparison for Intrabeam x-ray sources as this mode of IORT becomes more widespread. PMID:18705612

  12. A nonlinear elasticity phantom containing spherical inclusions

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Theo Z.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Frank, Gary R.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton O.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The strain image contrast of some in vivo breast lesions changes with increasing applied load. This change is attributed to differences in the nonlinear elastic properties of the constituent tissues suggesting some potential to help classify breast diseases by their nonlinear elastic properties. A phantom with inclusions and long-term stability is desired to serve as a test bed for nonlinear elasticity imaging method development, testing, etc. This study reports a phantom designed to investigate nonlinear elastic properties with ultrasound elastographic techniques. The phantom contains four spherical inclusions and was manufactured from a mixture of gelatin, agar and oil. The phantom background and each of the inclusions has distinct Young’s modulus and nonlinear mechanical behavior. This phantom was subjected to large deformations (up to 20%) while scanning with ultrasound, and changes in strain image contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between inclusion and background, as a function of applied deformation, were investigated. The changes in contrast over a large deformation range predicted by the finite element analysis (FEA) were consistent with those experimentally observed. Therefore, the paper reports a procedure for making phantoms with predictable nonlinear behavior, based on independent measurements of the constituent materials, and shows that the resulting strain images (e.g., strain contrast) agrees with that predicted with nonlinear FEA. PMID:22772074

  13. Cross-calibration of liquid and solid QCT calibration standards: corrections to the UCSF normative data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, K. G.; Gluer, C. C.; Grampp, S.; Genant, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) has been shown to be a precise and sensitive method for evaluating spinal bone mineral density (BMD) and skeletal response to aging and therapy. Precise and accurate determination of BMD using QCT requires a calibration standard to compensate for and reduce the effects of beam-hardening artifacts and scanner drift. The first standards were based on dipotassium hydrogen phosphate (K2HPO4) solutions. Recently, several manufacturers have developed stable solid calibration standards based on calcium hydroxyapatite (CHA) in water-equivalent plastic. Due to differences in attenuating properties of the liquid and solid standards, the calibrated BMD values obtained with each system do not agree. In order to compare and interpret the results obtained on both systems, cross-calibration measurements were performed in phantoms and patients using the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) liquid standard and the Image Analysis (IA) solid standard on the UCSF GE 9800 CT scanner. From the phantom measurements, a highly linear relationship was found between the liquid- and solid-calibrated BMD values. No influence on the cross-calibration due to simulated variations in body size or vertebral fat content was seen, though a significant difference in the cross-calibration was observed between scans acquired at 80 and 140 kVp. From the patient measurements, a linear relationship between the liquid (UCSF) and solid (IA) calibrated values was derived for GE 9800 CT scanners at 80 kVp (IA = [1.15 x UCSF] - 7.32).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. NOTE: Cone beam computerized tomography: the effect of calibration of the Hounsfield unit number to electron density on dose calculation accuracy for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Joan; McCurdy, Boyd; Greer, Peter B.

    2009-08-01

    The availability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images at the time of treatment has opened possibilities for dose calculations representing the delivered dose for adaptive radiation therapy. A significant component in the accuracy of dose calculation is the calibration of the Hounsfield unit (HU) number to electron density (ED). The aim of this work is to assess the impact of HU to ED calibration phantom insert composition and phantom volume on dose calculation accuracy for CBCT. CBCT HU to ED calibration curves for different commercial phantoms were measured and compared. The effect of the scattering volume of the phantom on the HU to ED calibration was examined as a function of phantom length and radial diameter. The resulting calibration curves were used at the treatment planning system to calculate doses for geometrically simple phantoms and a pelvic anatomical phantom to compare against measured doses. Three-dimensional dose distributions for the pelvis phantom were calculated using the HU to ED curves and compared using Chi comparisons. The HU to ED calibration curves for the commercial phantoms diverge at densities greater than that of water, depending on the elemental composition of the phantom insert. The effect of adding scatter material longitudinally, increasing the phantom length from 5 cm to 26 cm, was found to be up to 260 HU numbers for the high-density insert. The change in the HU value, by increasing the diameter of the phantom from 18 to 40 cm, was found to be up to 1200 HU for the high-density insert. The effect of phantom diameter on the HU to ED curve can lead to dose differences for 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays under bone inhomogeneities of up to 20% in extreme cases. These results show significant dosimetric differences when using a calibration phantom with materials which are not tissue equivalent. More importantly, the amount of scattering material used with the HU to ED calibration phantom has a significant effect on the dosimetric

  15. Quantifying the optical properties of turbid media using polarization sensitive hyperspectral imaging (SkinSpect): two-layer optical phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Saager, Rolf; Durkin, Anthony J.; Chave, Robert; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2015-03-01

    A polarization-sensitive hyperspectral imaging system (SkinSpect) has been built and evaluated using two-layer tissue phantoms, fabricated to mimic the optical properties of melanin in different epidermal thickness and hemoglobin in dermal layers. Multiple tissue-mimicking phantoms with varying top layer thicknesses were measured for optical system calibration and performance testing. Phantom properties were characterized and validated using SkinSpect. The resulting analysis shows that the proposed system is capable of distinguishing and differentiating the layer-dependent absorption spectra and the depths at which this absorption occurs.

  16. Phantom-less bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using dual energy computed tomography-based 3-material decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Philipp; Sedlmair, Martin; Krauss, Bernhard; Wichmann, Julian L.; Bauer, Ralf W.; Flohr, Thomas G.; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease usually diagnosed at the manifestation of fragility fractures, which severely endanger the health of especially the elderly. To ensure timely therapeutic countermeasures, noninvasive and widely applicable diagnostic methods are required. Currently the primary quantifiable indicator for bone stability, bone mineral density (BMD), is obtained either by DEXA (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) or qCT (quantitative CT). Both have respective advantages and disadvantages, with DEXA being considered as gold standard. For timely diagnosis of osteoporosis, another CT-based method is presented. A Dual Energy CT reconstruction workflow is being developed to evaluate BMD by evaluating lumbar spine (L1-L4) DE-CT images. The workflow is ROI-based and automated for practical use. A dual energy 3-material decomposition algorithm is used to differentiate bone from soft tissue and fat attenuation. The algorithm uses material attenuation coefficients on different beam energy levels. The bone fraction of the three different tissues is used to calculate the amount of hydroxylapatite in the trabecular bone of the corpus vertebrae inside a predefined ROI. Calibrations have been performed to obtain volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) without having to add a calibration phantom or to use special scan protocols or hardware. Accuracy and precision are dependent on image noise and comparable to qCT images. Clinical indications are in accordance with the DEXA gold standard. The decomposition-based workflow shows bone degradation effects normally not visible on standard CT images which would induce errors in normal qCT results.

  17. Use of a line-pair resolution phantom for comprehensive quality assurance of electronic portal imaging devices based on fundamental imaging metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Arun; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-06-15

    Image guided radiation therapy solutions based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) involve the extension of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) from their traditional role of weekly localization imaging and planar dose mapping to volumetric imaging for 3D setup and dose verification. To sustain the potential advantages of MVCT, EPIDs are required to provide improved levels of portal image quality. Therefore, it is vital that the performance of EPIDs in clinical use is maintained at an optimal level through regular and rigorous quality assurance (QA). Traditionally, portal imaging QA has been carried out by imaging calibrated line-pair and contrast resolution phantoms and obtaining arbitrarily defined QA indices that are usually dependent on imaging conditions and merely indicate relative trends in imaging performance. They are not adequately sensitive to all aspects of image quality unlike fundamental imaging metrics such as the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) that are widely used to characterize detector performance in radiographic imaging and would be ideal for QA purposes. However, due to the difficulty of performing conventional MTF measurements, they have not been used for routine clinical QA. The authors present a simple and quick QA methodology based on obtaining the MTF, NPS, and DQE of a megavoltage imager by imaging standard open fields and a bar-pattern QA phantom containing 2 mm thick tungsten line-pair bar resolution targets. Our bar-pattern based MTF measurement features a novel zero-frequency normalization scheme that eliminates normalization errors typically associated with traditional bar-pattern measurements at megavoltage x-ray energies. The bar-pattern QA phantom and open-field images are used in conjunction with an automated image analysis algorithm that quickly computes the MTF, NPS, and DQE of an EPID system. Our approach combines the fundamental advantages of

  18. Digital Image-Based Elasto-Tomography: First Experiments in Surface Based Mechanical Property Estimation of Gelatine Phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ashton; Wortmann, Stefan; Elliott, Rodney; Staiger, Mark; Chase, James Geoffrey; Houten, Elijah Van

    Digital Image-based Elasto-Tomography (DIET) is a novel surface-based elasticity reconstruction method for determining the elastic property distribution within the breast. Following on from proof of concept simulation studies, this research considers the motion evaluation and stiffness reconstruction of a soft tissue approximating gelatine phantom. This initial phantom work provides an intermediate stage between prior simulation studies more detailed phantom studies to follow. Reference points on the surface of a cylindrical phantom were successfully tracked and converted into a steady-state motion description. Motion error based mechanical property reconstruction allowed an estimation of the stiffness of the gelatine when actuated at 50Hz. The reconstructed stiffness compared favorably with independently measured stiffness properties of the gelatine material when experimental assumptions were considered. An experimental noise estimate of 50% was confirmed accurate by comparing experimental motions to simulated motion data with added noise.

  19. High-precision calibration of MRS thermometry using validated temperature standards: effects of ionic strength and protein content on the calibration.

    PubMed

    Vescovo, E; Levick, A; Childs, C; Machin, G; Zhao, S; Williams, S R

    2013-02-01

    Currently, there is very limited ability to measure the temperature of the brain, but a direct technique for its estimation in vivo could improve the detection of patients at risk of temperature-related brain damage, help in the diagnosis of stroke and tumour, and provide useful information on the mechanisms of thermoregulation of the brain. In this article, new calibrations in vitro of MRS thermometry using temperature-stabilised reference phantoms are reported. The phantoms comprise two concentric glass spheres: the inner sphere contains the phantom material to be measured by MRS, and the outer sphere contains a substance with a known temperature stable to within 0.2 °C. The substances were freezing organic fixed-point compounds (diphenyl ether and ethylene carbonate, freezing at 26.3 and 35.8 °C, respectively) or temperature-controlled circulating water. The phantom temperature was continuously monitored with a fluoroptic probe calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory with traceability to the International Temperature Scale 1990 (ITS-90). The MRS temperature calibration was obtained by measuring the chemical shift of water relative to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in a single voxel as a function of temperature using a 1.5-T Philips Intera scanner. Measurements were made for several phantom materials to assess the effect of tissue composition on the water-NAA chemical shift against temperature calibration. The phantom mixtures contained 25 mm of NAA buffered to pH 6.5 or 7.5 and several ionic salts or bovine serum albumin (BSA). Spectra were acquired from 25 to 45 °C. The correlation between frequency differences and phantom temperature was very linear with small residuals. However, the linear fitting parameters varied with ionic composition and BSA concentration. The 'apparent' temperature (calibrated using the water-NAA frequency differences) decreased by approximately 1 °C for every 100 mm increase in ionic concentration and increased proportionally to the

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of the movement and detection efficiency of a whole-body counting system using a BOMAB phantom.

    PubMed

    Bento, Joana; Barros, Sílvia; Teles, Pedro; Neves, Maria; Gonçalves, Isabel; Corisco, José; Vaz, Pedro

    2012-03-01

    This study reports on the computational analysis and experimental calibration of the whole-body counting detection equipment at the Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) in Portugal. Two state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulation programmes were used for this purpose: PENELOPE and MCNPX. This computational work was undertaken as part of a new set of experimental calibrations, which improved the quality standards of this study's WBC system. In these calibrations, a BOMAB phantom, one of the industry standards phantoms for WBC calibrations in internal dosimetry applications, was used. Both the BOMAB phantom and the detection system were accurately implemented in the Monte Carlo codes. The whole-body counter at ITN possesses a moving detector system, which poses a challenge for Monte Carlo simulations, as most codes only accept static configurations. The continuous detector movement was approximately described in the simulations by averaging several discrete positions of the detector throughout the movement. The computational efficiency values obtained with the two Monte Carlos codes have deviations of less than 3.2 %, and the obtained deviations between experimental and computational efficiencies are less than 5 %. This work contributes to demonstrate the great effectiveness of using computational tools for understanding the calibration of radiation detection systems used for in vivo monitoring.

  1. Spectral calibration for convex grating imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Shen, Weimin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an important role for acquiring target accurate spectrum. There are two spectral calibration types in essence, the wavelength scanning and characteristic line sampling. Only the calibrated pixel is used for the wavelength scanning methods and he spectral response function (SRF) is constructed by the calibrated pixel itself. The different wavelength can be generated by the monochromator. The SRF is constructed by adjacent pixels of the calibrated one for the characteristic line sampling methods. And the pixels are illuminated by the narrow spectrum line and the center wavelength of the spectral line is exactly known. The calibration result comes from scanning method is precise, but it takes much time and data to deal with. The wavelength scanning method cannot be used in field or space environment. The characteristic line sampling method is simple, but the calibration precision is not easy to confirm. The standard spectroscopic lamp is used to calibrate our manufactured convex grating imaging spectrometer which has Offner concentric structure and can supply high resolution and uniform spectral signal. Gaussian fitting algorithm is used to determine the center position and the Full-Width-Half-Maximum(FWHM)of the characteristic spectrum line. The central wavelengths and FWHMs of spectral pixels are calibrated by cubic polynomial fitting. By setting a fitting error thresh hold and abandoning the maximum deviation point, an optimization calculation is achieved. The integrated calibration experiment equipment for spectral calibration is developed to enhance calibration efficiency. The spectral calibration result comes from spectral lamp method are verified by monochromator wavelength scanning calibration technique. The result shows that spectral calibration uncertainty of FWHM and center wavelength are both less than 0.08nm, or 5.2% of spectral FWHM.

  2. Instrument calibration.

    PubMed

    Padden, Harvey

    2002-05-01

    The main thing to remember is that measurement uncertainty must encompass everything from NIST to the final laboratory result. Every source of error along the way must be accounted for. Our vendors do much of it for us, but we must make sure they are doing their job properly. We must make certain our vendors have performed rigorous uncertainty analyses and are performing in accordance with them. ISO 9001-2000 and 17,025 accreditations can eventually help offer us assurance in this area. PMID:12037906

  3. Multilayered phantoms with tunable optical properties for a better understanding of light/tissue interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Blandine; Koenig, Anne; Perraut, François; Piot, Olivier; Vignoud, Séverine; Lavaud, Jonathan; Manfait, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-03-01

    Light/tissue interactions, like diffuse reflectance, endogenous fluorescence and Raman scattering, are a powerful means for providing skin diagnosis. Instrument calibration is an important step. We thus developed multilayered phantoms for calibration of optical systems. These phantoms mimic the optical properties of biological tissues such as skin. Our final objective is to better understand light/tissue interactions especially in the case of confocal Raman spectroscopy. The phantom preparation procedure is described, including the employed method to obtain a stratified object. PDMS was chosen as the bulk material. TiO2 was used as light scattering agent. Dye and ink were adopted to mimic, respectively, oxy-hemoglobin and melanin absorption spectra. By varying the amount of the incorporated components, we created a material with tunable optical properties. Monolayer and multilayered phantoms were designed to allow several characterization methods. Among them, we can name: X-ray tomography for structural information; Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) with a homemade fibered bundle system for optical characterization; and Raman depth profiling with a commercial confocal Raman microscope for structural information and for our final objective. For each technique, the obtained results are presented and correlated when possible. A few words are said on our final objective. Raman depth profiles of the multilayered phantoms are distorted by elastic scattering. The signal attenuation through each single layer is directly dependent on its own scattering property. Therefore, determining the optical properties, obtained here with DRS, is crucial to properly correct Raman depth profiles. Thus, it would be permitted to consider quantitative studies on skin for drug permeation follow-up or hydration assessment, for instance.

  4. Calibration Monitor for Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, M. E.

    2009-11-23

    The goal of this program was to design, build, test, and characterize a flight qualified calibration source and monitor for a Dark Energy related experiment: ACCESS - 'Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars'. This calibration source, the On-board Calibration Monitor (OCM), is a key component of our ACCESS spectrophotometric calibration program. The OCM will be flown as part of the ACCESS sub-orbital rocket payload in addition to monitoring instrument sensitivity on the ground. The objective of the OCM is to minimize systematic errors associated with any potential changes in the ACCESS instrument sensitivity. Importantly, the OCM will be used to monitor instrument sensitivity immediately after astronomical observations while the instrument payload is parachuting to the ground. Through monitoring, we can detect, track, characterize, and thus correct for any changes in instrument senstivity over the proposed 5-year duration of the assembled and calibrated instrument.

  5. Instantaneous bit-error-rate meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Robert A.

    1995-06-01

    An instantaneous bit error rate meter provides an instantaneous, real time reading of bit error rate for digital communications data. Bit error pulses are input into the meter and are first filtered in a buffer stage to provide input impedance matching and desensitization to pulse variations in amplitude, rise time and pulse width. The bit error pulses are transformed into trigger signals for a timing pulse generator. The timing pulse generator generates timing pulses for each transformed bit error pulse, and is calibrated to generate timing pulses having a preselected pulse width corresponding to the baud rate of the communications data. An integrator generates a voltage from the timing pulses that is representative of the bit error rate as a function of the data transmission rate. The integrated voltage is then displayed on a meter to indicate the bit error rate.

  6. Computerized 50 liter volume calibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Proffitt, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    A system has been designed for the Savannah River Site that will be used to calibrate product shipping containers. For accountability purposes, it is necessary that these containers be calibrated to a very high precision. The Computerized 50 Liter Volume Calibration System (CVCS), which is based on the Ideal Gas Law (IGL), will use reference volumes with precision of no less {plus minus}0.03%, and helium to calibrate the containers to have a total error of no greater than {plus minus}0.10%. A statistical interpretation of the system has given a theoretical total calculated error of {plus minus}0.08%. Tests with the system will be performed once fabrication is complete to experimentally verify the calculated error. Since the total error was calculated using the worst case scenario, the actual error should be significantly less than the calculated value. The computer controlled, totally automated system is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The design, calibration procedure, and statistical interpretation of the system will be discussed. 1 ref.

  7. Self-calibrating multiplexer circuit

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, Chris P.

    1997-01-01

    A time domain multiplexer system with automatic determination of acceptable multiplexer output limits, error determination, or correction is comprised of a time domain multiplexer, a computer, a constant current source capable of at least three distinct current levels, and two series resistances employed for calibration and testing. A two point linear calibration curve defining acceptable multiplexer voltage limits may be defined by the computer by determining the voltage output of the multiplexer to very accurately known input signals developed from predetermined current levels across the series resistances. Drift in the multiplexer may be detected by the computer when the output voltage limits, expected during normal operation, are exceeded, or the relationship defined by the calibration curve is invalidated.

  8. Volumetric Intraoperative Brain Deformation Compensation: Model Development and Phantom Validation

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Staib, Lawrence H.; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2012-01-01

    During neurosurgery, nonrigid brain deformation may affect the reliability of tissue localization based on preoperative images. To provide accurate surgical guidance in these cases, preoperative images must be updated to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished by warping these preoperative images using a biomechanical model. Due to the possible complexity of this deformation, intraoperative information is often required to guide the model solution. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed to infer volumetric brain deformation associated with measured intraoperative cortical surface displacement. The developed model relies on known material properties of brain tissue, and does not require further knowledge about intraoperative conditions. To provide an initial estimation of volumetric model accuracy, as well as determine the model’s sensitivity to the specified material parameters and surface displacements, a realistic brain phantom was developed. Phantom results indicate that the linear elastic model significantly reduced localization error due to brain shift, from >16 mm to under 5 mm, on average. In addition, though in vivo quantitative validation is necessary, preliminary application of this approach to images acquired during neocortical epilepsy cases confirms the feasibility of applying the developed model to in vivo data. PMID:22562728

  9. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M.

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (U) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  10. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (Umeasured) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  11. Technique for calibrating angular measurement devices when calibration standards are unavailable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom D.

    1991-01-01

    A calibration technique is proposed that will allow the calibration of certain angular measurement devices without requiring the use of absolute standard. The technique assumes that the device to be calibrated has deterministic bias errors. A comparison device must be available that meets the same requirements. The two devices are compared; one device is then rotated with respect to the other, and a second comparison is performed. If the data are reduced using the described technique, the individual errors of the two devices can be determined.

  12. Long-term evaluation and cross-checking of two geometric calibrations of kV and MV imaging systems for Linacs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsuicheng D; Yan, Yulong; Foster, Ryan; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    Geometric or mechanical accuracy of kV and MV imaging systems of two Varian TrueBeam linacs have been monitored by two geomertirc calibration systems, Varian IsoCal geometric calibration system and home-developed gQA system. Results of both systems are cross-checked and the long-term geometric stabilities of linacs are evaluated. Two geometric calibration methodologies have been used to assess kV and MV imaging systems and their coincidence periodically on two TrueBeam linacs for about one year. Both systems analyze kV or MV projection images of special designed phantoms to retrieve geometric parameters of the imaging systems. The isocenters — laser isocenter and centers of rotations of kV imager and EPID — are then calculated, based on results of multiple projections from different angles. Long-term calibration results from both systems are compared for cross-checking. There are 24 sessions of side-by-side calibrations performed by both systems on two TrueBeam linacs. All the disagreements of isocenters between two calibrations systems are less than 1 mm with ± 0.1 mm SD. Most of the large disagreements occurred in vertical direction (AP direction), with an averaged disagreement of 0.45 mm. The average disagreements of isocenters are 0.09 mm in other directions. Additional to long-term calibration monitoring, for the accuracy test, special tests were performed by misaligning QA phantoms on purpose (5 mm away from setup isocenter in AP, SI, and lateral directions) to test the liability performance of both systems with the known deviations. The errors are within 0.5 mm. Both geometric calibration systems, IsoCal and gQA, are capable of detecting geometric deviations of kV and MV imaging systems of linacs. The long-term evaluation also shows that the deviations of geometric parameters and the geometric accuracies of both linacs are small and very consistent during the one-year study period. PMID:26218992

  13. Absolute backscatter coefficient estimates of tissue-mimicking phantoms in the 5–50 MHz frequency range

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Matthew M.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Deaner, Meagan E.; Varghese, Tomy

    2011-01-01

    Absolute backscatter coefficients in tissue-mimicking phantoms were experimentally determined in the 5–50 MHz frequency range using a broadband technique. A focused broadband transducer from a commercial research system, the VisualSonics Vevo 770, was used with two tissue-mimicking phantoms. The phantoms differed regarding the thin layers covering their surfaces to prevent desiccation and regarding glass bead concentrations and diameter distributions. Ultrasound scanning of these phantoms was performed through the thin layer. To avoid signal saturation, the power spectra obtained from the backscattered radio frequency signals were calibrated by using the signal from a liquid planar reflector, a water-brominated hydrocarbon interface with acoustic impedance close to that of water. Experimental values of absolute backscatter coefficients were compared with those predicted by the Faran scattering model over the frequency range 5–50 MHz. The mean percent difference and standard deviation was 54% ± 45% for the phantom with a mean glass bead diameter of 5.40 μm and was 47% ± 28% for the phantom with 5.16 μm mean diameter beads. PMID:21877789

  14. Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Hali Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron S.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Radiochromic film dosimetry is typically performed for high energy photons and moderate doses characterizing external beam radiotherapy (XRT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of previously established film calibration procedures used in XRT when applied to low-energy, seed-based brachytherapy at higher doses, and to determine necessary modifications to achieve similar accuracy in absolute dose measurements. Methods: Gafchromic EBT3 film was used to measure radiation doses upwards of 35 Gy from 75 kVp, 200 kVp, 6 MV, and (∼28 keV) I-125 photon sources. For the latter irradiations a custom phantom was built to hold a single I-125 seed. Film pieces were scanned with an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner and the resulting 48-bit RGB TIFF images were analyzed using both FilmQA Pro software andMATLAB. Calibration curves relating dose and optical density via a rational functional form for all three color channels at each irradiation energy were determined with and without the inclusion of uncertainties in the measured optical densities and dose values. The accuracy of calibration curve variations obtained using piecewise fitting, a reduced film measurement area for I-125 irradiation, and a reduced number of dose levels was also investigated. The energy dependence of the film lot used was also analyzed by calculating normalized optical density values. Results: Slight differences were found in the resulting calibration curves for the various fitting methods used. The accuracy of the calibration curves was found to improve at low doses and worsen at high doses when including uncertainties in optical densities and doses, which may better represent the variability that could be seen in film optical density measurements. When exposing the films to doses > 8 Gy, two-segment piecewise fitting was found to be necessary to achieve similar accuracies in absolute dose measurements as when using smaller dose ranges. When reducing the film measurement

  15. Gel phantom in selective laser phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yichao; Bailey, Christopher A.; Cowan, Thomas M.; Wu, Feng; Liu, Hong; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Tissue-simulating gel phantoms have been used in selective laser photothermal interaction. The gelatin phantom provides a uniform tissue-simulating medium for analyzing thermal performance under laser radiation. The gelatin phantom gel is used particularly in measurements of thermal reactions in laser thermology. The gelatin phantom is made from gelatin and Liposyn. A special gel sphere with Indocyanine Green (ICG) laser absorption enhancement dye is embedded in normal gel to simulate the dye-enhanced tumor in normal tissue. The concentration of ICG within the dye sphere is optimized using simulation for selective phototherapy. As a first attempt, the concentration of ICG and laser power density was optimized using a temperature ratio of target tissue versus surrounding tissue. The gel thermal performance is also monitored using MRI thermology imaging technology. The thermal imaging shows in vivo, 3D temperature mapping inside the gel. The study of thermal distribution using gel phantom provides information to guide the future selective laser photothermal thermal therapy.

  16. Note on the Schwarzschild-phantom wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, R.; Khaibullina, A.; Izmailov, R.; Yanbekov, A.; Karimov, R.; Potapov, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown by Lobo, Parsaei and Riazi (LPR) that phantom energy with $\\omega =p_{r}/\\rho <-1$ could support phantom wormholes. Several classes of such solutions have been derived by them. While the inner spacetime is represented by asymptotically flat phantom wormhole that have repulsive gravity, it is most likely to be unstable to perturbations. Hence, we consider a situation, where a phantom wormhole is somehow trapped inside a Schwarzschild sphere across a thin shell. Applying the method developed by Garcia, Lobo and Visser (GLV), we shall exemplify that the shell can possess zones of stability depending on certain constraints. It turns out that zones corresponding to "force" constraint are more restrictive than those from the "mass" constraint. We shall also enumerate the interior energy content by using the gravitational energy integral proposed by Lynden-Bell, Katz and Bi% \\v{c}\\'ak. It turns out that, even though the interior mass is positive, the integral implies repulsive energy. This is consistent with the phantom nature of interior matter.

  17. Adjustable fetal phantom for pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubán, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2009-05-01

    As the measuring head of a fetal pulse oximeter must be attached to the head of the fetus inside the mother's uterus during labor, testing, and developing of fetal pulse oximeters in real environment have several difficulties. A fetal phantom could enable evaluation of pulse oximeters in a simulated environment without the restrictions and difficultness of medical experiments in the labor room. Based on anatomic data we developed an adjustable fetal head phantom with three different tissue layers and artificial arteries. The phantom consisted of two arteries with an inner diameter of 0.2 and 0.4 mm. An electronically controlled pump produced pulse waves in the arteries. With the phantom we investigated the sensitivity of a custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter at different pulsation intensity and artery diameters. The results showed that the oximeter was capable of identifying 4% and 2% changes in diameter between the diastolic and systolic point in arteries of over 0.2 and 0.4 mm inner diameter, respectively. As the structure of the phantom is based on reported anatomic values, the results predict that the investigated custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter has sufficient sensitivity to detect the pulse waves and to calculate the R rate on the fetal head.

  18. Multi-pinhole SPECT calibration: influence of data noise and systematic orbit deviations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Vunckx, Kathleen; Nuyts, Johan

    2011-10-01

    The geometry of a single pinhole SPECT system with circular orbit can be uniquely determined from a measurement of three point sources, provided that at least two inter-point distances are known. In contrast, it has been shown mathematically that, for a multi-pinhole SPECT system with circular orbit, only two point sources are needed, and the knowledge of the distance between them is not required. In this paper, we report that this conclusion only holds if the motion of the camera is perfectly circular. In reality, the detector heads systematically slightly deviate from the circular orbit, which may introduce non-negligible bias in the estimated parameters and degrade the reconstructed image. An analytical linear model was extended to estimate the influence of both data noise and systematic deviations on the accuracy of the calibration and on the image quality of the reconstruction. It turns out that applying the knowledge of the distances greatly reduces the reconstruction error, especially in the presence of systematic deviations. In addition, we propose that instead of using the information about the distances between the point sources, it is more straightforward to use the knowledge about the distances between the pinhole apertures during multi-pinhole calibration. The two distance-fixing approaches yield similar reconstruction accuracy. Our theoretical results are supported by reconstruction images of a Jaszczak-type phantom scan.

  19. CCD-based optical CT scanning of highly attenuating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Nowais, Shamsa; Doran, Simon J.

    2009-05-01

    The introduction of optical computed tomography (optical-CT) offers economic and easy to use 3-D optical readout for gel dosimeters. However, previous authors have noted some challenges regarding the accuracy of such imaging techniques at high values of optical density. In this paper, we take a closer look at the 'cupping' artefact evident in both light-scattering polymer systems and highly light absorbing phantoms using our CCD-based optical scanner. In addition, a technique is implemented whereby the maximum measurable optical absorbance is extended to correct for any errors that may have occurred in the estimated value of the dark current or ambient light reaching the detector. The results indicate that for absorbance values up to 2.0, the optical scanner results have good accuracy, whereas this is not the case at high absorbance values for reasons yet to be explained.

  20. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  1. I. Stratigraphy, chemistry, K-Ar dating, and paleomagnetism of the Nine Hill Tuff, California-Nevada. II. Miocene/Oligocene ash-flow tuffs of Seven Lakes Mountain, California-Nevada. III. Improved calibration methods and error estimates for

    SciTech Connect

    Deino, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    I. The Nine Hill Tuff is a widespread mid-Tertiary ash-flow tuff, exposed intermittently from the central Sierra Nevada Foothills in California to the edge of the Carson Sink in Nevada. Maximum thicknesses of 250-300 m are attained near Carson City and Lemon Valley north of Reno, while the tuff in the Sierra Nevada is usually < 20 m thick. A reconnaissance paleomagnetic study was conducted to provide an independent chick on correlations of the Nine Hill Tuff in the Sierra Nevada proposed on the basis of K-Ar dating, geochemistry, textures, and mineralogical data. II. Oligocene/Miocene ash-flow tuffs of Seven Lakes Mountain (40 55'N, 120 W), located southeast of Honey Lake, California, have a composite maximum thickness of 645 m. Nine cooling units, which are further defined in the dissertation, have been recognized, ranging in K-Ar age from 23.0 to 30.5 m.y. III. Improved accuracy, precision, and error estimates in /sup 40/K-/sup 40/Ar dating can be achieved by employing a zero-age curve which quantitatively predicts the total non-radiogenic /sup 40/Ar component of a gas sample measured on a given argon extraction-mass spectrometer system.

  2. Sky camera geometric calibration using solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, Bryan; Kurtz, Ben; Kleissl, Jan

    2016-09-01

    A camera model and associated automated calibration procedure for stationary daytime sky imaging cameras is presented. The specific modeling and calibration needs are motivated by remotely deployed cameras used to forecast solar power production where cameras point skyward and use 180° fisheye lenses. Sun position in the sky and on the image plane provides a simple and automated approach to calibration; special equipment or calibration patterns are not required. Sun position in the sky is modeled using a solar position algorithm (requiring latitude, longitude, altitude and time as inputs). Sun position on the image plane is detected using a simple image processing algorithm. The performance evaluation focuses on the calibration of a camera employing a fisheye lens with an equisolid angle projection, but the camera model is general enough to treat most fixed focal length, central, dioptric camera systems with a photo objective lens. Calibration errors scale with the noise level of the sun position measurement in the image plane, but the calibration is robust across a large range of noise in the sun position. Calibration performance on clear days ranged from 0.94 to 1.24 pixels root mean square error.

  3. Uncertainty Analysis of Instrument Calibration and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Tcheng, Ping

    1999-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic researchers require estimated precision and bias uncertainties of measured physical quantities, typically at 95 percent confidence levels. Uncertainties of final computed aerodynamic parameters are obtained by propagation of individual measurement uncertainties through the defining functional expressions. In this paper, rigorous mathematical techniques are extended to determine precision and bias uncertainties of any instrument-sensor system. Through this analysis, instrument uncertainties determined through calibration are now expressed as functions of the corresponding measurement for linear and nonlinear univariate and multivariate processes. Treatment of correlated measurement precision error is developed. During laboratory calibration, calibration standard uncertainties are assumed to be an order of magnitude less than those of the instrument being calibrated. Often calibration standards do not satisfy this assumption. This paper applies rigorous statistical methods for inclusion of calibration standard uncertainty and covariance due to the order of their application. The effects of mathematical modeling error on calibration bias uncertainty are quantified. The effects of experimental design on uncertainty are analyzed. The importance of replication is emphasized, techniques for estimation of both bias and precision uncertainties using replication are developed. Statistical tests for stationarity of calibration parameters over time are obtained.

  4. Micromagnetometer calibration for accurate orientation estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-02-01

    Micromagnetometers, together with inertial sensors, are widely used for attitude estimation for a wide variety of applications. However, appropriate sensor calibration, which is essential to the accuracy of attitude reconstruction, must be performed in advance. Thus far, many different magnetometer calibration methods have been proposed to compensate for errors such as scale, offset, and nonorthogonality. They have also been used for obviate magnetic errors due to soft and hard iron. However, in order to combine the magnetometer with inertial sensor for attitude reconstruction, alignment difference between the magnetometer and the axes of the inertial sensor must be determined as well. This paper proposes a practical means of sensor error correction by simultaneous consideration of sensor errors, magnetic errors, and alignment difference. We take the summation of the offset and hard iron error as the combined bias and then amalgamate the alignment difference and all the other errors as a transformation matrix. A two-step approach is presented to determine the combined bias and transformation matrix separately. In the first step, the combined bias is determined by finding an optimal ellipsoid that can best fit the sensor readings. In the second step, the intrinsic relationships of the raw sensor readings are explored to estimate the transformation matrix as a homogeneous linear least-squares problem. Singular value decomposition is then applied to estimate both the transformation matrix and magnetic vector. The proposed method is then applied to calibrate our sensor node. Although there is no ground truth for the combined bias and transformation matrix for our node, the consistency of calibration results among different trials and less than 3(°) root mean square error for orientation estimation have been achieved, which illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed sensor calibration method for practical applications. PMID:25265625

  5. BXS Re-calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    Early in the commissioning it was noticed by Cecile Limborg that the calibration of the BXS spectrometer magnet seemed to be different from the strength of the BX01/BX02 magnets. First the BX01/BX02 currents were adjusted to 135 MeV and the beam energy was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit flat. Then BX01/BX02 magnets were switched off and BXS was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit in the spectrometer line flat, without changing the energy of the beam. The result was that about 140-141 MeV were required on the BXS magnet. This measurement was repeated several times by others with the same results. It was not clear what was causing the error: magnet strength or layout. A position error of about 19 mm of the BXS magnet could explain the difference. Because there was a significant misalignment of the vacuum chamber in the BXS line, the alignment of the whole spectrometer line was checked. The vacuum chamber was corrected, but the magnets were found to be in the proper alignment. So we were left with one (or conceivably two) magnet calibration errors. Because BXS is a wedged shaped magnet, the bend angle depends on the horizontal position of the incoming beam. As mentioned, an offset of the beam position of 19 mm would increase or decrease the bend angle roughly by the ratio of 135/141. The figure of 19 mm is special and caused a considerable confusion during the design and measurement of the BXS magnet. This is best illustrated in Figure 1 which was taken out of the BXS Traveler document. The distance between the horizontal midplanes of the poles and the apex of the beam path was chosen to be 19 mm so the beam is close to the good field region throughout its entire path. Thus it seemed possible that there was an error that resulted in the beam not being on this trajectory, or conversely, that the magnetic measurements were done on the wrong trajectory and the magnet was then mis-calibrated. Mechanical measurements of the vacuum chamber made in the tunnel

  6. Development of Traceable Phantoms for Improved Image Quantification in Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials for new drugs increasingly rely on imaging data to monitor patient response to the therapy being studied. In the case of radiopharmaceutical applications, imaging data are also used to estimate organ and tumor doses in order to arrive at the optimal dosage for safe and effective treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used imaging modalities for these types of applications. In large, multicenter trials it is crucial to minimize as much as possible the variability that arises due to use of different types of scanners and other instrumentation so that the biological response can be more readily evaluated. This can be achieved by ensuring that all the instruments are calibrated to a common standard and that their performance is continuously monitored throughout the trial. Maintaining links to a single standard also enables the comparability of data acquired on a heterogeneous collection of instruments in different clinical settings. As the standards laboratory for the United States, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been developing a suite of phantoms having traceable activity content to enable scanner calibration and performance testing. The configurations range from small solid cylindrical sources having volumes from 1 mL to 23 mL to large cylinders having a total volume of 9 L. The phantoms are constructed with 68Ge as a long-lived substitute for the more clinically useful radionuclide 18F. The contained activity values are traceable to the national standard for 68Ge and are also linked to the standard for 18F through a careful series of comparisons. The techniques that have been developed are being applied to a variety of new phantom configurations using different radionuclides. Image-based additive manufacturing techniques are also being investigated to create fillable phantoms having irregular shapes which can better mimic actual organs and tumors while still maintaining traceability

  7. SU-F-18C-04: A Combination of Monoenergetic Reconstruction and Stoichiometric Calibration for Tissue Characterization Using Dual Energy Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bedwani, S; Tremblay, J; Bouchard, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) pre-reconstruction methods require the prior knowledge of the X-ray source spectrum to allow extracting physical parameters needed for radiation therapy dose calculation, such as electron density (ED) and the effective atomic number (EAN). While DECT stoichiometric calibration may provide reliable performance for typical radiation therapy clinical conditions, it is yet to be adapted to prereconstruction methods. The presence of noise and inaccurate spectrum description may lead to systematic errors and artifacts which compromise the accuracy of treatment planning. Methods: A new technique is investigated which consists in applying a DECT stoichiometric calibration method to a set of monoenergetic images obtained with a DECT prereconstruction method. To evaluate the performance of this extended method, a simulation environment is developed to generate DECT scans under well controlled conditions, to reconstruct monoenergetic images of a tissue-equivalent phantom from transformed sinograms and to extract ED and EAN maps using a DECT formalism. Result: Under simulated clinical conditions, the accuracy in determining ED with the extended method versus a pre-reconstruction method alone is shown to be better than 0.35% versus 0.5%, respectively. In the presence of a realistic noise level, EAN determination presents a relative mean error that drops from 2.5% to 0.5% once the calibration is applied. Considering a spectrum alteration by a 1 mm Cu layer, EAN errors are up to 30% for the pre-reconstruction method alone versus less than 3% for the extended method. Conclusion: This study shows that combining pre-reconstruction DECT methods with a stoichiometric calibration considerably improves the accuracy and reliability of tissue characterization for radiation therapy in a clinical context. The presented method could potentially be adapted as gold standard for dose calculation methods based on DECT.

  8. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future. Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations. Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord

  9. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations.Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord demonstrated

  10. Quantification of Urinary Stone Composition in Mixed Stones Using Dual-Energy CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Huang, Alice; Montoya, Juan; Duan, Xinhui; Williams, James C.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using dual-energy computed tomography to accurately quantify uric acid and non-uric-acid components in urinary stones having mixed composition. Materials and Methods A total of 24 urinary stones were analyzed with microCT to serve as the reference standard for uric acid and non-uric-acid composition. These stones were placed in water phantoms to simulate body attenuation of slim to obese adults and scanned on a third-generation dual-source scanner using dual-energy modes adaptively selected based on phantom size. CT number ratio, which is distinct for different materials, was calculated for each pixel of the stones. Each pixel was then classified as uric acid and non-uric-acid by comparing the CT number ratio with preset thresholds ranging from 1.1 to 1.7. Minimal, maximal and root-mean-square errors were calculated by comparing composition to the reference standard and the threshold with the minimal root-mean-square-error was determined. A paired t-test was performed to compare the stone composition determined with dual-energy CT with the reference standard obtained with microCT. Results The optimal CT number ratio threshold ranged from 1.27 to 1.55, dependent on phantom size. The root-mean-square error ranged from 9.60% to 12.87% across all phantom sizes. Minimal and maximal absolute error ranged from 0.04% to 1.24% and from 22.05% to 35.46%, respectively. Dual-energy CT and the reference microCT did not differ significantly on uric acid and non-uric-acid composition (P from 0.20 to 0.96, paired t-test). Conclusion Accurate quantification of uric acid and non-uric-acid composition in mixed stones is possible using dual-energy CT. PMID:27224260

  11. A segmental calibration method for a miniature serial-link coordinate measuring machine using a compound calibration artefact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Awei; Guo, Junjie; Shao, Wei; Li, Beizhan

    2013-06-01

    In the application of a miniature serial-link coordinate measuring machine, it is necessary to calibrate the structural parameters and improve the positioning accuracy for accurate task performance. In this study, using a designed compound calibration artefact, a new calibration method which includes kinematic calibration and laser tool centre point (TCP) calibration is proposed. In the kinematic calibration, geometric parameters included in the kinematic model can be identified by using the constraint that the cone angle or cylinder diameter for several different positions is invariable. For the laser TCP calibration, the relative positions between the laser sensor and the end effector are calibrated by means of the cone surface part of the calibration artefact, using the constraint that the conic node positions for several different measurements are invariable. During the calibration process, the identification of all structural parameters from measuring data can be separated furthest, so the calibration errors brought by strong correlations between all the parameters can be decreased. Moreover, the differences of different positions of end effector in calculations can be used; thus, the calibration error which is due to the positioning error of the end effector can be decreased. Experimental results on real data have demonstrated the effectiveness of our method.

  12. Error-compensation measurements on polarization qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhibo; Zhu, Huangjun; Xiang, Guo-Yong; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-06-01

    Systematic errors are inevitable in most measurements performed in real life because of imperfect measurement devices. Reducing systematic errors is crucial to ensuring the accuracy and reliability of measurement results. To this end, delicate error-compensation design is often necessary in addition to device calibration to reduce the dependence of the systematic error on the imperfection of the devices. The art of error-compensation design is well appreciated in nuclear magnetic resonance system by using composite pulses. In contrast, there are few works on reducing systematic errors in quantum optical systems. Here we propose an error-compensation design to reduce the systematic error in projective measurements on a polarization qubit. It can reduce the systematic error to the second order of the phase errors of both the half-wave plate (HWP) and the quarter-wave plate (QWP) as well as the angle error of the HWP. This technique is then applied to experiments on quantum state tomography on polarization qubits, leading to a 20-fold reduction in the systematic error. Our study may find applications in high-precision tasks in polarization optics and quantum optics.

  13. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  14. Voyager high gain antenna calibration and pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahanshahi, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical description of the data reduction technique used in analyzing Voyager calibration data is presented. To achieve the required telecommunication link performance, highly accurate pointing of the Voyager high gain antenna boresight relative to earth is necessary. To provide the optimum pointing, in-flight calibrations of the high gain antenna pointing mechanism are regularly made, and the design of the calibration and the antenna error models is delineated. It is shown that due to the use of wide angle sun sensors for celestial attitude control, the Voyager antenna error model differs from those of previous missions. Results of the in-flight calibrations and their implementation in improving the antenna pointing are also presented.

  15. An automatic method for measurement of vertebral bone density based on QCT without an external reference phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Pan, Xiao-guang; Zou, Yu-yue; Wang, Zhi-qiong; Zhang, Tian-jing; Shao, Kai; Kang, Yan; Zhao, Hong

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: We developed an automatic method for measurement of vertebral bone density based on QCT with the use of internal references(muscle and subcutaneous fat) instead of traditional external phantom. Methods: The automatic multistep approach starts with segmentation of periosteal and endosteal surfaces of spine to define ellipse ROI in cancellous bone followed by segmentation of muscle and subcutaneous fat in the spine image and a subsequent calculation of bone mineral density in ellipse ROI and segmentation trabecular and cortical bone ROI using muscle and subcutaneous fat as internal references. The segmentation approach used a hybrid region-growing method which used local adaptive threshold and morphological operation. Results: We conducted with-phantom and without-phantom measurements by using 94 clinical cases. The doctor manually defined the ellipse ROI in the with-phantom measurement. As for the without-phantom measurement, we use our method to automatically gain the BMD. The Interaclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) is 0.93. We removed the points whose muscle and fat values are 2 times deviated from the standard deviation. And the calibrated ICC value is 0.999. Conclusion: The without-phantom measurement method is not fit for the patients whose muscle and fat are seriously deviated from the average value. The without-phantom measurement method proposed in this paper can automatically measure the BMD of spine. By accurately segmenting cortical bone and trabecular bone, determining ROI and removing inappropriate data, it is proved that the BMD measurement result by this method is highly consistent with that by with-phantom method.

  16. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors.

  17. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors. PMID:26649954

  18. Evaluation of tracking accuracy of the CyberKnife system using a webcam and printed calibrated grid.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Iori; Shiomi, Hiroya; Higashinaka, Naokazu; Murashima, Yoshikazu; Miyamoto, Youichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Tsuda, Eimei; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Tracking accuracy for the CyberKnife's Synchrony system is commonly evaluated using a film-based verification method. We have evaluated a verification system that uses a webcam and a printed calibrated grid to verify tracking accuracy over three different motion patterns. A box with an attached printed calibrated grid and four fiducial markers was attached to the motion phantom. A target marker was positioned at the grid's center. The box was set up using the other three markers. Target tracking accuracy was evaluated under three conditions: 1) stationary; 2) sinusoidal motion with different amplitudes of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mm for the same cycle of 4 s and different cycles of 2, 4, 6, and 8 s with the same amplitude of 15 mm; and 3) irregular breathing patterns in six human volunteers breathing normally. Infrared markers were placed on the volunteers' abdomens, and their trajectories were used to simulate the target motion. All tests were performed with one-dimensional motion in craniocaudal direction. The webcam captured the grid's motion and a laser beam was used to simulate the CyberKnife's beam. Tracking error was defined as the difference between the grid's center and the laser beam. With a stationary target, mean tracking error was measured at 0.4 mm. For sinusoidal motion, tracking error was less than 2 mm for any amplitude and breathing cycle. For the volunteers' breathing patterns, the mean tracking error range was 0.78-1.67 mm. Therefore, accurate lesion targeting requires individual quality assurance for each patient. PMID:27074474

  19. Image based Monte Carlo Modeling for Computational Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mengyun; Wang, Wen; Zhao, Kai; Fan, Yanchang; Long, Pengcheng; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    The evaluation on the effects of ionizing radiation and the risk of radiation exposure on human body has been becoming one of the most important issues for radiation protection and radiotherapy fields, which is helpful to avoid unnecessary radiation and decrease harm to human body. In order to accurately evaluate the dose on human body, it is necessary to construct more realistic computational phantom. However, manual description and verfication of the models for Monte carlo(MC)simulation are very tedious, error-prone and time-consuming. In addiation, it is difficult to locate and fix the geometry error, and difficult to describe material information and assign it to cells. MCAM (CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport Simulation) was developed as an interface program to achieve both CAD- and image-based automatic modeling by FDS Team (Advanced Nuclear Energy Research Team, http://www.fds.org.cn). The advanced version (Version 6) of MCAM can achieve automatic conversion from CT/segmented sectioned images to computational phantoms such as MCNP models. Imaged-based automatic modeling program(MCAM6.0) has been tested by several medical images and sectioned images. And it has been applied in the construction of Rad-HUMAN. Following manual segmentation and 3D reconstruction, a whole-body computational phantom of Chinese adult female called Rad-HUMAN was created by using MCAM6.0 from sectioned images of a Chinese visible human dataset. Rad-HUMAN contains 46 organs/tissues, which faithfully represented the average anatomical characteristics of the Chinese female. The dose conversion coefficients(Dt/Ka) from kerma free-in-air to absorbed dose of Rad-HUMAN were calculated. Rad-HUMAN can be applied to predict and evaluate dose distributions in the Treatment Plan System (TPS), as well as radiation exposure for human body in radiation protection.

  20. Three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling of tissue-simulating phantom for biomedical optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Erbao; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Minjie; Xie, Yanjun; Li, Shidi; Shao, Pengfei; Cheng, Liuquan; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-12-01

    Biomedical optical devices are widely used for clinical detection of various tissue anomalies. However, optical measurements have limited accuracy and traceability, partially owing to the lack of effective calibration methods that simulate the actual tissue conditions. To facilitate standardized calibration and performance evaluation of medical optical devices, we develop a three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling (FDM) technique for freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms. The FDM system uses transparent gel wax as the base material, titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder as the scattering ingredient, and graphite powder as the absorption ingredient. The ingredients are preheated, mixed, and deposited at the designated ratios layer-by-layer to simulate tissue structural and optical heterogeneities. By printing the sections of human brain model based on magnetic resonance images, we demonstrate the capability for simulating tissue structural heterogeneities. By measuring optical properties of multilayered phantoms and comparing with numerical simulation, we demonstrate the feasibility for simulating tissue optical properties. By creating a rat head phantom with embedded vasculature, we demonstrate the potential for mimicking physiologic processes of a living system.

  1. Three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling of tissue-simulating phantom for biomedical optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Erbao; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Minjie; Xie, Yanjun; Li, Shidi; Shao, Pengfei; Cheng, Liuquan; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical optical devices are widely used for clinical detection of various tissue anomalies. However, optical measurements have limited accuracy and traceability, partially owing to the lack of effective calibration methods that simulate the actual tissue conditions. To facilitate standardized calibration and performance evaluation of medical optical devices, we develop a three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling (FDM) technique for freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms. The FDM system uses transparent gel wax as the base material, titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) powder as the scattering ingredient, and graphite powder as the absorption ingredient. The ingredients are preheated, mixed, and deposited at the designated ratios layer-by-layer to simulate tissue structural and optical heterogeneities. By printing the sections of human brain model based on magnetic resonance images, we demonstrate the capability for simulating tissue structural heterogeneities. By measuring optical properties of multilayered phantoms and comparing with numerical simulation, we demonstrate the feasibility for simulating tissue optical properties. By creating a rat head phantom with embedded vasculature, we demonstrate the potential for mimicking physiologic processes of a living system.

  2. Exploration of new multivariate spectral calibration algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Melgaard, David Kennett; Martin, Laura Elizabeth; Wehlburg, Christine Marie; Pell, Randy J.; Guenard, Robert D.

    2004-03-01

    A variety of multivariate calibration algorithms for quantitative spectral analyses were investigated and compared, and new algorithms were developed in the course of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. We were able to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid classical least squares/partial least squares (CLSIPLS) calibration algorithms to maintain calibrations in the presence of spectrometer drift and to transfer calibrations between spectrometers from the same or different manufacturers. These methods were found to be as good or better in prediction ability as the commonly used partial least squares (PLS) method. We also present the theory for an entirely new class of algorithms labeled augmented classical least squares (ACLS) methods.